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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Faced with global warming, aviation aims to turn greenWill we someday be able to fly without the guilt of causing environmental damage? A handful of firms and regulators hope that the electric revolution in cars will also take to the skies, helping the industry cope with an expected boom in travel and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
12h
Viden

Kalkpiller og falske operationer: Sådan snyder narremedicin dig raskDyr medicin er bedre end billig? Her er fem eksempler på, at placebo snyder din hjerne.
7h
Ingeniøren

Microsoft-topchef: »Inden for fem år har vi en kommerciel kvantecomputer«Todd Holmdahl er hardwaremand til fingerspidserne og har til opgave at bringe Microsofts verdensomspændende indsats for at bygge en kvantecomputer i mål.
11h
DigitalOcean

How to Code in Python: A Free eBook for BeginnersGet started learning how to code in Python, one of the world's most popular programming languages.
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Science : NPR

The Impact Of Pruitt's EPA RollbackNPR's Michel Martin asks former EPA official Lisa Heinzerling whether EPA administrator Scott Pruitt's moves to roll back regulations are actually making an impact on the agency and the environment.
24min
Big Think

Mark Zuckerberg has been deleting his past messages on Facebook — and you can'tIn the middle of the Cambridge Analytica data harvesting controversy, the Facebook founder has been erasing his private chats from Facebook servers. So why isn't this an option for anyone else? Read More
40min
Science | The Guardian

Starwatch: our nearest star is heading for solar minimumSunspots come and go in 11-year cycles with fluctuations in solar magnetic activity The sun is our nearest star. Now that the spring equinox has passed, back on 20 March, it will increasingly dominate the sky in the northern hemisphere. Days will get longer, and nights shorter until summer finally arrives. The sun’s bright surface usually displays transitory dark blemishes known as sunspots . Eve
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Scientific American Content: Global

Paleo Profile: The Shortened FaceA small skull found in Connecticut offers a new view to ancient reptilian bites -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

The Terrible Cost of Obama's Failure in SyriaSyrian Attack B. ObamaFour years ago, it almost looked as if chemical attacks on Syrian civilians would stop. “We struck a deal where we got 100 percent of the chemical weapons out,” declared then-Secretary of State John Kerry on Meet the Press in 2014. Kerry was referring to Bashar al-Assad’s declared stockpiles of chemical weapons which, under a 2013 deal struck by the Obama administration following a sarin nerve ga
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Scientific American Content: Global

Dieselgate Pales in Comparison to What Automakers Just Did in AmericaIt might be time for automakers to close their corporate sustainability responsibility departments after their American lobbying association reversed efficiency and pollution gains and... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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FlyNYON Helicopter Crash: Inside the Safety Issues of the Fatal FlightI was a passenger onboard a companion flight on March 11. Locked to the downed craft, the victims didn't stand a chance.
4h
The Atlantic

The Logic of Assad's BrutalityBashar al-Assad, the president of Syria, might have great contempt for the sanctity of human life, but he is not a reckless strategist. Since 2011, he has prosecuted an uncompromising war against his own population. He has committed many of his most egregious war crimes strategically—sometimes to eliminate civilians who would rather die than live under his rule, sometimes to neuter an internation
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Scientific American Content: Global

Pigeons and Doves 101In which we briefly consider pigeons and doves... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Big Think

Fear of embarrassment holding you back? Here’s how to overcome itThe study’s results have implications for marketers as well. Read More
6h
Big Think

Why we’re making some calls on National Siblings DayThough conventional wisdom suggests that birth order influences personality, newer research says this isn’t true. What is true is how powerful an effort to remain close to our brothers and sisters as we grow up can be. Read More
6h
The Atlantic

King's Death Gave Birth to Hip-HopThe interlude immediately following Outkast’s “Rosa Parks” on their 1998 album Aquemini is perhaps the best starting point for understanding the group and the arts they bent to their whim. “You gotta come provocative, nigga. You know what I mean?” muses Wu-Tang Clan member Raekwon to Outkast’s Big Boi. “Shit gotta be spine-tingling with mad styles and crazy-dangerous, I mean, bust-ya-shit-open be
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The Atlantic

Another Strike on Syria Could Be ComingA suspected chemical-weapons attack in Douma, a rebel-controlled town in Eastern Ghouta, has killed dozens of people, an aid group said, blaming Syria’s Assad regime for the assault on the suburb of Damascus. The Syrian regime dismissed the claim made by the aid group, the White Helmets, calling it a “ fabrication ” by Jaish al-Islam, the Islamist group that controls the town. Russia, which suppo
7h
The Atlantic

A Dissent Concerning Kevin WilliamsonLast month, The Atlantic hired Kevin Williamson, the longtime National Review staffer. Jeffrey Goldberg, the editor in chief of The Atlantic , announced the move, declaring him a writer “whose force of intellect and acuity of insight reflect our ambition.” Immediately, critics began poring over Williamson’s substantial archive of published writing and public statements. Among the most controversi
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

Ask Me First: What Self-Assessments Can Tell Us about AutismSelf-report questionnaires gain popularity in Autism spectrum research and clinical practice -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Live Science

Why Extraterrestrial Life May Be More Unlikely Than Scientists ThoughtOne key ingredient for life may be less abundant in our galaxy than scientists thought.
8h
Science | The Guardian

Five ways to communicate better – and influence peopleFrom thinking on your feet in job interviews to negotiating with children, here are some top tips to up your conversational game Whether it’s Michel Barnier and David Davis talking themselves to a standstill in Brexit negotiations, or the impending face-off between Donald Trump and Kim Jong-un, the vexed topic of good – and bad – communication is on our minds. But is there a way to make your conv
8h
Feed: All Latest

The Backlash Over Sinclair Broadcast Group's Conservative Content Tops This Week's Internet NewsLast week social media spent an awful lot of time talking about old media. Twist!
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The Atlantic

The Era of Fake Video BeginsIn a dank corner of the internet, it is possible to find actresses from Game of Thrones or Harry Potter engaged in all manner of sex acts. Or at least to the world the carnal figures look like those actresses, and the faces in the videos are indeed their own. Everything south of the neck, however, belongs to different women. An artificial intelligence has almost seamlessly stitched the familiar v
8h
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The Facebook Debacle Proves It’s High Time for Stronger Privacy LawsFacebook Cambridge AnalyticaOpinion: The Cambridge Analytica scandal makes it clear: The US needs to pass a privacy law that gives consumers the protections they deserve.
9h
Ingeniøren

Kinesisk røntgenteleskop får dansk instrumentMed rumteleskopet EXTP, der skal registrere røntgenstråling fra sorte huller og neutronstjerner, rykker Kina op i superligaen for videnskabelige satellitter. Det sker med hjælp fra DTU Space.
9h
The Atlantic

A Landslide of Classic Art Is About to Enter the Public DomainThe Great American Novel enters the public domain on January 1, 2019—quite literally. Not the concept, but the book by William Carlos Williams. It will be joined by hundreds of thousands of other books, musical scores, and films first published in the United States during 1923. It’s the first time since 1998 for a mass shift to the public domain of material protected under copyright. It’s also th
9h
The Atlantic

Howards End Is a Lavish Portrait of Cultural DivisionThe 1992 film adaptation of E.M. Forster’s novel Howards End is still so sumptuous, so thrilling in its excavation of buried Edwardian desire, that you might question whether a new version is necessary. Yet Kenneth Lonergan’s four-part miniseries, which arrives Sunday on Starz, is its own masterpiece, visually lavish and narratively restrained. Lonergan and the director Hettie Macdonald find some
9h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Fossils sparked Charles Darwin’s imaginationDarwin’s Fossils recounts how finding extinct species in South America helped Charles Darwin develop his theory of evolution.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Scientists Must Unravel a Thorny Mummy ControversyWhen researchers extract DNA from human remains the rights of the dead remain murky -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Feed: All Latest

When Will Self-Driving Cars Be 'Ready'?The vehicles will need updates—forever.
10h
Feed: All Latest

New Brain Maps With Unmatched Detail May Change NeuroscienceA technique based on genetic bar codes can easily map the connections of individual brain cells in unprecedented numbers. Unexpected complexity in the visual system is only the first secret it has revealed.
10h
Viden

Vejviser, vagt og videoafspiller: Nu kommer hjælperobotterneServicerobotter står snart klar til at hjælpe os med hverdagens store og små udfordringer. Her er tre nye - en af dem fra Danmark.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Japan's vaunted alert system runs up against limitsOn January 5, as Tokyo's commuters were struggling back to work after their long New Year break, blaring sirens from every phone pierced the sleepy atmosphere: "strong" earthquake coming.
11h
The Atlantic

How Trump Channels the 1970sPresident Trump has brought the spirit of the 1970s into the Oval Office. If there is one consistent message that has come out of this White House, it is a message born out of the turbulent decade: Don’t trust any institution. Every president carries with them the zeitgeist of a period that shaped their values and vision. In recent decades, Presidents Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush embodied t
11h
The Atlantic

How the American Two-Party System Became so Divided“It would be a great tragedy if we had our two major political parties divide on what we would call a conservative-liberal line. [O]ne of the attributes of our political system has been that we have avoided generally violent swings … from one extreme to the other. And the reason we have avoided that is that in both parties there has been room for a broad spectrum of opinion.”—Vice President Richa
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US approves licence for Taiwan submarine planWashington has agreed to allow US defence contractors help Taiwan construct its own submarines, Taipei said, welcoming the breakthrough in long-standing ambitions to build up its fleet to counter the threat from China.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New technique more accurately reflects ponds on Arctic sea iceThis one simple mathematical trick can accurately predict the shape and melting effects of ponds on Arctic sea ice, according to new research by UChicago scientists.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dutch roll out 'orange carpet' to woo post-Brexit businessSweet tax deals, a business-friendly climate and an English-speaking population. The Netherlands is going all out to attract companies leaving Britain post-Brexit in search of a new EU-based home.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook suspends Canadian firm amid data mining scandalFacebook says it has suspended a Canadian political consulting firm amid media reports it had ties to Cambridge Analytica, a British data mining company accused of obtaining data from up to 87 million Facebook users to sway elections.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dubai splashes billions on mega projects ahead of ExpoDubai is splashing tens of billions of dollars on infrastructure and hospitality projects related to the international trade fair Expo 2020, Dubai-based BNC Network said in a report published Sunday.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tech sector frets as US-China trade tensions simmerAs US-China trade tensions ratchet up, the technology sector is fretting over the potential for collateral damage to one of America's most important export industries.
12h
Science | The Guardian

Neuroscientist Gregory Berns: ‘Studying dogs is way more enjoyable than studying humans’The US researcher on exploring the bond between dogs and humans and why animal testing needs to be questioned Gregory Berns is a distinguished professor of neuroeconomics at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. His current work involves taking brain scans of dogs to probe what goes on between canine ears, as well as using scanning techniques to probe the connections within brains of dead animals,
13h
Ingeniøren

Ugens debat: Skal vi kunne køre over Kattegat?Tankerne om en motorvejsforbindelse over Kattegat via Samsø fik hen over påsken debattørerne på Ing.dk til tasterne.
13h
Science | The Guardian

Bio bots: robots that mimic animal physiologyA new generation of machines is being created, often with complex purposes in mind Last week, Nasa announced that it is developing robotic bees to gather information about areas of Mars that wouldn’t be accessible to a Mars rover. The bots could detect, for example, methane, a possible sign of life. Continue reading...
15h
The Neurocritic

Big Theory, Big Data, and Big Worries in Cognitive NeuroscienceBig Theory vs. Big Data Debate at CNS2018 Eve Marder, Alona Fyshe, Jack Gallant, David Poeppel, Gary Marcus image by @jonasobleser What Will Solve the Big Problems in Cognitive Neuroscience? That was the question posed in the Special Symposium moderated by David Poeppel at the Boston Sheraton (co-sponsored by the Cognitive Neuroscience Society and the Max-Planck-Society). The format was four talk
20h
cognitive science

Artificial intelligence helps to predict likelihood of life on other worldssubmitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

School lunch decisions made by the child and not the parentWhile school lunches in the UK are subject to food standards, the contents of packed lunches are not as closely scrutinized, and studies have raised concern regarding the nutritional quality of packed lunches. A new study found that children, not their parents, are often the primary decision maker of whether they will eat a school lunch or what is packed for their lunch.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cell biology: Dynamics of microtubulesFilamentous polymers called microtubules play vital roles in chromosome segregation and molecular transport. An team has now examined how microtubule lengths vary in response to changes in the availability of their protein components.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unexpected finding may deter disabling diabetic eye diseaseA new study is the first to find that a particular type of lipid, or fat, thought to only exist in the skin, now lives in your eye and might play a major role in deterring diabetic retinopathy.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hybrid swarm in global mega-pestScientists have confirmed the hybridization of two of the world's major pest species, into a new and improved mega-pest.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In-depth genomic analysis of 33 cancer typesResearchers have completed a detailed analysis from a dataset containing molecular and clinical information on over 10,000 tumors from 33 forms of cancer. Known as the Pan-Cancer Atlas, this analysis empowers cancer clinicians and researchers through a comprehensive understanding of how, where and why tumors arise in humans.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Science course brings to life a new way of teachingArizona State University's School of Earth and Space Exploration recently released new research on its flagship Smart Course, Habitable Worlds. The study found that its student-centered, exploration-focused design resulted in high course grades and demonstrable mastery of content.
20h
Scientific American Content: Global

Old New England Underground May Be Spry After AllThe U.S. Northeast may be more geologically active than was previously thought, according to a seismic sensor network. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Primary care doctors may be unsure when kids' bad moods are serious or notFamily medicine doctors and pediatricians are less confident than psychiatrists in their abilities to tell the difference between normal irritability and possibly bigger issues in children and adolescents, according to researchers. Primary care providers and pediatricians were also more likely to prescribe medications when they thought there was a problem, while psychiatrists were more likely to s
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Organoids created from patients' bladder cancers could guide treatmentResearchers have created patient-specific bladder cancer organoids that mimic many of the characteristics of actual tumors. The use of organoids, tiny 3-D spheres derived from a patient's own tumor, may be useful in the future to guide treatment of patients.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can we imitate organisms' abilities to decode water patterns for new technologies?The shape of water. Can it tell us about what drives romance? Among fish, it might. Scientists are now studying how aquatic signals are transported through the water.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

MRI analysis with machine learning predicts impairment after spinal injury, study showsA test of machine-learning algorithms shows promise for computer-aided prognosis of acute spinal cord injury, according to a new study.
21h
Science | The Guardian

US gene-editing ruling delights plant scientistsRuling paves way for creation of new genetically altered crops Researchers in the US have been given the go-ahead to use gene-editing techniques to alter crops and plants. The decision opens the door for scientists to create a new generation of genetically altered crops without serious restriction and paves the way for approvals for similar work in Britain and the rest of Europe. The decision – by
22h
Science | The Guardian

Abandoned collieries could hold key to heating UK homesGeologists aim to tap reservoir in tunnels under Glasgow Scientists are finalising plans to exploit the vast reservoir of warm water that fills a labyrinth of disused mines and porous rock layers underneath Glasgow. They believe this subterranean store of naturally heated water could be used to warm homes in the city. If the system proves successful, such water could then be exploited in other cit
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Printed thermo-plasmonic heat patterns for neurological disorder treatmentScientists have developed a highly customized neural stimulation method. The research team developed a technology that can print the heat pattern on a micron scale to enable the control of biological activities remotely.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Species hitch a ride on birds and the wind to join green roof communitiesNew research suggests that species that live on green roofs arrived by hitching lifts on birds or by riding air currents.
23h

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