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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A different spin on superconductivity—Unusual particle interactions open up new possibilities in exotic materialsWhen you plug in an appliance or flip on a light switch, electricity seems to flow instantly through wires in the wall. But in fact, the electricity is carried by tiny particles called electrons that slowly drift through the wires. On their journey, electrons occasionally bump into the material's atoms, giving up some energy with every collision.
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NYT > Science

Many People Taking Antidepressants Discover They Cannot QuitLong-term use of the medications is surging in the United States, according to an analysis by The Times. One reason: withdrawal symptoms that make it difficult to stop.
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Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Kan man skabe en Jord-lignende atmosfære på Mars?En læser vil gerne vide, om man kan planetmodellere Mars, så den bliver beboelig for mennesker engang. Det svarer postdoc fra Niels Bohr Institutet på.
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LATEST

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

HIV cell dysfunction discovery sheds light on how virus worksA new study has revealed that certain immune cells behave differently in HIV-infected patients than they do in healthy individuals, a discovery that moves us one step closer to understanding how the virus works.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

1C rise in atmospheric temperature causes rapid changes to world's largest High Arctic lakeAn interdisciplinary team of scientists examining everything from glaciology to freshwater ecology discovered drastic changes over the past decade to the world's largest High Arctic lake. And from glacial melt to the declining lake ice to changes in lake ecology, the results from Lake Hazen on Ellesmere Island in Canada are alarming.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How pathogenic bacteria prepare a sticky adhesion proteinResearchers have described how the protein that allows strep and staph bacteria to stick to human cells is prepared and packaged. The research could facilitate the development of new antibiotics.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Interplanetary CubeSats Are Go!NASA’s latest Mars probe has a couple of very special hitchhikers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

'First luxury space hotel' plans to offer zero gravity living – for $792,000 a nightSelf-described ‘serial entrepreneur’ behind the Aurora Station says it is selling the astronaut experience and plans to open in 2021 A Houston-based company said this week it plans to open the “first luxury hotel in space” by late 2021. Orion Span ’s compact Aurora Station – at 35ft-by-14ft its interior will be comparable to that of a Gulfstream jet, the company said – is projected to accommodate
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Egypt court suspends ban on Uber and CareemAn Egyptian court on Saturday suspended a ruling banning the use of ride-sharing apps Uber and Careem until an appeal is exhausted, a judicial source said.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Online message board advice on ICDs reflects inaccuraciesMedical advice about implanted cardiac defibrillators obtained over two years from a dedicated online message board was accurate only about half of the time. About a quarter of advice dispensed via the online message board was inappropriate and 6 percent controversial. These findings underscore the need for clinicians to ask patients about sources of information to ensure they receive appropriate
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Depression negatively impacts heart and stroke patientsPeople with cardiovascular disease who haven't been diagnosed with depression but are at high-risk for it are more likely to report worse healthcare experiences and use emergency room services more often than those diagnosed with depression.Heart attack patients diagnosed with depression are more likely to be hospitalized, use emergency rooms and annually spend more on healthcare than heart attack
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Science | The Guardian

David Reich: ‘Neanderthals were perhaps capable of many modern human behaviours’In recent years, genome sequencing has changed everything we thought about our origins and how we relate to early human species For David Reich , research can be a harrowing experience. The 44-year-old Harvard University geneticist says he now goes to bed terrified he will wake up to find his team’s recent, stunning discoveries about human ancestry have been proved wrong. “We are now making so man
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Scientific American Content: Global

New Research Questions "Pawedness" in DogsDogs don't show consistent paw preference across tasks -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think

7 famous siblings who have changed historySibling rivalries can lead to some impressive moments in history, how did these seven sets of siblings do? Read More
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NYT > Science

In His Haste to Roll Back Rules, Scott Pruitt, E.P.A. Chief, Risks His AgendaCourts have found his orders on lead paint, pesticides and other issues to be poorly crafted, and have struck them down.
6h
Big Think

Giant dinosaur tracks found in Scotland reveal the secrets of the Jurassic periodScientists in Scotland find tracks of the largest animal that walked on Earth during the Middle Jurassic Period. Read More
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cognitive science

This strange syndrome causes people to think their loved ones have been replaced by identical impostorssubmitted by /u/thedabarry [link] [comments]
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Live Science

'Space Alien' Mummy Spurs DNA DebateThe remains of a 6-inch long mummy from Chile are not those of a space alien, according to recently reported research. These findings were supposed to end the controversy but they ignited a new one.
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Viden

55 kilometer lang: Kina åbner snart verdens længste hav-broBroen forbinder Hong Kong med Macao og kinesiske Zhuhai. Byggeriet er blevet stærkt kritiseret - blandt andet for sikkerheden.
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Space Photos of the Week: The Case of the Missing Dark MatterGalaxy NGC 1052-DF2 doesn't seem to contain any dark matter, and scientists have no idea why.
8h
Ingeniøren

Gummifabrikation er blevet en storindustri i MexicoUdvinding af gummi fra guayule-planten i det forholdsvis temperede mexicanske klima var i 1913 et attraktivt alternativ til det tropiske Afrika, »da livet i troperne ikke er særlig behageligt for medlemmer af den hvide race«, som Ingeniøren skrev.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Review: Inventing the MathematicianSara N. Hottinger’s thoughtful book addresses Western cultural narratives about who does mathematics -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

X Prize Is Relaunching a Private Moon Race Without Google (or a Prize)A private race to the moon is back on, without a title sponsor or a big cash prize.
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Live Science

Watch These Adorable Baby Eagles Weather the Southern California EarthquakeThursday's temblor alarmed an eagle family on Santa Cruz Island.
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The Atlantic

A Quiet Place Silently Jangles the NervesAs a director and an actor, John Krasinski should be applauded for knowing the power of a close-up on a face. Maybe that’s thanks to his years on NBC’s The Office as the sardonic everyman Jim, who would mug into the camera every chance he got, serving as a sympathetic stand-in for the viewer. The specter of a long-running TV role like that is difficult to outrun no matter how talented you are; wi
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study found people would rather pop a pill or sip tea than exercise to treat high blood pressureSurvey respondents were more likely to choose a daily cup of tea or a pill over exercise to 'treat' high blood pressure in an imaginary scenario, but many didn't think the interventions were worth the benefits.When the perceived gain of treating hypertension was higher -- one or five extra years of life versus one extra month, for example -- survey respondents were more likely to say they would.
8h
NYT > Science

Are Men Smarter at Science Than Women? Men Certainly Think So, Study ShowsA new study found that male college students expressed greater confidence in their own abilities than their female peers.
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The World Needs More Funny FantasyMost modern fantasy leans toward the "grimdark," 'Game of Thrones' style. Author Craig Shaw Gardner has the antidote.
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US Sanctions, Spectre Fixes, and More Security News This WeekRussia sanctions, Spectre fixes, and more security news this week.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Can You Lose Weight by Eating More Often?Is six meals a day the secret to losing weight? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think

Meg Wolitzer – Messages From Another Planet – Think Again - a Big Think Podcast #142Love is like umami. Adulthood is accepting the schmo you are. Wordplay and worldbuilding with novelist Meg Wolitzer. Read More
9h
The Atlantic

Humankind’s Most Important MaterialTo reach you, these words were encoded into signals of light moving about 125,000 miles per second through fiber-optic cables. These lines, splayed out across mountains and oceans, are made of hair-thin glass 30 times more transparent than the purest water. The technology was made possible in part by a team from Corning Incorporated. In 1970 they patented a type of cable that could transmit large
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8 Great Weekend Tech Deals: Nintendo, Apple, Tile, Eufy, Vive ProThis weekend, ramble around a VR world of your choosing or smartify your coffeemaker with these tech deals.
9h
Ingeniøren

Utopiske shelters? Danskere vil høste strøm fra støvstorme på MarsTo arkitektstuderende drømmer om at designe 20 primitive overnatningssteder på Mars, så fremtidens pionerer kan søge ly i noget, der minder om naturen på Jorden.
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Scientific American Content: Global

How Cancer Can Become Therapy-ResistantEpigenetics may play a role -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review

The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending April 7, 2018)This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.
10h
NYT > Science

The Disappearing Doctor: How Mega-Mergers Are Changing the Business of Medical CareBig corporations — giant retailers and health insurance companies — are teaming up to become your doctor.
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The Atlantic

The Family Weekly: Inheriting the Past, Facing the FutureThis Week in Family This Wednesday marked 50 years since the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., and The Atlantic published a special report with reflections on the man and his legacy. As part of that project, the Family section was thrilled to feature an essay by Mychal Denzel Smith arguing that Americans today often use the civil-rights leader’s memory to criticize black youth, creating an
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Why Winning in Rock-Paper-Scissors Isn’t EverythingWhat does John Nash’s game theory equilibrium concept look like in Rock-Paper-Scissors?
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New York’s L Train Shutdown Inspires Bizarre, Beautiful TransitHow a disastrous 15-month shutdown on one of the city's busier subway lines un-bottled its creativity.
10h
Science : NPR

Medical Marijuana's 'Catch-22': Limits On Research Hinder Patient ReliefSuffering Americans seek medical marijuana as an alternative to opioids and other powerful pharmaceuticals. Though legal in 29 states, doctors say the lack of strong data make it hard to recommend. (Image credit: Melissa Bailey/Kaiser Health News)
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Science | The Guardian

Gene therapy may help astronauts going to Mars resist deadly radiationResearchers and scientists say new discoveries and drug creation could be beneficial to future astronauts on deep space missions An international group of researchers has come up with a new plan to help astronauts survive high-level radiation in space – and even get them to Mars without the deadly exposure expected during three years of space travel. Related: Elon Musk: we must colonise Mars to p
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The Atlantic

The Party of Hubert HumphreySeventy years ago, on the night of July 14, 1948, Hubert Humphrey, speaking at the Democratic convention in the Philadelphia Convention Hall, changed the course of the Democratic Party, and of post-war American politics. Yes, that’s the same Hubert Humphrey whom those of us who came of age in the late 1960s remember as the incarnation of a shopworn Cold War liberalism, the martyr of the cataclysm
11h
NYT > Science

‘Big Brother’ in India Requires Fingerprint Scans for Food, Phones and FinancesThe government requires its people to submit finger, eye and facial images. The ID is mandatory for many services, but opponents say it infringes privacy.
11h
Big Think

Here's the AI documentary Elon Musk thinks is essential viewingArtificial intelligence threatens to take over our entire world. And that's only the 2nd most scary aspect about this documentary shared by Elon Musk. Read More
11h
Ingeniøren

Ny maling giver tre gange bedre rustbeskyttelseSammen med DTU har Hempel udviklet en korro­ionsbeskyttende maling til stålstrukturer og -konstruk­tioner, der giver tre gange så god beskyttelse mod korro­sion som dagens standard.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Africa's scientists encouraged to become the next EinsteinSouth African geneticist Vinet Coetzee held up a malaria-diagnosing scanner that she said can be developed for use in Africa's rural areas without the need for blood samples or lab tests.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

American Airlines orders 47 Boeing 787s, cancels A350 orderAmerican Airlines has ordered 47 Boeing 787 Dreamliners in a deal valued at $12 billion at list prices, while cancelling a major order for Airbus A350s.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Feds seize Backpage.com, websites in enforcement actionBackpage.com Sex FBIFederal law enforcement authorities are in the process of seizing online classified site Backpage.com and its affiliated websites known for listing adult escort services.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Who are the best gift-givers? Not who you'd think, says marketing researchHave you ever bought a gift for a friend, simply because it's a gift that you would like yourself?
12h
The Atlantic

The Threat Within NATOSpeaking days before an election most observers thought him sure to win, a long-serving Eurasian strongman railed against human rights, malevolent western powers, and rapacious “international speculators.” If delivered a fourth term in office, he vowed, vengeance against enemies of the state would be swift. His ruling party would achieve “ satisfaction ” against its adversaries, both foreign and
12h
The Atlantic

'The Most Dangerous Man in the European Union'One summer day in 1989, I saw an unshaven, long-haired young man approach a microphone to address 250,000 people in Budapest. They had gathered in Heroes’ Square for the ceremonial reburial of the leaders of a 1956 anti-communist uprising crushed by the Soviet army, and I was there reporting it live for television. The unknown speaker was a 26-year-old representing a tiny youth group called Fides
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Scientific American Content: Global

Brain Scan Might Reveal Appetite for RiskVolunteers willing to place riskier bets tended to sport larger amygdalas—a region associated with processing fear. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
18h
Popular Science

MIT is making a device that can 'hear' the words you say silentlyTechnology It's like having Siri listen to your internal commands. Students from MIT have created a prototype device, dubbed AlterEgo, that can recognize the words you mouth when silently talking to yourself.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New guidance for safe opioid prescribing for hospitalized patients with acute painEven as current research demonstrates that hospitalized patients' exposure to opioids has contributed to the nationwide addiction epidemic, there is little guidance on the safe prescribing of these pain killers in the inpatient, non-operative setting. Now, a national working group has developed a Consensus Statement intended to inform safe prescribing of opioids for hospitalized adults with acute
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Creating a 2-D platinum magnetPhysicists have induced magnetism in platinum with an electric field created by a paramagnetic ionic liquid. As only the surface of the platinum is affected, this creates a switchable 2-D ferromagnet.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Coffee filter' helps make new cancer drug Z-endoxifen 1000 times cheaperMaking drugs cheaper doesn't always require pricey investments. A new initiative proves just that. What started out as a Bachelor project laid the foundation for a much cheaper production of the promising cancer drug Z-endoxifen.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New butterfly species discovered nearly 60 years after it was first collectedA butterfly collected by a teenager in Mexico nearly 60 years ago has been described as a new species.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nicotine-imbibing teenage rats show an increased risk for drinking alcohol as adultsRats who were dosed with nicotine during their adolescence grew up to drink alcohol more often than those who weren't exposed to nicotine or were only exposed to it during adulthood. Exposure to nicotine at a young age changed the neuronal circuitry in the rat brain's reward pathways.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Charting an underexplored landscape: The genitourinary microbiomeMore sensitive cultivation methods and precise 16S rRNA gene sequencing techniques have revealed that the human bladder hosts a significant microbiome and those diverse bacteria inside the bladder impact pediatric urologic diseases.
18h
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Feds Seize Backpage.com, Site Linked to Sex TraffickingBackpage.com Sex FBIA notice on the website of Backpage.com said it had been seized by multiple federal agencies. The site was at the center of a debate over amending a bedrock internet law.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Who are the best gift-givers? Not who you'd think, says marketing researchHave you ever bought a gift for a friend, simply because it's a gift that you would like yourself?
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A different spin on superconductivityResearchers have seen exotic superconductivity that relies on highly unusual electron interactions. While predicted to occur in other non-material systems, this type of behavior has remained elusive. The team's research reveals effects that are profoundly different from anything that has been seen before with superconductivity.
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Hunting mystery giant lightning from spaceA new mission aboard the International Space Station is taking storm chasing to new heights.
22h
NYT > Science

Why Trump’s Tariffs Could Raise the Cost of a Hip ReplacementA growing percentage of medical devices and drugs used in American operating rooms are made in China, and many of them are on the White House’s list.
23h
Futurity.org

Belly fat cuts survival odds for women with kidney cancerBelly fat affects the odds of women surviving kidney cancer but not men, a new study shows. Half of female kidney cancer patients with substantial abdominal fat at the time of diagnosis died within 3 1/2 years, while more than half of women with little belly fat were still alive 10 years later. “A tumor growing in a man’s body is in a different environment than one growing inside a woman, so it’s
23h
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Facebook Messenger's 'Unsend' Feature Is What Happens When You ScrambleIt's good that Facebook is addressing its many privacy woes, but reacting rather than planning leaves some fixes feeling half-baked.
23h
Popular Science

Tornadoes are a little different when they happen on the sunSpace Also in space: A neighborhood of black holes, a new (and old) reason to study Venus' clouds, and the end of the Lunar XPrize. This was a busy week for space. We heard about hopes for life on Venus, neighborhoods of black holes, and distant stars. Oh, and solar tornadoes. What's up with those?
23h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Bringing IlluminationWhat We’re Following Washington vs. Moscow: The Trump administration announced new sanctions on Russian officials, oligarchs, and their companies that strike closer than ever to President Vladimir Putin—and bring Russian-U.S. relations close to what Krishnadev Calamur calls “a state of open hostility.” And Sam Patten, a Republican operative with ties to the data firm hired by Trump’s campaign, ha
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