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Scientific American Content: Global

The Number of Americans with No Religious Affiliation Is RisingThe rise of the atheists -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Neutrino experiment at Fermilab delivers an unprecedented measurementTiny particles known as neutrinos are an excellent tool to study the inner workings of atomic nuclei. Unlike electrons or protons, neutrinos have no electric charge, and they interact with an atom's core only via the weak nuclear force. This makes them a unique tool for probing the building blocks of matter. But the challenge is that neutrinos are hard to produce and detect, and it is very difficu
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bloodless revolution in diabetes monitoringScientists have created a non-invasive, adhesive patch, which promises the measurement of glucose levels through the skin without a finger-prick blood test, potentially removing the need for millions of diabetics to frequently carry out the painful and unpopular tests.
5h
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Substance that guides ant trail is produced by symbiotic bacteriaA research with ant from genus Atta reveals that a bacteria in their microbiota plays a key role in communication among individuals and also on the colony's defense against pathogens. A Brazilian group of scientists also showed how a type of fungus participates on stingless bees' development cycle.
15min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NY to spend $6M per year on computer training for teachersNew York state is making a $6 million investment in computer training for teachers.
18min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Media deserts project creates searchable media access research atlasOhio University's new Media Access Research Atlas maps the circulation of daily newspapers in the United States and how much of the population in that area is subscribing to the newspaper.
18min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Survival strategy: How one enzyme helps bacteria recover from exposure to antibioticsBeta-lactam antibiotics, including penicillin, are one of the most widely used classes of antibiotics in the world. Though they've been in use since the 1940s, scientists still don't fully understand what happens when this class of drugs encounters bacteria.
18min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Move over fake news: Hostile neighbors pose big threats to governancePropaganda by way of "fake news" is one way a nation can wage war without firing a single shot. Another is through tactics of subversion and coercion, in which a country intentionally keeps neighboring countries weak in order to advance its own foreign policy interests, according to a new study published by Princeton University.
18min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Top MEP says Zuckerberg 'must' face European ParliamentMark Zuckerberg FacebookFacebook chief Mark Zuckerberg must come to the European Parliament to face questions about the Cambridge Analytica data scandal, the head of the parliament's leading political group said Monday.
24min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research links anti-immigrant prejudice to mortality riskOne of the defining elements of the 2016 election cycle was its focus on immigration. On both sides of the partisan divide, immigration figured heavily into candidates' talking points and served as a key determinant of voting behavior.
24min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Food packaging could be negatively affecting nutrient absorption in your bodyFood packaging could be negatively affecting the way in which your digestive tract operates, according to new research by faculty and students at Binghamton University, State University at New York.
24min
The Scientist RSS

SSRI Consumption During Pregnancy Linked to Changes in Babies BrainsMRI data suggest prenatal exposure to the medication increases the volume of brain regions vital to processing emotions.
24min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Food packaging could be negatively affecting nutrient absorption in your bodyFood packaging could be negatively affecting the way in which your digestive tract operates, according to new research.
26min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Intergenerational trauma evident in offspring caring for Holocaust survivor parentsMore than 70 years since the end of World War II, there are still signs of intergenerational transmission of Holocaust trauma that are manifested in the way adult offspring of Holocaust survivors care for their elderly parents.
26min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Machine learning finds tumor gene variants and sensitivity to drugs in The Cancer Genome AtlasMatching unique genetic information from cancer patients' tumors with treatment options -- an emerging area of precision medicine efforts -- often fails to identify all patients who may respond to certain therapies. Other molecular information from patients may reveal these so-called 'hidden responders.'
26min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Imitation is the most sincere form of flattery, unless you are an app developerFor every two mobile apps released, one is a clone of an existing app. However, new research published in the INFORMS journal Information Systems Research shows the success of the original app is not always adversely affected by the creation of clone apps. In fact, the study, which was conducted by Carnegie Mellon University researchers, found that whether the copycat app increases or decreases th
30min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

10 teams advance in international carbon dioxide competitionA $20 million international competition to make profitable products from a gas that otherwise would contribute to global warming has entered its final stretch.
36min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First dynamic spine brace—robotic spine exoskeleton—characterizes spine deformitiesSpine deformities, such as idiopathic scoliosis and kyphosis (also known as "hunchback"), are characterized by an abnormal curvature in the spine. The children with these spinal deformities are typically advised to wear a brace that fits around the torso and hips to correct the abnormal curve. Bracing has been shown to prevent progression of the abnormal curve and avoid surgery. The underlying tec
36min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New patented technology removes phosphorus from manureAn innovation that could have a huge impact on water quality problems in the United States, a system capable of removing almost all phosphorus from stored livestock manure, was developed by a team of researchers from Penn State and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service.
36min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New device modulates light and amplifies tiny signalsImagine a single particle, only one-tenth the diameter of a bacterium, whose miniscule jiggles induce sustained vibrations in an entire mechanical device some 50 times larger. By taking clever advantage of the interplay between light, electrons on the surface of metals, and heat, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have for the first time created a plasmomechan
36min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Powering advances in wireless connectivity for the futureThe National Science Foundation (NSF) announces an important milestone in its Platforms for Advanced Wireless Research (PAWR) effort. In collaboration with an industry consortium of 28 networking companies and associations, NSF is supporting the development and deployment of the first two PAWR research platforms, based in Salt Lake City and New York City. These platforms will power research motiva
42min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Jaw bone on British beach belonged to huge ancient reptileA 205-million-year-old jaw bone belonging to an ancient porpoise-like reptile known as an ichthyosaur was likely one of the largest ever known on Earth, researchers in Britain said Monday.
42min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Monsanto shares jump on report of US approval of Bayer dealShares of agricultural giant Monsanto surged Monday following a report that the US Justice Department would approve its acquisition by Bayer, the last major hurdle facing the deal.
42min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lingering negative responses to stress linked with health a decade laterPeople whose negative emotional responses to stress carry over to the following day are more likely to report health problems and physical limitations later in life compared with peers who are able to 'let it go,' according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Seeking hidden respondersMatching unique genetic information from cancer patients' tumors with treatment options -- an emerging area of precision medicine efforts -- often fails to identify all patients who may respond to certain therapies. Other molecular information from patients may reveal these so-called 'hidden responders.'
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Medicaid expansion has no negative effect on cardiovascular procedural outcomesMore people are receiving coronary revascularization under Michigan's Medicaid expansion (the Healthy Michigan Plan). A new analysis finds that the expansion hasn't caused significant problems for patients.
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Intergenerational trauma evident in offspring caring for Holocaust survivor parentsMore than 70 years since the end of World War II, there are still signs of intergenerational transmission of Holocaust trauma that are manifested in the way adult offspring of Holocaust survivors care for their elderly parents, according to a new study by researchers at Bar-Ilan University.
50min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rare brain disease in children: Major breakthroughs in Rasmussen's encephalitisResearchers at Université de Montréal and the research centres of the CHUM and CHU Sainte-Justine are banding together to conquer this rare orphan pediatric disease. They have recently proven what scientists had already suspected: the disease is autoimmune, which means that it attacks patients using their own immune system.
50min
Feed: All Latest

'Solo: A Star Wars Story' and the False Hope of Really Great TrailersThe new trailer looks amazing—that doesn't mean the movie will be.
54min
Live Science

Prehistoric Sea Monster Was Nearly the Size of a Blue WhaleAbout 205 million years ago, a ginormous sea monster — so large it was nearly the size of a modern blue whale — swam through the ocean, fueling its colossal body by preying on prehistoric squid and fish, a new study finds.
55min
The Atlantic

Why Is Jupiter's Great Red Spot Shrinking?The most recognizable storm in the solar system used to be so big that it could fit three whole Earths. Now, it has room for only one. Jupiter’s Great Red Spot is shrinking, and has been for decades. The earliest observations of a massive, red spot on the face of Jupiter date back as far as the 1600s. Astronomers don’t know whether this spot was the Great Red Spot we know today, but it’s likely.
1h
Dana Foundation

The Neuroscientist Who Lost Her MindPhoto courtesy of the Rubin Museum On a recent night at New York’s Rubin Museum of Art, neuroscientist Barbara Lipska , Ph.D.sat down with journalist Jake Halpern as part of the museum’s annual “Brainwave” series. The discussion gave audience members the unique opportunity to hear a lucid perspective of what it’s like to experience psychosis. The interview was also particularly intimate because,
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Food packaging could be negatively affecting nutrient absorption in your bodyFood packaging could be negatively affecting the way in which your digestive tract operates, according to new research by faculty and students at Binghamton University, State University at New York.
1h
New on MIT Technology Review

23andMe CEO says consumer genetics will be the next at-home pregnancy test
1h
Viden

Facebook løfter sløret: Har du fået misbrugt dine oplysninger?Det sociale medie sender særlige beskeder ud om datamisbrug. Zuckerberg undskylder for læk.
1h
Popular Science

A new study on whales suggests Darwin didn't quite get it rightAnimals Evolution is too complicated to plot out like a family tree. Gray, blue, big, bigger: baleen whales put the mega in “megafauna.” In a new study, researchers discuss the whole-genome sequencing of several species of baleen whale,…
1h
Feed: All Latest

Inside the Cleanroom Where NASA’s New Mars Lander Waits to LaunchThe InSight lander will probe beneath the surface of Mars to understand its geology—unless humans contaminate it first.
1h
Big Think

Dungeons and Dragons, not chess and Go: why AI needs roleplayInstead of beating adversaries in games, we might learn more about intelligence if we tried to teach artificial agents to play together as we do: as paladins and elf rangers. Read More
1h
Big Think

Why the business model of social media giants like Facebook is incompatible with human rightsFacebook Cambridge Analytica DataFacebook’s actions – or inactions – facilitated breaches of privacy and human rights associated with democratic governance. Read More
1h
The Atlantic

The ‘g’ in Google’s Old Logo Is Really WeirdIn a recent study delightfully titled “ The Devil’s in the ‘g’-Tails ,” researchers at Johns Hopkins University found that most people are unaware of the common form of the lowercase “g” that appears in books. It looks like this: g. If you glossed right over that, notice that the letter has two closed loops, distinct from the way “g” is usually written by hand. “Nobody seemed to know what I was t
1h
The Atlantic

Assad Defies Another American PresidentNearly one year ago exactly, American cruise missiles rained down on a Syrian airbase from which a deadly chemical attack had been launched against defenseless civilians. Now, one year later, mass murder and military reprisal appear again as exclamation points in a seven-year horror story of civilian suffering, state failure, and diplomatic malpractice. Once again, an American president has drawn
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Survival strategy: How one enzyme helps bacteria recover from exposure to antibioticsResearchers at the University of Notre Dame focused on an enzyme in gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a pathogen that causes pneumonia and sepsis.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists decry lack of science in 'forensic science'Many of the 'forensic science' methods commonly used in criminal cases and portrayed in popular police TV dramas have never been scientifically validated and may lead to unjust verdicts, according to an editorial in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Advancing the science of smell -- with a hint of muskResearchers have identified key molecular mechanisms at work when people smell musks, a highly valued group of fixatives used in many perfumes and colognes. The discovery may have implications for a wide range of effects on mood and behavior in vertebrates, said the scientists.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

20-year-old mystery of malaria vaccine target solvedThe human piece of a malaria infection puzzle has been revealed for the first time, solving a long-standing mystery. A protein displayed on the surface of malaria parasites called 'TRAP' is a high-priority vaccine target, but how it interacts with human host cells has remained a puzzle. Wellcome Sanger Institute scientists have discovered a receptor protein on the surface of human cells that the T
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prominent academics, including Salk's Thomas Albright, call for more science in forensic scienceSix scientists who recently served on the National Commission on Forensic Science are calling on the scientific community at large to advocate for increased research and financial support of forensic science as well as the introduction of empirical testing requirements to ensure the validity of outcomes.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel hormone replacement therapy trial demonstrates improved memory function in adrenal patientsTiming cortisol replacement therapies to replicate secretion patterns in people with normal levels of the hormone has shown significant improvements in patients' cognitive function in a new trial led by University of Bristol scientists. The findings, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, are important as patients on cortisol replacement therapy often have side effects th
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why some beetles like alcoholAlcohol used as a 'weed killer' optimizes the harvest of ambrosia beetles.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An oil-eating bacterium that can help clean up pollution and spillsOil spills occur on a regular basis, leading to messy decontamination challenges. But however widespread and serious the damage may be, the solution could be microscopic -- Alcanivorax borkumensis -- a bacterium that feeds on hydrocarbons. A research team shows the effectiveness of enzymes produced by the bacterium in degrading petroleum products in soil and water. Their results offer hope for a s
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First dynamic spine brace -- robotic spine exoskeleton -- characterizes spine deformitiesResearchers have invented a new Robotic Spine Exoskeleton, a dynamic spine brace that enabled them to conduct the first study that looks at in vivo measurements of torso stiffness and characterizes the three-dimensional stiffness of the human torso. This device may solve current bracing limitations and lead to new treatments for children with spine deformities such as idiopathic scoliosis and kyph
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Imitation is the most sincere form of flattery, unless you are an app developerOne out of two mobile apps released is a clone of an existing app. However, new research shows the success of the original app is not always adversely affected by these clone apps. The study found that whether the copycat app increases or decreases the number of downloads of the original is dependent upon the quality of the copy.
1h
Science : NPR

A Grass-Roots Movement For Healthy Soil Spreads Among FarmersAmerica's farmers are digging soil like never before. A movement for "regenerative agriculture" is dedicated to building healthier soil and could even lead to a new eco-label on food. (Image credit: Dan Charles)
1h
Popular Science

Last week in tech: Your simple guide to becoming a 'power user of the internet'Technology Facebook's continuing drama, the fanciest Chromebook around, and more. Be sure to download the latest edition of our podcast!
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

20-year-old mystery of malaria vaccine target solvedThe human piece of a malaria infection puzzle has been revealed for the first time, solving a long-standing mystery. A protein displayed on the surface of malaria parasites called "TRAP" is a high-priority vaccine target, but how it interacts with human host cells has remained a puzzle. Scientists from the Wellcome Sanger Institute have discovered a receptor protein on the surface of human cells t
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Advancing the science of smell—with a hint of muskResearchers have identified key molecular mechanisms at work when people smell musks, a highly valued group of fixatives used in many perfumes and colognes. The discovery may have implications for a wide range of effects on mood and behavior in vertebrates, said the scientists.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Prominent academics call for more science in forensic scienceWith forensic science facing mounting scrutiny as it plays an increasingly prominent role in the administration of justice, six scientists who recently served on the National Commission on Forensic Science are calling on the scientific community at large to advocate for increased research and financial support of forensic science as well as the introduction of empirical testing requirements to ens
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why some beetles like alcoholIf a small beetle dives into your beer, consider giving it a break. Referred to as "ambrosia beetles," these insects just want what's best for themselves and their offspring. Drawn to the smell of alcohol, the beetles are always on the lookout for a new environment to farm. And alcohol plays an important role in optimizing the agricultural yield of their fungal crops, as an international team of r
2h
NYT > Science

Doctors Urge Elite Academy to Expel a Member Over Charges of PlagiarismNational Academy of Medicine was asked to tighten ethics rules following the strange case of a member accused of plagiarism and false claims of top scientific honors.
2h
NYT > Science

That Python in the Pet Store? He May Have Been Snatched From the WildMany reptiles and amphibians sold in pet stores were not bred in captivity as international law requires, conservationists say, but plucked from forests and rivers.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Move over fake news: Hostile neighbors pose big threats to governancePropaganda by way of 'fake news' is one way a nation can wage war without firing a single shot. Another is through tactics of subversion and coercion, in which a country intentionally keeps neighboring countries weak in order to advance its own foreign policy interests, according to a new study published by Princeton University.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An oil-eating bacterium that can help clean up pollution and spillsOil spills occur on a regular basis, leading to messy decontamination challenges. But however widespread and serious the damage may be, the solution could be microscopic -- Alcanivorax borkumensis -- a bacterium that feeds on hydrocarbons. A research team at INRS show the effectiveness of enzymes produced by the bacterium in degrading petroleum products in soil and water. Their results offer hope
2h
Big Think

Want to raise the next Socrates? Teaching children philosophy is easier than you thinkDoes your kid ask “Why” all the time? Do you want to help them search for answers to the big questions but don't know how? Here are a few ways to encourage your little philosopher. Read More
2h
The Atlantic

An Internal Email Contradicts Scott Pruitt's Account of Controversial RaisesScott Pruitt EPAThis story was updated on April 9, 2018, at 4:26 p.m. An email that suggests Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt personally signed off on a controversial pay raise for a favored aide last month is roiling the agency. In the last few days, top staffers became aware of an email exchange between one of two aides who received such a raise and the agency’s human resources divisi
2h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Vægttab før puberteten reducerer risikoen for type 2 diabetesHøj body mass index (BMI) og overvægt i barndommen øger risikoen for type 2 diabetes...
2h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Eliteforsker sætter rekord med 200.000 citationerProfessor Matthias Mann fra Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Protein Research på Københavns...
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How bilinguals process languagePsychologists and cognitive neuroscientists show that bilinguals who are highly proficient in their second language, such as international students who have come to the United States to pursue higher education, can not only overcome the difficulty that being immersed in their non-native language imposes, but also engage in reading strategies in their second language just like their monolingual pee
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tracing the origin of each cell in a zebrafishScientists have used CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing to pioneer a technique capable of determining both the type and origin of all the cells in an organism.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New device modulates light and amplifies tiny signalsResearchers have for the first time created a plasmomechanical oscillator, a nanometer-scale device that is no bigger than a red blood cell but has myriad technological applications.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High efficiency solar power conversion allowed by a novel composite materialA composite thin film made of two different inorganic oxide materials significantly improves the performance of solar cells. Researchers have developed this material which combines two crystal phases comprising the atomic elements bismuth, manganese, and oxygen. The combination of phases optimizes this material's ability to absorb solar radiation and transform it into electricity. The results are
2h
The Atlantic

Dionne Searcey of The New York Times Wins Atlantic Media's 2018 Michael Kelly AwardWashington, D.C. (April 9, 2018)— Dionne Searcey is the winner of Atlantic Media’s 15th annual Michael Kelly Award for her reporting for The New York Times on the brutal Boko Haram terrorist group in Nigeria, abuses by the Nigerian military, and the human toll of the conflict. Searcey was awarded a prize of $25,000 last night at a ceremony in Washington. Working where few Western journalists or d
2h
The Atlantic

Travel Monday: A Photo Trip to Meteora, GreeceToday’s entry is the first of a semi-regular Travel Monday series, with virtual photo trips to interesting, unusual, difficult-to-reach, or simply beautiful parts of our planet. Today, we’re visiting the amazing clifftop monasteries of Meteora in central Greece. Monks and hermits have been finding refuge in this unique rock formation for more than a thousand years. Six Eastern Orthodox monasterie
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Giant ichthyosaur is one of largest animals everThe 205-million-year-old jaw bone of a prehistoric reptile belongs to 'one of the largest animals ever' say a group of international paleontologists. The new discovery has also solved a 150-year-old mystery of supposed 'dinosaur bones' from the UK.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Topical antibiotic triggers unexpected antiviral responseA research team made a startling discovery while investigating the effect of bacteria on viral infections. When they applied a common topical antibiotic to mice before or shortly after infection with herpes and other viruses, they found that the antibiotic triggered an antiviral resistance in the animals, the researchers said.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nova-like explosion of spinning live bacteria explainedSuspensions of live bacteria in a viscous liquid do not act as expected when spun at certain speeds and now a team of researchers know why the bacterial aggregation appears to explode when the spinning stops.
2h
Big Think

Why Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak is deleting his Facebook accountFacebook Steve WozniakApple co-founder Steve Wozniak is one of the latest public figures to join the #DeleteFacebook movement over concerns on how the social media platform handles user data. Read More
2h
Live Science

85,000-Year-Old Finger Bone May Rewrite the Story of Human Migration Out of AfricaA sliver of bone the size of a Cheeto may radically revise our view of when and how humans left Africa.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First dynamic spine brace -- robotic spine exoskeleton -- characterizes spine deformitiesColumbia Engineering researchers have invented a new Robotic Spine Exoskeleton, a dynamic spine brace that enabled them to conduct the first study that looks at in vivo measurements of torso stiffness and characterizes the three-dimensional stiffness of the human torso. This device may solve current bracing limitations and lead to new treatments for children with spine deformities such as idiopath
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Doing the nano-shimmyNIST researchers have for the first time created a plasmomechanical oscillator, a nanometer-scale device thati is no bigger than a red blood cell but has myriad technological applications.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study sheds new light on how bilinguals process languageA study led by psychologist and cognitive neuroscientist Megan Zirnstein at the University of California, Riverside shows that bilinguals who are highly proficient in their second language, such as international students who have come to the United States to pursue higher education, can not only overcome the difficulty that being immersed in their non-native language imposes, but also engage in re
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UK giant ichthyosaur is one of the largest animals everThe 205-million-year-old jaw bone of a prehistoric reptile belongs to 'one of the largest animals ever' say a group of international paleontologists.The new discovery has also solved a 150-year-old mystery of supposed 'dinosaur bones' from the UK.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Removing the brakes on plant oil productionScientists studying plant biochemistry have discovered new details about biomolecules that put the brakes on oil production. The findings suggest that disabling these biomolecular brakes could push oil production into high gear -- a possible pathway toward generating abundant biofuels and plant-derived bioproducts.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Binge-eating mice reveal obesity cluesMice fed on a high-fat or chocolate-based diet show abnormal feeding behaviors such as snacking, bingeing and disrupted eating patterns, according to new research. The findings help to explain the behavioral triggers leading to obesity and point towards new ideas for preventing weight gain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How fat tissue shunts energy to tumorsResearchers recently discovered that that inactivation of a protein called p62 in fat cells fuels aggressive, metastatic prostate cancer in mice. The findings suggest that mTOR inhibitors currently used to treat a wide range of cancers may have the unintended consequence of shutting down fat tissue metabolism and fueling tumor growth.
2h
The Atlantic

What Is America Going to Do About Syria Now?Donald Trump says there will be a “big price to pay” for Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s suspected use of chemical weapons in the rebel-controlled town of Douma outside Damascus. But what exactly could that mean? Beyond responding to this particular attack, what can the United States really do about Assad’s depravity and flouting of international norms at this point in the seven-year conflict?
3h
Live Science

Deadly Pressure: Why These Two Men's Muscles 'Blew Up' From the InsideA life-threatening condition with a boring-sounding name has consequences that are gruesome and potentially deadly.
3h
Feed: All Latest

A Long-Awaited IoT Crisis Is Here, and Many Devices Aren't ReadySome network communication protocol vulnerabilities have been known for more than a decade and still aren't fixed. Now they're being exploited.
3h
NYT > Science

It’s the Latest in Conservation Tech. And It Wants to Suck Your Blood.In the digestive tracts of leeches, scientists find evidence of elusive forest species.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Developmental scarsThe MDC researcher Jan Philipp Junker and his team have used CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing to pioneer a technique capable of determining both the type and origin of all the cells in an organism. They describe their method in Nature Biotechnology.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research links anti-immigrant prejudice to mortality riskLiving in a community that demonstrates significant anti-immigrant prejudice doesn't seem to affect the mortality rates of immigrants to the United States as a whole. However, when compared with their foreign-born counterparts, nonwhite and nonblack ethnic minorities who were born in the U.S. appear to experience increased mortality risk in communities that exhibit high anti-immigrant prejudice.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Imitation is the most sincere form of flattery, unless you are an app developerOne out of two mobile apps released is a clone of an existing app. However, new research in the INFORMS journal Information Systems Research shows the success of the original app is not always adversely affected by these clone apps. The study, which was conducted by Carnegie Mellon University researchers, found that whether the copycat app increases or decreases the number of downloads of the orig
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blood flow is a major influence on tumor cell metastasisScientists have long theorized that blood flow plays an integral role in cancer metastasis. But new research, testing this long-held hypothesis in zebrafish and humans confirms that the circulatory blood flow impacts the position where circulating tumor cells ultimately arrest in the vasculature and exit into the body, where they can form a metastasis.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How tumors caused by STD quickly regress in dogsThe canine transmissible venereal tumor is a contagious cancer that has spread by mating among dogs worldwide. One unique feature of this cancer is that, for unclear reasons, it regresses spontaneously or a few weeks after a single treatment of radiotherapy or chemotherapy. A study shines a light on this mystery, revealing a key role for the immune system in triggering fast cancer rejection in che
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Urban growth leads to shorter, more intense wet seasons in Florida peninsulaNew research has found that urban areas throughout the Florida peninsula are experiencing shorter, increasingly intense wet seasons relative to underdeveloped or rural areas.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists develop macaque model to study Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic feverCrimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a viral disease spread by ticks in the Middle East, Asia, Africa and parts of Europe. Infection with CCHF virus is fatal in nearly one of every three cases. No specific treatments or vaccines for CCHF exist, primarily because a suitable animal model for studying the disease has not been available. Now researchers have developed a new animal model to study
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why the Tasmanian devil might be more susceptible to transmissible cancersCancers that can jump from one animal to another of the same species are rare, but the endangered Tasmanian devil is doubly unlucky: in recent years, two transmissible cancers affecting them have been identified. A comparison of these cancers suggests that they are similar in origin, leading researchers to believe that devils may be at greater risk for these kinds of diseases.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Solid research leads physicists to propose new state of matterThe term 'superfluid quasicrystal' sounds like something a comic-book villain might use to carry out his dastardly plans. In reality, it's a new form of matter proposed by theoretical physicists. The researchers have described a 'recipe' for making the exotic materials in the lab.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Burning ice in oceanic clay rich sedimentA research team has identified the formation of natural gas hydrates, so-called flammable ice, formed in oceans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The absence of a single mitochondrial protein causes severe inflammationScientists have demonstrated that the removal of a single mitochondrial protein in mouse muscle leads to severe inflammation throughout the body, causing the premature death of the animal.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rats sniff out TB in childrenRats are able to detect whether a child has tuberculosis (TB), and are much more successful at doing this than a commonly used basic microscopy test.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Controlling blood pressure even when older can prevent dementia in African AmericansControlling blood pressure with any of the commonly prescribed antihypertensive medications (beta blockers, ACE inhibitors, calcium channel blocks, and diuretics) can prevent dementia in older African-Americans with hypertension according to a new study.
3h
Live Science

The Story Claiming Buzz Aldrin Saw Aliens in Space Is Utter NonsenseA viral story claims Buzz Aldrin passed a lie-detector test proving he saw a UFO in space. This is complete nonsense.
3h
Science | The Guardian

Alan Baker obituaryDistinguished mathematician who won the Fields medal for his contribution to number theory In 1966 the start of a new era in number theory was marked by Alan Baker, who has died aged 78, joining the department of pure mathematics at Cambridge University. With a cascade of papers, he had published solutions to a series of problems from a line of inquiry that went back to the third-century mathemat
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Overlapping mechanisms in HIV cognitive disorders and Alzheimer's diseaseA protein involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD) may be a promising target for treating neurological disorders in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients, suggests a study published in JNeurosci of rat neurons and brain tissue from deceased humans. The research shows that the two conditions may damage neurons in similar ways.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Repairing a leaky blood-brain barrier in epilepsyBlocking the activity of an enzyme that has a key role in the generation of recurring seizures may provide a new way to treat epilepsy that is resistant to anti-seizure drugs, according to a study of rats and mice published in JNeurosci.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Where the brain detects changes in natural soundsElectrical activity in a region of the parietal cortex underlies the detection of a transition between two complex sounds, finds a study of human participants published in eNeuro. The research provides insight into how the brain tunes into relevant changes in the environment to optimize behavior.
3h
New Scientist - News

Antarctica still losing ice despite big rise in snowfallA 10 per cent rise in snowfall in Antarctica is adding more ice to the continent each year, but the ice sheets are still shrinking because it's being lost faster too
4h
New Scientist - News

Ancient finger bone may reveal humanity’s path out of AfricaHuman Africa BoneA single bone found in the Saudi Arabian desert is at least 85,000 years old, and may shed light on the route early humans took out of Africa
4h
New Scientist - News

Infections during pregnancy affect a child’s brain functionContracting infections like flu during pregnancy seems to lead to changes in a child’s brain that affects their cognitive abilities
4h
The Atlantic

The Difficult Choice Facing Young BushmenIs there inherent value in preserving tradition? What if tradition, for you, meant rejecting modern life in favor of your ancestral lifestyle of hunting and gathering in sub-Saharan Africa? This is the very real choice facing Ketelelo and Kitsiso, two young Bushmen in Botswana, in Daniel Koehler’s moving documentary, A House Without Snakes . Simultaneously a specific depiction of life on the fron
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The Atlantic

The Impossible Duality of The Marvelous Mrs. MaiselT he billboard loomed above me on La Brea Avenue: the marvelous mrs. maisel , it said in a twinkly, 1950s-style font, as a fetching young woman in a pillbox hat smiled down at me. My heart sank—not another museum-quality period piece from the gods of television. Then one day a friend mentioned the show over lunch. She’d heard it was good. That night I punched it up on my iPhone while I was lying
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Common genetic variant linked to AFib risk in LatinosWith the development of a large, diverse registry of patients with AFib, the most prevalent heart rhythm disorder worldwide, UIC researchers have confirmed for the first time the association of a chromosomal genetic variant with increased risk of AFib in Latinos.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Binge-eating mice reveal obesity cluesMice fed on a high-fat or chocolate-based diet show abnormal feeding behaviors such as snacking, bingeing and disrupted eating patterns, according to new research from scientists at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) and the Pompeu Fabra University (UPF) in Barcelona, Spain. The findings of two studies published back-to-back in the journal Addiction Biology help to explain the behavioral trig
4h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Tasmanian devil cancers targeted by human drugsCambridge University researchers find human cancer drugs could halt the extinction of the marsupial.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Zuckerberg testimony to Congress: 'My mistake, I'm sorry'Mark Zuckerberg FacebookFacebook chief Mark Zuckerberg says he accepts responsibility for the social network's failure to protect private data and prevent manipulation of the platform, according to testimony released Monday on the eve of his first Congressional appearance.
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Popular Science

We should build a baby-brained artificial intelligenceTechnology Toddler smarts will drive AI innovation. Toddler smarts will drive AI innovation. Psychologist Alison Gopnik's work inspires automous carmakers to think young.
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The Scientist RSS

Some Antibiotics Rev Up Host Immune Response to VirusesThe antimicrobial drug neomycin protects mice from some viral infections, complicating the picture of the relationship between antibiotics and susceptibility to viruses.
4h
Latest Headlines | Science News

A new soft bot mimics octopuses and inchworms to climb wallsA new soft robot that scales walls could help with surveillance or building inspections.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Mark Zuckerberg says fixing Facebook’s data scandal will “significantly impact” its profitabilityMark Zuckerberg Facebook
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The Atlantic

When a College Employee Shoots a Student“Twenty-one, mental. He’s a mental,” a university police officer said into his radio as his car approached Charles Thomas, a fourth-year student at the University of Chicago, on Tuesday night after reports of possible burglary and damage to buildings. Three campus police officers had responded to the call. Thomas, who according to police was holding a metal object, began walking toward the office
4h
The Atlantic

Tony Robbins, #MeToo, and the Limits of Self-Help“Problems are what sculpt our soul. Problems are what make us become more . If we can realize that life is always happening for us, not to us: game over. All the pain and suffering disappears.” It was 2014, and Tony Robbins was speaking—really, he was preaching—to a rapturous crowd during one of his many spectacular live events : a “Date With Destiny” seminar in Boca Raton, Florida. Robbins was s
4h
New on MIT Technology Review

Facebook may stop the data leaks, but it’s too late: Cambridge Analytica’s models live onFacebook Cambridge Analytica DataLong after the training data has been deleted, the models can continue being improved and used to influence future voters.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Removing the brakes on plant oil productionScientists studying plant biochemistry at Brookhaven Lab have discovered new details about biomolecules that put the brakes on oil production. The findings suggest that disabling these biomolecular brakes could push oil production into high gear--a possible pathway toward generating abundant biofuels and plant-derived bioproducts.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The 'immuno revolution': Turning up the heat on resistant tumorsA promising class of drugs known as CD40 monoclonal antibodies could be the spark needed to light the fire in the immune system of patients who don't respond to the newer cancer immunotherapies. Robert H. Vonderheide, M.D., D.Phil., director of the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania and an internationally renowned cancer immunotherapy expert, makes the case for the drugs in a
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Human drugs could help treat transmissible cancers in Tasmanian devilsTransmissible cancers are incredibly rare in nature, yet have arisen in Tasmanian devils on at least two separate occasions. New research from the University of Cambridge identifies key anti-cancer drugs which could be trialled as a treatment for these diseases, which are threatening Tasmanian devils with extinction.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds how fat tissue shunts energy to tumorsSanford Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) researchers recently discovered that that inactivation of a protein called p62 in fat cells fuels aggressive, metastatic prostate cancer in mice. The findings suggest that mTOR inhibitors currently used to treat a wide range of cancers may have the unintended consequence of shutting down fat tissue metabolism and fueling tumor growth.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blood flow is a major influence on tumor cell metastasisScientists have long theorized that blood flow plays an integral role in cancer metastasis. But new research, published April 9 in Development Cell, testing this long-held hypothesis in zebrafish and humans confirms that the circulatory blood flow impacts the position where circulating tumor cells ultimately arrest in the vasculature and exit into the body, where they can form a metastasis.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How tumors caused by STD quickly regress in dogsThe canine transmissible venereal tumor is a contagious cancer that has spread by mating among dogs worldwide. One unique feature of this cancer is that, for unclear reasons, it regresses spontaneously or a few weeks after a single treatment of radiotherapy or chemotherapy. A study published April 9 in the journal Cancer Cell shines a light on this mystery, revealing a key role for the immune syst
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why the Tasmanian devil might be more susceptible to transmissible cancersCancers that can jump from one animal to another of the same species are rare, but the endangered Tasmanian devil is doubly unlucky: in recent years, two transmissible cancers affecting them have been identified. A comparison of these cancers, published April 9 in the journal Cancer Cell, suggests that they are similar in origin, leading researchers at the University of Cambridge to believe that d
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Feed: All Latest

How to Check If Cambridge Analytica Could Access Your Facebook DataFacebook Cambridge Analytica DataFacebook has released a tool that lets you see if you were caught up in the Cambridge Analytica fiasco—and what other apps know about you know.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fund battling for Telecom Italia control gets fresh supportAn activist fund battling for control of Telecom Italia against Vivendi on Monday won support from an influential advisor, the second to back its efforts to curb the French group's power.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Removing the brakes on plant oil productionScientists studying plant biochemistry at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory have discovered new details about biomolecules that put the brakes on oil production. The findings suggest that disabling these biomolecular brakes could push oil production into high gear—a possible pathway toward generating abundant biofuels and plant-derived bioproducts. The study appears in
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UN reopens talks on defining 'killer robots'A new round of talks on the use of so-called killer robots reopened at the United Nations on Monday, with a focus on defining the characteristics of autonomous lethal weapons.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bots, good or bad, dominate Twitter conversation: studyAutomated accounts or "bots" play a big role in disseminating information on Twitter, accounting for two-thirds of tweets linking to popular websites, a study showed Monday.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Zuckerberg set for Congress grilling as Facebook notifies users on leakMark Zuckerberg FacebookEmbattled Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg faces a critical test this week as he goes before the US Congress to explain how user privacy was compromised at the world's biggest social network—and how he plans to fix it.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

Squeaky Clean Mice Could Be Ruining ResearchPristine lab conditions may not provide the best model for human disease -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Shaking up megathrust earthquakes with slow slip and fluid drainageMegathrust earthquakes are the most powerful type of earthquake, occurring at subduction zones -- where one tectonic plate is pushed beneath another. By contrast, slow slip events (SSEs) release seismic stress at a lower rate than large earthquakes, re-occurring in cycles. These processes can take place along the megathrust and other planes of weakness in response to loading, releasing low frequen
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tiny nanomachine successfully completes test driveScientists have used nanostructures to construct a tiny machine that constitutes a rotatory motor and can move in a specific direction. The researchers used circular structures from DNA.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Spoken language reveals how people develop and matureExamining 44,000 brief text samples collected over 25 years, a study of ego level and language sheds light on ego development, its relationship with other models of personality and individual differences, and its utility in characterizing people, texts and cultural contexts. If ego development can be scored from everyday language, then text from Twitter feeds to political speeches, and from childr
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists fix genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease in human brain cellsResearchers have revealed how apoE4 confers its risk for Alzheimer's disease in human brain cells. What's more, they were able to erase the damage caused by apoE4 by changing it, with a small molecule, into a harmless apoE3-like version.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ultra-powerful batteries made safer, more efficientResearchers are laying the foundation for more widespread use of lithium metal batteries. They have developed a method to mitigate the formation of dendrites -- crystal-like masses -- that damage the batteries' performance.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pollution to products: CO2 competition enters final roundA $20 million international competition to make profitable products from a gas that otherwise would contribute to global warming has entered its final stretch.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Psych! Colleges teach phishing lesson by targeting their ownThousands of university students and employees targeted by email phishing schemes this year have taken the bait. Fortunately, they were duped not by real scammers, but by their own schools—in simulations meant to make them more adept at spotting real threats.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Iris' remnants lingeringTropical Cyclone Iris has already re-generated once after weakening to a low pressure area, and forecasters are keeping an eye on the remnants for any hint of a second regeneration. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image of the low-pressure area currently fighting vertical wind shear.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Urban growth leads to shorter, more intense wet seasons in Florida peninsulaNew research from Florida State University scientists has found that urban areas throughout the Florida peninsula are experiencing shorter, increasingly intense wet seasons relative to underdeveloped or rural areas.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gene editing regulations threaten sustainability of global food animal supplyThe U.S. Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) 2017 draft guidance that proposed drug-like regulatory scrutiny of food animals produced using gene editing technology such as CRISPR has global implications for the future cost and feasibility of food animal production. This regulatory proposal fails to recognize that the same genetic changes could be achieved using conventional breeding techniques in
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Keni develop in the South PacificA low pressure area that has been lingering near Vanuatu in the Southern Pacific Ocean has consolidated into a tropical cyclone. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Keni on April 9.
5h
Science | The Guardian

Did you solve it? The hipster bicycle raceThe solutions to today’s puzzles On my puzzle blog earlier today I set the following questions: 1) Two hipsters, Atticus and Abe, were arguing about whose electronic bicycle was the slowest. They decided to race them along a 100m track. They agreed that the bike reaching the finish line last would be the winner. The guys got on their bikes on the start line. But, predictably, they just stood ther
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Human drugs could help treat transmissible cancers in Tasmanian devilsTransmissible cancers are incredibly rare in nature, yet have arisen in Tasmanian devils on at least two separate occasions. New research from the University of Cambridge identifies key anti-cancer drugs which could be trialled as a treatment for these diseases, which are threatening Tasmanian devils with extinction.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Iris' remnants lingeringTropical Cyclone Iris has already re-generated once after weakening to a low pressure area, and forecasters are keeping an eye on the remnants for any hint of a second regeneration. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite captured a visible image of the low-pressure area currently fighting vertical wind shear.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An advance for precision medicineScientists have developed a method to quickly and efficiently recognize the subtypes of cells within the body for the first time. The discovery will improve understanding of disease at the molecular level and could ultimately could enable the development of precise treatments of conditions such as cancer, disorders that destroy neurons in the brain, and diseases that affect the heart and blood ves
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why expressive brows might have mattered in human evolutionHighly mobile eyebrows that can be used to express a wide range of subtle emotions may have played a crucial role in human survival, new research suggests.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First human migration out of Africa more geographically widespread than previously thoughtHuman Africa BoneScientists have discovered a fossilized finger bone of an early modern human in the Nefud Desert of Saudi Arabia, dating to approximately 90,000 years ago. The discovery is the oldest directly dated Homo sapiens fossil outside of Africa and the Levant and indicates that early dispersals into Eurasia were more expansive than previously thought.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team aims to curb formation of harmful crystal-like masses in lithium metal batteriesFrom smartphones to electric vehicles, many of today's technologies run on lithium ion batteries. That means that consumers have to keep their chargers handy. An iPhone X battery only lasts for 21 hours of talk time, and Tesla's model S has a 335-mile range—which means you could expect to make it from Newark, Delaware to Providence, Rhode Island, but not all the way to Boston, on one charge.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Finger bone points to early human exodusHuman Africa BoneA fossil find from Saudi Arabia adds to growing evidence that modern humans left Africa earlier than supposed.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists tweak CRISPR to speed up genomic editingThe powerful gene-editing tool, CRISPR, has revolutionized research by allowing scientists to snip and patch DNA with remarkable precision. But tracking the impact of these changes on gene function can be time-consuming. Researchers currently analyze each edit one at a time, a process that can take weeks.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Keni develop in the South PacificA low pressure area that has been lingering near Vanuatu in the Southern Pacific Ocean has consolidated into a tropical cyclone. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Keni on April 9.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene editing regulations threaten sustainability of global food animal supplyThe US Food and Drug Administration's 2017 draft guidance that proposed drug-like regulatory scrutiny of food animals produced using gene editing technology such as CRISPR has global implications for the future cost and feasibility of food animal production.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Toxins produced by e-cigarettes vary by flavorDifferent flavors of e-cigarettes produce different levels of free radicals, toxins often associated with cancer and other diseases, according to Penn State researchers. Many of the chemicals used to flavor e-cigarettes increased the production of free radicals, while a few actually lowered it.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Urban growth leads to shorter, more intense wet seasons in Florida peninsulaNew research from Florida State University scientists has found that urban areas throughout the Florida peninsula are experiencing shorter, increasingly intense wet seasons relative to underdeveloped or rural areas.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Solid research leads physicists to propose new state of matterThe term "superfluid quasicrystal" sounds like something a comic-book villain might use to carry out his dastardly plans.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Corn hybrids with high yields come with more variabilityThe agriculture industry is in a tough spot; it's simultaneously tasked with feeding a growing population and minimizing its environmental footprint. For corn breeders, that means improving nitrogen-use efficiency and crowding tolerance, all while maximizing yield. The first step, according to a new study from the University of Illinois, is understanding the genetic yield potential of current hybr
5h
Science | The Guardian

Raising eyebrows: how evolution gave us expressive facesHumans lost their strong brow ridges as social communication became more important, researchers say Modern humans might never have raised a quizzical eyebrow had Homo sapiens not lost the thick, bony brows of its ancient ancestors in favour of smoother facial features, a new study suggests. Researchers at the University of York believe early humans bore prominent brow ridges as a mark of physical
5h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The Standing Rock resistance and our fight for indigenous rights | Tara HouskaStill invisible and often an afterthought, indigenous peoples are uniting to protect the world's water, lands and history -- while trying to heal from genocide and ongoing inequality. Tribal attorney and Couchiching First Nation citizen Tara Houska chronicles the history of attempts by government and industry to eradicate the legitimacy of indigenous peoples' land and culture, including the months
5h
Big Think

Yes, Buzz Aldrin DID see something odd in space. Here’s the real story.One of the latest things that has people all abuzz is the claim that Buzz Aldrin saw “an L-shaped object” when he went to the moon. Read More
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The Atlantic

The Strange Geography of the Latest Syria StrikeThe Syrian civil war has fast become the Syrian war: Russia and the Assad regime accused Israel Monday of striking a military airport where Iran is known to operate , reportedly killing 14 people. The assault came a day after the U.S. and France, in a statement , vowed a “strong, joint response” to Assad’s alleged use of chemical weapons Saturday in Eastern Ghouta. Details of the strike on T4, as
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mirror-like physics of superconductor-insulator transitionThe mirror-like physics of the superconductor-insulator transition operates exactly as expected. Scientists know this to be true following the observation of a remarkable phenomenon, the existence of which was predicted three decades ago but that had eluded experimental detection until now. The observation confirms that two fundamental quantum states, superconductivity and superinsulation, both ar
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Like babies, eggs send signals when 'hungry'Scientists are decoding the secrets of how ova grow and stay fertile. They found out who calls the shots when it is mealtime for the growing egg, how that cell-to-cell message is communicated and how the feeding tubes called filopodia themselves are generated. Their findings push the scope of our understanding of female fertility.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antiepileptic drugs increase risk of Alzheimer's and dementiaThe use of antiepileptic drugs is associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease and dementia, according to a new study. Continuous use of antiepileptic drugs for a period exceeding one year was associated with a 15 percent increased risk of Alzheimer's disease in the Finnish dataset, and with a 30 percent increased risk of dementia in the German dataset.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Associating frailty to cardiovascular disease and mortalityFrailty is common in elderly people with cardiovascular disease and goes along with elevated mortality. Medical researchers examined the predictive ability of 35 frailty scores for cardiovascular disease, cancer and all-cause mortality using data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. The analysis reveals that all frailty scores are associated with future mortality, and that some are linke
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The largest catalog ever published of very high energy gamma ray sources in the galaxyAstronomers have published the results of 15 years of gamma ray observations of the Milky Way. Its telescopes installed in Namibia have studied populations of pulsar wind nebulae and supernova remnants, as well as microquasars, never before detected in gamma rays.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

Uber acquired a dockless bike firm, but has a hard ride ahead of itUber Jump San Francisco
5h
Popular Science

DNA proved this tiny skeleton wasn't an alien—and opened up an ethical debate about testing human remainsScience Who owns the bones? For too long scientists failed to ask basic ethical questions: Who should control collections of human remains? What are the positive and negative consequences of…
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Solid research leads physicists to propose new state of matterThe term 'superfluid quasicrystal' sounds like something a comic-book villain might use to carry out his dastardly plans. In reality, it's a new form of matter proposed by theoretical physicists at The University of Texas at Dallas in a recent study published in the journal Physical Review Letters. Their study also describes a 'recipe' for making the exotic materials in the lab.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ultra-powerful batteries made safer, more efficientAn international team of researchers is laying the foundation for more widespread use of lithium metal batteries. They developed a method to mitigate the formation of dendrites -- crystal-like masses -- that damage the batteries' performance.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIH scientists develop macaque model to study Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic feverCrimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a viral disease spread by ticks in the Middle East, Asia, Africa and parts of Europe. Infection with CCHF virus is fatal in nearly one of every three cases. No specific treatments or vaccines for CCHF exist, primarily because a suitable animal model for studying the disease has not been available. Now, as reported in Nature Microbiology, researchers at NIA
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tiny nanomachine successfully completes test driveTogether with colleagues from the USA, scientists from the University of Bonn and the research institute Caesar in Bonn have used nanostructures to construct a tiny machine that constitutes a rotatory motor and can move in a specific direction. The researchers used circular structures from DNA. The results will now be presented in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists tweak CRISPR to speed up genomic editingUCLA researchers have tweaked CRISPR technology, enabling them to monitor the outcome of tens of thousands of gene edits in the time it currently takes to analyze a few. Reported in Nature Genetics, the development will improve scientists' ability to identify the genetic changes most likely to harm cells and contribute to disease.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shaking up megathrust earthquakes with slow slip and fluid drainageMegathrust earthquakes are the most powerful type of earthquake, occurring at subduction zones -- where one tectonic plate is pushed beneath another. By contrast, slow slip events (SSEs) release seismic stress at a lower rate than large earthquakes, re-occurring in cycles. These processes can take place along the megathrust and other planes of weakness in response to loading, releasing low frequen
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists fix genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease in human brain cellsIn a new study published in Nature Medicine, Gladstone researchers revealed how apoE4 confers its risk for Alzheimer's disease in human brain cells. What's more, they were able to erase the damage caused by apoE4 by changing it, with a small molecule, into a harmless apoE3-like version.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New cardiac imaging technique shortens testing time, improves patient comfortCedars-Sinai investigators have developed a new technique for conducting cardiac magnetic resonance imaging tests that improves patient comfort, shortens testing time and has the potential to increase diagnostic accuracy and reliability. MR Multitasking, is detailed in the April 9 issue of Nature Biomedical Engineering and solves the problem many cardiologists face when using conventional methods
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ALS, rare dementia share genetic linkStudying data from more than 125,000 individuals, an international team of researchers led by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has identified genetic links between amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia. The link between the seemingly unrelated disorders suggests that some drugs developed to treat ALS also may work against frontotemporal
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Increased risk of unnatural death to people with epilepsy foundA new study has shown that people diagnosed with epilepsy in England and Wales are at increased risk of dying from suicide and accidents.Though the risks of unnatural death for people with epilepsy are still low, they are significantly higher than the general population says Dr. Hayley Gorton from The University of Manchester.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Spoken language reveals how people develop and matureExamining 44,000 brief text samples collected over 25 years, a study of ego level and language sheds light on ego development, its relationship with other models of personality and individual differences, and its utility in characterizing people, texts and cultural contexts. If ego development can be scored from everyday language, then text from Twitter feeds to political speeches, and from childr
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why expressive brows might have mattered in human evolutionHighly mobile eyebrows that can be used to express a wide range of subtle emotions may have played a crucial role in human survival, new research from the University of York suggests.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Payments to doctors linked to prescription practices for two cancer typesCompared to physicians who didn't receive any payments, those who received general payments for meals and lodging from a drug manufacturer had higher odds of prescribing that company's particular drug for metastatic renal cell carcinoma and for chronic myeloid leukemia.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study examines associations of prenatal SSRI exposure, fetal brain developmentBrain imaging findings suggest selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) use by pregnant women may be associated with fetal brain development, particularly in regions of the brain related to emotional processing.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study confirms that inflammation during pregnancy is linked to baby's brainA study conducted by researchers at OHSU in Portland, Ore., has established a link between inflammation in pregnant women and the way the newborn brain is organized into networks. The results, which will public on April 9 in Nature Neuroscience, may provide promising avenues to explore treatments with potential to change these negative impacts on newborn brain function.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers locate circadian clock that controls daily rhythms of aggressionSynchronized by light and darkness, the circadian clock exerts control over wake/sleep cycles, body temperature, digestion, hormonal cycles and some behavior patterns. Now, for the first time, a team of neuroscientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) demonstrated circadian control of aggression in male mice and identified the specific neurons and circuitry regulating the daily patt
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An advance for precision medicineScientists have developed a method to quickly and efficiently recognize the subtypes of cells within the body for the first time. The discovery will improve understanding of disease at the molecular level and could ultimately could enable the development of precise treatments of conditions such as cancer, disorders that destroy neurons in the brain, and diseases that affect the heart and blood ves
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Topical antibiotic triggers unexpected antiviral responseA Yale-led research team made a startling discovery while investigating the effect of bacteria on viral infections. When they applied a common topical antibiotic to mice before or shortly after infection with herpes and other viruses, they found that the antibiotic triggered an antiviral resistance in the animals, the researchers said.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First human migration out of Africa more geographically widespread than previously thoughtA project led by the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History has discovered a fossilized finger bone of an early modern human in the Nefud Desert of Saudi Arabia, dating to approximately 90,000 years ago. The discovery, described in Nature Ecology and Evolution, is the oldest directly dated Homo sapiens fossil outside of Africa and the Levant and indicates that early dispersals into
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UCSF researcher identifies risk genes for ALSThe largest analysis to date of genetic data in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) -- the muscle-crippling neurodegenerative disease that afflicted the late astrophysicist Stephen Hawking and cut short the career of iconic Yankee baseball slugger Lou Gehrig -- has identified two previously unrecognized genetic risks that are significantly associated with the disease.
5h
Quanta Magazine

Mathematicians Explore Mirror Link Between Two Geometric WorldsTwenty-seven years ago, a group of physicists made an accidental discovery that flipped mathematics on its head. The physicists were trying to work out the details of string theory when they observed a strange correspondence: Numbers emerging from one kind of geometric world matched exactly with very different kinds of numbers from a very different kind of geometric world. To physicists, the corr
6h
New Scientist - News

Zuckerberg vs US Congress – here’s how he can address data fearsMark Zuckerberg FacebookWhen Mark Zuckerberg faces US politicians this week, he should admit his network is a global behavioural experiment that needs oversight to match, says Mark Harris
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovery of compounds that keep plants freshScientists have discovered new compounds that can control stomatal movements in plants. Some of the compounds have shown to prevent leaves from drying up and suppress withering when sprayed onto rose and oat leaves.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Geoengineering risks losers as well as winners for climate and wildfire risksArtificially altering the climate system to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius could increase the risks of wildfires in some areas, new research suggests.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brewing up Earth's earliest lifePlanetary scientists have found that large concentrations of sulfites and bisulfites in shallow lakes may have set the stage for synthesizing Earth's first life forms.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Corn hybrids with high yields come with more variabilityThe agriculture industry is in a tough spot; it's simultaneously tasked with feeding a growing population and minimizing its environmental footprint. For corn breeders, that means improving nitrogen-use efficiency and crowding tolerance, all while maximizing yield. The first step, according to a new study, is understanding the genetic yield potential of current hybrids.
6h
Big Think

How a 4th-century Taoist concept is treating anxietyThe concept of non-action might just be the most powerful action to take for curbing anxiety. Read More
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

2018 Budget a Mixed Bag for International Environmental FundingPrograms emphasizing sustainability and biodiversity fared well, whereas climate-focused efforts came up short -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

Finger fossil 'shows humans went east of Africa earlier than thought'Bone found in Arabian desert dates back 90,000 years, challenging view that we migrated into Eurasia 60,000 years ago A fossilised human finger bone dating to almost 90,000 years ago has been discovered in the Saudi Arabian desert, a find researchers say points to the possibility that our species ventured towards the east far earlier than previously thought. Until recently, evidence including gen
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4 Best Smartphones of 2018: Guide to Android, Samsung Galaxy, iPhoneIf you're on the prowl for a new Android, Galaxy, or iPhone, read our full guide to the best smartphones of 2018.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First human migration out of Africa more geographically widespread than previously thoughtHuman Africa BoneA project led by the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History has discovered a fossilized finger bone of an early modern human in the Nefud Desert of Saudi Arabia, dating to approximately 90,000 years ago. The discovery, described in Nature Ecology and Evolution, is the oldest directly dated Homo sapiens fossil outside of Africa and the Levant and indicates that early dispersals into
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Topical antibiotic triggers unexpected antiviral responseA Yale-led research team made a startling discovery while investigating the effect of bacteria on viral infections. When they applied a common topical antibiotic to mice before or shortly after infection with herpes and other viruses, they found that the antibiotic triggered an antiviral resistance in the animals, the researchers said.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research to raise a few eyebrows: Why expressive brows might have mattered in human evolutionHighly mobile eyebrows that can be used to express a wide range of subtle emotions may have played a crucial role in human survival, new research from the University of York suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spoken language reveals how people develop and matureWhen people think of "personality," they are likely to think of traits such as warmth or extraversion. For example, a person with high extraversion tends to exhibit an enthusiastic, gregarious, socially dominant, reward-seeking style of social performance across a wide range of situations and contexts as compared to a person with low extraversion.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Non-invasive, adhesive patch promises measurement of glucose levels through skin without finger-prick blood testScientists have created a non-invasive, adhesive patch, which promises the measurement of glucose levels through the skin without a finger-prick blood test, potentially removing the need for millions of diabetics to frequently carry out the painful and unpopular tests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discovery allows scientists to index thousands of cells simultaneously, a 40-fold increase from the current methodOf the 37 trillion cells in the typical human body, the ability to distinguish one type of cell from another isn't as straightforward as you may think.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: A Fossilized Finger Bone May Be From the Earliest Humans on the Arabian PeninsulaArchaeologists announced the discovery of the specimen found in the Arabian desert, providing new clues to the exodus of Homo sapiens from Africa.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fluorescent dye could enable sharper biological imagingResearchers have now taken a major step toward making short-wave infrared (SWIR) imaging widely available.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vaccination apathy fueled by decades of misinformationA legacy of social and political factors rather than bad parenting may be influencing people's decisions not to vaccinate their children, according to a new study.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Finger fossil puts people in Arabia at least 86,000 years agoA desert discovery suggests that Arabia was an ancient human destination.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

The search for mysterious dark matter underdogs steps upDark matter particles called axions are finally being put to the test.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hundreds of thousands of Kentucky residents could lose Medicaid under the work demonstration projectMedicaid work requirements would harm low-income Kentucky families and strain the safety net system, says Friend of the Court Brief filed in support of plaintiffs in Stewart v. Azar.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

To shore up beaches, just add sand?New research is shedding light on how mechanically placed sand on San Diego County beaches moves and its potential impacts. The study, published in the journal Coastal Engineering, could help planners develop beach nourishment projects that will reach their intended goals without causing unintended problems. North San Diego County for instance is planning a 50-year, $160 million series of beach no
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The Atlantic

The Never-Ending Task of Shielding Black Kids From Negative StereotypesA few years ago, when the former pro football player Martellus Bennett was looking for books to read to his young daughter, he was disappointed by his options. He had trouble finding titles with protagonists who looked like her and who had parents who looked like him. So, unable to find the sort of book he wanted, he wrote his own—his whimsical Hey A.J. series follows the adventures of a little g
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists observe mirror-like physics of the superconductor-insulator transitionThe world on the other side of Alice in Wonderland's looking-glass is not what it seems, but the mirror-like physics of the superconductor-insulator transition operates exactly as expected.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using the past to predict the future—climate change impacts on the sagebrush seaScientists from Utah State University developed a new way to use long-term population data to model how species could respond to climate change in the future.
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Ingeniøren

Dansk kilowatttime når rekordlav CO2-udledningDanskernes gennemsnitlige CO2-udledning per forbrugt kilowatttime strøm lå i 2017 for første gang nogensinde under 200 gram. Det skyldes en vækst i forbruget af biomasse, og et comeback for vindkraft efter et skuffende 2016.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Those living near oil and gas facilities may be at higher risk of diseasePeople living near oil and gas facilities along Colorado's Northern Front Range may be exposed to hazardous air pollutants, including carcinogens like benzene, that could pose health risks above levels deemed acceptable by the US Environmental Protection Agency, according to researchers at the Colorado School of Public Health, Boulder County Public Health, CU Boulder, the National Aeronautics and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Studies show hookah also plays critical role in tobacco product landscapeThe findings of two recently published studies on the emergence of hookah use indicate that public health officials may need to consider broadening their tobacco prevention efforts beyond traditional cigarettes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New source of global nitrogen discovered: Earth's bedrockFor centuries, the thinking has been that all the nitrogen available for plant growth worldwide comes from the atmosphere. But a new study by National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded researchers at the University of California (UC), Davis, shows that more than a quarter of that nitrogen is derived from the weathering of Earth's bedrock.
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Futurity.org

What friends of friends reveal about us onlineAt a time when social network privacy is in the news, new research shows there are more ways than previously realized to reveal certain traits we might be trying to conceal. …even if a person does not reveal their age, race, or political views, friendship studies can easily and accurately infer these traits. The work builds on one of the main threads in privacy research, which is to understand ho
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shipping industry needs an alternative to fossil fuels, but which one?The shipping industry needs to move to renewable and alternative fuels to reduce the sector's impact on the environment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

MicroRNAs regulate the formation of mitochondria in cellsMuscles require a large amount of energy to function. This is provided primarily by mitochondria in cells that consume a lot of energy. We therefore find more of these powerhouses of the cell in muscle cells than in other cell types with a lower metabolic rate. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Heart and Lung Research in Bad Nauheim have now identified a mechanism that can be used to regu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study resolves the mystery of an enigmatic Triassic reptileScientists from the University of Bristol have re-examined the fossilised remains of a Triassic reptile, currently housed in two separate collections on each side of the Atlantic, and have discovered it is a brand-new kind of beast.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Resistance training enhances recycling capacity in musclesA new study reports that autophagosome content is increased by resistance training in previously untrained young men, but this response may be blunted by aging.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Corn hybrids with high yields come with more variabilityThe agriculture industry is in a tough spot; it's simultaneously tasked with feeding a growing population and minimizing its environmental footprint. For corn breeders, that means improving nitrogen-use efficiency and crowding tolerance, all while maximizing yield. The first step, according to a new study from the University of Illinois, is understanding the genetic yield potential of current hybr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Highlights new issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications JournalThe Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications journal (CVIA) has just published an Special Issue on Valvular Heart Disease with Guest Editor Blase A. Carabello of East Carolina University. This contains several important case reports and reviews.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Controlling blood pressure even when older can prevent dementia in African-AmericansControlling blood pressure with any of the commonly prescribed antihypertensive medications (beta blockers, ACE inhibitors, calcium channel blocks, and diuretics) can prevent dementia in older African-Americans with hypertension according to a new study from Regenstrief Institute researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brewing up Earth's earliest lifeMIT planetary scientists led by Sukrit Ranjan find large concentrations of sulfites and bisulfites in shallow lakes may have set the stage for synthesizing Earth's first life forms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Media alert: New articles in The CRISPR JournalThis press release is issued on behalf of The CRISPR Journal, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert Inc. dedicated to publishing outstanding research and commentary in all aspects of CRISPR and gene editing research.
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New on MIT Technology Review

YouTube may be illegally collecting kids’ dataYouTube COPPA Kids FTC
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Futurity.org

Grief during pregnancy can affect baby’s mental healthGrief during pregnancy may affect the mental health of the baby as he or she grows into adulthood, new research shows. “We find that prenatal exposure to the death of a maternal relative increases take-up of ADHD medications during childhood and anti-anxiety and depression medications in adulthood,” write Petra Persson and Maya Rossin-Slater in American Economic Review . Both are faculty fellows
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Goodbye Kepler, hello TESS—passing the baton in the search for distant planetsFor centuries, human beings have wondered about the possibility of other Earths orbiting distant stars. Perhaps some of these alien worlds would harbor strange forms of life or have unique and telling histories or futures. But it was only in 1995 that astronomers spotted the first planets orbiting sunlike stars outside of our solar system.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The structure and function of a controller of stem cell divisionAn important complex forming the core of the cell division apparatus in stem cells has been imaged using the Macromolecular Crystallography beamlines, I04 and I04-1 at Diamond Light Source. As recently reported in Nature Communications, the spindle orientation protein known as LGN bound to an adapter protein known as Inscuteable in a tetrameric arrangement, which drove asymmetric stem cell divisio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The largest catalog ever published of very high-energy gamma ray sources in the GalaxyThe HESS international collaboration, to which CNRS and CEA contribute, has published the results of fifteen years of gamma ray observations of the Milky Way. Its telescopes installed in Namibia have studied populations of pulsar wind nebulae and supernova remnants, as well as microquasars, never before detected in gamma rays. These studies are supplemented by precise measurements such as those of
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Belgrade's 'tiny head' Gagarin statue causes dismaySerbian social media users mock city's tribute to the first man in space.
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Ingeniøren

DN om tal fra tysk elbil-rapport: »Det giver ikke mening«Skal en Tesla køre over en halv million kilometer, før den er 'grønnere' end en dieselbil? Ikke hvis man tager alle tal med i regnestykket, mener Dansk Naturfredningsforening.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why double majors might beat you out of a jobTwo college majors are better than one. That is the conclusion that researchers are beginning to reach.
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Feed: All Latest

Twitter Bots Post Two-Thirds of Links to Popular Sites on the PlatformA new study from Pew Research shows that the bulk of links on Twitter don't come from actual humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wheat research discovery yields genetic secrets that could shape future cropsA new study has isolated a gene controlling shape and size of spikelets in wheat in a breakthrough which could help breeders deliver yield increases in one of the world's most important crops.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

There's no such thing as oversharing in conservationSocial gadflies in an organization are the new superheroes of conservation, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biomarker helps identify 'window of opportunity' for cancer chemotherapy timingAngiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels, is essential for tumor growth. A new study describes a vascular stabilization biomarker that can visualize blood vessel activity, thus optimizing the timing of anticancer therapies including anti-angiogenics.
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Ingeniøren

Utilsigtede genændringer ved Crispr? Nature Methods trækker Crispr-artikel tilbageDer er ikke nok belæg for at konkludere, at genredigerings-teknologien har medført uventede genetiske ændringer i mus.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Election security means much more than just new voting machinesIn late March, Congress passed a significant spending bill that included US$380 million in state grants to improve election infrastructure. As the U.S. ramps up for the 2018 midterm elections, that may seem like a huge amount of money, but it's really only a start at securing the country's voting systems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why nuclear fusion is gaining steam – againBack when I studied geology in grad school, the long-term future of energy had a single name: nuclear fusion. It was the 1970s. The physicists I studied with predicted that tapping this clean new source of electric power by forcing two nuclei of hydrogen to combine and release massive amounts of energy, might be 50 years off.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Geoengineering risks losers as well as winners for climate and wildfire risksArtificially altering the climate system to limit global warming to 1.5C could increase the risks of wildfires in some areas, new research suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Machine learning could help search for gravitational wavesA trio of students from the University of Glasgow have developed a sophisticated artificial intelligence which could underpin the next phase of gravitational wave astronomy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Suspension system for high-performance microscopy results in perfect imagesIt is one of the most accurate measurement instruments available today: the high-performance microscope at the Institute of Applied Physics of TU Wien acquires images of individual atoms by moving the tip of a fine needle tip across a surface. The position of this tip must be controlled with a precision in the range of picometers, i.e., billionths of a millimeter. "This is akin to controlling a ne
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Childhood obesity declines project identifies community-based obesity strategies that workTo improve success rates and combat continuing disparities in the fight against childhood obesity, the Childhood Obesity Declines Project (COBD) is taking a systematic approach to studying community-based strategies that have led to declining obesity rates.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rats sniff out TB in childrenRats are able to detect whether a child has tuberculosis (TB), and are much more successful at doing this than a commonly used basic microscopy test. These are the results of research led by Georgies Mgode of the Sokoine University of Agriculture in Tanzania.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Four in one: Chemical analysis technique gets major upgrade from Russian scientistsResearchers have developed a device for upgrading mass spectrometers, which are used to analyze the chemical makeup of unknown substances. The new device analyzes one substance from four different perspectives. Alternatively, it enables multiple samples to be examined simultaneously. By contrast, conventional mass spectrometers analyze one substance at a time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The largest catalog ever published of very high energy gamma ray sources in the galaxyThe HESS international collaboration, to which CNRS and CEA contribute, has published the results of 15 years of gamma ray observations of the Milky Way. Its telescopes installed in Namibia have studied populations of pulsar wind nebulae and supernova remnants, as well as microquasars, never before detected in gamma rays. Fourteen articles, making up the largest ever set of scientific results in t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The absence of a single mitochondrial protein causes severe inflammationScientists at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) headed by Antonio Zorzano, demonstrate that the removal of a single mitochondrial protein in mouse muscle leads to severe inflammation throughout the body, causing the premature death of the animal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Associating frailty to cardiovascular disease and mortalityFrailty is common in elderly people with cardiovascular disease and goes along with elevated mortality. Dr. Gloria Aguayo from the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) and co-workers examined the predictive ability of 35 frailty scores for cardiovascular disease, cancer and all-cause mortality using data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. The analysis, recently published in PLOS Medici
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pharmacogenetics of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors for Alzheimer's diseaseThe researchers aimed to investigate whether ACE gene polymorphisms rs1800764 and rs4291 are associated with cognitive and functional change in patients with Alzheimer's disease.
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Scientific American Content: Global

America's Freshwater Mussels Are Going Extinct--Here's Why That SucksDozens of these water-filtering species are at risk of vanishing, and that’s bad news for every living creature that relies on them -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When heart disease runs in the family, exercise may be best defenseAs fitness increases, heart risk decreases regardless of genetic risk.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breast cancer therapy: All clear for the heartMany breast cancer therapies cause damage to the heart. However, in the largest study of its kind so far, scientists have now shown that the risk of death from heart disease in breast cancer patients following radiotherapy or chemotherapy is no higher than it is among the average population. Good risk management in the hospitals as well as control screenings at short intervals seem to make up for
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New on MIT Technology Review

The world’s most valuable AI startup is ... yep, Chinese
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

There is no 'one-size fits all approach' to ocean protectionThe oceans are in dire need of protection – fish stocks are declining, sensitive seafloor habitats are being degraded and lost, species are at risk of extinctions. Thankfully, there is growing global concern and increasing consensus around the need for action. But, achieving this protection is challenging, and it is clear that there is no one-size-fits-all solution.
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Dagens Medicin

Solide lægeaftryk på ny aftale om lægers efteruddannelseI aftalen er lagt vægt på gennemsigtighed gennem klare krav og regler for samarbejdet mellem lægemiddelindustrien og hospitalsansatte læger.
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Dagens Medicin

Mangel på sygeplejersker vil påvirke læger under konfliktDet kan have konsekvenser for landets læger, hvis der ikke er sygeplejersker nok til at bemande nødberedskaberne under en konflikt, siger formand for Yngre Læger.
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Big Think

Why Christianity has been pushed underground in ChinaThe Chinese government just banned the online sale of Bibles, yet another attempt at President Xi's suppression of Christianity. Read More
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Live Science

There's a Lot of Sperm on the International Space Station Right NowFor the first time (officially), NASA will set loose some human sperm in outer space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study: How life generates new formsWhen organisms change during the course of evolution, often what drives new forms is not genes themselves, but gene regulation —what turns genes on and off. A new study identifies the kind of gene regulation most likely to generate evolutionary change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Early climate action has big effect on rising sea levelsRising sea levels will accelerate this century and beyond, exposing hundreds of millions of people to flooding and other coastal hazards by the year 2300. But acting early to lower greenhouse gas emissions can slow that rise, say scientists in two new studies in Earth's Future, an open access journal published by the American Geophysical Union.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Geoengineering risks losers as well as winners for climate and wildfire risksArtificially altering the climate system to limit global warming to 1.5C could increase the risks of wildfires in some areas, new research suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fatty liver under stressA poor diet and other risk factors can result in liver disease. This important metabolic organ can become fatty and inflamed. In the long term, this may result in irreversible and life-threatening organ damage (cirrhosis of the liver or 'shrunken liver'). Experts at the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) in Berlin have now analyzed liver cells in vitro to investigate how degenerati
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A UC3M study analyzes the keys to fragmentation of metallic materialsResearchers from Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, Texas A&M, and the Israeli Institute of Technology have developed new theories for the fragmentation of metallic porous materials that can be applied to structural design in the aerospace, civil security and transportation sectors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antiepileptic drugs increase risk of Alzheimer's and dementiaThe use of antiepileptic drugs is associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease and dementia, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland and the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, DZNE. Continuous use of antiepileptic drugs for a period exceeding one year was associated with a 15 percent increased risk of Alzheimer's disease in the Finnish dataset, and wi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Like babies, eggs send signals when 'hungry'A team from Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre in Montreal is decoding the secrets of how ova grow and stay fertile. They found out who calls the shots when it is mealtime for the growing egg, how that cell-to-cell message is communicated and how the feeding tubes called filopodia themselves are generated. Their findings push the scope of our understanding of female fertilit
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery of compounds that keep plants freshA team of scientists at Nagoya University has discovered new compounds that can control stomatal movements in plants. Some of the compounds have shown to prevent leaves from drying up and suppress withering when sprayed onto rose and oat leaves.
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Feed: All Latest

Uber Acquires the Bike-Share Company JumpThe acquisition signals that Uber wants to be more than just taxi substitute.
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NYT > Science

How Our Journalism Is Like a Car Crash (Wait, That Didn’t Come Out Right)A good Interpreter column has a hook that, like a car crash, grabs your attention and gets you to care about otherwise arcane topics.
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Big Think

The first luxury space hotel will open to civilian astronauts in 2021Those recent tax breaks for the extremely wealthy might just have a new place to be spent. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

For identical quantum channels, order mattersPhysicists have demonstrated that using two quantum channels in different orders can enhance a communication network's ability to transmit information—even, counterintuitively, when the channels are identical. This result lies in stark contrast with how things work with identical classical channels (or pretty much anything else that is identical), where using them in a different order should not m
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Crystals could help uncover mysteries of dark matterThe flash of a glowing crystal could help us find lighter WIMPs—and answer heavy questions about our universe.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

To shore up beaches, just add sand?Sand nourishment projects aim to preserve California's iconic sandy beaches -- but little is known about the long-term effectiveness -- and unintended impacts -- of these sometimes multi-million dollar interventions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Water appeared while Earth was still growingCosmo-chemists have performed the largest study to date of oxygen isotopes in lunar rocks, and found a small but measurable difference in the makeup of the moon and Earth. The research proposes that Earth acquired the majority of its water during the main stage of its growth -- which counters a popular theory.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Too wet? Too cold? Too hot? This is how weather affects the trips we makeWhat sorts of weather lead us to change our daily travel behaviour? How do we respond to scorching heat waves, sapping humidity, snow and frost, strong winds, or torrential rain? International research shows weather is important in shaping our everyday movements.
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Dagens Medicin

Arbejdstilsynet giver påbud til Holbæk SygehusMedicinsk afdeling på Holbæk Sygehus får tre kritiske påbud af Arbejdstilsynet, da arbejdsbyrden og tidspresset er for høj, hvilket går ud over personalets sundhed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Phononic SEIRA -- enhancing light-molecule interactions via crystal lattice vibrationsResearchers from CIC-nanoGUNE (San Sebastián, Spain), in collaboration with the Donostia International Physics Center (San Sebastián, Spain), Materials Physics Center (CFM, CSIC-UPV/EHU, San Sebastián, Spain) and University of Oviedo demonstrate a new way to strongly couple infrared light and molecular vibrations, by utilizing phonon polariton nanoresonators made of hexagonal boron nitride, a Van
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

KAIST discloses the formation of burning ice in oceanic clay rich sedimentA KAIST research team has identified the formation of natural gas hydrates, so-called flammable ice, formed in oceans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Low bending loss waveguide opens the avenue to downsizing of 3-D photonic integrated circuitsFemtosecond lasers have been used for inscribing three-dimensional optical waveguides for a broad spectrum of applications. Currently, the difficulty in inducing large refractive index changes smoothly distributed in the laser irradiated regions is the major obstacle for producing compact photonic integrated circuit. Now researchers in Shanghai provide a solution to suppress the bend loss of the w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wind-wave map of East China Sea comes outWind-wave study is one of the main contents of oceanic environmental support and resource development, especially for East China Sea which is characteristic of intensive anthropogenic activities. Long-term variations of wind-wave have not been well documented for East China Sea, and the corresponding wind-wave maps are not available at hand. Now researchers in China have uncovered the geographic d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New technique more accurately reflects ponds on Arctic sea iceThis one simple mathematical trick can accurately predict the shape and melting effects of ponds on Arctic sea ice, according to new research by UChicago scientists.The study, published April 4 in Physical Review Letters by researchers with UChicago and MIT, should help climate scientists improve models of climate change and perhaps plug a gap between scientific predictions and observations over t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mirror, mirrorThe mirror-like physics of the superconductor-insulator transition operates exactly as expected. Scientists know this to be true following the observation of a remarkable phenomenon, the existence of which was predicted three decades ago but that had eluded experimental detection until now. The observation confirms that two fundamental quantum states, superconductivity and superinsulation, both ar
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using the past to predict the future: climate change impacts on the sagebrush seaScientists from Utah State University developed a new way to use long-term population data to model how species could respond to climate change in the future.
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Feed: All Latest

The New 'Star Wars' Trilogy Looks to the Past, 'Solo' Looks to Denny'sThe cast of the new anthology film might be headed to a diner near you.
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Feed: All Latest

The Gently Breathing Somnox Robot Cuddles You to SleepThe Somnox is a fuzzy, bean-shaped robot that mimics human breathing to help the human holding it fall asleep.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Artificial intelligence—between scientific, ethical and commercial issuesThe fatal crash involving an autonomous car operated by Uber in the United States was a tragic but timely reminder of the dangers of companies rushing to implement artificial intelligence to be first to market.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Planet orbiting a brown dwarf or a brown dwarf binary? Astronomers use cosmic lens to find new substellar systemUsing gravitational microlensing technique, an international group of astronomers has found a new substellar system whose composition remains a puzzle. The newly detected system, designated MOA-2015-BLG-337L, may consists of a planet orbiting a low-mass brown dwarf or may be composed of two brown dwarfs. The finding is detailed April 3 in a paper published on arXiv.org.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genome assembly of donkey reveals clues on how it may have branched from horseA team of researchers from Denmark, Malaysia, France and the U.K. has conducted a genome assembly of the donkey to learn more about its evolutionary history. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes their study and what they found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why the Arctic isn't a 'global commons'As the most recent Arctic Council meeting in Finland indicates, interest in the Arctic is as avid as ever.
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Dana Foundation

Bringing Consciousness to the StageAn ongoing challenge in brain research is trying to understand how neuro-activity creates consciousness or the awareness of one’s self. For example, we don’t understand how the brain creates colors and or why individuals process smell differently. Your favorite color is blue; mine is green. You hate even a sniff of gasoline, but I enjoy it. These are the hard problems of neuroscience and philosop
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BBC News - Science & Environment

100 years of chemical weaponsFrom chlorine to novichok, Hamish de Bretton-Gordon takes us through the history of chemical weapons.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

BBC climate change interview breached broadcasting standardsThe media watchdog says the ex-chancellor was "not sufficiently challenged" during a radio interview.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gold changes photoluminescence of silicon quantum dotsA group of scientists from Russia and Sweden showed that applying gold stripes to a sample with silicon quantum dots modifies the dots' properties. Their study results were published in Scientific Reports.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using superheroes such as Hawkeye, Wonder Woman and the Invisible Woman in the physics classroom"We find ourselves in an age when superhero films are immensely popular. With many students familiar with many of these characters and their superpowers, superheroes can facilitate a unique platform to aid in the dissemination of physics materials in the classroom," says scientist Barry W. Fitzgerald of Delft University of Technology (TU Delft, The Netherlands). In a paper published in Physics Edu
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The Atlantic

Mark Zuckerberg Says He’s Not ResigningMark Zuckerberg’s story doesn’t quite line up. For months, the Facebook chief executive has described the 2016 election as a turning point both for him and for the company over which he holds enormous power. The cavalcade of scandals that followed that November—disputes over user data, fake news, and Russia’s manipulation of the platform—has led to a “very basic shift in how we view our responsib
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Futurity.org

Pediatricians aren’t sure if your kid is just being crabbyPrimary care providers and pediatricians may be less confident than child and adolescent psychiatrists in their ability to tell whether irritability in young patients is normal or could be linked to deeper mental health issues, a new study suggests. Further, in their study, researchers found that primary care providers and pediatricians were more likely to prescribe medications when they thought
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The state of CRISPR researchCRISPR has been hailed as one of the most promising gene editing technologies and promises to revolutionize precision medicine and eradicate genetic diseases. However, the technique is not perfect and needs improvements. A new paper improves this system by creating a novel Cas9 fusion: ExoCas9. This fusion produces a higher rate of overall gene targeting and bias the spectrum of DNA lesions produc
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Scientific American Content: Global

Why Pancreatic Cancer Is on the RisePancreatic cancer will soon be the second-biggest cause of cancer deaths -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

To shore up beaches, just add sand?Sand nourishment projects aim to preserve California's iconic sandy beaches-but little is known about the long-term effectiveness-and unintended impacts-of these sometimes multimillion dollar interventions.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research suggests water appeared while Earth was still growingA team including UChicago cosmochemist Nicolas Dauphas performed the largest study to date of oxygen isotopes in lunar rocks, and found a small but measurable difference in the makeup of the moon and Earth.Published March 28 in Science Advances, the research proposes that Earth acquired the majority of its water during the main stage of its growth--which counters a popular theory.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fluorescent dye could enable sharper biological imagingA team of researchers at MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital has now taken a major step toward making short-wave infrared (SWIR) imaging widely available.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's mission to touch the sun arrives in FloridaNASA's Parker Solar Probe has arrived in Florida to begin final preparations for its launch to the Sun, scheduled for July 31, 2018.
8h
Ingeniøren

Efter analyse-skandalen: Vores fjorde får stadig langt mere kvælstof, end landbrugspakken forudsåForeløbige tal fra Aarhus Universitet korrigeret for både misvisende analyser og mængden af regn viser, at udvaskningen af kvælstof faldt en smule i 2016. Men der er stadig langt ned til regeringens fremskrivning.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Ny professor i præcisionsmedicin i HvidovreOverlæge Hartwig Siebner skal som ny professor i præcisionsmedicin finde nøglen til diagnostik og behandling til den enkelte patient ved hjælp af billeder af hjernen
8h
Futurity.org

A.I. creates ‘maps’ of immune system fighting cancerUsing artificial intelligence and deep learning on very high-resolution images of tumor tissue, researchers produced maps of how the immune system fights cancer. By combining data on pathology images of 13 types of cancer and correlating that with clinical and genomic data, the team of researchers were able to identify tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs), called TIL maps, which will enable canc
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Opinion: AI like HAL 9000 can never exist because real emotions aren't programmableHAL 9000 is one of the best-known artificial intelligence characters of modern film. This superior form of sentient computer embarks on a mission to Jupiter, along with a human crew, in Stanley Kubrick's iconic film 2001: A Space Odyssey, which is currently celebrating its 50th year since release.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reaction adds chiral groups to nitrogen rings without first installing reactive groupsA trio of researchers at the University of Cambridge has come up with a new way to control adding chirality to nitrogen rings without first installing reactive groups on them. In their paper published in the journal Science, Robert Phipps and grad students Rupert Proctor and Holly Davis, describe the new reaction process and possible uses for it.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rolls-Royce sells German unit L'OrangeBritish engine maker Rolls-Royce said Monday it has sold German division L'Orange for 700 million euros ($860 million) to US group Woodward.
8h
Futurity.org

Crazy heat produces metal mixes not found in natureEngineers can now combine up to eight different metals into a single uniformly mixed particle that’s 100 billionths of a meter in size or smaller. “This method enables new combinations of metals that do not exist in nature and do not otherwise go together,” says Chao Wang, assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at Johns Hopkins University and a coauthor of the study in Scien
8h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Gene ExpressionA new algorithm scrutinizes the most hard-to-read segments of the genome.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lufthansa cancels 800 flights Tuesday in German airport strikesGerman airline giant Lufthansa said it will cancel "more than 800" flights Tuesday as public-sector workers walk out on strike for more pay, hobbling major airports like Frankfurt.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple co-founder protests Facebook by shutting down accountApple co-founder Steve Wozniak is shutting down his Facebook account as the social media giant struggles to cope with the worst privacy crisis in its history.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

Flashes in the Night: The Mystery of Fast Radio BurstsAstronomers are racing to figure out what causes powerful bursts of radio light in the distant cosmos -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Science | The Guardian

BBC Radio 4 broke accuracy rules in Nigel Lawson climate change interviewOfcom says controversial claims, including on the frequency of extreme weather events, went unchallenged BBC Radio 4 broke accuracy rules by failing to sufficiently challenge the climate change denier Nigel Lawson’s controversial claims in an interview , the broadcasting watchdog has ruled. Lord Lawson appeared on a Radio 4 programme last summer denying the concept of climate change, which prompt
8h
The Atlantic

The Report on Race That Shook AmericaI n July 1967 , when President Lyndon B. Johnson formed a commission to analyze the riots then engulfing several major American cities, the radical wing of the civil-rights movement eyed his appointees with grave skepticism. Not only did the 11-person commission abound with the most conventional of politicians—including its chairman, Illinois Governor Otto Kerner—but a mere two of them were black
9h
Popular Science

Puffins are donning sexy little sunglasses in the name of scienceAnimals The eyewear can help us understand the puffin perspective. Puffins don’t need sunglasses. Despite the glare off the shining sea and snow, these lil birds have managed to survive for many years without the aid of fashionable…
9h
Feed: All Latest

'Far Cry 5' Review: All Games Are Illusions, But This Is Nothing MoreIn every game, the experience only holds up as far as you can see it. In 'Far Cry 5,' the experience doesn't even hold up that far.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Thermoelectric nanodevice based on Majorana fermions is proposedIn March 1938, the young Italian physicist Ettore Majorana disappeared mysteriously, leaving his country's scientific community shaken. The episode remains unexplained, despite Leonardo Scascia's attempt to unravel the enigma in his book The Disappearance of Majorana (1975).
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Printed thermo-plasmonic heat patterns for neurological disorder treatmentA KAIST team presented a highly customizable neural stimulation method. The research team developed a technology that can print the heat pattern on a micron scale to enable the control of biological activities remotely. The researchers integrated a precision inkjet printing technology with bio-functional thermo-plasmonic nanoparticles to achieve a selective nano-photothermal neural stimulation met
9h
New Scientist - News

World’s first over-the-phone abortion service hailed a successAn over-the-phone abortion service to end unwanted pregnancies in their early stages – operating in Australia - has been found to be safe and effective
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Low-cost science kits help fill experimental gaps facing African college studentsHaving access to basic equipment like test tubes and centrifuges to perform simple science experiments is a given in most American universities. Not so in Africa, where students face a shortage of equipment needed to undertake even basic laboratory experiments.
9h
Viden

Svindel, likes, fordele og påvirkning: Derfor vrimler det med falske facebookprofiler270 millioner falske profiler på verdensplan tjener mange forskellige formål, fortæller DR's korrespondent.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How cellphones are killing gorillas, and other threats to apes you didn't know aboutAll great apes are considered severely endangered. It's possible that 100 years from now, species such as orangutans will be wiped off the planet entirely.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mathematicians devise new model to study response of endovascular aneurysm sealingResearchers at the University of Liverpool have developed a mathematical model that has the potential to improve the performance of endovascular aneurysm sealing (EVAS), which is an innovative procedure to treat abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAA).
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new JPEG format for virtual reality, drones and self-driving carsThe Joint Photographic Experts Group (JPEG), an international committee headed by an EPFL professor, has just unveiled JPEG XS. With this new format, the image-compression process uses less energy, and higher-quality images can be sent with low latency over broadband networks like 5G. JPEG XS will have applications in areas such as virtual reality, augmented reality, space imagery, self-driving ca
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What you should do if bitten by a snakeThe most dangerous snake you are likely to meet in northern Europe are vipers and grass snakes, which are generally only dangerous to children and dogs.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study reveals increased snowfall in Antarctica over last two centuriesThe first comprehensive study of snowfall across Antarctica provides vital information in the study of future sea-level rise.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cambridge Analytica is 'only the beginning,' says data expertFacebook Cambridge Analytica DataDr. Yves-Alexandre de Montjoye has warned of the risk of privacy attacks that happen through friends.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineers pioneer greener and cheaper technique for biofuel productionA team of engineers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) recently discovered that a naturally occurring bacterium, Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum TG57, isolated from waste generated after harvesting mushrooms, is capable of directly converting cellulose, a plant-based material, to biobutanol.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Everything you wanted to know about wildland forest fires but were afraid to askA team of fire ecologists released a report this week titled "Everything You Wanted To Know About Wildland Fires" summarizing the state of knowledge about forest fires on public lands. This report comes just days after the US Congress passed the Wildfire Suppression Funding and Forest Management Activities Act as part of the federal omnibus appropriations bill, and calls into question the activiti
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unlocking the secrets of iceThe complex properties of water and ice are not well understood but a team from UCL and the ISIS Neutron and Muon Source have revealed new information about a phase of ice called ice II.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

It's all about the (stem cell) neighborhoodStem cells have the ability to develop, or differentiate, into the many cell types in the body. They also serve as a repair system to replace aged or damaged cells. With their regenerative abilities, stem cells offer enormous potential in treating many diseases. Researchers at Duke-NUS Medical School have now identified how the stem cell neighbourhood keeps stem cells in the gut alive.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dynamics of microtubulesFilamentous polymers called microtubules play vital roles in chromosome segregation and molecular transport. An LMU team has now examined how microtubule lengths vary in response to changes in the availability of their protein components.
10h
Live Science

Did You Buy Bitcoins? Your Brain's Anatomy Might Be to BlameScans show people who can endure greater risk share certain neurological features.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sulfites and bisulfites in shallow lakes may have set the stage for Earth's first biological moleculesAround 4 billion years ago, Earth was an inhospitable place, devoid of oxygen, bursting with volcanic eruptions, and bombarded by asteroids, with no signs of life in even the simplest forms. But somewhere amid this chaotic period, the chemistry of the Earth turned in life's favor, giving rise, however improbably, to the planet's very first organisms.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Imaging method evaluates cell functional changes and wound healingKyle Quinn, assistant professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Arkansas, has published a review highlighting recent advances in autofluorescence imaging and discussing its role in evaluating cell metabolism.
10h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Delusions of skin infestation may not be so rareDelusional infestation, an unwavering belief that one’s skin is overrun with creatures or objects, may not be as rare as previously thought, researchers say.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fluorescent dye could enable sharper biological imagingFluorescence imaging is widely used for visualizing biological tissues such as the back of the eye, where signs of macular degeneration can be detected. It is also commonly used to image blood vessels during reconstructive surgery, allowing surgeons to make sure the vessels are properly connected.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Cloudy VenusOur sister planet Venus is a dynamic and unusual place. Strong winds swirl around the planet, dragging thick layers of cloud with them as they go. These fierce winds move so speedily that they display 'super-rotation': Earth's can move at up to a fifth of our planet's rotation speed, but winds on Venus can travel up to 60 times faster than the planet.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Exotic binary starsCataclysmic variable stars (CVs) are white dwarf stars that are accreting from an orbiting, low mass binary companion star. The accretion is facilitated by the proximity of the stars; typical orbital periods range from about one to ten hours. Although the family of these exotic CV binaries is heterogeneous, there are, roughly speaking, four classes characterized by the accretion physics, eruptions
10h
Feed: All Latest

Why Pure Reason Won’t End American TribalismWIRED Columnist Robert Wright on what Steven Pinker’s new bestseller 'Enlightment Now' gets wrong about our polarized politics.
10h
Feed: All Latest

Fancy New Suspension Could Make Car Rides a Lot SmootherIt works sort of like noise-cancelling headphones, eliminating bumps with movement in the opposite direction.
10h
Live Science

This Mysterious Marijuana Syndrome Is Relieved by Hot ShowersA mysterious vomiting condition tied to marijuana use has an even stranger antidote: hot showers. Here's a possible reason.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

Native Americans, Fossil Fuels and Climate ChangeIndigenous people are rejecting oil, coal and gas extraction in favor of renewable energy to save their land, increase employment and fight global warming -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change and its effects on Rocky Mountain alpine lakesAlpine lakes in the Rocky Mountains are important biological hot spots of that ecosystem. These lakes do not have enough nutrients to support large amounts of aquatic life because of the cold climate in the surrounding watershed. Rather, the lakes are home to oligotrophs, organisms that grow slowly and can survive in harsh aquatic environments. The lakes also host a variety of cold-water fish, suc
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists discover that cells contain mitochondria specialized to build fatsMitochondria, known to most people as the "powerhouses of the cell," have been recognized for decades as the cellular organelle where sugars and fats are oxidized to generate energy. Now, new research by UCLA scientists has found that not all mitochondria fit this definition. Within each cell a group of specialized mitochondria can be found attached to fat droplets. Rather than burn fat to create
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Hubble finds an Einstein ringThis image is packed full of galaxies! A keen eye can spot exquisite elliptical galaxies and spectacular spirals, seen at various orientations: edge-on with the plane of the galaxy visible, face-on to show off magnificent spiral arms, and everything in between.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bound for Mars—countdown to first interplanetary launch from CaliforniaIn the early morning hours of May 5, millions of Californians will have an opportunity to witness a sight they have never seen before - the historic first interplanetary launch from America's West Coast. On board the 189-foot-tall (57.3-meter) United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket will be NASA's InSight spacecraft, destined for the Elysium Planitia region located in Mars' northern hemisphere. The
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Electron transfer and oxidative damage in DNA in a biomimetic crowding environmentIt is known that an electron hole moves through double helical DNA and induces oxidative damage at guanine sites. To date, this process has only been investigated in aqueous dilute solutions.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Robots that can learn like humansResearchers say that artificial intelligence (AI) is now superior to human intelligence in supervised learning using vast amounts of labeled data to perform specific tasks. However, it is considered difficult to realize human-like intelligence using only supervised learning because all supervised labels cannot be obtained for all the sensory information required by robots.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Global sodium variation revealed by satellite optical spectroscopic observationsAurora light emission appears at high altitudes in the range 100-300 km in the polar atmosphere. Auroras are caused by energetic particles precipitating from space near the Earth.Auroral particle precipitation can induce many kinds of effects in the Earth's atmosphere.
10h
Science | The Guardian

Killer robots: pressure builds for ban as governments meetCountries spending billions on ‘third revolution in warfare’ as UN debates regulation of AI-powered weapons They will be “weapons of terror, used by terrorists and rogue states against civilian populations. Unlike human soldiers, they will follow any orders however evil,” says Toby Walsh, professor of artificial intelligence at the University of New South Wales, Australia. “These will be weapons
10h
Ingeniøren

Silo væltede forkert vej: Politi hyrer ekstern ekspertKORRIGERET: Fredag eftermiddag gik nedrivningen af en silo i Vordingborg galt. Men det er ikke første gang, en sprængning på havnen ikke gik som planlagt.
10h
Live Science

Could Beasts Like Frankenstein's Monster Exist in Real Life?"Monsters" from science fiction are more common in the real world than you may expect.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

Study Casts Doubt on Existence of a Potential "Earth 2.0"A new analysis of data from NASA’s planet-hunting Kepler mission suggests one of the telescope’s prized finds, Kepler 452 b, might be a statistical mirage -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Live Science

Glass 'Bread Crumbs' Could Lead the Way to Missing CraterGlassy debris found in Antarctica could reveal an ancient meteor crater thousands of miles away.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breast cancer therapy: All clear for the heartMany breast cancer therapies cause damage to the heart. However, in the largest study of its kind so far, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg have now shown that the risk of death from heart disease in breast cancer patients following radiotherapy or chemotherapy is no higher than it is among the average population. Good risk management in the hospitals as well a
10h
Dagens Medicin

Midt i glæden over Svendborgsagens afgørelseDesværre vil endnu mere detailregulering og forsøg på at gøre reglerne ’klarere’ imidlertid løbe en risiko for netop at befordre sidstnævnte.
10h
New Scientist - News

Touching personal medical stories are no substitute for scienceRoutine screening for prostate cancer seems like a good thing, but for every life saved many more are blighted by unnecessary treatments
11h
The Atlantic

The White Men's Club Leading America's Largest CitiesFor a brief period beginning last December, London Breed had gained entry into a club that has, of late, almost exclusively belonged to white men: the ranks of big-city mayors. Breed, a 43-year-old African American woman and president of San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors, had automatically become the city’s acting mayor following the sudden death of Ed Lee, who had served for seven years befor
11h
Ingeniøren

Techtopia #47: Hvordan fungerer Internet of Things i en smart city?Podcast: Internet of Things er rygraden i en smart city. Men hvordan udveksler dimserne data? Det gør de via netværksteknologien LoRaWan. Lær (næsten) alt om den!
11h
Ingeniøren

VIDEO: Russisk postdrone smadrer mod mur på jomfrurejsenDriftssikkerheden for dronelevering er måske ikke så god, som vi (og det russiske postvæsen) gik og troede.
11h
Ingeniøren

Not so smart city: Ingen vil købe data på markedspladsCity Data Exchange skulle være markedsplads for smart city-data fra København. Men trods ni millioner kroner i offentligt tilskud vil ingen virksomheder købe og sælge data på platformen.
11h
Dagens Medicin

Hvor er Mathias?I dag, hvor vi alle ved hvad Mathias fejlede, er der jo ingen af de implicerede læger, der ville have handlet, som de gjorde den søndag nat. Men er det nok til at fejlen ikke sker igen? Noget tyder på, at det er det ikke. Kommentar fra Mathias’ far til Dagens Medicins artikel 6. april 2018: ’Styrelsen underkender udtalelser fra tre sagkyndige i klagesag’.
11h
Ingeniøren

Realitytjek: Kan man bygge mælkebøtte-shelters på Mars?To arkitektstuderende har et bud på, hvordan man kan tappe statisk elektricitet fra støvstorme på Mars. Ingeniøren har bedt videnskaben gå konceptet igennem.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Physical activity helps fight genetic risk of heart disease, Stanford-led study findsKeeping fit, even if you're born with a high genetic risk for heart disease, still works to keep your heart healthy, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When heart disease runs in the family, exercise may be best defenseAs fitness increases, heart risk decreases regardless of genetic risk.
11h
Dagens Medicin

Præhospital leder: Klagesager bør vurderes af sagkyndige med relevant baggrundJurist i det præhospitale beredskab i Region Hovedstaden måtte søge aktindsigt for at få afklaret, at afgørelse i klagesag omkring et meningitisdødsfald var truffet af en kontorchef, der er speciallæge i samfundsmedicin.
11h
Science : NPR

Trump Touts Pruitt's 'Great Job,' But EPA Rollbacks Have A Long Road AheadEmbattled EPA chief Scott Pruitt has moved to reverse or weaken dozens of environmental measures. But many face a slow regulatory process, and may yet be undone. (Image credit: George Frey/Getty Images)
12h
Ingeniøren

Politiet indberetter ikke ulovlige overvågningskameraerSelvom Københavns Politi i et år har haft til opgave at registrere overvågningskameraer, der er sat op ulovligt, så er der ikke indberettet et eneste. Politiet bruger selv materiale fra kameraerne til efterforskning.
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Big increase in Antarctic snowfallThe annual extra now compared with the early 1800s has a water volume twice that of the Dead Sea.
13h
Science | The Guardian

Caught in the crossfire: little dodo nears extinctionIllegal pigeon hunting across Samoa is risking the extinction of the country’s national bird: the little dodo or manumea. Will this little-known island pigeon suffer the same fate as its namesake? Nearly two hundred years after the extinction of the dodo, Sir William Jardin – a Scottish naturalist and bird-aficionado – described another odd, bulky, island pigeon. From the island of Samoa, this on
13h
Ingeniøren

Nu starter jagten på varmt vand i Lolland-Falsters undergrundStore dele af Lolland og Falster er omfattet af en ny tilladelse til efterforskning efter geotermisk varme, som selskabet Nail Resources Denmark netop har fået af energiministeren.
13h
Science-Based Medicine

Another pebble in the quackademic integrative avalancheWe've documented the infiltration of quackery into academic medicine through the "integration" of mystical and prescientific treatment modalities into medicine. Here, we look at a pebble in the quackademic avalanche. Is it too late for the pebbles to vote?
13h
Science | The Guardian

Natural Causes by Barbara Ehrenreich review – wise words on real wellnessThe author and activist’s sharp critique of what she calls an ‘epidemic of overdiagnosis’ is a joyous celebration of life You may view your body as a temple – particularly if you exercise ferociously, detox regularly, desist from alcohol, tobacco, sugar and all processed foods and positivity seeps out of every pore – but the indefatigable Barbara Ehrenreich has news for you. No amount of mindfulne
13h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Velfærdsteknologier glemmes i hverdagenKommunerne indkøber velfærdsteknologier for hundreder millioner af kroner, som kan forbedre...
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

5 questions for Mark Zuckerberg as he heads to CongressCongress has plenty of questions for Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, who will testify on Capitol Hill Tuesday and Wednesday about the company's ongoing data-privacy scandal and how it failed to guard against other abuses of its service.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Ideas' conference to grapple with dark side of techAt a conference where thinkers and luminaries gather to discuss world-changing ideas and innovations, the talk is shifting to the dark side.
14h
Science | The Guardian

Should we all get a health check?Testing for high blood pressure can save lives – but experts say that unnecessary tests, such as whole body scans, may just find problems that probably don’t need treatment. So what should you be tested for? Most health checks are designed to look for risk factors or early signs of diseases – the two most common being heart disease or cancer. A quarter of premature deaths are caused by cardiovasc
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Child advocates ask FTC to investigate YouTubeRead carefully through the fine print of YouTube's terms of service and you might notice that you've affirmed you are old enough to watch it.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook to send Cambridge Analytica data-use notices MondayGet ready to find out if your Facebook data has been swept up in the Cambridge Analytica scandal.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wheat research discovery yields genetic secrets that could shape future cropsA new study has isolated a gene controlling shape and size of spikelets in wheat in a breakthrough which could help breeders deliver yield increases in one of the world's most important crops.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

There's no such thing as oversharing in conservationSocial gadflies in an organization are the new superheroes of conservation, according to a study in this month's Nature Sustainability.
14h
Science | The Guardian

Can you solve it? The hipster bicycle raceFive moustache-twiddling riddles UPDATE: The solutions can be read here Hi guzzlers, Today, a spring selection of bite-sized brain food. Continue reading...
14h
Viden

87 millioner Facebook-brugere får besked om lækage i dagFacebook giver også 2,2 milliarder brugere overblik over, hvilke data deres konto giver adgang til.
15h
Ingeniøren

Sikkerhedsfolk slår alarm: GDPR-nedlukning vil fjerne nøglekilde til efterforskningNye persondataregler står til at ulovliggøre offentlige WHOIS-registre. En katastrofe, siger sikkerhedsekspert.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Resistance training enhances recycling capacity in musclesA new study at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland reports that autophagosome content is increased by resistance training in previously untrained young men, but this response may be blunted by aging.
15h
Science | The Guardian

A Neuroscientist Explains: how we read words - podcastFor our final episode of this series, Daniel Glaser (with a little misguided help from his producer Max ) attempts to unpick what the brain does – and doesn’t do – when we read Subscribe and review on iTunes and Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter A Neuroscientist Explains is back for its second season. In each episode, Daniel Glaser and series’ producer Max revisit a column f
15h
The Guardian's Science Weekly

A Neuroscientist Explains: how we read words - podcastFor our final episode of this series, Daniel Glaser (with a little misguided help from his producer Max) attempts to unpick what the brain does – and doesn’t do – when we read
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

There's no such thing as oversharing in conservationSocial gadflies in an organization are the new superheroes of conservation, according to a study in this month's Nature Sustainability.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wheat research discovery yields genetic secrets that could shape future cropsA new study has isolated a gene controlling shape and size of spikelets in wheat in a breakthrough which could help breeders deliver yield increases in one of the world's most important crops.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vaccination apathy fueled by decades of misinformationA legacy of social and political factors rather than bad parenting may be influencing people's decisions not to vaccinate their children, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biomarker helps identify 'window of opportunity' for cancer chemotherapy timingAngiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels, is essential for tumor growth. A new study reported in The American Journal of Pathology describes a vascular stabilization biomarker that can visualize blood vessel activity, thus optimizing the timing of anticancer therapies including anti-angiogenics.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Public awareness of cancer drug shortages is lowThe US population is largely unaware that there are shortages in the availability of cancer drugs, according to a study published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Kids with regular health care less likely to have life-threatening diabetic ketoacidosisA key factor in reducing the risk of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a potentially life-threatening complication of type 1 diabetes, in children at diagnosis of type 1 diabetes, is having a regular health care provider, according to a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
16h
Feed: All Latest

Groups Allege YouTube Is Violating Law That Protects KidsYouTube COPPA Kids FTCIn complaint to the FTC, child-health, privacy, and consumer groups say YouTube is targeting kids improperly.
17h
New on MIT Technology Review

In blockchain we trustTo understand why blockchain matters, look past the wild speculation at what is being built underneath, argue the authors of The Age of Cryptocurrency and its newly published follow-up, The Truth Machine: The Blockchain and the Future of Everything .
17h
Ingeniøren

København: Storstilet markedsplads for smart city-data er gået i ståSmart city-platformen City Data Exchange skulle gøre København smart med data om trafik og energi. Men i stedet fik borgerne priser på fladskærme og mobiler.
18h
Big Think

Random fact roundup: Pizza, heavy metal, and flatulenceWhat do pizza, heavy metal, and farts have in common? They're all in our random fact roundup! Read More
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Depression negatively impacts heart and stroke patientsPeople with cardiovascular disease who haven't been diagnosed with depression but are at high-risk for it are more likely to report worse healthcare experiences and use emergency room services more often than those diagnosed with depression. Heart attack patients diagnosed with depression are more likely to be hospitalized, use emergency rooms and annually spend more on healthcare than heart attac
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study found people would rather pop a pill or sip tea than exercise to treat high blood pressureSurvey respondents were more likely to choose a daily cup of tea or a pill over exercise to 'treat' high blood pressure in an imaginary scenario, but many didn't think the interventions were worth the benefits. When the perceived gain of treating hypertension was higher -- one or five extra years of life versus one extra month, for example -- survey respondents were more likely to say they would.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Greener and cheaper technique for biofuel productionA research team has found that a natural bacterium isolated from mushroom crop residue can directly convert cellulose to biobutanol, a biofuel.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists breed bacteria that make tiny high-energy carbon ringsResearchers have used directed evolution to breed bacteria that produce synthetically versatile, high-energy carbon rings in an efficient way.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

It's all about the (stem cell) neighborhoodResearchers have now identified how the stem cell neighborhood, known as a niche, keeps stem cells in the gut alive. Their results provide new insights into the structure of the stem cell niche in health and after injury.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New blood test useful to detect people at risk of developing Alzheimer's diseaseAlzheimer's disease is thought to begin long before patients show typical symptoms like memory loss. Scientists have now developed a blood test for Alzheimer's disease and found that it can detect early indicators of the disease long before the first symptoms appear in patients. The blood test would thus offer an opportunity to identify those at risk and may thereby open the door to new avenues in
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mechanism vital to keeping blood stem cells functional uncoveredHematopoietic stem cells, that form mature blood cells, require a very precise amount of protein to function -- and defective regulation of protein production is common in certain types of aggressive human blood cancers. Now, a research team has uncovered a completely new mechanism that controls how proteins are produced to direct stem cell function.
21h
Futurity.org

How the flu virus makes us sickResearchers have discovered new information about how flu viruses infect people, which could lead to new and more effective flu medicines. Using the protein called CD151, the team showed that flu viruses can hijack a unique class of proteins in the body’s respiratory cellular machinery. The viruses clone and multiply in the body before invading and colonizing new victims while multiplying further
21h
Futurity.org

Are baby wipes and dust key ‘ingredients’ for food allergies?A mix of environmental and genetic factors must coexist to trigger food allergies in infants and children, a new study suggests. “This is a recipe for developing food allergy…” The factors contributing to food allergy include the genetics that alter skin absorbency, use of infant cleansing wipes that leave soap on the skin, skin exposure to allergens in dust, and skin exposure to food from those
22h
Futurity.org

Macular degeneration tied to aging immune cellsAging immune cells increase the risk of age-related macular degeneration, a new study suggests. Studying mice and cells from patients, researchers found that as immune cells called macrophages age, they are more likely to contribute to the inflammation and abnormal blood vessel growth that damage vision in macular degeneration. “…microRNA-150 may be a potential therapeutic target, or at least a b
22h
Futurity.org

This eye fat could fight vision loss in diabetesA new study finds that a particular type of lipid, or fat—thought to only exist in the skin—lives in your eye and might play a major role in deterring the eye disease diabetic retinopathy. One of the most disabling complications of diabetes, diabetic retinopathy is the leading cause of new cases of vision loss among adults. “Our study presents an unexpected finding that the connections between ce
22h
Futurity.org

U.S. will see more wildfires, but not everywhereA new study suggests that while wildfires in the US will become more frequent overall, changes will not be straightforward and uniform—some areas may even see a decrease. Scientists have long believed that wildfires would become more frequent as global temperatures rise, but comparatively few studies have forecast fire behavior by region. Using climate projections of future temperature and precip
22h
cognitive science

New method enables researchers to peer deep inside a mouse’s brain and watch astrocytes’ influence over the communication between nerve cells in real timesubmitted by /u/SophiaDevetzi [link] [comments]
23h
NYT > Science

Night at the Space Museum: 10 Open Bars and Tons of Kubrick ReferencesYuri’s Night, a yearly worldwide celebration of space, was held at the National Air and Space Museum, as it enters a new era with a new leader and plans for a big renovation.
23h

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