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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The blue whale genome reveals the animals' extraordinary evolutionary historyFor the first time, scientists of the German Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Center, Goethe University and the University of Lund in Sweden have deciphered the complete genome of the blue whale and three other rorquals. Surprisingly, the genomes show that rorquals have been hybridizing during their evolutionary history. In addition, rorquals seem to have separated into different spec
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Older adults grow just as many new brain cells as young peopleResearchers show for the first time that healthy older men and women can generate just as many new brain cells as younger people.
19h
Ingeniøren

Ministerium tilbageholder omfattende rapport om signalprojektet fra FolketingetFolketingets medlemmer får ikke udleveret rapporten bag den forsinkede og fordyrede signaludskiftning. Dermed forhindres politikerne i at træffe beslutninger på et kvalificeret grundlag, vurderer forskere.
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LATEST

Science : NPR

2018 Hurricane Season Will Bring Another Battery Of StormsForecasters are cautioning the public to brace themselves, predicting 14 tropical storms this year. Seven are expected to become hurricanes and three of those are expected to be major hurricanes. (Image credit: NASA /AP)
14min
NYT > Science

Naloxone Stops Opioid Overdoses. How Do You Use It?Each day 115 Americans die of an opioid overdose. In the first surgeon general advisory in 13 years, Americans were urged to carry a medication to save lives.
26min
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Blake NewsToday in 5 Lines White House Chief of Staff John Kelly reportedly encouraged President Trump to fire Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt last week, but Trump resisted. China’s government vowed to “counterattack with great strength” if Trump proceeds with plans to raise tariffs on an additional $100 billion worth of Chinese goods. The Trump administration imposed sanctions a
36min
The Atlantic

Radio Atlantic: Trumpocracy“Trump gambled that Americans resent each other’s differences more than they cherish their shared democracy. So far that gamble has paid off,” writes David Frum in his new book Trumpocracy . Along with The Atlantic's global editor Kathy Gilsinan, David joins to explain how President Trump has undermined our most important institutions. What does democracy around the world look like when the leade
53min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A different spin on superconductivityA team of researchers from the University of Maryland (UMD) Department of Physics together with collaborators has seen exotic superconductivity that relies on highly unusual electron interactions. While predicted to occur in other non-material systems, this type of behavior has remained elusive. The team's research, published in the April 6 issue of Science Advances, reveals effects that are profo
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

HIV Cell dysfunction discovery sheds light on how virus worksA new study has revealed that certain immune cells behave differently in HIV-infected patients than they do in healthy individuals, a discovery that moves us one step closer to understanding how the virus works.
1h
Live Science

How a Stranded Nurse Saved His Own Life During a Heart AttackWhat do you do if you're in the middle of nowhere and you have a heart attack?
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The Scientist RSS

Ruth Nussenzweig, Malaria Researcher, DiesThe microbiologist's research led to the development of the first human malaria vaccine.
1h
Science : NPR

After Raising Concerns About Scott Pruitt, A Number Of EPA Officials Were DemotedA number of Environmental Protection Agency officials have been demoted or reassigned after raising concerns about the way EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt is managing the agency, according to a report from The New York Times.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Who are the best gift-givers? Not who you'd think, says Baylor marketing researchNew research shows that people who are "secure" in interpersonal settings are most likely to engage in social projection (making choices on behalf of others based on their own preferences). Those who are "anxious" are less likely to assume others share their preferences and less likely to make choices for others based on their personal attitudes.
1h
Live Science

Lin-Manuel Miranda's Shingles: Why He Was 'Quarantined' from His Newborn SonActor Lin-Manuel Miranda recently revealed that he has shingles and needs to be "quarantined" from his newborn son.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New cellular insights in bone developmentMost of us don't think about our teeth and bones until one aches or breaks. A team of engineers has looked deep within collagen fibers to see how the body forms new bone and teeth, seeking insights into faster bone healing and new biomaterials.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Index of tumor cells opens a new perspective to prevent cancer progressionResearchers from the School of Medicine in Ribeirão Preto (FMRP), at the University of São Paulo (USP), have developed indices that provide information about the prognosis of cancers, aid in the choice of the most appropriate therapy to be used and identify potential targets for the development of new drugs.
2h
NYT > Science

Q&A: In Your Bathroom, the Scum of the EarthWhy does bar soap clog the bathroom drain?
2h
NYT > Science

Global Health: TB Treatment May Leave Some Patients ContagiousStandard doses of two TB drugs were insufficient in African subjects also infected with H.I.V., a study finds. Experts say treatment guidelines should be revised.
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Blog » Languages » English

Eyewire Release Report 4/6/2018Happy Friday! To give you a comprehensive picture of everything new on Eyewire, here are all changes since the last report a few weeks ago. Scythes and Mystics: if you haven’t already read about Scythe Freeze , check it out and enjoy your new superpower! We have fixed some bugs related to player scripts, Scythe Freeze, and how the spawner responds to frozen tasks. Eyewire is now hosted in the clo
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Sheets of tiny bubbles could bring a sense of touch to virtual realityShape-shifting films used in sleeves or other garments could provide tactile feedback that makes virtual realities feel more real.
2h
Big Think

Study: Men significantly more likely to overestimate their own intelligenceA new study echoes a key finding in a growing body of research on self-estimated intelligence: men tend to overestimate how smart they are. Read More
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Popular Science

Self-care doesn’t have to cost you a dang thingHealth Forget the retail therapy. It’s time for some real talk. The concept of “self-care” is inescapable, between the social media posts about rejuvenating mani-pedis and TED talks about the restorative properties of journaling. But…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook to verify identities for political adsFacebook Mark ZuckerbergFacebook announced Friday that it will require any political ads on its platform to state who is paying for the message, and would verify the identity of the payer, in a bid to curb outside election interference.
2h
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Why Mark Zuckerberg’s 14-Year Apology Tour Hasn’t Fixed FacebookThe Facebook CEO's constant apologies aren't a promise to do better. They're a symptom of a profound crisis of accountability.
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Gadget Lab Podcast: The (Near) Future of PCsLaptops are getting mobile processors and behaving more like phones. How will that change the way we use them?
2h
The Scientist RSS

Missing CDC Researcher Found DeadThe body of Timothy Cunningham, who disappeared in February, was recovered from the Chattahoochee River earlier this week.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smartphone 'scores' can help doctors track severity of Parkinson's disease symptomsA new smartphone app allows Parkinson's disease patients and their doctors to better track the progression of symptoms, such as tremors and walking difficulties, that can vary dramatically over days, or even hours.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

Even if Magic Leap’s goggles suck, it can probably still make money off themThose who’ve tried Magic Leap One say it’s functional, but regardless the company’s got a boatload of patents it could license to satisfy investors.
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Live Science

German Scientists Harvest Their 1st Antarctic Salad, and It Looks AmazingLettuce, cucumbers and radishes are among the first plants to be collected from the greenhouse.
2h
Popular Science

If we’re going to capture our carbon emissions, we might as well put them to useNexus Media News Instead of storing carbon, researchers want to convert it into fuel. While scientists tend to talk about carbon capture and storage—one approach to fighting climate change — De Luna thinks the future instead will be about carbon capture…
2h
The Atlantic

A Suspected Russian Spy, With Curious Ties to WashingtonA longtime Republican operative with ties to the controversial data firm hired by President Donald Trump’s campaign team also has a nearly two-decade-long friendship and business relationship with a suspected Russian intelligence agent, Konstantin Kilimnik, who has landed in Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s crosshairs. The Washington-based operative, Sam Patten, would not tell me whether he has b
2h
The Atlantic

American Sanctions Are Getting Closer to PutinEven though Donald Trump himself has encouraged better relations with the Russians, his administration keeps finding new ways to punish them. It has sanctioned Russians; expelled Russians; and then sanctioned more Russians. And the new round of sanctions announced on Friday brings the punishment ever closer to Vladimir Putin himself. That’s because in contrast to sanctions issued in March, agains
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How pathogenic bacteria prepare a sticky adhesion proteinResearchers at Harvard Medical School, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of Georgia have described how the protein that allows strep and staph bacteria to stick to human cells is prepared and packaged. The research, which could facilitate the development of new antibiotics, will appear in the April 6 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
3h
Inside Science

Can We Hold Back the Glaciers?Earth Massive geoengineering projects to hold back glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica could slow sea level rise. 04/06/2018 Brian Owens, Contributor http://www.insidescience.org/news/can-we-hold-back-glaciers
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Thermoelectric nanodevice based on Majorana fermions is proposedA particle that is its own anti-particle is the subject of a new theoretical study. These Majorana quasi-particles can emerge as excitations in topological superconductors.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

China's STEM research environment in higher educationChina's President Xi Jinping has repeatedly stated his aim of transforming the country into a 'science and technology superpower.' But when it comes to China's science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) research environment, newly published research suggests that they may have a long way to go.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How pathogenic bacteria prepare a sticky adhesion proteinResearchers at Harvard Medical School, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of Georgia have described how the protein that allows strep and staph bacteria to stick to human cells is prepared and packaged. The research, which could facilitate the development of new antibiotics, will appear in the April 6 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry.
3h
Big Think

Belief in supernatural beings is totally natural – and falseWhy are we so drawn to supernatural beliefs? Read More
3h
Big Think

Humans once worked just 3 hours a day. Now we're always working, but why?As human beings we all must do some work for basic survival—but how much? Is there a “minimum daily requirement” of work? Read More
3h
New Scientist - News

A simple mathematical rule shapes the behaviour of Arctic pondsUnderstanding Arctic ponds can help us predict how fast the ice is melting. Their formation is governed by the simple maths of drawing overlapping circles
3h
New Scientist - News

Wasps drum with their stomachs to tell each other about foodGerman yellowjacket wasps alert each other to food by drumming their abdomens against the nest wall, in a wasp equivalent of the famous honeybee “waggle dance”
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nova-like explosion of spinning live bacteria explainedSuspensions of live bacteria in a viscous liquid do not act as expected when spun at certain speeds and now a team of researchers know why the bacterial aggregation appears to explode when the spinning stops.
3h
The Atlantic

Photos of the Week: Great Bustard, Shinmoedake Volcano, Ghost MushroomsA return to the University of Mosul in Iraq, the Festival of the Steel Phallus in Japan, marches commemorate the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., unrest in Kashmir, teachers go on strike in Oklahoma, a disastrous fuel theft attempt in Mexico, flowers for potholes in Belgium, and much more.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Clues for improved influenza vaccine designInfluenza vaccines that better target the influenza surface protein called neuraminidase (NA) could offer broad protection against various influenza virus strains and lessen the severity of illness, according to new research.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new class of antibiotics to combat drug resistanceResearchers report on the discovery of a new class of antibiotics that may be effective at treating drug-resistant infections.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Telemedicine provides accurate diagnosis of rare cause of blindness in preemiesAccurately detecting a rare, but devastating cause of blindness in premature babies can be done as effectively with telemedicine as with traditional, in-person eye exams, a study suggests. The finding could enable more blindness-preventing treatment for infants born in rural and other areas where there are few ophthalmologists trained to detect the condition, called retinopathy of prematurity, or
3h
NYT > Science

Naloxone Stops Opioid Overdoses. How Do You Use It?Each day 115 Americans die of an opioid overdose. In the first surgeon general advisory in 13 years, Americans were urged to carry a medication to save lives.
3h
Science : NPR

Another Place Plastics Are Turning Up: Organic Fertilizer From Food WasteTurning food waste into fertilizer is popular in parts of Europe and is catching on in the U.S. But tiny plastics are also making their way into that fertilizer — and into the food chain. (Image credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
3h
Inside Science

Can We Hold Back the Glaciers?Can We Hold Back the Glaciers? Massive geoengineering projects to hold back glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica could slow sea level rise. Glacier_in_Antarctica,_Antarctic_Peninsula.JPG Image credits: PaoMic via Wikimedia Rights information: CC BY-SA 3.0 Earth Friday, April 6, 2018 - 12:45 Brian Owens, Contributor (Inside Science) -- A major threat from climate change is rising sea levels, and m
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Creating a 2-D platinum magnetUniversity of Groningen physicists have induced magnetism in platinum with an electric field created by a paramagnetic ionic liquid. As only the surface of the platinum is affected, this creates a switchable 2-D ferromagnet. The study was published in Science Advances on April 6.
3h
Live Science

Elon Musk Worries That AI Research Will Create an 'Immortal Dictator'"It would live forever... and we could never escape," Musk says in a new documentary.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New blood test found to predict onset of TB up to two years in advanceA new blood test has been found to more accurately predict the development of tuberculosis up to two years before its onset in people living with someone with active TB, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genetics of the modern heirs of the Inkas shed new lights about their origins and lineagesA study of the Inka origins and their lineages was performed in twelve contemporary families with presumed patrilineal lineage to Inka monarchs. A comparison of Y-chromosome and mtDNA markers of these descendants with a database of about 2400 South American native individuals of Peru, Bolivia, Brasil and Ecuador showed two distinct patrilineal clusters, and a very diverse matrilineal origin. In ad
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What is the best way to treat infected hip replacements?New research has found treating an infected hip replacement in a single stage procedure may be as effective or better than the widely used two-stage procedure. Hip replacement is a very common operation that is effective at providing pain relief and improving mobility, however, infection can sometimes occur following joint replacement.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What makes a bestseller: Fiction, thriller and a Christmas releaseBooks that are fiction, thrillers or mysteries, have high initial sales numbers and are released around Christmas are more likely to be bestsellers, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More Americans aware of growing problem of opioid addictionA new survey reveals the number of Americans who see opioid addiction as a significant issue for their community today is up significantly over just two years ago. Forty-three percent of Americans now say the misuse of prescription drugs is a serious problem, compared with 33 percent in 2016.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Penguins go through the flowColonies of breeding king penguins behave much like particles in liquids do, according to a new study. This 'liquid' organization and structure enables breeding colonies to protect themselves against predators while also keeping members together.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Risk of type 1 diabetes climbs when one population of T cells fallsResearchers hypothesize that microbes in the gut, where most of the pTreg cell population is switched on, may be responsible for generating Treg cells and thus protecting against the autoimmune attack on pancreatic beta cells that cause type 1 diabetes.
4h
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Facebook Imposes New Restrictions on Ads and Popular PagesFacebook Mark ZuckerbergThe social network will now require ads about political issues, not just elections, to be verified. It will also begin vetting Pages with large numbers of followers.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

1C rise in atmospheric temperature causes rapid changes to world's largest High Arctic lakeAn interdisciplinary team of scientists examining everything from glaciology to freshwater ecology discovered drastic changes over the past decade to the world's largest High Arctic lake. And from glacial melt to the declining lake ice to changes in lake ecology, the results from Lake Hazen on Ellesmere Island in Canada are alarming.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nova-like explosion of spinning live bacteria explainedSuspensions of live bacteria in a viscous liquid do not act as expected when spun at certain speeds and now a team of researchers know why the bacterial aggregation appears to explode when the spinning stops.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Creating a 2-D platinum magnetUniversity of Groningen physicists have induced magnetism in platinum with an electric field created by a paramagnetic ionic liquid. As only the surface of the platinum is affected, this creates a switchable 2-D ferromagnet. The study was published in Science Advances on 6 April.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Number of doctorates awarded by US institutions in 2016 close to all-time highU.S. institutions awarded 54,904 research doctorate degrees in 2016, only five fewer than the previous year's record high, according to the Survey of Earned Doctorates (SED), a federally sponsored annual census of research degree recipients.
4h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Saving Threatened Species | Racing Extinction (360 Video)Get up close to the most extraordinary creatures on the planet... before they disappear. Whale sharks, giraffes, rhinos, elephants, mantas and lions are all threatened with extinction. Watch, then join our global movement to save them. Visit racingextinction.com for more information. Join a conservation biologist on an interactive mission to learn how animals critical to the world’s ecosystem thr
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NeuWrite San Diego

The Opioid Epidemic: A Sobering Vulnerability Of The Human BrainOpioids are a class of powerful psychoactive drugs that are often prescribed for pain relief, but can produce an intense euphoria that has proven remarkably addictive. Opioid use disorder, a diagnosis characterized by compulsive opioid use and withdrawal, affects or has affected approximately 3 million Americans and 16 million people worldwide. According to the Centers […]
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More dairy associated with higher bone density and greater spine strength in men over 50Researchers have discovered that higher intake of dairy foods, such as milk, yogurt, and cheese, is associated with higher volumetric bone mineral density and vertebral strength at the spine in men. Dairy intake seems to be most beneficial for men over age 50, and continued to have positive associations irrespective of serum vitamin D status.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Injecting gene cocktail into mouse pancreas leads to human-like tumorsA researcher has invented a unique method to generate, in mice, pancreatic tumors that resemble human pancreatic cancer. This will be a tool researchers can use to develop new drugs that extend patients' lives, and it is a tool researchers have not had at their disposal before.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Human drug trials are compromised by poor reporting of animal researchPoor animal study design and reporting thwarts the ethical review of proposed human drug trials, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Not just housekeeping: A new way to control protein production in stem cellsThousands of distinct cell types are needed to build a fully developed newborn. Individual cells take on their identities by switching on distinct sets of genes, producing different sets of RNA and protein molecules. So far, the overall rate of protein synthesis has been regarded as a "housekeeping" activity that does not play a major role in defining cell types. New results now show this is not q
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cancer genes characterized using ground-breaking new methodAll cells in our body carry the dictionary of genetic information, the human genome. However, their shape and function are determined by which genes are read from this dictionary and translated into proteins, the building blocks of a cell. The “reading” of active genes starts with their transcription into so-called messenger RNAs (mRNAs), a process that is controlled through a complex network of t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cysticercosis epidemiology in Spain: What's new?Cysticercosis, an infection caused by larval cysts of a pork tapeworm, is a leading cause of seizures and epilepsy in many parts of the world. Now, researchers have for the first time assessed the impact of cysticercosis hospitalizations in Spain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Which education systems are best? Look past the superficial numbersInternational large-scale education assessments (ILSAs) are used to compare the performance of countries' educational systems, but these rankings can be misleading and should not be the sole determinant informing educational policy, experts caution.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why cells with identical genes perform unique jobsA newly discovered family of proteins -- present in humans and all complex animals -- are key players in controlling how stem cells specialize and in how embryos develop. These families of proteins may also represent key targets for drug developers looking to design new therapeutic options for some cancer patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New actors identified in atherosclerosisStroke and heart attack are the leading cause of death in the Western world. Scientists have now used a special technique to get a clearer picture of the cells involved and their activity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A potential new therapeutic target for Ewing sarcomaResearchers correlate EphA2 membrane receptor with the metastatic capacity of tumors in Ewing sarcoma. Ewing sarcoma is the second most frequent bone cancer among children and adolescents, and it is characterized by its aggressiveness and tendency to metastasize. Researchers are currently working on nanoengineering a molecule capable of blocking EphA2 and deliver drugs in a targeted manner.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Twisting laser light offers the chance to probe the nano-scaleA new method to sensitively measure the structure of molecules has been demonstrated by twisting laser light and aiming it at minuscule gold gratings to separate out wavelengths.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research offers clues for improved influenza vaccine designInfluenza vaccines that better target the influenza surface protein called neuraminidase (NA) could offer broad protection against various influenza virus strains and lessen the severity of illness, according to new research published in Cell. The new research builds on previous studies of NA and was conducted by a team of scientists including investigators from the Centers of Excellence for Influ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ohio Supercomputer Center's spring SUG conference showcases variety of research, OSC resourcesThe demand for high performance computing in Ohio is relentless, and it does not discriminate by field. At Thursday's Ohio Supercomputer Center Statewide Users Group (SUG) spring conference, OSC clients in fields spanning everything from astrophysics to linguistics gathered to share research highlights and hear updates about the center's direction and role in supporting science across Ohio.
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Feed: All Latest

An Atmospheric River Will Hit California With a Month's Worth of RainAn atmospheric river means this weekend is going to be as wet as an entire typical April.
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Live Science

Sprawling, 2,000-Year-Old Desert Carvings Show Up in Drone PhotosDrones hovering and darting over the mountainous landscape of Peru have spied some amazing ancient "artwork": previously unknown and sprawling geoglyphs called Nazca Lines that were likely made by the Nazca people and their predecessors.
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Inside Science

The Shark Poop DietThe Shark Poop Diet By hunting in the deep and dumping in the shallows, sharks deliver rich nutrients to coral reefs, helping them grow. blacktip_hai_dangerous_predatory_fish_hunter_shark-1045654.jpg Rights information: Public domain Creature Friday, April 6, 2018 - 12:00 James Gaines, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Many sharks are alpha predators, and their hunting plays an important role in ma
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Out-of-pocket expenses for chronic heart disease care inflict heavy financial burdens for low-income families; even those with insuranceOne in 4 low-income families experience significant financial burden from out-of-pocket expenses for treatment of chronic heart disease, according to new research. One in 10 low-income families, including those with insurance, experience catastrophic financial burden for treating chronic heart disease conditions. Low-income families with insurance had higher rates of out-of-pocket expenses than th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate change also threatens the survival of seabirdsFinding food to feed baby birds is getting more and more difficult for seabirds due the effects of climate change, according to a new study.
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Live Science

Sewage Suggests That People Got High for 2017 Solar EclipseIllicit drug residues in sewage spiked for holidays and special events during summer 2017 in rural Kentucky.
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The Atlantic

What Do We Make of a Female Active Shooter?The biggest surprise about Tuesday’s shooting at YouTube wasn’t the fact that there was a shooting. Americans are horribly used to the ritual of these events by now: the sick feeling of waiting for the body count, the time it takes for biographical information to trickle out and a motive to be set forth, the think pieces advocating for fewer guns or more guns, excoriating white male rage or toxic
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Best Buy warns of data breachBest Buy is warning that some of its customers' payment information may have been compromised in a data breach.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new class of antibiotics to combat drug resistanceResearchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago and Nosopharm, a biotechnology company based in Lyon, France, are part of an international team reporting on the discovery of a new class of antibiotics.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers publish the first comprehensive study of China's STEM research environment in higher educationChina's President Xi Jinping has repeatedly stated his aim of transforming the country into a "science and technology superpower." But when it comes to China's science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) research environment, newly published research suggests that they may have a long way to go.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's GPM shows rainfall southeast of sheared Tropical Cyclone IrisWind shear has been affecting Tropical Cyclone Iris as it lingers off the coast of eastern Queensland. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission core satellite observed how northerly wind shear was pushing Iris' rainfall to the south of the center.
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One Woman Got Facebook to Police Opioid Sales On InstagramAfter years of media reports and complaints, Instagram recently moved to restrict hashtags related to opioids and deleted some accounts.
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Feed: All Latest

DC's Stingray Mess Won't Get Cleaned UpDHS this week confirmed that Washington, DC is littered with fake cell tower surveillance devices, but nothing will likely be done to fix it.
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Big Think

Infographics show jobs most likely to be lost to robotsInfographics look at jobs 95% likely to be taken by robots and the working hours that will be lost. Read More
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Popular Science

These seafaring robots will search for life across the solar systemSpace Submarines and rovers will go for a dive on the moons of Jupiter and Saturn Submarines and rovers will go for a dive on the moons of Jupiter and Saturn…
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Virgin Galactic spaceship completes test flightThe supersonic test flight of its SpaceShipTwo rocket ship was the first since a crash in 2014.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

South Florida startups taste the one thing they've been missing: moneySouth Florida startups are finally being shown the money.
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The Atlantic

Writing and Alcohol: A ReckoningAbout two-thirds of the way through The Recovering , Leslie Jamison—newly sober for the second time—finally confronts the reality of winter in Iowa City. “For years,” she writes, “I’d felt personally persecuted by winter—a martyr to its bitter chill, my numbness epic and inevitable, the air little more than an external companion to my interior weather.” But then she buys a down coat. And, “as it
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Big Think

A second Big Bang will likely destroy the universe, Harvard researchers sayOr maybe it’s already begun. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's GPM shows rainfall southeast of sheared Tropical Cyclone IrisWind shear has been affecting Tropical Cyclone Iris as it lingers off the coast of eastern Queensland. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission core satellite observed how northerly wind shear was pushing Iris' rainfall to the south of the center.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Facebook’s disappearing message saga is the act of a company in turmoilFacebook Mark Zuckerberg
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The Scientist RSS

Opinion: We Have Been Naive About Naive T CellsHuman naive T cells are far more heterogeneous than has long been appreciated, having implications for vaccine strategies.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

In a colony, king penguins behave like molecules in a 2-D liquidPositions of king penguins in a breeding colony resemble molecules in a 2-D liquid.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Innovation nationChina's President Xi Jinping has repeatedly stated his aim of transforming the country into a 'science and technology superpower.' But when it comes to China's science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) research environment, newly published research suggests that they may have a long way to go.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Telemedicine provides accurate diagnosis of rare cause of blindness in preemiesAccurately detecting a rare, but devastating cause of blindness in premature babies can be done as effectively with telemedicine as with traditional, in-person eye exams, a study published in JAMA Ophthalmology suggests.The finding could enable more blindness-preventing treatment for infants born in rural and other areas where there are few ophthalmologists trained to detect the condition, called
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new class of antibiotics to combat drug resistanceResearchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago and Nosopharm report on the discovery of a new class of antibiotics that may be effective at treating drug-resistant infections.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

PET tracer could help predict treatment effectiveness for depressionA positron emission tomography (PET) imaging agent could show, ahead of time, whether a specific treatment is likely to be effective for major depressive disorder (MDD) -- a debilitating condition that affects more than 14 million Americans. No such marker is currently available in clinical psychiatry. The study is featured in the April issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.
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Scientific American Content: Global

NASA's Next Exoplanet Hunter Will Seek Worlds Close to HomeThe Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite is designed to spot planets orbiting nearby bright stars -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New source of global nitrogen discoveredNot all of the nitrogen on the planet comes from the atmosphere, according to a new study. Up to a quarter comes from Earth's bedrock. The discovery could greatly improve climate change projections.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vitamin D blood test may one day speed bipolar diagnosis in kidsA blood test may have the potential to speed accurate diagnosis -- and proper treatment -- of bipolar disorder in children, new research suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tracking Aedes mosquito invasions in PanamaMosquitoes in the genus Aedes, which carry viruses causing yellow fever, chikungunya and Zika, invaded the crossroads of the Americas multiple times, by land and by sea.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: The Crystals That May Have Helped Vikings Navigate Northern SeasNorse sagas refer to “sunstones,” and new computer simulations shore up a hypothesis that they were used to guide ships as far as Greenland when weather was poor.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Thermoelectric nanodevice based on Majorana fermions is proposedA particle that is its own anti-particle is the subject of a theoretical study by Brazilian researchers with results published in Scientific Reports. These Majorana quasi-particles can emerge as excitations in topological superconductors.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study highlights benefits of weekly nutrition classes to improve type 2 diabetesPrescriptions are not enough -- diet changes and nutrition education make the difference in people with diabetes, according to a study published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.
6h
Popular Science

Scott Pruitt wants to roll back the EPA's requirements for clean vehicles. It's going to be a fight.Technology Buckle up for a bumpy legal battle about your next car's emissions. The 2025 EPA emissions standards may face repeal, but there's a long legal fight before that can happen.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New immunotherapy for lung cancer shows promise of successIn a groundbreaking development, results from a recent clinical trial to treat lung cancer show that a novel immunotherapy combination is surprisingly effective at controlling the disease's progression. The study focused on non-small cell lung cancer, which is the most common form of lung cancer.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How 'microbial axolotl' repairs itselfIn a new study, researchers report new insights into the regenerative capabilities of Stentor, a single celled model organism for regeneration biology. The study used novel gene expression methods that allowed the researchers to identify over one thousand genes that are involved in the regeneration process of individual stentor cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cells that trigger floweringHow do plants 'know' it is time to flower? A new study uncovers exactly where a key protein forms before it triggers the flowering process in plants.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genetic link to IBS identified in womenNew research links certain DNA variants to increased risk of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in women. The findings might help explain why IBS is more common in women than in men.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The humble fruit fly continues to boost biomedical discoveryResearchers have developed and made available a large versatile library of fruit flies that can be used to perform efficient and elegant in vivo gene-specific manipulations using the new protocol and gene-specific integration vector CRIMIC (CRISPR-Mediated Integrated Cassette).
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain differences in athletes playing contact vs. Noncontact sportsA study has found differences in the brains of athletes who participate in contact sports compared to those who participate in non-contact sports.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When kids' autistic brains can't calm downOne third of children who have autism spectrum disorder also have epilepsy. It's related to an autism risk gene. But scientists didn't now why the mutation, catnap2, caused seizures. Now scientists have discovered the mutation shrinks the neurons' dendrite arbors and synapses that enable brain cells to relay vital messages. The 'Calm down!' message gets lost in the brain, causing neurons to spin o
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Captain Scott's Discovery expedition offers climate change insight 100 years onSamples collected during Captain Scott's famous 1901-1904 Discovery expedition to Antarctica, the oldest of their kind, have recently undergone new analysis using modern techniques providing scientists with exciting new data, over 100 years after the voyage.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Paucity of phosphorus hints at precarious path for extraterrestrial lifeWork by astronomers suggests there may be a cosmic lack of a chemical element essential to life.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How will environmental changes affect western Greenland?Thirty-one miles north of the Arctic Circle lies Kangerlussuaq, Greenland. It is one of the most studied regions in the Arctic. To highlight environmental change and impacts in the Kangerlussuaq area, Arctic, Antarctic, and Alpine Research (AAAR),'has released a special issue, to examine how past, present and future climate impacts may affect this landscape. Three of the 10 articles feature lead a
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Out-of-pocket expenses for chronic heart disease care inflict heavy financial burdens for low-income families; even those with insuranceOne in 4 low-income families experience significant financial burden from out-of-pocket expenses for treatment of chronic heart disease. One in 10 low-income families, including those with insurance, experience catastrophic financial burden for treating chronic heart disease conditions. Low-income families with insurance had higher rates of out-of-pocket expenses than those without insurance.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

India defence website 'hacked', three other govt websites downIndia's defence minister said the department website was hacked on Friday, with the web portals of at least three other government departments including the interior, law and labour ministries also appearing to be down.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rights of the dead and the living clash when scientists extract DNA from human remainsThe remains of a 6-inch long mummy from Chile are not those of a space alien, according to recently reported research. The tiny body with its strange features – a pointed head, elongated bones – had been the subject of fierce debate over whether a UFO might have left it behind. The scientists gained access to the body, which is now in a private collection, and their DNA testing proved the remains
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

Beijing Launches Pioneering Brain-Science CenterChina’s move is expected to complement other countries’ related initiatives -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New cellular insights in bone developmentMost of us don't think about our teeth and bones until one aches or breaks. A team of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis looked deep within collagen fibers to see how the body forms new bone and teeth, seeking insights into faster bone healing and new biomaterials.
6h
Ingeniøren

Eksdirektør modsiger minister: Selvfølgelig anbefalede vi ikke ubetinget at sælge vaccinefabrikSundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby har flere gange gentaget, at ledelsen for Statens Serum Institut anbefalede at sælge vaccineproduktionen på Amager. Men det skyldtes kun, at politikerne insisterede på at fjerne det økonomiske grundlag, fastslår tidligere direktør.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why noise can enhance sensitivity to weak signalsResearchers have discovered a new mechanism to explain stochastic resonance, in which sensitivity to weak signals is enhanced by noise. The finding is expected to help electronic devices become smaller and more energy efficient.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Personal outreach to landowners is vital to conservation program successPrivate landowners trust conservation agencies more and have better views of program outcomes when they accompany conservation biologists who are monitoring habitat management on their land.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Oxygen-deprived black sea provides insights on future carbon budgetScientists are studying the oxygen-deprived waters of the Black Sea to help answer questions about the deepest parts of the ocean and Earth's climate.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Trap, contain and convertInjecting carbon dioxide deep underground into basalt flows holds promise as an abatement strategy. Now, new research sheds light on exactly what happens underground during the process, illustrating precisely how effective the volcanic rock could be in trapping and converting CO2 emissions.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Diabetes: A new insight of the protective role of estrogensEpidemiological data indicate an explosion of type 2 diabetes cases for women after menopause. By elucidating how estrogen affects two of the hormones involved in glucose homeostasis, researchers demonstrate the value of estrogen supplementation from the onset of menopause. They also show that only one of the three estrogen receptors seems to be involved in this mechanism. This could ultimately pr
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Up to 2.7 million Europeans affected by Facebook data scandal: EUFacebook Data Cambridge AnalyticaFacebook has admitted it may have "improperly shared" the personal data of up to 2.7 million people in the European Union, the bloc announced Friday, saying it would demand further answers from the social media giant.
7h
Inside Science

Sewage Suggests That People Got High For 2017 EclipseSewage Suggests That People Got High For 2017 Eclipse Illicit drug residues in sewage spiked for holidays and special events during summer 2017 in rural Kentucky. shutterstock_699546358-cropped.jpg Image credits: Suzanne Tucker via Shutterstock Culture Friday, April 6, 2018 - 10:30 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Even drugs that clear the body quickly leave traces about when and whe
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New recommendations for endoscopic eradication therapy in Barrett's esophagusA new guideline by the ASGE Standards of Practice Committee offers evidence-based recommendations and clinical guidelines addressing key issues related to Endoscopic Eradication Therapy (EET) in the management of Barrett's esophagus (BE)-related lesions.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New cellular insights in bone developmentMost of us don't think about our teeth and bones until one aches or breaks. A team of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis looked deep within collagen fibers to see how the body forms new bone and teeth, seeking insights into faster bone healing and new biomaterials.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Massive single-cell survey of kidney cell types reveals new paths to diseaseNew research from a team in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania shines a light on specific cell types that drive normal or diseased kidney function at the molecular level.
7h
New on MIT Technology Review

Tesla’s solar business is adding extra financial worries to its long list of headaches
7h
Futurity.org

Exercise fights depression, but what about if you’re happy?A review of studies on exercise and happiness addresses some lingering questions about the effects of physical activity on positive health conditions. The impact of physical activity on depression and anxiety is well known—and exercise is a common prescription for preventing or treating negative mental health conditions. “…even a small change of physical activity makes a difference in happiness.”
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Lost' Amazonian tribes—why the West can't get over its obsession with El DoradoA number of ancient settlement sites were recently discovered in the Amazon's Upper Tapajós Basin. This is no El Dorado – although you'd be forgiven for thinking so. The press coverage demonstrates a fixation on the idea that the tropical New World may once have been the site of monumental societies, such as those in Egypt or Mesopotamia. The recent discoveries were heralded by Newsweek as "rewrit
7h
The Atlantic

Trumpism: Speak Loudly and Carry a Big StickIt’s tempting to view the recent reshuffling of Donald Trump’s foreign-policy advisers—along with the make-or-break nuclear diplomacy with North Korea, looming trade conflict with China and other countries, pending deployment of the National Guard to the border with Mexico, and threatened U.S. withdrawal from NAFTA, the Iran nuclear deal, and the Syrian war—as merely the latest episodes in the Tr
7h
Science | The Guardian

Africa is slowly splitting in two – but this 'crack' in Kenya has little to do with itA widely reported crack in the Rift Valley was not formed by tectonic movement, but by erosion of soil from recent heavy rains Global media outlets have been abuzz recently about a large “crack” which appeared in the Kenyan Rift Valley. Many of these news pieces have tried to get to the bottom of what caused this feature, with many reports concluding that it was evidence for the African continent
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

German carmakers worst hit by China tariffs: studyGerman carmakers with big US operations like BMW and Mercedes-Benz maker Daimler would be worse hit by proposed Chinese import tariffs than American auto firms, a study has found.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why is it so stressful to talk politics with the other side?People disagree all the time, but not all disagreements lead to the same levels of stress.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook says it should have audited Cambridge AnalyticaFacebook's No. 2 executive says the company should have conducted an audit after learning that a political consultancy improperly accessed user data nearly three years ago.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Food allergy is triggered by perfect storm of genetics and skin exposure to infant wipes, dust and foodInfant and childhood food allergy has now been linked to a mix of environmental and genetic factors that must coexist to trigger the allergy, reports a new study. Those factors include genetics that alter skin absorbency, use of infant cleansing wipes that leave soap on the skin, skin exposure to allergens in dust and skin exposure to food from those providing infant care. The good news is factors
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Macular degeneration linked to aging immune cellsStudying mice and cells from patients, vision researchers found that as immune cells called macrophages get older, they are more likely to contribute to inflammation and abnormal blood vessel growth in the back of the eye. This can damage vision in patients with age-related macular degeneration.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Potential explanation for declines in brown bear populationsAnimals may fall into what are called evolutionary and ecological traps when they make poor decisions using seemingly reliable environmental cues.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The relevance of GABA for diabetesDynamic interactions between the nervous system, hormones and the immune system are normally on-going but in diabetes the balance is disturbed. New research highlights the importance of the neurotransmitter beta-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tolerating yourself: A novel pathway to regulate B cell activity and prevent autoimmunityAutoimmune disease is an abnormal immune response to the self and is prevented by a mechanism called tolerance. Researchers have identified a pathway that regulates B cell tolerance -- two proteins, GARP and TGF-beta, interact to temper B cell activity, thereby regulating autoimmunity. Monitoring GARP levels on B cells may provide a diagnostic marker for autoimmune disease, and this pathway may re
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

To track environmental impact on genome, don't forget the 'epi' in genetics researchScientists call for more integration between two fields of DNA-based research: genetics and epigenetics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Green technologies environmentally and profit friendlyCompanies looking to reduce their environmental impact without negatively affecting profits may want to consider increasing their investment in green technology and other sustainable IT solutions.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

To Meet Emissions Goals, Seattle Wants to Charge DriversAs population booms, the city looks to congestion pricing to rein in CO2 from cars -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unexpected finding may deter disabling diabetic eye diseaseA new Michigan State University study is the first to find that a particular type of lipid, or fat, thought to only exist in the skin, now lives in your eye and might play a major role in deterring diabetic retinopathy.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cell biology: Dynamics of microtubulesFilamentous polymers called microtubules play vital roles in chromosome segregation and molecular transport. An LMU team has now examined how microtubule lengths vary in response to changes in the availability of their protein components.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How birds can detect the Earth's magnetic fieldResearchers at Lund University in Sweden have made a key discovery about the internal magnetic compass of birds. Biologists have identified a single protein without which birds probably would not be able to orient themselves using the Earth's magnetic field.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Optimism remains in chickens in enriched environments despite exposure to stressChickens that grow up in an environment that they perceive as more diverse and manageable, retain an optimistic view of life and cope with stress better than individuals that grow up in more sterile surroundings, according to a new study published in Scientific Reports. A team of researchers lead by researchers from Linköping University, Sweden, measured how optimism in chickens is affected by str
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Printed thermo-plasmonic heat patterns for neurological disorder treatmentA KAIST team presented a highly customized neural stimulation method. The research team developed a technology that can print the heat pattern on a micron scale to enable the control of biological activities remotely.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

During bombings, robots played key role for Austin policeOn the morning of March 21, a white Austin police bomb squad truck pulled out of an obscure city facility near Austin-Bergstrom International Airport and rolled north, toward Pflugerville.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hunting for dark matter in the smallest galaxies in the UniverseAstrophysicists from the University of Surrey and the University of Edinburgh have created a new method to measure the amount of dark matter at the centre of tiny "dwarf" galaxies.
7h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How I use the drum to tell my story | Kasiva MutuaIn this talk-performance hybrid, drummer, percussionist and TED Fellow Kasiva Mutua shares how she's breaking the taboo against female drummers in Kenya -- and her mission to teach the significance and importance of the drum to young boys, women and girls. "Women can be custodians of culture, too," Mutua says.
7h
The Atlantic

Telling the Pop-Star-Goes-Country Story AgainThe Australian dance-pop institution Kylie Minogue does what she exists to do—coo high and flighty over disco thrump—across her new album, Golden . But on the title track, her coo forms a little, coyote-howl-like pattern that listeners will recognize as being lifted from somewhere else. It’s Ennio Morricone’s theme from The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly , repurposed for the gay bar. This is a camp
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Better roads essential for safer cyclingA QUT-led study of Queensland motorists and cyclists recommends that efforts to improve cyclist safety during overtaking events should focus on improving roadway infrastructure.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists discover hybrid swarm in global mega-pestCSIRO scientists have confirmed the hybridisation of two of the world's major pest species, into a new and improved mega-pest.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to deal with life's risks more rationallyThe world is an uncertain and risky place. The news constantly bombards us with scary situations from school shootings to gruesome murders.
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Futurity.org

‘Bad gardener’ to blame for seizures in kids with autismResearchers have discovered why a mutated gene causes seizures in some children who have autism. Autism spectrum disorder is a highly prevalent neurodevelopmental disorder—affecting one in 68 children—characterized by a range of symptoms, including difficulty with communication and social interactions. People with autism also often have other neurodevelopmental disorders, such as intellectual dis
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate change is wreaking havoc on delicate relationship between orchids and beesRising temperatures have wrecked a relationship, which relies on precision timing to succeed, between a rare orchid species and the Buffish Mining-bee which pollinates it.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Transparent patch to detect dangerous food-borne threatsIs that meat still good? Are you sure? Researchers have developed a test to bring certainty to the delicate but critical question of whether meat and other foods are safe to eat or need to be thrown out.
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Science | The Guardian

Darwin's lost fossils – including a sloth the size of a car – to be made publicFossils collected by Darwin on his global voyages on the Beagle will be digitally scanned and made available online On 23 September 1832 a young naturalist, thousands of miles from home and frequently seasick and homesick, found the fossil of an enormous skull embedded in soft rock. It took Charles Darwin three hours to chip it out of the cliff face at Punta Alta in Argentina, and hours more to l
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sowing strips of flowering plants has limited effect on pollinationMany pollinating insects benefit from a small-scale agricultural landscape with pastures, meadows and other unploughed environments. In landscapes dominated by arable land, they lack both food and nesting places. Sown flower strips can increase the availability of food for pollinating insects, and are therefore assumed to benefit pollination. However, new research from Lund University in Sweden sh
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why weather forecasters still struggle to get the big storms rightIt was March 2017, and a winter storm named Stella promised to deliver up to a foot and a half of snow to New York City and parts of New Jersey. Officials pushed out blizzard warnings, suggesting the city was under imminent snowy siege.
7h
Futurity.org

Parents feel weird about sex ed for LGBTQ teensThe parents of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer teens feel uncomfortable and unequipped when trying to educate them about sex and dating, research finds. “Parents play an important role in helping their children learn how to have healthy sexual relationships, but they really struggle when discussing this with their LGBTQ teens,” says lead author Michael Newcomb, an assistant profess
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The time to act towards globally sustainable livestock is nowThe livestock sector is developing rapidly in low and middle-income countries, becoming increasingly global. In the same time, society's expectations regarding the sector are changing rapidly. We therefore need to develop new knowledge to achieve a safer, fair and sustainable livestock sector worldwide and cope effectively with the dual demand for protein-rich foods and sustainability. This messag
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plastic crisis—divert foreign aid to dumpsites in developing countriesPlastic pollution in the oceans is a major problem that is finally getting the attention it deserves, thanks to Blue Planet II. It makes headline news almost every week – and famous figures such as the Pope, Prince Charles, Dame Ellen MacArthur and Sir David Attenborough have all joined the debate.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study shows climate change is wreaking havoc on delicate relationship between orchids and beesThe first definitive demonstration of climate change upsetting the vital interdependent relationships between species has been revealed, thanks to a study led by the University of Sussex.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mechanism vital to keeping blood stem cells functional uncoveredHematopoietic stem cells, that form mature blood cells, require a very precise amount of protein to function – and defective regulation of protein production is common in certain types of aggressive human blood cancers. Now, a research team at Lund University in Sweden has uncovered a completely new mechanism that controls how proteins are produced to direct stem cell function.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chickens remain optimistic in enriched environments despite exposure to stressChickens that grow up in an environment that they perceive as more diverse and manageable, retain an optimistic view of life and cope with stress better than individuals that grow up in more sterile surroundings, according to a new study published in Scientific Reports. A team of researchers lead by researchers from Linköping University, Sweden, measured how optimism in chickens is affected by str
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hunting for dark matter in the smallest galaxies in the UniverseAstrophysicists have created a new method to measure the amount of dark matter at the center of tiny “dwarf” galaxies.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How birds can detect Earth’s magnetic fieldResearchers have made a key discovery about the internal magnetic compass of birds. Biologists have identified a single protein without which birds probably would not be able to orient themselves using the Earth’s magnetic field.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hunting for dark matter in the smallest galaxies in the universeAstrophysicists from the University of Surrey and the University of Edinburgh have created a new method to measure the amount of dark matter at the center of tiny 'dwarf' galaxies.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sowing strips of flowering plants has limited effect on pollinationMany pollinating insects benefit from a small-scale agricultural landscape with pastures, meadows and other unploughed environments. In landscapes dominated by arable land, they lack both food and nesting places. Sown flower strips can increase the availability of food for pollinating insects, and are therefore assumed to benefit pollination. However, new research from Lund University in Sweden sh
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mechanism vital to keeping blood stem cells functional uncoveredHematopoietic stem cells, that form mature blood cells, require a very precise amount of protein to function -- and defective regulation of protein production is common in certain types of aggressive human blood cancers. Now, a research team at Lund University in Sweden has uncovered a completely new mechanism that controls how proteins are produced to direct stem cell function.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New blood test useful to detect people at risk of developing Alzheimer's diseaseAlzheimer's disease is thought to begin long before patients show typical symptoms like memory loss. Scientists have now developed a blood test for Alzheimer's disease and found that it can detect early indicators of the disease long before the first symptoms appear in patients. The blood test would thus offer an opportunity to identify those at risk and may thereby open the door to new avenues in
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Species hitch a ride on birds and the wind to join green roof communitiesNew research suggests that species that live on green roofs arrived by hitching lifts on birds or by riding air currents.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NUS engineers pioneer greener and cheaper technique for biofuel productionA research team led by Associate Professor He Jianzhong from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at NUS Faculty of Engineering has found that a natural bacterium isolated from mushroom crop residue can directly convert cellulose to biobutanol, a biofuel.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

It's all about the (stem cell) neighborhoodResearchers at Duke-NUS Medical School have now identified how the stem cell neighbourhood, known as a niche, keeps stem cells in the gut alive. Their results provide new insights into the structure of the stem cell niche in health and after injury.
8h
New on MIT Technology Review

This company can encode your favorite song in DNA—for $100,000It’s not cheap. But Twist Bioscience thinks storing data in genes could be the next big thing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Species hitch a ride on birds and the wind to join green roof communitiesNew research suggests that species that live on green roofs arrived by hitching lifts on birds or by riding air currents.
8h
New Scientist - News

Waggle-dancing robot tells bees where to look for foodA robotic bee talks to bees in their own language, but not all of them seem to pay attention
8h
Big Think

We'd rather have fair inequality than unfair equality, research showsHow we define "inequality" is of utmost importance in trying to implement fair equality. Read More
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Big Think

Millions of ‘space junk’ objects orbit Earth; The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will test a solution.Because, you know ... humans are the polluting kind. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Photonic communication comes to computer chipsDevice MIT AlterEgoWith novel optoelectronic chips and a new partnership with a top silicon-chip manufacturer, MIT spinout Ayar Labs aims to increase speed and reduce energy consumption in computing, starting with data centers.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Lake Baikal, SiberiaThe Copernicus Sentinel-3A satellite takes us over southern Siberia and the world's largest freshwater lake: Lake Baikal.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Putting the 'smart' in manufacturing"Although smartphones and tablets are ubiquitous, many of the companies that make our everyday consumer products still rely on paper trails and manually updated spreadsheets to keep track of their production processes and delivery schedules," says Leyuan Shi, a professor of industrial and systems engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Our ongoing love-hate relationship with personality testsThe public backlash against Cambridge Analytica and Facebook centres on their practices of harvesting psychological data to influence political behaviour. But this is not the first time corporations have used personality tests for their own gains.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Solar PV and wind are on track to replace all coal, oil and gas within two decadesSolar photovoltaic and wind power are rapidly getting cheaper and more abundant – so much so that they are on track to entirely supplant fossil fuels worldwide within two decades, with the time frame depending mostly on politics. The protestation from some politicians that we need to build new coal stations sounds rather quaint.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A paleontologist who teaches anatomy is good for medicine and scienceSome students are surprised to learn that their gross anatomy professor is a paleontologist—that's a scientist who studies fossils, right? My research is actually focused on the origins and evolution of humans today, during the period from about 6 million years ago to present day. Teaching anatomy at the Keck School of Medicine of USC has benefits in both directions: I bring the history of the hum
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How many stars to expect in Gaia's second data releaseAs astronomers worldwide are preparing to explore the second data release of ESA's Gaia satellite, the Data Processing and Analysing Consortium announced just how many sources will be included in the new catalogue, which will be made public on 25 April.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Caltech scientists breed bacteria that make tiny high-energy carbon ringsResearchers in the lab of Frances Arnold have used directed evolution to breed bacteria that produce synthetically versatile, high-energy carbon rings in an efficient way.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When health care hurts: High-deductible plans raise financial riskThis marks the latest study in a series to show that consumers on high-deductible plans are not making wiser, cost-saving choices than are o ffered by traditional plans.
8h
Popular Science

Seasoning your cast iron pan isn’t enoughDIY You season and reseason for a reason. Cast iron is strange mixture of incredibly durable and unusually delicate—especially for a cooking implement. The metal is physically sturdy, but also highly reactive,…
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

This low-carbon plan comes with an economic upsideThe debate around a low-carbon future typically assumes that choices benefiting the environment come with a price tag.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Education specialists argue that ILSA scores should not be used to conduct educational policyA pair of education specialists, one from Harvard, the other Boston College, have published a Policy Forum piece in the journal Science decrying the use of international large-scale education assessments (ILSAs) as tools for educational policymaking. In their paper, Judith Singer and Henry Braun point out problems with comparing ILSA results between countries and suggest they could be put to bette
8h
New on MIT Technology Review

Facebook had plans to break into medical data sharingFacebook Data Privacy
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Ingeniøren

Danske broingeniører skal sikre verdens første printede stålbroForce Technology udvikler det omfattende monitoreringsystem, der skal holde øje med, om den krumme og svingende stålbro, der er blevet printet i Amsterdam, fungerer efter planen.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Space-based telescope can image Earth and beyondLawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have developed and tested an optical telescope system that can be used for Earth and space observation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Paleontologist believes Cretaceous mosasaur might have specialized in fishTakuya Konishi held up a fossil of a mosasaur, a ferocious marine reptile that lived alongside dinosaurs more than 65 million years ago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New technologies to rehabilitate dams into useful landAn emerging technology has the potential to turn toxic red mud into useful soil, combatting the expensive rehabilitation of red mud dams across Australia.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

C9h peptide capped to induce cancer cell apoptosisResearchers at Valencia's Universitat Politècnica (UPV), the Valencia-CSIC Biomedicine Institute (IBV) and the Bioengineering, Biomaterial and Nanomedicine CIBER (CIBER BBN) have developed a new system to induce the death of carcinogenic cells.
8h
The Atlantic

Can Hungary Defeat a Budding Strongman?BUDAPEST—In southeast Hungary, not far from the borders with Serbia and Romania, sits a small city of some 47,000 called Hódmezővásárhely. In February, its mayoral election delivered a stinging and unexpected defeat to Fidesz, the seemingly unbeatable party of Prime Minister Viktor Orbán. That race, which pitted an independent candidate against Zoltán Hegedűs, the Fidesz favorite, provided a hypo
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hybrid swarm in global mega-pestScientists have confirmed the hybridization of two of the world's major pest species, into a new and improved mega-pest.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Legal barriers hindering ASEAN trade: ReportASEAN's legal frameworks must keep pace with how businesses use technology today, say Singapore Management University researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Better roads essential for safer cyclingA study conducted by QUT's Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety -- Queensland -- has revealed poor road infrastructure is a major factor in cyclist safety, especially during incidents involving them being overtaken by motorists.
8h
Feed: All Latest

This Week in the Future of Cars: Working Through the ChaosA Tesla wreck, an EPA rollback, and a city simulator
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Futurity.org

Digging in dirt unearths new kind of antibioticsResearchers have discovered a new class of powerful antibiotics called malacidins, which they hope will be effective against multidrug-resistant bacteria. In an effort to discover bacterial molecules with potential as drugs, the researchers sequenced the genes of microbes from more than 2,000 soil samples from New York City parks. “They are brand new molecules… They have never been seen before.”
9h
Big Think

Grow west: the mystery of America's migrating treesThree-quarters of tree species common in the eastern U.S. have moved their population centres westward over the last 30 years – an effect not predicted by assumptions about global warming. Read More
9h
Dagens Medicin

Første millioner til cannabisforskning er blevet uddeltTo projekter er blevet bevilliget i alt fem mio. kr. til forskningsprojekter om brugen af medicinsk cannabis. En pulje på yderligere fem mio. kr. kan ansøges frem til slutningen af maj.
9h
Science | The Guardian

Pee and pesticides: Thoreau's Walden Pond in trouble, warn scientistsImmortalised for its beauty by Henry David Thoreau, the Massachusetts pond is under threat from increased human activity and climate change according to a new study The water of Walden Pond, which Henry David Thoreau described in 1854 as “so transparent that the bottom can easily be discerned at the depth of 25 or 30 feet”, is no longer quite so clear according to a new study. The Massachusetts p
9h
Viden

Facebook dropper kontroversielt forsøg: Ville kombinere patientdata med Facebook-profilerDet skandaleramte sociale medie har forsøgt at få hospitaler og sundheds-organisationer til at dele patienters data som led i et forskningsprojekt.
9h
Viden

Kortlægning af en unik cykelgeneration: Her er fremtidens danske stjernerI sidste weekend kørte Mads Pedersen sig ind på en fornem andenplads i Flandern Rundt. Men han er langt fra det eneste cykeltalent, der snart kan nå til tops. DR Sporten har samlet et overblik over de danske cykeltalenter.
9h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Eggshell EdificeA new 3-D model plumbs the molecular intricacies of eggshell composition.
9h
The Atlantic

An Inordinate Fondness for WaspsWhen talking about whether theology has anything to learn from science, the British biologist J. B. S. Haldane used to quip that God must have “an inordinate fondness for beetles.” He had a point. Around 380,000 species of beetle have been described, which accounts for a quarter of all known animal species. There are more species of ladybugs than mammals, of longhorn beetles than birds, of weevil
9h
Feed: All Latest

Best Mobile Browsers: Microsoft Edge, Firefox Focus, Google Chrome, and MoreSurfing the web on your phone is about to get a whole lot better.
9h
Popular Science

Not even geckos can stick to Teflon (and other slippery facts)Science One of the many amazing inventions that came about by accident. Roy Plunkett doesn’t sound like a man destined for greatness. And in a way, he wasn’t. Plunkett gave us the technological marvel that is Teflon—but he did it…
9h
Live Science

Is Dark Matter Made Up of Mini Black Holes from the Big Bang?Dark matter may actually be a scattering of primordial black holes that arose soon after the Big Bang as a result of instabilities in the Higgs field, according to a new theory.
9h
Live Science

Military-Funded Study Successfully Tests 'Prosthetic Memory' Brain ImplantsThis computer chip will do some of your remembering for you (but you'll need brain surgery first).
9h
Live Science

This Prehistoric Sea Monster Was About to Be an OctomomA jumble of tiny bones turns out to be eight unborn ichthyosaurs.
9h
Futurity.org

Scientists map path into cell’s nucleusResearchers have delineated the architecture of the nuclear pore complex in yeast cells. The biological blueprint they uncovered shares principles sometimes seen on a much larger scale in concrete, steel, and wire. “It reminds us of a suspension bridge, in which a combination of sturdy and flexible parts produce a stress-resilient structure,” says Michael P. Rout, professor at Rockefeller Univers
10h
Dagens Medicin

Lægeformand: Juraprofessorer bør trække udtalelser om Svendborgssag tilbageFormand for Lægeforeningen, Andreas Rudkjøbing, protesterer mod to juraprofessorers beskyldninger mod lægen fra Svendborgsagen.
10h
Ingeniøren

Mangel på ingeniører: Nu uddanner Sønderborg dem selvDe første forskningsmedarbejdere er ansat, byggeriet af 3.300 kvadratmeter nye laboratorier er sat i gang, og til sommer starter de første studerende på tre nye elektronikingeniør-uddannelser på Center for Industriel Elektronik i Sønderborg
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

EPA's Proposed Rollbacks of Mileage Standards Is a Terrible IdeaRarely in my career have I seen a proposal more short-sighted and counterproductive than this one -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Viden

Microsoft Office-nedbrud lagde servere ned over hele verdenEfter et længerevarende nedbrud er Microsoft 365 nu oppe at køre igen.
10h
Dagens Medicin

250 ekstra studiepladser til lægeuddannelser i hele landetRegeringen udvider antallet af studiepladser og opretter nye kandidatuddannelser i Esbjerg og Køge. Lægeforeningen frygter, at det vil skabe køer, når lægerne skal videre i deres uddannelse.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Food allergy is linked to skin exposure and geneticsInfant and childhood food allergy has now been linked to a mix of environmental and genetic factors that must coexist to trigger the allergy, reports a new study. Those factors include genetics that alter skin absorbency, use of infant cleansing wipes that leave soap on the skin, skin exposure to allergens in dust and skin exposure to food from those providing infant care. The good news is factors
10h
Science-Based Medicine

Science-Based Satire: NASA Teams with NCCIH to Study Alternative Medicine in SpaceAre NASA and the NCCIH working together to study reiki in space? It sounds plausible I know, but this isn't even remotely true. It's satire. Enjoy!
10h
The Atlantic

Blockers Is an R-Rated Prom-Night Comedy With HeartLet us consider, for a moment, the plight of the middle-class suburban American parent, as told through some of the recent comedies centered on them. I’m referring to films like 2017’s The House , or the two Neighbors movies, nearly anything directed by Judd Apatow, and now Blockers , the directorial debut of Kay Cannon (the writer of the Pitch Perfect series). These moms and dads have homes that
10h
Feed: All Latest

Cyberinsurance Tries to Tackle the Unpredictable World of HacksInsuring against hacks and breaches can be a lucrative business—but also presents unique challenges.
11h
Feed: All Latest

A Brain-Boosting Prosthesis Moves From Rats to HumansAn algorithm tailored to individual brain activity shows it can boost memory with electrical zaps.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

How to Avoid Business Disasters with Behavioral ScienceData breaches, customer service embarrassments and other stock-tanking missteps seem to be in the news every other day—but it doesn't have to be this way -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon and Lidl are creating upheaval for big Charlotte grocers, new report showsThe arrival of Lidl and Amazon's massive purchase of Whole Foods last summer appear to have put pressure on the area's top grocers last year, costing them market share and pushing them to roll out creative ways to win over customers.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

Orangutans Use Plant Extracts to Treat PainHumans aren’t the only animals that have discovered medicinal products in nature -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wild horses living on the Channel Islands face an uncertain future on the mainlandIt's hot at El Campeon Farms, even for early August. A hard wind accompanies the heat, blowing through the Conejo Valley, where this horse ranch sits in Southern California. Abby Followwill is saddled on a horse named Vince. His golden-brown coat and blond mane stand out against the saturated blue sky and dusty corral where Followwill is training with him.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bacteria can pass on memory to descendants, researchers discoverLed by scientists at UCLA, an international team of researchers has discovered that bacteria have a "memory" that passes sensory knowledge from one generation of cells to the next, all without a central nervous system or any neurons.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows power of imagery in improving perceptions of presidentA new study by leading UChicago presidential scholar William G. Howell concludes that the rituals of public performances enhance the president's standing in the American public. Citizens who watch presidents participating in these performances are more likely to view them as fulfilling the obligations of office, enjoying the respect of key constituencies, and embodying the values and aspirations o
11h
The Guardian's Science Weekly

What our teeth tell us about our evolutionary past – Science Weekly podcastThis week, Nicola Davis asks: what clues do our teeth hold about our species? And what can they tell us about our past?
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Gullies of Matara CraterGullies on Martian sand dunes, like these in Matara Crater, have been very active, with many flows in the last 10 years. The flows typically occur when seasonal frost is present.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Human brain drug uncovers key to plant stress responseUniversity of Adelaide research has discovered that drugs used in the treatment of certain brain disorders, including epilepsy, also alter the signalling process in plants under stress.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Ariane 5's second launch of 2018An Ariane 5, operated by Arianespace, has delivered the DSN-1/Superbird-8 and Hylas-4 telecom satellites into their planned orbits.
11h
Dagens Medicin

Giftlinjen mangler midler for at kunne sikre kvalitetenGiftlinjen er pressede på midler. Antal henvendelser er steget drastisk, mens ressourcerne ikke er blevet flere. Uholdbart, hvis vi skal sikre kvaliteten, siger chef for Giftlinjen.
11h
Ingeniøren

Ingeniørens læsere: DAB-nettet kan ikke løfte arven fra FMRegeringen vil afskaffe FM-nettet senest i 2021, men flere hundrede læserhenvendelser peger på, at aftageren DAB+ måske ikke er klar til at løse opgaven.
11h
Ingeniøren

Facebook bad hospitaler udlevere patientdataSom del af et forskningsprojekt har Facebook bedt en række hospitaler om at få udleveret patientdata. Projektet er sat på pause efter verden har fået øjnene op for Facebooks problematiske forhold til persondata.
11h
Science | The Guardian

What our teeth tell us about our evolutionary past – Science Weekly podcastThis week, Nicola Davis asks: what clues do our teeth hold about our species? And what can they tell us about our past? Subscribe and review on Acast , Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom and Mixcloud . Join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Scientists have been digging up clues about the origins of humans for centuries, and remains of human species continue to come to light. But while f
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists breed bacteria that make tiny high-energy carbon ringsCaltech scientists have created a strain of bacteria that can make small but energy-packed carbon rings that are useful starting materials for creating other chemicals and materials. These rings, which are otherwise particularly difficult to prepare, now can be "brewed" in much the same way as beer.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More accurate biopsy by augmented realityThe University of Twente is currently developing a smartphone technology based on the usage of Simultaneous Localization And Mapping (SLAM) and augmented reality (AR). This technology enables medical personnel to reconstruct 3-D body sections quickly, only by holding the smartphone around the area of interest. This smartphone will display the augmented layers of the 3-D skin surface in order to vi
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New liquid modeling technique predicts chemical reactions and lowers drug development costsA Purdue-affiliated company is developing a way to reduce drug development costs by more accurately and efficiently modeling molecules and chemical reactions in liquid solutions. This will allow chemists to better understand process details of molecule synthesis.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers unravel 3-D locomotion of the nematode C. elegansJerzy Blawzdziewicz, professor, associate chairman and director of graduate studies in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, and Siva Vanapalli, an associate professor and Bill Sanderson faculty fellow in the Department of Chemical Engineering in Texas Tech University's Edward E. Whitacre Jr. College of Engineering, had their research paper, "Roll Maneuvers are Essential for Active Reorientati
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genetics of the modern heirs of the Inca shed new light on their origins and lineagesA multinational South American team from Peru, Brasil and Bolivia led by the Universidad de San Martin de Porres at Lima, Peru, published the first genetic study on the modern descendants of the imperial Inca lineages in the journal Molecular Genetics and Genomics.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Friends of friends reveal our hidden online traitsAt a time when social network privacy – or the lack of it – is headline news, two Stanford researchers have some sobering findings about how personal data is becoming increasingly difficult to hide if we have any public presence online.
11h
The Atlantic

The Tenacity of TrumpYou would think, based on the surprise that has greeted President Trump’s recent decisions to walk to the brink of a trade war with China and dispatch the National Guard to the Southern border, that he had not talked about securing the border and punishing Chinese trade practices for years. These two moves point to a curious paradox about Trump. He is a historically dishonest president , prone to
11h
The Atlantic

Police Shootings Are Also Gun ViolenceOn March 18, Stephon Clark was shot and killed by Sacramento Police officers. Responding to a call regarding a suspect breaking car windows, the two officers encountered Clark, a 22-year-old black man, who ran into his grandmother’s backyard. The officers allege they believed Clark had a gun, and can be heard on a body-camera recording yelling the word “gun” just before shooting. Clark was only c
11h
Ingeniøren

Hør ugens podcast om smart citiesI denne specialudgave af Transformator sætter vi fokus på begrebet smart cities. Dag for dag bliver vores byer smartere i form af alt fra overvågning til trafikstyring og ressourcehåndtering understøttet af innovative it-løsninger og big data. Men udviklingen rejser også spørgsmål om datasikkerhe...
12h
Big Think

How your personality is shaped by your brain's outlookWe are discovering that the subtleties of our psychological lives are being managed by specific modules in our brains. Read More
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change is wreaking havoc on delicate relationship between orchids and beesRising temperatures have wrecked a relationship, which relies on precision timing to succeed, between a rare orchid species and the Buffish Mining-bee which pollinates it.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Index measures similarity between cancer cells and pluripotent stem cellsThe theory that cancer progression involves tumor cells acquiring features similar to those of stem cells has gained strength in the scientific community. According to this theory, tumor cells become dissimilar from their originating tissue as the disease progresses, acquiring an undifferentiated phenotype associated with heightened aggressiveness and treatment resistance.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Theorists described an inertial lift of particles in microchannelsA group of scientists from MSU, Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, and Juelich Research Center have described the mechanism of appearance of an inertial lift force acting on finite-sized particles in microchannels. Such calculations were previously possible only for some specific cases. A more accurate description allows one to use this
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Double perovskites in environmentally friendly solar cellsResearchers have taken a step toward manufacturing solar cells from lead-free perovskites. High-quality films based on double perovskites, which show promising photovoltaic properties, have been developed in collaboration between Linköping University, Sweden, and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists design a model of Martian winterA team of researchers from MIPT and their German and Japanese colleagues have designed a numerical model of the annual water cycle in the Martian atmosphere. Previously, the scientists focused their research on relatively large airborne dust particles that serve as water condensation nuclei on Mars. In this study, the MIPT team expanded the analysis to include smaller particles that are more elusi
12h
Ingeniøren

Minister om vaccinesalg: Rigsrevisionens konsulent vidste ikke et klap om sagenSundhedsministeren kaster sig ud i et spektakulært modangreb på Rigsrevisionen.
12h
Dagens Medicin

#38 Ufrivillig barnløshedEt par der netop gennemgår kunstig befrugtning og Søren Ziebe, klinikchef for Rigshospitalets fertilitetsklinik, er med i Stetoskopets podcast, der sætter fokus på ufrivillig barnløshed.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Toyota's Plano-based CEO talks self-driving cars and the real reason the automaker suspended testingWhen a woman crossing an Arizona street was struck and killed by a self-driving Uber car late last month, it sparked a swift public reckoning over the near-term future of autonomous vehicle testing on public roads.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook faces Indonesia investigation over privacy breachIndonesian government said Friday it is investigating Facebook over the privacy breach of its Indonesian users.
13h
Ingeniøren

Er robotter roden til Teslas problemer?Teslas Fremont-fabrik er kaldt den mest avancerede bilfabrik i verden, men ifølge et analysefirma har Elon Musk overspillet automationskortet. Fabrikkens hundredevis af robotter er simpelthen årsagen til de massive leveranceproblemer med Teslas Model 3, påpeges det.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Russian regulator moves to block Telegram messaging appRussia's telecoms watchdog on Friday asked a Moscow court to block the popular messaging app Telegram, after a deadline for it to hand over encryption keys to security services expired.
13h
Ingeniøren

Google-ansatte til chefen: Stop våben med kunstig intelligensI et protestbrev bønfalder over 3.100 ansatte deres chef om at annullere en opgave for Pentagon om at udvikle en visuel overvågningsmaskine med AI beregnet til dronekrig.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Refill app: This company will bring the gas pump to youIf you could use an app to send someone to fill your car's empty gas tank while you were at work, would you do it?
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook's facial recognition violates user privacy, watchdog groups plan to tell FTCFacebook Data PrivacyAlready under siege over loose privacy controls and Russian manipulation, Facebook is about to be challenged on another issue: facial recognition.
13h
Science | The Guardian

Why science is being more open about animals in researchWe need to show the public the high welfare standards and care all research animals receive to help build trust in scientists If you have ever taken a medicine, you have benefited from the humane use of animals in medical research. My research at the University of Bath focuses on understanding how the brain responds to stress and how we can use that knowledge to develop new and better antidepress
13h
Ingeniøren

De dumme it-kriminelle og vaneforbryderne bliver fangetSelvom teknologien ikke fejler noget, bliver it-kriminelle fanget, når de dummer sig.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Philippine tourist island scrambles as shutdown loomsThe Philippines' tourism industry scrambled Friday to manage the fallout from the temporary shutdown of its world-famous Boracay island, which threw into chaos trips planned by hundreds of thousands of tourists.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In Cambodia, fears tarantula may go off the menuWhile a plate piled high with hairy, palm-sized tarantulas is the stuff of nightmares for some, these garlic fried spiders are a coveted treat in Cambodia, where the only fear is that they may soon vanish due to deforestation and unchecked hunting.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bolivia's jaguars facing threat from Chinese fang crazeBolivia's once-thriving jaguar population is loping into the cross-hairs of a growing threat from poachers responding to growing Chinese demand for the animal's teeth and skull.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Japan's hacked crypto exchange Coincheck bought outJapanese online broker Monex Group said Friday it would buy virtual currency exchange Coincheck, which was hit by a massive hack that saw thieves steal hundreds of millions of dollars in virtual currency.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ASU Online science course brings to life a new way of teachingArizona State University's School of Earth and Space Exploration recently released new research on its flagship Smart Course, Habitable Worlds, published in the peer-reviewed journal, Astrobiology. The study found that its student-centered, exploration-focused design resulted in high course grades and demonstrable mastery of content.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop transparent patch to detect dangerous food threatsIs that meat still good? Are you sure? McMaster researchers have developed a test to bring certainty to the delicate but critical question of whether meat and other foods are safe to eat or need to be thrown out.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Experts team up to study bluefin tuna and confirm return to UK watersAtlantic bluefin tuna are known for being amongst the biggest, fastest and most valuable fish in the sea.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook: Most users may have had public data 'scraped'Facebook Mark ZuckerbergFacebook's acknowledgement that most of its 2.2 billion members have probably had their personal data scraped by "malicious actors" is the latest example of the social network's failure to protect its users' data.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

As Trump tweets, Amazon seeks to expand its business empireAmazon is spending millions of dollars on lobbying as the global online retailer seeks to expand its reach into a swath of industries that President Donald Trump's broadsides haven't come close to hitting.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Samsung Electronics flags record $14.7 bn Q1 operating profitSamsung Electronics flagged Friday a first-quarter operating profit of 15.6 trillion won ($14.7 billion), a record for any three-month period, as it benefited from soaring demand for its memory chips for mobile devices.
15h
Ingeniøren

Enkle værktøjer hjælper kriminelle i gemmeleg med politiet i cyberspaceDer bliver flere af dem, og de bliver nemmere at bruge: Kriminelle anvender i stor stil nettjenester og -værktøjer for at skjule sig.
16h
Ingeniøren

Pape vil ikke sætte udløbsdato på dødsdømt telelogning: Jeg håber på ny lov i 2018Justitsministeren ville på samråd om telelogning ikke sætte nærmere tidshorisont på, hvornår dansk regler for logning bliver ændret.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers develop transparent patch to detect dangerous food threatsIs that meat still good? Are you sure? McMaster researchers have developed a test to bring certainty to the delicate but critical question of whether meat and other foods are safe to eat or need to be thrown out.
16h
BBC News - Science & Environment

The pest controller of KandaharIt's not just spiders, scorpions and snakes for the man in charge of pest control at Kandahar air base.
16h
Ingeniøren

Leder: Støtten til biogas er løbet løbsk
17h
Viden

Transfer-nyt: Google-chef skal gøre Apples Siri godMangeårig chef for Googles kunstige intelligens skal få Apples Siri op i gear.
17h
Science | The Guardian

Country diary: treasures that were once beneath the Cambrian seaAssynt, Sutherland, Highlands: The stromatolite fossils lie on the Eilean Dubh Formation, a geologic stratum often marked by coral and shell fossils As I climb up from the green-brown valley near Inchnadamph, the early spring countryside changes character. Snow patches appear and soon become abundant, then all seems white as the mountains’ snow-blanketed slopes merge into silver-grey clouds. On t
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetics of the modern heirs of the Incas shed new lights about their origins and lineagesA study of the Inka origins and their lineages was performed in twelve contemporary families with presumed patrilineal lineage to Inka monarchs. A comparison of Y-chromosome and mtDNA markers of these descendants with a database of about 2400 South American native individuals of Peru, Bolivia, Brasil and Ecuador showed two distinct patrilineal clusters, and a very diverse matrilineal origin. In ad
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New blood test found to predict onset of TB up to two years in advanceA new blood test has been found to more accurately predict the development of tuberculosis up to two years before its onset in people living with someone with active TB, according to research published online in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, an American Thoracic Society journal.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

School lunch decisions made by the child and not the parentWhile school lunches in the UK are subject to food standards, the contents of packed lunches are not as closely scrutinized, and studies have raised concern regarding the nutritional quality of packed lunches. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that children, not their parents, are often the primary decision maker of whether they will eat a school lunch
17h
New on MIT Technology Review

Here’s how the US needs to prepare for the age of artificial intelligenceGovernment indifference toward AI could let the US lose ground to rival countries. But what would a good AI plan actually look like?
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Negative fateful life events and the brains of middle-aged menConflict, a death in the family, financial hardship and serious medical crises are all associated with accelerated physical aging. In a new study, researchers found that such negative fateful life events -- or FLEs -- appear to also specifically accelerate aging in the brain.
18h
Live Science

Angkor Wat: History of Ancient TempleAngkor Wat in Cambodia is one of the largest religious monuments ever constructed.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dead star circled by lightNew images reveal a rich landscape of stars and glowing clouds of gas in one of our closest neighboring galaxies, the Small Magellanic Cloud. The pictures have allowed astronomers to identify an elusive stellar corpse left behind by a 2,000-year-old supernova explosion. The MUSE instrument was used to establish where this object is hiding, and Chandra X-ray Observatory data confirmed its identity
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New underwater geolocation technique takes cues from natureMarine animals such as mantis shrimp and squid have inspired a new mode of underwater navigation that allows for greater accuracy. Researchers have now developed the technique using imaging equipment that was sensitive to polarizing light.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why do children tattle?When young children see a peer cause harm, they often tattle to a caregiver.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Like human societies, whales value culture and family tiesIn a detailed genetic kinship study, an international team is the first to reveal that just like human societies, beluga whales appear to value culture and their ancestral roots and family ties. They have demonstrated that related whales returned to the same locations year after year, and decade after decade. Not only do these whales know where to go and where not to go, they are passing on this i
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Common diabetes drug may also help with nicotine withdrawalIn a mouse study, a drug that has helped millions of people around the world manage their diabetes might also help people ready to kick their nicotine habits.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Three-quarters of COPD cases are linked to childhood risk factors that are exacerbated in adulthoodThree-quarters of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) cases have their origins in poor lung function pathways beginning in childhood. These pathways are associated with exposures in childhood, and amplified by factors in adulthood, according to a cohort study. While smoking remains the biggest risk factor for COPD, the study demonstrates that childhood illnesses (such as asthma, bronchiti
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Giant solar tornadoes put researchers in a spinDespite their appearance solar tornadoes are not rotating after all, according to a team of scientists. A new analysis of these gigantic structures, each one several times the size of the Earth, indicates that they may have been misnamed because scientists have so far only been able to observe them using 2-dimensional images.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dark matter might not be interactive after allAstronomers are back in the dark about what dark matter might be, after new observations showed the mysterious substance may not be interacting with forces other than gravity after all.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An index measures similarity between cancer cells and pluripotent stem cellsThe new methodology measures tumor aggressiveness and the risk of relapse, helping doctors plan treatment.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists build better way to decode the genomeResearchers have developed a computational tool that shines a light on the genome's most hard-to-translate segments. With this tool in hand, scientists can get closer to understanding how DNA guides everything from growth and development to aging and disease.
19h
The Atlantic

Google's One-Time 'Chief Technology Advocate' on Making Facebook LikableOver the years I’ve often turned to my friend Michael Jones for guidance about the cultural and social effects of technology. For instance, five years ago I did an Atlantic interview with him about how the dawn of omnipresent mapping-on-your-phone was about to change personal and collective life. (He had been one of the inventors of Google Earth.) A few years before that, when Jones was the “chie
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What makes a bestseller: Fiction, thriller and a Christmas releaseBooks that are fiction, thrillers or mysteries, have high initial sales numbers and are released around Christmas are more likely to be bestsellers, according to a study published in the open access journal EPJ Data Science.
22h
Futurity.org

How do flowers know when it’s time to bloom?Researchers have uncovered exactly where a key protein forms before it triggers the flowering process in plants. Until now, no one has pinpointed which cells produce the small protein, called Flowering Locus T (FT). The study also points to an extensive intercellular signaling system that regulates FT production. “Understanding where FT is located and how it coordinates with other flowering facto
22h
Futurity.org

Diabetes drug may also tackle nicotine withdrawalAn inexpensive drug commonly used to treat patients with type 2 diabetes may block symptoms of nicotine withdrawal, at least in rodents. After researchers exposed laboratory mice to a two-week regimen of nicotine they displayed no withdrawal symptoms when they took the drug, called metformin, the researchers report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . Cigarette smoking is the
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What is the best way to treat infected hip replacements?New research has found treating an infected hip replacement in a single stage procedure may be as effective or better than the widely used two-stage procedure. Hip replacement is a very common operation that is effective at providing pain relief and improving mobility, however, infection can sometimes occur following joint replacement. The findings have wide implications for orthopedic surgery, th
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Giant solar tornadoes put researchers in a spinDespite their appearance solar tornadoes are not rotating after all, according to a European team of scientists. A new analysis of these gigantic structures, each one several times the size of the Earth, indicates that they may have been misnamed because scientists have so far only been able to observe them using 2-dimensional images.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dark matter might not be interactive after allAstronomers are back in the dark about what dark matter might be, after new observations showed the mysterious substance may not be interacting with forces other than gravity after all. Dr. Andrew Robertson of Durham University will today present the new results at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science in Liverpool.
22h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Communicate ResultsWhat We’re Following Military Matters: The White House announced that U.S. troops would remain in Syria without a clear timeline for withdrawal, despite a series of statements by President Trump that appeared to indicate that he wanted the troops back home. The president has frequently pointed to the military in the past two weeks as a possible solution for challenges such as securing the U.S.–Me
22h
Futurity.org

Housing recovery after disasters needs a remodelThe types of housing and homeowners—and how US policy handles each—play a major role in recovery outcomes following a natural disaster, a new study reports. The findings show the United States needs to change how it funds housing recovery, says Sara Hamideh, assistant professor of community and regional planning at Iowa State University. “Housing is such a unifier because it’s so essential to eco
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Dark matter isn’t interacting with itself after allHints that a distant galactic collision knocked dark matter askew fizzled with new observations.
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Futurity.org

Despite the evidence, STEM lectures remain the normAn analysis of more than 2,000 college classes in science, technology, engineering, and math has a central lesson: Enough with the lectures. Prior research has identified lecturing as among the styles least effective at teaching and engaging students. The largest-ever observational study of undergraduate STEM education, published in Science , monitored nearly 550 faculty as they taught more than
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dark matter might not be interactive after allAstronomers are back in the dark about what dark matter might be, after new observations showed the mysterious substance may not be interacting with forces other than gravity after all. Dr Andrew Robertson of Durham University will today (Friday 6 April) present the new results at the European Week of Astronomy and Space Science in Liverpool.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Giant solar tornadoes put researchers in a spinDespite their appearance solar tornadoes are not rotating after all, according to a European team of scientists. A new analysis of these gigantic structures, each one several times the size of the Earth, indicates that they may have been misnamed because scientists have so far only been able to observe them using 2-dimensional images. Dr Nicolas Labrosse will present the work, carried out by resea
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Futurity.org

Expressive faces predict who’s liberal or conservativeLiberals express more emotions with their faces than conservatives do, new research shows. “We did four studies for this paper, and they all triangulate on the same thing,” says Kevin Smith, professor and chair of political science at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. “People can, with greater-than-chance accuracy, figure out whether you’re liberal or conservative just by looking at your face,
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Futurity.org

Brains of contact and non-contact sport athletes aren’t the sameResearchers have found differences in the brains of athletes who participate in contact sports compared to those who participate in noncontact sports. Researchers observed the differences as both groups were given a simple visual task. The results could suggest that a history of minor but repeated blows to the head can result in compensatory changes to the brain as it relates to eye movement func
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