8h
The Atlantic

Remembering Animation's Legendary Isao TakahataMuch of Isao Takahata’s 1991 animated film Only Yesterday is told through vivid recollections: Its Japanese title, Omoide Poro Poro , literally means “memories come tumbling down.” The protagonist, Taeko Okajima, is a 27-year old woman heading to the Japanese countryside on vacation when she is idly struck by memories of her 10-year-old self, formative stories and events that take on new meaning
8h
The Atlantic

Why My Grandmother Carried a Plastic Brain in Her PurseI remember the bag from my childhood. Transparent and oblong, just large enough to fit a handful of papers, a few essentials, and a plastic brain. My 93-year-old grandmother, Marjorie Pearlson, once loved this bag, filling it with conversation starters. She was a woman who could talk to any stranger and pull an organ replica out of her purse with a straight face. Growing up, I would witness this
8h
Dagens Medicin

Andelen af børn og unge med psykiatriske diagnoser er fordoblet på få årDe seneste syv år er andelen af børn og unge, som får en psykiatrisk diagnose, steget fra fire til ni pct. Ingen grund til bekymring, mener formand for Børne og Ungdomspsykiatrisk Selskab.
8h
Futurity.org

Boys with asthma more likely to break bonesIndependent of age, boys with asthma who had between 1 and 3 recent wheezing episodes were 30 percent more likely to fracture a bone than boys who had not experienced a wheeze, research finds. The same association was not found in girls, although older girls with the disease did have an increased risk of fracture. “What we do in early childhood determines what could happen in later life, and whet
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How you helped create the crisis in private dataFacebook Cambridge AnalyticaAs Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg testifies before Congress, he's likely wondering how his company got to the point where he must submit to public questioning. It's worth pondering how we, the Facebook-using public, got here too.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discover three new, highly threatened chameleon species in MadagascarMadagascar is a chameleon paradise. A team of researchers has now discovered three new species, among them a beautifully coloured rainbow chameleon. These species are all restricted to very small ranges, and are probably highly threatened.
8h
Feed: All Latest

The 'Despacito' YouTube Hack Was Probably Pretty Simple to Pull OffThe removal of YouTube's most popular video this week was likely the result of a low-cost phishing scam rather than sophisticated hacking.
8h
Live Science

This 'Disappearing' Optical Illusion Proves Your Brain Is Too Smart for Its Own GoodStare at these colors for 20 seconds and see what happens.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Location and voice technology are the future of retailRetailers, struggling to connect with their customers, have been trialling new technologies to blend in-store and digital experiences.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Preventing sexual violence—lessons from rebel armies in Burundi and UgandaI conduct research on wartime sexual violence. But hold on.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Blazing a path for buried bits in quantum chipsNIST researchers have pioneered a process that drastically simplifies fabrication of the kind of nanoscale microchip features that may soon form the basis of a quantum computer, among other applications.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Are baby boomers returning to religion?Many in the baby boomer generation—known for ushering in an era of protests that brought about transformative change in American society—are increasingly turning to churches, temples and mosques to find meaning in their later years of life.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Target Earth—how asteroids made an impact on AustraliaOur planet has had a few close encounters with asteroids of late.
9h
Live Science

Nubian Stone Tablets Unearthed in African 'City of the Dead'A vast "city of the dead" in Sudan revealed stones inscribed with the oldest language in southern Africa.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plants 'hedge their bets' in germination—the route to better crop yieldsResearchers at the University of Birmingham have revealed how plants 'hedge their bets' by getting their seeds to germinate at different times. Their work identifies routes to reduce variability in agriculture and produce more consistent outcomes for farmers and food production, according to research published today.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Poll finds youth distrust social media, planning to voteAs debate swirls about tech companies' responsibility to protect their users' data and Congress questions Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg about third parties mining information about millions of site users, a new poll suggests that the romance between college-age Americans and social media may be cooling, or at least isn't passionate.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Synchrotron science could give soybeans a boostScientists at the University of Liverpool, together with Japanese colleagues, have gained new insight into how soil bacteria sense and adapt to the levels of oxygen in their environment. The findings could be used to help develop new treatments to promote crop growth and tackle disease.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Confirmation bias: I believe, therefore it's trueThere's no shortage of global issues. Nuclear tensions, increasing drug use, genocide in Syria, mass shootings, extreme weather events, animals going extinct, obesity ... these are only a few on an almost endless list.
9h
New Scientist - News

Facebook to examine tens of thousands of apps for data misuseThe US Senate questioned Mark Zuckerberg yesterday about Cambridge Analytica. He said Facebook will investigate thousands of other apps for similar misuse
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Capturing and analysing limb injuries in race horsesMassey University researchers are investigating limb injuries in race horses by capturing the 3-D movements of their limbs on camera and modelling it on computers.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The thermodynamics of computingInformation processing requires a lot of energy. Energy-saving computer systems could make computing more efficient, but the efficiency of these systems can't be increased indefinitely, as ETH physicists show.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

3-D human modelling technology projects body shape and size within 10 secondsShopping well-fitting clothes online or making bespoke garments can be done more easily with the intelligent 3-D human modelling technology developed by The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU), which digitally reconstructs the shape and size of a person accurately from two full body photographs within 5-10 seconds.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Duel of the inflammatory master regulators—insights for drug discoveryAnti-inflammatory drugs such as dexamethasone can have harmful side effects on the skin, bones and metabolism. Structural biology research from Emory University School of Medicine has implications for the long-standing quest to separate these drugs' benefits from their side effects.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: 3-D-molded interconnect devicesAn alternative to conventional circuit boards, these '3-D-molded interconnect devices' add electrical connectivity to the surface of three-dimensional structures.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shedding new light on laser additive manufacturingAdditive manufacturing (AM, also known as 3-D printing) allows us to create incredibly complex shapes, which would not be possible using traditional manufacturing techniques. However, objects created using AM have different properties from traditional manufacturing routes, which is sometimes a disadvantage.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Turning injectable medicines into inhalable treatments with the help of smart phone componentsImagine if all childhood vaccines could get delivered with an inhaler rather than shots; or wiping away tuberculosis bacteria in a patient's lungs with an inhaler; or disinfecting a hospital room thoroughly with a diffuser.
9h
Feed: All Latest

Raytheon's New Radar Could Help Bring Flying Cars to Our CitiesAs drones and flying cars move into reality, we need radar systems better equipped for keeping an eye on everyone.
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Feed: All Latest

The Best Nintendo Switch Deals and Console Bundles (2018)The best Nintendo Switch console deals and bundle prices. Also the games and essentials you'll want on day one.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Indigenous people's experiences on social media differ significantly from the mainstream population: national studyA new national report released today on Indigenous Australians' social media practices has found social media plays a complex role in the lives of Indigenous people, and often differs considerably from non-Indigenous populations.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Our sun—three different wavelengthsFrom March 20-23, 2018, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured three sequences of our sun in three different extreme ultraviolet wavelengths. The resulting images illustrate how different features that appear in one sequence are difficult, if not impossible, to see in the others.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers find manganese oxide-coated filters remove contaminants from hospital wastewaterResearchers at Penn State have developed a water filtration system that removes contaminants and reduces toxicity in hospital wastewater.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deep learning transforms smartphone microscopes into laboratory-grade devicesResearchers at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering have demonstrated that deep learning, a powerful form of artificial intelligence, can discern and enhance microscopic details in photos taken by smartphones. The technique improves the resolution and color details of smartphone images so much that they approach the quality of images from laboratory-grade microscopes.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Materials that make heat worse for kids demand a rethink by designersIt is with some relief that Australians are leaving behind the excruciatingly hot days of summer. But did you ever stop to think about the role of design in making matters better – or worse? Spending all day in air-conditioned rooms before walking out to a car that has baked in the sun all day is an exercise in extremes that many of us have faced. It's easy to forget these conditions are shaped an
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Extreme climate variability destabilizing West Coast ecosystemsNew research shows that extreme climate variability over the last century in western North America may be destabilizing both marine and terrestrial ecosystems.
9h
NYT > Science

Chinese Sperm Bank Seeks Donors. Only Good Communists Need Apply.A Beijing hospital advertised for donors with “good ideological thoughts” who “support the leadership of the Chinese Communist Party.”
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NYT > Science

Australia Diary: For the BirdsA Sydneysider rediscovers her wild home through the eyes and ears of a New Yorker.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding microbial competition for nitrogenNitrogen is a hot commodity in the surface ocean. Primary producers including phytoplankton and other microorganisms consume and transform it into organic molecules to build biomass, while others transform inorganic forms to access their chemical store of energy. All of these steps are part of the complex nitrogen cycle of the upper water column.
9h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Should you bank your baby’s umbilical cord blood? Here’s a guide for thinking through the issue.The professionals have advice to give, but the decision is ultimately a personal one.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Expanding Global Access to Essential Heart MedicationsModernizing the World Health Organization's official list of vital medications -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Dagens Medicin

200 praktiserende læger kan tvinges på pension fra august 2019200 læger har fået dispensation fra at blive akkrediteret og skal derfor lukke deres praksis senest 31. august 2019. PLO-formand, Christian Freitag, kalder situationen alvorlig og vil tage initiativ til at drøfte sagen med regionerne.
9h
New on MIT Technology Review

CRISPR trials are about to begin in people—but we still don’t know how well it works in monkeysMonkey studies look encouraging but show there’s still a lot to learn about the gene-editing technology.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Tour of the Moon' 4K reduxIn the fall of 2011, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission released its original Tour of the Moon, a five-minute animation that takes the viewer on a virtual tour of our nearest neighbor in space. Six years later, the tour has been recreated in eye-popping 4K resolution, using the same camera path and drawing from the vastly expanded data trove collected by LRO in the intervening years.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Want computers to see better in the real world? Train them in virtual realityScientists have developed a new way to improve how computers "see" and "understand" objects in the real world by training the computers' visual systems in a virtual environment.
9h
Live Science

That's Cheating! Medieval Dice with No 1 or 2 Found on Street in NorwayThe dice had two 4s and 5s, but no 1s or 2s.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A cosmic gorilla effect could blind the detection of aliensA well-known experiment with young people bouncing a ball showed that observers focusing on counting the passes failed to detect a man in a gorilla suit crossing the screen. According to researchers at the University of Cádiz (Spain), something similar could be happening when astronomers seek intelligent, non-earthly radio signals, which perhaps manifest themselves in dimensions that escape our pe
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Does physical activity influence the health of future offspring?Physical and mental exercise can affect the learning ability of future offspring, at least in mice. This particular form of inheritance is mediated by certain RNA molecules that influence gene activity. These molecules accumulate in both the brain and germ cells following physical and mental activity. Prof. André Fischer and colleagues from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) i
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Birds migrate away from diseasesIn a unique study, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have mapped the origins of migratory birds. They used the results to investigate and discover major differences in the immune systems of sedentary and migratory birds. The researchers conclude that migratory species benefit from leaving tropical areas when it is time to raise their young, because moving away from diseases in the tropics e
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When enemies come to help"The enemy of my enemy is my friend." Now, researchers at the University of Zurich show that this principle also holds for crab spiders and flowering plants. While it's true that the spiders eat or drive away useful pollinators such as bees, they're also attracted by floral scent signals to come and help if the plant is attacked by insects intent on eating it.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Robust and inexpensive catalysts for hydrogen productionResearchers from the Ruhr University Bochum (RUB) and the University of Warwick were able to observe the smallest details of hydrogen production with the synthetic mineral pentlandite. This makes it possible to develop strategies for the design of robust and cost-effective catalysts for hydrogen production. The working groups of Prof. Wolfgang Schuhmann and Dr. Ulf-Peter Apfel from the RUB and the
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists discover a link between superconductivity and the periodic tableScientists from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and Skoltech have demonstrated the high-temperature superconductivity of actinium hydrides and discovered a general principle for calculating the superconductivity of hydrides based on the periodic table alone. The results of their study were published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A tool based on the use ofcarbon nanoparticles enables detection of antidepressants in urine samplesA University of Cordoba research group has designed a tool that enables detection of antidepressants in urine samples in low concentrations. This new method is uses a newly developed material based on carbon nanotubes on the inside of pipette tips normally used laboratory analysis.
9h
Ingeniøren

Danske politikere forstår ikke kunstig intelligens: »De fleste famler i blinde«Politikerne på Christiansborg skal sikre, at vi har en fornuftig og dækkende lovgivning, men både it-eksperter og politikerne selv mener ikke, at de danske lovgivere forstår kunstig intelligens.
9h
Ingeniøren

Zuckerberg i senatet: Undskylder for Cambridge Analytica-skandalenFacebooks stifter havde mere travlt med at undskylde end med at forklare, hvordan Facebook overvåger sine brugere, da han i går var indkaldt af senatet.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Can a Pill That Boosts "Resilience" Treat Depression?A clinical trial tests a new way to reverse the psychiatric disorder -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medscape's annual physician compensation report finds modest increase in physician payThis is the 2018 Medscape Annual Physician Compensation Report, which surveys more than 20,000 US physicians across 29 specialties on questions such as quality of life, salary, and more. It has been used by more than 470,000 physicians in the US to assess information on compensation, hours worked, time spent with patients, and what they find most rewarding -- and challenging -- about their jobs
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SPHERE reveals fascinating zoo of discs around young starsNew images from the SPHERE instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope are revealing the dusty discs surrounding nearby young stars in greater detail than previously achieved. They show a bizarre variety of shapes, sizes and structures, including the likely effects of planets still in the process of forming.
10h
The Atlantic

The Senate Tries to Figure Out FacebookMark Zuckerberg FacebookThe sound of the camera shutters told the story. On Tuesday, when Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg entered Room 216 of the Hart Senate Office Building to testify in front of the Senate Judiciary and Commerce committees, dozens of photographers crowded the witness table, and the space filled with the sound of rain beating on a tin roof. By the hearing’s end, five hours later, it faded to a slow drizzl
10h
The Atlantic

A Single Solution for New York's Two Biggest ProblemsWhen I was growing up in Brooklyn in the 1980s, it was a watchword for urban decay, notorious for its high levels of violent crime and joblessness. Most of our family friends fled the city as soon as they could cobble together a down payment for a house in the suburbs, and it was hard to blame them. But the Salams toughed it out, and we are now delighted to have done so. By the 2010s, New York Ci
10h
The Atlantic

The Myth of 'Learning Styles'In the early ‘90s, a New Zealand man named Neil Fleming decided to sort through something that had puzzled him during his time monitoring classrooms as a school inspector. In the course of watching 9,000 different classes, he noticed that only some teachers were able to reach each and every one of their students. What were they doing differently? Fleming zeroed in on how it is that people like to
10h
The Atlantic

Maine's Fitful Experiment With a New Way of VotingIn two months, Maine voters will go to the polls to select their nominees to succeed the state’s pugnacious two-term Republican governor, Paul LePage. Whether all of the candidates accept the results of those party primaries, however, remains a surprisingly open question. The June 12 balloting will be the first statewide elections in the nation to use ranked-choice voting, a system Maine voters a
10h
The Atlantic

One Way to Get Through to Trump? ChildrenIf President Trump decides to launch military strikes on Syria, following the most recent gas attacks by the Assad regime, it’s a good bet that children will be central to his rationale. In a tweet on Sunday, he mentioned young victims of the attacks: Many dead, including women and children, in mindless CHEMICAL attack in Syria. Area of atrocity is in lockdown and encircled by Syrian Army, making
10h
The Atlantic

Killing Eve Is a Sign of TV to ComeBBC America’s new drama Killing Eve , which debuted on Sunday night, is already one of the most critically acclaimed new shows of the year, alongside HBO’s Barry and Netflix’s The End of the F*ing World. And, like both those shows, it’s tricky to categorize. Killing Eve at its core is a cat-and-mouse spy story between an MI6 investigator named Eve Polastri (Sandra Oh) and a glamorous assassin k
10h
Dagens Medicin

PLO er tilfreds med nye ændringer af vagtlægegebyretPraktiserende lægers formand er glad for, at færre læger skal betale det omstridte vagtlægegebyr, men fastholder kritikken af, at gebyret ikke helt afskaffes.
10h
Ingeniøren

Siemens skal levere ladestandere til elbusser på SjællandEn aftale mellem Movia og Siemens skal give sikkerhed for, at infrastrukturen for elbusser er på plads, så operatørerne lettere kan byde ind med elbus-drift.
10h
The Scientist RSS

Worlds Largest Cell and Gene Therapy Plant OpensLonza will employ more than 200 full-time staff to work at the Texas-based facility, the company says.
11h
Dagens Medicin

Over halvdelen af kommunerne har tilknyttet faste læger på plejehjem62 pct. af landets kommuner har tilknyttet faste læger på et eller flere plejehjem. Projektchef i Vive mener, at der er en faglig gevinst for lægerne ved at være med i ordningen
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Having one eye better than the other may explain ants' left biasUnlike Derek Zoolander, ants don't have any difficulty turning left. New research from the University of Bristol has now found rock ants often have one eye slightly better than the other, which could help explain why most of them prefer to turn left, given the choice.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Baby fish led astray by high CO2 in oceansBaby fish will find it harder to reach secure shelters in future acidified oceans -- putting fish populations at risk, new research from the University of Adelaide has concluded.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wildfire smoke associated with more ER visits for heart, stroke ailments among seniorsExposure to smoke from wildfires was associated with increased rates of emergency room visits for heart- and stroke-related illness, especially among adults age 65 and older.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Simultaneous chemo and immunotherapy may be better for some with metastatic bladder cancerResearchers from Mount Sinai and Sema4, a health information company and Mount Sinai venture, have discovered that giving metastatic bladder cancer patients simultaneous chemotherapy and immunotherapy is safe and that patients whose tumors have certain genetic mutations may respond particularly well to this combination approach, according to the results of a clinical trial published in European Ur
11h
Ingeniøren

Analyse: Skandalesalg af vaccine-fabrik udstiller regeringens krig med kritiske revisorerSalget af den statslige vaccineproduktion på Amager er blevet en slagsmark, som kommer til at afgøre, om Rigsrevisionen i fremtiden vil blive taget alvorligt, når den kulegraver skandaler i det offentlige.
11h
Viden

Mogensens rumkapsel kan snart ses på teknisk museumRumkapslen, der sendte første dansker i verdensrummet, udstilles på Teknisk Museum i Helsingør.
11h
Science | The Guardian

We’re running out of time to stop killer robot weapons | Bonnie DochertyThe fully autonomous AI weapons now being developed could disastrously transform warfare. The UN must act fast It’s five years this month since the launch of the Campaign to Stop Killer Robots , a global coalition of non-governmental groups calling for a ban on fully autonomous weapons. This month also marks the fifth time that countries have convened at the United Nations in Geneva to address the
11h
The Atlantic

Converting to Buddhism as a Form of Political ProtestSHIRASGAON, India—More than 500 low-caste Hindus filled the Veera Maidan, an open field at the edge of a dusty Maharashtra village, on a recent Sunday night. Neighbors openly gawked from porches as the throngs of people filed in, many dressed in symbolic white saris and kurtas. Under floodlights, they chanted: “I shall have no faith in Rama and Krishna who are believed to be incarnations of God n
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

CEO Zuckerberg apologizes for Facebook's privacy failuresMark Zuckerberg FacebookUnder fire for the worst privacy debacle in his company's history, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg batted away often-aggressive questioning from lawmakers who accused him of failing to protect the personal information of millions of Americans from Russians intent on upsetting the U.S. election.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Six takeaways from Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg's Senate testimony on data breachesMark Zuckerberg FacebookOne Silicon Valley star witness, 44 media-hungry senators, and five hours of mostly tough questions and often ambiguous answers.
12h
Ingeniøren

Dansk limteknologi uden epoxy sigter mod bilindustrienIværksættervirksomheden RadiSurf får hjælp af partnerskabet Kemi i Kredsløb til at lime metal og plast uden lim med giftige epoxy- og cyanakrylatforbindelser i.
12h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Overraskelse: Gen bag ’den søde tand’ forbundet med mindre kropsfedtSidste år fandt forskere fra Københavns Universitet ud af, at særligt stor sukkertrang...
12h
Science | The Guardian

Rocks, clocks, and zombie lineages | Elsa PanciroliRecent research on solenodon molecules reminds us the study of fossils is far from extinct We can now extract DNA from pretty much anything. If US crime series are anything to go by (they are not), sequencing it only takes an afternoon at a desktop computer, and an expression of determination. DNA can not only help identify murderers, but tell us how animal groups are related to one another. In t
12h
Viden

Zuckerberg fik senatorer til at ligne teknologiske analfabeterDet amerikanske senat kom aldrig helt tæt på at ryste Facebooks stifter under høring.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In quest of the coldest possible antihydrogenCurrently, one of the major goals in ultracold science is to cool antihydrogen atoms to as close to absolute zero as possible. Ultracold antihydrogen would pave the way toward ultraprecise antimatter experiments that could help answer some of the most perplexing questions about antimatter. For example, how does gravity act on antimatter? Why don't we see any antimatter in the universe? And could i
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Learning computer programming, with no teachers and no tuitionAspiring software engineers Kevin Yook and Becky Chen are hunched over a computer screen, fervently discussing lines of code indecipherable to the average person.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Appliance giant Thermomix fined in Australia over burns defectKitchen appliance giant Thermomix was fined Aus$4.6 million (US$3.5 million) in Australia Wednesday for breaching consumer laws after users of its mixers were burned by hot liquids due to a faulty seal.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

French startup Plume out to crowd-source air qualityFrench startup Plume Labs is out to let people breath easier, whether preparing for a marathon or just bicycling to work.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Vaccine suppresses peanut allergies in miceA vaccine may successfully turn off peanut allergy in mice, a new study shows.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trouble in Paradise: Tourism surge lashes Southeast Asia's beachesHordes of tourists clamber across the white sand with selfie sticks as Thai park rangers wade into turquoise waters to direct boats charging into the cliff-ringed cove.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fishing 'nomads': corralling carp on China's Thousand Island LakeOn a clear sunny morning in eastern China, the surface of Qiandao Lake boils with tens of thousands of thrashing carp as they are swept into the nets of fisherman like Ye Zhiqing.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cyprus on frontline against lionfish invasion of MediterraneanEquipped with harpoons and waterproof notebooks, Louis, Carlos and Antonis dive deep into the crystal clear waters of Konnos Bay in Cyprus on a mission to capture predatory lionfish.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Japan team maps 'semi-infinite' rare earth reservesJapanese researchers have mapped vast reserves of rare earth elements in deep-sea mud, enough to feed global demand on a "semi-infinite basis," according to a fresh study.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EasyJet, two others in running for Alitalia: companyTroubled Italian airline, Alitalia, said Tuesday that it has received three takeover offers, including one by a consortium led by British low-cost carrier EasyJet.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US public companies have increasingly shorter lifespans, research saysAt a time when more Americans are living longer, the companies where many people spend their working lives have increasingly shorter lifespans, according to research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Faba fix for corn's nitrogen needResearchers have good news for growers. Farmers raising a nitrogen-hungry crop like sweet corn may save up to half of their nitrogen fertilizer cost. The key: using a faba bean cover crop.
13h
Ingeniøren

Nyuddannede ingeniører fravælger kategorisk det offentligeArbejdsopgaverne er ikke spændende nok, og lønnen er for lav, siger de unge.
13h
Science | The Guardian

Why are kittens so cute? You asked Google – here's the answerEvery day millions of people ask Google life’s most difficult questions. Our writers answer some of the commonest queries A few months ago, my family and I went to a nearby cat rescue shelter to get a kitten. There were five in the available litter to choose from, but as we were watching them play, one of the two tabbies boldly decided to scale a nearby sack of bedding, then promptly fell in head
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanoparticles for lung cancer pass next testThe most common type of lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), continues to be difficult to treat, with five year survival rates of about 36 percent for stage 3A tumors. Jefferson College of Pharmacy researchers are developing a new treatment approach based on nanotechnology that was recently shown to be effective in mouse models of the disease. The research was published in the journal
13h
Viden

Har Alberte Windings gener gjort hende til musiker og forfatter?Har alle lige mulighed for at blive kunstnere? Forskning viser, at kreativitet er mere arveligt, end vi tidligere har troet.
14h
Ingeniøren

Elev-boykot på 20 til 50 procent kan lægge omstridt trivselsmåling i gravenSlutdato d. 3. august for mulighed for at få slettet cpr-numre i Undervisningsministeriets trivselsmåling skyldes frygt for, at det statistiske grundlag smuldrer.
15h
Ingeniøren

Udviklere i etisk opgør: Slut med usikre barbiedukker der overvåger vores børnInternet of Things er trods stor hype fortsat et umodent teknologisk område, som mangler etiske og sikkerhedsmæssige standarder. Ny dansk forskning viser, at udviklere savner praktiske værktøjer til at designe sikre og etiske Iot-løsninger
15h
Viden

Facebooks aktier steg under Zuckerberg-høringEfter massive kursfald steg kurserne med 4,5 procent i går.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New glaucoma treatment could ease symptoms while you sleepEye drops developed by UBC researchers could one day treat glaucoma while you sleep -- helping to heal a condition that is one of the leading causes of blindness around the world.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

US public companies have increasingly shorter lifespans, IU research saysAt a time when more Americans are living longer, the companies where many people spend their working lives have increasingly shorter lifespans, according to research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The emotions we feel may shape what we seeOur emotional state in a given moment may influence what we see, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. In two experiments, researchers found that participants saw a neutral face as smiling more when it was paired with an unseen positive image.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Want computers to see better in the real world? Train them in a virtual realityDatasets play a crucial role in the training and testing of the computer vision systems. Using manually labeled training datasets, a computer vision system compares its current situation to known situations and takes the best action it can 'think' of -- whatever that happens to be. Scientists have developed a new way to improve how computers 'see' and 'understand' objects in the real world by trai
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Faba fix for corn's nitrogen needResearchers have good news for growers. Farmers raising a nitrogen-hungry crop like sweet corn may save up to half of their nitrogen fertilizer cost. The key: using a faba bean cover crop.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

There's a better way to screen for cervical cancerA new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that high-quality cervical cancer screening can be done effectively using a completely automated approach. The researchers involved in the study indicate that automated technology could increase cervical screening coverage in underserved regions.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Severity of menopause symptoms could help predict heart diseaseHeart disease remains the leading cause of death in women. A study of 138 menopausal women examined the association of mood, symptoms, and quality of life measures with the key markers of vascular aging, a major risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Study results are published online today in Menopause, the journal of The North American Menopause Society.
16h
New on MIT Technology Review

This battery advance could make electric vehicles far cheaperSila Nanotechnologies has pulled off double-digit performance gains for lithium-ion batteries, promising to lower costs or add capabilities for cars and phones.
16h
New on MIT Technology Review

Bitcoin is eating QuebecA Canadian hydropower operation put out the welcome mat for bitcoin miners. Shortly thereafter, it was overrun.
16h
Ingeniøren

Lyskryds står pivåbne for hackerangrebLygtepæle og lyskryds med sim-kort på åbne bredbånd gør dem nemme at finde og angribe. Og så står døren åben til den samlede forsyning.
17h
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Four Questions Congress Should Actually Ask Mark ZuckerbergMark Zuckerberg FacebookMark Zuckerberg left a lot of questions unanswered before Senate committees on Tuesday. House members might try these more pointed queries when the Facebook CEO appears before them on Wednesday.
18h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Map records UK's small ups and downsThe subtle warping of the land surface across Britain is fully mapped in detail for the first time.
19h
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Mark Zuckerberg Makes Facebook Privacy Sound So EasyMark Zuckerberg Facebook[In his testimony to Congress, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg repeatedly misrepresented the amount of control Facebook users really have over their data.](https://www.wired.com/story/mark-zuckerberg-congress-day-one)
19h
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Mark Zuckerberg's Congress Testimony Day One: Simple Questions, Hard AnswersMark Zuckerberg FacebookThe basic lines of questioning Congress pursued show just how inscrutable Facebook remains to most Americans.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Clown Fish Need More Energy to Live in a Bleached HomeWarmer oceans can bleach sea anemones, not just coral. The clown fish that rely on these stinging animals for shelter become very stressed out, scientists report.
19h
New on MIT Technology Review

Well-rehearsed, evasive Mark Zuckerberg tries to explain Facebook user privacy to CongressMark Zuckerberg Facebook
20h
ArXiv Query

Spectral Statistics of Non-Hermitian Random Matrix EnsemblesRecently Burkhardt et. al. introduced the $k$-checkerboard random matrix ensembles, which have a split limiting behavior of the eigenvalues (in the limit all but $k$ of the eigenvalues are on the order of $\sqrt{N}$ and converge to semi-circular behavior, with the remaining $k$ of size $N$ and converging to hollow Gaussian ensembles). We generalize their work to consider non-Hermitian ensembles wi
20h
The Atlantic

The 13 Strangest Moments From the Zuckerberg HearingMark Zuckerberg FacebookShortly after 2:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Mark Zuckerberg sat down in a chair topped with a booster cushion to face 44 U.S. senators in his first-ever public appearance at a congressional hearing. And that was only the beginning of the weirdness. The dialogue between Facebook’s CEO and the members of the Senate Judiciary and Commerce Committees that has followed over the next several hours covered wide
20h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Rethink Our ApproachWhat We’re Following Facebook Face-Off: Mark Zuckerberg, Facebook’s CEO, appeared before the Senate Judiciary and Commerce Committees on a day of testimony that showed the limits of the senators’ ability to press him for answers. One of the major issues discussed was Facebook’s handling of a data breach by the political-consulting firm Cambridge Analytica, which affected an estimated 87 million p
20h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Iron Age study targets British DNA mysteryA project to sequence DNA from ancient remains may solve a puzzle involving people from south-east Britain.
20h
BBC News - Science & Environment

How ancient DNA is transforming our view of the pastAncient DNA from human remains has helped construct a new narrative for human history.
21h
Futurity.org

App guides Parkinson’s disease patients through ‘freezing’Engineering students at Rice University designed an iPhone app to help patients with Parkinson’s disease overcome a symptom known as “freezing,” in which the legs temporarily refuse to follow the brain’s command to lift and move forward. For many of these patients, visual, audio, or vibratory cues can help them overcome freezing. The app may be the most comprehensive way to provide those cues, th
21h
Futurity.org

Classroom yoga for kids may relieve anxietyParticipating in yoga and mindfulness activities at school may help anxious third-graders improve their well-being and emotional health, according to a small study. “Even younger children are experiencing a lot of stress and anxiety, especially around test time.” Researchers worked with a public school in New Orleans to add mindfulness and yoga to the school’s existing empathy-based programming f
21h
Futurity.org

What microbes in dead bodies can tell us about the livingThe postmortem microbiome, populations of micro-organisms that move in after death, can provide crucial insights into public health, a new study shows. What’s telling is that regardless of many factors—sex, ethnicity, or even type of death—the microbiome is consistent and distinct, depending on the number of days after death. With partnerships between forensic entomologists and medical examiners,
21h
The Atlantic

Mark Zuckerberg Is Halfway to Scot-FreeMark Zuckerberg FacebookMark Zuckerberg finally walked into Congress today in a suit and Facebook-blue tie. He sat alone in a chair, behind a brown wooden desk, backed by a short-row of Facebook lawyers, and facing a U of nearly half the Senate, a joint hearing of the Senate Judiciary and Commerce Committees. And as the first day of the hearings came to a close, not one Senator had landed a good punch on the CEO of Face
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study confirms link between traumatic brain injury and dementiaThe risk of dementia, including Alzheimer's, was significantly higher in people who had experienced a traumatic brain injury (TBI) than with people who had no history of TBI, according to one of the largest studies to date on that association.
21h
Viden

Zuckerberg i fuld kontrol: Glider af på kritiske spørgsmål fra SenatetMark Zuckerberg har relativt let overstået den første halvdel af spørgsmålene i Senatets høring.
21h
Futurity.org

How conservation pros can engage Amish and Mennonite communitiesResearchers have identified several factors that can improve coordination between Plain (the Amish and conservative Mennonite) communities and agricultural professionals such as conservation agents. The researchers found that agricultural professionals face challenges as well as opportunities on issues relating to conservation and pollution when working with Amish and conservative Mennonite commu
21h
Popular Science

A third of heavy pot users suffer severe nausea—and they’ve all landed on the same weird solutionHealth But there's got to be a better way. CHS is a condition where heavy marijuana users are frequently wracked with bouts of intense abdominal pain, along with severe nausea and vomiting. And the vast majority…
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How to avoid a roadblock when reprogramming cellsScientists have helped to answer lingering questions about cellular reprogramming.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Does physical activity influence the health of future offspring?Physical and mental exercise is not only beneficial for your own brain, but can also affect the learning ability of future offspring -- at least in mice.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bloodless revolution in diabetes monitoringScientists have created a non-invasive, adhesive patch, which promises the measurement of glucose levels through the skin without a finger-prick blood test, potentially removing the need for millions of diabetics to frequently carry out the painful and unpopular tests.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High efficiency solar power conversion allowed by a novel composite materialA composite thin film made of two different inorganic oxide materials significantly improves the performance of solar cells. Researchers have developed this material which combines two crystal phases comprising the atomic elements bismuth, manganese, and oxygen. The combination of phases optimizes this material's ability to absorb solar radiation and transform it into electricity. The results are
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Humans and others exposed to prenatal stress have high stress levels after birthVertebrate species, including humans, exposed to stress prenatally tend to have higher stress hormones after birth, according to a new study. While previous research has reported examples of maternal stress experience predicting offspring stress hormones in different species, this study is the first to empirically demonstrate the impact of prenatal stress on offspring stress hormone levels using d
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Making computer animation more agile, acrobatic -- and realisticAnimation in film and video games is hard to make realistic: each action typically requires creating a separate controller, while deep reinforcement learning has yet to generate realistic human or animal motion. Computer scientists have now developed an algorithm that uses reinforcement learning to generate realistic simulations that can even recover realistically, after tripping, for example. The
22h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Sitting ZuckToday in 5 Lines Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein reportedly signed off on the FBI’s raid of President Trump’s personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, on Monday. Agents reportedly targeted records about payments to women who claim they had affairs with Trump. During a press briefing, White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders told reporters that Trump “ certainly has the power ” to fire Spe
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tiny injectable sensor could provide unobtrusive, long-term alcohol monitoringEngineers have developed a tiny, ultra-low power chip that could be injected just under the surface of the skin for continuous, long-term alcohol monitoring. The chip is powered wirelessly by a wearable device such as a smartwatch or patch. The goal of this work is to develop a convenient, routine monitoring device for patients in substance abuse treatment programs.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cancer risk rises as patients wait for diagnostic testingThe longer a patient with a positive screening result waits for diagnostic testing, the worse their cancer outcomes may become, according to a literature review of breast, cervical, colorectal, and lung studies.
22h
Feed: All Latest

Facebook’s Cambridge Analytica Scandal Shows the Price of Tech UtopiaWas everything users gained from Facebook worth what they gave up?
22h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Earth's magnetic ocean tides mapped from spaceSatellites make the most detailed observations yet of the magnetism generated by moving seawater.
23h
Dagens Medicin

Fri mig for den frie ordinationsretBegrebet ‘fri ordinationsret’ er en mytologisk illusion som hverken har eller har haft nogen retlig legitimitet.
23h
The Atlantic

Donald Trump's Strange JusticeHow President Trump feels about due process appears to depend on whether he or his associates are the ones being investigated. Monday, after the news broke that federal investigators had raided the office, hotel room, and home of Trump's longtime personal attorney Michael Cohen, the president called it “an attack on our country, in a true sense,” and “an attack on what we all stand for.” It was a
23h
The Scientist RSS

Vision Restored: The Latest Technologies to Improve SightCell implants, gene therapy, even optogenetics are making headway in clinical trials to treat various forms of blindness.
23h
New on MIT Technology Review

The next breathalyzer may be a chip implanted under your skin
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two Colorado studies find resistance mechanisms in ALK+ and ROS1+ cancersIn one of 12 ROS1+ samples and 15 of 43 ALK+ samples, new kinases had been altered to allow treatment resistance. However, 'we found a lot of stuff besides kinase mutations,' a researcher says. 'What we're trying to say is that resistance happens in a lot of different ways and we need to be thinking about all the genetic and non-genetic changes that can occur.'
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanoparticles for lung cancer pass next testNon-small cell lung cancer Nanoparticles pass the next stage of development in preclinical tests.
23h
Big Think

Why is there a higher suicide rate in the spring?The suicide rate goes up in spring and summer, ad not winter as many believe, and some recent studies are suggesting a link between immune-system inflammation from pollen and and seasonal depression that can lead to suicide. Read More
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Footquakes': Messi really does make the Earth trembleIt's a scientific fact: when living football legends Neymar or Lionel Messi scores a goal, the Earth moves and the ground shakes.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making computer animation more agile, acrobatic—and realisticIt's still easy to tell computer-simulated motions from the real thing - on the big screen or in video games, simulated humans and animals often move clumsily, without the rhythm and fluidity of their real-world counterparts.
23h
Feed: All Latest

How Many G's Will the Hyperloop Pull in Its Next Test?Elon Musk tweeted that a hyperloop test will accelerate to half the speed of sound and brake in just 1.2 kilometers.
23h
Feed: All Latest

Ex-Commerce Secretary Pritzker on Saving the Future of JobsFormer Commerce secretary Penny Pritzker, cochair of a task force on the future of work, says the nation needs to "relink education, work, and opportunity."
1d
Inside Science

How Big Spiders Use Nanoscale Physics to FlyHow Big Spiders Use Nanoscale Physics to Fly New study reveals the complex strategies crab spiders use to soar on streamers of silk. vlcsnap-2017-01-08-12h20m32s857.png A crab spider spins silk lines into the breeze in preparation for a ballooning flight. Image credits: Moonsung Cho Rights information: This photo can only be used if published with this Inside Science story. Creature Tuesday, Apri
1d
Live Science

After Death, Your Microbiome Could Still Help the LivingYou don't need to be alive for your microbiome to be useful to science.
1d
New on MIT Technology Review

Solar industry jobs are set to grow this year, despite Trump’s tariffs
1d
Live Science

Greenland Has a Mysterious 'Dark Zone' — And It's Getting Even DarkerA new study investigates the dark zone that seems to be getting bigger on the western edge of the ice sheet.
1d
Viden

Hestekræfter som 50 biler: Se Danmarks nye vindtunnel blæse ekstrem vindNyt anlæg har kostet over 80 millioner og skal bl.a. gøre vindmøller mindre støjende.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Our humanity contains multitudes: Dehumanization is more than overlooking mental capacities [Social Sciences]A longstanding conclusion of work on dehumanization is that the denial of humanity facilitates violence, in part by loosening restraints against harming others (1–3). Rai et al. (4) propose that dehumanization only begets instrumental violence. They claim that dehumanization does not facilitate moral violence because moral violence necessitates blame and...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Fincher et al.: Conceptual specificity in dehumanization research is a feature, not a bug [Social Sciences]Fincher et al. (1) argue that our conceptualization of dehumanization as “the failure to engage in social cognition of other human minds” (2) is too narrow. Importantly, Fincher et al. (1) do not dispute our actual findings. They agree that reduced perception of mental and emotional states in victims generates...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Water-like anomalies as a function of tetrahedrality [Applied Physical Sciences]Tetrahedral interactions describe the behavior of the most abundant and technologically important materials on Earth, such as water, silicon, carbon, germanium, and countless others. Despite their differences, these materials share unique common physical behaviors, such as liquid anomalies, open crystalline structures, and extremely poor glass-forming ability at ambient pressure. To...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Local protein solvation drives direct down-conversion in phycobiliprotein PC645 via incoherent vibronic transport [Chemistry]The mechanisms controlling excitation energy transport (EET) in light-harvesting complexes remain controversial. Following the observation of long-lived beats in 2D electronic spectroscopy of PC645, vibronic coherence, the delocalization of excited states between pigments supported by a resonant vibration, has been proposed to enable direct excitation transport from the highest-energy to...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Successful reprogramming of cellular protein production through mRNA delivered by functionalized lipid nanoparticles [Chemistry]The development of safe and efficacious gene vectors has limited greatly the potential for therapeutic treatments based on messenger RNA (mRNA). Lipid nanoparticles (LNPs) formed by an ionizable cationic lipid (here DLin-MC3-DMA), helper lipids (distearoylphosphatidylcholine, DSPC, and cholesterol), and a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) lipid have been identified as very promising...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Escalation of competition into conflict in competitive networks of Formula One drivers [Social Sciences]This article investigates the factors that escalate competition into dangerous conflict. Recent sociological theorizing claims that such escalations are particularly likely in dyads of structurally equivalent people (i.e., actors who have the same relations with the same third parties). Using panel data on Formula One races from 1970 through 2014,...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

MDMX acidic domain inhibits p53 DNA binding in vivo and regulates tumorigenesis [Biochemistry]The MDM2 homolog MDMX oncoprotein is indispensable for inhibition of p53 during normal embryonic development and malignant transformation, yet how MDMX harnesses p53 functions is unclear. In addition to a canonical N-terminal p53-binding domain, recent work suggests the central acidic domain of MDMX regulates p53 interaction through intramolecular mimicry and...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

IpdAB, a virulence factor in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, is a cholesterol ring-cleaving hydrolase [Biochemistry]Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) grows on host-derived cholesterol during infection. IpdAB, found in all steroid-degrading bacteria and a determinant of pathogenicity, has been implicated in the hydrolysis of the last steroid ring. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that IpdAB orthologs form a clade of CoA transferases (CoTs). In a coupled assay with a...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

S-nitrosylation drives cell senescence and aging in mammals by controlling mitochondrial dynamics and mitophagy [Biochemistry]S-nitrosylation, a prototypic redox-based posttranslational modification, is frequently dysregulated in disease. S-nitrosoglutathione reductase (GSNOR) regulates protein S-nitrosylation by functioning as a protein denitrosylase. Deficiency of GSNOR results in tumorigenesis and disrupts cellular homeostasis broadly, including metabolic, cardiovascular, and immune function. Here, we demonstrate that
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cross-linking of Orai1 channels by STIM proteins [Biochemistry]The transmembrane docking of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+-sensing STIM proteins with plasma membrane (PM) Orai Ca2+ channels is a critical but poorly understood step in Ca2+ signal generation. STIM1 protein dimers unfold to expose a discrete STIM–Orai activating region (SOAR1) that tethers and activates Orai1 channels within discrete ER–PM junctions....
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Single-nucleotide resolution dynamic repair maps of UV damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome [Biochemistry]We have adapted the eXcision Repair-sequencing (XR-seq) method to generate single-nucleotide resolution dynamic repair maps of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers and (6-4) pyrimidine–pyrimidone photoproducts in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome. We find that these photoproducts are removed from the genome primarily by incisions 13–18 nucleotides 5′ and 6–7 nucleotides 3′ to...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Exploring the structural origins of cryptic sites on proteins [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of proteins reveal the existence of many transient surface pockets; however, the factors determining what small subset of these represent druggable or functionally relevant ligand binding sites, called “cryptic sites,” are not understood. Here, we examine multiple X-ray structures for a set of proteins with validated...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Loss of TDP43 inhibits progression of triple-negative breast cancer in coordination with SRSF3 [Cell Biology]Aberrant alternative splicing has been highlighted as a potential hallmark of cancer. Here, we identify TDP43 (TAR DNA-binding protein 43) as an important splicing regulator responsible for the unique splicing profile in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Clinical data demonstrate that TDP43 is highly expressed in TNBC with poor prognosis. Knockdown...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Small proline-rich protein 2B drives stress-dependent p53 degradation and fibroblast proliferation in heart failure [Cell Biology]Heart disease is associated with the accumulation of resident cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) that secrete extracellular matrix (ECM), leading to the development of pathological fibrosis and heart failure. However, the mechanisms underlying resident CF proliferation remain poorly defined. Here, we report that small proline-rich protein 2b (Sprr2b) is among the most...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Molecular and structural architecture of polyQ aggregates in yeast [Cell Biology]Huntington’s disease is caused by the expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ) tract in the N-terminal exon of huntingtin (HttEx1), but the cellular mechanisms leading to neurodegeneration remain poorly understood. Here we present in situ structural studies by cryo-electron tomography of an established yeast model system of polyQ toxicity. We find...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Phylogenetic homogenization of amphibian assemblages in human-altered habitats across the globe [Ecology]Habitat conversion is driving biodiversity loss and restructuring species assemblages across the globe. Responses to habitat conversion vary widely, however, and little is known about the degree to which shared evolutionary history underlies changes in species richness and composition. We analyzed data from 48 studies, comprising 438 species on five...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Global increase and geographic convergence in antibiotic consumption between 2000 and 2015 [Environmental Sciences]Tracking antibiotic consumption patterns over time and across countries could inform policies to optimize antibiotic prescribing and minimize antibiotic resistance, such as setting and enforcing per capita consumption targets or aiding investments in alternatives to antibiotics. In this study, we analyzed the trends and drivers of antibiotic consumption from 2000...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Embryophyte stress signaling evolved in the algal progenitors of land plants [Evolution]Streptophytes are unique among photosynthetic eukaryotes in having conquered land. As the ancestors of land plants, streptophyte algae are hypothesized to have possessed exaptations to the environmental stressors encountered during the transition to terrestrial life. Many of these stressors, including high irradiance and drought, are linked to plastid biology. We...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

RNA-mediated gene regulation is less evolvable than transcriptional regulation [Evolution]Much of gene regulation is carried out by proteins that bind DNA or RNA molecules at specific sequences. One class of such proteins is transcription factors, which bind short DNA sequences to regulate transcription. Another class is RNA binding proteins, which bind short RNA sequences to regulate RNA maturation, transport,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cooption of an appendage-patterning gene cassette in the head segmentation of arachnids [Evolution]The jointed appendages of arthropods have facilitated the spectacular diversity and success of this phylum. Key to the regulation of appendage outgrowth is the Krüppel-like factor (KLF)/specificity protein (Sp) family of zinc finger transcription factors. In the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, the Sp6-9 homolog is activated by Wnt-1/wingless (wg) and...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Recombinant immunotoxins with albumin-binding domains have long half-lives and high antitumor activity [Medical Sciences]Recombinant immunotoxins (RITs) are chimeric proteins consisting of a Fv that binds to a cancer cell and a portion of a protein toxin. One of these, Moxetumomab pasudotox, was shown to be effective in treating patients with some leukemias, where the cells are readily accessible to the RIT. However, their...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Inhibition of Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) induces natural killer cell-mediated eradication of hepatocellular carcinoma cells [Medical Sciences]Natural killer (NK) cell-mediated tumor cell eradication could inhibit tumor initiation and progression. However, the factors that regulate NK cell-mediated cancer cell eradication remain unclear. We determined that hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells exhibit transcriptional down-regulation of NK group 2D (NKG2D) ligands and are largely resistant to NK cell-mediated eradication. Because...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A zipped-helix cap potentiates HAMP domain control of chemoreceptor signaling [Microbiology]Environmental awareness is an essential attribute for all organisms. The chemotaxis system of Escherichia coli provides a powerful experimental model for the investigation of stimulus detection and signaling mechanisms at the molecular level. These bacteria sense chemical gradients with transmembrane proteins [methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs)] that have an extracellular ligand-binding..
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Adeno-associated virus Rep proteins antagonize phosphatase PP1 to counteract KAP1 repression of the latent viral genome [Microbiology]Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a small human Dependovirus whose low immunogenicity and capacity for long-term persistence have led to its widespread use as vector for gene therapy. Despite great recent successes in AAV-based gene therapy, further improvements in vector technology may be hindered by an inadequate understanding of various aspects...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Nonmonotonic spatial structure of interneuronal correlations in prefrontal microcircuits [Neuroscience]Correlated fluctuations of single neuron discharges, on a mesoscopic scale, decrease as a function of lateral distance in early sensory cortices, reflecting a rapid spatial decay of lateral connection probability and excitation. However, spatial periodicities in horizontal connectivity and associational input as well as an enhanced probability of lateral excitatory...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Antidepression action of BDNF requires and is mimicked by G{alpha}i1/3 expression in the hippocampus [Neuroscience]Stress-related alterations in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression, a neurotrophin that plays a key role in synaptic plasticity, are believed to contribute to the pathophysiology of depression. Here, we show that in a chronic mild stress (CMS) model of depression the Gαi1 and Gαi3 subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins are...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Kv4.2 autism and epilepsy mutation enhances inactivation of closed channels but impairs access to inactivated state after opening [Physiology]A de novo mutation in the KCND2 gene, which encodes the Kv4.2 K+ channel, was identified in twin boys with intractable, infant-onset epilepsy and autism. Kv4.2 channels undergo closed-state inactivation (CSI), a mechanism by which channels inactivate without opening during subthreshold depolarizations. CSI dynamically modulates neuronal excitability and action potential...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Endothelial GqPCR activity controls capillary electrical signaling and brain blood flow through PIP2 depletion [Physiology]Brain capillaries play a critical role in sensing neural activity and translating it into dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow to serve the metabolic needs of the brain. The molecular cornerstone of this mechanism is the capillary endothelial cell inward rectifier K+ (Kir2.1) channel, which is activated by neuronal activity–dependent...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

CSI1, PATROL1, and exocyst complex cooperate in delivery of cellulose synthase complexes to the plasma membrane [Plant Biology]Cellulose synthesis occurs exclusively at the plasma membrane by cellulose synthase complexes (CSCs). Therefore, delivery of CSCs to discrete sites at the plasma membrane is critical for cellulose synthesis. Despite their significance, the delivery of CSCs is poorly understood. Here we used proteomics approaches, functional genetics, and live cell imaging...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Chloroplast SRP43 acts as a chaperone for glutamyl-tRNA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis [Plant Biology]Assembly of light-harvesting complexes requires synchronization of chlorophyll (Chl) biosynthesis with biogenesis of light-harvesting Chl a/b-binding proteins (LHCPs). The chloroplast signal recognition particle (cpSRP) pathway is responsible for transport of nucleus-encoded LHCPs in the stroma of the plastid and their integration into the thylakoid membranes. Correct folding and assembly of...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Crystal structure of human lysyl oxidase-like 2 (hLOXL2) in a precursor state [Biochemistry]Lysyl oxidases (LOXs), a type of copper- and lysyl tyrosylquinone (LTQ) -dependent amine oxidase, catalyze the oxidative deamination of lysine residues of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as elastins and collagens and generate aldehyde groups. The oxidative deamination of lysine represents the foundational step for the cross-linking of elastin and...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Sortase ligation enables homogeneous GPCR phosphorylation to reveal diversity in {beta}-arrestin coupling [Biochemistry]The ability of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to initiate complex cascades of cellular signaling is governed by the sequential coupling of three main transducer proteins, G protein, GPCR kinase (GRK), and β-arrestin. Mounting evidence indicates these transducers all have distinct conformational preferences and binding modes. However, interrogating each transducer’s mechanism...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

OSR1 regulates a subset of inward rectifier potassium channels via a binding motif variant [Biochemistry]The with-no-lysine (K) (WNK) signaling pathway to STE20/SPS1-related proline- and alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) and oxidative stress-responsive 1 (OSR1) kinase is an important mediator of cell volume and ion transport. SPAK and OSR1 associate with upstream kinases WNK 1–4, substrates, and other proteins through their C-terminal domains which interact with linear...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Binding site for coenzyme A revealed in the structure of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase from Moorella thermoacetica [Biochemistry]Pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) is a microbial enzyme that uses thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), three [4Fe-4S] clusters, and coenzyme A (CoA) in the reversible oxidation of pyruvate to generate acetyl-CoA and carbon dioxide. The two electrons that are generated as a result of pyruvate decarboxylation are used in the reduction of low...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Water-mediated conformational preselection mechanism in substrate binding cooperativity to protein kinase A [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Substrate binding cooperativity in protein kinase A (PKA) seems to involve allosteric coupling between the two binding sites. It received significant attention, but its molecular basis still remains not entirely clear. Based on long molecular dynamics of PKA and its complexes, we characterized an allosteric pathway that links ATP binding...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structural basis for the ethanol action on G-protein-activated inwardly rectifying potassium channel 1 revealed by NMR spectroscopy [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Ethanol consumption leads to a wide range of pharmacological effects by acting on the signaling proteins in the human nervous system, such as ion channels. Despite its familiarity and biological importance, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the ethanol action, due to extremely weak binding affinity and...
1d
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Fusogenic micropeptide Myomixer is essential for satellite cell fusion and muscle regeneration [Cell Biology]Regeneration of skeletal muscle in response to injury occurs through fusion of a population of stem cells, known as satellite cells, with injured myofibers. Myomixer, a muscle-specific membrane micropeptide, cooperates with the transmembrane protein Myomaker to regulate embryonic myoblast fusion and muscle formation. To investigate the role of Myomixer in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Circadian clock activity of cryptochrome relies on tryptophan-mediated photoreduction [Chemistry]Cryptochromes (CRYs) entrain the circadian clocks of plants and animals to light. Irradiation of the Drosophila cryptochrome (dCRY) causes reduction of an oxidized flavin cofactor by a chain of conserved tryptophan (Trp) residues. However, it is unclear how redox chemistry within the Trp chain couples to dCRY-mediated signaling. Here, we...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mechanistic insights into staphylopine-mediated metal acquisition [Chemistry]Metal acquisition is vital to pathogens for successful infection within hosts. Staphylopine (StP), a broad-spectrum metallophore biosynthesized by the major human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, plays a central role in transition-metal acquisition and bacterial virulence. The StP-like biosynthesis loci are present in various pathogens, and the proteins responsible for StP/metal transportation...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Seagrass habitat metabolism increases short-term extremes and long-term offset of CO2 under future ocean acidification [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The role of rising atmospheric CO2 in modulating estuarine carbonate system dynamics remains poorly characterized, likely due to myriad processes driving the complex chemistry in these habitats. We reconstructed the full carbonate system of an estuarine seagrass habitat for a summer period of 2.5 months utilizing a combination of time-series...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Grassland biodiversity can pay [Economic Sciences]The biodiversity–ecosystem functioning (BEF) literature provides strong evidence of the biophysical basis for the potential profitability of greater diversity but does not address questions of optimal management. BEF studies typically focus on the ecosystem outputs produced by randomly assembled communities that only differ in their biodiversity levels, measured by indices...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Dependence of the evolution of carbon dynamics in the northern permafrost region on the trajectory of climate change [Environmental Sciences]We conducted a model-based assessment of changes in permafrost area and carbon storage for simulations driven by RCP4.5 and RCP8.5 projections between 2010 and 2299 for the northern permafrost region. All models simulating carbon represented soil with depth, a critical structural feature needed to represent the permafrost carbon–climate feedback, but...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Identification of a queen and king recognition pheromone in the subterranean termite Reticulitermes flavipes [Evolution]Chemical communication is fundamental to success in social insect colonies. Species-, colony-, and caste-specific blends of cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) and other chemicals have been well documented as pheromones, mediating important behavioral and physiological aspects of social insects. More specifically, royal pheromones used by queens (and kings in termites) enable workers...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

New tRNA contacts facilitate ligand binding in a Mycobacterium smegmatis T box riboswitch [Genetics]T box riboswitches are RNA regulatory elements widely used by organisms in the phyla Firmicutes and Actinobacteria to regulate expression of amino acid-related genes. Expression of T box family genes is down-regulated by transcription attenuation or inhibition of translation initiation in response to increased charging of the cognate tRNA. Three...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Split cGAL, an intersectional strategy using a split intein for refined spatiotemporal transgene control in Caenorhabditis elegans [Genetics]Bipartite expression systems, such as the GAL4-UAS system, allow fine manipulation of gene expression and are powerful tools for interrogating gene function. Recently, we established cGAL, a GAL4-based bipartite expression system for transgene control in Caenorhabditis elegans, where a single promoter dictates the expression pattern of a cGAL driver, which...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

IRF9 and unphosphorylated STAT2 cooperate with NF-{kappa}B to drive IL6 expression [Immunology and Inflammation]In response to IFNβ, the IL6 gene is activated, modestly at early times by ISGF3 (IRF9 plus tyrosine-phosphorylated STATs 1 and 2), and strongly at late times by U-ISGF3 (IRF9 plus U-STATs 1 and 2, lacking tyrosine phosphorylation). A classical IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) at −1,513 to −1,526 in the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Anti-CTLA-4 therapy requires an Fc domain for efficacy [Immunology and Inflammation]Ipilimumab, a monoclonal antibody that recognizes cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen (CTLA)-4, was the first approved “checkpoint”-blocking anticancer therapy. In mouse tumor models, the response to antibodies against CTLA-4 depends entirely on expression of the Fcγ receptor (FcγR), which may facilitate antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis, but the contribution of simple CTLA-4 blockade...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Rlip depletion prevents spontaneous neoplasia in TP53 null mice [Medical Sciences]TP53 (p53) is a tumor suppressor whose functions are lost or altered in most malignancies. p53 homozygous knockout (p53−/−) mice uniformly die of spontaneous malignancy, typically T-cell lymphoma. RALBP1 (RLIP76, Rlip) is a stress-protective, mercapturic acid pathway transporter protein that also functions as a Ral effector involved in clathrin-dependent endocytosis....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Establishment of human pluripotent stem cell-derived pancreatic {beta}-like cells in the mouse pancreas [Medical Sciences]Type 1 diabetes is characterized by autoimmune destruction of β cells located in pancreatic islets. However, tractable in vivo models of human pancreatic β cells have been limited. Here, we generated xenogeneic human pancreatic β-like cells in the mouse pancreas by orthotopic transplantation of stem cell-derived β (SC-β) cells into...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

PUMA amplifies necroptosis signaling by activating cytosolic DNA sensors [Medical Sciences]Necroptosis, a form of regulated necrotic cell death, is governed by RIP1/RIP3-mediated activation of MLKL. However, the signaling process leading to necroptotic death remains to be elucidated. In this study, we found that PUMA, a proapoptotic BH3-only Bcl-2 family member, is transcriptionally activated in an RIP3/MLKL-dependent manner following induction of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reduction of lipid accumulation rescues Bietti’s crystalline dystrophy phenotypes [Medical Sciences]Bietti’s crystalline dystrophy (BCD) is an intractable and progressive chorioretinal degenerative disease caused by mutations in the CYP4V2 gene, resulting in blindness in most patients. Although we and others have shown that retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells are primarily impaired in patients with BCD, the underlying mechanisms of RPE cell...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

LTP requires postsynaptic PDZ-domain interactions with glutamate receptor/auxiliary protein complexes [Neuroscience]Long-term potentiation (LTP) is a persistent strengthening of synaptic transmission in the brain and is arguably the most compelling cellular and molecular model for learning and memory. Previous work found that both AMPA receptors and exogenously expressed kainate receptors are equally capable of expressing LTP, despite their limited homology and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

BACE1 SUMOylation increases its stability and escalates the protease activity in Alzheimer’s disease [Neuroscience]Amyloid beta (Aβ) is a major pathological marker in Alzheimer’s disease (AD), which is principally regulated by the rate-limiting β-secretase (i.e., BACE1) cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP). However, how BACE1 activity is posttranslationally regulated remains incompletely understood. Here, we show that BACE1 is predominantly SUMOylated at K501 residue, which...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Kruppel homolog 1 represses insect ecdysone biosynthesis by directly inhibiting the transcription of steroidogenic enzymes [Physiology]In insects, juvenile hormone (JH) and the steroid hormone ecdysone have opposing effects on regulation of the larval–pupal transition. Although increasing evidence suggests that JH represses ecdysone biosynthesis during larval development, the mechanism underlying this repression is not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that the expression of the Krüppel homolog...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Endoplasmic reticulum-localized CCX2 is required for osmotolerance by regulating ER and cytosolic Ca2+ dynamics in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]Ca2+ signals in plant cells are important for adaptive responses to environmental stresses. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis CATION/Ca2+ EXCHANGER2 (CCX2), encoding a putative cation/Ca2+ exchanger that localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), is strongly induced by salt and osmotic stresses. Compared with the WT, AtCCX2 loss-of-function mutant was...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Internal states and extrinsic factors both determine monkey vocal production [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]A key question for understanding speech evolution is whether or not the vocalizations of our closest living relatives—nonhuman primates—represent the precursors to speech. Some believe that primate vocalizations are not volitional but are instead inextricably linked to internal states like arousal and thus bear little resemblance to human speech. Others...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Identifying psychological responses of stigmatized groups to referendums [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Public votes and referendums on the rights of marginalized communities are utilized in 27 states and occur with some regularity. However, research has only recently begun to examine the psychological consequences of these voter referendums for members of stigmatized groups, and a number of important questions remain regarding the internal...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cracking the social code of speech prosody using reverse correlation [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Human listeners excel at forming high-level social representations about each other, even from the briefest of utterances. In particular, pitch is widely recognized as the auditory dimension that conveys most of the information about a speaker’s traits, emotional states, and attitudes. While past research has primarily looked at the influence...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The opportunity cost of animal based diets exceeds all food losses [Sustainability Science]Food loss is widely recognized as undermining food security and environmental sustainability. However, consumption of resource-intensive food items instead of more efficient, equally nutritious alternatives can also be considered as an effective food loss. Here we define and quantify these opportunity food losses as the food loss associated with consuming...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Divergent trends of open-surface water body area in the contiguous United States from 1984 to 2016 [Sustainability Science]The contiguous United States (CONUS), especially the West, faces challenges of increasing water stress and uncertain impacts of climate change. The historical information of surface water body distribution, variation, and multidecadal trends documented in remote-sensing images can aid in water-resource planning and management, yet is not well explored. Here, we...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Bevan et al., Holocene fluctuations in human population demonstrate repeated links to food production and climate [Correction]ANTHROPOLOGY, SUSTAINABILITY SCIENCE Correction for “Holocene fluctuations in human population demonstrate repeated links to food production and climate,” by Andrew Bevan, Sue Colledge, Dorian Fuller, Ralph Fyfe, Stephen Shennan, and Chris Stevens, which was first published November 20, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1709190114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:E10524–E10531). The authors note that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Paluck et al., Changing climates of conflict: A social network experiment in 56 schools [Correction]PSYCHOLOGICAL AND COGNITIVE SCIENCES Correction for “Changing climates of conflict: A social network experiment in 56 schools,” by Elizabeth Levy Paluck, Hana Shepherd, and Peter M. Aronow, which was first published January 4, 2016; 10.1073/pnas.1514483113 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 113:566–571). The authors wish to note the following: “We reported...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Bernardo-Seisdedos et al., Structural basis and energy landscape for the Ca2+ gating and calmodulation of the Kv7.2 K+ channel [Correction]BIOPHYSICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY Correction for “Structural basis and energy landscape for the Ca2+ gating and calmodulation of the Kv7.2 K+ channel,” by Ganeko Bernardo-Seisdedos, Eider Nuñez, Carolina Gomis, Covadonga Malo, Álvaro Villarroel, and Oscar Millet, which was first published February 20, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1800235115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:2395–2400)....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Jiang et al., Proteins induced by telomere dysfunction and DNA damage represent biomarkers of human aging and disease [Correction]MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for “Proteins induced by telomere dysfunction and DNA damage represent biomarkers of human aging and disease,” by Hong Jiang, Eric Schiffer, Zhangfa Song, Jianwei Wang, Petra Zürbig, Kathrin Thedieck, Suzette Moes, Heike Bantel, Nadja Saal, Justyna Jantos, Meiken Brecht, Paul Jenö, Michael N. Hall, Klaus Hager, Michael...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Pheromone distinguishes termite royalty from worker castes Primary queen of R. flavipes with attendant workers. Image courtesy of Matt Bertone (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC). For eusocial insects, caste systems prescribe crucial social and reproductive division of labor. Nestmates primarily recognize one another and their roles within the colony...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Profile of Dorothy L. Cheney and Robert M. Seyfarth [Profiles]Field studies in Africa over the past four decades by ethologists Dorothy Cheney and Robert Seyfarth have uncovered a trove of insights into the behavior, communication, and social cognition of nonhuman primates. The pair’s research further reveals evolutionary antecedents of the human mind. University of Pennsylvania professors emeriti, Cheney and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Global amphibian declines have winners and losers [Ecology]Global change imperils a large swath of the planet’s biodiversity, portending a future with decreasing species richness and functioning of natural ecosystems (1). However, the effects of global change are highly variable across scales (2). For example, while the data are contentious, patterns of local stability or increases in species...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

BDNF signaling: Harnessing stress to battle mood disorder [Neuroscience]The link between the onset of major depressive disorder (MDD) and loss of neurotrophins in the brain is of interest to clinicians and basic scientists. MDD is caused by a combination of genetic, environmental, and psychological factors. Trauma, chronic health problems, and substance abuse are risks (1), as are grief...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Good news and bad news of blue carbon [Ecology]Traditionally, ocean acidification researchers have focused on how secular changes in carbon dioxide (CO2) or pH will impact organisms. Global mean pH is estimated to have decreased by 0.1 pH units (representing a 28% increase in acidity) since the preindustrial age and may drop another 0.3 pH units by the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Amide-forming chemical ligation via O-acyl hydroxamic acids [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The facile rearrangement of “S-acyl isopeptides” to native peptide bonds via S,N-acyl shift is central to the success of native chemical ligation, the widely used approach for protein total synthesis. Proximity-driven amide bond formation via acyl transfer reactions in other contexts has proven generally less effective. Here, we show that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Catalyst design by scanning probe block copolymer lithography [Chemistry]Scanning probe block copolymer lithography (SPBCL), in combination with density-functional theory (DFT), has been used to design and synthesize hydrogen evolution catalysts. DFT was used to calculate the hydrogen adsorption energy on a series of single-element, bimetallic, and trimetallic (Au, Pt, Ni, and Cu) substrates to provide leads that could...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Continuous plating/stripping behavior of solid-state lithium metal anode in a 3D ion-conductive framework [Chemistry]The increasing demands for efficient and clean energy-storage systems have spurred the development of Li metal batteries, which possess attractively high energy densities. For practical application of Li metal batteries, it is vital to resolve the intrinsic problems of Li metal anodes, i.e., the formation of Li dendrites, interfacial instability,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Light-induced dilation in nanosheets of charge-transfer complexes [Chemistry]We report the observation of a sizable photostrictive effect of 5.7% with fast, submillisecond response times, arising from a light-induced lattice dilation of a molecular nanosheet, composed of the molecular charge-transfer compound dibenzotetrathiafulvalene (DBTTF) and C60. An interfacial self-assembly approach is introduced for the thickness-controlled growth of the thin films....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Rapid enhancement of chemical weathering recorded by extremely light seawater lithium isotopes at the Permian-Triassic boundary [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Lithium (Li) isotope analyses of sedimentary rocks from the Meishan section in South China reveal extremely light seawater Li isotopic signatures at the Permian–Triassic boundary (PTB), which coincide with the most severe mass extinction in the history of animal life. Using a dynamic seawater lithium box model, we show that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

South American monsoon response to iceberg discharge in the North Atlantic [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Heinrich Stadials significantly affected tropical precipitation through changes in the interhemispheric temperature gradient as a result of abrupt cooling in the North Atlantic. Here, we focus on changes in South American monsoon precipitation during Heinrich Stadials using a suite of speleothem records covering the last 85 ky B.P. from eastern...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Levy flight movements prevent extinctions and maximize population abundances in fragile Lotka-Volterra systems [Ecology]Multiple-scale mobility is ubiquitous in nature and has become instrumental for understanding and modeling animal foraging behavior. However, the impact of individual movements on the long-term stability of populations remains largely unexplored. We analyze deterministic and stochastic Lotka–Volterra systems, where mobile predators consume scarce resources (prey) confined in patches. In...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Synergistic activity of cosecreted natural products from amoebae-associated bacteria [Microbiology]Investigating microbial interactions from an ecological perspective is a particularly fruitful approach to unveil both new chemistry and bioactivity. Microbial predator–prey interactions in particular rely on natural products as signal or defense molecules. In this context, we identified a grazing-resistant Pseudomonas strain, isolated from the bacterivorous amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. Genome
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reversal of orbital angular momentum arising from an extreme Doppler shift [Physics]The linear Doppler shift is familiar as the rise and fall in pitch of a siren as it passes by. Less well known is the rotational Doppler shift, proportional to the rotation rate between source and receiver, multiplied by the angular momentum carried by the beam. In extreme cases the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Opinion: How to achieve better flood-risk governance in the United States [Social Sciences]Recent flood disasters (Fig. 1) have exposed issues with how flood risk is governed in the United States, raising questions about who owns responsibility for managing and paying for losses. In February 2017, 190,000 residents were evacuated as the primary and emergency spillways at Oroville Dam in California failed, a...
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Big Think

New research shows siblings can make you more empathicBoth younger and older siblings uniquely contribute to each others’ empathy development. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vampire bats' bloody teamworkVampire bats are the only mammals that feed exclusively on blood. The way they manage to do that offers us some remarkable insights into hologentics and evolution.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Making computer animation more agile, acrobatic -- and realisticAnimation in film and video games is hard to make realistic: each action typically requires creating a separate controller, while deep reinforcement learning has yet to generate realistic human or animal motion. UC Berkeley computer scientists have now developed an algorithm that uses reinforcement learning to generate realistic simulations that can even recover realistically, after tripping, for
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Popular Science

California’s snow drought is a recipe for dangerNexus Media News Scant snowfall is fueling drought, floods, wildfires and mudslides. The Sierra Nevada snowpack is exceptionally meager this year, putting California’s water supply at risk and portending more floods, wildfires and mudslides over the…
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Live Science

If 'Oumuamua Is an Alien Spacecraft, It's Keeping Quiet So FarAre there intelligent aliens living on the cigar-shaped, interstellar object that's zooming through our solar system? To find out, astronomers in Western Australia used the Murchison Widefield Array telescope to eavesdrop on the rocky visitor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists learn how to avoid a roadblock when reprogramming cellsOver a decade ago, Shinya Yamanaka and Kazutoshi Takahashi made a discovery that would revolutionize biomedical research and trigger the field of regenerative medicine. They learned how to reprogram human adult cells into cells that behave like embryonic stem cells. Scientists were shocked that something so complex could be done so simply, and they had thousands of questions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds humans and others exposed to prenatal stress have high stress levels after birthVertebrate species, including humans, exposed to stress prenatally tend to have higher stress hormones after birth, according to a new Dartmouth-led study published in Scientific Reports. While previous research has reported examples of maternal stress experience predicting offspring stress hormones in different species, this study is the first to empirically demonstrate the impact of prenatal str
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineers build smallest volume, most efficient wireless nerve stimulatorIn 2016, University of California, Berkeley, engineers demonstrated the first implanted, ultrasonic neural dust sensors, bringing closer the day when a Fitbit-like device could monitor internal nerves, muscles or organs in real time. Now, Berkeley engineers have taken neural dust a step forward by building the smallest volume, most efficient wireless nerve stimulator to date.
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Live Science

If You Want Your Friend to Vaccinate Their Kids, Don't Try to Change Their MindNudging people toward the right behavior without trying to win their hearts is the key to improving vaccination rates.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Experience of black doctoral students underscores need for diversity in STEMThe danger and risk of riding out a storm is symbolic of the decision black men make to pursue a graduate degree in engineering. They do so knowing they will face challenges, but the barriers described by black men who shared their experiences as part of a six-year study show how race was a greater obstacle than they expected.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists learn how to avoid a roadblock when reprogramming cellsScientists at the Gladstone Institutes, in Nobel Laureate Shinya Yamanaka's laboratory, helped answer lingering questions about cellular reprogramming.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biomarker panel can guide treatment of brain cancerBrazilian researchers have identified seven biomarkers that could be used at the time of the primary diagnosis to show which glioma patients will tend to progress to a more aggressive form of the disease
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tiny injectable sensor could provide unobtrusive, long-term alcohol monitoringEngineers have developed a tiny, ultra-low power chip that could be injected just under the surface of the skin for continuous, long-term alcohol monitoring. The chip is powered wirelessly by a wearable device such as a smartwatch or patch. The goal of this work is to develop a convenient, routine monitoring device for patients in substance abuse treatment programs.
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Live Science

65 Pounds of Plastic Trash Tore This Whale Apart from the InsideThe sperm whale likely died of an infection after it could not expel all the plastic.
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The Scientist RSS

Alzheimers Should be Characterized by Biomarkers: ReportA proposed definition of the disease emphasizes signs of neurodegeneration and the presence of β-amyloid and tau, rather than cognitive symptoms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A cosmic gorilla effect could blind the detection of aliensA well-known experiment with young people bouncing a ball showed that when an observer focuses on counting the passes, he does not detect if someone crosses the stage disguised as a gorilla. Something similar could be happening to us when we try to discover intelligent non-earthly signals, which perhaps manifest themselves in dimensions that escape our perception, such as the unknown dark matter a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US farm lobby wants strict definition of 'meat'A major US agriculture lobbying group on Tuesday threw its weight behind an effort to keep the "meat" label off of lab-created products, including ones that employ animal cells.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rivers worldwide threatened by pharma waste: studiesRiver systems around world are coursing with over-the-counter and prescription drug waste harmful to the environment, researchers said Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Airbus to offer sleeping berths down in cargo holdSoon when you fly in an Airbus jet and you fancy a bit of shut-eye, all you will need do is make your way down to the cargo hold.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What to do if Facebook says your info was used by Cambridge AnalyticaFacebook Cambridge AnalyticaWith Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg set to testify before Congress on the scandal involving data firm Cambridge Analytica, the social network is informing individual users their profiles may have been used for the firm's political targeting without their consent.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

50 years on, vaccines have eliminated measles from the AmericasThanks to high vaccination rates, measles has mostly disappeared from the Americas.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds humans and others exposed to prenatal stress have high stress levels after birthVertebrate species, including humans, exposed to stress prenatally tend to have higher stress hormones after birth, according to a new Dartmouth-led study published in Scientific Reports. While previous research has reported examples of maternal stress experience predicting offspring stress hormones in different species, this study is the first to empirically demonstrate the impact of prenatal str
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The Atlantic

The 1918 Flu Pandemic: Photos From a Century AgoOne hundred years ago, an outbreak of influenza spread rapidly across the world, and killed more than 50 million—and possibly as many as 100 million—people within 15 months. The speed of the pandemic was shocking; the numbers of dead bodies overwhelmed hospitals and cemeteries. Quarantine centers, emergency hospitals, public use of gauze masks, and awareness campaigns were all undertaken swiftly
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists uncover details of viral infections that drive environmental, human healthNew research offers a glimpse into the complexity of interactions between bacteria and the viruses -- or phages -- that infect them.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Melting of Arctic mountain glaciers unprecedented in the past 400 yearsGlaciers in Alaska's Denali National Park are melting faster than at any time in the past four centuries because of rising summer temperatures, a new study finds.
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Popular Science

These ancient, swimming reptiles may have been the biggest animals of all timeAnimals England's ichthyosaurs have changed the course of paleontology again. In 2016, Paul de la Salle was walking along the beach in the British town of Lilstock when he came across a rock that looked suspiciously bone-like. Specifically, a…
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Popular Science

Let's watch Mark Zuckerberg testify in front of CongressMark Zuckerberg FacebookTechnology Get ready for the wildest couple hours C-Span has to offer. Mark Zuckerberg is in Washington to testify in front of House and Senate committees. Let's watch, shall we?
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New on MIT Technology Review

This algorithm automatically spots “face swaps” in videosBut the same system can be used to make better fake videos that are harder to detect.
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Big Think

Apple says all its facilities worldwide are running on 100% renewable energyApple reports that it has completed an aggressive, years-long effort to reduce its environmental footprint. Read More
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The Atlantic

The Good Friday Agreement in the Age of BrexitIt’s been 20 years since the Good Friday Agreement formally brought an end to a period in Northern Ireland known, perhaps too understatedly, as “The Troubles.” The three-decade conflict pitted Protestant Unionists, who wanted to preserve Northern Ireland’s status as part of the U.K., against Catholic Republicans, who sought to leave the U.K. and join the Republic of Ireland. Fighting among parami
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The Atlantic

'It's Difficult for Trans People to Enter Public Spaces'It’s easy to take for granted the ability to move through public spaces without consequence. But for many marginalized communities, this simply isn’t the reality. “[People] say that we’re unnatural, that we’re perverted, that we’re not genuine people,” says a transgender woman in Cecilia Golding and Nick Finegan’s documentary, The Swimming Club . “It’s difficult for trans people to enter public s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook's biggest Black Lives Matter page was reportedly fake, according to CNNMark Zuckerberg FacebookOne of Facebook's biggest pages devoted to the Black Lives Matter movement was reportedly fake.
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New on MIT Technology Review

The US military desperately wants to weaponize AI
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Thin engineered material perfectly redirects and reflects soundMetamaterials researchers have created a thin plastic structure with geometric details allowing it to control the redirection and reflection of sound waves with almost perfect efficiency.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Center of world's marine biodiversity is in dangerResearchers have found that the world's center of biodiversity is under widespread threat of losing a key marine resource.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New sodium-ion electrolyte may find use in solid-state batteriesA newly discovered structure of a sodium-based material allows the materials to be used as an electrolyte in solid-state batteries, according to researchers. The team is fine-tuning the material using an iterative design approach that they hope will shave years off the time from research to everyday use.
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New Scientist - News

Life on nearest exoplanet may have been wiped out by superflareBad news for life near Proxima Centauri – the star has been seen emitting explosive blasts of radiation that would destroy the ozone on its Earth-like planet
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple announces (PRODUCT)RED iPhone 8 and 8 Plus models to help combat AIDSApple announced red versions of the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus, special edition models that will be available for pre-order online on Tuesday and in stores on Friday. The red 8 and 8 Plus start at $699 and $799, respectively for the 64GB model, and climb to $849 and $949, for 256GB. Those are the same prices as Apple charges for iPhone 8s and 8 Plus's in other colors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cancer risk rises as patients wait for diagnostic testingThe longer a patient with a positive screening result waits for diagnostic testing, the worse their cancer outcomes may become, according to a literature review of breast, cervical, colorectal, and lung studies in the journal CA led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Berkeley engineers build smallest volume, most efficient wireless nerve stimulatorBerkeley engineers have taken their neural dust invention a step forward by building the smallest volume, most efficient wireless nerve stimulator to date.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cohesive neighborhoods, less spanking result in fewer child welfare visitsThe child welfare system is more likely to intervene in households in 'less neighborly' neighborhoods and in which parents spank their kids, a new study shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study highlights the health and economic benefits of a US salt reduction strategyNew research, published in PLOS Medicine, conducted by researchers at the University of Liverpool, Imperial College London, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts and collaborators as part of the Food-PRICE project, highlights the potential health and economic impact of the United States (US) Food and Drug Administration's proposed voluntary salt policy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Large-scale study links PCOS to mental health disordersWomen with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common hormone condition among young women, are prone to mental health disorders, and their children face an increased risk of developing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

US FDA sodium reformulation targets projected to save lives and costsCommercial adherence to the United States (US) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 2016 sodium reformulation targets for processed foods will cost-effectively reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a modeling study published this week in PLOS Medicine.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Silicon Valley wunderkind Zuckerberg in eye of the stormFacebook Mark ZuckerbergHis goal was to change the world with computer code, but now Mark Zuckerberg is facing the test of his life in rescuing Facebook from a deepening crisis over its failure to protect privacy and thwart manipulation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gecko-inspired adhesives help soft robotic fingers get a better gripResearchers have developed a robotic gripper that combines the adhesive properties of gecko toes and the adaptability of air-powered soft robots to grasp a much wider variety of objects than the state of the art.
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Big Think

Is April the cruelest month? What T.S. Eliot really meantIs April the cruelest month? What did T.S. Eliot mean by that? Read More
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Viden

LIVE-TV Zuckerberg: Jeg håber ikke, vores dataindsamling overrasker brugerneMark Zuckerberg er i fuld sving med at afgive forklaring i Kongressen om misbrug af data fra 87 millioner profiler.
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Quanta Magazine

The Elusive Calculus of Insects’ Altruism and Kin SelectionIn 1964, the evolutionary biologist William D. Hamilton seemingly explained one of the greatest paradoxes in biology with a simple mathematical equation. Even Charles Darwin had called the problem his “one special difficulty” a century earlier in On the Origin of Species , writing that it made him doubt his own theory. The paradox in question is the altruistic behavior exhibited most famously by
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More organic than thou? Rebel farmers create new food labelWas your tomato grown in dirt or water? Organic shoppers might notice additional labels this summer that will give them the answer—and tell them whether their choices align with what a rebellious group of farmers and scientists deem the true spirit of the organic movement.
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Live Science

How (and Where) Did Hannibal Cross the Alps? Experts Finally Have AnswersA documentary takes a fresh look at the incredible journey made by Hannibal — and his famous elephants.
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Science | The Guardian

Belgrade Yuri Gagarin monument shrinks away after head jibesStream of sarcasm and parodies about scale of bust to plinth leads to it being dismantled In 1961, Yuri Gagarin’s legendary space flight lasted just 108 minutes. A monument in Belgrade to the first person in space did not last much longer, being swiftly dismantled after causing online hilarity owing to its curiously small head. On Sunday, a number of Serbian websites noticed that a monument to th
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Feed: All Latest

Enter the Intense World of Competitive Yo-YoingFor these players, yo-yos are much more than just toys.
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Popular Science

Cambridge Analytica Facebook scandal: how to find out if your data was compromisedFacebook Data M. ZuckerbergTechnology Are you one of the unlucky 87 million? A simple check to see if your Facebook data ended up in the wrong hands.
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Live Science

Have Archaeologists Discovered the Tomb of King Tut's Wife? Maybe.So far, archaeologists have remained tight-lipped about their findings.
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The Atlantic

My Facebook Was Breached by Cambridge Analytica. Was Yours?Facebook has begun to notify users who were affected by the Cambridge Analytica data breach. If you or one of your friends installed the personality-quiz app “This Is Your Digital Life” prior to 2015, then some of your data illicitly made it to the servers of the voter-profiling company. If your data was ensnared in the breach, you’re not alone. I’m also one of Cambridge Analytica’s victims. (If
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Scientific American Content: Global

Fragmented U.S. Privacy Rules Leave Large Data Loopholes for Facebook and OthersU.S. companies follow more comprehensive privacy laws in other countries but have little incentive to protect U.S. consumers the same way -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NeuWrite West

Nurturing the Study of NatureThis article is part of an ongoing blog series, titled Inequality in STEM: a Dive Into the Data . In this series, we cover recent research exploring and quantifying inequality in STEM. We'll discuss different aspects of inequality, including barriers to career advancement and a chilly social climate, as well as the efficacy of various interventions to combat bias. Our goal with these pieces is to
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New Scientist - News

We can read memories by analysing brain gene activityMemories have unique genetic signatures that reveal what they are. The finding could lead to ways to read and alter memories in people with PTSD or phobias
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The Atlantic

3 Million Uber Drivers Are About to Get a New BossEvery day, the world’s 3 million Uber drivers spend 8.5 million hours logged into the ride-hailing company’s app. That’s roughly 1,000 years of Uber driving packed into any given 24 hours. Because of this tremendous scale, Uber is the most important test case for the gig economy, the new economic arrangement where contract workers are arranged into a cohesive labor force by software. There are ma
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Blog » Languages » English

Introverts vs Extroverts: Personality Face-offPopularized by Swiss psychoanalyst Carl Jung, the introversion/extroversion personality continuum is one that we’ve heard a lot about in recent years. But what does it mean to be an introvert or an extroverts? Is one painfully shy and meek? Is the other brazen with a voice that could echo in a vacuum chamber? Well, not exactly. The main difference between extroverts and introverts is where they d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Melting of Arctic mountain glaciers unprecedented in the past 400 yearsGlaciers in Alaska's Denali National Park are melting faster than at any time in the past four centuries because of rising summer temperatures, a new study finds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Polarization has strong impact on electrons, study showsNew research helps understand movement of electrons in two-dimensional systems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What social media platforms and search engines know about youFacebook Data M. ZuckerbergThe Facebook scandal involving the harvesting of data from tens of millions of users has raised a lot of questions about social media and search engines.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A cosmic gorilla effect could blind the detection of aliensA well-known experiment with young people bouncing a ball showed that when an observer focuses on counting the passes, he does not detect if someone crosses the stage disguised as a gorilla. According to researchers at the University of Cádiz (Spain), something similar could be happening to us when we try to discover intelligent non-earthly signals, which perhaps manifest themselves in dimensions
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Melting of Arctic mountain glaciers unprecedented in the past 400 yearsGlaciers in Alaska's Denali National Park are melting faster than at any time in the past four centuries because of rising summer temperatures, a new study finds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tiny distortions in universe's oldest light reveal strands in cosmic webScientists have decoded faint distortions in the patterns of the universe's earliest light to map huge tubelike structures invisible to our eyes -- known as filaments -- that serve as superhighways for delivering matter to dense hubs such as galaxy clusters.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook sends privacy alerts to affected usersFacebook Cambridge AnalyticaFacebook has begun alerting some users that their data was swept up in the Cambridge Analytica privacy scandal.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Beached whale dies despite rescue efforts at Argentina resortA whale that ran aground on a beach in Mar del Plata, Argentina's biggest seaside resort, has died despite rescue efforts to get it back into the sea.
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Popular Science

The surprising politics of sidewalksTechnology It takes a lot more than concrete to get a sidewalk built. For communities all over America, sidewalks present an increasingly contentious debate over issues of infrastructure spending, safety, and the rights of the individual.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tiny distortions in universe's oldest light reveal clearer picture of strands in cosmic webScientists have decoded faint distortions in the patterns of the universe's earliest light to map huge tubelike structures invisible to our eyes – known as filaments – that serve as superhighways for delivering matter to dense hubs such as galaxy clusters.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dense stellar clusters may foster black hole megamergersWhen LIGO's twin detectors first picked up faint wobbles in their respective, identical mirrors, the signal didn't just provide first direct detection of gravitational waves—it also confirmed the existence of stellar binary black holes, which gave rise to the signal in the first place.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Report: Breakthrough on devastating citrus disease unlikelyFlorida's citrus industry got some dire news Tuesday from an organization that advises the federal government on science and technical matters.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fit for porpoise: Gene changes made 'river pig' uniqueChina's critically endangered Yangtze River porpoise is a distinct species, meaning it cannot interbreed with other porpoise types to pass on its DNA, a major analysis of the creature's genome revealed on Tuesday.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hepatitis C: A novel point-of-care assayOne of the major challenges identified by the WHO in efforts to eradicate the hepatitis C virus is the diagnosis of chronic cases that are generally asymptomatic. Major progress is required for new diagnostic techniques that can be 'decentralized,' in other words accessed by populations and countries with limited resources. Scientists have now developed and validated a rapid, reliable, point-of-ca
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Outback radio telescope listens in on interstellar visitorA telescope in outback Australia has been used to listen to a mysterious cigar-shaped object that entered our Solar System late last year. When 'Oumuamua was first discovered, astronomers thought it was a comet or an asteroid from within the Solar System. But after studying its orbit and discovering its long, cylindrical shape, they realised 'Oumuamua was neither and had come from interstellar spa
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Machine learning offers new way of designing chiral crystalsEngineers and chemists have successfully used the same technology at the core of facial recognition to design chiral crystals. This is the first study reporting the use of this technology, called logistic regression analysis, to predict which chemical groups are best for making chiral molecules.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers explore little-known, deadly fungal infectionsA new study sheds light on little-known fungal infections caused by the fungus Cryptococcus. There are currently no vaccines available for any fungal infection, which can be extremely deadly to patients under treatment for diseases like HIV, AIDS and cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Women most at risk for heart failure weeks after giving birthHeart failure is a leading cause of maternal morbidity and death in the US -- with the rate of pregnancy-related deaths more than doubling between 1987 and 2011. Even so, much about heart failure-related hospitalizations before, during and after delivery is unknown.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why some beetles like alcoholAlcohol used as a 'weed killer' optimizes the harvest of ambrosia beetles.
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Cambridge Analytica Could Also Access Private Facebook MessagesA Facebook permission allowed an app to read messages between 1,500 Facebook users and their friends until October 2015—data that Cambridge Analytica could have accessed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Zuckerberg says company working with Mueller probe (Update)Mark Zuckerberg FacebookApologetic Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg told senators Tuesday it had been "clearly a mistake" to believe the Trump-linked data-mining company Cambridge Analytica had discarded data that it had harvested from social media users in an attempt to sway 2016 elections.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genetic screening tool identifies how the flu infiltrates cellsResearchers at the University of Chicago have developed a genetic screening tool that identified two key factors that allow the influenza virus to infect human lung cells. The technique uses new gene editing tools to create a library of modified cells, each missing a different gene, allowing scientists to see which changes impact their response to flu. This in turn could identify potential targets
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

GPM sees Keni following Tropical Cyclone Josie's trackAnother tropical cyclone called Keni has formed in the South Pacific Ocean between Vanuatu and Fiji and the data from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM found heavy rainfall occurring in the new storm.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA watching stubborn remnants of ex-Tropical Cyclone IrisFormer Tropical Cyclone Iris continues to linger in the Southwestern Pacific Ocean off the coast of Queensland, Australia. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the remnants of Iris on April 10.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mini toolkit for measurements: New NIST chip hints at quantum sensors of the futureResearchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have created a chip on which laser light interacts with a tiny cloud of atoms to serve as a miniature toolkit for measuring important quantities such as length with quantum precision. The design could be mass-produced with existing technology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Newly discovered biomarkers could be key to predicting severity of brain tumor recurrenceResearchers have identified predictive biomarkers that could help assess the level of risk for recurrence in patients with malignant glioma. The study, led by Henry Ford Health System, was published today in Cell Reports. In an analysis of 200 tumor samples, the authors identified a set of epigenetic biomarkers that can predict, at a patient's initial diagnosis, which tumors are likely to recur wi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's GPM sees Keni following Tropical Cyclone Josie's trackAnother tropical cyclone called Keni has formed in the South Pacific Ocean between Vanuatu and Fiji and the data from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM found heavy rainfall occurring in the new storm.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study identifies new molecular target for treating deadly lung disease IPFScientists searching for a therapy to stop the deadly and mostly untreatable lung disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), found a new molecular target that slows or stops the illness in preclinical laboratory tests. Researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center report their data in the journal Cell Reports. Studying mice with IPF and donated human cells, they identify a gene c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetic screening tool identifies how the flu infiltrates cellsResearchers at the University of Chicago have developed a genetic screening tool that identified two key factors that allow the influenza virus to infect human lung cells. The technique uses new gene editing tools to create a library of modified cells, each missing a different gene, allowing scientists to see which changes impact their response to flu. This in turn could identify potential targets
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene jumpstarts regeneration of damaged nerve cellsSearching the entire genome, a Yale research team has identified a gene that when eliminated can spur regeneration of axons in nerve cells severed by spinal cord injury.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene that makes humans eat more sugar can also lower body fatYou are what you eat, the old saying goes. But what if, in fact, you eat certain things because of who you are? Scientists have known since 2013 that a common version of the gene FGF21 makes us consume more carbohydrates. Now, a group of researchers is showing that, despite the effect it has on diet, this gene variant actually decreases fat in the body. The results appear April 10 in the journal C
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Does physical activity influence the health of future offspring?Physical and mental exercise is not only beneficial for your own brain, but can also affect the learning ability of future offspring -- at least in mice. Researchers from the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE) report these findings in the journal Cell Reports.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists uncover details of viral infections that drive environmental, human healthBelow the surface of systems as large and ancient as an ocean and as small and new as a human baby are communities of viruses and bacteria that interact to influence everything from worldwide oxygen levels to the likelihood a newborn will fall ill.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Marriage reduces depression in couples earning less than $60,000 per year, study findsPeople who are married and earning less than $60,000 per year in total household income have fewer symptoms of depression than comparable earning unmarried people, but for couples earning more, marriage doesn't show the same mental health benefits, according to a study co-authored by a Georgia State University researcher.
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The Atlantic

Is It Better to Be Polite or Honest?The advice column as we know it today started with a deception. In The Athenian Mercury , a London magazine that ran from 1690 to 1697, the Athenian Society—supposedly a group of 30-some experts across many fields—answered anonymous reader questions. They replied to all sorts of queries, as Jessica Weisberg recounts in her new book Asking for a Friend : “Why alcohol killed erections and made peop
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Disparities in coastal stream restoration in central CaliforniaStream restoration efforts along the coast of Central California are unevenly distributed, with activity more likely to occur in areas that are more highly populated and dominated by residents who are "whiter, wealthier, and more educated," according to an analysis by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study reveals that the center of the world's marine biodiversity is in dangerResearch led by Swansea University's Bioscience department have found that the world's centre of biodiversity is under widespread threat of losing a key marine resource.
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New Scientist - News

Our eyesight is sharpest at twilight – and now we may know whyWe see best at dawn and dusk, and this could be because our brain activity changes at these times, making it easier to distinguish signals from background noise
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Scientific American Content: Global

XPRIZE Projects Aim to Convert CO2 Emissions, but Skepticism RemainsSemifinalists hope to transform carbon dioxide into cement, bioplastic and other useful materials -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think

Ghost nations of Russia's civil warYou think the collapse of the Soviet Union was chaotic? You should have seen the start. Read More
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New on MIT Technology Review

Russian forces are reportedly jamming US drones over Syria
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists records brain activity of free-flying batsJohns Hopkins University researchers have developed a way to study the brain of a bat as it flies, recording for the first time what happens as a roving animal focuses and refocuses its attention.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Metamaterial device controls transmission and reflection of acoustic wavesMetamaterials researchers at Duke University have demonstrated the design and construction of a thin material that can control the redirection and reflection of sound waves with almost perfect efficiency.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NREL opens large database of inorganic thin-film materialsAn extensive experimental database of inorganic thin-film materials that organizes a decade's worth of research at the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is now publicly available.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Everything we know about Internet gaming disorderAn analysis of articles on Internet gaming disorder (IGD) notes that the condition has a complex psychosocial background, and many personal, neurobiological, familial, and environmental factors may put certain individuals at increased risk.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Man develops severe 'thunderclap' headaches after eating world's hottest chili pepperTaking part in a hot chili pepper eating contest might have some unexpected consequences, highlight doctors in a recent case study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists uncover details of viral infections that drive environmental, human healthNew research from The Ohio State University offers a glimpse into the complexity of interactions between bacteria and the viruses -- or phages -- that infect them.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New sodium-ion electrolyte may find use in solid-state batteriesA newly discovered structure of a sodium-based material allows the materials to be used as an electrolyte in solid-state batteries, according to researchers from Penn State and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The team is fine-tuning the material using an iterative design approach that they hope will shave years off the time from research to everyday use.
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NYT > Science

Senators: E.P.A. Files Undercut Pruitt’s Need for First-Class TravelIn a letter, two Democratic senators claim to have a document disputing the E.P.A. chief’s need for costly travel and other security measures.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Virtual robots that teach themselves kung fu could revolutionize video gamesMachine learning may make it much easier to build complex virtual characters.
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The Atlantic

The States Where People Die YoungWe’ve known for some time now that Americans are increasingly dying younger , but the scale and nature of the problem has been a little bit murky. There was speculation that the downturn in American life expectancy was all thanks to “deaths of despair ,” but some experts have said that might not be the full story , and that obesity and tobacco are still major factors in American mortality. A new
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How a team of chefs fed Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria | José AndrésAfter Hurricane Maria hit Puerto Rico in 2017, chef José Andrés traveled to the devastated island with a simple idea: to feed the hungry. Millions of meals served later, Andrés shares the remarkable story of creating the world's biggest restaurant -- and the awesome power of letting people in need know that somebody cares about them.
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Science : NPR

PrEP Campaign Aims To Block HIV Infection And Save Lives In D.C.PrEP is shorthand for a pill that prevents HIV infection, if taken daily. As Washington, D.C. aims to cut new infections in half by 2020, it hopes to quadruple the number of residents on the medicine. (Image credit: Tyrone Turner/ WAMU)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Indonesia's Lion Air buying 50 Boeing 737's in $6.2 bn dealIndonesia's Lion Air is buying 50 Boeing 737 MAX 10 airplanes in a deal valued at about $6.2 billion, the firms said Tuesday, as the carrier looks to cash in on a transport boom in the Southeast Asian nation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers inaugurate a new era of precision antimatter studiesThe ALPHA experiment at CERN, led by Swansea University scientists, has carried out the most precise and accurate measurement ever done on antimatter.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study reveals that the center of the world's marine biodiversity is in dangerResearch led by Swansea University's Bioscience department have found that the world's center of biodiversity is under widespread threat of losing a key marine resource.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blood test may predict future risk of cardiovascular eventsDespite heart disease and type 2 diabetes being among the leading causes of death in the US, the mechanisms leading to and linking these two diseases remain incompletely understood. A new study by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital may help shed light on a molecular pathway that heart disease and diabetes share, and points to a biomarker that is elevated in women at risk of cardiovascul
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA watching stubborn remnants of ex-Tropical Cyclone IrisFormer Tropical Cyclone Iris continues to linger in the Southwestern Pacific Ocean off the coast of Queensland, Australia. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the remnants of Iris on April 10.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Thin engineered material perfectly redirects and reflects soundMetamaterials researchers from Duke University have created a thin plastic structure with geometric details allowing it to control the redirection and reflection of sound waves with almost perfect efficiency.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Perovskite technology is scalable, but questions remain about the best methodsAs perovskite solar cells set efficiency records and the nascent technology becomes more stable, another major challenge remains: the issue of scalability, according to researchers at the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Professor Amitay receives Air Force grant to study flow separation on wing surfacesMichael 'Miki' Amitay, the James L. Decker '45 Endowed Chair in Aerospace Engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, has received a grant from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research to study the phenomenon of flow separation on aircraft wings, which could lead to improved aerodynamic performance in future-generation air vehicles.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mini toolkit for measurements: New NIST chip hints at quantum sensors of the futureResearchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have created a chip on which laser light interacts with a tiny cloud of atoms to serve as a miniature toolkit for measuring important quantities such as length with quantum precision. The design could be mass-produced with existing technology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Marriage reduces depression in couples earning less than $60,000 per year, study findsPeople who are married and earning less than $60,000 per year in total household income have fewer symptoms of depression than comparable earning unmarried people, but for couples earning more, marriage doesn't show the same mental health benefits, according to a study co-authored by a Georgia State University researcher.
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Big Think

Mark Zuckerberg’s testimony to congress begins today. What will he say?“In modern politics, even the leader of the free world needs help from the sultan of Facebookistan.” ― Rebecca MacKinnon Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

D-Day for Facebook, Zuckerberg before skeptical lawmakersMark Zuckerberg FacebookFacebook chief Mark Zuckerberg was set for a fiery face-off on Capitol Hill Tuesday as he attempts to quell a firestorm over privacy and security lapses at the social network that have angered lawmakers and the site's two billion users.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Could you do it? Trips that ban cellphones, even for photosWould you take a trip without your cellphone?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bugs, microbes and death can inform the livingA new study shows that the postmortem microbiome -- populations of micro-organisms that move in after death -- can provide crucial insights into public health. What's telling is that regardless of many factors -- sex, ethnicity or even type of death -- the microbiome is consistent and distinct, depending on the number of days after death.
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Popular Science

Here's what you need to know before Mark Zuckerberg's testimony in WashingtonMark Zuckerberg FacebookTechnology It's not going to be a fun trip to see the cherry blossoms Mark Zuckerberg will talk user data, Russian meddling, and possible regulations…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: Why you can't buy fresh olivesOlives grow on trees. So why have you never seen a fresh, tree-ripened olive in the produce section at the grocery store?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists record brain activity of free-flying batsJohns Hopkins University researchers have developed a way to study the brain of a bat as it flies, recording for the first time what happens as a roving animal focuses and refocuses its attention.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Disparities in coastal stream restoration in central CaliforniaStream restoration efforts along the coast of Central California are unevenly distributed, with activity more likely to occur in areas that are more highly populated and dominated by residents who are 'whiter, wealthier, and more educated,' according to an analysis by researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study says charisma trumped narcissism for voters in 2016 US presidential electionA new study of the 2016 US presidential election suggests that narcissism and charisma are both important predictors of voter choice. Researchers found that attributed charisma may serve as a balance to narcissism. Thus, followers of a candidate potentially look beyond negative leadership qualities to select those leaders who they perceive to have redeeming positive attributes and values.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Contrast-enhanced subharmonic imaging detects prostate cancers not identified by MRIA test of contrast-enhanced subharmonic imaging (SHI) has shown promise in detecting prostate cancers that were not identified by MRI, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2018 Annual Meeting, set for April 22-27 in Washington, D.C.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Optimized perception in the twilight zoneAs neuroscientists at Goethe University Frankfurt have now discovered, the human brain processes weak visual stimuli better in the morning and evening than at noon.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diamond-based circuits can take the heat for advanced applicationsWhen power generators transfer electricity, they lose almost 10 percent of the generated power. To address this, scientists are researching new diamond semiconductor circuits to make power conversion systems more efficient. Researchers in Japan successfully fabricated a key circuit in power conversion systems using hydrogenated diamond. These circuits can be used in diamond-based electronic device
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hotter, longer, more frequent -- marine heatwaves on the riseWe know heatwaves over land have been increasing, but now new research reveals globally marine heatwaves have also been increasing in length, number and intensity over the past century. More intriguing still, this trend has accelerated markedly since 1982.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Warning signs: New US health study reveals 'dangerous disparities' among statesWorking-age Americans in 21 states faced a higher probability of premature death from 1990 to 2016, according to the most extensive state-by-state US health study ever conducted.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wide differences exist between states in impact of diseaseThe impact of diseases varies widely across states, with tobacco, overweight, poor diet, alcohol and drug use, high blood sugar and high blood pressure accounting for many years lost to ill health, disability or early death.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Malnutrition, anemia among Rohingya children in Bangladesh refugee campThe pervasiveness of malnutrition and anemia among Rohingya children in a refugee camp in Bangladesh exceeds emergency thresholds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study shows invasive Chinese privet can be well controlled with lower concentrations of herbicideChinese privet is one of the most invasive shrubs in the southeastern United States - frequently growing in dense thickets along roadsides, on rights of way and in forests. Now the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management has good news for land managers battling the shrub. Researchers say you can achieve great control with much less herbicide than typically used.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Churchill's favourite butterfly to returnThe UK's changing climate means conditions may now be suitable for one of Sir Winston Churchill's favourite butterflies—the black-veined white—to return, a study has revealed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

DNA testing can rapidly solve Legionnaires' disease outbreaksA DNA test method called polymerase chain reaction allowed New York City health officials to identify the source of a Legionnaires' disease outbreak within hours of specimen collection and should be considered in all Legionnaires' outbreak investigations, researchers say.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Robust and inexpensive catalysts for hydrogen productionScientists were able to observe the smallest details of hydrogen production with the synthetic mineral pentlandite. This makes it possible to develop strategies for the design of robust and cost-effective catalysts for hydrogen production.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How cheetahs outsmart lions and hyenasCheetahs in the Serengeti National Park adopt different strategies while eating to deal with threats from top predators such as lions or hyenas. A new study shows that male cheetahs and single females eat their prey as quickly as possible. Mothers with cubs, on the other hand, watch out for possible threats while their young are eating in order to give them enough time to eat their fill.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Birds migrate away from diseasesIn a unique study, researchers have mapped the origins of migratory birds. They used the results to investigate and discover major differences in the immune systems of sedentary and migratory birds. The researchers conclude that migratory species benefit from leaving tropical areas when it is time to raise their young -- as moving away from diseases in the tropics enables them to survive with a le
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How cheetahs outsmart lions and hyenasCheetahs in the Serengeti National Park adopt different strategies while eating to deal with threats from top predators such as lions or hyenas. A new study in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology shows that male cheetahs and single females eat their prey as quickly as possible. Mothers with cubs, on the other hand, watch out for possible threats while their young are eating in o
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Big Think

For thousands of years, humans slept in two shifts. Should we do it again?Researchers believe that the practice of sleeping through the whole night didn’t really take hold until just a few hundred years ago. Read More
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Viden

Nyopdaget hvaløgle var et af de største dyr nogensindeDen 26 meter lange øgle levede for 205 millioner år siden - og fundet af fossilet kan måske opklare et gammelt knogle-mysterium.
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Viden

Sidste stop på Zuckerbergs undskyldnings-turné er Kongressen: Det kan vi forventeFacebooks stifter skal de næste to dage stå skoleret i USAs kongres, hvor han skal svare på spørgsmål om, hvordan Facebook vil beskytte brugerenes data. Den første høring starter kl. 20.15 og kan følges live på dr.dk.
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Viden

Tjek om dine data har været en del af Facebook-skandalen42.000 danskeres data er havnet i Cambridge Analyticas data-høster. Nu kan du se, om du er en af dem.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Human impact on sea urchin abundanceSea urchin populations are more sensitive to human activities than previously believed, according to a half-century observational study. Researchers found that changing water temperature and algal blooms strongly affected sea urchin populations and even caused some abnormal development of their larvae. The research is published in the journal Ecological Indicators.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers connect the data to show an accelerating trend for marine heatwaves in our oceansAn international study in Nature Communications co-authored by researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes (CLEX) and the Institute of Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS) reveals globally marine heatwaves have increased over the past century in number, length and intensity as a direct result of warming oceans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Diamond-based circuits can take the heat for advanced applicationsWhen power generators like windmills and solar panels transfer electricity to homes, businesses and the power grid, they lose almost 10 percent of the generated power. To address this problem, scientists are researching new diamond semiconductor circuits to make power conversion systems more efficient.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

The seismic signal of Lionel MessiWhen the Barcelona striker nets another wonder goal, the city literally shakes.
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Ingeniøren

Verdens første luksushotel i rummet åbner for reservationHar du 9,5 millioner dollars til overs, kan du booke 12 overnatninger på turistrumstationen Aurora Station.
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The Atlantic

The Yankees’ Biggest Strength May Be Their Greatest WeaknessOn the opening day of the season, Giancarlo Stanton—who last year hit 59 home runs en route to the National League MVP award before a December trade brought him to the New York Yankees—muscled two homers out of Toronto’s Rogers Centre. The first came on a low fastball that he shot to right. MLB’s Statcast measured it as the hardest-hit opposite-field blast since the system’s inception in 2015. Th
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Ocean heat waves are becoming more common and lasting longerOver the last 100 years, the world’s oceans have sweltered through a rising number of heat waves.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research suggests alternative treatment for beta blocker intolerant heart attack patientsBeta blockers have become a prescription drug staple for recovering heart attack patients. However, these blood pressure-reducing medications cannot be tolerated by many patients who are at higher risk for developing cardiovascular disease, including those with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma, the elderly, and diabetics. As seen in the March 26 issue of Thyroid, researchers
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients with high-risk clinical features are at high risk for acute aortic dissectionPatients with one or more high-risk clinical features (tearing pain, hypotension, pulse deficit, neurologic deficit, new murmur) should be considered high risk for acute aortic dissection (AAD).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lack of vegetable choices in infant and toddler food is widespreadThe inability to foster children's taste for dark green vegetables is related to a lack of commercially prepared single-vegetable products, according to a new study led by researchers from the University of Colorado School of Medicine on the Anschutz Medical Campus.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Impact of Medicare annual wellness visit on detection of cognitive impairment is minimalIn the first nationwide study to measure the effect of the Medicare Annual Wellness Visit on early identification of cognitive impairment such as Alzheimer's disease, researchers from the Indiana University Center for Aging Research, Regenstrief Institute and IU Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science found the visit has only minimal impact on detection of cognitive impairment as w
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Scientific American Content: Global

State of the Union for Life Expectancy Is Positive, but Some States Lag BehindNewly published data highlights health trends throughout the country -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Digital penicillin productionMicroorganisms are often used to produce chemicals. These processes are usually very complicated. It is hard to completely understand every detail of the process, when living organisms are involved. Therefore, bioreactors are often seen as 'black boxes' that can only be effectively exploited with a lot of experience. Scientists have succeeded in completely analyzing the penicillin production proce
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Machine learning offers new way of designing chiral crystalsEngineers and chemists at Hiroshima University successfully used the technology underlying facial recognition to design chiral crystals. This is the first study reporting the use of this technology, called logistic regression analysis, to predict which chemical groups are best for making chiral molecules. Results were published in Chemistry Letters.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Why Scientists Are Battling Over PleasureThe question of whether the benefit from viewing a da Vinci is different from enjoying a visit to Pornhub or McDonalds is dividing psychologists and neuroscientists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fish have ears, so man-made noise threatens their survivalAn 'acoustic fog' from motorboat noise, underwater construction and other man-made marine sounds can threaten the survival of fish and their ability to communicate with each other, research has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fathers missing in childhood obesity interventions, study findsFathers are often absent when it comes to family-based interventions to prevent childhood obesity, University of Guelph study finds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Life expectancy significantly worse in deprived areasLife expectancy and health outcomes worsen the more deprived an area or population is, new research from Cass Business School has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why you can't buy fresh olives (video)Olives grow on trees. So why have you never seen a fresh, tree-ripened olive in the produce section at the grocery store? Why are they always swimming in salty brine? Oh, and did you know that black olives are actually green? Watch as this video from Reactions breaks down the chemistry of these salty, oily stone fruits: https://youtu.be/oStoeHntfG8.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sex and race disparities in cardiovascular health could be reducedSubstantial sex and racial gaps exist for cardiac rehabilitation referral at hospital discharge, especially among females, African-Americans, Hispanic and Asian patients leading to less favorable outcomes and/or survival rates.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hepatitis C: A novel point-of-care assayOne of the major challenges identified by the WHO in efforts to eradicate the hepatitis C virus is the diagnosis of chronic cases that are generally asymptomatic. Major progress is required for new diagnostic techniques that can be 'decentralized,' in other words accessed by populations and countries with limited resources. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur and Inserm, in collaboration with the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Review examines everything we know about Internet gaming disorderAn analysis of all published articles on Internet gaming disorder (IGD) notes that the condition has a complex psychosocial background, and many personal, neurobiological, familial, and environmental factors may put certain individuals at increased risk.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers propose a blockchain data network to boost manufacturingResearchers are proposing the creation of a public, open-source network that uses blockchains -- the technology behind cryptocurrencies -- to share verifiable manufacturing data. The system could be used as a peer-to-peer network that allows companies to find small- and medium-sized manufacturers that are capable of producing specific components on a reliable basis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study shows invasive Chinese privet can be well controlled with lower concentrations of herbicideChinese privet is one of the most invasive shrubs in the southeastern United States -- frequently growing in dense thickets along roadsides, on rights of way and in forests. Now the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management has good news for land managers battling the shrub. Researchers say you can achieve great control with much less herbicide than typically used.
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Live Science

This Pouched Rat Can Sniff Out Tuberculosis in KidsTuberculosis is both deadly and difficult to test for. But a new paper suggests rats might make the illness easier to sniff out.
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New on MIT Technology Review

City emergency sirens can be hacked to sound rogue messages
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Ingeniøren

MIT-rapport: AAU’s ingeniøruddannelser tilhører verdenselitenDet amerikanske topuniversitet har interviewet 178 ekspert fra hele verden, og deres svar placerer ingeniøruddannelserne fra Aalborg Universitet som fjerdebedst i verden. Den problembaserede undervisningsform får æren.
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Futurity.org

Friend groups shield kids from bullying better than 1 bestieHaving a group of friends to rely on appears to buffer children from the emotional hurt bullying causes better than a single “best” friend, a new study of more than 1,200 primary school children and their parents suggests. “A group of friends appears to protect the mental health of bullied children when just having a best friend makes little difference,” says co-lead researcher Lisa Mundy of the
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Futurity.org

Radio receiver ‘listens’ for dark matter particlesResearchers have developed a way to “listen” for the signs of dark matter axions, the particles that may make up dark matter. “We’ve built a radio that looks for a radio station, but we don’t know its frequency.” Forty years ago, scientists theorized a new kind of low-mass particle that could solve one of the enduring mysteries of nature: what dark matter is made of. Now a new chapter in the sear
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Digital penicillin productionTU Wien and Sandoz GmbH have successfully implemented a real-time computer simulation of the complex growth behaviour of penicillin producing organisms. This simulation now helps to keep the production process under control.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Virus's 'taste' for unusual sugar could lead to new cancer treatmentsThe way in which a rare virus attacks cells could hold the key to new therapies for aggressive brain and lung cancers, according to new research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Experience of black doctoral students underscores need to increase diversity in STEM fieldsThe danger and risk of riding out a storm is symbolic of the decision black men make to pursue a graduate degree in engineering. They do so knowing they will face challenges, but the barriers described by black men who shared their experiences as part of a six-year study show how race was a greater obstacle than they expected.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cheaper, less toxic and recyclable light absorbers for hydrogen productionMimicking photosynthesis in plants, using light to convert stable and abundant molecules like water and CO2 into a high energy fuel (hydrogen) or into chemicals of industrial interest, is a major research challenge today. However, achieving artificial photosynthesis in solution remains limited by the use of costly and toxic metal-based compounds to harvest light. Researchers at CNRS, CEA and the U
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Five ivory objects that will be exempt from a proposed trade banWhen Michael Gove first called for responses from the public to his plan to ban ivory sales back in October 2017, the environment secretary said a ban would "put the UK front and centre of global efforts to end the insidious trade in ivory".
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Milestone for next-gen solid-state batteries to power future long-range electrical vehiclesImec, the world-leading research and innovation hub in nanoelectronics, energy and digital technologies and partner in EnergyVille, has fabricated an innovative type of solid-state Li-ion battery achieving an energy density of 200 Wh/liter at a charging speed of 0.5C (2 hours). This battery is a milestone on our roadmap to surpass wet Li-ion battery performance and reach 1000Wh/L at 2C by 2024. Wi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bugs, microbes and death can inform the livingA Michigan State University study, published in the current issue of Nature Scientific Reports, shows that the postmortem microbiome -- populations of micro-organisms that move in after death -- can provide crucial insights into public health. What's telling is that regardless of many factors -- sex, ethnicity or even type of death -- the microbiome is consistent and distinct, depending on the num
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How cheetahs outsmart lions and hyenasCheetahs in the Serengeti National Park adopt different strategies while eating to deal with threats from top predators such as lions or hyenas. A new study in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology shows that male cheetahs and single females eat their prey as quickly as possible. Mothers with cubs, on the other hand, watch out for possible threats while their young are eating in o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Robust and inexpensive catalysts for hydrogen productionTeams of scientists from the Ruhr University Bochum (RUB) and the University of Warwick were able to observe the smallest details of hydrogen production with the synthetic mineral pentlandite. This makes it possible to develop strategies for the design of robust and cost-effective catalysts for hydrogen production.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

DNA testing can rapidly solve Legionnaires' disease outbreaksA DNA test method called polymerase chain reaction allowed New York City health officials to identify the source of a Legionnaires' disease outbreak within hours of specimen collection and should be considered in all Legionnaires' outbreak investigations, researchers say in the April issue of the Journal of Environmental Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Birds migrate away from diseasesIn a unique study, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have mapped the origins of migratory birds. They used the results to investigate and discover major differences in the immune systems of sedentary and migratory birds. The researchers conclude that migratory species benefit from leaving tropical areas when it is time to raise their young -- as moving away from diseases in the tropics enab
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Digital penicillin productionMicroorganisms are often used to produce chemicals. These processes are usually very complicated. It is hard to completely understand every detail of the process, when living organisms are involved. Therefore, bioreactors are often seen as 'black boxes' that can only be effectively exploited with a lot of experience. In Vienna, scientists have succeeded in completely analyzing the penicillin produ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Competing in a global innovation economy: The current state of R&D in CanadaA new expert panel report, released today by the Council of Canadian Academies (CCA), provides the latest data and information on Canada's track record in fundamental research, applied research and experimental development, industrial R&D, and the relationship of these research efforts to wealth creation and prosperity through innovation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weight loss is an important predictor of cancerUnintended weight loss is the second highest risk factor for some forms of cancer, concludes the first robust research analysis to examine the association.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New drug combo improves survival of women with rare uterine cancerAdding the monoclonal antibody drug trastuzumab -- already used to treat certain breast cancers -- to the chemotherapy regimen of women with a rare form of uterine cancer lengthens the amount of time their tumors are kept from growing, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers conducting a small phase II trial of the regimen, testing its safety and value
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gut bacteria keeps bears healthily obeseThe summer sun pokes its way through the pine trees to strike the forest floor, where a bear is feasting on blueberries. She can easily get through 50 kilograms a day.
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The Atlantic

What Did You Do in the Trade War, Daddy?While Donald Trump has diverted his attention to other matters, here are some questions and answers to bear in mind, when he is back to talking about winning a trade war. Q. Is there a “China problem” to be dealt with? A. Yes. This was the theme of a piece I did just before the 2016 election: “ China’s Great Leap Backward .” Its argument was that through the decades since the beginning of China’s
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The Atlantic

Letters: Who Handles The Dishes?Doing Dishes Is the Worst Last week, Caroline Kitchener wrote about a new report that examines the strain dishwashing can have on heterosexual relationships. I always love reading The Atlantic , but today I take issue with some of the wording in your article “Doing Dishes Is the Worst.” You say (both in the article and in the Facebook status promoting the article), “Women who wash the vast majori
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Polarization has strong impact on electrons, study showsThe movement of thousands of electrons underlies electronics. Yet, ubiquitous as electrons are, the particulars of their behavior continue to stump physicists. One phenomenon has proven especially puzzling: how electrons move under the influence of polarized electromagnetic waves.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deforestation in tropical Africa is not as bad as previously thoughtDeforestation has massive effects on the biosphere. It contributes to carbon emissions, changes in water cycles and biodiversity loss. The main cause of deforestation is the conversion of forested lands to agricultural lands.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop more comprehensive acoustic scene analysis methodResearchers have demonstrated an improved method for audio analysis machines to process our noisy world. Their approach hinges on the combination of scalograms and spectrograms—the visual representations of audio—as well as convolutional neural networks (CNNs), the learning tool machines use to better analyze visual images. In this case, the visual images are used to analyze audio to better identi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bugs, microbes and death can inform the livingIt's been said that people can be judged by the company they keep. New research from Michigan State University shows that what's true for the living also is true for the dead.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Toxic levels of arsenic in Amazon basin well water: studyShallow wells dug for drinking water in the Amazon basin in order to avoid polluted rivers contain up to 70 times the recommended limit of arsenic, researchers warned Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Inside an asteroidWhy Perth scientists are hoping to score asteroid fragments brought back to Earth by an ambitious space mission.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Almost 100 million adults have COPD in ChinaChronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is widespread in China with 8.6 percent of the country's adult population -- almost 100 million people -- suffering from the chronic lung disease, according to a new study. The study, which provided lung-function screenings for more than 50,990 participants, is the largest survey of COPD across age groups ever conducted in China.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Substance that guides ant trail is produced by symbiotic bacteriaA research with ant from genus Atta reveals that a bacteria in their microbiota plays a key role in communication among individuals and also on the colony's defense against pathogens. A group of scientists also showed how a type of fungus participates on stingless bees' development cycle.
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Feed: All Latest

What Random Walks in Multiple Dimensions Teach You About LifeThere are real world applications of the stochastic mathematical process known as a random walk—really.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Swarm tracks elusive ocean magnetismThe magnetic field is arguably one of the most mysterious features of our planet. ESA's Swarm mission is continually yielding more insight into how our protective shield is generated, how it behaves and how it is changing. Adding yet another string to its bow, Swarm is now tracking changes in the magnetic field produced in the oceans in more detail that ever before.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Recovering SAS orders 50 Airbus A320-neosSAS said Tuesday it had ordered 50 Airbus A320-neos for its short and medium-haul routes, a sign of improving fortunes for the Scandinavian carrier after some difficult years.
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Big Think

Cognitive gains from meditation last for seven years, research showsNew research from UC Davis shows forty volunteers still experiencing cognitive gains seven years after an intensive retreat. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The story of techlash, and how the future might be differentAre you over social media? Are you disillusioned with a seemingly relentless pace of change? Does the future really, really worry you? You're not alone.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU court backs France ban of Uber service without notifying BrusselsUber Service CarThe EU's top court on Tuesday dealt another blow to US ridesharing giant Uber by backing the right of France and other member states to ban an illegal taxi service without notifying Brussels regulators.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Natural disasters in 2017 cost record $144 bn: Swiss ReThe cost of natural diasters hit a record $144 billion (117 billion euros) last year, a study from one of the world's top reinsurance firms, Swiss Re, said Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Volkswagen says considering board 'changes', may name new CEOScandal-hit car giant Volkswagen said Tuesday it was considering reshuffling its board and that chief executive Matthias Mueller could be replaced, although no decision has yet been made.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When enemies come to helpThe enemy of my enemy is my friend. Now researchers at the University of Zurich show that this principle also holds for crab spiders and flowering plants. While it's true that the spiders do eat or drive away useful pollinators such as bees, they're also attracted by floral scent signals to come and help if the plant is attacked by insects intent on eating it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists discover a link between superconductivity and the periodic tableScientists from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and Skoltech have discovered a general principle for calculating the superconductivity of hydrides based on the periodic table alone. Turned out that certain elements capable of forming superconducting compounds are arranged in a specific pattern in the periodic table.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

From Vascular Medicine: Focus on vascular imaging and diagnosticsVascular disease is a leading cause of morbidity and death worldwide. In order to combat the disease, specialists must have skills with imaging techniques. With this in mind, Vascular Medicine, the official journal of the Society for Vascular Medicine, dedicated its April 2018 issue to the topic of vascular imaging and diagnostics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New class of drugs could help tackle treatment-resistant cancersResearchers have discovered a new class of drug that has the potential to help cancer patients who no longer respond to existing therapies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cheaper, less toxic and recyclable light absorbers for hydrogen productionAchieving artificial photosynthesis in solution remains limited by the use of costly and toxic metal-based compounds to harvest light. Researchers at CNRS, CEA and the Université Grenoble Alpes propose an efficient alternative using semiconductor nanocrystals (also called quantum dots) based on cheaper and less toxic elements, such as copper, indium and sulfur.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A tool based on the use ofcarbon nanoparticles enables detection of antidepressants in urine samplesThe test can be used to monitor therapeutic dosages, for cases of intoxication due to overdose or at a forensic level.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

School-based yoga can help children better manage stress and anxietyParticipating in yoga and mindfulness activities at school helps third-graders exhibiting anxiety improve their well-being and emotional health, according to a new Tulane University study published in the journal Psychology Research and Behavior Management.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deciphering the 'mosaic' of the brainScientists' discovery sheds new light on how neurodegenerative diseases might occur.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Higher risk of infectious disease with both high and low cholesterolThe so-called good cholesterol, HDL, is associated with infectious disease, new research from the University of Copenhagen and Copenhagen University Hospital shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why does some tap water taste weird?Every year Australia's councils contest the academy awards of the water industry: the Best Tasting Tap Water in Australia. Entrants compete on clarity and colour as well as taste and odour.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research ties persistence of 'white flight' to race, not socioeconomic factors"White flight" from the city to the suburbs has long been identified as producing racially segregated communities. Some scholars have argued the behavior is motivated not by race but by a desire to live in more stable and prosperous neighborhoods.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research paints underwater pictures with soundSilent marine robots that record sounds underwater are allowing researchers at the University of East Anglia (UEA) to listen to the oceans as never before.
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New Scientist - News

Robots don’t take people’s jobs – they make new onesA German study casts doubt on the story that automation will destroy jobs. Could it be true elsewhere?
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Ingeniøren

Ramt af cyberangreb: Halvdelen bliver ramt igen inden for et årEr man en gang blevet ramt af et målrettet cyberangreb, er der stor chance for, at du bliver ramt igen inden for et år. Det viser nye tal fra sikkerhedsfirmaet FireEyes kunder.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The dark secrets of social media dark patternsTweeting praise or criticism gives you more power—and can pose a greater potential threat—than you may know, according to Michigan State University research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New light technique could result in less intrusive, more effective diagnosis for patientsA new method of using light to scan the human body, developed by researchers at the University of St Andrews, could result in less intrusive and more effective diagnosis for patients. The work is the result of a collaboration between researchers from the Schools of Physics and Astronomy, Biology, Medicine and the Scottish Oceans Institute at the University.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to turn light into atomic vibrationsSheet-like materials can have intriguing properties that could benefit devices from flexible electronics to solar cells. Researchers think they can customize the properties of these materials by using light pulses to rapidly switch the materials from one state to another. For example, light pulses could turn an electrical insulator into a conductor. But the ability to do this depends on how effici
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The fight for clean emissions continuesIt is exactly 20 years since experts from Empa and VERT published the first test results on diesel particle filters. Today, more than 300 million vehicles worldwide are fitted with such filters. However, a VERT conference held at the Empa Academy revealed why the emission problem is by no means over.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Polarization has strong impact on electrons, study showsNew research helps understand movement of electrons in two-dimensional systems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early 'chemobrain' intervention needed for breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapyMore support is needed to help breast cancer patients and survivors manage 'chemobrain' symptoms, such as memory loss, short attention span and mental confusion, according to a study led by researchers from the National University of Singapore.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How intestinal bacteria can affect your blood sugar and lipid levelsIntestinal bacteria have attracted recent attention since they were discovered to influence various physiological functions and diseases in humans. Japanese researchers analyzing the influence of changes in intestinal bacteria on sugar and lipid metabolism have found that secondary bile acids produced by intestinal bacteria can influence blood glucose and lipid concentrations as well as parts of t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers develop more comprehensive acoustic scene analysis methodResearchers have demonstrated an improved method for audio-analysis machines to process our noisy world. Their approach hinges on the combination of scalograms and spectrograms -- the visual representations of audio -- as well as convolutional neural networks (CNNs), the learning tool machines use to better analyze visual images. In this case, the visual images are used to analyze audio to better
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Feed: All Latest

This Radio Hacker Could Hijack Emergency Sirens to Play Any SoundBalint Seeber found that cities around the US are leaving their emergency siren radio communication systems unencrypted and vulnerable to spoofing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ctenophores and the story of evolution in the oceansCtenophores (pronounced "TEEN-o-fours") are mysterious ocean drifters found anywhere from the ocean's edge to the deepest parts of the ocean. Colorful, translucent, and delicate, these predators slip through ocean waters capturing other animals, typically using their long, sticky tentacles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New material makes cooling devices more energy-efficientWaste heat from industry can often not be utilised because of its low temperature. With this material, it can be used in environmentally friendly cooling systems for example in the field of building technology. The research team from Kiel will present its material and its applications at the Hannover Messe 2018.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Newly discovered supernova remnants only reveal themselves at the highest gamma-ray energiesThe H.E.S.S. telescopes have surveyed the Milky Way for the past 15 years searching for sources of gamma radiation. The H.E.S.S. collaboration includes scientists of the Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics of the University of Tübingen led by Professor Andrea Santangelo and Dr. Gerd Pühlhofer. They are interested in sources of very high energy gamma radiation in the TeV energy range, i.e. in t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rats, cats, and people trade-off as main course for mosquitoes in Baltimore, Md.Understanding how neighborhood dynamics regulate mosquito bites is key to managing diseases like West Nile virus and Zika virus. Today in Parasites & Vectors, researchers report that in Baltimore, Md., socioeconomic differences between neighborhoods influence bite risk, with rats being a primary blood meal source in lower income neighborhoods.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Advancing the science of smell -- with a hint of muskResearchers have identified key molecular mechanisms at work when people smell musks, a highly valued group of fixatives used in many perfumes and colognes. The discovery may have implications for a wide range of effects on mood and behavior in vertebrates, said the scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Move over fake news: Hostile neighbors pose big threats to governancePropaganda by way of 'fake news' is one way a nation can wage war without firing a single shot. Another is through tactics of subversion and coercion, in which a country intentionally keeps neighboring countries weak in order to advance its own foreign policy interests, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Survival strategy: How one enzyme helps bacteria recover from exposure to antibioticsResearchers focused on an enzyme in gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a pathogen that causes pneumonia and sepsis.
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Popular Science

Music can seriously improve your workout. Here's how to create the perfect playlist.DIY And choose the right headphones to go with it. Countless studies have shown the right music can help you exercise longer and harder. Here's how to harness that science in the perfect workout playlist.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The fishy problem of underwater noise pollutionWhen the famous explorer Jacques Cousteau released The Silent World, a documentary of his underwater adventures in 1953, he inspired generations of scientists to study the world's oceans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Quantum simulator offers faster route for prime factorizationFactoring very large numbers into their prime "building blocks" is extremely difficult for classical computers, and this difficulty underlies the security of many cryptographic algorithms. While it's easy to factor the number 20 as the product of the primes 2 x 2 x 5, for example, factoring larger numbers becomes exponentially more difficult when using classical factoring algorithms.
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Ingeniøren

Omsider en høring om Femern: Får vi så de hemmelige trafikprognoser?Enhedslistens transportordfører har til sin egen store overraskelse overtalt de øvrige partier til at holde en offentlig høring om Femern-tunnelens omdiskuterede trafikprognoser. Han håber, at det betyder et opgør med hemmlighedskræmmeriet.
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Scientific American Content: Global

To Keep NASA's Golden Age Alive, We Need More Telescopes--but Far Less Expensive OnesA focus on costly space telescopes is hurting the field -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A magnetar just woke up after three years of silenceWhen stars reach the end of their main sequence, they undergo a gravitational collapse, ejecting their outermost layers in a supernova explosion. What remains afterward is a dense, spinning core primarily made up of neutrons (aka. a neutron star), of which only 3000 are known to exist in the Milky Way Galaxy. An even rarer subset of neutron stars are magnetars, only two dozen of which are known in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study results suggest genetic influence on social outcomes greater in meritocratic than communistic societiesA team of researchers from the U.K., Australia and the U.S. has found evidence that suggests genetic influence on social outcomes is greater in meritocratic than in communistic societies. In their paper published in the journal Nature Human Behavior, the group describes their study of people living in Estonia before and after the breakup of the Soviet Union and the impact it had on social outcomes
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Dagens Medicin

Ny KBU-model skal få flere læger til FærøerneSundhedsministeren vil oprette en ny særordning for færøske KBU-læger, der giver dem et forspring i KBU-ordningen, og som på sigt skal sikre bedre lægedækning på øerne.
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Dagens Medicin

Ny doktor vil forske i placeboeffekterLene Vase forsker i sammenhængen mellem psykologiske og neurobiologiske faktorer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new wave of rock removal could spell disaster for farmland wildlifeMy (DM's) perception of threatened species habitats changed the first time I encountered a population of endangered lizards living under small surface rocks in a heavily cleared grazing paddock. That was 20 years ago, at a time when land managers were well aware of the biodiversity values of conservation reserves and remnant patches of native vegetation. But back then we knew very little about the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New tool helps minimize impact of solar activityUniversity of Saskatchewan researcher Lindsay Goodwin has developed a new way to measure the impact of solar activity on the ionosphere as indicated by northern lights and geomagnetic storms. The ionosphere is the upper part of the atmosphere.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Machine learning offers new way of designing chiral crystalsEngineers and chemists at Hiroshima University successfully used the same technology at the core of facial recognition to design chiral crystals. This is the first study reporting the use of this technology, called logistic regression analysis, to predict which chemical groups are best for making chiral molecules.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Risk stages defined for children with chronic kidney diseaseExperts in pediatric kidney disease have published a new staging system to help doctors better predict the length of time until a child with chronic kidney disease will need to undergo a kidney transplant or start receiving dialysis. Although this type of prognostic guide exists for adults, this is the first such tool specific to children.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New clues to help restore fertility in women with disabling ovary disorderGround-breaking research out of the University of Otago, New Zealand, is showing potential to restore fertility in women suffering polycystic ovary syndrome.
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New on MIT Technology Review

YouTube’s biggest videos have been hacked
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reading the entire human genome – one long sentence at a timeFifteen years ago, the Human Genome Project announced they had cracked the code of life. Nonetheless, the published human genome map was incomplete and parts of our DNA remained to be deciphered. Now, a new study published in the journal Nature Biotechnology brings us closer to a complete genetic blueprint by using a nanotechnology-based sequencing technique.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lifespan of new solar cell technologies to increase tenfoldArmi Tiihonen defended her doctoral dissertation at Aalto University 6 April 2018 on the ageing of new kinds of perovskite and dye-sensitised solar cells. She has developed ways to increase the lifetime of solar cells and also proposes ways to improve ageing tests for them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Four new 'hot Jupiter' exoplanets discoveredFour new "hot Jupiter" extrasolar planets have been detected as part of the Hungarian-made Automated Telescope Network-South (HATSouth) exoplanet survey. The newly found alien worlds are generally similar in size, but vary widely in mass. The discovery is detailed in a paper published April 4 on the arXiv pre-print server.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Superacids are good medicine for super thin semiconductorsDesigning wearable sensors or other devices demands robust, flexible electronics. Extremely thin films, just one atom thick, such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), hold promise. Large-area synthesis of these materials is required for their commercialization. But today's thin films are plagued by structural defects. These defects degrade device performance. Scientists at New York University and the C
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tubular science improves polymer solar cellsA popular polymer-based solar cell could produce more energy if the electronic charges can move efficiently through the cell's components. A novel three-component mixture allows conductive solar cell materials to self-align into columns. The alignment improves the efficiency. This, in turn, allows the solar cells to be fabricated more than three times thicker without degrading the high performance
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hard X-ray flash breaks speed recordReactions in solar panels, catalytic converters, and other devices are governed by the quick motion of electrons. To capture the movement of these electrons, scientists use pulses of extremely high energy x-rays. The challenge is making the pulses short enough to get a good look at the electrons. Now, the shortest-ever pulses of hard x-rays were produced using two methods developed at SLAC's Linac
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discover how colliding oxygen molecules absorb lightScientists at Radboud University have managed to do what had never been tried before: accurately describe how colliding oxygen molecules absorb light. Our atmosphere consists of approximately 20 percent oxygen molecules, which constantly collide with each other and with the 80 percent of nitrogen molecules, and in doing so absorb light. The new theory describes the mechanism by which this takes pl
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain Trauma: New Glasgow Coma Scale-pupils score and multifactor probability outcome chartsScientists have created new assessment tools that build on the Glasgow Coma Scale to provide greater information on injury severity and prognosis in patients with traumatic brain injury while still offering simplicity of use.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Large-scale replication study challenges key evidence for the pro-active reading brainWhen people read or listen to a conversation, their pro-active brains sometimes predict which word comes next. But a scientific team now demonstrates that the predictive function of the human language system may operate differently than the field has come to believe in the last decade. Their study is the first large-scale, multi-laboratory replication effort for the field of cognitive neuroscience
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Paralyzed patient feels sensation againUsing a tiny array of electrodes implanted in the brain's somatosensory cortex, scientists have induced sensations of touch and movement in the hand and arm of a paralyzed man.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Later school start times really do improve sleep timeA new study indicates that delaying school start times results in students getting more sleep, and feeling better, even within societies where trading sleep for academic success is common.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The evolutionary advantage of having eyebrowsEyebrows—we all have them, but what are they actually for? While eyebrows help to prevent debris, sweat, and water from falling into the eye socket, they serve another important function too – and it's all to do with how they move and human connection.
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The Atlantic

The Revelation of Cardi BIt’s one of the best things mass entertainment has produced this year: Cardi B’s rendition of “Be Careful” on Saturday Night Live . As her band turned a loungey and minimal beat into a hushed, tense Latin jazz jam, the 25-year-old rap arriviste born Belcalis Almanzar addressed a cheating partner: “You still stutter after certain questions / You keep in contact with certain exes.” Shot from the wa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Outback radio telescope listens in on interstellar visitorA telescope in outback Australia has been used to listen to a mysterious cigar-shaped object that entered our solar system late last year.When 'Oumuamua was first discovered, astronomers thought it was a comet or an asteroid from within the solar system. But after studying its orbit and discovering its long, cylindrical shape, they realized 'Oumuamua was neither and had come from interstellar spac
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research ties persistence of 'white flight' to race, not socioeconomic factorsExamining population trends in racially mixed suburbs, Indiana University sociologist Samuel Kye finds that white flight occurs when nonwhite residents move in, regardless of socioeconomic factors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The dark secrets of social media dark patternsMSU researchers used the GamerGate controversy to uncover how one angry social media user inspired thousands to join its movement, amplify its messages, cyberbully innocent users and ultimately get thousands more to participate ... without the users even knowing it. This can happen to anyone.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why zombie slugs could be the answer to gardeners' woesSlugs and snails are the bane of almost every vegetable planting gardener and farmer. Slugs in particular have voracious appetites and are relentless in eating stems, leaves and shoots. No wonder gardeners have sought any means to control the spread of this crop killer. Unfortunately, the most common response – slug pellets – can have a terrible effect on other wildlife. One alternative is the par
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Our survey found 'questionable research practices' by ecologists and biologists – here's what that meansCherry picking or hiding results, excluding data to meet statistical thresholds and presenting unexpected findings as though they were predicted all along – these are just some of the "questionable research practices" implicated in the replication crisis psychology and medicine have faced over the last half a decade or so.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Reptiles Are Concentrated in Specific Locations, Often UnprotectedLizards, snakes and turtles are concentrated in largely unprotected areas -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dagens Medicin

Ny brugerundersøgelse: Langt de fleste læger er utilfredse med sundhedsplatformenSeks ud af ti læger i Region Hovedstaden er utilfredse med Sundhedsplatformen. Professor i datalogi er ikke overrasket over lægernes utilfredshed.
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Dagens Medicin

Psykiatrien i Region Sjælland vil flytte og fyre ansattePsykiatrien i Region Sjælland skal finde 23 mio. kr. på budgettet. Ledelsen ønsker derfor at flytte rundt på en række læger, sygeplejersker, plejere og sekretærer. FOA frygter, det vil få mange til at søge væk og gøre det sværere at rekruttere.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Silent robots listen to ocean windsAutonomous sea-gliders fitted with hydrophones gather information far from weather stations.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists explore a safe alternative to X-ray security scannersA team of physicists at the University of Sussex are developing the science to create a safe and efficient 'paint' that can reveal, with terahertz (THz) radiation, the contents of luggage or objects hidden in clothing.
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Live Science

SpaceX Not to Blame for Loss of Top-Secret Spy SatelliteSpaceX isn't responsible for the loss of the top-secret Zuma spy satellite during the craft's launch earlier this year, according to media reports.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More people staying longer in federally assisted housing strains ability to serve families, study findsPeople are staying in federally assisted housing for about six years, up from the average of 4 1/2 years 20 years ago, which is straining the federal rental assistance program's ability to serve families with children, according to a University of Kansas researcher.
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The Atlantic

Why the GOP Is Making the Midterm Elections All About ImpeachmentTo the old-fashioned, it might seem crazy that the Republicans plan to fight the 2018 election as a referendum on a Trump impeachment. Traditional wisdom was: If the president of your party is unpopular, try your utmost to de-nationalize off-year elections. Focus the voters on local issues and down-ballot candidates! “Maybe you don’t like Trump. But you like the new factory openings in our distri
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

After Uber, Tesla incidents, can artificial intelligence be trusted?Given the choice of riding in an Uber driven by a human or a self-driving version, which would you choose?
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Scientific American Content: Global

Psychological Weapons of Mass PersuasionThe truth about the controversial science that has everyone worried -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

Nothing brings out tiny violins like pretty people moaning. But might they have a point? | Arwa MahdawiBeing beautiful mainly seems a blessing. But it can be a curse – and the main problem is that you are just not allowed to complain about it It’s tough being beautiful . Other women, women who are not so genetically blessed, despise you, you see. They worry you will steal their husband. They get together with their average-looking friends and say nasty things behind your inordinately elegant back
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Popular Science

This guy ate a pepper so hot doctors thought he might be having an aneurysmScience The Carolina Reaper gets everyone in the end. You know the feeling: You’re just trying to compete in a pepper-eating contest and your poor stomach thinks you’ve maybe swallowed a whole fire. It’s trying to save you,…
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Dagens Medicin

Psykiatridirektør: Udvikling kræver omprioriteringOmplacering eller opsigelse af ansatte i psykiatrien i Region Sjælland skal skabe plads til, at virksomheden kan udvikle sig. Det siger psykiatridirektør Michael Werchmeister.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Paralyzed patient feels sensation againUsing a tiny array of electrodes implanted in the brain's somatosensory cortex, Caltech scientists have induced sensations of touch and movement in the hand and arm of a paralyzed man.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

CFRP recycling—into the battery instead of the garbageCarbon fiber-reinforced plastics are gaining importance as components of aircraft. The trend is increasing the need for sustainable recycling concepts. At the ILA from April 25 to 29, 2018 in Berlin, Fraunhofer will present a technology that converts recycled carbon fibers into materials for batteries and fuel cells. This saves costs, improves the CO2 balance and opens up new means of recycling in
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The Atlantic

Your Body is a Teeming BattlegroundI went to medical school , at least in part, to get to know death and perhaps to make my peace with it. So did many of my doctor friends, as I would find out. One day—usually when you’re young, though sometimes later—the thought hits you: You really are going to die. That moment is shocking, frightening, terrible. You try to pretend it hasn’t happened (it’s only a thought, after all), and you go
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Automated lightweight construction reduces weight and costsThe aircraft of the future flies electrically and autonomously, is feather-light and can be conveniently produced in a fully automated manner. While the electrification and permanent autopilot are still in their infancy, lightweight construction is already indispensable today. Digital manufacturing processes are about to be applied. Fraunhofer will present new automated production technologies for
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Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Hvordan genereres der ilt i fly?En læser vil gerne vide, hvor passagerfly og kampfly får deres ilt fra i kabinen. Det svarer testpilot fra Flyvevåbnet på.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: SuckersA recently expanded online database allows researchers and the public to share and view videos of sea lampreys.
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NYT > Science

Climate Change Denialists Say Polar Bears Are Fine. Scientists Are Pushing Back.In a new study, researchers single out a blog run by a Canadian zoologist as a primary source of dubious information about the status of polar bears.
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Feed: All Latest

Helix Takes Clinical Genetic Testing Straight to ConsumersSoon, anyone curious about their health will be able to request a clinical DNA test—not just doctors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fly with individually air-conditioned seatsIn cooperation with its partner Gentherm, Fraunhofer has developed an air-conditioned business class seat (Aviation Double Seat). The seat features a combination of seat ventilation by means of fans and thermal regulation by seat heating. This leads to an optimal temperature control of the seat surface as well as a continuous moisture removal. The result is a permanently comfortable, dry climate o
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The Atlantic

Michael Cohen Has a Big ProblemUpdated at 12:11 p.m. Whatever evidence federal prosecutors have collected concerning Michael Cohen, President Trump’s longtime attorney, it is most likely extraordinarily strong. Before federal agents raided Cohen’s home, hotel room, and office Monday afternoon, they would have had to convince high-ranking officials at the Department of Justice and a federal judge that a search warrant was neces
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BBC News - Science & Environment

More than half your body is not humanHuman cells make up only 43% of the body's total cell count, while the rest are microscopic colonists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Europe must sea food in a new way thanks to warming watersAquaculture, or fish farming, is one of the world's fastest growing food sectors, providing about half of all the fish we eat. As it stands, climate change is altering our ocean's environment, causing the seawater to become warmer and impacting the marine ecosystems profoundly. How will these changes affect marine species, consumers and industries that rely on them?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sensors in public spaces can help create cities that are both smart and sociableHow are smart cities meant to meet citizen needs? Big data from a network of sensors can give managers and planners a real-time, big-picture overview of traffic flows, public transport patronage, and water and power use. However, the needs of people in the city must be met at both the meta and micro levels.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Traveling into space – safely, quickly and cost-effectivelyLow Earth orbit increasingly resembles an overcrowded junkyard. Disused satellites, burned-out rocket stages and thousands of pieces of debris produced by collisions – all these things pose a threat to infrastructure in space. Fraunhofer researchers have developed a new radar system and other technologies to give spacecraft better protection against space junk. And that is not all: By virtue of an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tackling the toughest questions with NanoSIMSIt may take a village to raise a child, according to the old proverb, but it takes an entire team of highly trained scientists and engineers to install and operate a state-of-the-art, exceptionally complex ion microprobe. Just ask Julie Smith, a nuclear security scientist at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientific challenges and opportunities for remediating radioactive wasteOne of the nation's enduring scientific challenges has been to find effective ways of remediating millions of gallons of chemical and radioactive waste remaining from Cold War activities. Now a team of experts has combed through more than 100 studies to determine what is known of the complex chemical and rheological aspects of the waste and identify scientific issues that must be resolved to final
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Failing to match parents' educational achievements among men can be as distressing as being divorcedFailing to match the educational achievements of one's parents can be as distressing for men as having ethnic minority status or being divorced, new research says.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Snowfall patterns may provide clues to Greenland Ice SheetThe Greenland Ice Sheet is melting, discharging hundreds of billions of tons of water into the ocean each year. Sea levels are steadily rising.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Harnessing 'Rashba spin-Seebeck effect' phenomenon will enable commercial devices to turn waste heat into electricityMechanical engineers at the University of California, Riverside, have reported success in using inexpensive materials to produce thermoelectric devices that transform low-level waste heat into electricity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Start of most sensitive search yet for dark matter axionThanks to low-noise superconducting quantum amplifiers invented at the University of California, Berkeley, physicists are now embarking on the most sensitive search yet for axions, one of today's top candidates for dark matter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Outback radio telescope listens in on interstellar visitorA telescope in outback Western Australia has been used to listen to a mysterious cigar-shaped object that entered our Solar System late last year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Almost a third of fathers lack access to flexible work arrangementsAlmost a third of working fathers in the UK lack access to flexible work arrangements, new research says.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Footballers' frequent transfers leave their wives and children feeling lonelyProfessional footballers' frequent transfers to new clubs leave their wives and children feel isolated and lonely as they move around the country, research says.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ExoMars poised to start science missionThe Trace Gas Orbiter has reached its final orbit after a year of 'aerobraking' that ended in February. This exciting operation saw the craft skimming through the very top of the upper atmosphere, using drag on its solar wings to transform its initial highly elliptical four-day orbit of about 200 x 98 000 km into the final, much lower and near-circular path at about 400 km.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What is the optimal way to diversify an economy?One of the eternal challenges of economic development is how to identify the economic activities that a country, city, or region should target. During recent years, a large body of research has shown that countries, regions, and cities, are more likely to enter economic activities that are related to the ones they already have. For instance, a region specialized in the exports of frozen fish and c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New result draws on 30 years of research and development and begins the definitive search for axion particlesForty years ago, scientists theorized a new kind of low-mass particle that could solve one of the enduring mysteries of nature: what dark matter is made of. Now a new chapter in the search for that particle has begun.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New quantum device set to support measurement standards of the electrical currentAn international collaboration, including researchers from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and Royal Holloway, University of London, has successfully demonstrated a quantum coherent effect in a new quantum device made out of continuous superconducting wire – the Charge Quantum Interference Device (CQUID).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Iridescent photonic cellulose, mimicking the structural color of insects, with optical applicationsThe bright colors of some butterflies, beetles or birds are not due to the presence of pigments that selectively absorb light, but due to the so-called structural coloration. Structural coloration occurs on surfaces with a nanostructure with dimensions similar to those of the wavelength of the incident light (typically below the micron). These ordered nanostructures are known as photonic crystals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

North-ex­posed ice cliffs ac­cel­er­ate glac­ier meltETH researchers have confirmed the suspicion that north-facing ice cliffs on debris-covered glaciers in the Himalayas accelerate ice melt.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Repeat spawning comes with tradeoffs for troutSteelhead trout that spawn multiple times have more than twice the lifetime reproductive success of single spawning trout, suggesting there is a substantial benefit associated with repeat spawning. But it comes with a tradeoff, according to new research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Characterising the structure of self-assembling organic molecules on the surface of nanoparticlesA large collaboration led by scientists from École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland has used a powerful new approach to overcome the challenging task of characterising the structure of self-assembling organic molecules on the surface of nanoparticles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Substance that guides ant trail is produced by symbiotic bacteriaResearchers working on the Ribeirão Preto campus of the University of São Paulo (USP) in Brazil have discovered that a bacterium found in the microbiota associated with leafcutter ant species Atta sexdens rubropilosa produces so-called "trail pheromones," the aromatic chemical compounds used by the ants to lay a trail to their nest. An article on their findings has been published in Scientific Rep
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Dagens Medicin

Rigide krav til journalføring hæmmer overblikket i journalenKrav om alt – stort og småt – skal skrives ned gør det vanskeligere at få overblik i journalerne, og det tager kostbar tid fra patienterne.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An oil-eating bacterium that can clean up pollution and spillsOil spills and their impact on the environment are a source of concern for scientists. These disasters occur on a regular basis, leading to messy decontamination challenges that require massive investments of time and resources. Seeking a solution, researchers are now studying Alcanivorax borkumensis, a bacterium that feeds on hydrocarbons. Professor Satinder Kaur Brar and her team at INRS have co
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers trace biological development via CRISPER-Cas9-induced scarring on DNATechnologies such as RNA sequencing are now revealing which genes are expressed in each individual cell. All cells can then be arranged systematically using similar expression profiles. Dr. Jan Philipp Junker, head of the Quantitative Developmental Biology research group at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC), says, "Whenever we use such a technology t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tiny nanomachine successfully completes test driveTogether with colleagues from the USA, scientists from the University of Bonn and the research institute Caesar in Bonn have used nanostructures to construct a tiny machine that constitutes a rotatory motor and can move in a specific direction. The researchers used circular structures from DNA. The results will now be presented in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.
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The Atlantic

The Deceptively Accessible Music of Cecil TaylorSometimes, when listening to an avant-garde giant of yore, it’s difficult to understand what made her so striking. A vanguard by definition lays the way for imitators, so eventually the things that once made her radical now seem conventional. This is not a challenge with Cecil Taylor’s music. The pianist and composer, who died Thursday at 89, retains his ability to shock, despite decades of work
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shaking up megathrust earthquakes with slow slip and fluid drainageMegathrust earthquakes are the most powerful type of earthquake, occurring at subduction zones where one tectonic plate is pushed beneath another. By contrast, slow slip events (SSEs) release seismic stress at a lower rate than large earthquakes, re-occurring in cycles across months to years. These processes can take place along the megathrust and other planes of weakness in response to loading, r
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Latest Headlines | Science News

This material uses energy from ambient light to kill hospital superbugsA quantum dot–powered material could help reduce the number of hospital-acquired infections, including those with drug-resistant bacteria.
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Live Science

Weird Neutrinos Can't Quite Explain Matter's Huge Riddle YetEarly results from an experiment deep underground have found no evidence that neutrinos are their own antiparticles.
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Live Science

Restroom Hand Dryers Are Blowing Bacteria EverywhereUsing a restroom hand dryer? Your digits aren't as clean as you think.
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Feed: All Latest

Mark Zuckerberg Answers to Congress For Facebook's TroublesTensions around Facebook's privacy and ad practices have escalated dramatically since the last time the company sat before Congress.
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Live Science

What Happens If You Get Injected with Embalming Fluid?A woman in Russia died after doctors allegedly gave her an IV drip containing a formaldehyde solution instead of saline, according to news reports.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Change Your Mind-Set, Reduce Your Chronic PainPsychological approaches can help control the agony and lessen the need for drugs -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Taming the Mighty Mississippi May Have Caused Bigger FloodsHuman meddling with the river is blamed for most of the rise in flood levels, but the role of climate remains unclear -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

Beslutning om Viking Link til England udskydesEnerginet og National Grid har udsat en endelig investeringsbeslutning om et omdiskuteret elkabel mellem Danmark og England. Årsagen er uklarhed om britiske plantilladelser.
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The Atlantic

A House You Can Buy, But Never OwnATLANTA—It was not until a few years after he moved in that Zachary Anderson realized that he was not, in fact, the owner of the house he thought he’d purchased. Anderson had already spent tens of thousands of dollars repairing a hole in the roof, replacing a cracked sidewalk, and fixing the ceilings of the small two-bedroom home where he lives in southwest Atlanta. He was trying to get a reducti
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The Atlantic

On Google and Facebook: 'The Finest Intelligence Operation on Earth'On Tuesday, Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook finally appears before Congress. Franklin Foer, who has extensively chronicled the relationship between social-media companies and democracy, had a report yesterday on the phase-change in national power that his appearance might indicate. (And you can take an advance look at Zuckerberg’s prepared testimony , highly underwhelming in my view.) Last week I ran
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Science | The Guardian

To Brits with knickers in a twist over Americanisms: don't get your panties in a bunchMany ‘American’ phrases are actually British but a new book argues why we say what we say reveals a lot about our cultures To those dedicated warriors hunched over their keyboards or gripping their pens, ready to fire off an angry salvo about the Americanization of British English to their favorite newspaper, television channel or book publisher, linguist Lynne Murphy has a solemn warning: check
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Phononic SEIRA—enhancing light-molecule interactions via crystal lattice vibrationsA study published in Light: Science & Applications opens new avenues for fundamental studies of vibrational strong coupling, as well as for the development of novel infrared sensors for chemical recognition of very small amounts of molecules. The interaction of light and matter at the nanoscale is a key element for many fundamental studies and technological applications, ranging from light harvest
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study analyzes the keys to fragmentation of metallic materialsScientists have analyzed the mechanisms behind the dynamic fragmentation of ductile metallic materials that exhibit large permanent deformations when subjected to severe mechanical loading. Previously, it was thought that dynamic fragmentation was triggered by the inherent defects of the material. What this research suggests is that the key mechanism may not be the porosity of the metallic materia
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The absence of a single mitochondrial protein causes severe inflammationThe link between mitochondria and inflammation is still unclear. But it is known is that the accumulation of defective mitochondria that should have been removed causes inflammation. Scientists at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) headed by Antonio Zorzano have demonstrated that the removal of a single mitochondrial protein in mouse muscle leads to severe inflammation throu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers design upgrade device for mass spectrometersResearchers from Skoltech and MIPT have developed a device for upgrading mass spectrometers used to analyze the chemical makeup of unknown substances. The new device analyzes one substance from four different perspectives. Alternatively, it enables multiple samples to be examined simultaneously. By contrast, conventional mass spectrometers analyze one substance at a time. The research paper was pu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team discloses the formation of burning ice in oceanic clay rich sedimentA KAIST research team has identified the formation of natural gas hydrates, so-called flammable ice, formed in oceans. Professor Tae-Hyuk Kwon from the Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering and his team found that clay minerals in oceanic clay-rich sedimentary deposits promote formation of gas hydrates and proposed the principle of gas hydrate formation in the clayey sedimentary layers.
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Ingeniøren

Tyskernes interesse for dieselbiler i frit faldTyske bilkøbere vil nu lige så gerne have en elbil som en dieselbil. Udviklingen går hurtigt efter ny lovgivning, der gør diesellivet mere besværligt.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discovery of compounds that keep plants freshA team of scientists at Nagoya University has discovered new compounds that can control stomatal movements in plants. Some of the compounds have been shown to prevent leaves from drying up suppressed withering when sprayed on rose and oat leaves. Further investigation could lead to the development of new compounds to extend the freshness of cut flowers and flower bouquets, reduce transportation co
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Low bending loss waveguide opens the avenue to downsizing of 3-D photonic integrated circuitsFemtosecond laser direct writing is a promising technology for the fabrication of photonic integrated chips mainly due to its intrinsic capability of three-dimensional (3-D) prototyping in transparent substrates. Currently, the difficulty in inducing large refractive index changes smoothly distributed in the laser-irradiated regions is the major obstacle for producing compact photonic integrated c
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Ingeniøren

Mikrofossil opkaldt efter dansk geologHenrik Nøhr-Hansen fra Geus lægger navn til en ny art af mikrofossiler.
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Ingeniøren

Parkering: Københavns Kommune vælger software over sensorerMatematiske modeller er bedre til at forudsige trafikken end fysiske sensorer, der tæller biler.
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The Atlantic

The Family Trying to Escape Blame for the Opioid CrisisMuch as the role of the addictive multibillion-dollar painkiller OxyContin in the opioid crisis has stirred controversy and rancor nationwide, so it has divided members of the wealthy and philanthropic Sackler family, some of whom own the company that makes the drug. In recent months, as protesters have begun pressuring the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and other cultural institutions to
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Feed: All Latest

Mozilla's Internet Health Report Diagnoses Life OnlineThe foundation released a broad, sweeping report Tuesday about the state of our lives online.
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Ingeniøren

40 procent af de ansatte utilfredse med SundhedsplatformenTo ud af tre mener ikke, at platformen er brugervenlig.
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Viden

Korrespondent om datalæk: Zuckerberg kan ikke snakke sig ud af det herKrise i Facebook efter massivt datalæk. Stifteren har et kæmpe problem.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UEA research paints underwater pictures with soundSilent marine robots that record sounds underwater are allowing researchers to listen to the oceans as never before.While pilot whales make whistles, buzzes and clicks, pods of hunting dolphins create high-pitched echolocation clicks and larger species such as sperm whales make louder, slower clicks.As well as eavesdropping on marine life, the recordings can be used to measure sea-surface wind spe
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Inside Science

Folding, Cutting and Crumpling GrapheneFolding, Cutting and Crumpling Graphene Before learning what can be done with graphene, we need to know what can be done to graphene. Origami_spring.jpg An origami spring made using a single piece of paper. Image credits: Jason7825 via Wikimedia Rights information: CC BY-SA 1.0 Technology Monday, April 9, 2018 - 13:15 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Graphene has long been touted as the
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Det er lavstatus at tale 'perkersprog' i skolenTidligere var det primært børn med indvandrerbaggrund, som talte gadesprog, eller såkaldt...
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Ancient sea reptile was one of the largest animals everSea reptiles the size of blue whales swam off the English coast 200 million years ago, fossils show.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is Facebook really changing? Or just trimming its data haul?Facebook Data M. ZuckerbergLost amid a flurry of Facebook announcements about privacy settings and data access is a much more fundamental question: Is Facebook really changing its relationship with users, or just tinkering around the edges of a deeper problem—its insatiable appetite for the data it uses to sell ads?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Jet Airways rules out Air India bidJet Airways on Tuesday became the latest major Indian airline to rule out a bid for debt-laden national carrier Air India in a new blow to the government's privatisation plans.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Risikoen for infektionssygdomme stiger ved både højt og lavt kolesterolDet såkaldt gode kolesterol, HDL, hænger sammen med infektionssygdomme, viser ny forskning...
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Science-Based Medicine

Modern Reflexology: Still As Bogus As Pre-Modern ReflexologyReflexology is a belief system based on imaginary connections between spots on the skin and internal organs. It has no basis in science.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Barriers to Scientific Research Are Holding Back InnovationScientists waste countless hours navigating paywalls to access research papers, but major changes are under way -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Race for Mexico's 'cocaine of the sea' pushes two species toward extinctionThe dried fish parts don't look like much to the novice eye, but the totoaba swim bladders discreetly displayed in this shop in Guangzhou, China sell for up to $20,000.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ubisoft aims to rack up five billion players with Tencent dealFresh from winning a long corporate battle, French video game powerhouse Ubisoft is aiming for a tenfold surge in its global playing audience after securing a partnership with Chinese internet giant Tencent.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Backpage co-founders, executives indicted on prostitution chargesTwo co-founders of Backpage and top executives of the classified advertising website have been indicted on charges of enabling prostitution and money laundering.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Air France says 7 days of strikes cost company 170 mn eurosAir France said Tuesday that seven day-long strikes since February by workers demanding higher pay are set to cost it 170 million euros ($209 million).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sperm whale 'clicks' help scientists understand behaviourScientists have recorded thousands of hours of "clicks" that sperm whales make to forage for food and communicate, helping them better understand the behaviour of one of the Southern Ocean's key predators.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Anyone want to buy a dinosaur? Two on sale in ParisThe skeletons of an allosaurus and a diplodocus are up for auction in Paris this week, marketed as hip interior design objects—for those with big enough living rooms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple turns green, claiming '100% clean energy'Apple said Monday it had achieved a goal of "100 percent clean energy" for its facilities around the world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flat math and reading results in national report cardThe results of the latest Nation's Report Card are in and the news isn't good.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Large-scale replication study challenges key evidence for the pro-active reading brainWhen people read or listen to a conversation, their pro-active brains sometimes predict which word comes next. But a scientific team led by the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in the Netherlands now demonstrates that the predictive function of the human language system may operate differently than the field has come to believe in the last decade. Their study is the first large-scale, mu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Yes, Mark Zuckerberg will wear a suit for Congress testimonyFacebook Mark ZuckerbergYes, Mark Zuckerberg will wear a suit.
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Science | The Guardian

Star Man: a lunar odyssey – in picturesInspired by everything from The Shining to the aubergine-coloured bathroom suite of his childhood, artist Tom Hammick’s Lunar Voyage is a beautiful, mesmerising depiction of a lonely traveller’s journey to the moon and back Continue reading...
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Science | The Guardian

Africa's unsung scientists finally get their own journal to spread researchPublication will highlight pioneering work of scientists searching for cures to diseases like HIV and malaria and solutions to climate change A new journal to showcase Africa’s often-overlooked scientific research has been launched to give the continent’s scientists better global recognition. Scientific African will be the first “mega-journal” in Africa. It was unveiled in Kigali last week at Afr
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Viden

Forskere arbejder igen med LSD og svampeDepression, angst, OCD og hovedpine kan måske afhjælpes af psykedeliske stoffer.
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Ingeniøren

Margrethe Vestager kræver gennemskuelige algoritmer: Ikke nok at pege på sort boksIfølge Gartner er store softwareleverandører ved at tilpasse deres produkter, så algoritmernes resultater kan forklares.
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Ingeniøren

Stort flertal af danskerne støtter politisk indsats for elbiler73 procent af danskerne mener, at danske politikere bør gøre en særlig indsats for at fremme salget af elbiler, viser en ny undersøgelse af YouGov for Dansk Elbil Alliance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mount Sinai-led task force identifies ways US health care systems can learn from the worldThe Task Force report explores how the US can apply global lessons to improve community health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Women most at risk for heart failure weeks after giving birthHeart failure is a leading cause of maternal morbidity and death in the US -- with the rate of pregnancy-related deaths more than doubling between 1987 and 2011. Even so, much about heart failure-related hospitalizations before, during and after delivery is unknown.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UTSA researchers explore little-known, deadly fungal infectionsA new study by Althea Campuzano, Ph.D., a student at the University of Texas at San Antonio, and Floyd Wormley, Jr., Professor of Biology and Senior Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies, sheds light on little-known fungal infections caused by the fungus Cryptococcus. There are currently no vaccines available for any fungal infection, which can be extremely deadly to patients under trea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Concussion increases the risk of prolonged headache woesEvery day people are whisked into hospital emergency rooms with concussions. A new study shows that even mild head trauma can cause major problems in daily life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Later school start times really do improve sleep timeA new study in SLEEP, published by Oxford University Press, indicates that delaying school start times results in students getting more sleep, and feeling better, even within societies where trading sleep for academic success is common.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New method lets doctors quickly assess severity of brain injuriesA new way to rapidly assess levels of consciousness in people with head injuries could improve patient care.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Alzheimer's disease redefined: New research framework defines Alzheimer's by brain changes, not symptomsNew research framework, published in Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association. First author Clifford R. Jack, Jr., M.D., of Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN and colleagues propose shifting the definition of Alzheimer's disease in living people -- for use in research -- from the current one, based on cognitive changes and behavioral symptoms with biomarker confirmation, to a stri
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New biological research framework for Alzheimer's seeks to spur discoveryThe research community now has a biomarker-based construct for Alzheimer's which could result in a more precise and faster approach to testing drug and other interventions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New Glasgow Coma Scale-pupils score and multifactor probability outcome chartsThe University of Glasgow's Sir Graham Teasdale, co-creator of the Glasgow Coma Scale, has teamed with Paul M. Brennan and Gordon D. Murray of the University of Edinburgh to create new assessment tools that build on the Glasgow Coma Scale to provide greater information on injury severity and prognosis in patients with traumatic brain injury while still offering simplicity of use.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Bitcoin would be a calamity, not an economyA cryptocurrency future sounds liberating. In reality, it would be a disaster for everybody.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Antarctic expedition hopes for Ernest Shackleton bonusA scientific cruise next year will look for Ernest Shackleton's famous lost ship given the opportunity.
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Science : NPR

Everybody Lies, And That's Not Always A Bad ThingWhen we think of lies, we think of the big stuff. We say, "I could never do something like that." But big lies start with small deceptions. Dan Ariely talks about why we lie and why we're honest. (Image credit: Gary Waters /Getty Images/Ikon Images)
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The Atlantic

Trump's Assault on the Rule of LawHours after the FBI raided the office, home, and hotel room of his sometime-personal attorney Michael Cohen, President Trump delivered an angry response at the White House on Monday. The group of people he targeted is wide and deep: Special Counsel Robert Mueller, Attorney General Jeff Sessions, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, former FBI Director James Comey, and his own appointee as U.S.
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New Scientist - News

Theresa May pledges £75 million for prostate cancer researchThe prime minister, Theresa May, is to pledge £75 million for clinical trials researching prostate cancer, which affects around one in eight men in the UK
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Feed: All Latest

Watch Mark Zuckerberg Testify Before Congress Live Right HereFacebook Data M. ZuckerbergOn Tuesday and Wednesday, Mark Zuckerberg will testify before the Senate and House of Representatives. Here's how to make sure you don't miss a minute.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gender gap in academic medicine has negative impact, but there are simple solutionsExisting gender gaps in academic medicine may have a negative impact on workplace culture and organizational effectiveness, but there are simple, systems-based solutions, suggests a new study.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Right Whales Seem to Think before They SpeakRather than always making the same call in response to the same stimuli, North Atlantic right whales are capable of changing their vocalizations. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org

There’s a new, cheaper way to make grapheneResearchers have developed an economical and industrially viable strategy to produce graphene. The new technique addresses the long-standing challenge of an efficient process for large-scale production of graphene, and paves the way for sustainable synthesis of the material. Graphene is a two-dimensional material with a honeycomb structure of only one atom thick. Dubbed the material of the future
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NYT > Science

F.D.A. Restricts Sales of Bayer’s Essure Contraceptive ImplantThe agency said the device could only be sold by doctors who agree to warn women of the serious risks associated with it.
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Feed: All Latest

Porsche's 919 Hybrid Evo Wallops F1's Fastest CarsIgnoring the regulations that govern motorsports, the 919 Hybrid Evo beat F1 champ Lewis Hamilton's record time at Belgium's famed Spa Francorchamps track.
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Futurity.org

These gene mutations link a bunch of different cancersResearchers completed the genetic sequencing and analyses of more than 11,000 tumors from patients, spanning 33 types of cancer and identifying about 300 genes that drive tumor growth. Remarkably, they say, just over half of all tumors analyzed carry genetic mutations that therapies already approved for use in patients could target. The types of cancer are all part of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCG
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Viden

Forskere undersøger søvnmangel: Hvad gør det ved nybagte mødre?Forskere fra Oxford og Aarhus Universitet skal undersøge, hvordan manglen på søvn påvirker hjernen.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Mission to Antarctica's Larsen ice shelvesAn international expedition next year will try to reach the site of a major new iceberg.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: How to Describe the WorldWhat We’re Following All Eyes on Syria: Dozens of civilians in the rebel-controlled town of Douma, Syria, were killed in a suspected chemical-weapons attack by President Bashar al-Assad’s regime. The attack crosses “red lines” against chemical warfare set by both President Obama and President Trump, and suggests that the Assad regime isn’t worried about an American response. Trump said on Monday
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Futurity.org

What impact will cutting fuel economy rules have?Recently, the Environmental Protection Agency announced plans to weaken Obama administration gas emissions and fuel economy standards. Proposed in 2012, the CAFE (Corporate Average Fuel Economy) standards require automakers to nearly double the average fuel economy of new cars and trucks by 2025—making the US and Canada the only two major nations to adopt such long-range goals. In this interview,
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Futurity.org

To stay fertile, eggs demand food via food tubesNew research clarifies how female reproductive cells—eggs or oocytes—get the food they need to grow and remain fertile. The egg gets its food from little arm-like feeding tubes (called filopodia) that jut out from tiny cells surrounding the egg and must poke through a thick wall coating the egg in order to feed it. Until recently, scientists did not really understand the place and timing of the f
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Futurity.org

Cancer ‘test kit’ could end one-size-fits-all treatmentA new cancer cell-based assay could help doctors diagnose cancer, better monitor the disease, and take a step closer to customized treatment for individual patients. The microfluidic device, which allows for precise control of fluids at the submillimeter scale, cultures circulating tumor cells (CTCs) collected from a patient’s blood and grows the CTC clusters in its microwells. CTCs are cells tha
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Futurity.org

What happens when nanoparticles collideNew research on what happens when nanoparticles collide could one day inform the development of better helmets, protective earphones, and even devices to convert “junk” energy from airport runway vibrations into usable power. Using supercomputers, scientists modeled what happens when two nanoparticles smash into each other in a vacuum. The team ran simulations for nanoparticles with three differe
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Latest Headlines | Science News

World’s hottest pepper may have triggered this man’s severe headachesA man ate one of the hottest peppers in the world. About a minute later, his head began pounding.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Almost 100 million adults have COPD in ChinaChronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is widespread in China with 8.6 percent of the country's adult population -- almost 100 million people -- suffering from the chronic lung disease, according to a new Tulane University study published in The Lancet. The study, which provided lung-function screenings for more than 50,990 participants, is the largest survey of COPD across age groups ever c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stop prioritizing the car to tackle childhood obesity, governments/planners urgedThe UK governments need to ditch a 42-year-old trend and stop prioritizing the car if they are serious about tackling childhood obesity, insist clinicians and transport experts in a call to action, published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Man develops severe 'thunderclap' headaches after eating world's hottest chili pepperTaking part in a hot chili pepper eating contest might have some unexpected consequences, highlight doctors in the journal BMJ Case Reports.
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Science | The Guardian

Man eats world's hottest chilli pepper – and ends up in hospitalCarolina Reaper appears to have narrowed the arteries in the competitive eater’s brain, causing a series of thunderclap headaches A man who took part in a chilli pepper eating contest ended up with more than he bargained for when he took on the hottest pepper in the world. After eating a Carolina Reaper pepper, the 34-year-old started dry heaving before developing a pain in his neck that turned i
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Popular Science

Humans may have a surprising evolutionary advantage: Expressive eyebrowsAnimals Scientists still aren’t sure why early humans had such weird skulls—or why we don’t. It’s one of the first things you notice when you look at archaic humans in a textbook or museum. Just above the eyes rests an imposing feature, a prominent brow ridge…
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Live Science

A Man Ate the 'World's Hottest' Pepper. Then the 'Thunderclap' Headaches StartedBiting into the "hottest pepper in the world" sounds painful enough. But for one man, the daring feat resulted in excruciating headaches.
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The Atlantic

Silicon Valley Falls to EarthMark Zuckerberg FacebookWhen Mark Zuckerberg rehearsed the manic routine of a presidential candidate last year, he was of sound mind. Electoral success may have ultimately been beyond his talent set. But the culture accorded him the sort of profound respect that two-term senators and technocratic governors never receive. Zuckerberg sat on the cover of glossy magazines and reaped plaudits: for teaching himself Chinese (
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: He Ate the World’s Hottest Pepper, Then Landed in the Hospital With ‘Thunderclap’ HeadachesAfter eating the Carolina Reaper during a contest, an unidentified patient suffered headaches so severe he was hospitalized. The symptoms resembled those of a stroke.
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The Scientist RSS

Homo Sapiens Fossil Pushes Back Date of Human Migration from AfricaAn 88,000-year-old finger bone places human ancestors in Arabia earlier than previously believed.
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The Scientist RSS

Human Cancer Drugs May Be Effective in Tasmanian DevilsA new study reveals similarities between the transmissible cancers that infect the endangered marsupials, and hints at ways to treat them.
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New Scientist - News

One bad night’s sleep may increase levels of Alzheimer’s proteinA bad night’s sleep may lead to a protein linked to Alzheimer’s building up in the brain, but whether this raises the risk of the condition is unclear
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Science | The Guardian

Theresa May launches £75m drive against prostate cancerProject will see 40,000 men recruited for research into the disease, which kills more than 11,000 a year The prime minister is to launch a new drive against prostate cancer, which kills more than 11,000 men every year in the UK and causes great anxiety and sometimes suffering for the 47,000 men who get a diagnosis. Theresa May will announce £75m for research that will recruit 40,000 men into tria
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Raiding PlacesToday in 5 Lines The FBI raided the office of President Trump’s personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, and seized records related to several topics, including payments to adult-film actress Stormy Daniels. Federal investigators also reportedly searched his home and hotel room. Trump condemned the suspected chemical attack in Syria as a “barbaric act” and said he will make a decision on the U.S. response
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

20-year-old mystery of malaria vaccine target solvedThe human piece of a malaria infection puzzle has been revealed for the first time, solving a long-standing mystery. A protein displayed on the surface of malaria parasites called 'TRAP' is a high-priority vaccine target, but how it interacts with human host cells has remained a puzzle. Scientists have discovered a receptor protein on the surface of human cells that the TRAP protein interacts with
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lingering negative responses to stress linked with health a decade laterPeople whose negative emotional responses to stress carry over to the following day are more likely to report health problems and physical limitations later in life compared with peers who are able to 'let it go.'
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Live Science

Please Help Name These Adorable Bald Eagle Hatchlings. Democracy Depends on It.For the love of democracy, please vote on what these adorable baby eagles should be named.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Practice leaders' and facilitators' perspectives on quality improvement may differPractice facilitators and practice leaders agreed on the value of a facilitated quality improvement program, but reached different judgments on practices' intensity and pace of change.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Leadership and adaptive reserve are not associated with blood pressure controlPrimary care leadership and practice resilience can strengthen organizational culture. In small primary care practices, however, practice adaptive reserve and leadership capability are not associated with baseline blood pressure control.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Interventions to decrease cardiovascular disease are not one-size-fits-allIn a study spanning four culturally different communities, tailored recruitment materials were developed to facilitate community engagement.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Solo medical practices outperform groups in treatment of cardiac diseaseSolo primary care practices in New York City are more likely than group practices to meet practice guidelines for reducing cardiovascular risk.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Major disruptions are frequent in primary careAmong 208 primary care practices, two-thirds experienced one or more major disruptive events, such as personnel changes or relocation, adversely affecting quality improvement efforts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Use of quality improvement strategies among US primary care practicesSmall- to medium-sized practices with quality improvement systems (e.g., registries) are most likely to use quality improvement strategies. Practices with fewer major disruptions are more likely to use quality improvement strategies to improve cardiovascular preventive services.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Recruiting practices is costlyRecruiting practices for large scale quality improvement initiatives is difficult and costly ($5,529 per enrolled practice on average), and even more expensive for practices with no prior relationship with the study team.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hospital ownership of practice may reduce physician burnoutAmong staff in small- to medium-sized primary care practices, hospital ownership is associated with positive perceptions of work environment and lower burnout.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality releases early findings from EvidenceNOWThe Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality today released early findings from EvidenceNOW, a multi-million dollar initiative to help primary care practices across the country more rapidly improve the heart health of Americans.
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