(bemærk at 11. april 2018 nederst indeholder dublet af nyheder, som er angivet 10. april 2018)

MOST POPULAR

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Peptide-based biogenic dental product may cure cavitiesResearchers at the University of Washington have designed a convenient and natural product that uses proteins to rebuild tooth enamel and treat dental cavities.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Night owls have higher risk of dying soonerNight owls -- people who prefer to stay up late and sleep late -- have 10 percent higher risk of dying sooner than larks, people who go to bed early and rise early, reports a new study. This is the first study to show 'owls' have higher risk of mortality. Owls also suffer from more diseases and disorders than morning larks. Employers should allow greater flexibility in working hours for owls, scie
17h
Ingeniøren

Efter 17 år: Danske DAB-signaler halter stadig bagefter FM’s lydkvalitetSelv om DAB er en nyere teknologi, kan lydkvaliteten ikke hamle op med den på FM-nettet, som Kulturministeriet vil slukke for i 2021.
19h

LATEST

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The hidden health cost of that extra drinkRegularly drinking more than the recommended UK guidelines for alcohol could take years off your life, according to new research published today in the Lancet. Part-funded by the British Heart Foundation, the study shows that drinking more alcohol is associated with a higher risk of stroke, fatal aneurysm, heart failure and death.
2min
Futurity.org

Sensor-carrying drones ‘talk’ to each otherNew hardware and software that can coordinate sensor-carrying drones may be able to assist in evaluating local atmospheric conditions, measuring electronic signals such as Wi-Fi, and mapping areas in three dimensions. Application programming interfaces (APIs) will allow users to customize the drones to meet specific sensing requirements. “The system is designed to be application-agnostic in the s
2min
Science | The Guardian

One extra glass of wine 'will shorten your life by 30 minutes'Drinking is as harmful as smoking and consuming more than five drinks a week lowers life expectancy, say researchers Drinking will shorten your life, according to a major new study that suggests every glass of wine or pint of beer over the daily recommended limit will cut half an hour from the expected lifespan of a 40 year old. Those who think a glass of red wine every evening will help keep the
13min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wiggling atoms switch the electric polarization of crystalsA time-resolved x-ray experiment now elucidates that tiny atomic vibrations shift negative charges over a 1000 times larger distance between atoms and switch the macroscopic polarization on a time scale of a millionth of a millionth of a second.
17min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Certain iron supplements may influence the development of colon cancerTwo common iron compounds increase the formation of a known biomarker for cancer, according to a new study. The two compounds, ferric citrate and ferric EDTA, are often used in dietary supplements and as a food additive respectively, in worldwide markets including the USA and the EU.
17min
Latest Headlines | Science News

Sweet potatoes might have arrived in Polynesia long before humansGenetic analysis suggests that sweet potatoes were present in Polynesia over 100,000 years ago, and didn’t need help crossing the Pacific.
24min
Popular Science

This drug can stop an opioid overdose—and you should carry itHealth You can learn how to administer naloxone yourself. Last week the Surgeon General issued an advisory emphasizing that “knowing how to use naloxone and keeping it within reach can save a life.” If you’re wondering what…
29min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A simple tool for doubling down on disease controlA team global health researchers have created a web-based tool that allows public health officials to assess the cost-effectiveness and benefits of disease control initiatives in countries around the world.
31min
Live Science

Totally Bogus Doomsday Predicted for April 23Call it the recycled doomsday: A new prediction for the end of the world sets the date for Monday, April 23, based on a mishmash of old numerology, re-readings of the Biblical Book of Revelation, and rehashed conspiracy theories about a rogue "Planet X."
39min
NYT > Science

Peter Grünberg, 78, Winner of an ‘iPod Nobel,’ Is DeadA discovery of how to store vast amounts of data by manipulating magnetic and electrical fields paved the way for devices like the smartphone.
43min
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Tease-Pacific PartnershipToday in 5 Lines President Trump told lawmakers that he has ordered his advisers to look into rejoining the Trans-Pacific Partnership , a deal he pulled out of days after taking office. In his confirmation hearing for secretary of state, CIA Director Mike Pompeo said that he has been interviewed by Special Counsel Robert Mueller, but did not provide additional details. Trump appeared to walk back
54min
Live Science

What's to Blame for Fatal Tesla Crash? Nobody Can AgreeTesla is blaming last month's fatal Tesla Model X car crash largely on the driver, not the car itself, according to a statement released by Tesla this week.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lavas in the lab could lead miners to new iron ore depositsGeologists have discovered that some magmas split into two separate liquids, one of which is very rich in iron. Their findings can help to discover new iron ore deposits for mining.
1h
Science : NPR

After Deadly Storms, Agency Retires 4 Hurricane NamesHarvey, Irma, Maria and Nate will no longer be on the U.N.'s official rotating list of storm names. The hurricanes killed hundreds of people and caused billions of dollars in damage. (Image credit: NASA via AP)
1h
The Scientist RSS

Marching OnRush Holt, CEO of AAAS, discusses what's changed as a result of the March for Science-and what hasn't.
1h
Popular Science

If you love staying up late and sleeping in, doing otherwise might actually hurt your healthHealth Here’s one more way our modern sleep schedules might be killing us. Night owls might get a rap for staying up too late watching Netflix or getting lost in meme spirals on the web, but it’s not all fun and games. Study after study shows…
1h
Feed: All Latest

Tesla Fights the NTSB Over Its Latest Autopilot DeathAutopilot Tesla NTSBElon Musk's automaker has quit the investigation led by the agency, and the sniping is getting serious.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bad antibodies made good: The immune system's secret weapon uncoveredThe 'bad apples' of the immune system are also its secret weapon, according to major new research. Scientists have revealed how a population of 'bad' antibodies in the immune system -- which are usually 'silenced' because they can harm the body -- can provide crucial protection against invading microbes.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How molecules in cells 'find' one another and organize into structuresA longstanding mystery in biology is how the millions of molecules bumping around in a cell "find" one another and organize into functional structures. So it was a big surprise in 2008 when a group realized that simple phase separations -- like oil separating from water -- may be one important way to create order inside a cell.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovery of four subtypes of melanoma points to new treatment approachesResearchers have found that melanomas can be divided into four distinct subtypes according to their stages of differentiation. Cell subtypes that de-differentiated -- meaning that they reverted back to a less-mature cell -- showed sensitivity to a type of self-inflicted cell death called ferroptosis.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists teach computers how to analyze brain cellsIn the early days of neuroscience research, scientists painstakingly stained brain cells and drew by hand what they saw in a microscope. Fast forward to 2018 and machines may be able to learn how to do that work. According to a new study, it may be possible to teach machines how to pick out features in neurons and other cells that have not been stained or undergone other damaging treatments.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mountain erosion may add CO2 to the atmosphereScientists have long known that steep mountain ranges can draw carbon dioxide (CO2) out of the atmosphere -- as erosion exposes new rock, it also starts a chemical reaction between minerals on hill slopes and CO2 in the air, 'weathering' the rock and using CO2 to produce carbonate minerals like calcite.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sweet potato history casts doubt on early contact between Polynesia and the AmericasNew evidence shows that sweet potatoes arose before there were any humans around to eat them. The findings also suggest that the sweet potato crossed the ocean from America to Polynesia without any help from people. The discovery raises doubts about the existence of pre-Columbian contacts between Polynesia and the American continent.
1h
New on MIT Technology Review

When curing a disease with gene therapy is bad businessA drug giant turns over its pipeline of miracle drugs to a startup.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Peptide-based biogenic dental product may cure cavitiesResearchers have designed a convenient and natural product that uses proteins to rebuild tooth enamel and treat dental cavities.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Plan for quantum supremacyThings are getting real for researchers in the UC Santa Barbara John Martinis/Google group. They are making good on their intentions to declare supremacy in a tight global race to build the first quantum machine to outperform the world's best classical supercomputers.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Newly identified gene mutation results in intellectual disability and developmental delayScientists have identified a new genetic mutation associated with intellectual disability, developmental delay, autism spectrum disorder, abnormal facial features, and congenital cardiac anomalies.
2h
New Scientist - News

Making custom qubits by pushing together two individual atomsFor the first time, we’ve made a molecule by pressing two atoms together to make them bond on command. This could help build better qubits for quantum computers
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Scaffolding' method allows biochemists to see proteins in remarkable detailUCLA biochemists have achieved a major goal in biology: seeing at near atomic detail the smallest protein ever visualized by the technique whose development won the 2017 Nobel Prize in chemistry. Until now, this method has not worked with the small proteins inside cells.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An unexpected discovery in a central lineAn otherwise healthy 6-year-old had a central line that tested positive for a type of fungal infection that typically strikes adults with compromised immune systems.
2h
Feed: All Latest

Despite Zuckerberg Pledge, Facebook Fights State Privacy LawsThe social network has pushed back against consumer-focused legislation in places like Illinois and California.
2h
Live Science

What 3 Facial Expressions from Zuckerberg's Congressional Testimony MeanFacial expressions and body movements, whether we make them knowingly or not, can persuade people.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why alcohol, sugar lead to thirstResearchers have identified a hormone that acts on the brain to increase the desire to drink water in response to specific nutrient stresses that can cause dehydration.
2h
The Scientist RSS

Deep Learning Allows for Cell Analysis Without LabelingA new microscopy program requires no fluorescent markers to identify cell type, nuclei, and other characteristics.
2h
The Scientist RSS

New Ovarian Cancer Vaccine Shows PromiseA preliminary clinical trial finds that the personalized therapy improves survival rates and has no severe side-effects.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

This neural network examines neurons. Like, the kind in your brain.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Big ideas' conference steps up funding for 'audacious' projectsThe big-idea TED Conference is now backing up its talk on world-changing innovations with big money.
2h
Big Think

'I believe because it is absurd': Christianity's first memeIs it ever okay to believe in things we consider to be impossible or extremely improbable? Read More
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook to stop spending against California privacy effortFacebook says it will stop spending money to fight a proposed California ballot initiative aimed at giving consumers more control over their data.
2h
The Atlantic

Can Humans and Lions Get Along?“Lions are really causing us havoc,” laments an African pastoralist in Nani Walker and Alan Toth’s short documentary, Living with Lions. The film chronicles the conflict between lions and humans in Laikipia County, Kenya, where drought and urbanization have pushed people and wildlife into closer contact. Conservationists attempt to mitigate the encounters, which often begin with hunted livestock
2h
Big Think

New cyberattack method steals data directly from power cords and gridsWhat seems like sorcery is actually smart science. Read More
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Complexity, fidelity, application: Researchers outline plan for quantum supremacyThings are getting real for researchers in the UC Santa Barbara John Martinis/Google group. They are making good on their intentions to declare supremacy in a tight global race to build the first quantum machine to outperform the world's best classical supercomputers.
2h
Popular Science

You wanna see something crazy? Check out all the advertisers targeting you on Facebook.Technology It's a long list, and you've probably never heard of most of them. The information you leave around the web is an essential tool for targeting you with ads.
2h
Live Science

2 Tornadoes Drop in on Fort Lauderdale in Just One DayTwo tornadoes touched down in Fort Lauderdale Tuesday, but how exactly does that happen?
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UMass Amherst geoscientist on NASA mission to improve astronaut experienceGeoscientist Will Daniels, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Massachusetts Amherst's Climate System Research Center, is set to embark on the trip of a lifetime this month as part of an experiment for NASA, spending 45 days away from Earth as he knows it, without ever leaving the ground.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Algae-forestry, bioenergy mix could help make CO2 vanish from thin airAn unconventional mélange of algae, eucalyptus and bioenergy with carbon capture and storage appears to be a quirky ecological recipe. But, scientists from Cornell University, Duke University, and the University of Hawaii at Hilo have an idea that could use that recipe to help power and provide food protein to large regions of the world - and simultaneously remove carbon dioxide from Earth's atmos
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Complexity, fidelity, applicationUCSB/Google researchers in quantum computing professor John Martinis' group outline their plan for quantum supremacy in the journal Science.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wiggling atoms switch the electric polarization of crystalsA time-resolved x-ray experiment now elucidates that tiny atomic vibrations shift negative charges over a 1000 times larger distance between atoms and switch the macroscopic polarization on a time scale of a millionth of a millionth of a second.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Peptide-based biogenic dental product may cure cavitiesResearchers at the University of Washington have designed a convenient and natural product that uses proteins to rebuild tooth enamel and treat dental cavities.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Class of proteins involved in essential cell functions has an unexpected role, scientists discoverIn 2013, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to three scientists for their contributions to uncovering the mechanisms governing vesicle transport in cells. Their explanations provided both a conceptual and a mechanistic understanding of basic processes at the most fundamental level.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Remnants of antibiotics persist in treated farm waste, research findsEach year, farmers in the U.S. purchase tens of millions of pounds of antibiotics that are approved for use in cows, pigs, fowl and other livestock.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study uncovers surprising things about squirrelsAs the squirrel rotates a nut between its front paws, its brain is considering a variety of factors to reach the answer to a critical question: Do I eat this nut now, or do I store it for later?
3h
Big Think

The mystery of how birds navigate is over, and the answer is so amazingIt’s the first time magnetoreception has been discovered in animals, researchers claim. Read More
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

Europeans are arguing over whether robots should have rights
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

America’s cryptocurrency tax policy is confusing everyoneLack of clarity from the Internal Revenue Service is creating headaches for users of Bitcoin and other digital currencies.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Remnants of antibiotics persist in treated farm waste, research findsEach year, farmers in the US purchase tens of millions of pounds of antibiotics approved for use in cows, pigs, fowl and other livestock. When the animals' manure is repurposed as fertilizer or bedding, traces of the medicines leach into the environment, raising concerns about how agriculture contributes to the rise of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. New research holds troublesome insights with reg
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

From the cloud to the clinic, wide range of St. Jude research presented at AACR 2018The 2018 American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) Annual Meeting features research, resources and expertise from St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.
3h
Live Science

'Fake Pee' Is In Demand, and Now States Want to Ban ItFake urine has become such a problem for those issuing drug tests that some states are moving to ban it.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sitting is bad for your brain -- not just your metabolism or heartStudies show that too much sitting, like smoking, increases the risk of heart disease, diabetes and premature death. Researchers found sedentary behavior is linked to thinning in regions of the brain that are critical to memory formation.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Microphone for light: Tiny guitar string vibrates 1 billion times when pluckedScientists have engineered a tiny guitar string that vibrates 1 billion times when plucked. They would like to use it as a microphone for light.
3h
Feed: All Latest

TED 2018 Is All About Facebook—and Not in a Good WayMark Zuckerberg's congressional testimony, and Facebook's problems, are the talk of the annual TED conference.
3h
The Atlantic

Israel and Iran Are Headed for a Collision in SyriaThe reports of yet another Israeli Air Force strike this week on a base near Homs show that there is a new reality in Syria, taking shape as the civil war draws to a close—one that creates a predetermined chronicle of collision between Israel and Iran, on the soil of a third party. The routing of ISIS and the reestablishment of Bashar al-Assad's rule across much of the state of Syria, alongside t
3h
NYT > Science

Threatened: A Green-Haired Turtle That Can Breathe Through Its GenitalsGetting on the endangered list issued by the Zoological Society of London isn’t actually about looks. Creatures have to be evolutionarily distinctive, not just weird.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

No, Facebook doesn't secretly listen via your microphone to target ads at youWhatever you might have heard, Facebook doesn't listen in on everything you do through the microphone on your phone, mining the information for clues on what ads to send you.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Soluble antibodies play immune suppressive role in tumor progressionWistar researchers have found that soluble antibodies promote tumor progression by inducing accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in preclinical cancer models.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Protein moonlightingA class of proteins involved in essential cell functions has an unexpected role, UCSB scientists discover.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Immune-engineered device targets chemo-resistant lymphomaCornell University researchers have developed a 'lymphoma micro-reactor' device that exposes human lymphomas to fluid flow similar to that in the lymphatics and parts of the lymph node. It is designed to explore how fluid forces may relate to a tumors' drug resistance.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Missile strikes against Syria 'as serious as triggering events,' expert saysThe University of Notre Dame's Mary Ellen O'Connell says reprisal attacks are a serious breach of the United Nations charter.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why alcohol, sugar lead to thirstUT Southwestern researchers identify a hormone that acts on the brain to increase the desire to drink water in response to specific nutrient stresses that can cause dehydration.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How much are your online data really worth?By now Facebook users seem to finally get that they may not get charged anything for using the social networking service but it sure isn't free, not after being subjected to ad after spookily tailored ad.
3h
The Atlantic

The Principle of Professional Law Enforcement Is Now on the LineExpect President Trump to fire Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein in the next few days. Maybe he won’t do it. Maybe he’ll change his mind. But Trump is apparently livid at Rosenstein and both The Washington Post and CNN have reported that he is actively contemplating Rosenstein’s removal. Trump urged people on Twitter last night to watch Sean Hannity, who in turn invited on his show a guest w
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Extremely fast dives help peregrine falcons maneuver to catch agile preyComputer simulations of peregrine falcon attacks show that the extreme speeds reached during dives from high altitudes enhance the raptors' ability to execute maneuvers needed to nab agile prey that would otherwise escape.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Animal images used in marketing may skew public perception about their survival risksMany of the world's most charismatic animal species -- those that attract the largest interest and deepest empathy from the public -- are at high risk of extinction in part because many people believe their iconic stature guarantees their survival.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Viruses can evolve in parallel in related speciesViruses are more likely to evolve in similar ways in related species -- raising the risk that they will 'jump' from one species to another, new research shows.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

Technological job loss is nothing new—but is this time different?
3h
Popular Science

Intermittent fasting can help you lose weight. But can it make you live longer?Health What you should know before you try it. While people have been practicing intermittent fasting for thousands of years, it’s only in the past two decades that scientists began to understand what, if any,…
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Algae-forestry, bioenergy mix could help make CO2 vanish from thin airAn unconventional mélange of algae, eucalyptus and bioenergy with carbon capture and storage appears to be a quirky ecological recipe. But, scientists from Cornell University, Duke University, and the University of Hawaii at Hilo have an idea that could use that recipe to help power and provide food protein to large regions of the world -- and simultaneously remove carbon dioxide from Earth's atmo
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A simple tool for doubling down on disease controlA team of Georgetown global health researchers have created a web-based tool that allows public health officials to assess the cost-effectiveness and benefits of disease control initiatives in countries around the world.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pay less, get more: Spotify to bundle Premium service with HuluIt may not be a buy-one-get-one-free deal, but an offering from Spotify and Hulu comes pretty close.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google is turning some NC school buses into rolling study hallsThanks to an initiative from Google, some North Carolina students are receiving homework help from an unlikely source – their school buses.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genetic evidence that magnetic navigation guides loggerhead sea turtlesNew research provides valuable insight into the navigation and nesting behaviors of loggerhead sea turtles that could inform future conservation efforts. Loggerhead sea turtles that nest on beaches with similar magnetic fields are genetically similar to one another, according to a new study.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

To impress females, Costa's hummingbirds 'sing' with their tail feathersMale Costa's hummingbirds perform a high-speed dive during which they 'sing' to potential mates using their tail feathers. Males perform their dives to the side, rather than in front of females. UC Riverside researchers used an acoustic camera to find out why. The results are published in Current Biology. They showed that sideways dives allow males to hide the speed of their dives, perhaps enablin
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Watch out, Bay Area, the e-scooter revolution is coming to a sidewalk near youWhen Harman Ghotra woke up late, dashed out the door and realized he had four minutes to get across campus to deliver a paper to his statistics professor, the calculations started spinning through his mind. Walk to class: Eight minutes. Run? Too much trouble.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mountain erosion may add CO2 to the atmosphereScientists have long known that steep mountain ranges can draw carbon dioxide (CO2) out of the atmosphere—as erosion exposes new rock, it also starts a chemical reaction between minerals on hill slopes and CO2 in the air, "weathering" the rock and using CO2 to produce carbonate minerals like calcite.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Inhibiting metabolism found to be effective in treating aggressive form of lung cancerResearchers from UCLA and Long Beach Memorial Medical Center have found that two targeted therapies could be more effective if used in combination to treat squamous cell carcinomas of the lung
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research shows how genetics can contribute for advances in 2G ethanol productionThe study focused three fungi species which produce enzymes with application in biomass degradation; scientists in Brazil reveal how these substances are regulated and how they can interact synergically.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

RNAs help molecules come together in liquid-like droplets within living cellsResearchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill collaborated to determine how proteins and messenger RNAs condense into liquid-like droplets within cells. The activity is a normal biological process, but it can lead to neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease when it goes awry. The researchers found that the process is regulated by molecules of RNA that recognize each oth
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

One string to rule them allEPFL scientists have engineered a tiny guitar string that vibrates 1 billion times when plucked. They would like to use it as a microphone for light.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sitting is bad for your brain -- not just your metabolism or heartStudies show that too much sitting, like smoking, increases the risk of heart disease, diabetes and premature death. Researchers at UCLA found sedentary behavior is linked to thinning in regions of the brain that are critical to memory formation.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How highly contagious norovirus infection gets its startResearchers have shown, in mice, that norovirus infects a rare type of intestinal cell called a tuft cell. Noroviruses tucked inside tuft cells are effectively hidden from the immune system, which could explain why some people continue to shed virus long after they are no longer sick. These 'healthy carriers' are thought to be the source of norovirus outbreaks, so understanding how the virus evade
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Viruses can evolve in parallel in related speciesViruses are more likely to evolve in similar ways in related species -- raising the risk that they will 'jump' from one species to another, new research shows.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mountain erosion may add CO2 to the atmosphereScientists have long known that steep mountain ranges can draw carbon dioxide (CO2) out of the atmosphere -- as erosion exposes new rock, it also starts a chemical reaction between minerals on hill slopes and CO2 in the air, 'weathering' the rock and using CO2 to produce carbonate minerals like calcite.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Animal images used in marketing may skew public perception about their survival risksMany of the world's most charismatic animal species -- those that attract the largest interest and deepest empathy from the public -- are at high risk of extinction in part because many people believe their iconic stature guarantees their survival.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Team finds a mechanism for the composition of liquid droplets in cellsIt was big surprise in 2008 when participants in the Marine Biological Laboratory physiology course realized that simple phase separations -- like oil separating from water -- may be one important way to create order inside a cell. This week in Science, a team shows for the first time that RNA molecules recognize one another to condense into the same liquid 'droplet' in cells due to specific 3-D s
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Optical tweezers steer a chemical reaction from just 2 atomsHighlighting the fine level of control modern chemists possess, researchers have trapped two single atoms -- sodium and cesium -- in separate 'optical tweezers' and then maneuvered them together, resulting in a single molecule of sodium cesium (NaCs) with unique properties.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

All pooped out -- this is how norovirus does itResearchers have long sought to identify the cells in the gut that are susceptible to infection by norovirus, the leading cause of viral gastroenteritis worldwide -- and now one team has pinpointed the type of cell that falls victim.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How mitochondria cope with too much workResearchers have uncovered a mechanism by which mitochondria, essential organelles within cells that create energy, cope with an overload of imported proteins.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tiny microbes make a surprisingly big contribution to carbon releaseAs erosion eats away at Earth's surface, some types of rocks release carbon they contain back into the atmosphere -- and now a new study suggests that microbes play a substantial role in this release.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bad antibodies made good: The immune system's secret weapon uncoveredThe 'bad apples' of the immune system are also its secret weapon, according to major Australian research published today in the world-leading journal Science. In a world first, scientists from Sydney's Garvan Institute of Medical Research have revealed how a population of 'bad' antibodies in the immune system -- which are usually 'silenced' because they can harm the body -- can provide crucial pro
4h
Big Think

Yale's most popular course of all time is now available online—for freeIt's the most popular class of all time at the university—and it's now available free of charge. Read More
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Actual fossil fuel emissions checked with new techniqueResearchers have measured CO2 emissions from fossil fuel use in California and compared them to reported emissions. This is the first time fossil fuel emissions have been independently checked for such a large area.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Is the 'Queen Bee' phenomenon a myth?Portrayals in the media and academic research suggest that females act like queen bees. When they succeed in male-dominated settings they mistreat subordinate women and stop their professional advancement -- contributing to gender inequality in the work place. The latest study on the 'Queen Bee' phenomenon presents a different perspective altogether.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mississippi River diversions will produce new land, but more slowly than shoreline is lostThe best solution to sustaining portions of the Mississippi Delta may be river diversions that bring sediment to shrinking coastlines. However, a new study concludes that the rate of land-building will likely be dwarfed by the rate of wetland loss.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study explores carbohydrates' impact on head, neck cancersConsuming high amounts of carbohydrates and various forms of sugar during the year prior to treatment for head and neck cancer may increase patients' risks of cancer recurrence and mortality, a new study reports. However, eating moderate amounts of fats and starchy foods such as whole grains, potatoes and legumes after treatment could have protective benefits, reducing patients' risks of disease r
4h
New Scientist - News

Life on toxic Venus? Acid-loving microbes could thrive in cloudsLife on Venus has been thought impossible due to its acidic atmosphere. But acid-loving microbes are all over Earth, so they could also live in its toxic clouds
4h
Science current issue

The RNA exosome captured in action
4h
Science current issue

Early evolution of insect scales
4h
Science current issue

Zooming in on human lymph nodes
4h
Science current issue

Writing a cell's history in its DNA
4h
Science current issue

The mitoCPR unclogs mitochondria
4h
Science current issue

Quantitative analysis of millions of relatives
4h
Science current issue

A topological superconductor
4h
Science current issue

Identifying single-cell types in the mouse brain
4h
Science current issue

A close-up view of oligosaccharyltransferase
4h
Science current issue

Autoantibody redemption through rapid mutations
4h
Science current issue

Climate effects of aerosol cleanup
4h
Science current issue

Can wound healing worsen metastasis?
4h
Science current issue

Signaling for nitrogen fixation
4h
Science current issue

Synthesizing graphene nanopores
4h
Science current issue

Sexual signals not so strict
4h
Science current issue

Silicon sheds its harmonicity
4h
Science current issue

Wildflower contamination with neonicotinoids
4h
Science current issue

Denisovans shaped our genomes, twice
4h
Science current issue

Reforestation to enhance the soil carbon sink
4h
Science current issue

Seeing the clasps that stabilize prion fibrils
4h
Science current issue

Superstars drive regional drug use
4h
Science current issue

Quantitative analysis of population-scale family trees with millions of relativesFamily trees have vast applications in fields as diverse as genetics, anthropology, and economics. However, the collection of extended family trees is tedious and usually relies on resources with limited geographical scope and complex data usage restrictions. We collected 86 million profiles from publicly available online data shared by genealogy enthusiasts. After extensive cleaning and validati
4h
Science current issue

Single-cell profiling of the developing mouse brain and spinal cord with split-pool barcodingTo facilitate scalable profiling of single cells, we developed split-pool ligation-based transcriptome sequencing (SPLiT-seq), a single-cell RNA-seq (scRNA-seq) method that labels the cellular origin of RNA through combinatorial barcoding. SPLiT-seq is compatible with fixed cells or nuclei, allows efficient sample multiplexing, and requires no customized equipment. We used SPLiT-seq to analyze 15
4h
Science current issue

Observation of topological superconductivity on the surface of an iron-based superconductorTopological superconductors are predicted to host exotic Majorana states that obey non-Abelian statistics and can be used to implement a topological quantum computer. Most of the proposed topological superconductors are realized in difficult-to-fabricate heterostructures at very low temperatures. By using high-resolution spin-resolved and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, we find that th
4h
Science current issue

Predicting reaction performance in C-N cross-coupling using machine learningMachine learning methods are becoming integral to scientific inquiry in numerous disciplines. We demonstrated that machine learning can be used to predict the performance of a synthetic reaction in multidimensional chemical space using data obtained via high-throughput experimentation. We created scripts to compute and extract atomic, molecular, and vibrational descriptors for the components of a
4h
Science current issue

Measurement of the fine-structure constant as a test of the Standard ModelMeasurements of the fine-structure constant α require methods from across subfields and are thus powerful tests of the consistency of theory and experiment in physics. Using the recoil frequency of cesium-133 atoms in a matter-wave interferometer, we recorded the most accurate measurement of the fine-structure constant to date: α = 1/137.035999046(27) at 2.0 x 10 –10 accuracy. Using multiphoton i
4h
Science current issue

A blueprint for demonstrating quantum supremacy with superconducting qubitsA key step toward demonstrating a quantum system that can address difficult problems in physics and chemistry will be performing a computation beyond the capabilities of any classical computer, thus achieving so-called quantum supremacy. In this study, we used nine superconducting qubits to demonstrate a promising path toward quantum supremacy. By individually tuning the qubit parameters, we were
4h
Science current issue

Bottom-up synthesis of multifunctional nanoporous grapheneNanosize pores can turn semimetallic graphene into a semiconductor and, from being impermeable, into the most efficient molecular-sieve membrane. However, scaling the pores down to the nanometer, while fulfilling the tight structural constraints imposed by applications, represents an enormous challenge for present top-down strategies. Here we report a bottom-up method to synthesize nanoporous gra
4h
Science current issue

Tropism for tuft cells determines immune promotion of norovirus pathogenesisComplex interactions between host immunity and the microbiome regulate norovirus infection. However, the mechanism of host immune promotion of enteric virus infection remains obscure. The cellular tropism of noroviruses is also unknown. Recently, we identified CD300lf as a murine norovirus (MNoV) receptor. In this study, we have shown that tuft cells, a rare type of intestinal epithelial cell, ex
4h
Science current issue

Microbial oxidation of lithospheric organic carbon in rapidly eroding tropical mountain soilsLithospheric organic carbon ("petrogenic"; OC petro ) is oxidized during exhumation and subsequent erosion of mountain ranges. This process is a considerable source of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to the atmosphere over geologic time scales, but the mechanisms that govern oxidation rates in mountain landscapes are poorly constrained. We demonstrate that, on average, 67 ± 11% of the OC petro initially p
4h
Science current issue

Photoperiodic control of seasonal growth is mediated by ABA acting on cell-cell communicationIn temperate and boreal ecosystems, seasonal cycles of growth and dormancy allow perennial plants to adapt to winter conditions. We show, in hybrid aspen trees, that photoperiodic regulation of dormancy is mechanistically distinct from autumnal growth cessation. Dormancy sets in when symplastic intercellular communication through plasmodesmata is blocked by a process dependent on the phytohormone
4h
Science current issue

Structural basis for coupling protein transport and N-glycosylation at the mammalian endoplasmic reticulumProtein synthesis, transport, and N-glycosylation are coupled at the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum by complex formation of a ribosome, the Sec61 protein-conducting channel, and oligosaccharyltransferase (OST). Here we used different cryo–electron microscopy approaches to determine structures of native and solubilized ribosome-Sec61-OST complexes. A molecular model for the catalytic OST subunit
4h
Science current issue

Structure of the nuclear exosome captured on a maturing preribosomeThe RNA exosome complex processes and degrades a wide range of transcripts, including ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs). We used cryo–electron microscopy to visualize the yeast nuclear exosome holocomplex captured on a precursor large ribosomal subunit (pre-60 S ) during 7 S -to-5.8 S rRNA processing. The cofactors of the nuclear exosome are sandwiched between the ribonuclease core complex (Exo-10) and the
4h
Science current issue

Germinal center antibody mutation trajectories are determined by rapid self/foreign discriminationAntibodies have the specificity to differentiate foreign antigens that mimic self antigens, but it remains unclear how such specificity is acquired. In a mouse model, we generated B cells displaying an antibody that cross-reacts with two related protein antigens expressed on self versus foreign cells. B cell anergy was imposed by self antigen but reversed upon challenge with high-density foreign
4h
Science current issue

New Products
4h
Science current issue

My path to contentment
4h
Science current issue

MitoCPR--A surveillance pathway that protects mitochondria in response to protein import stressMitochondrial functions are essential for cell viability and rely on protein import into the organelle. Various disease and stress conditions can lead to mitochondrial import defects. We found that inhibition of mitochondrial import in budding yeast activated a surveillance mechanism, mitoCPR, that improved mitochondrial import and protected mitochondria during import stress. mitoCPR induced expr
4h
Science current issue

Erratum for the Report "Predicting reaction performance in C-N cross-coupling using machine learning" by D. T. Ahneman, J. G. Estrada, S. Lin, S. D. Dreher, A. G. Doyle
4h
Science current issue

Rewritable multi-event analog recording in bacterial and mammalian cellsWe present two CRISPR-mediated analog multi-event recording apparatus (CAMERA) systems that use base editors and Cas9 nucleases to record cellular events in bacteria and mammalian cells. The devices record signal amplitude or duration as changes in the ratio of mutually exclusive DNA sequences (CAMERA 1) or as single-base modifications (CAMERA 2). We achieved recording of multiple stimuli in bact
4h
Science current issue

Obfuscating with transparency
4h
Science current issue

News at a glance
4h
Science current issue

Latin America's lost histories revealed
4h
Science current issue

Alpha Centauri's siren call has frustrated planet hunters
4h
Science current issue

Chemists seek antiaddiction drugs to battle hijacked brain
4h
Science current issue

Ancient sites savaged in Yemen, Iraq
4h
Science current issue

Study questions animal efficacy data behind trials
4h
Science current issue

Human mutation rate a legacy from our past
4h
Science current issue

Free agents
4h
Science current issue

How cleaner air changes the climate
4h
Science current issue

Improved memory devices for synthetic cells
4h
Science current issue

Redemption for self-reactive antibodies
4h
Science current issue

Crowdsourced genealogies and genomes
4h
Science current issue

A recipe for nanoporous graphene
4h
Science current issue

Stephen Hawking (1942-2018)
4h
Science current issue

John Sulston (1942-2018)
4h
Science current issue

Bystander risk, social value, and ethics of human research
4h
Science current issue

Adapting to life in the big city
4h
Science current issue

The future of artisanal fishing
4h
Science current issue

Editor's note
4h
Science current issue

Social media for social change in science
4h
Science current issue

Journal editors should not divide scientists
4h
Science current issue

SciComm speaks
4h
Science current issue

Efforts large and small speed science reform
4h
Science current issue

Microbes eat rocks and leave carbon dioxide
4h
Science current issue

Scaling up to supremacy
4h
Science current issue

A guide for catalyst choice in the forest
4h
Science current issue

Dormancy by communication shutdown
4h
Science current issue

Aiding and abetting norovirus disease
4h
Science current issue

Refining the fine-structure constant
4h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Using laser tweezers, chemists nudged two atoms to bondThis is the first time researchers have purposefully combined two specific atoms into a molecule.
4h
Latest Headlines | Science News

A key constant’s new measurement hints ‘dark photons’ don't existNew measurement of the fine-structure constant is the most precise yet.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Punk, butt-breathing turtle joins unlucky clubBoasting a green, punk hairdo and the unusual ability to breathe through its backside, an Australian turtle has become famous overnight—but not only for its eccentricity.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tesla exits US probe of fatal 'Autopilot' crashAutopilot Tesla NTSBTesla said Thursday it withdrew from participating in a US probe of a fatal crash last month that killed a driver who was using its "Autopilot" feature.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Viruses can evolve in parallel in related speciesViruses are more likely to evolve in similar ways in related species—raising the risk that they will "jump" from one species to another, new research shows.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Animal images used in marketing may skew public perception about their survival risksMany of the world's most charismatic animal species - those that attract the largest interest and deepest empathy from the public—are at high risk of extinction in part because many people believe their iconic stature guarantees their survival.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds a mechanism for the composition of liquid droplets in cellsA longstanding mystery in biology is how the millions of molecules bumping around in a cell "find" one another and organize into functional structures. So it was a big surprise in 2008 when participants in the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) Physiology course realized that simple phase separations - like oil separating from water - may be one important way to create order inside a cell.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genetic changes underpin diverse structures in group of toxins produced by fungiAnalysis of nine types of fungi provides evidence for evolutionary processes that have led to structural differences in a family of fungal toxins known as trichothecenes. Robert Proctor of the U.S. Department of Agriculture and colleagues from the USDA, the Rural Development Administration in South Korea, and the University of León at Ponferrada in Spain present these findings in PLOS Pathogens.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Extremely fast dives help peregrine falcons maneuver to catch agile preyComputer simulations of peregrine falcon attacks show that the extreme speeds reached during dives from high altitudes enhance the raptors' ability to execute maneuvers needed to nab agile prey that would otherwise escape. Robin Mills and colleagues of the University of Groningen, Netherlands, and Oxford University, UK, report this discovery in PLOS Computational Biology.
4h
Live Science

Here's How Norovirus Takes Hold in Your Gut — and Doesn't Let GoHow the notorious virus takes hold.
4h
Inside Science

How Our Love for Animals May Be Killing ThemHow Our Love for Animals May Be Killing Them Popularity of increasingly endangered wild animals may create the misguided notion that they’re thriving in nature. Giraffes.jpg Image credits: FamVeld via shutterstock Creature Thursday, April 12, 2018 - 14:00 Tracy Staedter, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Wild animals from lions and tigers to cheetahs, wolves and many others appear in everything fro
4h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Lion Whisperer | Racing Extinction (360 Video)Kevin Richardson, also known as the "lion whisperer", wrestles with some members of his pride. Richardson explains the complexities of his relationship to one female in particular, and summarizes his life’s work of protecting these amazing animals from the game hunting trade. Join a conservation biologist on an interactive mission to learn how animals critical to the world’s ecosystem thrive and
4h
The Atlantic

Firing Rosenstein Won’t Save TrumpLet’s be blunt. Given what we know about President Trump’s impulsive nature, there are good odds that sometime soon he will fire the special counsel, Robert Mueller, or perhaps the deputy attorney general, Rod Rosenstein (who, because Attorney General Jeff Sessions is recused, is currently supervising the Mueller investigation as acting attorney general). No doubt some of his advisers will convin
4h
Science : NPR

Magnetic Fields Are A Big Predictor Of A Loggerhead Turtle's GenesYou might expect turtles that live near each other or in similar environments would be genetically similar. But new research shows that magnetic fields actually have more to do with genetic likeness. (Image credit: Wilfredo Lee/AP)
4h
Big Think

Survey reveals how many Americans have joined the #DeleteFacebook movementThe survey asked whether people had deleted Facebook, whether they’d pay for service, and whether they’d been using it less since the scandal broke. Read More
4h
NYT > Science

Scientist Behind Dolly the Sheep, a Key to Parkinson’s Research, Has the Disease HimselfDr. Ian Wilmut said he received the diagnosis four months ago and would participate in a major research program to test new types of treatments.
5h
NYT > Science

64 Pounds of Trash Killed a Sperm Whale in Spain, Scientists SayA 33-foot-long young sperm whale that washed ashore in February in the Mediterranean Sea had consumed plastic bags, fish netting and even a plastic drum.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

An ex-Google engineer is scraping YouTube to pop our filter bubblesHe’s built a website that lets you see how often YouTube’s algorithm recommends videos, so you can find out where it wants to take you.
5h
cognitive science

Play with neuron models in your browser.submitted by /u/dergthemeek [link] [comments]
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Student develops gaming technology for scientific researchScientists have developed a new method and software for using computer game technology for complex scientific and engineering simulations.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mississippi River diversions will produce new land, but more slowly than shoreline is lostThe best solution to sustaining portions of the Mississippi Delta may be river diversions that bring sediment to shrinking coastlines. However, a new study concludes that the rate of land-building will likely be dwarfed by the rate of wetland loss.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Duel of the inflammatory master regulators: Insights for drug discoveryAnti-inflammatory drugs such as dexamethasone can have harmful side effects on the skin, bones and metabolism. Structural biology research has implications for the long-standing quest to separate these drugs' benefits from their side effects.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

One-fifth of carbon entering coastal waters of eastern North America is buriedCoastal waters play an important role in the carbon cycle by transferring carbon to the open ocean or burying it in wetland soils and ocean sediments, a new study shows.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cure for fission yeast genes could have bigger things aheadNew study of mystery chemical has uncovered potential new medical treatments for genetic disorders.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deeper understanding of species roles in ecosystemsA species' traits define the role it plays in the ecosystem in which it lives -- this is the conclusion of a new study. New methods can make it easier to predict the ecological role that a species will play when it is introduced, by accident or design, into a new habitat.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tiny probe can see deep inside the body and take body temperaturesResearchers have invented a world-first tiny fiber-optic probe that can simultaneously measure temperature and see deep inside the body. The probe may help researchers find better treatments to prevent drug-induced overheating of the brain, and potentially refine thermal treatment for cancers.
5h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Why some cancers are 'born to be bad'Breakthrough explains why some cancers are far more deadly than others.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA still eyeing ex-Tropical Cyclone Iris' remnantsThe remnant low pressure area that was once Tropical Cyclone Iris continues to linger in the South Pacific Ocean. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the system and captured a visible image of it.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers optimize lung stem cell engineering processThe Center for Regenerative Medicine (CReM) at Boston University and Boston Medical Center has engineered two new categories of lung epithelial cells in vitro using pluripotent stem cells. Published in Stem Cell Reports, CReM researchers detailed their use of single cell RNA sequencing, a state-of-the-art technique they employed to generate the most comprehensive profile to date of air sack-like (
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Actual fossil fuel emissions checked with new techniqueResearchers have measured CO2 emissions from fossil fuel use in California and compared them to reported emissions.
5h
The Atlantic

The Human Body Is Too Complex for Easy FixesIn 2016, I became the lucky parent of a newborn who slept horribly. Of course, this meant that my wife and I slept horribly, too. We rested in small snatches and were constantly irritable. We were a mess. As a result, I became consumed with the idea of minimizing my need for sleep as much as possible. I had always required less sleep than my wife, but I thought that if I could just find some clev
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is the 'queen bee' phenomenon a myth?Portrayals in the media and academic research suggest that females act like queen bees. When they succeed in male-dominated settings they mistreat subordinate women and stop their professional advancement—contributing to gender inequality in the work place. The latest study on the "Queen Bee" phenomenon, published in The Leadership Quarterly, presents a different perspective altogether.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Superiority complex? People who claim superior beliefs exaggerate their own knowledgeNo one likes smug know- it-all friends, relatives or co-workers who believe their knowledge and beliefs are superior to others.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More than just menageries: First look at zoo and aquarium research shows high outputMost of us think of zoos and aquariums as family destinations: educational but fun diversions for our animal-loving kids. But modern zoos and aquariums are much more than menageries. According to a new study, the institutions are increasingly contributing to our knowledge base on biodiversity conservation and other scientific topics.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Equal earnings help couples say 'I do' and stay togetherThere are lots of theories about why some couples who live together get married while others separate.
5h
Ingeniøren

Tilfældige tal skabes med hjælp af kvantemekanik og relativitetsteoriTilfældighed er centralt begreb for at holde på hemmeligheder og et ofte uforklarligt fænomen på finansmarkederne. To nye videnskabelige artikler gør det tilfældige mere kontrollabelt og forståeligt.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA still eyeing ex-Tropical Cyclone Iris' remnantsThe remnant low pressure area that was once Tropical Cyclone Iris continues to linger in the South Pacific Ocean. NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the system and captured a visible image of it.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

LJI researchers are one step closer to an effective anti-atherosclerosis vaccineA new paper published in Circulation by researchers at La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology reports successful vaccination of atherosclerotic mice with a small chunk of protein snipped out of 'bad cholesterol.' Vaccination reduced plaque levels in test mice, and other experiments with human blood samples identified the class of T cells likely responsible for positive outcomes. The paper s
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers optimize lung stem cell engineering processThe Center for Regenerative Medicine (CReM) at Boston University and Boston Medical Center has engineered two new categories of lung epithelial cells in vitro using pluripotent stem cells.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Understanding the mechanism behind HTLV-1 survivalResearchers report on a novel molecular mechanism that explains how HTLV-1 survives in human cells. By allowing a small number of infected cells to express the gene Tax, they survive and spread.
5h
Live Science

Chimps Seen Sucking Brains from Monkeys' HeadsFor monkey-eating chimps, the youngsters' brains are the best part.
6h
Popular Science

Great apps for creative kidsTechnology From baby Van Goghs to tiny Van Halens. Four smartphone apps to begin your baby-Van Goghs to tiny-Van Halens on their path to art, music, and game creation.
6h
Viden

Elon Musk: Vi tester Hyperloop ved over 600 km/tTesla-chefen kan ikke holde fingrene fra sin vakkum-tog ide, der egentlig er i open source udbud.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More than just menageries: First look at zoo and aquarium research shows high outputMost of us think of zoos and aquariums as family destinations: educational but fun diversions for our animal-loving kids. But modern zoos and aquariums are much more than menageries. According to a new study, the institutions are increasingly contributing to our knowledge base on biodiversity conservation and other scientific topics.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is the 'queen bee' phenomenon a myth?Portrayals in the media and academic research suggest that females act like queen bees. When they succeed in male-dominated settings they mistreat subordinate women and stop their professional advancement -- contributing to gender inequality in the work place. The latest study on the 'Queen Bee' phenomenon, published in The Leadership Quarterly, presents a different perspective altogether.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Equal earnings help couples say 'I do' and stay togetherRecent work by Patrick Ishizuka, a postdoctoral fellow at Cornell University's Cornell Population Center, is the first to offer empirical evidence that cohabitating couples are likely to get married only when they earn as much as their married peers.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ArunA biomedical study published in Stroke, exosomes improved recovery in stroked pigsArunA Biomedical announces publication of study in Stroke that reports exosomes improved tissue and functional recovery in pig model of ischemic stroke.
6h
Latest Headlines | Science News

These hummingbirds aim their singing tail feathers to wow matesAcoustic cameras reveal how male Costa’s hummingbirds can aim the sound produced by fluttering tail feathers during courtship dives.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flight of the future: UC students, faculty create innovative, internationally recognized technology for BoeingAir travel can be a pretty disconnected experience. Often times passengers are left without typical phone and internet capabilities and a limited choice in entertainment options to pass the time. Meanwhile, flight attendants are stretched too thin to cater to the needs of many travelers, from safety instructions to drink orders.
6h
Quanta Magazine

Trouble Detected in Infamous Dark Matter SignalFor 20 years, an experiment in Italy known as DAMA has detected an oscillating signal that could be coming from dark matter — the fog of invisible particles that ostensibly fill the cosmos , sculpting everything else with their gravity. One of the oldest and biggest experiments hunting for dark matter particles, DAMA is alone in claiming to see them. It purports to pick up on rare interactions be
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Recycling experts hit milestone in quest for zero-waste phoneUBC researchers have perfected a process to efficiently separate fibreglass and resin - two of the most commonly discarded parts of a cellphone - bringing them closer to their goal of a zero-waste cellphone.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mars impact crater or supervolcano?These images from ESA's Mars Express show a crater named Ismenia Patera on the Red Planet. Its origin remains uncertain: did a meteorite smash into the surface or could it be the remnants of a supervolcano?
6h
Big Think

New coating kills germs on hospital surfaces with lightA new coating material has been developed for fighting healthcare-associated infections (HAI) using overhead lighting. It’s a new coating for hospital walls and surfaces that uses quantum dots and crystal violet to kill germs. Read More
6h
Dagens Medicin

Diabetescenter ansætter professor i brugerinddragelseFra 1. maj er professor Kirsten Lomborg ny seniorforsker på Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen med fokus på brugerinddragelse. Hun glæder sig især til at dykke ned i et nicheområde inden for sundhedssektoren.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers find combination for small data storage and tinier computersIt may sound like a futuristic device out of a spy novel, a computer the size of a pinhead, but according to new research from the University of New Hampshire, it might be a reality sooner than once thought. Researchers have discovered that using an easily made combination of materials might be the way to offer a more stable environment for smaller and safer data storage, ultimately leading to min
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discovery of switchblade-like defensive system redraws family tree of stonefishesIn dark alleys of the Pacific and Indian oceans, new research shows some of the deadliest, armored fishes on the planet are packing switchblades in their faces.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Keni dropped heavy rain on Fiji, direct hit to KadavuAs expected, Tropical Cyclone Keni followed a track similar to Tropical Cyclone Josie and passed to the southwest of Fiji's main island of Viti Levu on April 10, 2018 (UTC).
6h
The Atlantic

The Fake Facebook Pages Targeting Vietnam VeteransEarlier this week, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg promised lawmakers that his platform would crack down on fake accounts and foreign influence. But at least two Facebook pages linked to websites operating out of Bulgaria are still targeting U.S. veterans of the Vietnam War, according to a letter obtained by The Atlantic that was sent to lawmakers by a nonprofit veteran’s organization. The U.S. mili
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sociologist upends notions about parental help with homeworkUConn researcher Angran Li, a doctoral student in sociology, has found that one size does not fit all students when it comes to parents helping with homework, and that parental involvement in homework can be particularly beneficial among economically disadvantaged African-American and Hispanic students.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Many social media users unaware researchers study their dataIf you're unaware that your tweets could be analyzed by researchers and published in studies without your consent, you're not alone. A majority of Twitter users don't know that researchers often gather and study their tweets – and occasionally, even the deleted ones.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tsunamis could cost beach tourism hundreds of millions of dollars every yearEuropean tourists are more frequently going to places all over the world with significant tsunami risk, researchers have found. A global tourism destination risk index for tsunamis was released today at the 2018 Annual Conference of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) in Vienna, based on a study led by Andreas Schaefer of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). This study examined all prominent
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smart home dashboard to better visualize energy usageDuke's Smart Home generates a lot of data about its energy usage, but no one understands what it means—yet. To make sense of it all, an interdisciplinary team of students is developing a visualization dashboard that will convey consumption data in an easily comprehendible manner.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Superiority complex? People who claim superior beliefs exaggerate their own knowledgeNo one likes smug know- it-all friends, relatives or co-workers who believe their knowledge and beliefs are superior to others.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetically modified cornea safely and effectively prevents rejection post-transplantationResearchers engineered a donor cornea, introducing two genes intended to prevent new blood vessel formation following transplantation, and have shown this novel approach to be safe, well tolerated, and effective at reducing the risk of tissue rejection in a high-risk rabbit model.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Look! Down in the petri dish! It's a superplatelet!A University of British Columbia bioengineer has endowed platelets with extra powers to make the clotting process more resilient in the face of trauma. If it's proven to work in clinical situations, such 'superplatelets' might become a standard part of emergency department supplies, along with bandages, oxygen and saline.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Actual fossil fuel emissions checked with new techniqueResearchers have measured CO2 emissions from fossil fuel use in California and compared them to reported emissions. This is the first time fossil fuel emissions have been independently checked for such a large area.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dietary lipids play diverse roles in diseaseThis month's issue of the Journal of Lipid Research features studies examining how fats in the diet affect health, including whether the ketogenic diet is a reasonable cancer therapy; how the type of unsaturated fats in a mouse's chow affects inflammation; and how cells respond to nutrient signals.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lung stem cells repair airways after injuryWorking in mice, University of Iowa researchers have identified a new population of lung stem cells that appear to be important for regenerating the airway following severe injury. The cells, known as glandular myoepithelial cells (MECs), can self-renew and differentiate into seven distinct cell types in the airway. Overexpression of the transcription factor Lef-1 in MECs is sufficient to activate
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First seeds of kidney cancer sown in adolescenceThe earliest critical genetic changes that can lead to kidney cancer have been mapped by scientists. The first key genetic change occurs in childhood or adolescence, and the resulting cells follow a consistent path to progress into kidney cancer four or five decades later, scientists from the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators have found. Insights from the study present an opportuni
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Water-in-salt' electrolyte yields stable cathode for lithium-air battery operationsDespite more than two decades of research, improvements to lithium-ion batteries have stalled short of their theoretical potential. As an electrochemical energy storage technology, upgrading performance requires improved stability of electrolytes. Researchers from Boston College have applied a 'water-in-salt' electrolyte that enables stable operation of a lithium-air battery, offers superior long
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery of 4 subtypes of melanoma points to new treatment approachesUCLA researchers have found that melanomas can be divided into four distinct subtypes according to their stages of differentiation. Cell subtypes that de-differentiated -- meaning that they reverted back to a less-mature cell -- showed sensitivity to a type of self-inflicted cell death called ferroptosis.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists teach computers how to analyze brain cellsIn the early days of neuroscience research, scientists painstakingly stained brain cells and drew by hand what they saw in a microscope. Fast forward to 2018 and machines may be able to learn how to do that work. According to a new study in Cell, it may be possible to teach machines how to pick out features in neurons and other cells that have not been stained or undergone other damaging treatment
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deep learning: A superhuman way to look at cellsA team at the Gladstone Institutes teamed up with computer scientists at Google. Using artificial intelligence approaches, they developed one of the first applications of deep learning in biology.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study finds genetic evidence that magnetic navigation guides loggerhead sea turtlesNew research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill provides valuable insight into the navigation and nesting behaviors of loggerhead sea turtles that could inform future conservation efforts. Loggerhead sea turtles that nest on beaches with similar magnetic fields are genetically similar to one another, according to a new study by UNC-Chapel Hill biologists Kenneth Lohmann and Roger
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Killer' kidney cancers identified by studying their evolutionScientists have discovered that kidney cancer follows distinct evolutionary paths, enabling them to detect whether a tumor will be aggressive and revealing that the first seeds of kidney cancer are sown as early as childhood.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Newly identified gene mutation results in intellectual disability and developmental delayAn international group of researchers led by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Assistant Professor Gholson Lyon has identified a new genetic mutation associated with intellectual disability, developmental delay, autism spectrum disorder, abnormal facial features, and congenital cardiac anomalies.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Faster, cheaper wastewater treatment through improved oxidation reactionsResearchers at the University of California, Riverside have discovered a method to dramatically improve the way pollutants are removed from wastewater using Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs).
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

To impress females, costa's hummingbirds 'sing' with their tail feathersMale Costa's hummingbirds perform a high-speed dive during which they 'sing' to potential mates using their tail feathers. Males perform their dives to the side, rather than in front of females.UC Riverside researchers used an acoustic camera to find out why. The results are published in Current Biology.They showed that sideways dives allow males to hide the speed of their dives, perhaps enabling
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sweet potato history casts doubt on early contact between Polynesia and the AmericasEvidence reported in the journal Current Biology on April 12 shows that sweet potatoes arose before there were any humans around to eat them. The findings also suggest that the sweet potato crossed the ocean from America to Polynesia without any help from people. The discovery raises doubts about the existence of pre-Columbian contacts between Polynesia and the American continent.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

As hummingbirds dive, twisting tail feathers direct sound at potential matesRather than singing to their mates, Costa's hummingbird males court females with musical, high-speed dives. Their 'song' is produced as the wind whistles through their tail feathers. Now, researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology on April 12 have found that the diving males twist half their tails as they whiz through the air, apparently to aim the sound in the direction of their potenti
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The secret to being cool: Try smilingPeople often assume that being inexpressive makes them appear more cool, but new research suggests that smiling is considered more cool than an inexpressive attitude.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Understanding a cell's 'doorbell'A multi-institutional project to understand one of the major targets of human drug design has produced new insights into how structural communication works in a cell component called a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCRs), basically a 'doorbell' structure that alerts the cell of important molecules nearby.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Automating personal safety with wearable smart jewelryResearchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham are utilizing technology to create a pragmatic solution for physical or sexual assault prevention.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

With The Herman Project, home bakers become citizen scientistsResearchers from MIT are taking their microbial research out of the lab and into the kitchen.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Circumbinary castaways: Short-period binary systems can eject orbiting worldsPlanets orbiting "short-period" binary stars, or stars locked in close orbital embrace, can be ejected off into space as a consequence of their host stars' evolution, according to new research from the University of Washington.
6h
Big Think

The rise of Mark Zuckerberg explained in one amazing infographicThis detailed infographic shows the path of Mark Zuckerberg's life. Read More
6h
Feed: All Latest

AI Learns a New Trick: Measuring Brain CellsNew techniques could help researchers outsource the grunt work of neuroscience.
6h
New on MIT Technology Review

Three problems with Facebook’s plan to kill hate speech using AIMark Zuckerberg thinks AI will largely automate the process of censorship, but that assumes profound progress will be made.
6h
The Atlantic

Born a Decade Too LatePaul Ryan RepublicanPaul Ryan is being roundly condemned for any number of sins, both real and imagined. On the left, the House speaker is being pilloried for his supposed devotion to the cause of enriching the already well-off at the expense of the poor and his failure to protect the interests of unauthorized immigrants who arrived in the U.S. as minors, despite his insistence that he would do just that. In a rare
6h
The Atlantic

This Hummingbird's Tail Whistles, and No One's Sure WhyIn early spring, people walking through the deserts of California might be able to hear a high-pitched whistle. That noise comes from a male Costa’s hummingbird, but not from his throat—it’s all in his tail. Males woo females in a number of ways. They sing. They spread the iridescent feathers of their throats, transforming their heads into shiny, violet octopuses. And they fly up to tall perches
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Faster, cheaper wastewater treatment through improved oxidation reactionsResearchers at the University of California, Riverside have discovered a method to dramatically improve the way pollutants are removed from wastewater using Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOPs).
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sweet potato history casts doubt on early contact between Polynesia and the AmericasEvidence reported in the journal Current Biology on April 12 shows that sweet potatoes arose before there were any humans around to eat them. The findings also suggest that the sweet potato crossed the ocean from America to Polynesia without any help from people. The discovery raises doubts about the existence of pre-Columbian contacts between Polynesia and the American continent.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers show how male Costa's hummingbirds control the acoustics of a tail song produced during high speed divesIn the world of Costa's hummingbirds, it's not size that matters—it's sound. During breeding season, male Costa's perform a high-speed dive during which they "sing" to potential mates using their tail feathers.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study finds genetic evidence that magnetic navigation guides loggerhead sea turtlesNew research from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill provides valuable insight into the navigation and nesting behaviors of loggerhead sea turtles that could inform future conservation efforts. Loggerhead sea turtles that nest on beaches with similar magnetic fields are genetically similar to one another, according to a new study by UNC-Chapel Hill biologists Kenneth J. Lohmann and J.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deep learning: A superhuman way to look at cellsIt's harder than you might think to look at a microscope image of an untreated cell and identify its features. To make cell characteristics visible to the human eye, scientists normally have to use chemicals that can kill the very cells they want to look at.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Water-in-salt' electrolyte yields stable cathode for lithium-air battery operationsHarnessing the full electrochemical power of lithium-oxygen batteries requires an efficient, more stable electrolyte. Researchers from Boston College have applied a "water-in-salt" electrolyte that enables stable lithium-air battery operation, offers superior long cycle lifetimes and presents a platform that moves lithium-ion batteries closer to their full potential, the team reports in the journa
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists teach computers how to analyze brain cellsIn the early days of neuroscience research, scientists painstakingly stained brain cells and drew by hand what they saw in a microscope. Fast forward to 2018 and machines may be able to learn how to do that work. According to a new study in Cell, it may be possible to teach machines how to pick out features in neurons and other cells that have not been stained or undergone other damaging treatment
6h
NYT > Science

Matter: All by Itself, the Humble Sweet Potato Colonized the WorldMany botanists argued that humans must have carried the valuable staple to the Pacific from South America, a hidden chapter in human history. Not so, according to a new study.
6h
Science | The Guardian

Tests on Captain Cook's sweet potato fuel row over how crop reached PolynesiaResearchers claim to have settled question of whether there was contact between islanders and Americas with construction of tuber’s ‘family tree’ The sweet potato is ubiquitous enough to seem almost mundane – but its origins have long been shrouded in mystery. Now scientists say they have solved the puzzle, in the process scotching the idea that people in the Americas were in touch with Polynesia
6h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How we need to remake the internet | Jaron LanierIn the early days of digital culture, Jaron Lanier helped craft a vision for the internet as public commons where humanity could share its knowledge -- but even then, this vision was haunted by the dark side of how it could turn out: with personal devices that control our lives, monitor our data and feed us stimuli. (Sound familiar?) In this visionary talk, Lanier reflects on a "globally tragic, a
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Signs of early aging more likely among adolescent & young adult cancer survivorsResearchers have reported a higher prevalence of frailty, pre-frailty, and comorbidities such as depression and anxiety that may indicate accelerated aging among adolescent and young adult survivors of cancer.
6h
New on MIT Technology Review

China is testing high-tech roads for the electric cars of the future
6h
The Economist: The world this week

Politics this week
6h
The Economist: The world this week

KAL's cartoonFacebook Mark Zuckerberg
6h
The Economist: The world this week

Business this week
6h
The Atlantic

The Bargain at the Heart of the Kid InternetOn Tuesday, joining the dozens of lawmakers asking Mark Zuckerberg about Facebook’s data practices, Senator Ed Markey of Massachusetts posed a question: “Would you support a child online-privacy bill of rights for kids under 16 to guarantee that that information is not reused for any other purpose without explicit permission from the parents for the kids?” Zuckerberg said he agreed on the “ gener
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Most widely prescribed diabetes drug improves nicotine withdrawal symptoms in animal modelMetformin, the most widely used medication for diabetes, has also been shown to help treat dementia and some cancers. New research shows smoking cessation may be added to that list. The research team found that after giving mice metformin the animals displayed reduced symptoms when going through nicotine withdrawal.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Imagining an object can change how we hear sounds laterSeeing an object at the same time that you hear sound coming from somewhere else can lead to the 'ventriloquist illusion' and its aftereffect, but research suggests that simply imagining the object produces the same illusory results.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Repeat spawning comes with tradeoffs for troutSteelhead trout that spawn multiple times have more than twice the lifetime reproductive success of single spawning trout, suggesting there is a substantial benefit associated with repeat spawning. But it comes with a tradeoff.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Circumbinary castaways: Short-period binary systems can eject orbiting worldsPlanets orbiting 'short-period' binary stars, or stars locked in close orbital embrace, can be ejected off into space as a consequence of their host stars' evolution, according to new research from the University of Washington.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Keni dropped heavy rain on Fiji, direct hit to KadavuAs expected, Tropical Cyclone Keni followed a track similar to Tropical Cyclone Josie and passed to the southwest of Fiji's main island of Viti Levu on April 10, 2018 (UTC).
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Understanding barriers to mental health care for urban black men who experience traumaPsychological distress is common in the aftermath of a traumatic injury. Symptoms of depression and post-traumatic stress can make it harder to re-establish one's social and family life, work performance, and wellbeing after injury.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For repeat-spawning steelhead, more than once is worth the risksNew research shows steelhead trout that spawn repeatedly have greater than double the lifetime reproductive success of fish that spawn a single time, the benefit for making the daunting journey to sea more than once.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Overestimated mutation rateAt the start of the epidemic in West Africa, the Ebola virus did not change as rapidly as thought at the time. ETH researchers explain why scientists misjudged it at the time.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study explores carbohydrates' impact on head, neck cancersConsuming high amounts of carbohydrates and various forms of sugar during the year prior to treatment for head and neck cancer may increase patients' risks of cancer recurrence and mortality, a new study reports.However, eating moderate amounts of fats and starchy foods such as whole grains, potatoes and legumes after treatment could have protective benefits, reducing patients' risks of disease re
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery of switchblade-like defensive system redraws family tree of stonefishesA study from the University of Kansas appearing in the journal Copeia details for the first time evolution of a 'lachrymal saber' unique to stonefishes -- a group of rare and elaborately dangerous fishes inhabiting Indo-Pacific coastal waters. The new finding rewrites scientific understanding of relationships among several groups of fishes and reveals a previously unknown defensive strategy -- als
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Marker substance for research into brain diseasesA new substance makes particular molecules in the brain visible using imaging, enabling better research into brain diseases.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UNH researchers find combination for small data storage and tinier computersIt may sound like a futuristic device out of a spy novel, a computer the size of a pinhead, but according to new research from the University of New Hampshire, it might be a reality sooner than once thought. Researchers have discovered that using an easily made combination of materials might be the way to offer a more stable environment for smaller and safer data storage, ultimately leading to min
7h
The Atlantic

Issa Rae: ‘I Never Identified as a Nerd’When Issa Rae read an article several years back asking why there wasn’t a black counterpart to 30 Rock ’s resolutely awkward Liz Lemon, she was inspired to create one. With a little help from Kickstarter, she made a web series, The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl , which quickly went viral. In 2015, HBO picked up her show Insecure , which will enter its third season later this year. A crispl
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Recycling experts hit milestone in quest for zero-waste phoneUBC researchers have perfected a process to efficiently separate fiberglass and resin -- two of the most commonly discarded parts of a cellphone -- bringing them closer to their goal of a zero-waste cellphone.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Night owls have higher risk of dying soonerNight owls -- people who prefer to stay up late and sleep late -- have 10 percent higher risk of dying sooner than larks, people who go to bed early and rise early, reports a new study. This is the first study to show 'owls' have higher risk of mortality. Owls also suffer from more diseases and disorders than morning larks. Employers should allow greater flexibility in working hours for owls, scie
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

From property damage to lost production: How natural disasters impact economicsWhen a natural disaster strikes, major disaster databases tend to compile information about losses such as damages to property or cost of repairs, but other economic impacts after the disaster are often overlooked -- such as how a company's lost ability to produce products may affect the entire supply-chain within the affected region and in other regions. This may give an incomplete picture of the
7h
New Scientist - News

Zuckerberg survived Washington – here’s what’s next for FacebookMark Zuckerberg FacebookMark Zuckerberg spent two days answering mostly soft questions from the US Congress, but some of his answers were revealing, says James Ball
7h
New Scientist - News

A virtual reality hand feels real after a zap to your brainWill we ever be able to truly feel like we’re inhabiting a virtual world? A brain stimulation twist on the classic rubber hand illusion suggests we can
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Most widely prescribed diabetes drug improves nicotine withdrawal symptoms in animal modelMetformin, the most widely used medication for diabetes, has also been shown to help treat dementia and some cancers. New research shows smoking cessation may be added to that list. The research team found that after giving mice metformin the animals displayed reduced symptoms when going through nicotine withdrawal.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ACR responds to HHS benefit and payment parameters final ruleThe American College of Rheumatology (ACR) today expressed concern that the 2019 Benefit and Payment Parameters final rule allowing states to select their own Essential Health Benefits (EHB) benchmark plans on federal health exchanges could jeopardize care access for patients with complex rheumatologic conditions.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nutrition, physical activity guidelines and survival after colon cancer diagnosisA lifestyle consistent with the American Cancer Society (ACS) guidelines to maintain a healthy weight, engage in regular physical activity, and eat a diet rich in nutritious foods was associated with a lower risk of death in patients with colon cancer.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nature-based solutions can prevent $50 billion in Gulf Coast flood damagesWhile coastal development and climate change are increasing the risk of flooding for communities along the US Gulf Coast, restoration of marshes and oyster reefs are among the most cost-effective solutions for reducing those risks, according to a new study.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How life generates new formsA new study identifies the kind of gene regulation most likely to generate evolutionary change.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deep learning transforms smartphone microscopes into laboratory-grade devicesResearchers have demonstrated that deep learning, a powerful form of artificial intelligence, can discern and enhance microscopic details in photos taken by smartphones. The technique improves the resolution and color details of smartphone images so much that they approach the quality of images from laboratory-grade microscopes.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists unlock path to use cell's own nanoparticles as disease biomarkersDeveloping a method to identify individual cell messengers, called extracellular vesicles, means they can now be used to detect cancer and other disease and be engineered for regenerative medicine.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pluto's largest moon, Charon, gets its first official feature namesLegendary explorers and visionaries, real and fictitious, are among those immortalized by the IAU in the first set of official surface-feature names for Pluto's largest moon, Charon.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

It's not your fitness tracker -- it's youAn international study reveals that no one defines physical activity the same way when they are asked to report how much they exercise. The findings are a caution for researchers trying to make cross-cultural comparisons about exercise.
7h
Science | The Guardian

New satellite to spot planet-warming industrial methane leaksMultimillion dollar project will scan and make public methane leaks from oil and gas plants that are a major contributor to global warming Methane leaking from oil and gas facilities around the world – a major contributor to global warming – is set to be spotted from space. The Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) has announced it aims to launch a satellite called MethaneSAT by 2021 to scan the globe
7h
Science | The Guardian

Scientists solve mystery of how Giant's Causeway was formedVolcanologists use samples from Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland to recreate famous hexagonal columns in laboratory According to legend, the Giant’s Causeway was built by the Irish giant, Finn MacCool, as a crossing to confront his Scottish rival. Scientists have an alternative explanation, and for the first time they have reproduced in the laboratory the process through which the causeway’s 40,000 ne
7h
Feed: All Latest

Why It's Almost Impossible for Fastballs to Get Any FasterAdvances have fueled a dramatic upward trend in world-record athletic performances, but the baseball pitch is stuck. The reason is physics.
7h
Feed: All Latest

Airstream's New Nest Camper is Cute and PracticalThe compact, lightweight Nest breaks with the aluminum tradition in favor of fiberglass.
7h
Live Science

What the Heck Are These 520-Million-Year-Old Blobs? Experts Can't Agree.Here's a brainteaser: Do the 520-million-year-old fossils of an ancient, bug-like creature actually show a silhouette of its brains? Or are these blobby shapes in its head merely fossilized bacteria?
7h
Popular Science

Mushrooms might save the world—if they don't kill us firstScience Some musings on our favorite mycological marvels. Mushrooms just might be able to cut down on cow farts, wash your clothes, treat PTSD, replace styrofoam and leather, fight cancer, and save the bees.
7h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Russian spy poisoning: Nerve agent inspectors back UKThe international chemical weapons watchdog confirms the UK's analysis of the nerve agent in Salisbury.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Recycling experts hit milestone in quest for zero-waste phoneUBC researchers have perfected a process to efficiently separate fiberglass and resin -- two of the most commonly discarded parts of a cellphone -- bringing them closer to their goal of a zero-waste cellphone.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study suggests ways to close CEO pay gapRecent research from UT Dallas' Naveen Jindal School of Management examines how cultural perceptions affect the compensation of female CEOs in China, where women CEOs earn significantly less than their male counterparts.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Duel of the inflammatory master regulators: Insights for drug discoveryAnti-inflammatory drugs such as dexamethasone can have harmful side effects on the skin, bones and metabolism. Emory structural biology research has implications for the long-standing quest to separate these drugs' benefits from their side effects.
7h
New Scientist - News

Hawaii tops the list of beach destinations at risk of tsunamiThe world’s first ranking of tsunami risks for major tourist beaches shows popular spots like Hawaii and Bali are most in danger
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tsunamis could cause beach tourism to lose hundreds of millions of dollars every yearGoing to the beach this summer? European tourists are more frequently going to places with significant tsunami risk, researchers have found.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

3-D printed active metamaterials for sound and vibration controlResearchers have been pushing the capabilities of materials by carefully designing precise structures that exhibit abnormal properties that can control acoustic or optical waves. However, these metamaterials are constructed in fixed geometries, meaning their unique abilities are always fixed. Now, new 3-D printed metamaterial can be remotely switched between active control and passive states.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

Why Are Glaciers Melting from the Bottom? It's ComplicatedWarm ocean waters are eating away at ice, but what’s driving that process is unclear -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Imagining an object can change how we hear sounds laterSeeing an object at the same time that you hear sound coming from somewhere else can lead to the 'ventriloquist illusion' and its aftereffect, but research suggests that simply imagining the object produces the same illusory results. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How advanced nanotechnology can improve cancer careA new Tel Aviv University study addresses the challenges of nanoparticle-based cancer-targeting strategies and suggests ways of refocusing the collaborative work of cancer researchers and clinicians.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tsunamis could cause beach tourism to lose hundreds of millions of dollars every yearGoing to the beach this summer? European tourists are more frequently going to places with significant tsunami risk, researchers have found. A global tourism destination risk index for tsunamis was released today at the 2018 Annual Conference of the European Geosciences Union in Vienna. It is based on a study led by Andreas Schaefer of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) that examined all prom
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unusual climate during Roman times plunged Eurasia into hunger and diseaseA recent study indicates that volcanic eruptions in the mid 500s resulted in an unusually gloomy and cold period.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sensing interactions between moleculesAn experimental approach to visualize structures of organic molecules with exceptional resolution is reported by physicists and chemists.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why do some children read more?A new study of more than 11,000 7-year-old twins found that how well children read determines how much they read (not vice versa).
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wildlife haven of Sulawesi much younger than first thought, according to new researchNew research has shed light on the origins of some of South East Asia's most iconic and unique wildlife; the 'deer-pig' (Sulawesi Babirusa), 'warty pig' and the 'miniature buffalo.' In doing so, the research has revealed that Sulawesi, the island paradise where they were discovered, is younger than previously thought.
8h
Ingeniøren

Nordmænd slæber nu 339 meter høj platform ud gennem fjordStatoil begynder nu en spektakulær og nøje planlagt sejltur med en 339 meter høj boreplatform ud af en norsk fjord og op gennem Norgeshavet.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cycling motion keeps hydrofoils upright during flightWhen you're about to fall when riding your bike, you steer into the direction of the fall without even realising it. This correction can be explained using the principles of physics; your supports, i.e. the wheels, remain in balance due to the centre of gravity. Now, for the very first time, it has also been scientifically proven that this principle of bicycle stability can also be used to maintai
8h
The Atlantic

Trump Loudly Insists That He Is IncompetentDonald Trump’s supporters insist that the public shouldn’t lose faith in the president as Robert Mueller and the Department of Justice delve ever more deeply into his affairs. Sure, his personal attorney’s office was raided and his political associates keep having to strike deals after getting caught breaking the law. But Trump supporters believe the president when he says that he is a victim of
8h
The Atlantic

The Families Who Sacrificed Everything for AssadBEIRUT—Since Syrian regime forces were accused of conducting a chemical-weapons attack on Saturday on Douma, the largest rebel town near Damascus to surrender, the world has waited anxiously for the U.S. response. In the aftermath of the suspected attack, President Donald Trump spoke of imminent retaliation and had tough words for Bashar al-Assad, the president of Syria, and his patron Russia; he
8h
The Atlantic

Come Sunday Is an Uneven Biopic of Faith and DissentCome Sunday is not a biographical film about apostasy. When the bishop Carlton Pearson (Chiwetel Ejiofor) is declared a heretic by his peers in the Pentecostal church, it’s not because he has renounced the Bible, but because he has reevaluated it. His new interpretation is indeed a drastic shift: In the 1990s, the real-life Pearson began preaching about universal reconciliation, doubting the exis
8h
New on MIT Technology Review

This new lidar sensor could equip every autonomous car in the world by the end of 2018The startup Luminar aims to challenge market leaders by building its hardware at a never-before-seen scale.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Harvey, Irma, Maria and Nate retired by the World Meteorological OrganizationHarvey, Irma, Maria and Nate are storm names that don't bear repeating.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The severity of neurocognitive impairmentNeurocognitive impairment is frequently encountered in multiple sclerosis patients affecting between 40-65 percent of these individuals, irrespective of disease duration, severity of physical disability, and at both the earlier and later disease stages, with a tendency to worsen over time.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Trolley Problem version of autonomous vehiclesThe Trolley Problem is a very well-known ethics dilemma about actively killing one or sometimes even more persons in order to save more persons. The problem can occur in situations involving autonomous vehicles when the vehicle realizes that there is no way to prevent a collision, the computer of the vehicle should analyze which collision is considered to be the least harmful collision.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Italy: Ongoing hepatitis A virus outbreak among men who have sex with men is linked to current outbreaks in EuropeILC 2018: Phylogenetic analysis of circulating viruses in an ongoing acute hepatitis A outbreak in Lombardy, Italy links the majority of cases to two virus strains responsible for recent outbreaks in the UK and the Netherlands.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Statins associated with reduced morbidity and mortality in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitischolangiAn award-winning register-based study reports a reduced risk of all-cause mortality, liver transplantation, liver cancer, and variceal bleeding in patients with primary sclerosing cholangitis exposed to statins.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A third of bacterial infections in patients with cirrhosis across the world are multi-drug resistantAn international study reports a high prevalence of multi-drug-resistant bacteria in hospitalized patients with cirrhosis and significant regional differences in risk.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Linkage to care specialist facilitates access to hepatitis C treatment for people who inject drugsA longitudinal study involving more than 1,000 individuals reports promising role for linkage to care specialists in expanding access to hepatitis C treatment for people who inject drugs.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An amazingly wide variety of disksWith an instrument at the Very Large Telescope in Chile scientists of ETH Zurich observed planet-forming disks around young stars similar to the sun 4,5 billion years ago. Surprisingly, the disks are very different. The data will help to shed more light on the formation processes of planets.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Screening for hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with hepatitis C-related cirrhosis achieving sustained virological response is likely to be cost effectiveA Canadian study suggests that biannual or annual ultrasound screening for HCC is likely to be cost effective after a sustained virological response in those with hepatitis C-related cirrhosis, but not in those with advanced fibrosis without cirrhosis.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scotland: Direct-acting antiviral agent therapy reduces the burden of HCV-related decompensated cirrhosisNational surveillance data and cost-effectiveness modeling provide complementary evidence to support the scale-up of DAA therapy in Scotland.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hepatitis E virus infections can be life threatening and transmitted through blood productsILC 2018: Hepatitis E virus infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality in both immunocompromised and immune-competent individuals - blood products are confirmed as an important source of infection.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Continuous glucose monitors proven cost-effective, add to quality of life for diabeticsA new study by researchers from the University of Chicago Medicine, based on a 6-month clinical trial, finds that use of a CGM is cost-effective for adult patients with type 1 diabetes when compared to daily use of test strips. The results are well within the thresholds normally used by insurance plans to cover medical devices.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Repeat spawning comes with tradeoffs for troutSteelhead trout that spawn multiple times have more than twice the lifetime reproductive success of single spawning trout, suggesting there is a substantial benefit associated with repeat spawning. But it comes with a tradeoff.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Paternal' and 'maternal' DNA in fungi active at different timesMany types of mushroom have two different nuclei in their cells, one from the 'father' and another from the 'mother." Researchers at the universities of Delft, Utrecht and Wageningen have discovered that the genes from the parental DNAs are expressed at different times in mushroom development. "This means that when genes involved in mushroom formation are identified, we first need to find out whet
8h
The Atlantic

The Man Who Killed Republican ReformPaul Ryan RepublicanIt’s hard to remember now, but a dozen years ago the conservative world was pulsing with intellectual creativity. Paul Ryan did not kill that vitality single-handedly, but he ranks high among the principal suspects. Those were days when Newt Gingrich wanted action on climate change. When Mitt Romney pioneered universal health coverage in Massachusetts in 2006—and Jim DeMint cited that accomplishm
8h
Big Think

Saudi Arabia threatens to turn Qatar into an islandThe Saudi blockade of its tiny neighbour Qatar could soon change the very geography of the region. Read More
8h
Live Science

Mystery Mummy Found in Ceiling of Minneapolis Department StoreThe primate was found 'mummified' in a ceiling duct.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change is slowing Atlantic currents that warm Europe and the Atlantic SeaboardThe ocean currents that help warm the Atlantic coasts of Europe and North America have significantly slowed since the 1800s and are at their weakest in 1600 years, according to new research my colleagues and I have conducted. As we've set out in a new study in Nature, the weakening of this ocean circulation system may have begun naturally but is probably being continued by climate change related t
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A slightly warmer office won't make it too hot to thinkIf you're reading this article in your office, chances are the air conditioning is set to around 22°C. Setting the temperature to 25°C could cut your office's daily air-conditioning energy consumption by 18%, drive down electricity bills and help save the planet.
8h
cognitive science

Why is the Human Brain So Efficient?submitted by /u/NaiveSkeptic [link] [comments]
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Punjab, India: Mass treatment of a population with chronic hepatitis C infection produces high rates of cureA program of decentralized public healthcare achieves high rates of cure regardless of genotype or the presence of cirrhosis: the Punjab Model.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Personalized T cell therapy shows signs of clinical effectiveness against HBV-related HCCILC 2018: HBV DNA integration profile of tumour cells used to guide T cell adoptive immunotherapy in a liver transplant patient with HBsAg-negative HCC metastases in the lungs.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mediterranean-style diet improves gut microbial diversity and reduces hospitalizationILC 2018: Diets rich in vegetables, fermented milk products, tea, coffee and chocolate may improve outcomes in patients with liver cirrhosis.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

HEPAHEALTH Project Report -- risk factors and the burden of liver disease in Europe and selected Central Asian countriesThe HEPAHEALTH Project Report, which was presented today in a press conference at The International Liver Congress trade; 2018 in Paris, France, is the second overview commissioned by EASL on the burden of liver disease in Europe.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mechanism of oxidative unzipping of multiwall carbon nanotubes to graphene nanoribbonsUnzipping multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) attracted great interest as a method for producing graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). However, depending on the production method, the GNRs have been proposed to form by different mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that the oxidative unzipping of MWCNTs is intercalation-driven, not oxidative chemical-bond cleavage as was formerly proposed. The unzipping mechan
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The urgency of curbing pollution from ships, explainedThe International Maritime Organization, a United Nations agency that regulates global shipping, is writing new rules to curb greenhouse gas emissions from ships by 2050 as it implements other regulations that will mandate cleaner-burning fuels at sea by 2020.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

2 Transgender Activists Explain Why They're Marching for ScienceUnder this administration's threat of censorship and ideologically motivated budget cuts, programs that provide critical medical and public health services could face a precarious future -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

Total Recall: The Latest Tools for Understanding How Memory Works-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Women are shattering the glass ceiling only to fall off the glass cliffThe glass ceiling is an idea familiar to many. It refers to the invisible barrier that seems to exist in many fields and which prevents women from achieving senior positions.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Australia's 2017 environment scorecard—high temperatures further stress ecosystemsWhile rainfall conditions were generally good across Australia in 2017, record-breaking temperatures stressed our ecosystems on land and sea, according to our annual environmental scorecard. Unfortunately, it looks like those records will be broken again next year – and again in the years after that.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discovery raises possibility of treating neurological disordersThe discovery of a novel class of enzyme in human biology by scientists at the University of Dundee has opened a new area of research that could benefit patients suffering from a range of neurological disorders.
8h
Popular Science

Think you’re too busy to journal? These apps let you do it on the go.DIY Dear digital diary... You can journal any time, any place, by recording your daily thoughts with your phone. These five journaling apps let you jot your entries on the go.
9h
Futurity.org

Moth antennae grab sex pheromones with scales, not sizeBigger antennae would help male moths detect more female sex pheromone, but would create aerodynamic drag during flight. New research suggests the solution is for some male moths to have evolved intricate scale arrangements on their antennae to enhance detection of female sex pheromones, by trapping them close to the antennae for longer. This also means that the antennae can remain at an optimal
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Extensive seagrass meadows discovered in Indian Ocean through satellite tracking of green turtlesBiologists have discovered for the first time extensive deep-water seagrass meadows in the middle of the vast Indian Ocean through satellite tracking the movement of green sea turtles.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The dinosaur menu, as revealed by calciumBy studying calcium in fossil remains in deposits in Morocco and Niger, researchers have been able to reconstruct the food chains of the past, thus explaining how so many predators could coexist in the dinosaurs' time.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New gadgets help reveal the collective behavior of wild animalsBiologists describe how novel technologies are transforming our understanding of why wild animals form different groups.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Most primitive kangaroo ancestor rediscovered after 30 years in obscurityA handful of tiny teeth have led scientists to identify the most distant ancestor of today's kangaroos. The fossils were found in the desert heart of Australia, and then hidden away, and almost forgotten in a museum collection for over three decades.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Synthesizing a deadly mushroom toxinThe death-cap mushroom has a long history as a tool of murder and suicide, going back to ancient Roman times. The fungus, Amanita phalloides, produces one of the world's deadliest toxins. While it may seem ill-advised, researchers are eager to synthesize the toxin because studies have shown that it could help fight cancer. the death-cap killer compound.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cactus roots inspire creation of water-retaining materialDuring rare desert rainfalls, cacti waste no time sopping up and storing a storm's precious precipitation. Inspired by this natural phenomenon, scientists report that they have developed a material that mimics cactus roots' ability to rapidly absorb and retain vast amounts of water with a minimal amount of evaporation. They say this unique material could lead to new and improved cosmetics, medical
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Viagra has the potential to be used as a treatment for rare cancersThe class of drugs currently prescribed to treat male erectile dysfunction has been flagged for its potential to be included in new trials for anti-cancer drugs.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Are there two pilots in the cockpit?Ever since the early days of commercial aviation, flight safety has steadily improved. Considering the number of flights, accidents are now extremely rare, and 70% of them are attributable to human factors. This has led to research in psychology, cognitive science and, more recently, in neuroergonomics. Researchers have been investigating factors such as drowsiness, stress, attention, workload, co
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Calling for better police body cam designChallenges reported by both police and the public surrounding usability issues with the vast array of body cams and recording functionality prompted a study by human factors/ergonomics (HF/E) researchers from Wichita State University. In their just-published Ergonomics in Design article, "Design Considerations in the Proliferation of Police Body-Worn Cameras," Joel Suss and colleagues identify lim
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding a cell's 'doorbell'A multi-institutional project to understand one of the major targets of human drug design has produced new insights into how structural communication works in a cell component called a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCRs), basically a "doorbell" structure that alerts the cell of important molecules nearby. Understanding the structure and function of the receptor more deeply will enable better drug d
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cytochrome P450 3A4 induction: Lumacaftor versus ivacaftor?Cystic fibrosis is a disease caused by genetically defective CFTR proteins. The recent approval of lumacaftor combined with ivacaftor targets 70 percent of CF patients with F508del-CFTR. Unfortunately, our understanding of the way these drugs move (pharmacokinetics) and work (pharmacodynamics) in the human body is limited. For the first time, researchers have investigated potential cytochrome inte
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sexual objectification influences visual perceptionIt has been suggested that sexually objectified women or men are visually processed in the same fashion of an object. Far from being unanimously accepted, this claim has been criticized by a lack of scientific rigor. A team of the University of Vienna and scientists of the University of Trieste and SISSA have explored the conditions under which this phenomenon persists. The results of the study we
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Student develops gaming technology for environmental scientific researchA Ph.D. student at The University of Manchester has developed a new method and software for using computer game technology for complex scientific and engineering simulations.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tiny probe can see and take body temperaturesUniversity of Adelaide researchers have invented a world-first tiny fiber-optic probe that can simultaneously measure temperature and see deep inside the body. The probe may help researchers find better treatments to prevent drug-induced overheating of the brain, and potentially refine thermal treatment for cancers.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The raw power of human motionStandalone power modules that harvest and convert vibrations from their surroundings into electricity could soon fuel future microsystems.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pluto's largest moon, Charon, gets its first official feature namesLegendary explorers and visionaries, real and fictitious, are among those immortalized by the IAU in the first set of official surface-feature names for Pluto's largest moon, Charon. The names were proposed by the New Horizons team and approved by IAU Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Calling for better police body cam designBetter-designed body cameras could improve the quality of evidence in cases of police use of force and potentially reduce the frequency of such interactions.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First real-world studies report glecaprevir/pibrentasvir to be effective and well tolerated in chronic HCV infectionStudies conducted in Italy and Germany confirm the effectiveness and safety of glecaprevir/pibrentasvir in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection, with viral suppression rates similar to those observed in clinical trials.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How life generates new formsA new study identifies the kind of gene regulation most likely to generate evolutionary change.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

3-D printed active metamaterials for sound and vibration controlResearchers have been pushing the capabilities of materials by carefully designing precise structures that exhibit abnormal properties that can control acoustic or optical waves. However, these metamaterials are constructed in fixed geometries, meaning their unique abilities are always fixed. Now, new 3-D printed metamaterial developed by a team led by University of Southern California researchers
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Theoreticians finally prove that 'curly arrows' tell the truth about chemical reactionsRecent work from the ARC Centre of Excellence in Exciton Science, published in Nature Communications today, bridges the cultural gap between organic chemists and theoreticians that is embodied in the "curly arrow."
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists unlock path to use cell's own nanoparticles as disease biomarkersResearchers at the University of Sydney have established a method to identify individual nanoparticles released by human cells, opening the way for them to become diagnostic tools in the early-detection of cancers, dementia and kidney disease.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists mimic a worm's lethal jaw to design and form resilient materialsKnown as the polychaete worm, it uses the tip of its jaw to inject lethal venom. The design of the jaw, with a gradient of hard materials at the tip connected to softer tissues, dissipates force and prevents serious damage to the jaw. The gradient in mechanical properties is correlated to the number of metal ions available for bonding. This mechanism inspired a novel approach to generate stiffness
9h
Dagens Medicin

Lang daglig fasteperiode afprøves som kur mod diabetesEr det muligt at forebygge diabetes ved at spise inden for et kortere, dagligt tidsinterval og på faste tidspunkter? Det undersøger dansk forsker i et nyt forskningsprojekt.
9h
New on MIT Technology Review

It’s not just taxis—Uber wants to take over all of city travel
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Trees Sweat to Keep CoolDuring extreme heat waves, one species of eucalyptus copes by releasing water -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
cognitive science

Using fMRI, researchers identified patterns of brain activity that align with four distinct stages of problem-solving: encoding, planning, solving, and responding.submitted by /u/randomusefulbits [link] [comments]
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team creates detailed map of genetic evolution of Saccharomyces cerevisiaeA team of researchers with members from several institutions in France has created a detailed map of the genetic evolution of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the group describes their analyses of the common yeast and what they found.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Emerging diseases: Is MERS-CoV a threat for Africa?The main MERS-CoV reservoir species is the dromedary, which is found in large numbers in many African countries. Why is it that they have never transmitted the virus to humans, as they have in parts of the Middle East?
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tree rings provide vital information for improved climate predictionsUsing a decade-long sequence of annual growth rings from pine trees, scientists have introduced a highly advanced technique for tracking the carbon metabolism of plants and its environmental controls.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Airway disease in racehorses more prevalent than previously thoughtResearchers examined lung tissue from 95 racehorses that had actively raced or trained before their deaths and found a majority had inflammatory airway disease (IAD). Previous research suggested the disease occurs in up to half of equine athletes. The first of its kind study suggests even racehorses without respiratory signs could have IAD.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovery could let doctors customize brain's immune response to diseasesThe neuroscience lab that discovered that the brain connects directly to the immune system now has found evidence that doctors could load up the brain with custom blends of immune cells to battle genetic disorders and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wildfire smoke associated with more ER visits for heart, stroke ailments among seniorsExposure to smoke from wildfires was associated with increased rates of emergency room visits for heart- and stroke-related illness, especially among adults age 65 and older.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deeper understanding of species roles in ecosystemsA species' traits define the role it plays in the ecosystem in which it lives -- this is the conclusion of a study carried out by researchers at Linköping University, Sweden. New methods can make it easier to predict the ecological role that a species will play when it is introduced, by accident or design, into a new habitat.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cure for fission yeast genes could have bigger things aheadNew OIST study of mystery chemical has uncovered potential new medical treatments for genetic disorders.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Understanding a cell's 'doorbell'A multi-institutional project to understand one of the major targets of human drug design has produced new insights into how structural communication works in a cell component called a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCRs), basically a 'doorbell' structure that alerts the cell of important molecules nearby.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The fewer the deadlierKyoto University researchers report on a novel molecular mechanism that explains how HTLV-1 survives in human cells. By allowing a small number of infected cells to express the gene Tax, they survive and spread.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The secret to being cool: Try smilingPeople often assume that being inexpressive makes them appear more cool, but new research suggests that smiling is considered more cool than an inexpressive attitude.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists unlock path to use cell's own nanoparticles as disease biomarkersDeveloping a method to identify individual cell messengers, called extracellular vesicles, means they can now be used to detect cancer and other disease and be engineered for regenerative medicine.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The neurons the power parentingHarvard researchers have described, for the first time, how separate pools of neurons control individual aspects of parenting behavior in mice.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deep learning transforms smartphone microscopes into laboratory-grade devicesResearchers at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering have demonstrated that deep learning, a powerful form of artificial intelligence, can discern and enhance microscopic details in photos taken by smartphones. The technique improves the resolution and color details of smartphone images so much that they approach the quality of images from laboratory-grade microscopes.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study results from Uganda strengthen the case for contraceptive self-injectionResults from a PATH study in Uganda, now published in the journal Contraception, show that self-injection of subcutaneous DMPA may help women to continue using injectable contraception longer than women who receive traditional intramuscular injections from providers. Over the course of a 12-month study period, 81 percent of DMPA self-injection participants continued to use the product. Meanwhile,
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Theoreticians finally prove that 'curly arrows' tell the truth about chemical reactionsTeam used theoretical modelling, looking at wave functions in new ways to show why curly arrows work. This unprecedented method of extracting the movements of electrons during a chemical reaction is a breakthrough in connecting traditional depictions of chemical mechanism with state-of-the-art quantum chemical calculations.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Enzyme LSD1 found to regulate muscle fiber type differentiationJapanese researchers have clarified the mechanism by which the LSD1 enzyme regulates genes to determine how myoblasts differentiate into different types of muscle fibers and control their metabolic strategies. By clarifying the actions of specific enzymes and hormones, new methods for managing skeletal muscle formation, health maintenance, and changes due to aging are expected.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

It's not your fitness tracker -- it's youAn international study reveals that no one defines physical activity the same way when they are asked to report how much they exercise. The findings are a caution for researchers trying to make cross-cultural comparisons about exercise.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

One-fifth of carbon entering coastal waters of eastern North America is buriedCoastal waters play an important role in the carbon cycle by transferring carbon to the open ocean or burying it in wetland soils and ocean sediments, a new study shows.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

To serve a free society, social media must evolve beyond data miningAs Congress and the public wrestle with the Facebook-Cambridge Analytica scandal, many people are now realizing the risks data collection poses to civic institutions, public discourse and individual privacy. The U.K.-based political consulting firm didn't just collect personal data from the 270,000 people who used researcher Aleksandr Kogan's online personality quiz – nor was the damage limited to
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers fly and sail to stormiest place on Earth to study cloud processesBy ship and by plane, Department of Atmospheric Science researchers ventured to the stormiest place on Earth, the Southern Ocean, to collect cloud, aerosol and precipitation data for a project called SOCRATES. Knowledge gained during the Southern Ocean Clouds, Radiation, Aerosol Transport Experimental Study is expected to enhance weather and climate modeling and forecasting capabilities across the
9h
Futurity.org

Malaria can be deadly because of these proteinsThe most severe strains of malaria infection are associated with a small group of proteins, according to a new study. The finding could be a step toward a vaccine against the deadliest forms of the disease. “The great burden of mortality for malaria is in children under five.” Not all cases of malaria are the same. There are thousands of different strains—some parasites cause only mild symptoms,
9h
Ingeniøren

Teleselskaber snubler stadig i netneutralitetsreglerTelia har ændret i sine abonnementsvilkår, mens Yousee har ændret sit markedsføringsmateriale for såkaldte 'Fri Data'-abonnementer. Det er strid med europæiske netneutralitetsregler, der siger at man må bruge sit abonnement på alle typer udstyr
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What makes someone believe or reject information?Separating fact from fiction in the age of alternate facts is becoming increasingly difficult, and now a new study has helped reveal why.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Declining central American frog species are bouncing backFor more than 40 years, frog populations around the world have been declining. Now, a new study reports that some Central American frog species are recovering, perhaps because they have better defenses against a deadly fungal pathogen.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Medicine in antiquity—from ancient temples to Roman logisticsWe usually regard the Greek doctor Hippocrates as the father of the Western medicine. His greatest achievement was to separate healing from religion and apply natural science methods – an early medical science that was in use centuries before the Christian era.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ocean heat waves and weaker winds will keep Australia warm for a while yetThe Australian Bureau of Meteorology's latest climate outlook, issued today, suggests the above-average warmth of April is likely to extend into May, and for parts of the south, potentially into winter.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Salmon farms are in crisis – here's how scientists are trying to save themSalmon farming is facing a huge challenge in the form of a tiny pest. The parasitic sea louse is infecting salmon stocks worldwide, causing devastating losses for salmon farmers and increased prices for shoppers. But scientists are working hard to tackle this global problem, with a combination of new ways to biologically and mechanically remove the lice and to make the salmon more resilient to inf
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals the inner workings of a molecular motor that packs and unpacks DNADNA is tightly packed into the nucleus of a cell. Nevertheless, the cellular machinery needs to constantly access the genomic information. An LMU team now reveals the inner workings of a molecular motor made of proteins which packs and unpacks DNA.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New Saturn storm emerging?Are you following the planets this season? The planetary action is about to heat up, as Jupiter, Saturn and Mars all head towards fine oppositions over the next few months.
9h
The Atlantic

What Does a Workspace Built for Women Look Like?So many moments of female togetherness take place in proximity to a toilet. A couple of years ago, during early design meetings for The Wing, a women’s club that calls itself a space “between Work and Werk ,” bathrooms were discussed at length; the whole place is a kind of ladies’ room. “Nobody had done a women-only co-working and event space before,” Alda Ly, the architect who directed the proje
9h
cognitive science

Change Anxiety: Is Your Brain Holding You Back?submitted by /u/Learnings_a_lifeline [link] [comments]
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

To drive AI forward, teach computers to play old-school text adventure gamesGames have long been used as test beds and benchmarks for artificial intelligence, and there has been no shortage of achievements in recent months. Google DeepMind's AlphaGo and poker bot Libratus from Carnegie Mellon University have both beaten human experts at games that have traditionally been hard for AI – some 20 years after IBM's DeepBlue achieved the same feat in chess.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A sperm race to save one of New Zealand's threatened birds, the sugar-lapping hihiIt's likely you've never heard of a hihi, let alone seen one in the wild. Also known as stitchbirds, these colourful little critters are a true taonga, or treasure. They're only found in New Zealand, and currently restricted to just seven sanctuary sites.
9h
Feed: All Latest

Space Oddities: We need a plan to stop polluting space before it’s too lateOpinion: Before we start colonizing other planets, we have to deal with all the trash we've hurtled into the atmosphere.
9h
Feed: All Latest

Cloudflare's Plan to Protect the Whole Internet Comes Into FocusOne of the internet's biggest infrastructure companies is expanding its protections beyond the web.
9h
Dagens Medicin

OK18: De regionale parter forhandler videre i dagParterne på det regionale område mødes i dag i Forligsinstitutionen. Det kan dog være svært at komme frem til en aftale, da forhandlingerne på det kommunale område brød sammen i går.
9h
Dagens Medicin

Fagudvalg for tarmkræft skal have ny formandJim Stenfatt Larsen stopper formand til Medicinrådets fagudvalg for tarmkræft. Dansk Selskab for Klinisk Onkologi skal indstille ny formand.
9h
Dagens Medicin

Nu kan de praktiserende læger formelt indgå i klyngerProgrambestyrelsen for det nye kvalitetsprogram i almen praksis afholdte tirsdag sit første møde. Her blev det besluttet, at de praktiserende læger nu formelt kan påbegynde arbejdet med de nye kvalitetsklynger.
9h
NYT > Science

Baby in China Is Born to Surrogate 4 Years After His Parents’ DeathsAfter a long legal battle, the parents of the deceased couple sued for the release of embryos conceived in vitro, and turned to a surrogacy agency in Laos.
9h
The Scientist RSS

Wound-Healing in Mice Triggers Growth of Dormant TumorsTreating mice with anti-inflammatory drugs following surgery reduced the size of tumors.
9h
The Scientist RSS

Neural Circuit of Parental Behavior Mapped in MiceThis is the first time the precise brain cells and their connections controlling a complex behavior have been worked out.
9h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Dino TracksA combination of analysis techniques including 3-D models and false-color depth maps allow researchers to study tridactyl dinosaur tracks in Switzerland.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Media professor says Facebook's business model is perfectly predatoryWith all eyes on Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg's congressional testimony, UVA Today sat down Wednesday – ironically, in a Facebook Live chat – with University of Virginia media studies professor Siva Vaidhyanathan to break everything down.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Are viruses the new frontier for astrobiology?They are the most abundant form of life on Earth, but viruses – or their seed-like dormant state, known as virions – are outliers in our search for life on other planets. Now, one group of scientists are pushing for astrobiologists to consider searching for viruses beyond Earth more seriously.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Arctic Is Breaking Climate Records, Altering Weather WorldwideThe Arctic climate is shattering record after record, altering weather worldwide -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Futurity.org

Energy-efficient light bulbs cost more in high-poverty areasEnergy-efficient light bulbs are more expensive and less available in high-poverty urban areas than in more affluent locations, according to a new study. Researchers explored disparities in the availability and price of energy-efficient bulbs by surveying 130 stores across Michigan’s most populous county. “The ability to benefit from the transition to more energy-efficient lighting is not equitab
9h
Ingeniøren

Kronik: Udnyt den digitale omstilling inden for fødevarer
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers reveal history through exhumation of Otago gravesExhumation and analysis of skeletons and burial sites in the historic Otago town of Lawrence is underway, with University of Otago researchers conducting The Otago Historic Cemeteries Bioarchaeology Project.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An amazingly wide variety of planet-forming disksWith an instrument at the Very Large Telescope in Chile scientists of ETH Zurich observed planet-forming disks around young stars similar to the sun 4,5 billion years ago. Surprisingly, the disks are very different. The data will help to shed more light on the formation processes of planets.
10h
Science : NPR

A Thank You To NPR's Science Commentary ReadersFor 6 1/2 years, Barbara J. King has written commentaries for NPR on everything from animals and anthropology to gender and higher education. Here, she offers up some of her favorite pieces. (Image credit: Mark Mawson/Getty Images)
10h
Dagens Medicin

Ny kombination af medicin anbefales til behandling af knoglemarvskræftDansk Myelomatose Studie Gruppe har netop udsendt opdaterede retningslinjer for diagnostik og behandling af myelomatose. Trestofbehandling fremhæves til patienter, der ikke er kandidater til højdosis kemoterapi med stamcellestøtte.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Ny undersøgelse: Administrativt arbejde stjæler tid fra psykisk syge patienterSeks ud af ti speciallæger bruger mindst en femtedel af arbejdstiden på administrative opgaver frem for på patienterne. »Vi kan ikke være det bekendt,« siger formanden for lægeforeningen.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Når tillid er livsvigtigTilliden og respekten mellem alle parter er i sidste ende er afgørende for, om om sundhedsvæsenet effektivt kan lære af sine fejl.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Autonomous vehicle to improve integrated transport solutionsWe all know that, in the future, cars will be driving themselves. In fact, some already are – but debate is still raging about their safety after a pedestrian in Arizona was killed by a car in autonomous mode last month.
10h
The Atlantic

Watergate Lawyer: Trump Is Going Full Nixon on MuellerRichard Nixon needed a reason. He’d resolved to fire Archibald Cox, the special prosecutor investigating his involvement in Watergate, more than three months before the Saturday Night Massacre, when Cox was eventually dispatched. It was only a matter of time until Nixon would find a suitable pretext to give him political cover—and soon, Cox gave him one. The investigator refused to accept a so-ca
10h
Popular Science

The horrifying maternal mortality rate in Texas turned out to be wrong, but that's not the biggest issueHealth The lone star state isn’t alone Texas is, in fact, a cautionary tale, just not in the way we all thought. It’s been collecting data poorly for years now, and they’re not alone—maternal mortality rates…
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

Brain's "Brakes" Suppress Unwanted ThoughtsResearchers identify a new target for disorders such as PTSD and schizophrenia -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber to up its background checks for driversUber will start doing annual criminal background checks on U.S. drivers and hire a company that constantly monitors criminal arrests as it tries to do a better job of keeping riders safe.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Decreasing the magnetism of metallic core particles with a metal-organic framework shellSurface mining for rare earth elements used in smartphones and wind turbines is difficult and rarely done in the United States. Scientists wanted to know if they could pull the metals, present at trace levels, from geothermal brines using magnetic particles. The particles, wrapped in a molecular framework shell known as a metal-organic framework, or MOF, should easily trap the metals and let the r
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How social media helps scientists get the message acrossAnalyzing the famous academic aphorism 'publish or perish' through a modern digital lens, a group of emerging ecologists and conservation scientists wanted to see whether communicating their new research discoveries through social media -- primarily Twitter -- eventually leads to higher citations years down the road.Turns out, the tweets are worth the time investment.
10h
Ingeniøren

Kommunale toiletdata driller app-udviklerKvaliteten af kommunernes åbne data er så ringe, at det ifølge app-udvikler afholder det mange private virksomheder fra at bruge dem til smart city-løsninger.
10h
Feed: All Latest

Luminar's New Lidar Could Dominate the Self-Driving Car MarketThe company run by a 23-year-old photonics genius is ramping up production as self-driving cars get closer to reality.
10h
Feed: All Latest

Instant Pot Cookbook Review: America's Test Kitchen's Multicooker Perfection Is Sure to Be an Instant HitAmerica's Test Kitchen new cookbook for Instant Pots and other multicookers is a great way to navigate the pressure-cooker trend.
10h
Feed: All Latest

The Race to Find the Next Pandemic—Before It Finds UsIn the past, researchers typically discovered new deadly viruses when they overwhelmed the healthcare system. A new initiative is trying to do things differently.
10h
New Scientist - News

2017 was the year of the biggest fire storms ever seenThe record-breaking 2017 wildfires in the US generated massive thunderstorms that pumped as much smoke into the stratosphere as a volcanic eruption
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study suggests ways to close CEO pay gapThe gender compensation gap between women and men is well-documented, and research shows that the gap is wider in the top positions.
10h
The Atlantic

Letters: Legalizing 'Free-Range' Parenting Is a Step in the Right Direction‘Free-Range’ Parenting's Unfair Double Standard In a recent article on TheAtlantic.com, Jessica McCrory Calarco examined Utah’s new “free-range” parenting law, and argued that issues of interpretation may put poor and working-class families—particularly poor families of color—at a disadvantage. Is the “free-range” parenting bill that passed in Utah “unfair” to the poor and people of color, as the
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How social media helps scientists get the message acrossAnalyzing the famous academic aphorism "publish or perish" through a modern digital lens, a group of emerging ecologists and conservation scientists wanted to see whether communicating their new research discoveries through social media—primarily Twitter—eventually leads to higher citations years down the road.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Autonomous driving – hands on the wheel or no wheel at allVehicles on the road today are getting smarter, safer and more capable. But even the newest vehicles vary widely in their advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS), which aim to enhance safety and make driving more comfortable. Add to that the global race to fully self-driving vehicles, which will take the driver out of the equation completely.
10h
Live Science

Solar Wind Lights Up Night Skies, After Bursting Through a 'Hole' in the SunA powerful gust of solar wind is crackling its way through Earth's upper atmosphere. Here's what that means for you.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA selects new technologies for flight tests for future space explorationThrough NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate's Flight Opportunities program, six promising space technologies have been selected to be tested on commercial low-gravity-simulating aircraft and suborbital rockets. The opportunity to fly on these vehicles helps advance technologies closer to practical use by taking them from a laboratory environment to the real world.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: The Aurora and the Sunrise"Sunrise crashes an aurora party over the southern hemisphere," said astronaut Ricky Arnold of the image he snapped from the International Space Station.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Top tomatoes thanks to Mars missionsNext time you eat a tomato or sweet pepper, take a closer look, because there's a good chance that its healthy appearance is thanks to one of former US President Barack Obama's speeches and ESA research for sending people on long-duration space missions.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Student develops gaming technology for environmental scientific researchA Ph.D. student at the University of Manchester has developed a new method and software for using computer game technology for complex scientific and engineering simulations.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Proxima Centauri just released a flare so powerful it was visible to the unaided eyeSince its discovery was announced in August of 2016, Proxima b has been an endless source of wonder and the target of many scientific studies. In addition to being the closest extra-solar planet to our Solar System, this terrestrial planet also orbits within Proxima Centauri's circumstellar habitable zone (aka. "Goldilocks Zone"). As a result, scientists have naturally sought to determine if this
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Students did not benefit from studying according to their supposed learning styleThe idea that we learn better when taught via our preferred modality or "learning style" – such as visually, orally, or by doing – is not supported by evidence. Nonetheless the concept remains hugely popular, no doubt in part because learning via our preferred style can lead us to feel like we've learned more, even though we haven't.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Radio telescope records a rare 'glitch' in a pulsar's regular pulsing beatPulsars are rapidly rotating neutron stars and sometimes they abruptly increase their rotation rate. This sudden change of spin rate is called a "glitch" and I was part of a team that recorded one happening in the Vela Pulsar, with the results published today in Nature.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lavas in the lab could lead miners to new iron ore depositsGeologists have discovered that some magmas split into two separate liquids, one of which is very rich in iron. Their findings can help to discover new iron ore deposits for mining.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's Juno mission provides infrared tour of Jupiter's north poleScientists working on NASA's Juno mission to Jupiter shared a 3-D infrared movie depicting densely packed cyclones and anticyclones that permeate the planet's polar regions, and the first detailed view of a dynamo, or engine, powering the magnetic field for any planet beyond Earth. Those are among the items unveiled during the European Geosciences Union General Assembly in Vienna, Austria, on Wedn
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gold protein clusters could be used as environmental and health detectorsPeng Zhang and his collaborators study remarkable, tiny self-assembling clusters of gold and protein that glow a bold red. And they're useful: protein-gold nanoclusters could be used to detect harmful metals in water or to identify cancer cells in the body.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Britons less satisfied with restaurant food and their dining companionsBritons are less happy with restaurants' food and service, and with their dining companions, than they were 20 years ago, research says.
11h
Dagens Medicin

Efter kritik: København ændrer kurs i tildeling af førtidspensionDe praktiserende læger glæder sig over, at Københavns Kommune vil rette op på praksis af tildelingen af førtidspension, efter kulegravning af området viste en for hård kurs.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pluto's largest moon, Charon, gets its first official feature namesLegendary explorers and visionaries, real and fictitious, are among those immortalized by the IAU in the first set of official surface-feature names for Pluto's largest moon, Charon. The names were proposed by the New Horizons team and approved by IAU Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

One-fifth of carbon entering coastal waters of eastern North America is buriedCoastal waters play an important role in the carbon cycle by transferring carbon to the open ocean or burying it in wetland soils and ocean sediments, a new study shows.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Philosophical debate helps make maximum security prisoners less macho and more tolerantProfound Socratic philosophical debate has helped tackle macho inmate culture and aid rehabilitation among prisoners in a maximum security jail, research says.
11h
The Atlantic

Kiri Is a British Import Worth WatchingIf there’s one thing British TV drama does better than its American counterpart, it’s turning real-life events into necessary cultural debates. Ripped-from-the-headlines stories in the U.S. get relegated to one-off episodes of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit , or sporadic “topical” plotlines in other splashy network dramas. But in the U.K., which has perfected the art of the three- or four-epis
11h
The Atlantic

The Twice-Transplanted KidneyUpdated on April 12 at 4:55 p.m. ET Vertis Boyce got the call from her transplant surgeon last July. We have a kidney for you, Jeffrey Veale explained on the phone, but it has an unusual backstory. The kidney was first transplanted two years ago from a 17-year-old girl into a man in his early 20s, who just unexpectedly died in a car accident. Boyce would be its second recipient. Did she want it?
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Most young Syrian refugees are in work or studying, research saysAround two-thirds of young Syrian refugees in Britain are either in work or studying, latest figures show.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Insensitive white audiences make black people feel unwelcome at cultural eventsSome black people are being put off attending art galleries and classical music concerts because they are made to feel unwelcome by insensitive white attendees, research says.
11h
Feed: All Latest

Using Open Source Designs to Create More Specialized ChipsRISC-V wants to do for chips what Linux did for software.
11h
Feed: All Latest

How Android Phones Hide Missed Security Updates From YouAndroid Updates PhonesA study finds that Android phones aren't just slow to get patched; sometimes they lie about being patched when they're not.
11h
Feed: All Latest

Astronomers Suggest Some Exoplanet Signals Are False AlarmsWhat if some of the Earth-like planets discovered by Kepler aren’t there at all?
11h
Feed: All Latest

Best Amazon Device Deals: Huge Kindle, Fire Sale (April 2018)The 8-Inch Fire HD tablet, 4K Fire TV, and Kindle are now $50 (among others) in Amazon's biggest spring sale.
11h
Live Science

What If the Ocean's Climate-Controlling 'Conveyor Belt' Came to a Halt?A recent decline in the strength of a climate-regulating ocean current could spell trouble for weather patterns in the future.
11h
Live Science

How Human Error Led the Vikings to CanadaHere's how Viking navigators may have accidentally sailed on to the mainland of North America while looking for Greenland.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tiny probe can see and take body temperaturesUniversity of Adelaide researchers have invented a world-first tiny fibre-optic probe that can simultaneously measure temperature and see deep inside the body.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research reveals new aspects of superconductivity and correlated phenomenaDiscovered accidentally over a century ago, the phenomenon of superconductivity inspired a technological revolution. In 1911, while studying the behavior of solid mercury supercooled to 4 K (-269 °C), Dutch physicist Heike Kamerlingh Onnes (1853-1926) observed for the first time that certain materials conduct electricity without resistance or losses at temperatures in the vicinity of absolute zero
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Oxidative unzipping of multiwall carbon nanotubes to graphene nanoribbonsGraphene, a two-dimensional lattice of carbon atoms, has attracted enormous interest from a broad base of the research community for more than a decade. Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), narrow strips of quasi one-dimensional graphene, possess complementary features relative to their two-dimensional counterpart of graphene sheets. Based on theoretical calculations, the electrical properties of GNRs can
11h
Latest Headlines | Science News

With the launch of TESS, NASA will boost its search for exoplanetsThe Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will set the stage for the next chapter of exoplanet exploration.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

Why Everyone Is Insecure (and Why That's Okay)A healthy dose of self-doubt spurs us to monitor ourselves and our interactions and helps us identify how to get along better with our fellow humans -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Live Science

Late to Bed, Early to Die? Night Owls May Die SoonerBad news for "night owls": Those who tend to stay up late and sleep in well past sunrise are at increased risk of early death, a new study suggests.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Better quality of life and cancer patients' satisfaction with a coordinating nurseInvesting in the continuity of care for lung cancer patients can bring tremendous benefits in terms of patient satisfaction and quality of life. In Quebec, Canada, this investment has taken the form of a dedicated role on the medical team: the Pivot Nurse in Oncology (PNO). A study presented at ELCC 2018 (European Lung Cancer Congress) in Geneva has produced new evidence of the different ways in w
12h
Ingeniøren

Facetime-sag: Apple skal betale patent-haj 3 milliarder kronerHvem ejer den digitale idé bag iOS-applikationen ‘Facetime’? Ikke Apple, ifølge amerikansk domstol.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel combination therapy effective for NRAS mutant and therapy resistant melanomaWistar researchers have identified a novel therapeutic vulnerability in NRAS mutant melanoma and an effective strategy to address it, using a combination of two clinically relevant inhibitors, according to study results published online in EMBO Molecular Medicine.
12h
Ingeniøren

Skatteminister: Vi vil sænke den generelle elafgift så meget som muligtIfølge skatteminister Karsten Lauritsen vil regeringen foreslå markante ændringer af energiafgifterne og i særlig grad omkring elafgifter i udspillet til et nyt energiforlig.
12h
The Atlantic

‘We’re Back’First, President Trump promised to drain the swamp of Washington. Very quickly, many of the swamp creatures were let back in. But a contingent of them stayed out: Republican foreign-policy hawks and centrists who had opposed Trump. But the arrival of John Bolton to the National Security Council, and Mike Pompeo to the State Department, could spell a fresh start for Washington’s Republican foreign
12h
The Atlantic

What Exactly Was Michael Cohen Doing for Donald Trump?The more the public learns about the raid this week on Michael Cohen’s office, home, and room at a New York hotel, the more it seems Cohen is in deeper and deeper trouble, and the harder and harder it becomes to tell what in particular the federal government is looking for from Cohen. Unlike actions taken by special counsel Robert Mueller, this raid, conducted by federal agents in New York City,
12h
New Scientist - News

Struggle to get up in the morning? You’re at risk of early deathA six-year study of nearly half a million people in the UK has found that people who were night owls were 10 per cent more likely to die during that time period
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team delivers world's first biosensor chips based on copper and graphene oxideRussian researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology have developed biosensor chips of unprecedented sensitivity based on copper instead of gold. Besides making the device somewhat cheaper, this innovation will facilitate the manufacturing process. The research findings are reported in the journal Langmuir.
12h
Ingeniøren

Skævt ekspertpanel: Høring om mobilstråling vil formentlig advare kraftigt mod mobilerSundhedsudvalget i Folketinget har indkaldt eksperter til at opdatere politikerne om den nyeste viden på området. Panelet har dog en overvægt af kritikere, men det skyldes ministerens fravær.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unusual climate during Roman times plunged Eurasia into hunger and diseaseA recent study published in an esteemed academic journal indicates that volcanic eruptions in the mid-500s resulted in an unusually gloomy and cold period. A joint research project of the Chronology Laboratory of the Finnish Museum of Natural History and Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke) suggests that the years 536 and 541-544 CE were very difficult for many people.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists use carbon nanotube technology to develop robust water desalination membranesA research team of Shinshu University, Japan, has developed robust reverse osmosis membranes that can endure large-scale water desalination. The team published their results in early February in Scientific Reports.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tree rings provide vital information for improved climate predictionsDue to their worldwide distribution, trees have an extraordinary role in removing excessive amounts of CO2 released into the atmosphere by human activity. So far, however, no tool exists to precisely calculate the carbon dioxide uptake of trees over their whole lifetime. Using a decade-long sequence of annual growth rings from pine trees, scientists at the NMR Centre at Umeå University's Chemical
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sensing interactions between moleculesIn a recent study published in the scientific journal Nature Nanotechnology, physicists and chemists of the University of Münster (Germany) describe an experimental approach to visualising structures of organic molecules with exceptional resolution. The key to this newly developed microscopic method is the high stability of a particularly sharp and atomically defined probe tip.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop prototype of advanced quantum memoryEmployees of Kazan Federal University and Kazan Quantum Center of Kazan National Research Technical University demonstrated an original layout of a prototype of multiresonator broadband quantum-memory interface.
12h
Dagens Medicin

Vi kan og skal hjælpe børn med psykiske lidelser bedreDer mangler en behandlingsform til de tusindvis af børn og unge, som har det dårligt mentalt, men som ikke er tjent med at blive indlagt i psykiatrien, skriver Erik Jylling, sundhedspolitisk direktør i Danske Regioner.
13h
Science : NPR

Really Random NumbersRandom numbers are essential for secure cyber communications. But making truly random numbers is harder than it seems. Now scientists have devised a way to make the most random random numbers ever.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New insight into how Giant's Causeway and Devils Postpile were formedA new study by geoscientists at the University of Liverpool has identified the temperature at which cooling magma cracks to form geometric columns such as those found at the Giant's Causeway in Northern Ireland and Devils Postpile in the USA.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lavas in the lab could lead miners to new iron ore depositsGeologists have discovered that some magmas split into two separate liquids, one of which is very rich in iron. Their findings can help to discover new iron ore deposits for mining.
13h
Viden

Ekspert efter Zuckerberg-høringer: Facebook kommer til at ændre sigDet bliver blandt andet nemmere at ændre sine privatindstillinger, fortæller digital rådgiver.
13h
Ingeniøren

Amazon Web Services åbner kontor i KøbenhavnAmazon Web Services opretter afdeling i Danmark med henblik på at ekspandere på det danske marked.
13h
Science : NPR

Male OB-GYNs Are Rare, But Is That A Problem?Women outnumber men in obstetrics and gynecology residencies and medical practices in the U.S. Heads of training programs now wonder if they should go out of their way to recruit more men. (Image credit: Alex Olgin/WFAE)
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New insight into how Giant's Causeway and Devils Postpile were formedA new study by geoscientists at the University of Liverpool has identified the temperature at which cooling magma cracks to form geometric columns such as those found at the Giant's Causeway in Northern Ireland and Devils Postpile in the USA.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bottom trawling causes deep-sea fish populations collapseBottom trawling is causing "boom and bust" fisheries.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Buzz feed—bringing renewables to the power gridRenewable energy is on the rise in Europe as the economy develops away from the use of fossil fuels such as coal and oil, but an ageing electricity grid is struggling to keep up with the rapid pace of developments.
13h
Ingeniøren

Crispr-forsker: Vigtigt at undersøge mulige bivirkninger ved CrisprSamtidig skal vi huske, at vi i dag accepterer behandlingsformer, der kan skade arvemassen, siger forskeren.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Paris to sue Airbnb over undeclared listingsParis is taking home-sharing giant Airbnb to court for failing to remove ads from people who have not properly declared their properties, city authorities said Thursday.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The background hum of space could reveal hidden black holesDeep space is not as silent as we have been led to believe. Every few minutes a pair of black holes smash into each other. These cataclysms release ripples in the fabric of spacetime known as gravitational waves. Now Monash University scientists have developed a way to listen in on these events. The gravitational waves from black hole mergers imprint a distinctive whooping sound in the data collec
14h
Ingeniøren

Fingernem robot løser et af robotteknologiens helt store hovedbrudEn toarmet robot udstyret med et avanceret, todelt neuralt netværk viser, at kunstig intelligens er vejen til at løse et af robotteknologiens helt store problemer: bin-picking.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hino, VW partner on hybrids, autonomous drive, technologyHino Motors, Toyota Motor Corp.'s group truck manufacturer, and Volkswagen Truck & Bus of Germany agreed Thursday to work together on technologies such as hybrids, electric cars, autonomous driving and connectivity.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Inuka, first polar bear born in the tropics, may be put downAn elderly polar bear at Singapore zoo, one of the site's most beloved animals, may be put down after its health deteriorated markedly, the zoo operator said Thursday.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Key points from Facebook-Zuckerberg hearingsFacebook chief Mark Zuckerberg testified for nearly 10 hours over two days on Facebook's privacy and data protection issues before committees of the Senate and House on Tuesday and Wednesday. Here are key points:
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The background hum of space could reveal hidden black holesDeep space is not as silent as we have been led to believe. Every few minutes a pair of black holes smash into each other. These cataclysms release ripples in the fabric of spacetime known as gravitational waves. Now Monash University scientists have developed a way to listen in on these events. The new technique is expected to reveal the presence of thousands of previously hidden black holes.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Zuckerberg testimony reveals lawmaker confusion on FacebookFacebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg acknowledged Wednesday that regulation of social media is "inevitable" and disclosed that his own personal information has been compromised by malicious outsiders. But after two days of congressional testimony, what seemed clear was how little Congress seems to know about Facebook, much less what to do about it.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA Tess spacecraft to prowl for planets as galactic scoutLook up at the sky tonight. Every star you see—plus hundreds of thousands, even millions more—will come under the intense stare of NASA's newest planet hunter.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scandal-hit Volkswagen expected to name new CEOGerman car giant Volkswagen is set to replace chief executive Matthias Mueller Thursday, as it seeks to turn the page on the "dieselgate" emissions scandal that has dogged the company since 2015.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New Zealand halts new offshore oil and gas explorationNew Zealand is halting all new offshore oil and gas exploration to become a global leader in the fight against climate change, the centre-left government said Thursday, but opponents accused it of "economic vandalism".
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lying eyes: Google engineer developing tool to spot fake videoIn an era replete with fake news stories, you might expect video evidence to provide a clearer picture of the truth.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Vietnam eyes cryptocurrency crackdown after alleged $660 mn scamVietnam has vowed to tighten regulations on cryptocurrencies as authorities investigate an alleged multi-million-dollar fraud in the country, where digital units are traded in a shadowy and unregulated market.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Airbag-maker Takata brand disappears as CEO quitsJapan's Takata said Thursday its chief had formally resigned after the completion of a takeover by a US firm, bringing the curtain down on the crisis-hit brand tainted by a deadly airbag scandal.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Alectinib provides longer symptom improvement than crizotinib in ALK-positive lung cancerThe findings of the ALEX trial presented at the ELCC (European Lung Cancer Congress) 2018 in Geneva, Switzerland, support the use of alectinib as the new standard of care in the frontline treatment of ALK-positive lung cancer. Alectinib was found to provide longer symptom improvement than crizotinib in ALK-positive non-small-cell lung cancer.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Immunotherapy provides long-term survival benefit: Further evidence in lung cancerFurther evidence that immunotherapy provides long-term survival benefit for patients with lung cancer was presented today at ELCC 2018 (European Lung Cancer Congress) in Geneva, Switzerland.Researchers presented the three-year survival results of the randomised phase 2 POPLAR trial in second line, which is the longest follow-up reported to date with anti-programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) immunothe
16h
Ingeniøren

Kommentar: Facebook er vor tids CheminovaOm 30 år vil vi se tilbage på den ringe regulering af it-giganterne fuldstændig som vi i dag ser på kemikaliereguleringens historie, mener Version2s redaktør.
17h
NeuWrite West

The Anxious CircuitAnxiety is a feeling we all face on a daily basis about our jobs, our relationships, and even the meaning of our lives. But when normal anxiety gets so severe that it interferes with daily functioning it becomes generalized anxiety disorder, a psychiatric diagnosis that 28% of people in the United States will suffer from during some period in their life, costing the economy billions of dollars an
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New affordable hepatitis C combination treatment shows 97 percent cure rateThe sofosbuvir/ravidasvir combination treatment for hepatitis C has been shown to be safe and effective, with extremely high cure rates, according to interim results from the Phase II/III STORM-C-1 trial presented by DNDi at the International Liver Conference in Paris.
17h
Science | The Guardian

Non-profit’s $300 hepatitis C cure as effective as $84,000 alternativeExclusive: 71 million people stand to benefit from reduced price treatment for virus which can lead to liver cirrhosis, cancer and death An affordable hepatitis C treatment has been shown to be safe and effective, with very high cure rates for patients including hard-to-treat cases, in interim clinical trial results that offer hope to the 71 million people living with the disease worldwide. The t
17h
Viden

Instagram vil lade brugere downloade deres indholdDet sociale medie Instagram planlægger at følge i Facebooks spor og lade brugere downloade deres indhold.
17h
Science-Based Medicine

Hypothesized benefit from integrative treatments for veterans’ chronic pain fails to materializeResearchers hypothesized that chiropractic, acupuncture and massage would benefit veterans with chronic pain. Their results said otherwise.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Certain iron supplements may influence the development of colon cancerTwo common iron compounds increase the formation of a known biomarker for cancer, according to a new study of cancer cells from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden. The two compounds, ferric citrate and ferric EDTA, are often used in dietary supplements and as a food additive respectively, in worldwide markets including the USA and the EU.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sensitive new assay detects hepatitis B infection in single liver cells and serumChronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) can progress to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A study published in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics describes a new HBV assay that offers advantages over currently used methods because it has the capability to detect closed circular DNA (cccDNA) in serum, single cells, and preserved tissue samples. This assay can be used to diagnose HCC at an ear
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

RAND identifies new strategies for countering Russian social mediaA new RAND Corporation report finds that Russia is waging a social media campaign in the Baltics, Ukraine and nearby states to sow dissent against neighboring governments, as well as NATO and the European Union.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

After tax, Philadelphians 40 percent less likely to drink soda every dayThe first study to look at what Philadelphians actually drank instead of sales at local stores since the city's 'Soda Tax' came into play, the study found that residents stopped drinking soda every day at a significant rate.
18h
New on MIT Technology Review

Inside the Jordan refugee camp that runs on blockchainSyrian refugees could regain legal identities that were lost when they fled their homes.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists discover first super salty subglacial lakes in Canadian ArcticAn analysis of radar data led scientists to an unexpected discovery of two lakes located beneath 550 to 750 meters of ice underneath the Devon Ice Cap, one of the largest ice caps in the Canadian Arctic. They are thought to be the first isolated hypersaline subglacial lakes in the world.
20h
Feed: All Latest

The Questions Zuckerberg Should Have Answered About RussiaRussian agents used Facebook to influence the 2017 election. Congress missed the chance to delve into what the company knows about it—and how they’ll stop it in 2018.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Baby fish led astray by high CO2 in oceansBaby fish will find it harder to reach secure shelters in future acidified oceans -- putting fish populations at risk, new research has concluded.
20h
Feed: All Latest

Why Facebook's 2011 Promises Haven't Protected UsersFacebook didn't notify the Federal Trade Commission when it learned that Cambridge Analytica had improperly obtained personal information of users.
21h
NYT > Science

An Eye in the Sky Could Detect Planet-Warming Plumes on the GroundAn environmental group says it will spend millions to launch a satellite that could help fight climate change by identifying methane leaks with pinpoint accuracy.
21h
Live Science

Camelot, King Arthur & the Knights of the Round TableThe mythical kingdom of King Arthur emerged from a series of French poems in the 13th century.
21h
Live Science

Facts About MolybdenumProperties, sources and uses of the element molybdenum.
21h
New Scientist - News

Ovarian cancer vaccine improves women’s survival ratesA personalised cancer vaccine that trains the immune system to attack tumours has had encouraging results in women with ovarian cancer
21h
Live Science

Gallbladder: Function, Problems & Healthy DietThe gallbladder is a small organ that is used to store bile, which breaks up the fat in food.
22h
cognitive science

New Brain Maps With Unmatched Detail May Change Neurosciencesubmitted by /u/SophiaDevetzi [link] [comments]
22h
cognitive science

Crime-predicting A.I. isn't science fiction. It's about to roll out in Indiasubmitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]
22h
Feed: All Latest

Mark Zuckerberg's Congress Testimony Day Two: Republicans and Democrats DivergeIn his second day of Congressional testimony, Democrats wanted to know about privacy. Republicans wanted to hear about Diamond and Silk.
22h
Futurity.org

Earth’s temperature history is good news for finding alien lifeAn analysis of temperature during early Earth’s history supports more moderate average temperatures throughout the billions of years when life slowly emerged on Earth. Theories about the early days of our planet’s history vary wildly. Some studies have painted the picture of a snowball Earth, when much of its surface was frozen. Other theories have included periods that would be inhospitably hot
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Do Democrat and Republican doctors treat patients differently at the end of life?Despite deep rifts in health care opinions across party lines, a physician's party affiliation appears to have no effect on clinical decisions in end-of-life care. Researchers found no cross-party differences among physicians in their choice of care protocols, including the intensity of life-sustaining treatments, among terminally ill patients.
23h
NYT > Science

Trilobites: Farmland Birds in France Are in Steep DeclineTwo surveys in France, one national and one regional, show a loss of bird populations in agricultural areas. Pesticides may be the culprit.
23h
Futurity.org

‘Junk DNA’ isn’t so useless after allResearchers have determined how satellite DNA, considered to be “junk DNA,” plays a crucial role in holding the genome together. Their findings, published recently in the journal eLife , indicate that this genetic “junk” performs the vital function of ensuring that chromosomes bundle correctly inside the cell’s nucleus, which is necessary for cell survival. And this function appears to be conserv
23h
Science : NPR

Environmental Group Plans Methane-Tracking SatelliteScientists hope MethaneSAT will show where the potent greenhouse gas is coming from. Tracking methane in the air is difficult because it rises and spreads from the source. (Image credit: Environmental Defense Fund)
23h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Principles and TeachingsWhat We’re Following Retaliation Plan? President Trump threatened a military strike on Syria over President Bashar al-Assad’s suspected chemical attack on civilians, tweeting that Russia— an ally of the Assad regime —should “get ready … because [missiles] will be coming.” Russia responded with a claim that reports of the attack had been fabricated. Trump has in the past expressed a desire to with
23h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Rolls-Royce and Boeing invest in UK space engineBoeing and Rolls-Royce are investing in the UK company developing a revolutionary propulsion system.
23h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Secrets of the sea bed: Hunt for Stone Age site in North SeaUK and Belgian scientists explore the seabed off Norfolk after prehistoric finds.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Droughts mean fewer flowers for beesBees could be at risk from climate change because more frequent droughts could cause plants to produce fewer flowers, new research shows.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can you really be obese yet healthy?A new paper has called for an end to the term 'healthy obesity,' due to it being misleading and flawed. The focus should instead be on conducting more in-depth research to understand causes and consequences of varying health among people with the same BMI.
23h
Scientific American Content: Global

Some Habitable Zone Exoplanets May Get X-Rayed OutRed dwarfs are a popular place to hunt for small exoplanets in the habitable zone—but the stars' radiation bursts might fry chances for life as we know it. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
Futurity.org

‘Smart socks’ enhance telemedicine for physical therapyA pair of “smart socks” might offer a solution to the limitations of video consultations with physiotherapists and other specialists, report researchers. Consulting via video saves patients’ time and money, as they no longer have to endure the sometimes hours-long journey to hospital. The technology has its limitations, however—particularly the two-dimensional view of the patient available to the
23h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Isolated lakes found beneath Canadian ice sheetTwo lakes discovered beneath an Arctic ice sheet may help us to learn about Europa's subsurface ocean.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Droughts mean fewer flowers for beesBees could be at risk from climate change because more frequent droughts could cause plants to produce fewer flowers, new research shows.
23h
Futurity.org

These factors drive black men out of engineering schoolFor black men, pursuing a graduate degree in engineering is like riding out a storm, according to new research. They enroll knowing they will face challenges, but the barriers that black men described as part of a six-year study show how race was a greater obstacle than they expected. “Our research shows the main challenges these students faced were beyond their control. They were systemic, struc
23h
Feed: All Latest

Mark Zuckerberg's Testimony Birthed a Memepocalypse—Which Is a Good ThingMark Zuckerberg FacebookGive the internet some credit: People watched hours upon hours of testimony just to get some jokes off.
23h
Blog » Languages » English

Celebrating 5 Years of BRAIN Initiative on Capitol HillIn 2013, President Obama announced a new endeavor to further neuroscience research in the form of the United States BRAIN Initiative . Sebastian was there at the White House in person. Over the next five years, research surged forward. From genomics to connectomics; whole brain imaging and behavioral studies, the BRAIN Initiative (BRAINI) has catalyzed questions and expedited answers to tough neu
1d
Futurity.org

Side effects lie in wait after testicular cancerAlthough testicular cancer has a 95 percent cure rate, patients should stay alert for side effects from platinum-based chemotherapy, which is associated with health problems that can creep up years later, including heart disease, hearing loss, pain, neuropathy, and erectile dysfunction. “Some men are in their mid-20s when they undergo treatment and they may have 50 or more years of life, and you
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hormone imbalance causes treatment-resistant hypertensionBritish researchers have discovered a hormone imbalance that explains why it is very difficult to control blood pressure in around 10 per cent of hypertension patients.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel mosquito net provides children with greater protection against malariaA novel class of bed net that neutralizes mosquitoes' ability to resist pyrethroid insecticide is shown to significantly reduce malaria infection in children, according to new research published in The Lancet.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Higher cigarette prices would save millions of people from extreme poverty and poor healthHigher cigarette prices would save millions of people from extreme poverty and poor health around the world, while also cutting health treatment costs for families across the globe, suggests a comprehensive study published today in The BMJ.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Surprising discovery: Sweet tooth gene connected with less body fatLast year researchers discovered that a particular craving for sweet things may be determined by a genetic variation. Now the researchers have discovered that people with this genetic disposition for a sweet tooth have less body fat.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hotter, longer, more frequent -- marine heatwaves on the riseWe know heatwaves over land have been increasing, but now new research reveals globally marine heatwaves have also been increasing in length, number and intensity over the past century. More intriguing still, this trend has accelerated markedly since 1982.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cohesive neighborhoods, less spanking result in fewer child welfare visitsThe child welfare system is more likely to intervene in households in 'less neighborly' neighborhoods and in which parents spank their kids.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Marriage reduces depression in couples earning less than $60,000 per year, study findsPeople who are married and earning less than $60,000 per year in total household income have fewer symptoms of depression than comparable earning unmarried people, but for couples earning more, marriage doesn't show the same mental health benefits.
1d
Popular Science

Now paleontologists know what colors graced these 200-million-year-old butterfly wingsAnimals They found some nanoscale clues on the hues. Researchers examined more than 500 butterfly specimens, ultimately selecting six that were well preserved enough to reveal their secrets. The specimens date to the…
1d
Feed: All Latest

SpaceX’s President is Thinking Even Bigger Than Elon MuskGwynne Shotwell tells the TED conference that plans to take humans to Mars are "risk reduction for the human species."
1d
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Paul Out BoyToday in 5 Lines House Speaker Paul Ryan announced that he will not seek reelection in November. During a meeting with GOP lawmakers, Ryan explained that he has “become a Sunday Dad” and wants to spend more time with his family. President Trump praised Ryan’s “legacy of achievement” on Twitter. Republican Representative Dennis Ross of Florida announced that he’s retiring at the end of his term. F
1d
The Atlantic

'Very Soon or Not So Soon': Parsing Trump on SyriaThe progression of President Trump’s reaction to the latest reported chemical-weapons attack on the Damascus suburb of Douma is less straight line than seesaw. On Sunday, the president warned Syrian Bashar al-Assad’s regime and its backers in Russia and Iran that there would be a “big price to pay” for the assault, in which dozens of people, including children, were killed. The next day, he hedge
1d
The Scientist RSS

Microglia Remember Bouts of Bodily Inflammation in MiceA new study reports that immune memory may contribute to neurodegenerative diseases.
1d
Feed: All Latest

Everything Mark Zuckerberg Will Follow Up On for CongressIf you're a member of Congress, Mark Zuckerberg's team will get back to you.
1d
NYT > Science

Ruth Nussenzweig, Who Pursued Malaria Vaccine, Dies at 89Dr. Nussenzweig’s research into one of the world’s most deadly diseases laid the groundwork for an approach once thought beyond reach.
1d
Popular Science

Meet the test dummies NASA uses to simulate and study aircraft crashesTechnology Here's how the space agency gathers data when planes (purposely) hit the ground hard. At NASA’s Langley Research Center, engineers subject aircraft to what they call “severe but survivable” crashes. Here's how that works.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists find excess mitochondrial iron, Huntington's disease linkNew research identifying a pathway for Huntington's disease helps lay the foundation for developing drug therapies.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain combats dementia by shifting resourcesThe brain continues to put up a fight even as neurodegenerative diseases like dementia damage certain areas and functions. In fact, recent findings in a Baycrest-University of Arizona study suggest that one method the brain uses to counter these diseases is the reassigning of tasks to different regions.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Babies make the link between emotions expressed vocally and faciallyThe ability of babies to differentiate emotional expressions appears to develop during their first six months. But do they really recognize emotion or do they only distinguish the physical characteristics of faces and voices? Researchers have just provided an initial answer to this question, measuring the ability of six-month-old babies to make a connection between a voice expressing happiness or
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fossil study sheds light on ancient butterfly wing colorsPioneering new research has given an illuminating new insight into the metallic, iridescent colors found on the earliest known ancestors of moths and butterflies, which inhabited the Earth almost 200 million years ago.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Life expectancy significantly worse in deprived areasLife expectancy and health outcomes worsen the more deprived an area or population is, new research has found.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Student class engagement soars when they use personal data to learnLife sciences professors have found that giving students access to their personal biological data has a profound impact on their learning experience. In a summary of their experiment, the researchers report students with access to data about their own microbiome -- the trillions of tiny microorganisms that live in a person's gut, mouth and skin -- are significantly more engaged and more interested
1d
New on MIT Technology Review

What Mark Zuckerberg’s testimony told us about the past, present, and future of Facebook and its data
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

From property damage to lost production: How natural disasters impact economicsWhen a natural disaster strikes, major disaster databases tend to compile information about losses such as damages to property or cost of repairs, but other economic impacts after the disaster are often overlooked—such as how a company's lost ability to produce products may affect the entire supply-chain within the affected region and in other regions.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

TESS readies for takeoffSatellite developed by MIT aims to discover thousands of nearby exoplanets, including at least 50 Earth-sized ones.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The changing chemistry of the Amazonian atmosphereHow do you measure a chemical compound that lasts for less than a second in the atmosphere?
1d
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How the arts help homeless youth heal and build | Malika WhitleyMalika Whitley is the founder of ChopArt, an organization for homeless teens focused on mentorship, dignity and opportunity through the arts. In this moving, personal talk, she shares her story of homelessness and finding her voice through arts -- and her mission to provide a creative outlet for others who have been pushed to the margins of society.
1d
Live Science

Whale Sneezes Rainbow, Proving Nature is Beautiful and WeirdThis whale sneezed a rainbow, and all is right in the world.
1d
Live Science

Here's What Causes Some People's Bones to 'Drip' Like Candle WaxResearchers have discovered a genetic cause of "dripping candle wax" bone disease.
1d
The Atlantic

These Bright Spots Are Alien VolcanoesAs Voyager 1 approached Jupiter in the 1970s, scientists expected the spacecraft to find a world not unlike our moon. Io, the innermost of Jupiter’s largest moons, is about the same size and mass as the moon. It seemed reasonable to predict Io would turn out to be a cold, rocky world studded with craters, too. Instead, Voyager found a world alive with volcanoes . The first plume was spotted by Li
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

From property damage to lost production: How natural disasters impact economicsWhen a natural disaster strikes, major disaster databases tend to compile information about losses such as damages to property or cost of repairs, but other economic impacts after the disaster are often overlooked--such as how a company's lost ability to produce products may affect the entire supply-chain within the affected region and in other regions. This may give an incomplete picture of the f
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research reveals new aspects of superconductivity and correlated phenomenaThe exotic behaviors displayed by organic compounds subjected to low temperatures are explored in a study developed in Brazil, whose results were published in Physical Review B.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The changing chemistry of the Amazonian atmosphereResearchers have been debating whether nitrogen oxides (NOx) can affect levels of OH radicals in a pristine atmosphere but quantifying that relationship has been difficult. Now, Harvard researchers have found that accompanying the increase of NOx concentration from urban pollution, daytime peak OH concentrations in the rainforest skyrocketed, increasing by at least 250 percent. These increased lev
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Zuckerberg faces 'Grandpa' questions from lawmakersMark Zuckerberg faced two days of grilling before House and Senate committees Tuesday and Wednesday to address Facebook's privacy issues and the need for more regulation for the social media site.
1d
Scientific American Content: Global

Slow-Motion Ocean: Atlantic's Circulation Is Weakest in 1,600 YearsIf hemisphere-spanning currents are slowing, greater flooding and extreme weather could be at hand -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Swamp microbe has pollution-munching powerSewage treatment may be an unglamorous job, but bacteria are happy to do it. Sewage plants rely on bacteria to remove environmental toxins from waste so that the processed water can be safely discharged into oceans and rivers.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EPA's IRIS program has made substantial progress, says new reportThe U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) program has made "substantial progress" in implementing recommendations outlined in past reports by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, improving the program's overall scientific and technical performance, says a new Academies report. The program, which is used to assess the hazard
1d

t


Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.