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Science | The Guardian

Scientists accidentally create mutant enzyme that eats plastic bottlesThe breakthrough, spurred by the discovery of plastic-eating bugs at a Japanese dump, could help solve the global plastic pollution crisis Scientists have created a mutant enzyme that breaks down plastic drinks bottles – by accident. The breakthrough could help solve the global plastic pollution crisis by enabling for the first time the full recycling of bottles. The new research was spurred by t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Thin film converts heat from electronics into energyNearly 70 percent of the energy produced in the United States each year is wasted as heat. Much of that heat is less than 100 degrees Celsius and emanates from things like computers, cars or large industrial processes. Engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a thin-film system that can be applied to sources of waste heat like these to produce energy at levels unpreceden
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Ingeniøren

Danske forskere har kortlagt menuen hos gavnlig tarmbakterieForskere fra DTU har fundet ud af, hvad og hvordan en vigtig gruppe af tarmbakterier spiser. Det kan bane vejen for effektive præbiotika til forebyggelse af sygdomme.
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Keep your love of chocolate from destroying the planet with this one easy fixNexus Media News Chocolate production generates a lot of pollution. You don't have to give up chocolate to reduce carbon emissions, but you might choose your indulgence more wisely. Here are a few tips to keep your sweet tooth from…
19min
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*Incredibles 2* Asks: What's the Right Way to Solve a Math Problem?The new Pixar movie has a trailer that makes you think about how teaching math *really* works.
45min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hello DARKNESSUCSB physicists team up with Caltech astronomers to commission the most advanced camera in the world.
49min
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From insulator to conductor in a flashA clever combination of novel technologies enables us to study promising materials for the electronics of tomorrow.Using short laser pulses, a research team led by Misha Ivanov of the Max Born Institute in Berlin together with scientists from the Russian Quantum Center in Moscow have now shed light on the extremely rapid processes taking place within novel materials. Their results have appeared in
49min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mosquitoes reveal fatal attractionMalaria causes the bodies of its human hosts to emit specific odors from the skin that make the hosts even more attractive to mosquitoes, which invites further bites and risks infection of more mosquitoes and wider transmission of the disease. It's a vicious circle but one that has enabled researchers to identify the odors as organic hydrocarbons whose discovery could bring relief to a disease tha
49min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Oregon scientists decipher the magma bodies under YellowstoneUsing supercomputer modeling, University of Oregon scientists have unveiled a new explanation for the geology underlying recent seismic imaging of magma bodies below Yellowstone National Park.
49min
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Don’t Know What You Got (Till It’s Sean)Today in 5 Lines During a court hearing in Manhattan, Fox News host Sean Hannity was revealed as a client of President Trump’s personal lawyer, Michael Cohen. Cohen’s attorneys are seeking a temporary restraining order to stop the government from reviewing documents seized in last week’s FBI raids on Cohen’s home, office, and hotel room. President Trump reportedly halted a preliminary plan to imp
53min
Science : NPR

EPA Takes Toxic Site Flooded By Harvey Off Special Cleanup ListThe EPA says the San Jacinto Waste Pits near Houston no longer needs Scott Pruitt's personal attention due to progress on a remediation plan. But the site is still years away from being cleaned up. (Image credit: Rebecca Hersher/NPR)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists decipher the magma bodies under YellowstoneUsing supercomputer modeling, University of Oregon scientists have unveiled a new explanation for the geology underlying recent seismic imaging of magma bodies below Yellowstone National Park.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Elevation in buildings can affect the decisions we makePeople rely on financial managers, doctors and lawyers to be as objective as possible when making decisions about investments, health and legal issues, but findings from a new study suggest that an unexpected factor could be influencing these choices.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Warming climate could speed forest regrowth in eastern U.S.Climate change could speed the natural regrowth of forests on undeveloped or abandoned land in the eastern U.S., according to a new study.
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Warming climate could speed forest regrowth in eastern USWarming climate could speed the natural regrowth of forests on undeveloped or abandoned land in the eastern United States, according to a new study. Previous research has shown that the succession from field to forest can happen decades sooner in the southeastern US than in the Northeast. But it wasn't obvious why. A new study points to temperature as the major factor influencing the pace of refor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Elevation in buildings can affect the decisions we makeNew research shows that elevation in an office building can increase someone's willingness to take financial risks because it makes people feel more powerful.
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Live Science

Organ Donations from Overdose Victims Save ThousandsLives tragically claimed by the American opioid epidemic may benefit people desperately in need of organ transplants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Should Mark Zuckerberg be Facebook's chairman and CEO? Some investors say noMark Zuckerberg's tight grip on Facebook is under growing scrutiny as investors call for the giant social network to name an independent chairman.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reddit CEO says racism allowed, but not 'welcome,' on the siteReddit has a history of allowing its users to say just about anything. On Wednesday, its CEO said racist language is just fine—officially giving license to the hatred that already lives on the site, which bills itself as the front page of the internet.
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The Atlantic

Beyoncé Masters the Fierceness of CrowdsMore than 100 dancers and musicians get hired for a mononym’s megafestival performance: We know, in some ways, what it’s going to look like. It’s going to look like the first moments of Beyoncé’s conversation-breaking Coachella set, in which leotard-wearing women formed two lines on a catwalk into the crowd, making way for Beyoncé in regal cape and headpiece. When people talk about pop stars as g
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook's Zuckerberg got grilled, but nothing's really changedFacebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg made a big splash testifying to Congress this week about the social network privacy scandal, but in the aftermath, not much changed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

SpaceX postpones launch of NASA's planet-hunter spacecraftSpaceX postponed the launch of NASA's new planet-hunting mission Monday in order to verify the Falcon 9 rocket's navigation systems, the California-based company said.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Regional health system growth and implications for stroke careNew research shows that stroke patients are increasingly being transferred out of smaller community and rural hospitals and sent to larger medical centers for their care and rehabilitation. While this is a positive sign for patients who need more advanced treatments, the trend has drawbacks in terms of cost and points to the need to improve the coordination of care between hospitals.
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The Atlantic

Sean Hannity’s Ethical MessMichael Cohen S. HannityGenuinely stunning moments are hard to come by these days, but one arrived on Monday in a courtroom in New York City. Michael Cohen, President Trump’s fixer, was in court, trying to shield documents seized in a raid Monday on his office, home, and hotel room from prosecutors. Cohen had invoked attorney-client privilege to ask the court to hold documents back, but there have been questions about t
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New Scientist - News

Catching malaria makes you smell more attractive to mosquitoesMosquitoes are particularly attracted to the sweat of people who have malaria, suggesting the parasite that causes it may change a person’s body odour
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers use search engines, social media to predict syphilis trendsNew research finds that internet search terms and tweets related to sexual risk behaviors can predict when and where syphilis trends will occur.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Post-surgical opioids can, paradoxically, lead to chronic painGiving opioids to animals to quell pain after surgery prolongs pain for three weeks and primes specialized immune cells in the spinal cord to be more reactive to pain, according to a new study. The authors say the paradoxical findings could add a new wrinkle to the conversation about the national opioid epidemic.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

People with Type 2 diabetes who eat breakfast later, more likely to have a higher BMIBeing an "evening person" is linked to higher body mass indices among people with Type 2 diabetes, and having breakfast later in the day seems to be what drives this association, according to a new article.
1h
Live Science

Punk-Rock Turtle Has 'Green Hair,' Will Probably Die AloneNo, that's not hair. This endangered turtle's mohawk is made of algae.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Netflix is proving to be a tough act for copycats to followNetflix's video-streaming service has been thriving for so long that other companies are striving to duplicate its success in other kinds of digital entertainment and content.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Web's inventor discusses digital monopolies, privacy threatsTim Berners-Lee gave away the technology that he used to invent the World Wide Web, so it's not surprising that he's worried about the current state of the internet as Google, Facebook and Amazon become increasingly dominant in the digital world.
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cognitive science

TIL how Google, Open AI, and Facebook make AI get smarter. (it's not as technical as you'd expect).submitted by /u/Menilik [link] [comments]
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When three months from now feels right around the cornerIf you've ever noticed yourself thinking about the timing of a plan in two opposing ways - something that feels longer off than your actual time calculation -- you're on to something. New research shows our different ways of estimating time don't necessarily move in lock-step.
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Volunteering 2 hours per week reduces loneliness in widowed older adults, study findsWidowed older adults can reduce the loneliness that results from the death of a spouse by volunteering 100 hours per year, which is about two hours per week, according to a recent study.
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Music intensifies effects of anti-hypertensive medicationA research shows anti-hypertensive drugs improving heart rate more in patients who listen to music after taking medication. Among musical genres, classical music is the one with greatest efficiency at reducing arterial pressure; Brazilian authors of the study speculate whether music acts on the patients' parasympathetic system, increasing their capability of absorbing medication.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reversing brain injury in newborns and adultsResearchers at OHSU in Portland, Ore., have identified a new molecule within the brain's white matter that blocks the organ's ability to repair itself following injury. By preventing the production of this molecule, it is possible to create an effective pathway that allows the brain to continue its regenerative process. This may help to limit long-term physical and mental disability associated wit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Toyota to start deploying vehicle-to-vehicle tech in 2021Toyota says it will start equipping models with technology to talk to other vehicles starting in 2021, as it tries to push safety communications forward. The company says most of its U.S. models should have the feature by the mid-2020s.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Global warming is mixing up nature's dinner time, study saysGlobal warming is screwing up nature's intricately timed dinner hour, often making hungry critters and those on the menu show up at much different times, a new study shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Minor earthquakes rattle Silicon Valley, California farmlandTwo minor earthquakes a few minutes apart shook farmland in the southern San Joaquin Valley and wilderness east of Silicon Valley.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Marriage diversity' a must-have for rock bands to businessesThe rock n' roll lore says that once a bandmate gets married, the party's over for the group. But recently published Michigan State University research says that the blended mix of married and unmarried bandmates improves creativity, innovation and collaborative thinking (and, that the same goes for working professionals).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First an alga, then a squid, enigmatic fossil is actually a fishA fossil slab discovered in Kansas 70 years ago and twice misidentified—first as a green alga and then as a cephalopod—has been reinterpreted as the preserved remains of a large cartilaginous fish, the group that includes sharks and rays. In a study published in the Journal of Paleontology, American Museum of Natural History researchers describe the fishy characteristics of the animal, which lived
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new Bose-Einstein condensateResearchers have created a Bose-Einstein condensate of light coupled with metal electrons, so-called surface plasmon polaritons.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Is whole-brain radiation still best for brain metastases from small-cell lung cancer?A new study compares outcomes of 5,752 small-cell lung cancer patients who received whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) with those of 200 patients who received stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), finding that the median overall survival was actually longer with SRS (10.8 months with SRS versus 7.1 months with WBRT).
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Marriage diversity' a must-have for rock bands to businessesThe rock n' roll lore says that once a bandmate gets married, the party's over for the group. But recent research says that the blended mix of married and unmarried bandmates improves creativity, innovation and collaborative thinking (and, that the same goes for working professionals).
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Effects of climate change on communally managed water systems softened by shared effortShared fates and experiences in a community can help it withstand changes to water availability due to climate change, a recent study has found. The work paired a dynamic systems model of an acequia community and its water system with a hydrology model of an upland water source to study how the community responds to changes in water availability and flow.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Quantum shift shows itself in coupled light and matterA team led by Rice University scientists used a unique combination of techniques to observe, for the first time, a condensed matter phenomenon about which others have only speculated. The research could aid in the development of quantum computers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team develops face recognition technology that works in the darkArmy researchers have developed an artificial intelligence and machine learning technique that produces a visible face image from a thermal image of a person's face captured in low-light or nighttime conditions. This development could lead to enhanced real-time biometrics and post-mission forensic analysis for covert nighttime operations.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Logging in tropical forests jeopardizing drinking waterGlobally, remaining tropical forests are being rapidly cleared, particularly in countries like the Solomon Islands where commercial logging accounts for about 18 percent of government revenue, and at least 60 percent of exports while providing the largest number of formal sector jobs. However, the loss of native forests has huge ecological and social consequences, many of which are poorly document
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Delay for Nasa's Tess planet-hunterTESS NASA EarthThe launch of the Tess mission to find new worlds beyond our Solar System is delayed by 48 hours.
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Popular Science

Restaurants could save a lot of dough by letting sick employees stay homeScience A single outbreak of norovirus—or any foodborne illness—can cost quite a lot. Foodborne illness costs the U.S. more than $15 billion annually, according to USDA estimates—never mind the miserable nights spent groaning over the toilet. But how much…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

General aviation pilots struggle to interpret weather forecast and observation displaysWhen tested on their knowledge of 23 types of weather information, from icing forecasts and turbulence reports to radar, 204 general aviation (GA) pilots surveyed by Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University researchers were stumped by about 42% of the questions.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Motivation for using fake Instagram (Finsta) is not to reveal inappropriate selfAs Instagram is viewed as a place for building the ideal self, some users have created fake Instagram (Finsta) accounts to buck this trend. But are these "fake" accounts really there to express the real, sometimes ugly self, or is there a deeper motivation? A recent study by researchers at Pennsylvania State University, found that users align their real Instagram accounts (Rinsta) with their actua
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Warming planet led to peatland formationRising temperatures were a key driver of peatland formation after the last glacial maximum, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ear infections can lead to meningitis, brain abscess and other neurological complicationsWhile antibiotics have greatly reduced the dangers of ear infections, serious neurological complications, including hearing loss, facial paralysis, meningitis and brain abscess still occur.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two robots are better than one for NIST's 5G antenna measurement researchResearchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) continue to pioneer new antenna measurement methods, this time for future 5G wireless communications systems.
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Big Think

Seven reasons people no longer want to be teachersThe programs are long and intense, the creativity and relationships aspect of the vocation has been eroded, there is pervasive negativity in the media, and comparatively poor salary and working conditions. Read More
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Big Think

Launching early tonight: NASA’s TESS, designed to find livable planets nearbyTESS NASA EarthWatch it live! Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bike paths for everyone—except childrenWhile the network of bike paths spanning greater Montreal, Longueuil, and Laval more than doubled in size between 1991 and 2016, accessibility has not improved for children, according to a study by INRS researchers published in the Journal of Transport Geography.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Recycling hope for plastic-hungry enzymeScience created a 'wonder material' in plastic; now nature is helping to unmake it.
2h
Live Science

200 Million Eggs Recalled: How Does Salmonella Get into Eggs, Anyway?How do the bacteria get into eggs in the first place?
2h
The Atlantic

How Courts Are Neutralizing Trump's DeceptionsOn April 6, FBI agents raided the home, hotel room, and office of President Trump’s personal lawyer Michael Cohen. We now have a sense of the scope of their search: Investigators appear to have been seeking material relating to, among other things, the Access Hollywood tape , Cohen’s payments to two women who signed nondisclosure agreements regarding their alleged affairs with Trump, and communic
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Big Think

Elon Musk just secured $507 million in funding to pursue these 3 SpaceX projectsSpaceX Elon MuskSpaceX recently secured about $507 million in new funding. Based on recent statements, SpaceX will put that cash toward three ambitious projects. Read More
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Scientific American Content: Global

India Joins the Worldwide March for ScienceScientists across 50 cities took to the streets against funding cuts and government leaders’ anti-science rhetoric -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First an alga, then a squid, enigmatic fossil is actually a fishA fossil slab discovered in Kansas 70 years ago and twice misidentified -- first as a green alga and then as a cephalopod -- has been reinterpreted as the preserved remains of a large cartilaginous fish, the group that includes sharks and rays. In a study published in the Journal of Paleontology, American Museum of Natural History researchers describe the fishy characteristics of the animal, which
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In new anthology, experts look to future for managing dementia, mental healthA new supplement to the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society finds field leaders in dementia and mental health research weighing in on the science, public policy, and professional education and practice that will change our experience of aging.
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Feed: All Latest

TED 2018: Thought-Reading Machines and the Death of LoveA new holographic technology promises to replace expensive medical imaging. But it might also blur individual human identities.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Dogs lived and died with humans 10,000 years ago in the AmericasDogs unearthed at sites in Illinois were older than originally thought.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Basel researchers succeed in cultivating cartilage from stem cellsStable joint cartilage can be produced from adult stem cells originating from bone marrow. This is made possible by inducing specific molecular processes occurring during embryonic cartilage formation, as researchers from the University and University Hospital of Basel report in the scientific journal PNAS.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Children infected with malaria parasites produce odor more attractive to mosquitoesResearchers smell opportunity for new malaria test and control methods after odor study carried out with Kenyan children. Finding is a major step forward in malaria research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Engineering a plastic-eating enzymeScientists have engineered an enzyme which can digest some of our most commonly polluting plastics, providing a potential solution to one of the world's biggest environmental problems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Man-made antibodies show promise in attacking cancer cells in animal modelsUsing chemotherapy along with aptamers -- lab-made molecules that function like antibodies -- Duke Health researchers showed that they can zero in on and kill prostate cancer tumors in mice while leaving healthy tissue unscathed.
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The Atlantic

Travel Monday: A Photo Trip to Ethiopia's Danakil DepressionIn the Afar region of northern Ethiopia, lies a vast, tortured, desert plain called the Danakil Depression . Danakil lies about 410 ft (125 m) below sea level, and is one of the hottest and most inhospitable places on Earth— temperatures average 94 degrees Fahrenheit (34.5 Celsius) but have been recorded above 122 Fahrenheit (50 Celsius). Numerous sulfur springs, volcanoes, geysers, acidic pools,
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The Atlantic

The Shellfish GeneIn the late 1970s , scientists noticed that soft-shell clams from Maine were dying from a strange kind of leukemia. Large, cannonball-shaped cancer cells would fill their blood, turning it milky white, and eventually fatally clogging the mollusks’ organs. For almost 40 years, scientists struggled to work out what was causing the cancer. But once they noticed that the disease seemed to spread from
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Quantum shift shows itself in coupled light and matterResearchers observe and measure a Bloch-Siegert shift in strongly coupled light and matter in a vacuum. The project could aid in the development of quantum computers.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Logging in tropical forests jeopardizing drinking waterResearchers have found that increasing land clearing for logging in Solomon Islands -- even with best management strategies in place -- will lead to unsustainable levels of soil erosion and significant impacts to downstream water quality.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Face recognition technology that works in the darkResearchers have developed an artificial intelligence and machine learning technique that produces a visible face image from a thermal image of a person's face captured in low-light or nighttime conditions. This development could lead to enhanced real-time biometrics and post-mission forensic analysis for covert nighttime operations.
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News

How to watch NASA’s next exoplanet hunter launchNASA’s next exoplanet hunter, TESS, launches today to seek planets in 85 percent of the sky.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

General aviation pilots struggle to interpret weather forecast and observation displaysWhen tested on their knowledge of 23 types of weather information, from icing forecasts and turbulence reports to radar, 204 general aviation (GA) pilots surveyed by Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University researchers were stumped by about 42 percent of the questions. The findings, published in the April 2018 edition of the International Journal of Aerospace Psychology, are worrisome. Embry-Riddle's
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Warming planet led to peatland formationRising temperatures were a key driver of peatland formation after the last glacial maximum, according to new research.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineering a plastic-eating enzymeScientists have engineered an enzyme which can digest some of our most commonly polluting plastics, providing a potential solution to one of the world's biggest environmental problems.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When nuclei catch up with electronsIn an attosecond study of the H2 molecule physicists found that for light atomic nuclei -- as contained in most organic and biological molecules -- the correlation between electronic and nuclear motions cannot be ignored.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Three-fold higher risk of cancer after acute thrombosis in the legThe risk of developing cancer is more than three times higher during the first six months following blood clot in the leg, compared with the background population.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Potential cost savings for early detection and treatment of type 2 diabetesA large study showed that for individuals diagnosed with diabetes, screening is associated with a reduction in healthcare costs due to fewer admissions and doctor's visits and a reduction in prescribed medication.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Two robots are better than one: 5G antenna measurement researchResearchers continue to develop new antenna measurement methods, this time for future 5G wireless communications systems.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Delivery system considerations for inhaled medications undermined in patients with COPDResearchers from the American College of Chest Physicians conducted the Delivery Makes a Difference (DMaD) project to obtain a better understanding of health care provider and patient perspectives about the role of inhalation delivery devices in COPD.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is whole-brain radiation still best for brain metastases from small-cell lung cancer?University of Colorado Cancer Center study compares outcomes of 5,752 small-cell lung cancer patients who received whole-brain radiation therapy (WBRT) with those of 200 patients who received stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), finding that the median overall survival was actually longer with SRS (10.8 months with SRS versus 7.1 months with WBRT).
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new Bose-Einstein condensate created at Aalto UniversityResearchers at Aalto University, Finland are the first to create a Bose-Einstein condensate of light coupled with metal electrons, so-called surface plasmon polaritons.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

People with Type 2 diabetes who eat breakfast later, more likely to have a higher BMIBeing an 'evening person' is linked to higher body mass indices among people with Type 2 diabetes, and having breakfast later in the day seems to be what drives this association, according to a new paper in the journal Diabetic Medicine.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UCLA researchers use search engines, social media to predict syphilis trendsUCLA-led research finds that internet search terms and tweets related to sexual risk behaviors can predict when and where syphilis trends will occur.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Post-surgical opioids can, paradoxically, lead to chronic painGiving opioids to animals to quell pain after surgery prolongs pain for three weeks and primes specialized immune cells in the spinal cord to be more reactive to pain, according to a new study by the University of Colorado Boulder. The authors say the paradoxical findings could add a new wrinkle to the conversation about the national opioid epidemic.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bike paths for everyone -- except childrenWhile the network of bike paths spanning greater Montreal, Longueuil, and Laval more than doubled in size between 1991 and 2016, accessibility has not improved for children, according to a study by INRS researchers published in the Journal of Transport Geography.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Army develops face recognition technology that works in the darkArmy researchers have developed an artificial intelligence and machine learning technique that produces a visible face image from a thermal image of a person's face captured in low-light or nighttime conditions. This development could lead to enhanced real-time biometrics and post-mission forensic analysis for covert nighttime operations.
3h
Popular Science

If your genes put you at risk of heart disease, exercise might be able to helpHealth And every little bit counts. In a study out this week researchers analyzed data from nearly 500,000 people who were enrolled in a long term health study in the United Kingdom and found that exercise…
3h
Popular Science

Last week in tech: Kill some time before Facebook AI fixes everythingTechnology Download the latest podcast and catch up on everything tech you missed last week. Download the latest episode of our podcast!
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two robots are better than one for NIST's 5G antenna measurement researchResearchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) continue to pioneer new antenna measurement methods, this time for future 5G wireless communications systems.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Logging in tropical forests jeopardizing drinking waterA team of researchers from The University of Queensland (UQ), Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), and other groups have found that increasing land clearing for logging in Solomon Islands-even with best management strategies in place -- will lead to unsustainable levels of soil erosion and significant impacts to downstream water quality.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ear infections can lead to meningitis, brain abscess and other neurological complicationsWhile antibiotics have greatly reduced the dangers of ear infections, serious neurological complications, including hearing loss, facial paralysis, meningitis and brain abscess still occur, according to a report in the journal Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows potential cost savings for early detection and treatment of type 2 diabetesA large study from Aarhus University, Denmark, showed that for individuals diagnosed with diabetes, screening is associated with a reduction in healthcare costs due to fewer admissions and doctor's visits and a reduction in prescribed medication. These results have just been published in the scientific journal Diabetologia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trial reveals differences in pain-relieving drugs when combined with aspirinA landmark 2016 Cleveland Clinic study of widely used pain-relieving drugs showed that celecoxib (Celebrex) was associated with comparable cardiovascular safety and better gastrointestinal (GI) and kidney safety when compared with either naproxen (Naprosyn) and ibuprofen (Motrin). A new substudy analyzed outcomes in PRECISION based on the presence or absence of aspirin use with specific NSAIDs (no
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Drinking up to 3 cups of coffee per day may be safe, protectiveMany clinicians advise patients with atrial or ventricular arrhythmias to avoid caffeinated beverages, but recent research has shown that coffee and tea are safe and can reduce the frequency of arrhythmias, according to a review published today in JACC: Clinical Electrophysiology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women remain less likely to receive high-intensity statins following heart attackLess than half of women who filled a statin prescription following a heart attack received a high-intensity statin -- indicating they continue to be less likely than men to be prescribed this lifesaving treatment, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. The persistent gap in heart disease treatment between women and men continues despite similar e
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Women less likely than men to receive high-intensity statins following a heart attackWomen in the United States who have experienced heart attacks are less likely than men to receive the high-intensity statins recommended to prevent further heart attacks and strokes, new research by The George Institute for Global Health at the University of Oxford has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Job hunters drop ties with supportive colleaguesPeople considering quitting their jobs stop supporting current colleagues because they no longer feel they need to do favors for them, research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists uncover connection between post-natal sensory experiences and brain developmentNew research by neuroscientists sheds light on links between brain growth and sensations experienced by animals soon after birth. The researchers have identified a form of neural feedback in zebrafish that could link development of the body with that of the brain. The findings suggest mobility restrictions or insufficient sensory stimuli impact the production of new brain cells and brain developme
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Men willing to punish more than women to get aheadResearchers have measured gender differences in cooperation and punishment behavior. Results showed that men punish more than women, men obtain higher rank, and punishment by males decreases payoffs for both sexes. Furthermore, men are willing to punish people who have done nothing wrong, except cooperate to the fullest extent possible.
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Live Science

SpaceX Rocket Launching NASA's TESS Exoplanet Hunter Today: Watch LiveNASA's next exoplanet-hunting mission is scheduled to launch today (April 16) atop a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, and you can watch the action live.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Altered immune cells clear childhood brain tumor in miceIn mice, a fatal brainstem tumor was cleared by injecting it with engineered T cells that recognized the cancer and targeted it for destruction. The discovery is moving to human trials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Once upon a time, an exoplanet was discoveredIn recent history, a very important achievement was the discovery, in 1995, of 51 Pegasi b, the first extrasolar planet ever found around a normal star other than the Sun.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Effective school-based cavity prevention programSchool-based prevention programs can substantially reduce children's cavities -- but what type of treatment should be delivered in schools to best prevent tooth decay? A new study suggests that cavity prevention programs with a combination of prevention strategies may be more effective than one alone for reducing tooth decay.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Innate immune adaptor TRIF confers neuroprotection in ALSAmyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease damaging motor neurons in brain and spinal cords. ALS patients show progressive muscle weakness and atrophy, leading to a fatal respiratory muscle paralysis. There are no effective therapies for ALS.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Some superconductors can also carry currents of 'spin'Researchers have shown that certain superconductors -- materials that carry electrical current with zero resistance at very low temperatures -- can also carry currents of 'spin'. The successful combination of superconductivity and spin could lead to a revolution in high-performance computing, by dramatically reducing energy consumption.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genetically altered broadly neutralizing antibodies protect monkeys from HIV-like virusTwo genetically modified broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) protected rhesus macaques from an HIV-like virus, report scientists. After introducing genetic mutations into two potent HIV bNAbs, researchers prepared intravenous infusions of two bNAbs. Single infusions of each modified bNAb protected monkeys against weekly exposures to simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) up to 37 weeks, co
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Mono' virus linked to 7 serious diseasesThe Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) -- best known for causing mononucleosis -- also increases the risks for some people of developing seven other major diseases, according to a new study. The diseases are: systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and type 1 diabetes. Combined, these diseases affect n
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What's in a niche? Time to rethink microbial ecology, say researchersScientists are looking to rewrite the textbook on microbial ecology. When it comes to microbe species, they argue, niche is much more important than names. In microbial systems, hundreds of species can co-exist and perform the same biochemical functions in one setting, and switch functions in a different setting, explain scientists.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study identifies more than a hundred new genes that determine hair colorScientists have discovered 124 genes that play a major role in determining human hair color variation.
4h
Live Science

Can an Opioid Overdose Drug Help Stroke Patients Recover?The same medication used to save lives by reversing opioid overdoses may also benefit nonopioid users
4h
Quanta Magazine

Ultra-Accurate Clocks Lead Search for New Laws of PhysicsIn the late 1990s, Jun Ye , a young physicist at the research institute JILA in Boulder, Colorado, decided to dedicate much of his career to making the world’s best atomic clock. He spent some time getting to know different atoms — magnesium, calcium and barium. Eventually he settled on strontium for its internal stability. He then set to work building a laser that would tickle strontium atoms at
4h
The Atlantic

What Fresh Gel Is This?As I type these words, my nails are 10 small silver mirrors, reflecting the overhead fluorescent lights as I move my fingers across my keyboard. I learned about these so-called chrome nails from The Atlantic’s fashionable deputy web editor Swati Sharma, and shortly thereafter, she and I went and got manicures so I could see the process in action. The mirror effect was created with a special powde
4h
Live Science

Elon Musk Says SpaceX Will Try to Land a Rocket with a 'Giant Party Balloon'From anyone else, it would sound ridiculous: Elon Musk says SpaceX is going to try to land a rocket stage with … wait for it … a "giant party balloon."
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Grafted brain organoids provide insight into neurological disordersScientists improve the growth of three-dimensional brain models to better understand autism, dementia, schizophrenia.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers have placed an electron in a dual state -- neither freed nor bound -- thus confirming a hypothesis from the 1970sHalf a century ago, Walter Henneberger wondered if it was possible to free an electron from its atom, but still make it stay around the nucleus. Scientists considered it was impossible. For the first time, physicists have managed to control the shape of the laser pulse to keep an electron both free and bound to its nucleus, and were at the same time able to regulate the electronic structure of thi
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antimicrobial therapy can prevent sepsis in pneumonia patientsResearch sheds light on initial phase of infectious disease and potential for prevention of pneumococcal septicaemia.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Enigmatic gene critical for a healthy brainScientists have identified a non-coding RNA, called Paupar, influences how healthy brains develop during early life. They have shown that Paupar orchestrates proteins that control neurodevelopment.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New algorithm could add life to bridgesA new algorithm developed by the University of Surrey could help structural engineers better monitor the health of bridges and alert them to when they need repair faster.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists uncover how to stop cyber intrusionsResearchers have found a proverbial smoking gun signature of the long sought-after Majorana particle, and the find, they say, could block intruders on sensitive communication networks.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate change mitigation project threatens local ecosystem resilience in EthiopiaTo increase forest cover in the Global South in order to mitigate climate change does not always have positive effects, as shown in a new study in southern Ethiopia. It can also threaten biodiversity and the survival of unique alpine plants.
4h
New on MIT Technology Review

Tesla says its factory is safer—but it left injuries off the booksTesla Safety InjuriesUndercounting injuries is a symptom of a larger problem: Tesla has put electric car manufacturing above safety concerns, former safety experts say.
4h
cognitive science

Scientists Discover Hidden Structure of Enigmatic 'Backwards' Neural Networkssubmitted by /u/NaiveSkeptic [link] [comments]
4h
New Scientist - News

Watch a swarm of underwater drones hunt and surround a boatDozens of underwater SwarmDiver drones can autonomously explore an area or encircle an object. To launch them they are just thrown into the sea
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

We think we're the first advanced earthlings -- but how do we really know?Imagine if, many millions of years ago, dinosaurs drove cars through cities of mile-high buildings. A preposterous idea, right? In a compelling thought experiment, scientists wonder how we would truly know if there were a past civilization so advanced that it left little or no trace of its impact on the planet.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Course set to overcome mismatch between lab-designed nanomaterials and nature's complexityAdvances in nanotechnology have made it possible to control the size, shape, composition, elasticity and chemical properties of laboratory-made nanomaterials. Yet many of these materials do not to function as expected in the body. In new research, the team homes in on biomembranes -- the gatekeeping bilipid-layers and proteins surrounding cells. They explore the barriers a synthetic nanomaterial m
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Two is better than one to improve brain function in Alzheimer's disease mouse modelUsing two complementary approaches to reduce the deposits of amyloid-beta in the brain rather than either approach alone improved spatial navigation and memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists create technology that measures tumors' drug resistance up to 10 times fasterScientists have developed a new, high-speed microscopy platform that can measure a cancer cell's resistance to drugs up to 10 times faster than existing technology, potentially informing more effective treatment selection for cancer patients.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An astrophysicist is unlocking the secrets to dark matterNew research examines an interesting light source that was captured by four different telescopes each pointing in a different direction in the sky.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Feminine hygiene products and infection: Concerning connectionNinety-five percent of Canadian women have used vaginal hygiene products and a new study shows that these products might be doing more harm than good.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Are the media all 'doom and gloom'? Not when it comes to coverage of our oceansThe news media are often accused by adopting a 'doom and gloom' tone, especially when it comes to coverage of the environment. However, a new study on how journalists report on the state of our oceans shows that view may be misguided.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How does one prepare for adverse weather events? Depends on your past experiencesWith much of the central plains and Midwest now entering peak tornado season, the impact of these potentially devastating weather events will be shaped in large part by how individuals think about and prepare for them. A new study shows that people's past experiences with tornadoes inform how they approach this type of extreme weather in the future, including their perception of the risk.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Motivation for using fake Instagram (Finsta) is not to reveal inappropriate selfAs Instagram is viewed as a place for building the ideal self, some users have created fake Instagram (Finsta) accounts to buck this trend. But are these 'fake' accounts really there to express the real, sometimes ugly self, or is there a deeper motivation? A recent study by researchers at Pennsylvania State University, found that users align their real Instagram accounts (Rinsta) with their actua
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fermentation byproduct suppresses seizures in nerve agent poisoningA compound found in trace amounts in alcoholic beverages is more effective at combating seizures in rats exposed to an organophosphate nerve agent than the current recommended treatment, according to new research published in eNeuro.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Overdose antidote promotes stroke recovery in ratsThe life-saving drug used to treat opioid overdose, naloxone, reduces brain inflammation in the aftermath of stroke in male rats. The preclinical research, published in eNeuro, lays the groundwork for developing the first drug to promote recovery from a leading cause of adult disability.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early environment may shape axon pathfindingA new mechanism regulating the early development of connections between the two sides of the nervous system has been identified in a paper published in eNeuro. The work demonstrates that neuronal activity is required for this process, a finding that may provide new insight into brain connectivity disorders such as autism.
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Feed: All Latest

Mark Zuckerberg’s Hearings Were Facebook’s and Silicon Valley’s Ultimate DebutTo spectators, Mark Zuckerberg's appearance before Congress marked a crisis at Facebook. To tech's elite, it was a demonstration of how the Valley operates.
5h
Feed: All Latest

An Elaborate Hack Shows How Much Damage IoT Bugs Can DoRube-Goldbergesque IoT hacks are surprisingly simple to pull off—and can do a ton of damage.
5h
Live Science

Wormholes Could Cast Weird Shadows That Could Be Seen by TelescopesWormholes could leave a signature smooshed shadow that future telescopes could detect.
5h
Live Science

How a Football Field-Size Asteroid Caught Us by SurpriseEarth received a cosmic close shave on Sunday (April 15) when a football field-size boulder passed by at half the moon's distance from our planet.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Men willing to punish more than women to get aheadChapman University has published research measuring gender differences in cooperation and punishment behavior. Results showed that men punish more than women, men obtain higher rank, and punishment by males decreases payoffs for both sexes. Furthermore, men are willing to punish people who have done nothing wrong, except cooperate to the fullest extent possible.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

Trump Budget Cuts Could Cause Hundreds of Plant Extinctions in HawaiiThe “extinction capital of the world” could start losing unique plant species in as little as a month if funding disappears -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pancreatitis in minorities linked to triglycerides, gallstones, alcohol abusePancreatitis in ethnic minorities is linked to very high levels of triglycerides and the risk is further increased by alcohol abuse and gallstones, according to a study published in the journal Endocrine Practice.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Three-fold higher risk of cancer after acute thrombosis in the legThe risk of developing cancer is more than three times higher during the first six months following blood clot in the leg, compared with the background population. This is shown by a register-based study that medical doctor and Ph.D. Jens Sundbøll has recently published in the journal Circulation. Jens Sundbøll is employed at the Department of Clinical Epidemiology, which is part of the Department
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Marriage diversity' a must-have for rock bands to businessesThe rock n' roll lore says that once a bandmate gets married, the party's over for the group. But recently published Michigan State University research says that the blended mix of married and unmarried bandmates improves creativity, innovation and collaborative thinking (and, that the same goes for working professionals).
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Quantum shift shows itself in coupled light and matterResearchers observe and measure a Bloch-Siegert shift in strongly coupled light and matter in a vacuum. The Rice University-led project could aid in the development of quantum computers.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Effects of climate change on communally managed water systems softened by shared effortShared fates and experiences in a community can help it withstand changes to water availability due to climate change, a recent study by Sandia National Laboratories researchers found. The work, recently published in a special socio-hydrology issue of Water Resources Research, paired a dynamic systems model of an acequia community and its water system with a hydrology model of an upland water sour
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When nuclei catch up with electronsIn an attosecond study of the H2 molecule physicists at ETH Zurich found that for light atomic nuclei -- as contained in most organic and biological molecules -- the correlation between electronic and nuclear motions cannot be ignored.
5h
NYT > Science

NASA and SpaceX Delay Launch of TESS, a New Planet HunterEarth TESS NASAThe orbiting satellite will search for planets around nearby star systems, advancing the search for other signs of life in the Milky Way, but the launch was pushed back to Wednesday.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Course set to overcome mismatch between lab-designed nanomaterials and nature's complexityCells and the machinery they encase are soft matter—shape-shifting multicomponent systems with an overwhelming richness of forms. But, these squishy packages are hard targets for potential therapeutic and diagnostic applications that exploit nanomaterials, from quantum dots that light up specific tissues to nanocages carrying drug payloads.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

We think we're the first advanced earthlings—but how do we really know?Imagine if, many millions of years ago, dinosaurs drove cars through cities of mile-high buildings. A preposterous idea, right? Over the course of tens of millions of years, however, all of the direct evidence of a civilization—its artifacts and remains—gets ground to dust. How do we really know, then, that there weren't previous industrial civilizations on Earth that rose and fell long before hum
5h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Lasers squeezed iron to mimic the conditions of exoplanet coresIn the first experiment to measure what exoplanets might be like on the inside, scientists hit iron with 176 lasers at once.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Personal recollections of an astrophysicist shed new light on the 1995 discovery on 51 Pegasi bIn recent history, a very important achievement was the discovery, in 1995, of 51 Pegasi b, the first extrasolar planet ever found around a normal star other than the Sun.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Are millennials taking over the supply chain?The way you get a cup of coffee, cook a meal at home and even purchase clothing is changing.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Job hunters drop ties with supportive colleaguesPeople considering quitting their jobs stop supporting current colleagues because they no longer feel they need to do favours for them, research shows.
5h
cognitive science

A paper in JPSP with 25 studies looks at the age-old advice that to understand other people, you need to take their perspective.submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Men willing to punish more than women to get aheadChapman University has published research measuring gender differences in cooperation and punishment behavior. Results showed that men punish more than women, men obtain higher rank, and punishment by males decreases payoffs for both sexes. Furthermore, men are willing to punish people who have done nothing wrong, except cooperate to the fullest extent possible.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are millennials taking over the supply chain?The way you get a cup of coffee, cook a meal at home and even purchase clothing is changing. Each consumer wants something completely unique, which has disrupted the entire supply chain and created the 'experiential supply chain,' says Michigan State University research.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study examines accuracy of test for lymph node metastases in women with breast cancerA new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) study indicates that axillary ultrasound imaging is inferior for detecting axillary node metastasis in patients with breast cancer.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New disease model to facilitate development of ALS and MS therapiesResearchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed a new disease model for neurodegenerative diseases such as ALS and MS that can be used to develop new immunotherapies. The model is described in a publication in the scientific journal Nature Immunology.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Course set to overcome mismatch between lab-designed nanomaterials and nature's complexityAdvances in nanotechnology have made it possible to control the size, shape, composition, elasticity and chemical properties of laboratory-made nanomaterials. Yet many of these materials do not to function as expected in the body. In a recent issue of Biointerphases, the team homes in on biomembranes -- the gatekeeping bilipid-layers and proteins surrounding cells. They explore the barriers a synt
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

We think we're the first advanced earthlings -- but how do we really know?Imagine if, many millions of years ago, dinosaurs drove cars through cities of mile-high buildings. A preposterous idea, right? In a compelling thought experiment, professor of physics and astronomy Adam Frank and director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies Gavin Schmidt wonder how we would truly know if there were a past civilization so advanced that it left little or no trace of its
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How does one prepare for adverse weather events? Depends on your past experiencesWith much of the central plains and Midwest now entering peak tornado season, the impact of these potentially devastating weather events will be shaped in large part by how individuals think about and prepare for them. A new study published in Risk Analysis: An International Journal shows that people's past experiences with tornadoes inform how they approach this type of extreme weather in the fut
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Saving the bison: Polish bison off to help Spanish herd growSeven young female bison from Poland are being shipped off to help boost a herd in Spain and expand the population of Europe's largest animal, which is on the endangered species list.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Giving roots and shoots their space: The Advanced Plant HabitatThe Advanced Plant Habitat (APH), a recent addition to the International Space Station, is the largest growth chamber aboard the orbiting laboratory. Roughly the size of a mini-fridge, the habitat is designed to test which growth conditions plants prefer in space and provides specimens a larger root and shoot area. This space in turn will allow a wider variety of crops to grow aboard the station.
5h
Science | The Guardian

Scientists discover dozens of new genes for hair colourForensic scientists a step closer to predicting a suspect’s hair colour from crime scene DNA alone Forensic scientists are a step closer to predicting the colour of a suspect’s hair from their DNA alone after the discovery of more than 100 new genes that influence the shade of a person’s locks. A test based on the new genetic markers was 10-20% more accurate than existing forensic tests and was m
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Are the media all 'doom and gloom'? Not when it comes to coverage of our oceansThe news media are often accused by adopting a "doom and gloom" tone, especially when it comes to coverage of the environment. However, a new study on how journalists report on the state of our oceans shows that view may be misguided.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is it time to abandon the Nobel Prize?In a commentary piece published in De Gruyter's journal Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, authors Clare Fiala and Eleftherios P. Diamandis spawned a debate now further nourished by recent disclosures.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can FraudBuster help insurers use big data to combat fraud?FraudBuster is a new data-driven approach designed to help insurers in high fraud rate markets, such as the automobile insurance market, proactively identify risk and reduce fraud. The unique design and deployment of FraudBuster is described in an article in Big Data.
6h
Live Science

As World Warms, America's Invisible 'Climate Curtain' Creeps EastA climate boundary divides the U.S. — and it's on the move.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Screenings miss half of diabetic, prediabetic patientsScreening patients for diabetes based solely on their age and weight -- a recommendation from a leading medical expert group -- could miss more than half of high-risk patients, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study of a nationwide sample. These limited screening criteria also missed more racial and ethnic minorities, most notably Asians.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists uncover connection between post-natal sensory experiences and brain developmentNew research by University of Toronto neuroscientists sheds light on links between brain growth and sensations experienced by animals soon after birth. The researchers have identified a form of neural feedback in zebrafish that could link development of the body with that of the brain. The findings suggest mobility restrictions or insufficient sensory stimuli impact the production of new brain cel
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NYU Dentistry study identifies effective school-based cavity prevention programSchool-based prevention programs can substantially reduce children's cavities -- but what type of treatment should be delivered in schools to best prevent tooth decay? A new study by researchers at NYU College of Dentistry, published in the journal BMC Oral Health, suggests that cavity prevention programs with a combination of prevention strategies may be more effective than one alone for reducing
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Once upon a time, an exoplanet was discoveredIn recent history, a very important achievement was the discovery, in 1995, of 51 Pegasi b, the first extrasolar planet ever found around a normal star other than the sun. In a paper published in EPJ H, Davide Cenadelli from the Aosta Valley Astronomical Observatory (Italy) interviews Michel Mayor from Geneva Observatory (Switzerland) about his personal recollections of discovering this exoplanet.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Altered immune cells clear childhood brain tumor in miceIn mice, a fatal brainstem tumor was cleared by injecting it with engineered T cells that recognized the cancer and targeted it for destruction. The Stanford discovery is moving to human trials.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

AACR: How do melanoma cells survive drug treatment long enough to acquire drug resistance?'What we find is that dabrafenib, even at high doses, does not fully turn off the MAPK pathway, thereby enabling eventual escape from drug,' says Sabrina Spencer, Ph.D.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When prostate cancer reaches bone, bone cells may drive overall growth of the diseaseWhen prostate cancer metastasizes to bone, it can become especially dangerous. A CU study at AACR18 hints at why: cells involved in these bone metastases may release signals that drive the progression of the disease.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Beyond PD-L1: Taking away TIM3 and Tregs stops cancer regrowth after immunotherapyCU Cancer Center study presented at AACR18 shows that TIM3 and/or increased regulatory T cells (Tregs) within a tumor may help cancers inactivate immune system killer T cells that would otherwise identify and attack the cancer.
6h
Big Think

What 'kakistocracy' means, and who were the most kakistocratic in historyKakistocracy is rule by the worst, but who are the worst? A better question, how do we know? Read More
6h
Big Think

Is human civilization Earth’s first?Earth is old enough to have been home to other industrialized civilizations so far back in the past we have no idea they were there. What we’ll leave behind may offer clues of what we could look for as evidence. Read More
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unlocking the secrets to dark matterUniversity of Miami astrophysicist Nico Cappelluti studies the sky. An assistant professor in the Physics Department, Cappelluti is intrigued by the cosmic phenomena of super massive black holes, the nature of dark matter, and active galactic nuclei, which is the very bright light source found at the center of many galaxies.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How machine learning helped develop a new algorithm that could add life to bridgesA new algorithm developed by the University of Surrey could help structural engineers better monitor the health of bridges and alert them to when they need repair faster.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists uncover how to stop cyber intrusionsU.S. Army-funded researchers at the University of California in Los Angles have found a proverbial smoking gun signature of the long sought-after Majorana particle, and the find, they say, could block intruders on sensitive communication networks.
6h
The Atlantic

Trump’s Greatest FearIt’s always been the business that worried Donald Trump. This was true during the presidential campaign, it was true during the transition, and it remains true now. The president continues to waffle over what to do about Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s probe—fire Mueller? Fire Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein?—but for the moment, he seems content with bluster. As federal prosecutors in New
6h
Science : NPR

Grocery Stores Get Mostly Mediocre Scores On Their Food Waste EffortsA new report, "Supermarkets Fail to Make the Grade in Reducing Food Waste," scores the 10 largest grocery stores on how they handle food waste. No store got an A, but Walmart got a B. (Image credit: paul mansfield photography/Getty Images)
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How does one prepare for adverse weather events? Depends on your past experiencesWith much of the central plains and Midwest now entering peak tornado season, the impact of these potentially devastating weather events will be shaped in large part by how individuals think about and prepare for them. A new study published in Risk Analysis: An International Journal shows that people's past experiences with tornadoes inform how they approach this type of extreme weather in the fut
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are the media all 'doom and gloom'? Not when it comes to coverage of our oceansThe news media are often accused by adopting a 'doom and gloom' tone, especially when it comes to coverage of the environment. However, a new study on how journalists report on the state of our oceans shows that view may be misguided.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

U of G study finds concerning connection between feminine hygiene products and infectionNinety-five percent of Canadian women have used vaginal hygiene products and a new study shows that these products might be doing more harm than good.
6h
The Scientist RSS

Human Brain Organoids Thrive in Mouse BrainsAfter implantation, the tissue developed blood vessels and became integrated into neuronal networks in the animals' brains.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists create technology that measures tumors' drug resistance up to 10 times fasterA group of scientists from VCU Massey Cancer Center and UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center have developed a new, high-speed microscopy platform that can measure a cancer cell's resistance to drugs up to 10 times faster than existing technology, potentially informing more effective treatment selection for cancer patients. The technology is being presented in abstract form today at the America
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two is better than one to improve brain function in Alzheimer's disease mouse modelUsing two complementary approaches to reduce the deposits of amyloid-beta in the brain rather than either approach alone improved spatial navigation and memory in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Proving what can't be seenNew research published in The Astrophysical Journal examines an interesting light source that was captured by four different telescopes each pointing in a different direction in the sky.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can FraudBuster help insurers use big data to combat fraud?FraudBuster is a new data-driven approach designed to help insurers in high fraud rate markets, such as the automobile insurance market, proactively identify risk and reduce fraud.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change mitigation project threatens local ecosystem resilience in EthiopiaTo increase forest cover in the Global South in order to mitigate climate change does not always have positive effects, as shown in a new study undertaken by Stockholm University in southern Ethiopia. It can also threaten biodiversity and the survival of unique alpine plants.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Timing is everything: Researchers describe genetic clockwork in germ cell developmentThe nematode C. elegans is truly an organizational talent: The tiny animals live for only two to three weeks, with sexual maturity lasting only four days. They still manage to generate over 300 offspring during this period. For this ambitious development program to function optimally, a large number of processes must be synchronized within their cells. Geneticists have deciphered a central signall
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dinosaurs ended -- and originated -- with a bang!It is commonly understood that the dinosaurs disappeared with a bang -- wiped out by a great meteorite impact on the Earth 66 million years ago. But their origins have been less understood. In a new study, scientists show that the key expansion of dinosaurs was also triggered by a crisis -- a mass extinction that happened 232 million years ago.
6h
The Atlantic

When Einstein Warned the WorldIn November of 1947, Albert Einstein offered the United States and the international community advice on how to coexist under the looming threat of nuclear war. An excerpt from his article in The Atlantic , “Atomic War or Peace,” has been animated in the video above. Today, as the Trump administration appears to be considering nuclear war with North Korea , Einstein’s words resonate once again. I
6h
Futurity.org

This program would ease the pain of doing your taxesJoseph Bankman doesn’t think taxes need to be so painful and anxiety provoking. In fact, he knows the US can introduce a much easier and more straightforward process for paying taxes because he’s already done it. In 2005, Bankman worked with the State of California to create ReadyReturn—a pilot study with a completed tax return prepared by the state (not an individual or tax professional) that wa
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

Ebola Vaccine Appears to Provide Long-Lasting ProtectionResearchers are now optimistic about combating the virus with this inoculation -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
New on MIT Technology Review

Now it’s time for Facebook to think about Europe, too
7h
New Scientist - News

Dear IRS, why can’t we have a simpler way to do our taxes?Pre-filled tax returns in the US could save us a headache and reduce the grip of commercial software that benefits from a complex system, says David Auerbach
7h
Popular Science

People who need self-care the most aren’t getting it. Just ask a trucker.Health Wellness is for everyone. The app Rolling Strong is just one of several efforts to bring self-care and wellness practices to everyone. But there are some obstacles in the way.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Better education during childhood decreases risk of dementia in African-AmericansA newly published observational study from the Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University has found that increased levels of education, particularly for those who grew up in low-income rural areas, was significantly associated with the decrease in the risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease in older African-Americans previously reported by the same research group.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Americans with a college education live longer without dementia and Alzheimer'sThe prevention of chronic diseases associated with increased risk of dementia will not reduce the number of Americans with dementia in the coming decades, but developing a treatment that delays onset will significantly reduce the burden of dementia.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Army scientists uncover how to stop cyber intrusionsUS Army-funded researchers at the University of California in Los Angles have found a proverbial smoking gun signature of the long sought-after Majorana particle, and the find, they say, could block intruders on sensitive communication networks.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is it time to abandon the Nobel Prize?In a commentary piece published in De Gruyter's journal Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, authors Clare Fiala and Eleftherios P. Diamandis spawned a debate now further nourished by recent disclosures.Fiala and Diamandis argue that it is time to abandon the Nobel Prize in favor of alternative recognitions which encompass the collaborative nature of modern science.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How machine learning helped Surrey develop a new algorithm that could add life to bridgesA new algorithm developed by the University of Surrey could help structural engineers better monitor the health of bridges and alert them to when they need repair faster.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In animal studies, stimulating a brain pathway reduces depressive behaviorNeurobiology researchers have identified a pathway in brain circuitry that, when stimulated, leads to 'antidepressive' behavior in animals. If such brain stimulation proves to have similar effects in people, it may eventually lead to a novel treatment for depression.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A higher-energy, safer and longer-lasting zinc batteryAgain establishing the University of Maryland (UMD) as a leader in the development of groundbreaking battery technology, a team led by researchers at UMD's A. James Clark School of Engineering has created a water-based zinc battery that is simultaneously powerful, rechargeable, and intrinsically safe. A peer-reviewed paper based on the research was published April 16 in the high-impact journal Nat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIH scientists watch the brain's lining heal after a head injuryFollowing head injury, the brain's protective lining may get a little help from its friends. Scientists from the National Institutes of Health watched in real-time as different immune cells took on carefully timed jobs to fix the damaged lining of the brain in mice. These results may help provide clues to how the meninges in humans may heal following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and why addi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antimicrobial therapy can prevent sepsis in pneumonia patientsResearch sheds light on initial phase of infectious disease and potential for prevention of pneumococcal septicaemia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Freeing electrons to better trap themHalf a century ago, Walter Henneberger wondered if it was possible to free an electron from its atom, but still make it stay around the nucleus. Scientists considered it was impossible. For the first time, physicists from UNIGE and MBI managed to control the shape of the laser pulse to keep an electron both free and bound to its nucleus, and were at the same time able to regulate the electronic st
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New blood pressure guidelines could put lives at risk, say expertsA new report in JAMA Internal Medicine by University of Sydney and Bond University scholars weighs the risks and benefits of a recent change to blood pressure guidelines in the US.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Grafted brain organoids provide insight into neurological disordersSalk scientists improve the growth of three-dimensional brain models to better understand autism, dementia, schizophrenia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Randomized clinical trial examines therapies for chronic spinal painIn a randomized clinical trial of patients with chronic spinal pain, a program that combined education to help patients think differently about pain with an exercise program that increasingly introduced movements patients feared or avoided (pain neuroscience education plus cognition-targeted motor control training) appeared better than usual care (combining education on back and neck pain and gene
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Self-regulation in children, adolescentsA wide-range of programs to help children and adolescents with self-regulation appear to be effective.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is smartphone app associated with medication adherence, blood pressure control?Among patients with poorly controlled high blood pressure, those who used a smartphone application had a small improvement in self-reported medication adherence but no change in systolic blood pressure.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Thin film converts heat from electronics into energyEngineers at the University of California, Berkeley, have developed a thin-film system that can be applied to sources of waste heat to produce energy at levels unprecedented for this kind of technology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists discover hidden structure of enigmatic 'backwards' neural connectionsThe long-standing mystery of the organisation of 'backwards' connections in the visual system has been solved. Scientists in Lisbon, Portugal, discovered that they tell the brain where not to look.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What's in a niche? Time to rethink microbial ecology, say researchersScientists in Canada, the United States and Europe are looking to rewrite the textbook on microbial ecology. When it comes to microbe species, they argue, niche is much more important than names. In microbial systems, hundreds of species can co-exist and perform the same biochemical functions in one setting, and switch functions in a different setting, explains University of British Columbia scien
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study identifies more than a hundred new genes that determine hair colorA team of scientists, led by academics from King's College London and Erasmus MC University Medical Center Rotterdam, have discovered 124 genes that play a major role in determining human hair color variation.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Mono' virus linked to 7 serious diseasesThe Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) -- best known for causing mononucleosis -- also increases the risks for some people of developing seven other major diseases, according to a study in Nature Genetics. The diseases are: systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, and type 1 diabetes. Combined, these di
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Epstein-Barr virus protein can 'switch on' risk genes for autoimmune diseasesInfection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), the cause of infectious mononucleosis, has been associated with subsequent development of systemic lupus erythematosus and other chronic autoimmune illnesses, but the mechanisms behind this association were unclear. Now, a novel computational method shows that a viral protein found in EBV-infected human cells may activate genes associated with increased ris
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetically altered broadly neutralizing antibodies protect monkeys from HIV-like virusTwo genetically modified broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) protected rhesus macaques from an HIV-like virus, report scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). After introducing genetic mutations into two potent HIV bNAbs, researchers prepared intravenous infusions of two bNAbs. Single infusions of each modified bNAb protected monkeys against weekly expos
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Some superconductors can also carry currents of 'spin'Researchers have shown that certain superconductors -- materials that carry electrical current with zero resistance at very low temperatures -- can also carry currents of 'spin'. The successful combination of superconductivity and spin could lead to a revolution in high-performance computing, by dramatically reducing energy consumption.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Run faster, learn betterLearning and performance can be enhanced by locomotor activity in mice, concludes a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Virtual contact lenses for radar satellitesRadar satellites supply the data used to map sea level and ocean currents. However, up until now the radar's 'eyes' have been blind where the oceans are covered by ice. Researchers have now developed a new analysis method to solve this problem.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

BESSY II sheds light on how the internal compass is constructed in magnetotactic bacteriaBacteria exist in many shapes and with very different talents. Magnetotactic bacteria can even sense the earth's magnetic field by making use of magnetic nanoparticles in their interior that act as an internal compass. Experts have now examined the magnetic compass of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense at BESSY II. Their results may be helpful in designing actuation devices for nanorobots and nanose
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Moss capable of removing arsenic from drinking water discoveredA moss capable of removing arsenic from contaminated water has been discovered. And it happens quickly -- in just one hour, the arsenic level is so low that the water is no longer harmful for people to drink.
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Feed: All Latest

Meet the Illustrator Behind WIRED’s New Staff PortraitsThe black-and-white portraits capturing more than 100 WIRED staff members in profile were created by New York–based artist Simone Noronha.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Grafted brain organoids provide insight into neurological disordersMany neurological disorders—Alzheimer's, schizophrenia, autism, even depression—have lagged behind in new therapies. Because the brain is so complex, it can be difficult to discover new drugs and even when a drug is promising in animal models, it often doesn't work for humans.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Are we alone? NASA's new planet hunter aims to find outTESS NASA EarthAre we alone? NASA's new planet-hunting mission, poised to launch Monday, aims to advance the search for extraterrestrial life by scanning the skies for nearby, Earth-like planets.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What's in a niche? Time to rethink microbial ecology, say researchersScientists in Canada, the United States and Europe are looking to rewrite the textbook on microbial ecology, advocating a new approach to studying the most abundant form of life on Earth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

For the first time, researchers place an electron in a dual state—neither freed nor boundAtoms are composed of electrons moving around a central nucleus to which they are bound. The electrons can also be torn away via the powerful electric field of a laser, overcoming the confining force of their nucleus. A half-century ago, the theorist Walter Henneberger wondered if it were possible to use a laser field to free an electron from its atom without removing it from the nucleus. Many sci
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Some superconductors can also carry currents of 'spin'Researchers have shown that certain superconductors—materials that carry electrical current with zero resistance at very low temperatures—can also carry currents of 'spin'. The successful combination of superconductivity and spin could lead to a revolution in high-performance computing, by dramatically reducing energy consumption.
7h
Big Think

Chilling maps of lynchings in 1930s AmericaThese sober maps have a chilling topic: the prevalence of lynchings throughout the U.S. from 1930 to 1938. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Enigmatic gene critical for a healthy brain show University of Bath scientistsScientists from the universities of Bath, Oxford and Edinburgh have identified a non-coding RNA, called Paupar, influences how healthy brains develop during early life. They have shown that Paupar orchestrates proteins that control neurodevelopment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Job hunters drop ties with supportive colleaguesPeople considering quitting their jobs stop supporting current colleagues because they no longer feel they need to do favors for them, research shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hope for new treatment of severe epilepsyResearchers at Lund University in Sweden believe they have found a method that in the future could help people suffering from epilepsy so severe that all current treatment is ineffective.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lack of sleep leads to obesity in children and adolescentsChildren who get less than the recommended amount of sleep for their age are at a higher risk of developing obesity.Research at the University of Warwick has found that children and adolescents who regularly sleep less than others of the same age gain more weight when they grow older and are more likely to become overweight or obese.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Articles provide updated guidance to authors submitting to the British Journal of PharmacologyNew editorials published in the British Journal of Pharmacology provide guidance for authors of papers submitted to the journal, with guidance on how to design and conduct experiments as well as what key information should be provided in methodology and presentation of data.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Timing is everything: Researchers describe genetic clockwork in germ cell developmentThe nematode C. elegans is truly an organizational talent: The tiny animals live for only two to three weeks, with sexual maturity lasting only four days. They still manage to generate over 300 offspring during this period. For this ambitious development program to function optimally, a large number of processes must be synchronized within their cells. Geneticists at Martin Luther University Halle
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

BESSY II sheds light on how the internal compass is constructed in magnetotactic bacteriaBacteria exist in many shapes and with very different talents. Magnetotactic bacteria can even sense the earth's magnetic field by making use of magnetic nanoparticles in their interior that act as an internal compass. Spanish teams and experts at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin have now examined the magnetic compass of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense at BESSY II. Their results may be helpful in designi
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Virtual contact lenses for radar satellitesRadar satellites supply the data used to map sea level and ocean currents. However, up until now the radar's 'eyes' have been blind where the oceans are covered by ice. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now developed a new analysis method to solve this problem.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study discovers cancer-relevant protein shieldResearchers from the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Protein Research have uncovered a new protein shield that aids in repairing damaged DNA in cells and affects resistance to drugs used for breast cancer treatment. The new study has just been published in the internationally acclaimed scientific journal Cell.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dinosaurs ended -- and originated -- with a bang!It is commonly understood that the dinosaurs disappeared with a bang -- wiped out by a great meteorite impact on the Earth 66 million years ago. But their origins have been less understood. In a new study, scientists from MUSE -- Museum of Science, Trento, Italy, universities of Ferrara and Padova, Italy and the University of Bristol show that the key expansion of dinosaurs was also triggered by a
7h
The Atlantic

What's at Stake in Cannes's Battle With NetflixNetflix Content GrowthThe ongoing publicity battle between one of cinema’s hoariest institutions (the Cannes Film Festival) and its loudest new “disruptor” (Netflix) is a standoff where it’s tough to really sympathize with either side. Last year, after some internal uproar over the presence of Netflix’s Okja and The Meyerowitz Stories (New and Selected) at Cannes, the festival announced it would require all competitio
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cholesterol leash: Key tethering protein found to transport cellular cholesterolCholesterol is an essential component of living organisms, but the mechanisms that transport cholesterol inside the cell are poorly understood. Researchers have identified RELCH, a tethering protein that is essential for non-vesicular transport of cholesterol. The findings may lead to new discovery pathways for the treatment of cholesterol-related metabolic disorders.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

50x more stable adsorbent createdA research team developed a technology to increase the stability of amine-containing adsorbents by fifty times, moving one step further toward commercializing stable adsorbents that last longer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Formidable duo: Protective effect of CD9 and CD81 in COPD and accelerated agingChronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a disease of accelerated lung aging, but the mechanism remains unclear. Researchers studied the aging-like phenotype and its underlying mechanisms in a COPD mouse model. Double deletion of tetraspanins CD9 and CD81 in epithelial cells downregulated expression of the protein SIRT. As SIRT1 is a key molecule that protects against various lifestyle-rela
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Education, not income, the best predictor of a long lifeRising income and the subsequent improved standards of living have long been thought to be the most important factors contributing to a long and healthy life. However, new research has shown that instead, the level of education a person has is a much better predictor of life expectancy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Raw fruit and vegetables provide better mental health outcomesResearchers have discovered raw fruit and vegetables may be better for your mental health than cooked, canned and processed fruit and vegetables.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chemical sleuthing leads to detection of little-known flame retardant in the environmentChemists have published research findings on their discovery of a new and relatively unknown flame retardant in the environment. Their study is the first to detect the potentially toxic chemical in North America.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Maternal metabolic factors and early-onset pubertyIn a study of more than 15,000 girls and their mothers maternal overweight and hyperglycemia were linked to the earlier onset of puberty in girls 6 to 11 years old. Early puberty has been linked to multiple adverse health developments as girls grow up.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A foodborne illness outbreak could cost a restaurant millions, study suggestsA single foodborne outbreak could cost a restaurant millions of dollars in lost revenue, fines, lawsuits, legal fees, insurance premium increases, inspection costs and staff retraining, a new study suggests.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

What's missing in the global debate over refugees | Yasin KakandeIn the ongoing debate over refugees, we hear from everyone -- from politicians who pledge border controls to citizens who fear they'll lose their jobs -- everyone, that is, except migrants themselves. Why are they coming? Journalist and TED Fellow Yasin Kakande explains what compelled him and many others to flee their homelands, urging a more open discussion and a new perspective. Because humanity
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Singapore proposes allowing Airbnb-type rentals, with tough conditionsSingapore on Monday proposed allowing private home owners to rent out their property for short-term stays but with stringent conditions, a move welcomed by home-sharing giant Airbnb.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lufthansa'a Alitalia bid the 'most promising': MinisterLufthansa emerged as the number one candidate to take over Alitalia on Monday after an Italian government minister called the German airline's bid the "most promising".
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Archaeologists find silver treasure on German Baltic islandHundreds of 1,000-year-old silver coins, rings, pearls and bracelets linked to the era of Danish King Harald Gormsson have been found on the eastern German island of Ruegen in the Baltic Sea.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Russian begins blocking messaging app TelegramRussia's communications watchdog said Monday it has begun enforcing a nationwide ban for the popular messaging app Telegram.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New robot for skull base surgery is very accurate, alleviates surgeon's workloadDrilling out a hole in the skull base has to be done with great precision and often takes many hours. It is an intervention that requires the maximum from a surgeon. Researchers from TU/e have therefore developed a surgery robot to take over this task. With sub-millimeter precision, the robot can automatically and safely mill a cavity of the desired shape and dimensions. Jordan Bos will receive hi
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Futurity.org

Clay specks turn stem cells into bone and cartilageA new class of clay nanoparticles can direct stem cells to become bone or cartilage cells, report researchers. Human stem cells have shown potential in medicine as they can transform into various specialized cell types such as bone and cartilage cells. These nanoparticles are shaped like flaxseeds, but are 10,000,000,000X smaller. The current approach to obtain such specialized cells is involves
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Moss capable of removing arsenic from drinking water discoveredA moss capable of removing arsenic from contaminated water has been discovered by researchers from Stockholm University. And it happens quickly -- in just one hour, the arsenic level is so low that the water is no longer harmful for people to drink. The study has been published in the journal Environmental Pollution.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cholesterol leash: Key tethering protein found to transport cellular cholesterolCholesterol is an essential component of living organisms, but the mechanisms that transport cholesterol inside the cell are poorly understood. Researchers at Osaka University identified RELCH, a tethering protein that is essential for non-vesicular transport of cholesterol. The findings may lead to new discovery pathways for the treatment of cholesterol-related metabolic disorders.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Formidable duo: Protective effect of CD9 and CD81 in COPD and accelerated agingChronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a disease of accelerated lung aging, but the mechanism remains unclear. Osaka University-centered researchers studied the aging-like phenotype and its underlying mechanisms in a COPD mouse model. Double deletion of tetraspanins CD9 and CD81 in epithelial cells downregulated expression of the protein SIRT. As SIRT1 is a key molecule that protects agai
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Education, not income, the best predictor of a long lifeRising income and the subsequent improved standards of living have long been thought to be the most important factors contributing to a long and healthy life. However, new research from Wolfgang Lutz and Endale Kebede, from IIASA and the Vienna University of Economics and Business (WU) has shown that instead, the level of education a person has is a much better predictor of life expectancy.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How our senses connect with the stress systemEpigenetic programming following early life stress likely results from a dual-activation of the stress system and the sensory systems. Further research is warranted.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Combination therapy doubles survival in metastatic lung cancerThe immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab, combined with chemotherapy, doubles survival in patients with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSNSCLC) lacking genetic changes in the EGFR or ALK genes, when compared to chemotherapy alone, according to an international, Phase III clinical trial.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Drug reduces size of some lung cancer tumors, relapse rate after surgeryA drug given to early stage lung cancer patients before they undergo surgery showed major tumor responses in the removed tumor and an increase in anti-tumor T-cells that remained after the tumor was removed, which resulted in fewer relapse cases in the patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More prehospital deaths may mean increased intensity in violenceA new analysis of national trauma data shows that trauma patients were four times more likely to die from gunshot wounds and nearly nine times more likely to die from stab wounds before getting to a trauma center in 2014, compared with rates in 2007.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Should states support pregnant teens and their babies?The majority of US adults with children agree that state support for pregnant teens is a good investment but want to see teens meet certain criteria -- including taking parenting classes -- before receiving assistance.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Structure of a protein complex related with cell survival revealedScientists have determined for the first time the high-resolution structure of a complex (R2TP) involved in key processes for cell survival and in diseases such as cancer. This achievement has been made possible by using high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fast-acting benefits of ketamine for depression and suicidalityA nasal spray formulation of ketamine shows promise in the rapid treatment of symptoms of major depression and suicidal thoughts, according to a new study. The double-blind study compared the standard treatment plus an intranasal formulation of esketamine, part of the ketamine molecule, to standard treatment plus a placebo for rapid treatment of symptoms of major depression, including suicidality,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new hope: One of North America's rarest bees has its known range greatly expandedThe Macropis cuckoo bee is one of the rarest bees in North America, partly because of its specialized ecological associations. It is a nest parasite of oil-collecting bees of the genus Macropis which, in turn, are dependent on oil-producing flowers of the genus Lysimachia. However, new data greatly expands the known range of the cuckoo, and has implications for its conservation status.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research predicts which trees are at greatest risk of beetle invasionPitch pine forests are at greater risk of attack from the southern pine beetle than forests with a mix of tree species, according to research from Dartmouth College. The study shows that the composition of forests is more important than other factors when predicting where the destructive pest will strike next.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How memes use humor to discredit African-American EnglishInternet memes can be entertaining, but a recent exploratory study finds that video memes can also use humor to contribute to – and reinforce – negative views of black culture.
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Futurity.org

The planet-hunter telescope TESS launches todayTESS NASA EarthPlanet hunters have a new tool in their quest for planets like Earth: a space telescope called TESS, set to launch from Cape Canaveral today . Over the course of its two-year mission, TESS (Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite) will scan almost the entire sky, using four cameras to snap images of more than 200,000 stars. Astronomers anticipate that it will discover dozens of Earth-size planets.
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Scientific American Content: Global

U.N. Agency Agrees to Path for Shipping Emissions CutsNonbinding resolution, opposed by U.S., is a key step toward mandatory regulations -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

VIDEO: Se hvordan man crashtester flyNu kan man få et indblik i, hvordan fly, helikoptere og rumkapsler crashtestes, så de er sikre at bruge.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flaxseed-like particles can now grow bone, cartilage tissues for humansHuman stem cells have shown potential in medicine as they can transform into various specialized cell types such as bone and cartilage cells. The current approach to obtain such specialized cells is to subject stem cells to specialized instructive protein molecules known as growth factors. However, use of growth factors in the human body can generate harmful effects including unwanted tissue growt
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bold and aggressive behaviour means birds thrive in citiesMost people probably wouldn't consider bustling towns and cities good places for nature to thrive. Yet a few species of birds have so successfully adapted to city living that they boast large and thriving urban populations. Now, research has suggested that the success of these city-dwelling species may lie in their behaviour.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemical sleuthing leads to detection of little-known flame retardant in the environmentChemists at Indiana University have published research findings on their discovery of a new and relatively unknown flame retardant in the environment. Their study is the first to detect the potentially toxic chemical in North America.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Searching for signs of ice on Mars using radarSearching for signs of ice on Mars is complex. To explore whether ice lurks beneath the surface of the Red Planet, ESA's Mars Express uses its radar to probe the interior.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mass extinction crisis triggered expansion of dinosaursIt is commonly understood that the dinosaurs disappeared with a bang – wiped out by a great meteorite impact on the Earth 66 million years ago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research reveals insects were major food source millions of years agoInsects could have accounted for almost half of the daily diet of early man millions of years ago, new research has claimed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers find evidence of added auditor scrutiny involving credit default swapsInstitutions that monitor public companies include governments and regulators, financial media, analysts, shareholders, debtholders and auditors. A forthcoming paper that includes two University of Kansas School of Business professors suggests that reduced monitoring incentives among bondholders lead to increased monitoring efforts by auditors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More than 3000 years of human activity in 5 square metresNico Staring, researcher in Egyptian art, culture and history is taking part in an excavation mission in Saqqara. During the New Kingdom, the tombs of Horemheb and Maya were built. But also long before and after, over a period of 3.000 years, the location was used a cemetery .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How indigenous women who survived Guatemala's conflict are fighting for justiceIn February 2016, Guatemalan women survivors and the alliance of organisations supporting them successfully prosecuted two former members of the Guatemalan military for domestic and sexual slavery in the groundbreaking Sepur Zarco trial. The trial marked the first time a national court has prosecuted members of its own military for these crimes. It was an historic achievement in the fight to stop
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

KAIST succeeds in producing 50x more stable adsorbentA KAIST research team developed a technology to increase the stability of amine-containing adsorbents by fifty times, moving one step further toward commercializing stable adsorbents that last longer.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Innate immune adaptor TRIF confers neuroprotection in ALSResearchers led by Nagoya University report that deficiency of the innate immune adaptor TIR domain-containing adaptor inducing interferon-β (TRIF) significantly shortens survival time and accelerates disease progression of ALS mice. They revealed for the first time that the TRIF pathway is involved in eliminating aberrantly activated astrocytes to maintain the microenvironment surrounding motor n
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New on MIT Technology Review

Alibaba is developing its own driverless cars
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

People who live in diverse neighbourhoods are more helpful – here's how we knowWhether or not diversity is a good thing is still a topic of much debate. Though many businesses tout the benefits of diversity, American political scientist Robert Putnam holds that diversity causes people to hunker down, creating mistrust in communities.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Poor planning by railways leading to losses for farmersWestern Canadian grain farmers may reap financial losses in the billions in years to come, unless the country's railroads ramp up their capacity to get crops to market, says a University of Alberta expert.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New self-assembling protein hydrogels may hold many applications for biomedicineDelivering medications safely and accurately is of great interest to researchers and, of course, to people who need them. So is restoring function to damaged body parts. Jin K. Montclare, an associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the NYU Tandon School of Engineering, has taken a big step towards meeting both of these goals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Academics blame low wage growth on underemploymentEmployees looking for a hike in salary have lost their bargaining power because of a rise in underemployment, according to a new paper by University of Stirling economists.
8h
New Scientist - News

How Facebook let a friend pass my data to Cambridge AnalyticaFacebook Data M. ZuckerbergFacebook has been alerting users whose data ended up in the hands of Cambridge Analytica – and our reporter Timothy Revell is one of the unlucky millions
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Depression study pinpoints genes that may trigger the conditionNearly 80 genes that could be linked to depression have been discovered by scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Boosting T cell 'memory' may result in longer-lasting and effective responses for patientsJust like people, some T cells have excellent memories. These subtypes known as memory T cells may explain why some immunotherapies are more effective than others and potentially lead to researchers designing more effective studies using combination checkpoint blockade treatments, according to experts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Plants play greater role than megaherbivore extinctions in changes to ecosystem structurePlants may have exerted greater influence on our terrestrial ecosystems than the megaherbivores that used to roam our landscapes, according to new research.
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Viden

Nyt hospital: Borgere skal være levende laboratoriumFremtidens hospital skal udvikles sammen med patienter og deres data
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NYT > Science

Lung Cancer Patients Live Longer With Immune TherapyAdding immunotherapy to standard chemo treatments can halve the risk of death for people with the most common type of lung cancer, a new study shows.
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NYT > Science

How NASA’s TESS Spacecraft Will Hunt ExoplanetsTESS NASA EarthNASA’s TESS spacecraft will spend two years searching the sky for nearby alien worlds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Raw fruit and vegetables provide better mental health outcomes: Otago researchUniversity of Otago researchers have discovered raw fruit and vegetables may be better for your mental health than cooked, canned and processed fruit and vegetables.
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Feed: All Latest

These Celebrity Portraits Are Fake. Sort ofThe photographs of Britney Spears, Donald Trump, and others aren't what they seem.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The gamma ray burst – supernova connectionA "core-collapse" supernova occurs when the iron core of a massive star collapses under the force of gravity and then rebounds, generating pressure waves and shocks that propagate outward. A superluminous supernovae is a rare class of core collapse supernovae whose luminosity, equal to 10-1000 billion suns, is too high to be powered by the usual process that drives supernovae, the radioactive deca
8h
Big Think

Which religion has the longest life expectancy?The scales are not in favor for the most religious among us. Read More
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Dagens Medicin

Kühnau: Måske kan vi lukke en aftale i dagTrods arbejdstagernes musketered var regionernes chefforhandler, Anders Kühnau (S), optimistisk forud for dagens overenskomstforhandlinger.
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Dagens Medicin

Her er de databaser, der mangler indberetninger fra SundhedsplatformenHver sjette kliniske kvalitetsdatabase mangler indberetninger på grund af Sundhedsplatformen, viser aktindsigt. »Dybt problematisk,« mener Danske Patienter.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Spikes of graphene can kill bacteria on implantsA tiny layer of graphene flakes becomes a deadly weapon and kills bacteria, stopping infections during procedures such as implant surgery.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Position statement: Avoid using medical marijuana to treat sleep apneaMedical cannabis and synthetic marijuana extracts should not be used for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, according to a position statement from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New way to fight HIV transmissionScientists have developed a new tool to protect women from HIV infection.
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Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Hvordan giver radiobølger et elektrisk output fra en antenne?En læser vil gerne have fastslået, hvordan radiobølger inducerer strøm i en antenne og giver et elektrisk output. Det svarer DTU-professor på.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Effects of climate change on communally managed water systems softened by shared effortShared fates and experiences in a community can help it withstand changes to water availability due to climate change, a recent study by Sandia National Laboratories researchers found.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ants prefer a hard-earned treatWe are not exactly closely related to ants, but our brains have one surprising similarity: we both value highly the prize we get after a hard day's work.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chemical sleuthing leads to detection of little-known flame retardant in the environmentChemists at Indiana University have published research findings on their discovery of a new and relatively unknown flame retardant in the environment. Their study is the first to detect the potentially toxic chemical in North America.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SU2C researchers find promising treatment strategy for stage 1-3 NSCL cancer patientsA new, innovative approach to lung cancer treatment, administration of immunotherapy prior to surgery yielded encouraging outcomes in findings from SU2C-CRI Dream Team researchers. Two doses of anti-PD1 immunotherapy nivolumab several weeks prior to surgery was found to be safe; 45 percent of the trial patients showed little evidence of disease upon follow-up; and patients' immune systems intercep
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Drug reduces size of some lung cancer tumors, relapse rate after surgeryA drug given to early stage lung cancer patients before they undergo surgery showed major tumor responses in the removed tumor and an increase in anti-tumor T-cells that remained after the tumor was removed, which resulted in fewer relapse cases in the patients.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Combination therapy doubles survival in metastatic lung cancerThe immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab, combined with chemotherapy, doubles survival in patients with non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSNSCLC) lacking genetic changes in the EGFR or ALK genes, when compared to chemotherapy alone, according to an international, Phase III clinical trial.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Penn study finds relationship between PTEN loss, potential for immune response in BRCA 1/2-deficient ovarian cancerhe protein known as phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) is frequently mutated or affected by cancer as tumors develop. Now a new study from the Basser Center for BRCA at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania shows PTEN may serve as a marker for whether a patient with BRCA 1-2 deficient ovarian cancer is likely to respond to checkpoint inhibitor therapy.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using anti-PD-1 therapy pre-surgery in melanoma patients can identify those most likely to benefitCheckpoint inhibitors that block the protein PD-1 are used in melanoma patients after they've had surgery to remove their cancer, but not all patients benefit from the immunotherapy. Now a new study from the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania found that shifting use of anti-PD-1 drugs to before surgery may provide clues about which patients will benefit and which may be at in
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Futurity.org

Antibiotic cream works on viruses, tooWhen researchers applied a common topical antibiotic to mice before or shortly after infection with herpes and other viruses, they found that the antibiotic triggered an antiviral resistance in the animals. As reported in Nature Microbiology , the antibiotic neomycin decreased the herpes virus and its symptoms. Researchers studied gene expression in the treated mice and observed greater expressio
8h
New on MIT Technology Review

UK lawmakers want to bring good old British decorum to the AI industry
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Artificial antimicrobial peptides could help overcome drug-resistant bacteriaResearchers have now developed a streamlined approach to developing artificial antimicrobial peptides. Their strategy, which relies on a computer algorithm that mimics the natural process of evolution, has yielded one potential drug candidate that successfully killed bacteria in mice.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Surviving climate change, then and nowAn archeological dig in Italy reveals that prehistoric humans made it through a major natural disaster by cooperating with each other -- and that's a lesson for our future.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Predicting which trees are at greatest risk of beetle invasionThis study shows that the composition of forests is more important than other factors when predicting where the destructive pest will strike next.
8h
Futurity.org

How does China steal U.S. intellectual property?President Trump announced stiff new tariffs in March, hitting back at China for what he calls “the unfair and harmful acquisition of US technology.” According to a 2017 report by the United States Trade Representative, Chinese theft of American intellectual property currently costs between $225 billion and $600 billion annually. How extensive is intellectual property theft in China? Why does it h
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The Trump administration's new migratory bird policy undermines a century of conservationThe Trump administration has announced a position on protecting migratory birds that is a drastic pullback from policies in force for the past 100 years.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sex life of the blue-ringed octopusWhat one of the world's most venomous marine creatures gets up to after dark.
9h
Dagens Medicin

Flere patienter med alvorligt mavesår har brug for akut ambulancePatienter med blødende mavesår får dårligere akut hjælp med den hurtigste ambulance end f.eks. patienter med brystsmerter eller traumepatienter - selv om 30-dagesdødeligheden er lige så høj
9h
Dagens Medicin

Gynækologer vælger ny formandOverlæge Hanne Brix Westergaard er ny formand i Dansk Selskab for Obstetrik og Gynækologi.
9h
Dagens Medicin

Tidlig opsporing af diabetes kan give millionbesparelseScreening for diabetes kan spare udgifter til indlæggelser, lægebesøg og medicin, mener forskere fra fra Aarhus Universitet.
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Dagens Medicin

#39 AntibiotikaresistensPodcast sætter fokus antibiotikaresistens og hvor stor truslen i virkeligheden er.
9h
Big Think

Is marijuana legalization really linked to an increase in fatal car crashes?April 20, 4:20 in stoner folklore, is a day of celebration—as well as a 12 percent increase in fatal car crashes. Read More
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More prehospital deaths may mean increased intensity in violenceA new Johns Hopkins Medicine analysis of national trauma data shows that trauma patients were four times more likely to die from gunshot wounds and nearly nine times more likely to die from stab wounds before getting to a trauma center in 2014, compared with rates in 2007.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Precancerous colon polyps in patients with Lynch syndrome exhibit immune activationColon polyps from patients with Lynch syndrome, a hereditary condition that raises colorectal cancer risk, display immune system activation well before cancer development, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The preclinical research challenges traditional models of cancer immune activation and suggests immunotherapy may be useful for colorectal cancer prev
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research: High risk of malaria transmission after blood transfusions in sub-Saharan AfricaA new study suggests that in high transmission areas of sub-Saharan Africa, nearly one in four blood bank supplies contain the parasites that cause malaria. Additional research, focusing on the blood supply of Equatorial Guinea's capital, Malabo, found slightly higher levels of latent malaria infection, most of it -- more than 89 percent -- at a level that commonly used diagnostic technology canno
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hepatitis C: Simplified curative treatments can drive global scale-upAccording to a WHO progress report, an estimated 1.5 million people started direct-actingantiviral (DAA) treatment in 2016, compared to around 1 million in 2015.1 Behind theimpressive scale-up seen in 2016, a diverse set of countries have been leading the action.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First global carbon dioxide maps produced by Chinese observation satelliteAn Earth observation satellite, called TanSat, has produced its first global carbon dioxide maps. TanSat was launched by a collaborative team of researchers in China, and these maps are the first steps for the satellite to provide global carbon dioxide measurements for future climate change research.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flaxseed-like particles can now grow bone, cartilage tissues for humansHuman stem cells have shown potential in medicine as they can transform into various specialized cell types such as bone and cartilage cells. The current approach to obtain such specialized cells is to subject stem cells to specialized instructive protein molecules known as growth factors. However, use of growth factors in the human body can generate harmful effects including unwanted tissue growt
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Futurity.org

ALS shares genetic links with rare dementiaResearchers have identified genetic links between ALS and frontotemporal dementia, a rare disorder marked by deterioration in behavior and personality, language disturbances, and poor impulse control. Nearly half of all patients with ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), a fatal neuromuscular disorder, develop cognitive problems that affect memory and thinking. But why a disease that primarily aff
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Harmful genetic mutations may be less common than we thoughtWe are all mutants. Every characteristic that defines our species is the result of a genetic mutation somewhere in the history of evolution. And the same is true for every other organism on the planet. Yet more often than not we think about mutations as bad, leading to disability or disease. So how often are these changes to DNA harmful and how many of them are potentially helpful? A new study sug
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plants use advertising-like strategies to attract bees with colour and scentWatching plants and pollinators such as bees can teach us a lot about how complex networks work in nature.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to profit from biowasteETH Zurich and Eawag researchers are developing a method to produce animal feed from biowaste products. This is one of 14 projects in the Engineering for Development programme funded by the Sawiris Foundation over the past decade and entering its next 5-year cycle.
9h
The Atlantic

Trump's Syria Strategy Actually Makes SenseThe Trump administration is coming in for an avalanche of complaints that it conducted military operations against Syria without having a strategy for Syria. This is inaccurate. President Obama had grandiose goals that he omitted to attain. He wanted Bashar al-Assad to go. He wanted the Russians to leave Syria. He wanted to promote democracy and protect human rights unless it became too costly (s
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Drowsy driving in the ridesharing industry is a public safety riskResearchers conclude that fatigue and sleepiness are inherent safety risks in the ride-sharing industry.
9h
Science | The Guardian

What depressed robots can teach us about mental health | Zachary MainenThe idea of a depressed computer may seem absurd – but artificial intelligence and the human brain share a vital feature Depression seems a uniquely human way of suffering, but surprising new ways of thinking about it are coming from the field of artificial intelligence. Worldwide, over 350 million people have depression , and rates are climbing. The success of today’s generation of AI owes much t
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'Rampage': 14 Unanswered Questions About the Rock’s New MovieAlmost none of them are about wigs.
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Feed: All Latest

How Russian Facebook Ads Divided and Targeted US Voters Before the 2016 ElectionNew research shows just how prevalent political advertising was from suspicious groups in 2016—including Russian trolls.
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Ingeniøren

Energistyrelsen: Flere fossile brændsler i transporten på trods af vækst i elbilerI den seneste basisfremskrivning af energiforbruget i Danmark har Energistyrelsen regnet med flere elbiler i 2030. Men selv om biler generelt bliver mere brændstofeffektive, så vil brugen af de fossile brændsler i transporten fortsat stige.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Japanese astronomers discover gas giant planets orbiting evolved starsUsing radial velocity method a group of Japanese astronomers has found that two evolved stars, namely 24 Booties and Gamma Librae, are orbited by gas giant planets. They discovered that 24 Booties hosts one planet, while Gamma Librae is circled by two alien worlds. The finding is detailed in a paper published April 11 on arXiv.org.
9h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Nasa planet-hunter set for launchTESS NASA EarthThe Tess mission will survey nearly the entire sky and is expected to find thousands of new worlds.
9h
Dagens Medicin

Regioner slås om ny uddannelse til ambulancebehandlereKampen om at få lov til at udbyde den nye uddannelse til ambulancebehandler er i gang. Region Midtjylland og Nordjylland mener, at de hver især har den bedste placering til uddannelsen
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Dagens Medicin

Formandsskifte i Dansk Selskab for PatientsikkerhedKarin Friis Bach (Rad.) afløser Ulla Astman (S) som formand for Dansk Selskab for Patientsikkerhed
9h
HumanBrainProject (uploads) on YouTube

The Human Brain ProjectThe Human Brain Project should lay the technical foundations for a new model of ICT-based brain research, driving integration between data and knowledge from different disciplines, and catalysing a community effort to achieve a new understanding of the brain, new treatments for brain disease and new brain-like computing technologies. From: HumanBrainProject
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The Baltic Sea needs an interventionNitrate pollution poses a big threat to the Baltic Sea.
9h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Elephant TwinsA pair of calves was born about eight months ago in Tanzania's Tarangire National Park.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A mathematical model to explain the paradox of planktonA pair of researchers, one with The Simons Centre for the Study of Living Machines in India, the other with the University of Illinois in the U.S., has built a model to explain a paradox of plankton. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, Akshit Goyal and Sergei Maslov describe their model and how well they believe it portrays actual bacterial communities.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fleets of compact e-vehicles could help battle air pollutionLightweight electric mini-cars could soon be a common sight on the streets of Europe's cities thanks to longer-lasting batteries, tilting and stackable design, and modular components to bring down the cost of mass production.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sugar withdrawal—killing the leishmania parasiteFindings on how parasites cope with stress on a cellular level could aid the development of drugs that combat leishmaniasis, a tropical disease neglected by the pharmaceutical industry.
9h
Futurity.org

Tiny needles give defibrillators a big boostA new add-on for automated external defibrillators—aka AEDs—punches through the skin to help deliver a jolt to a person in cardiac arrest. The skin presents a formidable barrier to life-saving defibrillators, but the new add-on could be a way around that problem. Or, more to the point, through. A team of senior bioengineering students from Rice University—the Zfib team—developed a needle-laden pa
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Farming drone imagery often inaccurateFarmers should be cautious of drone imagery being offered by rogue operators, researchers have warned.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

Forestalling a Fatal DecisionSocial scientists have begun to close in on new ways to stop people from taking their own lives -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Ingeniøren

Ingeniøren har brug for din hjælp: Hvem er årets robotambassadør?Hjælp os med at hylde de enkeltpersoner, som har været afgørende for at rykke deres virksomheder via brugen af ny automationsteknologi. Ingeniøren kårer i samarbejde med IDA og Erhvervspartnerskabet for Avanceret Produktion årets robotambassadør. Vinderen får mulighed for gratis at deltage på et ...
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Planning for hurricanesRainstorms in 1960 look different from those in 2017, both in terms of intensity and rainfall.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tribal forests in Wisconsin are more diverse, sustainableDon Waller first visited the forests managed by the Menominee Nation in the 1980s while studying the effects of deer on seedling growth. He was immediately impressed. The forests seemed more mature and healthy than those outside of the Menominee reservation in northern Wisconsin.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Don't believe the label—'flushable wipes' clog sewersThe manufacturer of White King "flushable" wipes has been fined A$700,000 because these are not, in fact, flushable. The wipes, advertised as "just like toilet paper", cannot disintegrate in the sewerage system, and cause major blockages.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists discover a pathway that monitors a protein import into mitochondriaIf there's one fact that most people retain from elementary biology, it's that mitochondria are the powerhouses of the cell. As such, they break down molecules and manufacture new ones to generate the fuel necessary for life. But mitochondria rely on a stream of proteins to sustain this energy production. Nearly all their proteins are manufactured in the surrounding gel-like cytoplasm, and must be
10h
New Scientist - News

Tune in your head? Mind-reading tech can guess how it soundsWe now have the ability to hear another person’s thoughts. Researchers have identified the brain activity involved in imagining sounds in your head
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Evidence mounts that daily opioid users may fare worse after spine surgery, study findsIn a multicenter database study of adults who had undergone surgery for spinal deformities, researchers say that those who had used narcotics daily on average had worse outcomes, such as longer intensive care unit stays and more severe post-op disability, compared with those who did not use opioids preoperatively.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Boosting T cell 'memory' may result in longer-lasting and effective responses for patientsJust like people, some T cells have excellent memories. These subtypes known as memory T cells may explain why some immunotherapies are more effective than others and potentially lead to researchers designing more effective studies using combination checkpoint blockade treatments, according to experts at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research predicts which trees are at greatest risk of beetle invasionThis study shows that the composition of forests is more important than other factors when predicting where the destructive pest will strike next.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Storm hunter in positionThe Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor, also known as the Space Storm Hunter, was installed today outside the European space laboratory Columbus.
10h
Popular Science

You cannot escape poop bacteriaHealth Bathrooms are gross, but so is everything. You may have heard there’s poop bacteria getting sprayed all over people’s hands by bathroom hand dryers. But did you know there’s poop bacteria everywhere!? That’s…
10h
Ingeniøren

Europæisk robotprogram giver store muligheder for danske virksomhederTeknologisk Institut skal sammen med Made og Odense Kommune være med til at koordinere uddelingen af 30 mio. kroner til europæiske robotvirksomheder. TI håber, at ti af virksom­hederne bliver danske.
10h
The Atlantic

The Future of College Looks Like the Future of RetailOnline learning has come a long way since the turn of the millennium. It certainly hasn’t displaced traditional colleges, as its biggest proponents said it had the potential to, but it has gained widespread popularity: The number of students in the U.S. enrolled in at least one online course rose from 1.6 million in 2002 to more than 6 million in 2016 . As online learning extends its reach, thoug
10h
The Atlantic

American Sports Needs More Fair-Weather FansWhen I was 10 years old, I was brainwashed. It was a perfectly legal maneuver. My uncle, who lived in New York City, observed that I liked to play baseball and took great care to impress upon me the superiority of the Yankees. This was the mid-1990s, an auspicious time to be hypnotized by pinstripes. Led by a telegenic talent who shared my first name, the team achieved dynastic dominance before t
10h
Science | The Guardian

‘Come on out and fight!’: an extract from The Lost Boys by Gina PerryA new book about the 1950s Robbers Cave experiment details how subterfuge and manipulation were used to turn ‘upstanding 11-year-olds’ into ‘brutal savages’ • The inside story of the Robbers Cave experiment After the sun had gone down, the boys raced one another from the swimming hole to their cabins. They were still jubilant from their win, fizzing with excitement, eager to get back and pass aro
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Science | The Guardian

A real-life Lord of the Flies: the troubling legacy of the Robbers Cave experimentIn the early 1950s, the psychologist Muzafer Sherif brought together a group of boys at a US summer camp – and tried to make them fight each other. Does his work teach us anything about our age of resurgent tribalism? • Read an extract from The Lost Boys July 1953: late one evening in the woods outside Middle Grove, New York state, three men are having a furious argument. One of them, drunk, draw
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How to Be an Amateur Cinematographer—250 Miles Above the EarthItalian astronaut Paolo Nespoli had to learn in a hurry in order to capture footage for the NatGeo docu-series 'One Strange Rock.'
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Ultimate Dinosaur Biography, a Cosmological Caper and Other New Science BooksThe latest book recommendations from the editors of Scientific American -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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cognitive science

Breaking Language Barriers: Gender Bias in Computationsubmitted by /u/trot-trot [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Record breaking fiber transmission speed reportedNICT Network System Research Institute and Fujikura Ltd. (Fujikura, President: Masahiko Ito) developed a 3-mode optical fiber, capable of wide-band wavelength multiplexing transmission with standard outer diameter (0.125 mm) that can be cabled with existing equipment. The researchers have successfully demonstrated a transmission experiment over 1045 km with a data-rate of 159 Tb/s. Multimode fiber
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study produces clearest images to date of HSV-1, the virus that causes cold soresUCLA researchers have produced the clearest 3-D images to date of the virus that causes cold sores, herpes simplex virus type 1, or HSV-1. The images enabled them to map the virus' structure and offered new insights into how HSV-1 works.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Structure of a protein complex related with cell survival revealedA team from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) has determined for the first time the high-resolution structure of a complex (R2TP) involved in key processes for cell survival and in diseases such as cancer. This achievement was made with high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy, a technique brought to the CNIO by Óscar Llorca, director of the Structural Biology Programme and lead a
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Ingeniøren

HD-vinylplader kan spille højere og længereVinylplader, der skabes med laser fra et topologisk 3D-kort, kan være i butikkerne allerede i 2019, hvis det står til østrigsk firma.
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Science | The Guardian

Boy unearths treasure of the Danish king Bluetooth in GermanyDiscovery by a 13-year-old and an amateur archaeologist leads to hoard linked to king who brought Christianity to Denmark A 13-year-old boy and an amateur archaeologist have unearthed a “significant” trove in Germany which may have belonged to the Danish king Harald Bluetooth who brought Christianity to Denmark. René Schön and his student Luca Malaschnitschenko were looking for treasure using met
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spikes of graphene can kill bacteria on implantsA tiny layer of graphene flakes on a surface kills bacteria, stopping infections during procedures such as implant surgery. This is the finding of new research from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, recently published in Advanced Materials Interfaces.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Transfer learning meets livestock genomicsResearchers at Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) have developed a new computational method that predicts harmful mutations in mammalian species. As more livestock producers are using genetic tests to improve their herds, this method will help to optimize and guide the animal breeding programmes, as well as increase the profitability and yields of livestock. Published in
10h
NYT > Science

Freight Train Kills 4 Elephants in India, Including a CalfAs mining and development projects shrink the country’s forests, animals in search of food have been forced to wander farther from their natural habitats.
11h
Live Science

Why Every Parent Will Love This 'Everything Repellent'A new clear coating can keep fingerprints and jelly smears off your walls, windows and even your phone screen.
11h
The Atlantic

How France Cut Heroin Overdoses by 79 Percent in 4 YearsIn the 1980s, France went through a heroin epidemic in which hundreds of thousands became addicted. Mohamed Mechmache, a community activist, described the scene in the poor banlieues back then: “To begin with, they would disappear to shoot up. But after a bit we’d see them all over the place, in the stairwells and halls, the bike shed, up on the roof with the washing lines. We used to collect the
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pulsed corona discharge removes pharmaceutical residues from wastewaterA doctoral dissertation by a candidate at Lappeenranta University of Technology (LUT) examines the removal of harmful organic substances such as pharmaceutical residues from wastewater using only electricity. According to practical tests, pulsed corona discharge (PCD) may significantly reduce the environmental burden of pharmaceutical residues.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cytoplasmic streaming is involved in the transmission of signals within giant cells in Chara algaeChara algae are ancient plant organisms that are commonly found in freshwater reservoirs and occur, though more rarely, in water bodies with salt water. An unusual feature of this type of algae is the huge size of individual cells, which can reach up to one mm in diameter and up to several centimeters in length. This feature makes Characean algae a unique subject for the study of intracellular sig
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Similar charges are attracted to each otherNUST MISIS scientists have discovered how the latent state formation in layered tantalum disulfide develops. The discovery has future applications in computer memory.
11h
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Watch SpaceX Loft NASA’s New Planet-Hunting Mission Into OrbitThe TESS satellite will hitch a ride atop a Falcon 9 rocket to search out new worlds.
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Feed: All Latest

SoftBank's Futuristic Vision Fund Takes on the Real (Estate) WorldSoftBank's $93 billion Vision Fund is making big bets on real-estate-focused startups.
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Feed: All Latest

Uber Makes Peace With a Data-Sharing Deal for CitiesThe ride-hailing company is working with DC to share info—and the much coveted curb.
11h
Latest Headlines | Science News

‘Weird Math’ aims to connect numbers and equations to the real worldThe book Weird Math attempts to make chaos theory, higher dimensions and other concepts more relatable.
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Viden

Klar til affyring: NASA-rumteleskop skal finde tusindvis af planeterI nat opsendes det længe ventede rumteleskop TESS. Det skal finde Jord-kopier i solsystemets nabolag.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

Escape from Proxima bA civilization in the habitable zone of a dwarf star like Proxima Centauri might find it hard to get into interstellar space with conventional rockets -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Material scientists shape the surface of tiny, curved carbon fibres using laser structuringThe surfaces of materials can have an enormous influence on their function. If the external properties are changed, this also expands the range of possible applications. This is why materials scientists at Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany) are researching how they can tailor the surfaces of different materials using laser technology. They are mainly focusing on laser-induced periodic su
11h
Live Science

NASA's Got a Plan for a 'Galactic Positioning System' to Save Astronauts Lost in SpaceExotic, ultra-precise pulsing stars would be used to navigate probes and crewed ships through deep space.
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Ingeniøren

65.000 elever skal lære at programmere med micro-controllerTusindvis af 4. klasser bliver udstyret med en micro-controller på størrelse med et kreditkort. Den skal bruges til at lære børn og unge at programmere i eksempelvis JavaScript og Python.
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Ingeniøren

Maritim klimaaftale er hverken teknisk eller ambitiøsIMO er blevet enig om en klimaaftale for skibsfarten. Men forhandlingerne fokuserede for lidt på de teknologiske muligheder og for meget på storpolitik, mener Danske Maritime.
11h
Ingeniøren

CBB Mobil kritiseres for usikker password-håndteringHos teleselskabet CBB Mobil bliver kunderne bedt om at oplyse de første tre tegn af deres kodeord i forbindelse med kundeservice. Det kan svække it-sikkerheden men er ikke unormalt i branchen.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

Q&A: 3-D Printing Rockets with Relativity Space CEO Tim EllisAfter years of stealthy activity, the start-up is making big moves and revealing its plans to overturn more than a half century of tradition in aerospace manufacturing -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

Live: Følg jagten på exoplaneter – Danmark er medNatten til tirsdag sender Nasa en satellit med fire kameraer i kredsløb. DTU Space og Aarhus Universitet er med. Læs om missionen her og følg Nasas transmission, der allerede er begyndt.
11h
The Atlantic

The Planet That Took Us Beyond the Solar SystemTESS NASA EarthUpdated on April 16 at 4:19 p.m. ET For millennia, the only planets we knew of were the ones in our own solar system. That changed in October 1995, when a pair of Swiss astrophysicists discovered a planet orbiting a sun-like star about 50 light-years from Earth, in the constellation Pegasus. For decades, scientists had suspected that other planets existed in the cosmos, and they finally had the p
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Water safety checks dangerously underestimate pathogen levels, study suggestsDeadly bacteria lurking in drinking water storage tanks could be missed by standard health and safety tests, scientists have warned in a new report.
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The Atlantic

Iran's Real Enemy in Syria“What kind of a nation wants to be associated with the mass murder of innocent men, women, and children?” President Trump asked Russia and Iran Friday night after launching air strikes against the Syrian regime. “The nations of the world can be judged by the friends they keep.” Despite his speechwriters’ best efforts, if there is one thing Donald Trump and Iran share it is an inability to be sham
12h
The Atlantic

Trump vs. Harvard and Yale, ContinuedRecently I posted a dispatch from a reader based in New Haven, himself a Harvard graduate, who said that America’s elite-level universities were ill-prepared for what the Trump administration had in store for them. Here is a sampling of the response that has come in. First, the flippant: Your blog post detailing a reader’s concern about the insularity and elitism of Ivy League universities made m
12h
The Atlantic

The Travel Ban's Ignominious Precedents“When the government wants to do something, it has to give a reason,” former acting Solicitor General Walter Dellinger once said. “When it wants to do something bad, it has to give a really good reason.” I begin my introductory constitutional-law course every year with Dellinger’s rule. Governments must give reasons, because governments don’t have rights . They have powers— “just powers” derived,
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The Atlantic

Burma's Collective AmnesiaThe story my Burmese family told itself went like this: We’d fled the only home we’d known to escape oppression and danger, only to find ourselves in America, strangers in a strange land. But we did it. We made it. And from our vantage across the ocean, we continued to fight for Burma, to support its virtuous freedom fighters with our voices and resources. We were on the other side of an ocean, t
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Quantum physicists achieve entanglement recordEntanglement is of central importance for the new quantum technologies of the 21st century. A German-Austrian research team is now presenting the largest entangled quantum register of individually controllable systems to date, consisting of a total of 20 quantum bits. The physicists in Innsbruck, Vienna and Ulm are pushing experimental and theoretical methods to the limits of what is currently pos
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Measuring the risks of extreme temperatures on public healthExtreme hot and cold weather increase the number of deaths and emergency room visits, but affect specific at-risk populations differently, according to new research from the U.S. and Japan.
12h
Ingeniøren

Techtopia #48: Træning på den digitale slagmarkPodcast: Militær træning anno 2018 er ét stort rollespil, som udspiller sig både på marken, i luften og på havet, samtidig med at det foregår i en nøjagtig digital kopi på computere i et kontrolcenter.
12h
Ingeniøren

Internt jobskifte opfyldte karrieredrøm»Var det blevet et nej, ville jeg nok have søgt andre veje,« fortæller Trine Sundsvald Christensen, som pressede på, indtil hun til sidst fik mulighed for at skifte specialistrollen ud med et job som projektleder.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Depression study pinpoints genes that may trigger the conditionNearly 80 genes that could be linked to depression have been discovered by scientists.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Artificial antimicrobial peptides could help overcome drug-resistant bacteriaResearchers at MIT and the Catholic University of Brasilia have now developed a streamlined approach to developing artificial antimicrobial peptides. Their strategy, which relies on a computer algorithm that mimics the natural process of evolution, has yielded one potential drug candidate that successfully killed bacteria in mice.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Structure of a protein complex related with cell survival revealedA team from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) has determined for the first time the high-resolution structure of a complex (R2TP) involved in key processes for cell survival and in diseases such as cancer. This achievement has been made possible by using high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smoking may increase heart failure risk among African-AmericansAfrican-Americans who smoke may be at greater risk of developing heart failure. Among African-Americans, those who smoke a pack or more a day are likely at greatest risk for heart failure. African-Americans who quit smoking may no longer be at increased risk of heart failure.
13h
Science : NPR

Drug Test Spurs Frank Talk Between Hypertension Patients And DoctorsHigh blood pressure can cause severe health problems, but some of the medications to control it have unpleasant side effects. A new drug test alerts doctors when patients aren't taking their meds. (Image credit: Blake Farmer/WPLN)
13h
NYT > Science

Basics: You Share Everything With Your Bestie. Even Brain Waves.Scientists have made astonishing discoveries about the nature and evolution of friendship. Without it, humans suffer significant physical and emotional damage.
13h
NYT > Science

Friendship’s Dark Side: ‘We Need a Common Enemy’Friendship generally is regarded as an unalloyed good. But scientists have found it also can be a conspiracy, a way to separate “us” from “them.”
13h
Science : NPR

The Super-Hot Pepper That Sent A Man To The ERCarolina Reapers are some of the hottest peppers in the world. So hot, in fact, that for one man, participating in a pepper-eating contestant resulted in a painful, serious "thunderclap headache." (Image credit: Maria Dattola Photography/Getty Images)
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Artificial antimicrobial peptides could help overcome drug-resistant bacteriaDuring the past several years, many strains of bacteria have become resistant to existing antibiotics, and very few new drugs have been added to the antibiotic arsenal.
13h
Ingeniøren

Danskere skal bygge regnekraften til verdens største teleskopForce Technology med Poul-Henning Kamp i spidsen er med til at fjerne billedforvrængninger fra teleskop i Chile.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ad giant WPP faces brief stock slump after CEO resignsShares in British advertising giant WPP briefly slumped on Monday after chief executive and founder Martin Sorrell resigned over the weekend.
14h
Science-Based Medicine

Homeopathy Awareness Week shows that homeopathy is still a problemHomeopathy Awareness Week might be almost over, but The One Quackery To Rule Them All wastes resources and endangers patients year round, and a recent French criticism of homeopathy has provoked another case of legal thuggery by homeopaths.
14h
Viden

Forskning: Hjernerystelse kan give demens i alderdommenPatientforening håber, at nyt studie kan føre til en hurtigere behandling af hovedskader.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study examines maternal metabolic factors and early-onset pubertyIn a study of more than 15,000 girls and their mothers -- all Kaiser Permanente members in Northern California -- maternal overweight and hyperglycemia were linked to the earlier onset of puberty in girls 6 to 11 years old. Early puberty has been linked to multiple adverse health developments as girls grow up.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Surviving climate change, then and nowTrade and social networking helped our Homo sapiens ancestors survive a climate-changing volcanic eruption 40,000 years ago, giving hope that we will be able to ride out global warming by staying interconnected, a new study suggests.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plants play greater role than megaherbivore extinctions in changes to ecosystem structurePlants may have exerted greater influence on our terrestrial ecosystems than the megaherbivores that used to roam our landscapes, according to new research.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new hope: One of North America's rarest bees has its known range greatly expandedThe Macropis Cuckoo Bee is one of the rarest bees in North America, partly because of its specialized ecological associations. It is a nest parasite of oil-collecting bees of the genus Macropis which, in turn, are dependent on oil-producing flowers of the genus Lysimachia.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Albania's pelicans return to their lagoon 'kingdom'With feathers on its head that make it look like it is wearing a wig, it does not go unnoticed—the Dalmatian pelican is back with a flourish in the Divjaka Lagoon in western Albania.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Despite job cuts, GM won't abandon small car marketGeneral Motors confirmed Sunday its plans to eliminate a shift at an Ohio plant, idling some 1,500 employees as demand for compact cars dips.
15h
Science | The Guardian

Universities are a key resource for the NHS. Why are they so underused?The UK’s research ecosystem is fragmented. We need more collaboration to pool expertise and improve public health Good public health is central to the success of our cities, nations and regions. It’s an area in which higher education has a key role to play, since working to address local and global health challenges and develop cutting-edge drug therapies is deeply rooted within academic institut
16h

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