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Facebook Is Steering Users Away From Privacy ProtectionsCritics say Facebook is using design tricks to win users' permission to collect personal data under new European rules.
56min
Live Science

'The Truth About Animals': Storks Flying to the Moon, and Other Wild TalesDid you know that the late drug lord Pablo Escobar flew kidnapped hippos to Colombia? Or that the African clawed frog Xenopus laevis was once used as a pregnancy test for humans?
30min
Futurity.org

How volcanic rock traps CO2 and turns it inertNew research shows how effective injecting carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) into the volcanic rock basalt could be for fighting carbon emissions. Burning fossil fuels produces carbon dioxide. As the gas rises and the atmosphere traps it, it retains heat as part of a process called the greenhouse effect. The increased temperatures associated with the greenhouse effect can cause melting ice caps, higher sea
38min

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Latest Headlines | Science News

NASA’s TESS spacecraft launches to begin its exoplanet searchAfter reaching its orbit in about two months, the telescope will start scanning nearby stars telltale dips in light that signal a passing planet.
10min
NYT > Science

San Francisco Earthquake Risks: Questions and AnswersOur correspondent in San Francisco answers readers’ questions about the risks facing the Bay Area when the Big One hits.
14min
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Why Can't We Fix Puerto Rico's Power Grid?The only upside to Puerto Rico's island-wide blackout is that engineers and aid groups could rethink it from the ground up. They may have to.
20min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Global burden of multiple serious illnesses must be urgently addressed: AMS reportIncreasing numbers of people worldwide are suffering lifelong disability and dying prematurely due to the ineffective treatment of people with multiple health conditions, a new report suggests. The report from the Academy of Medical Sciences, published today, points to an alarming lack of information about multimorbidity, a scenario where a patient suffers several diseases simultaneously.
33min
Futurity.org

Tungsten in drinking water builds up in bonesNew research could add to doubts over the once-universal assumption that tungsten poses little or no health risk to the general human population. The study shows how and where tungsten accumulates in bones of mice exposed to the element through drinking water. With the highest melting point of any metal, tungsten’s remarkably high density and hardness make it a prized ingredient in a range of ind
38min
Futurity.org

ALS-linked protein clusters may actually protect neuronsProtein clusters thought to be tied to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease, may actually protect—not harm neurons. Autopsy studies of ALS patients often reveal the accumulation of large, fibrous aggregates of a protein called SOD1 in disease-affected motor neurons. Researchers have hypothesized that these fibrils are what kill neurons and cause ALS in some peop
45min
Ingeniøren

Efter teknisk fejl: Exoplanet-jagten er sat indKl. 00.51 i nat sendte Nasa en SpaceX-raket afsted med TESS-teleskopet, som i de kommende år skal spotte exoplaneter og stjerneskælv.
50min
BBC News - Science & Environment

100 Women: 'Record number' of Nepalese women climbing Everest this seasonA record number of Nepalese women are climbing Mount Everest this spring season, officials tell the BBC.
56min
BBC News - Science & Environment

Planet-hunter launches from FloridaTESS NASA SpaceXThe US space agency's Tess satellite lifts off on a mission to find thousands of new worlds.
56min
BBC News - Science & Environment

Last of the wild asses back from the brinkWild equines are being reintroduced to the grasslands of Kazakhstan where they once roamed in large numbers.
56min
Futurity.org

Stressed out cells stash RNA to keep it safeWhen stress strikes, our cells focus on socking away the important stuff—free-floating material that relays genetic information and helps them grow and divide. The speed and accuracy of this activity may have a lot to do with development of diseases like cancer and nerve-killing conditions such as Alzheimer’s and Lou Gehrig’s diseases, researchers say. Stress granules as safe harbors To store the
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How mental health diagnosis should be more collaborativeNew research published in The Lancet Psychiatry finds that mental health diagnosis should be more collaborative.The study found evidence that service users can feel isolated, confused and distressed when a diagnosis is not discussed with them, is discovered via health records, in a letter or inadvertently mentioned in a care meeting.Instead, doctors should work alongside service users to approach
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Experts weigh risks of epilepsy drug in pregnancy, as EU considers safety recommendationsAs the European Commission considers whether to introduce a partial ban on use of the epilepsy drug valproate in pregnancy over risks to unborn babies, researchers in The BMJ discuss the arguments and the implications for patients and healthcare professionals.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Artificial pancreas is a safe and effective treatment for type 1 diabetesUse of an artificial pancreas is associated with better control of blood sugar levels for people with type 1 diabetes compared with standard treatment, finds a review of the available evidence published by The BMJ today.
1h
Science : NPR

SpaceX Launches NASA Satellite To Search For Alien WorldsTESS — short for Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite — will spend two years searching for planets near bright, nearby stars.
1h
NYT > Science

Trilobites: Diamonds in a Meteorite May Be a Lost Planet’s FragmentsThe space rock crashed in a desert in Sudan in 2008, and the flaws in its embedded minerals are like nothing seen in today’s solar system.
1h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: The Bottom LineWhat We’re Following Pompeo’s Plans: President Trump confirmed on Twitter that CIA Director Mike Pompeo met with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un recently in preparation for Trump’s planned summit with Kim—a sign that the president is eager to make a big diplomatic statement. As his nominee for secretary of state, Pompeo is opposed by several prominent members of the Senate Foreign Relations Commi
1h
The Scientist RSS

Ocean Heat Wave Wreaked Havoc on Great Barrier ReefNot only did many corals die in recent years, but some were actually killed by the hotter temperatures themselves, rather than bleaching.
1h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Kobach YellowToday in 5 Lines President Trump confirmed that CIA Director Mike Pompeo met secretly with North Korea Leader Kim Jong Un earlier this month, and said “a good relationship was formed.” White House Budget Director Mick Mulvaney said his office will investigate Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt’s spending of $43,000 on a phone booth for his office. Three men from rural Kans
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The OURSA Security Conference Calls Out Lack of InclusionThe OURSA security conference offered a place for diverse voices in security, a counterpoint to the corporate hegemony of RSA.
2h
Live Science

Hundreds of Purple Octopus Moms Are Super Weird, and They're DoomedWhat's the story behind a mysterious gathering of octopus mothers?
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

Gene therapy could free some people from a lifetime of blood transfusionsCorrecting a genetic mutation lets beta thalassemia patients make healthy blood cells.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ACP calls for a 'time out' to assess and revise approach to performance measurementIn 'Time Out -- Charting a Path for Improving Performance Measurement,' published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, the American College of Physicians (ACP) reports that the majority of quality measures for ambulatory internal medicine in Medicare's Merit-based Incentive Payment System program are not valid based on criteria developed by ACP.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene therapy for beta-thalassemia safe, effective in peoplePhilippe Leboulch, M.D., and colleagues report that a one-time treatment with the gene therapy known as LentiGlobin BB305 vector reduced or eliminated the need for blood transfusions in 22 patients with severe beta-thalassemia. The team's results are published in the April 19 issue of The New England Journal of Medicine.
2h
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The Return of 'MAD Magazine' and Its All-New Gang of IdiotsThe new incarnation of the satire magazine will never be able to compete with the pace of the internet, but that's not the point.
2h
Science : NPR

Gene Therapy For Inherited Blood Disorder Reduced TransfusionsA small study finds promise for using gene therapy to treat patients with beta-thalassemia, a blood condition that can cause severe anemia. The experimental treatment is in early development. (Image credit: Power and Syred/Science Photo Library/Getty Images)
2h
NYT > Science

Robot Conquers One of the Hardest Human Tasks: Assembling Ikea FurnitureIkea Robots FurnitureResearchers in Singapore explained how they created a robot that could devise and execute a plan to put together an Ikea chair.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

With this tool, AI could identify malware as readily as it recognizes catsA huge new data set will help train algorithms to spot the nasty programs hiding in our computers.
2h
Live Science

Why Did the Whites of This Man's Eyes Turn Blue?The 70-year-old man's eyes seemed fine, expect for one thing — the whites of his eyes were turning blue.
2h
Live Science

There Is Evidence That a Planet in Our Solar System Was DestroyedThe lost planet was the size of Mercury or perhaps Mars, researchers now say.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is Apple really better about privacy? Here's what we found outIs Apple the shining knight when it comes to privacy collection, as it wants us to believe?
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Low-cost anti-hookworm drug boosts female farmers' physical fitnessImpoverished female farm workers infected with intestinal parasites known as hookworms saw significant improvements in physical fitness when they were treated with a low-cost deworming drug. The benefits were seen even in those with low level infections, according to a study co-authored by researchers at Yale and the nonprofit company InnovationsCZ.
2h
The Scientist RSS

Women Less Successful When Applying for PatentsAn investigation of 2.7 million patent submissions in the U.S. finds gender disparities throughout the application process.
2h
Science : NPR

Climate Change Is Killing Coral On The Great Barrier ReefThe ecosystem has collapsed for 29 percent of the 3,863 reefs in the giant coral reef system, according to new research. Scientists are learning which corals are the "winners" and "losers." (Image credit: ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies/ Gergely Torda)
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research seeks to optimize space travel efficiencySending a human into space and doing it efficiently presents a galaxy of challenges. Koki Ho, University of Illinois assistant professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering, and his graduate students, Hao Chen and Bindu Jagannatha, explored ways to integrate the logistics of space travel by looking at a campaign of lunar missions, spacecraft design, and conducting research, published today
3h
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Let's Use Star Wars to Explain the Concept of Angular SizeCould you actually see invading Star Destroyers from the surface of a planet?
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research seeks to optimize space travel efficiencySending a human into space and doing it efficiently presents a galaxy of challenges. Koki Ho, University of Illinois assistant professor in the Department of Aerospace Engineering, and his graduate students, Hao Chen and Bindu Jagannatha, explored ways to integrate the logistics of space travel by looking at a campaign of lunar missions, spacecraft design, and creating a framework to optimize fuel
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Defense contract pits Amazon against the rest of Big TechA wide range of technology giants find themselves unified by a single concern: that Amazon has the inside track to win a huge winner-take-all government cloud-computing contract that could help accelerate the Seattle company's lead in the fast-growing industry.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dual-class firms have higher market valuations near time of IPO that drop over next six years, studyFacebook, Google, Comcast and Berkshire Hathaway are among a number of large companies that have dual-class stock structures, providing controlling shareholders with majority voting power despite owning a minority of total equity.
3h
Dagens Medicin

Dennis Kristensen har sejret ad helvede tilMan taler meget om sosuers store ansvar, men ansvaret er blevet dem frataget forlængst. Når jeg bliver gammel, vil jeg hellere have en kærlig ufaglært hjemmehjælper til at passe mig end et FOA-medlem.
3h
Live Science

What Do Blind People 'See' When They Take LSD?What would LSD feel like if you couldn't see?
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dual-class firms have higher market valuations near time of IPO that drop over next six years, studyNew research from the University of Notre Dame may have regulatory implications, and can inform the debate regarding dual-class stock financing.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Football scuffles, auto injuries may raise risk for Parkinson'sA rear-ender in which the driver's head slams against the steering wheel or a helmet-to-helmet tussle with an opponent on the football field may increase one's risk for Parkinson's disease if concussion results, say researchers from UCSF and the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Preliminary study suggests drug may help babies with spinal muscular atrophyA preliminary study suggests that an investigational drug may help increase protein levels in babies with spinal muscular atrophy. The open-label study is released today and will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 70th Annual Meeting in Los Angeles, April 21-27, 2018.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A single concussion may increase risk of Parkinson's diseasePeople who have been diagnosed with a mild concussion, or mild traumatic brain injury, may have a 56 percent increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease, according to a study published in the April 18, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More than 3,300 Android apps are improperly tracking kids, study findsThousands of family-friendly apps from the Google Play Store are potentially violating federal law, according to a new large-scale study from North American and European universities and organizations.
3h
Science : NPR

How People Learned To Recognize Monkey Calls Reveals How We All Make Sense Of SoundA brain imaging study of grown-ups hints at how children learn that "dog" and "fog" have different meanings, even though they sound so much alike. (Image credit: Ilana Kohn/Getty Images)
3h
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Smartphone and Internet Addiction: The Definitive WIRED GuideEverything you ever wanted to know about screen time, likes, and pull-to-refresh.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A news subscription for your iPhone? Apple may launch one by 2019: reportLast month, Apple announced it acquired the digital magazine distributor Texture as an entry to the journalism world. Now, it plans to use its platform to launch a premium news subscription by 2019.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Will the FTC come down hard on Facebook? It's only happened twice in 20 yearsIf Facebook has to pay a Federal Trade Commission penalty for the Cambridge Analytica data scandal, it will join a very short list of companies to have done so.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

Bill Gates and Masayoshi Son are backing a plan to have video cameras watch every inch of Earth from space
3h
The Scientist RSS

Tiny Shrimp Mix Up the OceanCrowds of zooplankton swimming upward generate large downward jets of water, a study finds.
4h
Popular Science

Watch SpaceX launch NASA’s new planet-hunting satelliteTESS NASA SpaceXSpace TESS is blasting off on Wednesday night. NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) will search the brightest stars in our galactic neighborhood for evidence of planets. Its mission starts today.
4h
Big Think

Programmable liquid metal could bring the villain from Terminator 2 to lifeScientists are developing liquid metal or "electric blood" that can move and form 2D shapes. This may revolutionize the field of soft robotics. Read More
4h
Live Science

Healthy Eaters May Waste the Most FoodHealthy eaters have a lot to be proud of in their nutrient-packed diets, but a new study finds that a health-conscious diet may have a planet-harming downside.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Graphene changes elastic properties depending on applied forceA research group, including scientists from Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITF), described a universal feature, in which many unique graphene properties are hidden. The study showed that abnormal graphene behavior can be fully characterised by Poisson ratio, which determines material capability to shrink or extend in transverse dimension. Moreover, the scientists found key factors that
4h
The Atlantic

Trump's Selective Empathy for Syrian War VictimsVideo footage of the impact of chemical-weapons attacks on Syrian civilians has twice moved President Trump into militarily striking regime targets. After the U.S. and its allies struck most recently, Trump tweeted Saturday: A perfectly executed strike last night. Thank you to France and the United Kingdom for their wisdom and the power of their fine Military. Could not have had a better result.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Peptide induces chirality evolution in a single gold nanoparticleSeoul National University has created a synthesis method to make optically active and chiral gold nanoparticles using amino acids and peptides for the first time. Many chemicals significant to life have mirror-imaged twins and such characteristics are conventionally called as chirality. This study describes how the chirality, typically observed in organic molecules, can be extended to three-dimens
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study suggests social workers could help families navigate foreclosureIn a qualitative study, researchers focused on Cleveland service providers who shared how foreclosure affects their clients. The research was recently published in The Journal of Contemporary Social Services.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Meteorite diamonds tell of a lost planetScientists have examined a slice from a meteorite that contains large diamonds formed at high pressure. The study shows that the parent body from which the meteorite came was a planetary embryo of a size between Mercury to Mars.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study reveals new Antarctic process contributing to sea level rise and climate changeA new study has revealed a previously undocumented process where melting glacial ice sheets change the ocean in a way that further accelerates the rate of ice melt and sea level rise. The research found that glacial meltwater makes the ocean's surface layer less salty and more buoyant, preventing deep mixing in winter and allowing warm water at depth to retain its heat and further melt glaciers fr
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Martian moons model indicates formation following large impactScientists posit a violent birth of the tiny Martian moons Phobos and Deimos, but on a much smaller scale than the giant impact thought to have resulted in the Earth-moon system. Their work shows that an impact between proto-Mars and a dwarf-planet-sized object likely produced the two moons.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Electric ferries and joined-up shipping to turn sea travel greenElectric ferries and digital communication between ships could help in the quest to decarbonise maritime transport, a sector which is often perceived as being the green option but could still do much to lower its environmental footprint.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spinach used in neutron studies could unearth secret to stronger plant growthPlants, algae, and other organisms produce the RuBisCO enzyme to convert carbon dioxide from the atmosphere into energy-rich molecules, like glucose, that form carbohydrates and other organic carbon compounds essential to life on earth.
4h
New Scientist - News

Watch robots assemble a flat-pack IKEA chair in just 9 minutesIkea Robots FurnitureTwo robotic arms make assembling flat-pack furniture look easy. Faced with a pile of IKEA chair parts they work together to piece it together
4h
New Scientist - News

Bioengineered freckle turns darker when it detects cancerAn implant of genetically engineered skin cells has been designed to grow darker in colour when it detects early breast, prostate and colon cancers
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Latest Headlines | Science News

How ravens caused a LIGO data glitchRavens pecking at frosty pipes caused a glitch in gravitational wave data.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers identified a protein associated with breast cancerResearchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have identified a protein that is strongly associated with metastatic breast cancer and that could be a target for future therapies.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Black hole and stellar winds form giant butterfly, shut down star formation in galaxyResearchers have completed an unprecedented 'dissection' of twin galaxies in the final stages of merging. The new study explores a galaxy called NGC 6240. While most galaxies in the universe hold only one supermassive black hole at their center, NGC 6240 contains two -- and they're circling each other in the last steps before crashing together.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Global warming is transforming the Great Barrier ReefA new study shows that corals on the northern Great Barrier Reef experienced a catastrophic die-off following the extended marine heatwave of 2016.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Characterizing 'keyhole' is first step to fighting obesity at cellular levelScientists have characterized for the first time a complex, little-understood cellular receptor type that, when activated, shuts off hunger.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Robot developed for automated assembly of designer nanomaterialsEngineers have developed a robot that can identify, collect, and manipulate two-dimensional nanocrystals. The robot stacked nanocrystals to form the most complex van der Waals heterostructure produced to date, with much less human intervention than the manual operations previously used to produce van der Waals heterostructures. This robot allows unprecedented access to van der Waals heterostructur
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unique protein is a vulnerability in the malaria parasiteThe malaria parasite is highly dependent on a unique protein for infecting new mosquitoes. This protein could be a target for the development of new drugs.
4h
Popular Science

My ancestor died of a splinter. Wait, what?Health Little bumps and blisters used to kill. How did bumps, pricks, and bruises kill? I followed my great-great-great-grandma’s obituary down a deadly rabbit hole.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Green digitization: Botanical collections data answer real-world questionsScientists are digitizing the wealth of data attached to herbarium specimens and using those data to address questions ranging from species identification to global climate change. This special issue explores methods, challenges, and applications of these collections data, with articles addressing topics including globally unique identifiers, deep learning and computer recognition, and citizen sci
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Time Warner CEO says merger needed due to 'tectonic' industry shiftTime Warner chief Jeff Bewkes testified Wednesday that the media-entertainment giant needs to merge with AT&T because of "tectonic changes" in the television industry which favor big internet firms.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Green digitization: Botanical collections data answer real-world questionsEven as botany has moved firmly into the era of "big data," some of the most valuable botanical information remains inaccessible for computational analysis, locked in physical form in the orderly stacks of herbaria and museums. Herbarium specimens are plant samples collected from the field that are dried and stored with labels describing species, date and location of collection, along with various
5h
Big Think

Data firm left detailed profiles of 48 million people on a publicly accessible websiteIn the wake of Facebook's Cambridge Analytica scandal, another data firm was discovered to have amassed similar user profiles of millions of people. Read More
5h
The Atlantic

When Disadvantaged Students Overlook Elite CollegesEvery year, scores of gifted students have their college prospects hampered by life circumstances. Imagine a teenager attending a high school where few of his peers make it to graduation, much less college. This student, however, is a high achiever. His grade-point average and test scores show it. In fact, they’re good enough to get into some of the best institutions in the country. But he doesn’
5h
Latest Headlines | Science News

This meteorite’s diamonds hint that it was born in a lost planetBits of metal nestled inside diamonds suggest the space rock could have formed in a Mars-sized protoplanet in the early solar system.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

Diamonds in Meteorite May Come from a Lost PlanetFormed at high temperatures and pressures, the gems trace extreme events from the dawn of our solar system -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Live Science

Star 'DNA' Survey Could Reunite the Sun with Its Long-Lost SiblingsIs the sun due for a cosmic family reunion?
5h
Live Science

The Entire Island of Puerto Rico Just Lost Power Again — Here's WhyThe entire island of Puerto Rico is without power again, 210 days after its grid first collapsed during Hurricane Maria on September 20, 2017.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

How is America preparing for the future of work?Three questions on retraining and the future of work with economist Jay Shambaugh.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Role of intravascular ultrasound imaging in detection of acute aortic syndromeMisdiagnosed Aortic Intramural Hematoma and the Role of Intravascular Ultrasound Imaging in Detection of Acute Aortic SyndromeIn the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications, Niya Mileva, Medical University of Sofia, Sofia, Bulgaria and other researchers from Poland and Italy present a case study of misdiagnosed aortic intramural hematoma and the role of intravascular ultrasoun
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Management of mitral regurgitation in a patient contemplating pregnancyIn the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications, researchers Yee-Ping Sun and Patrick T. O'Gara, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass., USA present a case study of management of rheumatic mitral regurgitation in a woman contemplating pregnancy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ischemic mitral regurgitationIn the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications, researchers Marc Katz of Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, S.C., USA and Scott D. Lim of University of Virginia Health System, Charlottesville, Va., USA present a case study about ischemic mitral regurgitation.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cities and communities in the US losing 36 million trees a yearNationally, urban/community tree cover declined from 42.9 percent to 42.2 percent between 2009-2014. This translates to losing an estimated 36 million trees or approximately 175,000 acres of tree cover annually.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A robot by NTU Singapore autonomously assembles an IKEA chairScientists from Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, have developed a robot that can autonomously assemble IKEA's Stefan chair in 8 minutes and 55 seconds.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An artificial mole as an early warning systemETH researchers working with Martin Fussenegger have developed an early warning system for the four most common types of cancer. Should a tumor develop, a visible mole will appear on the skin.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Difference in gene switching discovered in different parts of brainResearchers found significant difference in the molecular machinery that turns on and off gene expression between cerebellum and prefrontal cortex of a mouse brain. Their results provide clues to the molecular apparatus that is involved in conscious thinking in brains.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Delivering cancer treatment on a nanodisc helps eliminate tumorsResearchers at the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center designed this new delivery system -- a drug hidden in a nanodisc -- to increase the number of patients who can be treated successfully with cancer immunotherapy drugs.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Iron Age breeding practices likely influenced lack of stallion lineages in modern horsesSelective breeding just before and during the Iron Age nearly 3,000 years ago is likely the reason for the lack of variability in modern domestic horses' paternally inherited DNA, a trait unique among livestock animals.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A bioengineered tattoo monitors blood calcium levelsScientists have created a biomedical tattoo that becomes visible on the skin of mice in response to elevated levels of calcium in the blood.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals new Antarctic process contributing to sea level rise and climate changeA new study has revealed a previously undocumented process where melting glacial ice sheets change the ocean in a way that further accelerates the rate of ice melt and sea level rise.Led by IMAS PhD student Alessandro Silvano and published in the journal Science Advances, the research found that glacial meltwater makes the ocean's surface layer less salty and more buoyant, preventing deep mixing i
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SwRI's Martian moons model indicates formation following large impactSouthwest Research Institute scientists posit a violent birth of the tiny Martian moons Phobos and Deimos, but on a much smaller scale than the giant impact thought to have resulted in the Earth-moon system. Their work shows that an impact between proto-Mars and a dwarf-planet-sized object likely produced the two moons, as detailed in a paper published today in Science Advances.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Top HIV cure research team refutes major recent results on how to identify HIV persistenceAn international team focused on HIV cure research spearheaded by The Wistar Institute in collaboration with the University of Pennsylvania and Vall d'Hebron Research Institute (VHIR) in Barcelona, Spain, established that the CD32 molecule is not a preferential biomarker to identify HIV silent reservoirs within the immune system of patients undergoing antiretroviral therapy (ART), as proposed by a
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

People waste nearly a pound of food dailyAmericans waste nearly a pound of food per person each day, but the exact amount of food we trash differs by how healthy your diet is, a new PLOS ONE study finds. Between 2007-2014, consumers wasted nearly 150,000 tons of food per day. Researchers estimate that food waste corresponded with the use of 30 million acres of land (7 percent of total US cropland) and 4.2 trillion gallons of water annual
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cities and communities in the US losing 36 million trees a yearScientists with the USDA Forest Service estimate that between 2009 and 2014, tree cover in the Nation's urban/community areas declined by 0.7 percent, which translates to losing an estimated 36 million trees or approximately 175,000 acres of tree cover annually. Pavement and other impervious cover increased at a rate of about 167,000 acres a year during the same period, according to research by US
5h
Quanta Magazine

Machine Learning’s ‘Amazing’ Ability to Predict ChaosHalf a century ago, the pioneers of chaos theory discovered that the “butterfly effect” makes long-term prediction impossible. Even the smallest perturbation to a complex system (like the weather, the economy or just about anything else) can touch off a concatenation of events that leads to a dramatically divergent future. Unable to pin down the state of these systems precisely enough to predict
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Viden

Facebook vil have dig til at sige ‘ja’ til ansigtsgenkendelseFacebook genintroducerer kontroversiel ansigts-teknologi i EU, men nye regler betyder, de er tvunget til at spørge europæerne om lov. Så heldige er amerikanerne ikke.
5h
The Atlantic

Barbara Bush Changed With Her CountryGeorge W. Bush B.Some famous people are much less interesting in person than you would expect. Some are more interesting. And a few—a very few—rock your world. For me, Barbara Bush, who left us on Tuesday, occupies that last category, almost by herself. Many of the tributes to the former first lady portray her as a throwback to an earlier era of American politics, the silver-haired doyenne of a political dynasty.
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New Scientist - News

Your boss is probably to blame for meetings starting lateHalf of all meetings start late – and your boss is probably to blame. A study found that meetings delayed just 10 minutes are likely to be less productive
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New Scientist - News

There’s no way to tell for sure if child refugees are under 18Two-thirds of child refugees whose age is disputed turn out to be adults, according to the UK government – but there's no definitive way to determine age
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New Scientist - News

Mavericks are belittling statins – here’s why they’re wrongDrugs designed to cut the risk of heart disease are being talked down amid a worrying lack of use by people who could benefit from them, says Anthony Warner
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New Scientist - News

Our grandchildren may never see the Great Barrier Reef recoverThe reef has been so severely damaged by record ocean heat that it has had no chance to recover fully - and may never be the same again.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study: How to calculate pricing and resources for cloud computingResearchers in the University at Buffalo School of Management have developed a new algorithm that cloud computing service providers can use to establish pricing and allocate resources.
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Science | The Guardian

Can these robots build an Ikea chair? – videoScientists have demonstrated two robots using human-like dexterity to construct an Ikea chair. Components of the chair were randomly scattered in front of the robots, who were able to identify the correct parts and detect force to understand when, for example, pins were fully inserted into their holes, all while managing to move without obstructing one another Defeated by Ikea's flatpack? Call in
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Science | The Guardian

Flat-pack heaven? Robots master task of assembling Ikea chairMachines programmed by engineers in Singapore complete job in just over 20 minutes Those who fear the rise of the machines, look away now. In a laboratory in Singapore two robots have mastered a task that roundly defeats humans every weekend: they have successfully assembled an Ikea chair. Engineers at Nanyang Technological University used a 3D camera and two industrial robot arms fitted with gri
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A Robot Does the Impossible: Assembling an Ikea Chair Without Having a MeltdownResearchers use off-the-shelf robot parts to piece together one of those Stefan Ikea chairs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

People waste nearly a pound of food daily: studyAmericans waste nearly a pound of food per person each day, but the exact amount of food we trash differs by how healthy your diet is, a new University of Vermont co-authored national study finds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New ancestor of modern sea turtles found in AlabamaA sea turtle discovered in Alabama is a new species from the Late Cretaceous epoch, according to a study published April 18, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Drew Gentry from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Alabama, USA, and colleagues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Martian moons model indicates formation following large impactSouthwest Research Institute scientists posit a violent birth of the tiny Martian moons Phobos and Deimos, but on a much smaller scale than the giant impact thought to have resulted in the Earth-Moon system. Their work shows that an impact between proto-Mars and a dwarf-planet-sized object likely produced the two moons, as detailed in a paper published today in Science Advances.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals new Antarctic process contributing to sea level rise and climate changeA new IMAS-led study has revealed a previously undocumented process where melting glacial ice sheets change the ocean in a way that further accelerates the rate of ice melt and sea level rise.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Why touch can be such a creepy sensation in VRTouch sensation in VR can go from immersive to unnerving as the feeling gets more realistic, if you can’t see the source.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An asymptomatic patient with severe mitral regurgitationIn the current issue of Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications, researcher Blase A. Carabello, from East Carolina University, Greenville, N.C., USA presents a case study of an asymptomatic patient with severe mitral regurgitation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers design 'soft' robots that can move on their ownIf Star Wars' R2-D2 is your idea of a robot, think again. Researchers led by a University of Houston engineer have reported a new class of soft robot, composed of ultrathin sensing, actuating electronics and temperature-sensitive artificial muscle that can adapt to the environment and crawl, similar to the movement of an inchworm or caterpillar.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: How to calculate pricing and resources for cloud computingResearchers in the University at Buffalo School of Management have developed a new algorithm that cloud computing service providers can use to establish pricing and allocate resources.
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Scientific American Content: Global

IKEA-Building Robot Conquers Touchy-Feely ChallengeThe Swedish furniture has become something of a benchmark for robotics engineers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pacquiao to launch own cryptocurrencyPhilippine boxing icon Manny Pacquiao said Wednesday he would launch a cryptocurrency to connect with fans, but also backed the regulation of virtual currencies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU parliament demands Zuckerberg answer questions in personThe European Parliament on Wednesday demanded Facebook chief Mark Zuckerberg appear in person to answer questions about the Cambridge Analytica scandal, rejecting his offer to send a more junior executive in his place.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Take 2 for launch of NASA planet-hunting spacecraftNASA's newest planet-hunting spacecraft is back on the pad for another shot at launch.
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The Atlantic

The Myths and Realities Behind The ExorcistThe Exorcist is to exorcisms what The Godfather is to the Mafia: That is, the film is the font of every cliché about its subject and barely rooted in fact. Just as Francis Ford Coppola’s 1972 mobster classic invented many of its gangland rituals out of thin air, William Friedkin’s landmark 1973 horror movie didn’t have much to do with the real-life case it was based on. One could view Friedkin’s
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The Atlantic

Since 2016, Half of All Coral in the Great Barrier Reef Has DiedOnce upon a time, there was a city so dazzling and kaleidoscopic, so braided and water-rimmed, that it was often compared to a single living body. It clustered around a glimmering emerald spine, which astronauts could glimpse from orbit. It hid warm nooks and crannies, each a nursery for new life. It opened into radiant, iris-colored avenues, which tourists crossed oceans to see. The city was, th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Craigslist, other online exchanges, may be good for the environmentOnline exchanges, such as Craigslist, may not just help consumers declutter and earn a few extra bucks—a Penn State researcher suggests that using those exchanges may help inspire behavior that is good for the environment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Compared to nomadic communities, Silk Road cities were urban food desertsLike passionate foodies who know the best places to eat in every town, Silk Road nomads may have been the gastronomic elites of the Medieval Ages, enjoying diets much more diverse than their sedentary urban counterparts, suggests a new collaborative study from Washington University in St. Louis, the Institute of Archaeology in Samarkand, Uzbekistan and Kiel University in Germany.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Screen reader plus keyboard helps blind, low-vision users browse modern webpagesBrowsing through offerings on Airbnb means clicking on rows of photos to compare options from prospective hosts. This kind of table-based navigation is increasingly central to our digital lives - but it can be tedious or impossible for people who are blind or have low vision to navigate these modern webpages using traditional screen readers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Craigslist, other online exchanges, may be good for the environmentOnline exchanges, such as Craigslist, may not just help consumers declutter and earn a few extra bucks -- a Penn State researcher suggests that using those exchanges may help inspire behavior that is good for the environment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Obesity linked with higher chance of developing rapid, irregular heart ratePeople with obesity are more likely to develop a rapid and irregular heart rate, called atrial fibrillation, which can lead to stroke, heart failure and other complications, according to Penn State researchers. They found that people with obesity had a 40 percent higher chance of developing atrial fibrillation than people without obesity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Screen reader plus keyboard helps blind, low-vision users browse modern webpagesBy using a keyboard for tactile feedback in combination with a screen reader, users were three times more successful at navigating complex modern webpages, like they would encounter in a typical Airbnb booking site.
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Science : NPR

Swarms Of Tiny Sea Creatures Are Powerful Enough To Mix Oceans, Study FindsEach night, the organisms gather in a "vertical stampede" to feed at the ocean's surface. Research suggests the columns of swimming animals can create large downward jets that help churn the waters. (Image credit: Isabel Houghton / J.R. Strickler /courtesy of Stanford / University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Republicans more persuasive than scientists on climate changeRegardless of political affiliation, people are more likely to believe facts about climate change when they come from Republicans speaking against what has become a partisan interest in this country, says a new University of Connecticut study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers study how well greater sage grouse habitat protects other speciesResearchers in the University of Wyoming's Department of Zoology and Physiology and Program in Ecology discovered that size does matter—as it pertains to the effectiveness of secondary species' wildlife protection relative to the size of a wildlife reserve set aside for an umbrella species.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Great Welsh science helps solve pollinator puzzleWelsh scientists piecing together the giant jigsaw puzzle of plant pollination are a step closer to knowing how it all fits thanks to a new paper by Swansea University PhD researcher Andrew Lucas.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

This 2-D nanosheet expands like a Grow MonsterGrow Monsters. Expandable water toys. Whatever you call them, they're plastic-like figurines that swell when placed in water.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon partners with Best Buy on smart TVs, a "win-win"TV Best Buy AmazonAmazon has cut a deal to sell voice-controlled TVs at Best Buy, the latest attempt by the online retailer to get its burgeoning suite of tech products out where people can see and touch them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Portable device to sniff out trapped humansThe first step after buildings collapse from an earthquake, bombing or other disaster is to rescue people who could be trapped in the rubble. But finding entrapped humans among the ruins can be challenging. Scientists now report in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry the development of an inexpensive, selective sensor that is light and portable enough for first responders to hold in their hands o
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The Atlantic

The Inheritance and the Ambitions of Queer ArtThe Inheritance opens with a narrative device that could be unbearable if it weren’t so charmingly done. A writer (Samuel H. Levine) has a story to tell, and for assistance he channels the spirit of his idol, the English novelist E.M. Forster. The unnamed writer explains that he wants to capture the world that he and his friends occupy as a group of gay men in contemporary New York. But he’s stru
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Scientific American Content: Global

Low-Carbon Investment Is Moving Too Slowly to Rein in Warming, U.N. WarnsGrowing recognition of climate change’s economic threat has not stymied fossil fuel investments -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Masses of shrimp and krill may play a huge role in mixing oceansHoards of migrating shrimp and krill can cause large-scale turbulence in the ocean, a new study suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

One step closer to understanding explosive sensitivity with molecule designExplosives have an inherent problem - they should be perfectly safe for handling and storage but detonate reliably on demand. Using computer modeling and a novel molecule design technique, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have replaced one "arm" of an explosive molecule to help unravel the first steps in the detonation process and better understand its sensitivity—how easily it begins
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UTA expands efforts to develop water recycling technologiesThe Collaborative Laboratories for Environmental Analysis and Remediation at The University of Texas at Arlington has expanded its partnership with oil field equipment supplier Challenger Water Solutions to develop water recycling technologies that will transform waste from unconventional oil and gas development into reusable water.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientist works to increase crops' water saving potentialThere is one ingredient that every single crop is absolutely dependent on—water.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Coal mining reduces abundance, richness of aquatic lifeCoal mining, under current US regulations, has significantly reduced the abundance and variety of fish, invertebrates, salamanders, and other aquatic life in streams, according to a new study from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Psoriasis treated with compound derived from immune cellsA compound from the body's own immune cells can treat psoriasis in mice and holds promise for other autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, according to a new study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Global warming is transforming the Great Barrier ReefA new study published online today in Nature shows that corals on the northern Great Barrier Reef experienced a catastrophic die-off following the extended marine heatwave of 2016.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Black hole and stellar winds form giant butterfly, shut down star formation in galaxyResearchers at the University of Colorado Boulder have completed an unprecedented 'dissection' of twin galaxies in the final stages of merging. The new study, led by CU Boulder research associate Francisco Müller-Sánchez, explores a galaxy called NGC 6240. While most galaxies in the universe hold only one supermassive black hole at their center, NGC 6240 contains two -- and they're circling each o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Characterizing 'keyhole' is first step to fighting obesity at cellular levelA Vanderbilt team and their international colleagues characterized for the first time a complex, little-understood cellular receptor type that, when activated, shuts off hunger.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Leptin's neural circuit identifiedScientists identified a neural circuit in the hypothalamus as the primary mechanism mediating the hormone leptin's anti-obesity and anti-diabetes effects and found two mechanisms underlying leptin's inhibition of appetite. The work in mice advances efforts to treat human obesity and diabetes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

En route to the optical nuclear clockTogether with colleagues from Munich and Mainz, researchers at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have performed the first-ever optical measurements of some important properties of the low-energy state of the Th-229 nucleus. In this way, a laser excitation of the atomic nucleus can be monitored, thus allowing an optical nuclear clock to be realized that 'ticks' more precisely than pre
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The "dead zone" of the Gulf of Mexico | Nancy RabalaisOcean expert Nancy Rabalais tracks the ominously named "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico -- where there isn't enough oxygen in the water to support life. The Gulf has the second largest dead zone in the world; on top of killing fish and crustaceans, it's also killing fisheries in these waters. Rabalais tells us about what's causing it -- and how we can reverse its harmful effects and restore one o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can estimates from forensic handwriting experts be trusted in court?Forensic handwriting specialists are often called on to testify in court about the origins of a few lines of writing, or to determine whether a specific person has written a sentence. Scientific and forensic institutions also increasingly ask these experts to state the likelihood that a specific handwriting feature will occur in handwriting in the general public. Following a new study, researchers
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US judges should do more than simply 'apply the law' when it demands cruel sentencesIn a paper published by the Virginia Journal of Criminal Law, experts argue for strategies to help judges resolve conflicts between their morals and the letter of the law. The paper uses mandatory minimum sentences as a case study of one key context where judicial dilemmas often occur.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Heatwaves 'cook' Great Barrier Reef coralsRecurring spells of ocean warming impact the diversity of coral reef communities.
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The Atlantic

The Megafire Burning in OklahomaIn western Oklahoma, a region suffering through an exceptionally harsh drought and now enduring dangerously hot and dry conditions, several wildfires have recently broken out, including the Rhea Fire, a “megafire” which has burned more than 260,000 acres since April 12. Megafire is a term used by the National Interagency Fire Center for a wildfire larger than 100,000 acres. The Rhea Fire, one of
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Tax Refund Tech Deals: Roomba, Essential Phone, Dell, SonyThese are the best deals we found this week.
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Google's New AI Head Is So Smart He Doesn't Need AIColleagues joke that Jeff Dean increased the speed of light. Now he's charged with taking Google's artificial-intelligence efforts in new directions.
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Feed: All Latest

Welcome to the Wikipedia for Terms of Service AgreementsTerms of Service; Didn't Read summarizes the terms you've blindly agreed to, and offers discussion around what they mean.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stemming the tide of ocean plasticsAs people in the developing countries become more affluent, they end up buying more plastics. But these areas often don't have good waste management procedures in place, so a lot of that plastic eventually ends up in the ocean, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Brexit debate on Twitter driven by economic and nationalist issues, not populismDiscussion on Twitter during the Brexit referendum campaign was motivated by nationalist and economic concerns, and less driven by populist and globalist issues, according to a new study from City, University of London.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Black hole and stellar winds form giant butterfly, shut down star formation in galaxyResearchers at the University of Colorado Boulder have completed an unprecedented "dissection" of twin galaxies in the final stages of merging.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Global warming is transforming the Great Barrier ReefA new study published online today in Nature shows that corals on the northern Great Barrier Reef experienced a catastrophic die-off following the extended marine heatwave of 2016.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

En route to the optical nuclear clockThe nucleus of thorium-229 possesses a property that is unique among all known nuclides: It should be possible to excite it with ultraviolet light. To date, little has been known about the low-energy state of the Th-229 nucleus that is responsible for this property. Together with their colleagues from Munich and Mainz, researchers at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) have now perform
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers study how well greater sage grouse habitat protects other speciesProtected areas for sage grouse don't necessarily serve the needs of other species that depend on sagebrush habitat, showing that the bird might not be as much of an umbrella species as had been assumed.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

Bold and Aggressive Behavior Means Birds Thrive in CitiesBirds living in urban areas rarely get any peace and must cope with almost constant disturbance from both humans and their pets -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Richard Harland (UC Berkeley) 3: Early Frog Development: How to Make a Tadpole or a TwinXenopus laevis, is an excellent model to study vertebrate development. Richard Harland outlines frog development including the cell movements and molecular signals of gastrulation. https://www.ibiology.org/development-and-stem-cells/frog-development Talk Overview: Richard Harland begins his talk by asking how a fertilized egg goes from a single cell to a complex, multicellular organism during ver
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Richard Harland (UC Berkeley) 2: The Cellular Basis of GastrulationXenopus laevis, is an excellent model to study vertebrate development. Richard Harland outlines frog development including the cell movements and molecular signals of gastrulation. https://www.ibiology.org/development-and-stem-cells/frog-development Talk Overview: Richard Harland begins his talk by asking how a fertilized egg goes from a single cell to a complex, multicellular organism during ver
6h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Richard Harland (UC Berkeley) 1: Early Frog Development: How to Make a TadpoleXenopus laevis, is an excellent model to study vertebrate development. Richard Harland outlines frog development including the cell movements and molecular signals of gastrulation. https://www.ibiology.org/development-and-stem-cells/frog-development Talk Overview: Richard Harland begins his talk by asking how a fertilized egg goes from a single cell to a complex, multicellular organism during ver
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fatty fish and camelina oil are beneficial for your HDL and IDL cholesterolEating fatty fish increases the size and lipid composition of HDL particles in people with impaired glucose metabolism, according to a new study. These changes in the size and lipid composition of HDL particles make them beneficial for cardiovascular health. The study also found that camelina sativa oil decreases the number of harmful IDL particles.
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New Scientist - News

Shredded galaxy is disintegrating before our eyes after smash-upAfter a collision with its neighbouring galaxy, the Small Magellanic Cloud may lose its ability to give birth to new stars, causing it to grow dim
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New Scientist - News

More education is what makes people live longer, not more moneyAs countries get richer, their citizens live longer. We’ve long thought that rising wealth was responsible for this, but it turns out education is the cause
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The Scientist RSS

RNA Injection Restores Hearing in Guinea PigsResearchers deliver small interfering RNAs loaded into nanoparticles into the ears of adult guinea pigs to regenerate hair cells damaged by noise.
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Popular Science

This company wants to replace braille with a controversial new fontTechnology Meet ELIA, a new tactile reading system. Little has changed in the way of tactile reading and writing since Louis Braille published his braille system in 1829. But ELIA has big plans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Key workflow interruptions in emergency departments identifiedInterruptions in workflow, such as a phone call while working on another task, or when a colleague stops by for a chat, can lead to inefficiencies in the workplace. Now, a study from the University of Missouri has determined that workflow interruptions are most likely to occur during two key events -- electronic medical record documentation and direct patient care. Findings suggest that changes in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tennessee scientist works to increase crops' water saving potentialStudies at the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture are identifying plant physiological traits that could minimize the effect of drought in row crops.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Wide distribution of naloxone can slash overdose deaths during epidemicsA new study in The Lancet Public Health shows the rapid expansion of British Columbia's Take Home Naloxone program significantly reduced the number of fentanyl-related overdose deaths in 2016.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ultrafast electron oscillation and dephasing monitored by attosecond light sourceCollaborative research team of Prof. Jun Takeda and Associate Prof. Ikufumi Katayama in the laboratory of Yokohama National University (YNU) and Nippon Telegraph and Telephone (NTT) successfully observed petahertz (PHz: 1015 of a hertz) electron oscillation. The periodic electron oscillations of 667-383 attoseconds (as: 10-18 of a second) is the fastest that has ever been measured in the direct ti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Republicans more persuasive than scientists on climate changeRegardless of political affiliation, people are more likely to believe facts about climate change when they come from Republicans speaking against what has become a partisan interest in this country, says a new UConn study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Transplanted livers help body defend against organ rejection, Mayo Clinic study findsWhen patients undergo a dual kidney-liver transplant, the liver has a protective effect on the kidney, the study found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A molecular atlas of calcific aortic valve diseaseA team of researchers from BWH has comprehensively analyzed gene expression and protein distribution in human aortic valves obtained from valve replacement surgery. Their results are published in Circulation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Many European countries are not ready to stop viral hepatitisMany European countries lack a comprehensive policy to eliminate viral hepatitis as a major public health threat, according to a patient group-based survey implemented in 25 countries. The Hep-CORE study was coordinated by ISGlobal -- an institution supported by the 'la Caixa' Foundation -- and led by the European Liver Patient's Association.
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Science | The Guardian

Constance Blackwell obituaryMy mother, Constance Blackwell, an intellectual historian who has died aged 83, played a key role in fostering deeper understanding of the development of 16th- and 17th-century science and philosophy in Europe. As the founder, in 1994, of the International Society for Intellectual History (ISIH), she supported several national and international conferences and saw their proceedings through to pub
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Science | The Guardian

Mercury 13: the untold story of women testing for spaceflight in the 1960sIn a new Netflix documentary, the tales of 13 female pilots who dreamed of becoming astronauts yet were denied the opportunity by Nasa are finally brought to light When Neil Armstrong clambered down on to the surface of the moon, he famously declared that he had taken “one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind”. But what if that one small step had been taken by a woman? What kind of
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Science | The Guardian

Smart cities need thick data, not big dataIn Barcelona, high-tech data platforms generate demand for old-fashioned community development. Residents living around Plaça del Sol joke that theirs is the only square where, despite the name, rain is preferable. Rain means fewer people gather to socialise and drink, reducing noise for the flats overlooking the square. Residents know this with considerable precision because they’ve developed a
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The Atlantic

The Surgeon Who Experimented on SlavesTheir names—at least the ones we know—were Lucy, Anarcha, and Betsey. There were other women, but their identities have been forgotten. The man whose name appears in medical textbooks, whose likeness is memorialized in statues, is J. Marion Sims. Celebrated as the “father of modern gynecology,” Sims practiced the surgical techniques that made him famous on enslaved women: Lucy, Anarcha, Betsey, a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ebola media coverage impacted how the public perceived the disease and survivorsNow, researchers at the University of Missouri have found that news coverage of Ebola during the time it was in the US focused on telling individual stories to humanize those affected. Based on these findings, the researchers suggest that reporters covering health crises might have a greater positive impact on their audiences if they write human interest stories that share helpful information.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NYITCOM at A-State professor lends anatomy expertise to solve ancient mysteryScientists have long wondered why the physical traits of Neanderthals, the ancestors of modern humans, differ greatly from today's man. Now, a research team led by a professor at the University of New England in Australia, with the aid of an anatomy and fluid dynamics expert at NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine at Arkansas State University (NYITCOM at A-State), may have the answer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Coal mining reduces abundance, richness of aquatic lifeCoal mining, under current US regulations, has significantly reduced the abundance and variety of fish, invertebrates, salamanders, and other aquatic life in streams, according to a new study from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain scans may help diagnose neurological, psychiatric disordersA new study shows that individual brain networks are remarkably stable from day to day and while undertaking different tasks, suggesting that they could potentially form the basis of diagnostic tests for brain disorders or diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For young adults with blood cancer, pediatric centers may improve survivalAdolescents and young adults with acute leukemia have a survival advantage if they receive treatment at a pediatric cancer center versus an adult center, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers find the brain processes sight and sound in same mannerGeorgetown neuroscientists have found that the human brain learns to make sense of auditory and visual stimuli in the same two-step process.
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Viden

Det er blevet sværere at fuske i danske web-butikkerØget identitetskontrol har indtil videre lukket 2600 fup-butikker på nettet
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why is it harder for females to gain weight?Why is it harder for females to gain weight? A new study proposes that part of the answer may be in the brain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deep learning predicts drug-drug and drug-food interactionsScientists have developed a computational framework, DeepDDI, that accurately predicts and generates 86 types of drug-drug and drug-food interactions as outputs of human-readable sentences, which allows in-depth understanding of the drug-drug and drug-food interactions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain networks: Keeping the excitement under controlScientists are using advanced techniques to monitor the activity of networks of single sensory neurons in the brain. By listening in on hundreds of conversations, the scientists have discovered how a single signal from one cell manages to attract attention.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

T cell antigen receptors act alone: Longstanding immunological mystery solvedWith a standard electron microscope, only dead T cells can be studied. Therefore, it is very hard to figure out the inner workings of the cell. New microscopy techniques, making it possible to study living T cells, have now led to surprising results: while it has been generally believed that T cell receptors must interact with one another for effective immune-signaling, the new study shows: T cell
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flexible TVs and high performance wearable smart tech one step closerFlexible televisions, tablets and phones as well as 'truly wearable' smart tech are a step closer thanks to a nanoscale transistor just created.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Coho salmon die, chum salmon survive in stormwater runoff researchScientists found that coho salmon became sick and nearly died, within just a few hours of exposure to polluted stormwater. But chum salmon showed no signs of ill-effects after prolonged exposure to the same water.
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'Trustjacking' Could Expose iPhones to AttackThink twice before you tell your iPhone to trust that laptop when you charge it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

One step closer to understanding explosive sensitivity with molecule designExplosives have an inherent problem -- they should be perfectly safe for handling and storage but detonate reliably on demand.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Having fully stocked cart to treat malignant hyperthermia during labor not cost-beneficialMaintaining a stocked cart, with a full supply of the life-saving drug dantrolene, to treat malignant hyperthermia, a rare but potentially fatal adverse reaction to general anesthesia, may not be cost-beneficial in hospital maternity units where the incidence of the reaction is low, according to a new paper published in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal
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Scientific American Content: Global

Assam's Endangered ApesNortheast India's hoolock gibbons are at risk from human incursion into their native forests -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Writing and deleting magnets with lasersScientists have found a way to write and delete magnets in an alloy using a laser beam -- a surprising effect. The reversibility of the process opens up new possibilities in the fields of material processing, optical technology, and data storage.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What happens to our muscles during spaceflight and when living on Mars?The inactivity of astronauts during spaceflights presents a significant risk to their muscles, says a new study. Scientists have simulated the impact of 21-day spaceflights on the body, and the impact of low gravity environments such as the moon or Mars.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Overcoming bias about music takes workExpectations and biases play a large role in our enjoyment of experiences such as art and wine. Now, researchers have found that simply being told that a performer is a professional or a student changes the way the brain responds to music, and overcoming this bias takes a deliberate effort.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why don't kids use their asthma medicines?In a new analysis of interviews conducted with children who have asthma, their caregivers and their clinicians, researchers found that there was significant lack of agreement about why the kids miss their needed daily anti-inflammatory medication.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The 'radical' ways sunlight builds bigger molecules in the atmosphereWith summer approaching, 'sea and sun' might conjure up images of a beach trip. But for scientists, the interactions of the two have big implications for the climate and for the formation of tiny droplets, or aerosols, that lead to clouds. Researchers demonstrate that sunlight can cause certain molecules at the ocean's surface to activate others, resulting in larger molecules that could affect the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

People who use medical marijuana more likely to use and misuse other prescription drugsCan medical marijuana help to fight the opioid epidemic? Many believe that it can. But a new study finds that people who use medical marijuana actually have higher rates of medical and non-medical prescription drug use -- including pain relievers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new Listeria species from Costa RicaListeria costaricensis is the official name given to the new bacterial species just described by investigators.
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Ingeniøren

Klimaråd: Sådan skal energiafgifterne reformeresKlimarådet anbefaler, at de høje og meget forskellige energiafgifter i Danmark skal erstattes til én enkelt afgift på drivhusgasudledning efter princippet om, at forureneren skal betale for den skade, forureningen forvolder.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team backed by Microsoft co-founder locates USS Helena wreckA Microsoft co-founder's mission to locate sunken warships in the South Pacific has chalked up another victory with the discovery of the USS Helena nearly 75 years after it was sunk by Japanese torpedoes in the waters off the Solomon Islands, reviving stories of the battle-tested ship's endurance and the nearly unbelievable survival of 165 of the crewmen.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Water dynamics indicate tumor statusHow aggressive is a tumor? To measure the tumor status without taking tissue samples, Italian researchers have developed a method based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of whole body parts. The technique measures proton nuclear resonance dispersion profiles at low magnetic fields, which reveals the water exchange rate of the tumor cells. Thus, tumor development can be monitored rapidly and noni
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study suggests we can recognize speakers only from how faces move when talkingResults of a new study by cognitive psychologist and speech scientist Alexandra Jesse and her linguistics undergraduate student Michael Bartoli at the University of Massachusetts Amherst should help to settle a long-standing disagreement among cognitive psychologists about the information we use to recognize people speaking to us. The study shows that listeners can use visual dynamic features to l
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Great Welsh science helps solve pollinator puzzleWelsh scientists piecing together the giant jigsaw puzzle of plant pollination are a step closer to knowing how it all fits thanks to a new paper by Swansea University Ph.D. researcher Andrew Lucas.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Portable device to sniff out trapped humansThe first step after buildings collapse from an earthquake, bombing or other disaster is to rescue people who could be trapped in the rubble. But finding entrapped humans among the ruins can be challenging. Scientists now report in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry the development of an inexpensive, selective sensor that is light and portable enough for first responders to hold in their hands o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pepper plant sops up personal care product antibioticIt sometimes can be hard to find toothpastes, soaps and other toiletries without antibiotics. Their popularity has caused an increase in environmental levels of antimicrobial substances, such as triclocarban (TCC), which end up in the water and soil used to grow crops. Scientists report in the ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that TCC and related molecules can end up in food, with p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Electromagnetic wizardry: Wireless power transfer enhanced by backward signalAn international research team has proposed a way to increase the efficiency of wireless power transfer over long distances and tested it with numerical simulations and experiments. To achieve this, they beamed power between two antennas, one of which was excited with a back-propagating signal of specific amplitude and phase. The new development will improve wireless power transmission. This study
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stemming the tide of ocean plasticsAs people in the developing countries become more affluent, they end up buying more plastics. But these areas often don't have good waste management procedures in place, so a lot of that plastic eventually ends up in the ocean, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

This 2-D nanosheet expands like a Grow MonsterEngineers discovered that tiny crystal lattices called 'self-assembling molecular nanosheets' expand when exposed to light. The advancement could form the backbone of new light-powered actuators, oscillators and other microscopic electronic components useful in the development of artificial muscles and other soft robotic systems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UTA expands efforts to develop water recycling technologiesThe Collaborative Laboratories for Environmental Analysis and Remediation at the University of Texas at Arlington has expanded its partnership with oil field equipment supplier Challenger Water Solutions to develop water recycling technologies that will transform waste from unconventional oil and gas development into reusable water.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Harvesting water from fog with harps (video)As summertime draws near, some people around the US will face annual water usage restrictions as water supplies become strained. But for those who live in arid climates year-round, water shortages are a constant concern. In these areas, residents must capitalize on even the smallest bit of moisture in the air. Now researchers report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces that they have developed a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Development of a quantitative pharmacodynamic assay for apoptosis in fixed tumor tissueExisting microscopy-based methods of detecting apoptosis, such as TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labeling), have limited quantitative capabilities due to insufficient signal-to-noise ratios. Researchers at the National Cancer Institute and National Cancer Institute-Frederick have addressed this issue via development of a highly specific apoptosis assay designed for immu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Safety measures could save 250,000 lives a year in low- and middle-income countriesInterventions such as speeding enforcement and formal swimming lessons for young children could potentially save more than 250,000 lives a year if they were implemented across populations living in extreme poverty in low- and middle-income countries, according to a new study from researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
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Big Think

What do the first 10 million years of the solar system look like? These diamonds give a clue.A little peak into our past reveals tantalizing details. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Detailed images of tumor vasculatureThanks to a new method of analyzing ultrasound images, conventional scanners can be used for generating high-res images of blood vessels in tumors. This approach makes it easier to distinguish between different types of tumors, and it facilitates the tracking of the progress and success of chemotherapy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can estimates from forensic handwriting experts be trusted in court?Forensic handwriting specialists are often called on to testify in court about the origins of a few lines of writing, or to determine whether a specific person has written a sentence. Following a new study, researchers are now advising courts to take a cautionary approach when using experience-based likelihood ratios as evidence.
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New Scientist - News

Getting just 6 hours of sleep is linked to mental health issuesYou might think you can get by on 5 or 6 hours’ sleep a night, but people who get less than 7 hours are more likely to have mood or mental health problems
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Moderate decline in violent attacks against Jews, but attacks are becoming more brutalAnti-Semitic violence around the world dropped 9 percent from 2016 to 2017, but a 'dramatic increase' of all other forms of anti-Semitic manifestations has raised 'grave concerns among European Jews regarding their security and the continuation of communal life,' according to an annual report from Tel Aviv University's Kantor Center for the Study of Contemporary European Jewry, published on April
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why is it harder for females to gain weight?Why is it harder for females to gain weight? A new study proposes that part of the answer may be in the brain.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Detailed images of tumor vasculatureThanks to a new method of analyzing ultrasound images, conventional scanners can be used for generating high-res images of blood vessels in tumors. This approach makes it easier to distinguish between different types of tumors, and it facilitates the tracking of the progress and success of chemotherapy.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can estimates from forensic handwriting experts be trusted in court?Forensic handwriting specialists are often called on to testify in court about the origins of a few lines of writing, or to determine whether a specific person has written a sentence. Following a new study, researchers are now advising courts to take a cautionary approach when using experience-based likelihood ratios as evidence. The research, led by Kristy Martire of the University of New South W
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

US judges should do more than simply 'apply the law' when it demands cruel sentencesLegal experts from the University of Surrey and Virginia Tech are calling for judges to seek a middle ground between the law and morality to deal with cases where 'mandatory minimum' provisions would force them to impose excessive punishments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is risk of suicide attempt among soldiers associated with time before, during or after deployments?Early first deployment and a shorter length of time between deployments were associated with a higher risk of suicide attempt among soldiers with two deployments regardless of previous mental health diagnosis and other military service-related or sociodemographic factors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Association of cannabis with cognitive functioning in young peopleFrequent cannabis use by adolescents and young adults was associated with small reductions in cognitive function that appeared to diminish with abstinence over time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is marital status associated with early detection of localized melanoma?Marital status was associated with earlier detection of localized melanoma, with married patients more likely to present with early stage tumors than patients who were never married, divorced or widowed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early skin cancer more accurately diagnosed by dermatologist than other providersPAs increasingly used in dermatology to cut costs and improve access, but are less likely than dermatologists to accurately diagnose early stage skin cancers, according to new research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Three solutions to maximize the clinical benefit and affordability of targeted cancer drugsA group led by the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania has proposed three solutions to maximize the clinical benefit and affordability of targeted cancer drugs.
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Popular Science

An evolutionary biologist takes on the absurd bodies of superheroesNexus Media News An interview with evolutionary biologist Shane Campbell-Staton. Evolutionary biologist Shane Campbell-Staton loves reading comic books almost as much as he loves studying unusual animals. Now he’s combining his twin passions in a new…
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Futurity.org

Longer lives mean more people will have dementiaThe rate of older Americans with dementia is on the decline, but the growing number of people 85 or older will roughly double in the next 20 years. That means the actual number of people will increase substantially, a new study warns. More than 45 million people worldwide have the condition and the impact on both them and the people who care for them is significant. Its economic impact, including
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Futurity.org

Know-it-alls are more ignorant than they’ll admitPeople who think their knowledge and beliefs are superior to others are especially prone to overestimating what they actually know, new research suggests. Even after getting feedback showing them how much they didn’t know relevant political facts, these people still claimed that their beliefs were objectively more correct than everyone else’s. On top of that, they were more likely to seek out new
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New on MIT Technology Review

China is being pushed out of US telecoms
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Similarity between high-risk atherosclerotic plaque and cancer cells discoveredNew research from Lund University in Sweden shows that inflammatory, unstable atherosclerotic plaque has a metabolism that differs from that of stable plaque -- and is similar to that of cancer cells. Future research will therefore investigate whether cancer drugs could potentially be used to treat cardiovascular disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flexible TVs and high performance wearable smart tech one step closerFlexible televisions, tablets and phones as well as 'truly wearable' smart tech are a step closer thanks to a nanoscale transistor created by researchers at The University of Manchester and Shandong University in China.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bees and cuckoos will bring savings to airlinesThe flight routes of passenger aircraft are generally well established. In practice, unforeseen factors, mainly related to the weather, often force pilots to cover more kilometers than anticipated. A Polish-Colombian team of scientists and engineers, inspired by the behavior of insects and birds, has developed software that allows real-time rational modification of flight routes. As a result, it w
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Writing and deleting magnets with lasersScientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, USA have found a way to write and delete magnets in an alloy using a laser beam -- a surprising effect. The reversibility of the process opens up new possibilities in the fields of material processing, optical technology,
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Instagram micro-celebritiesPhysical attractiveness, high-quality photos, interesting content, engagement with the audience, and subject competence are the key contributing factors to Instagram micro-celebrities' success, according to a study which examines the influence of online celebrity endorsers on consumer purchase intentions. The research was conducted by Oxana Trofimenko from HSE University jointly with Elmira Djafar
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

T cell antigen receptors act alone: Longstanding immunological mystery solvedWith a standard electron microscope, only dead T cells can be studied. Therefore, it is very hard to figure out the inner workings of the cell. New microscopy techniques, making it possible to study living T cells, have now led to surprising results: while it has been generally believed that T cell receptors must interact with one another for effective immune-signaling, the new study shows: T cell
8h
The Atlantic

Pompeo's Secret Visit Shows Trump Wants to Go Big on North KoreaOn Tuesday, Donald Trump, who once threatened North Korea with “fire and fury” and tweeted at his secretary of state to quit “wasting his time trying to negotiate with Little Rocket Man,” gave North and South Korea his “blessing” discuss a possible peace treaty and boasted that the United States and North Korea were talking “at very high levels.” Hours later, we found out how high: The Washington
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The harm reduction model of drug addiction treatment | Mark TyndallWhy do we still think that drug use is a law-enforcement issue? Making drugs illegal does nothing to stop people from using them, says public health expert Mark Tyndall. So, what might work? Tyndall shares community-based research that shows how harm-reduction strategies, like safe-injection sites, are working to address the drug overdose crisis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How does the Pacific Walker circulation respond to strong tropical volcanism?A new study found the Pacific Walker circulation, one of the most important circulation systems in the tropics, shows a significant interannual weakening after strong tropical volcanic eruptions.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Improved method of delivering anti-cancer drugsA new non-toxic method for delivering anti-cancer drugs to specific parts of the human body could mean the end of the severe and nasty side effects associated with many cancer therapies, according to researchers at Cardiff University's School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Keeping the excitement under controlJames Poulet's lab at the MDC uses advanced techniques to monitor the activity of networks of single sensory neurons in the brain. By listening in on hundreds of conversations, the scientists have discovered how a single signal from one cell manages to attract attention.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Molecular scaffolding aids construction at the nanoscaleResearchers at OIST have made a nanoscale construction kit comprised of molecular 'bricks' and 'scaffolding,' inspired by the way the extracellular matrix is built around living cells.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brexit debate on Twitter driven by economic and nationalist issues, not populismDiscussion on Twitter during the Brexit referendum campaign was motivated by nationalist and economic concerns, and less driven by populist and globalist issues, according to a new study from City, University of London.The City researchers found three quarters of messages (74 percent) displayed nationalist sentiments, such as the desire for the country to be self-governing, as opposed to 26 percen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ALS treatment delays disease and extends life in ratsInvestigators at Cedars-Sinai are exploring a new way to treat amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) by transplanting specially engineered neural cells into the brain. Their new study shows the transplanted cells delayed disease progression and extended survival in animal models.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Chemical attackExperts describe the challenges facing those investigating an alleged chemical attack in Syria.
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NYT > Science

Climate Lawsuits, Once Limited to the Coasts, Jump InlandLocal governments in California and New York City have sued oil and gas giants. Now Boulder and two Colorado counties have joined the fight.
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Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor er dej nemmere at vaske af i koldt vand?En læser vil gerne vide, hvorfor dej glider lettere af fadet med koldt vand frem for varmt. Det svarer professor i gastrofysik på.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New new genus and species of extinct baleen whale identifiedPaleontologists are rewriting the history of New Zealand's ancient whales by describing a previously unknown genus of baleen whale, alive more than 27.5 million years ago and found in the Hakataramea Valley, South Canterbury.
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Futurity.org

Computer model can tell farmers what crops to plantA new computational model could help farmers and seedmakers take the guesswork out of what to plant each year. It’s simple enough that a farmer could receive a recommendation containing the five best seed types to grow given the average yields, weather conditions, and soil composition of his or her region—ranked in order of simulated success rates. The program, dubbed SimSoy, uses tools as simple
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unique protein is a vulnerability in the malaria parasiteThe malaria parasite is highly dependent on a unique protein for infecting new mosquitoes. This protein could be a target for the development of new drugs. It was discovered recently by researchers from Radboud university medical center and colleagues from the Humboldt University of Berlin. The results were published in Cell Reports on April 18.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Charge density wave inhomogeneity and pseudogap in 1T-TiSe21T-TiSe2 undergoes the superconductivity transition under Cu intercalation, pressure or electric gating. However, the interplay between CDW and superconductivity is still under debate. Researchers at Nanjing University recently demonstrate the dopant-induced CDW inhomogeneity and pseudogap state in 1T-TiSe2 by using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The CDW inhomogeneity gives rise t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Robot developed for automated assembly of designer nanomaterialsA Japanese research team developed a robot that can identify, collect, and manipulate two-dimensional nanocrystals. The robot stacked nanocrystals to form the most complex van der Waals heterostructure produced to date, with much less human intervention than the manual operations previously used to produce van der Waals heterostructures. This robot allows unprecedented access to van der Waals hete
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fatty fish and camelina oil are beneficial for your HDL and IDL cholesterolEating fatty fish increases the size and lipid composition of HDL particles in people with impaired glucose metabolism, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. These changes in the size and lipid composition of HDL particles make them beneficial for cardiovascular health. Published in Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, the study also found that camelina sativa oil decrea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deep learning predicts drug-drug and drug-food interactionsA Korean research team from KAIST developed a computational framework, DeepDDI, that accurately predicts and generates 86 types of drug-drug and drug-food interactions as outputs of human-readable sentences, which allows in-depth understanding of the drug-drug and drug-food interactions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Building crystals on a very hot surfaceAn innovative chemical reactor for depositing semiconductors at very high temperatures draws on the strength of Saudi Arabia's chemical industry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

World-first research into injury rates among people released from prisonPeople released from prison who have both mental illness and substance use problems are at 12 times the risk of suffering injury compared to the general community, world-first research from the University of Melbourne has found. Risky drug use was a health concern for many people, but injury from causes other than drugs accounted for nine out of 10 injury events.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds malaria parasites prevalent in North American fawnsResearchers who analyzed blood samples from 33 farm-raised, white-tailed fawns in Florida report that about 21 percent -- seven of 33 -- were infected by malaria parasites at some point during the first eight months of life. This research was published in mSphere, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology, Blood samples were collected at three months, six months, and eight mo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Personalized letter improves pregnancy weight for women with gestational diabetesWomen with gestational diabetes who received a tailored letter with personalized weight-gain recommendations were significantly more likely to meet national weight-gain guidelines, according to a new Kaiser Permanente study published today in Diabetes Care, a journal of the American Diabetes Association.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Battery's hidden layer revealedAn international team led by Argonne National Laboratory makes breakthrough in understanding the chemistry of the microscopically thin layer that forms between the liquid electrolyte and solid electrode in lithium-ion batteries. The results are being used in improving the layer and better predicting battery lifetime.
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The Atlantic

Beware of Selling Yoga Pants on FacebookFacebook Data Privacy“H i! I noticed you posted about your cold today. It sucks to be sick. I thought maybe you’d like to try some greens! I love them; I swear, you’ll never get sick again!” I did not want the greens. This was the third time my friend from college had tried to sell them to me online. She also did things like post statuses about “That Crazy Wrap Thing” that her friends were supposed to pretend were no
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How to improve habitat conservation for migrating cranesEvery year, endangered whooping cranes travel along a 4,000-kilometer corridor linking their Canadian nesting grounds and their winter home in Texas. Habitat in their path through the northern Great Plains is being lost at an alarming rate, but identifying key spots for protection is a challenge. Now, researchers behind a new study have created a model of whooping crane habitat use with the potent
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Some kitchen cabinets can emit potentially harmful compoundsProbably the last place anyone would want to find airborne polychlorinated biphenyl compounds (PCBs) is in the kitchen, yet that's exactly where scientists detected their presence. They say that the PCBs, which are widely considered carcinogenic, are unwanted byproducts of sealant breakdown in modern kitchen cabinetry.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Root exudates affect soil stability, water repellencyWe might think of roots as necessary, but uninteresting, parts of the crop production process. New research, however, focuses on what's going on in the soil with the plant's roots and the chemicals they produce.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study shows men and women tear ACL the same way in non-contact injuryWhile women are two to four times more likely than men to tear the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in their knee, the cause of this injury is no different between the sexes, according to new research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Coho salmon die, chum salmon survive in stormwater runoff researchWSU scientists have discovered that different species of salmon have varying reactions to polluted stormwater runoff.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Better species mapping can improve conservation efforts, study findsThe scientific models that ecologists and conservation biologists rely on to determine which species and habitats to protect lack critical information to help them make effective decisions, according to a new study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds malaria parasites prevalent in North American fawnsParasites that cause malaria can lurk in plain sight, including in deer in North America.
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Big Think

Everything doesn't 'happen for a reason'. Why do we keep saying it?In her new memoir, Duke Divinity School professor Kate Bowler opens up about battling Stage IV cancer. Read More
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Ingeniøren

Københavns Kommune snart klar med åben API til smart parkeringKøbenhavns Kommune er snart klar med en algoritme, der beregner, hvor der er størst sandsynlighed for at finde en parkeringsplads. Det har fået kommunen til at ændre udviklingsmodel fra vandfaldsmodellen til en agil model
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Futurity.org

Humor is good for you—if you do it rightHumor isn’t always useful or beneficial for reaching our goals, new research suggests. The research breaks people’s goals into three broad categories: hedonic goals (maximizing pleasure and minimizing pain), utilitarian goals (optimizing long-term well-being), and social goals (getting along with others). While humor appreciation can help make bad experiences better and help us bond with new frie
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Extreme environment of Danakil Depression sheds light on Mars, Titan and nuclear wasteThe Danakil Depression in Ethiopia is a spectacular, hostile environment that may resemble conditions encountered on Mars and Titan – as well as in sites containing nuclear waste. From 20-28 January 2018, five teams of researchers and more than 30 support staff visited two locations in the region to study the microbiology, geology and chemistry at the Dallol hydrothermal outcrop and the saline Lak
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Field-cycling relaxometry can assess the tumor status by measuring the rate of cellular water exchangeHow aggressive is a tumor? To measure the tumor status without taking tissue samples, Italian researchers have developed a method based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of whole body parts. The technique measures proton nuclear resonance dispersion profiles at low magnetic fields, which reveals the water exchange rate of the tumor cells. Thus, tumor development can be monitored rapidly and noni
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Including Some Activism with Your Earth Day Arts and CraftsRemembering the scale and impact of the day's origin may inspire kids to expand their Earth Day plans -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Eurasian atmospheric circulation anomalies can persist from winter to the following springSurface air temperature (SAT) anomalies have pronounced impacts on agriculture, socioeconomic development, and people's daily lives. A question is whether the Eurasian atmospheric circulation anomalies can persist from winter to the following spring. Using observational data and atmospheric model simulation, scientists from the Institute of Atmospheric Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences re
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Evolution: Urban life leaves behind traces in the genome of bumblebeesBumblebees living in the city have genes that differ from their relatives in the countryside. Although genetic differences are minor, they may influence how well the insects adapt to their habitat. These differences in genetic makeup are an indication that urban life does impact the evolutionary trajectory of a species, write researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the G
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Coho salmon die, chum salmon survive in stormwater runoff researchIn a recent paper published in the journal Environmental Pollution, scientists found that coho salmon became sick and nearly died, within just a few hours of exposure to polluted stormwater. But chum salmon showed no signs of ill-effects after prolonged exposure to the same water.
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New Scientist - News

New blood pressure guidelines could do more harm than goodMillions of healthy people have been recast as “sick” under new blood pressure rules, which could trigger unnecessary anxiety and medication use
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A little fold-up joystick brings haptics to portable devicesThe tactile joystick developed by startup Foldaway Haptics brings the sense of touch to mobile devices, drones and, in a smaller version, to virtual reality controls. This pocket-sized device, which can be unfolded in an instant, is about to hit the market. Next week it will be showcased at the Hannover Messe, the world's largest trade fair for industrial technology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Five reasons why robots won't take over the worldScientists are known for making dramatic predictions about the future – and sinister robots are once again in the spotlight now that artificial intelligence has become a marketing tool for all sorts of different brands.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

340,000 stars' DNA interrogated in search for sun's lost siblingsAstronomers have revealed the 'DNA' of more than 340,000 stars in the Milky Way, which should help them find the siblings of the sun, now scattered across the sky. This is the first major announcement of an ambitious survey as part of a quest to uncover the formulation and evolution of galaxies -- after the Australian-led Galactic Archaeology survey, called GALAH, commenced three years ago.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Competition between males improves resilience against climate changeAnimal species with males who compete intensively for mates might be more resilient to the effects of climate change, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bugged out by climate changeWarmer summer and fall seasons and fewer winter freeze-thaw events have led to changes in the relative numbers of different types of bugs in the Arctic. The study relies on the longest-standing, most comprehensive data set on arctic arthropods in the world today: a catalogue of almost 600,000 flies, wasps, spiders and other creepy-crawlies collected at the Zackenberg field station on the northeast
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bystanders key to tackling cyber-bullying epidemicResearchers looking into how to reduce cyber-bullying among school-age children are calling for workshops encouraging young people to morally engage with the issue to be introduced in schools.
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Popular Science

Seeing your phone's screen while wearing sunglasses just takes one quick trickDIY Here’s why. As summer returns, it’s time to relax and read by the pool. So you pull out your phone, don your shades, and...you can’t see a thing on the screen. What gives?
10h
The Scientist RSS

How Kidney Cancer EvolvesRenal cell carcinoma tumors have three different evolutionary fates, each associated with specific clinical outcomes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Revisiting existing drugs finds molecules that control body clocksUsing drug repurposing, a team of researchers led by animal biologists at Nagoya University has discovered compounds that can either shorten or lengthen the circadian rhythm in human cells. A hormone, also known as a common anti-aging supplement demonstrated period-shortening activities, and when it was fed to mice, jet lag symptoms were significantly reduced.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New light shed on how bone marrow niches keep stem cells thrivingHematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) require specialized niches in bone marrow to generate functional blood cells. CAR cells are among cell types located in niches, but their function is poorly understood. Researchers identified a protein, Ebf3, in CAR cells that is needed to maintain the bone marrow cavities and the HSC niche. With no Ebf3, HSC abundance is greatly reduced, and bone overgrowths fill t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New species of ancient whale identified and named by Otago paleontologistsUniversity of Otago paleontologists are rewriting the history of New Zealand's ancient whales by describing a previously unknown genus of baleen whale, alive more than 27.5 million years ago and found in the Hakataramea Valley, South Canterbury.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Better species mapping can improve conservation efforts, study findsWith limited funding available for conservation efforts, it's critical that species distribution models be more comprehensive
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists reveal trends in carbon storage and sequestration across Chinese ecosystemsLed by Professor FANG Jingyun from the Institute of Botany of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, together with collaborators, the ecosystem carbon sequestration project team was set up, the team aims to quantify the magnitude and distribution of ecosystem carbon pools and sequestration in China's terrestrial ecosystems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Alpine grassland productivity not sensitive to climate warming on third poleHE Jinsheng's research team at the Northwest Institute of Plateau Biology, collaborating with scientists from Peking University, established a warming-by-precipitation manipulative experiment at the Haibei National Field Research Station of Alpine Grassland Ecosystem. By combining the field manipulative experiment, 32 years of field monitoring and a meta-analysis from nine sites across the plateau
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A graphene roll-outMIT engineers have developed a scalable manufacturing process that spools out strips of graphene for use in ultrathin membranes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shielding oxygen production to keep hydrogen comingA porous cerium-based coating boosts the durability of oxygen-forming catalysts while maintaining their inherent water-splitting activity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Molecular scaffolding aids construction at the nanoscaleIf you want to build a tall house, you need to use scaffolding. Professor Ye Zhang and colleagues at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) are applying this construction principle to their lab work, with one major difference: The materials they are working with are just a few billionths of a square meter in size.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

On building ribossomesRibosomes are organelles responsible for protein synthesis in all living organisms. Ribosomes are made of proteins and RNA (Ribosomal RNA, rRNA) and putting the several elements in the right location requires a precise multi-step hierarchically ordered process. In this biogenesis, processing of rRNA precursor (pre-rRNA) is a critical step that guarantees the integrity of the functional ribosome. I
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Iran bans government bodies from using foreign message appsIran's presidency has banned all government bodies from using foreign-based messaging apps to communicate with citizens, state media reported Wednesday, after economic protests organized through such apps shook the country earlier this year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Collaborative scientific research is needed to inform the future of seabed miningTwo researchers who led a recent field study investigating potential impacts of deep-sea mining activities advocate that there is an important opportunity to establish informed guidelines for the extraction of minerals from the ocean, as activities are poised to commence in coming years.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to improve habitat conservation for migrating cranesEvery year, North America's critically endangered Whooping Cranes travel back and forth along a 4,000-kilometer corridor linking their nesting grounds in Canada and their winter home in Texas. Habitat in their path through the northern Great Plains is being lost at an alarming rate to agriculture and other development, but the birds' widely dispersed movements make identifying key spots for protec
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Protozoa detected in waste water even after treatmentA study carried out by the Water Chemistry and Microbiology group of the Universitat Politècnica de València shows that pathogenic protozoa Cryptosporidium and Giardia are present in the sludge generated by wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) even after being treated, with negative public health consequences as a result.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Computer models combat malariaAs one of the world's deadliest pathogens, Plasmodium spreads relentlessly from host to host. But a computer model created by KAUST scientists may reveal and help exploit the parasite's unknown weaknesses to uncover new options for treating malaria.
10h
Futurity.org

New speech in French Revolution paved way for changeDifferent ways of speaking may have played a significant role in winning acceptance for the new principles of governance during the French Revolution, a new study suggests. The French Revolution was one of the most important political transformations in history. Even more than 200 years later, it is held up as a model of democratic nation building. For years, historians and political scientists h
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What Earth Day means when humans possess planet-shaping powersFor nearly 50 years, Earth Day has provided an opportunity for people across the globe to come together and rally in support of the natural world. While the specific challenges have varied, the goal has remained more or less the same: to protect the rich, biological world that the current generation has inherited from being overwhelmed by the influences of humanity.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Intelligent components for the power grid of the futureFast charging of electric cars requires a lot of energy in a short period of time. These peak loads lead to bottlenecks in the power grid, and are one of the problems facing the expansion of electric mobility. The many challenges of the energy transition require a flexible and reliable power grid, which can accommodate fluctuations in the consumption and production of energy. A key element of this
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tohoku tsunami impacted home-building habits of eco-engineer heart urchinsTsunamis bring destruction. The massive waves can rip homes from beachside perches and wipe coasts clean of life. But tsunamis also bring change in their wake and can influence the lives of creatures large and small.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Novo Nordisk og Røde Kors vil sikre billig insulin i konfliktområderNyt partnerskab mellem Novo Nordisk og Røde Kors skal sikre, at kronisk syge i konfliktområder får bedre adgang til behandling.
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Dagens Medicin

Eksperter giver 20 forslag til bedre brugerinddragelse i sundhedsvæsenet140 eksperter er gået sammen om et manifest, der skal inspirere til at gøre brugerinddragelse mere naturlig på landets hospitaler.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

Oil- and Gas-Drilling Noise Stresses BirdsAnimals that nest near the loud equipment show PTSD-like physiology and have more stunted offspring -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Feed: All Latest

FCC Delays Are Keeping Broadband From Rural School KidsAn FCC program promised to bring high-speed internet to remote schools. Instead, they've mostly gotten red tape.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Expert examines the trade-offs companies face when grappling with sustainability issuesIn 2010, the environmental group Greenpeace launched an online campaign against Nestle, the food-production giant. Nestle's KitKat bars, the campaign charged, contained palm oil supplied by a company that was improperly clearing rainforests.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hydrogen as a pedalling aidAn e-bike fueled with hydrogen instead of electricity? No, this is not a utopia, but reality: industrial gas specialist Linde has developed a hydrogen pedelec equipped with a compact fuel cell instead of the usual battery. Florian Freund was inspired by the invention for his Matura thesis: He developed a prototype with which the hydrogen e-bike can be refuelled safely at the H2 filling station on
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flexible TVs and high performance wearable smart tech one step closerFlexible televisions, tablets and phones as well as 'truly wearable' smart tech are a step closer thanks to a nanoscale transistor created by researchers at The University of Manchester and Shandong University in China.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A growing climate niche for giant treesNew techniques using lasers on satellites reveal where giant trees are. An international group of scientists led by Wageningen University & Research and Nanjing University, now showed that across climate zones 'giant forests' (~40 m) are a markedly distinct phenomenon with a specific climate niche that may expand globally with climate change.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deep learning predicts drug-drug and drug-food interactionsDrug interactions, including drug-drug interactions (DDIs) and drug-food constituent interactions (DFIs), can trigger unexpected pharmacological effects, including adverse drug events (ADEs), with causal mechanisms often unknown. However, current prediction methods do not provide sufficient details beyond the chance of DDI occurrence, or require detailed drug information often unavailable for DDI
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why don't kids use their asthma medicines?In a new analysis of interviews conducted with children who have asthma, their caregivers and their clinicians, Johns Hopkins researchers found that there was significant lack of agreement about why the kids miss their needed daily anti-inflammatory medication.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows men and women tear ACL the same way in non-contact injuryWhile women are two to four times more likely than men to tear the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in their knee, the cause of this injury is no different between the sexes, according to new research from Duke Health.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to improve habitat conservation for migrating cranesEvery year, endangered whooping cranes travel along a 4,000-kilometer corridor linking their Canadian nesting grounds and their winter home in Texas. Habitat in their path through the northern Great Plains is being lost at an alarming rate, but identifying key spots for protection is a challenge. Now, researchers behind a new study have created a model of whooping crane habitat use with the potent
10h
Ingeniøren

Novo-læringscenter skal løfte undervisningen i naturvidenskabNovo Nordisk Fonden giver 123 mio. til millioner kroner til opbygningen af et læringscenter, en digital undervisningsplatform og rullende laboratorier for børn og unge.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How vampire bats survive on a diet of bloodIt may seem batty, but blood is the diet of choice for several species of bats. Now, scientists discover that jumping genes provide the evolutionary key to this vampiric life.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Less meat, more bugs in our dietary future, scientists still insistingBiologically speaking, humans are omnivores and we like to eat a variety of things. There is increasing interest in all sorts of alternative sources of protein as we diversify our diets. This trend is accelerating in 2018.
10h
Futurity.org

Binary stars can eject ‘castaways’ into spacePlanets orbiting “short-period” binary stars—those locked in a close orbital embrace—can shoot off into space as a consequence of their host’s evolution, a new study suggests. The findings help explain why astronomers have detected few circumbinary planets—which orbit stars that in turn orbit each other—despite observing thousands of short-term binary stars, or ones with orbital periods of 10 day
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Playing nice at work could cost you successIf you're struggling to say "no" at work and instead feel the need to constantly assist coworkers you might be compromising your success. As sad as it sounds, research shows that being agreeable can come at a cost in terms of career success. It can even mean earning less over the course of your career.
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Science | The Guardian

The first human on Mars should be a woman – we deserve stardust too | Rhiannon Lucy CosslettFor decades, men have had all the glory in space exploration. Imagine how young girls would feel seeing a woman step on to the red planet What do the names Kalpana Chawla, Mae Jemison, Valentina Tereshkova and Sally Ride mean to you? Until fairly recently, the names of these female space pioneers didn’t mean much to me. Despite being obsessed with all things space as a six-year-old girl, who thoug
10h
Feed: All Latest

How to Set Up and Use a YubiKey for Online SecurityThese simple, battery-free devices provide an easy way to securely verify that it's really you who's trying to access your online accounts.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ford uses van service to enter medical transport businessFord is getting into the non-emergency medical transportation business as it moves toward making money off its experimental ventures in new mobility.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Russia admits to blocking millions of IP addressesThe chief of the Russian communications watchdog acknowledged Wednesday that millions of unrelated IP addresses have been frozen in a so-far futile attempt to block a popular messaging app.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study improves 'crowd wisdom' estimatesIn 1907, a statistician named Francis Galton recorded the entries from a weight-judging competition as people guessed the weight of an ox. Galton analyzed hundreds of estimates and found that while individual guesses varied wildly, the median of the entries was surprisingly accurate and within one percent of the ox's real weight. When Galton published his results, he ushered the theory of collecti
10h
NYT > Science

Do You Know Which Dog Breeds Are in a Mutt? Scientists Want to Find OutA new online citizen science questionnaire is a brain teaser for people who think they’re good at guessing the breeds in the genetic makeup of a mutt.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Fire ud af fem læger i Risskovs voksenpsykiatri føler sig etisk belastetVagtarbejdet i voksenpsykiatrien i Riiskov er af en sådan karakter, at 31 ud af 38 læger føler sig etisk belastet af det, viser intern undersøgelse. »Undersøgelsen viser tydeligt, hvor der er behov for at gøre en indsats,« siger lægefaglig direktør.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The 'radical' ways sunlight builds bigger molecules in the atmosphereWith summer approaching, "sea and sun" might conjure up images of a beach trip. But for scientists, the interactions of the two have big implications for the climate and for the formation of tiny droplets, or aerosols, that lead to clouds. In ACS Central Science, researchers demonstrate that sunlight can cause certain molecules at the ocean's surface to activate others, resulting in larger molecul
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Some kitchen cabinets can emit potentially harmful compoundsProbably the last place anyone would want to find airborne polychlorinated biphenyl compounds (PCBs) is in the kitchen, yet that's exactly where scientists detected their presence, according to a new report in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology. They say that the PCBs, which are widely considered carcinogenic, are unwanted byproducts of sealant breakdown in modern kitchen cabinetry.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

Evolution Research Could Revolutionize Cancer TherapyEvolutionary studies indicate that the genetic changes enabling a cancer to develop arise shockingly early within the primary tumor. This discovery points to a promising new approach to therapy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
New Scientist - News

Millions of censored web pages discovered in massive studyMasses of web pages censored in China, Indonesia, Iran, and Turkey, have been discovered. They reveal the content each country is most intent on blocking
10h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Will China beat the world to nuclear fusion and clean energy?China's nuclear fusion research might put the country at the fore of future clean energy solutions.
11h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Bialowieza forest: Poland broke EU law by loggingPoland violated EU law by ordering large-scale logging in Bialowieza forest, Europe's top court says.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Mitochondrial DNA Plays a Role in MetastasisExperiments in mice show that mitochondria, both within the tumor and beyond, can make the difference between promoting or inhibiting cancer spread.
11h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Infrared TumorsA camera inspired by butterfly eyes allows surgeons to see cancer cells during surgery.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Five-year study reveals how much carbon China's environmental resources captureA large team of researchers has conducted a five-year research program in China aimed at measuring the amount of carbon sequestered by environmental resources in that country. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, a subset of the group describes the study and what was found.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Laryngeal muscles found to be underdeveloped compared to articulatory muscles, explaining poor human singingA trio of researchers, one with Bloorview Research Institute in Canada, the other two with the University of Maastricht in The Netherlands, has found that human laryngeal muscles are less well developed than articulatory muscles. In their paper published in Royal Society Open Science, Michel Belyk, Joseph Johnson and Sonja Kotz suggest that differences in the two muscle groups explains why people
11h
Dagens Medicin

Forligsmand udsætter storkonflikt igenForligsmanden udsætter en storkonflikt i 14 dage mere efter maratonforhandling i Forligsinstitutionen. Arbejdsgiver gav et tilbud om lønstigning, som ikke var godt nok, siger Rathcke.
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Dagens Medicin

Odense får Danmarks første professor i gynækologisk kræftkirurgiForskning i robotkirurgi bliver et fokusområde for overlæge Pernille Tine Jensen, som netop er udnævnt som professor i gynækologisk kræftkirurgi.
11h
The Atlantic

Europe Was Once Obsessed With Fake Dilapidated BuildingsIf you walk through Belvedere House Gardens and Park in Westmeath, Ireland, a dramatic sight rises through the trees: an enormous, shattered abbey, a staircase of broken stones climbing to the sky. Visitors often wonder what imposing building once stood here, but the whole thing is a deception. The ruin, which is called the Jealous Wall, was constructed in this dilapidated state in the 18th centu
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In an ant's world, the smaller you are, the harder it is to see obstaclesLook around your home or garden, or while out for a walk in the bush, and you'll soon find plenty of ants of all shapes and sizes making their way around the place.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How much would you trust an autonomous vehicle?Would you trust a car that does the driving for you? Do you trust the adaptive cruise control available in newer cars? What about the traction control feature? Would you trust a car to brake for you in an emergency?
11h
Dana Foundation

Coben Reveals Secrets to SuccessA recent Brainwave program focused on a best-selling author’s approach to writing thrillers. The featured guest was Harlan Coben , the 56-year-old author of 30 novels (seven New York Times No. 1 bestsellers) and a Jersey guy with a shaved head and a keen sense of humor. Matching wits and finding neuroscience angles was David Eagleman , the Stanford University-based author of Incognito: The Secret
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

Should You Eliminate Oil from Your Diet?Is an oil-free diet healthier? What are the arguments for and against eliminating oil from your diet? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Engineering a better device to capture -- and release -- circulating tumor cellsYaling Liu, of Lehigh University, has created an innovative microfluidic device that uses magnetic particles and wavy-herringbone design to capture and release circulating tumor cells with an 80-95% capture efficiency rate at different tumor cell concentrations. Liu will present some of his findings today, April 18th, at a conference taking place in Istanbul, Turkey called The Future of Medicine h
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Direct electrical current used to preferentially inhibit pain-transmitting neuronsUsing computer models and laboratory rats, Johns Hopkins researchers have demonstrated that 'direct electrical current' can be delivered to nerves preferentially, blocking pain signals while leaving other sensations undisturbed.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study improves 'crowd wisdom' estimatesIn a new study published in the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, researchers Albert Kao (Harvard University), Andrew Berdahl (Santa Fe Institute), and their colleagues examined just how accurate our collective intelligence is and how individual bias and information sharing skew aggregate estimates. Using their findings, they developed a mathematical correction that takes into account bias a
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Some kitchen cabinets can emit potentially harmful compoundsProbably the last place anyone would want to find airborne polychlorinated biphenyl compounds (PCBs) is in the kitchen, yet that's exactly where scientists detected their presence, according to a new report in ACS' journal Environmental Science & Technology. They say that the PCBs, which are widely considered carcinogenic, are unwanted byproducts of sealant breakdown in modern kitchen cabinetry.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The 'radical' ways sunlight builds bigger molecules in the atmosphereWith summer approaching, 'sea and sun' might conjure up images of a beach trip. But for scientists, the interactions of the two have big implications for the climate and for the formation of tiny droplets, or aerosols, that lead to clouds. In ACS Central Science, researchers demonstrate that sunlight can cause certain molecules at the ocean's surface to activate others, resulting in larger molecul
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research shows Transcendental Meditation empowers disadvantaged Ugandan mothersA new study with disadvantaged women in Uganda using measures of self-efficacy, perceived stress, and mental and physical quality of life, found significant differences between a group practicing Transcendental Meditation and controls after three months. Results indicate improved ability to cope with difficult situations, decreased perceived stress, and improved clarity of mind and physical vitali
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study suggests social workers could help families navigate foreclosure, protect the American DreamCommunity-based service professionals think that helping clients navigate a financial crisis—such as foreclosure—is a good idea.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Battery's hidden layer revealedCommercially available since the 1970s, the lithium-ion battery is now the workhorse power source in many applications. It can be found in cell phones, laptops and electric vehicles. Yet, much about the basic science taking place at the atomic and molecular levels during charge and discharge remains a mystery.
11h
Ingeniøren

Superfølsomt eksperiment leder efter mørkt stof i form af axionerDen fejlslagne eftersøgning efter mørkt stof i form af Wimps har øget interessen for alternative teorier for mørkt stof. Med brug af superledende kvante-forstærkere går jagten nu for alvor ind på de hypotetiske axioner.
11h
Popular Science

Everything you never wanted to know about artificial sweetenersHealth Your diet soda might just be worse than a regular one. Low-calorie sweeteners have been around for decades now, and we’re finally at a point where we’ve studied them enough to understand roughly how they work and what effect…
11h
The Atlantic

Dear Therapist: Should I Contact My Birth Mom?Editor’s Note: Every Wednesday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com. Dear Therapist, I was adopted at birth by two amazing parents who also adopted my younger sister. Whenever people have asked, “Are you interested in meeting your birth family?,” I’ve been consistent with my response: My ado
11h
The Atlantic

How to Sway a Baboon DespotE arly LAST year , more than 70 years after its publication, George Orwell’s Animal Farm appeared on The Washington Post ’s best-seller list. A writer for the New York Observer declared the novel—an allegory involving a government run by pigs—a “guidepost” for politics in the age of Donald Trump. A growing body of research, however, suggests that animals may offer political lessons that are more
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cold water devastates coral reefs off Japan: surveyUnusually cold water has devastated some of the world's most northerly coral reefs, which lie off the coast of western Japan, an environment ministry official said Wednesday.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wayfair follows Amazon with its own made-up holiday: Way DayAmazon started Prime Day. Alibaba capitalized on Singles Day. Now another e-commerce company is hoping for success with an invented shopping holiday.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

German police raid Porsche execs in diesel probeGerman police raided the offices of Porsche and Audi Wednesday as part of a fraud probe against two top Porsche executives and a former employee of the luxury carmaker in connection with the diesel emissions cheating scandal.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China fights big smog with big air purifierChina has a found a novel way to tackle its massive air pollution problem: Putting up a giant air purifier the size of an industrial smokestack in the middle of a smog-plagued city.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Russia says to probe Facebook after Telegram crackdownRussia's telecoms watchdog plans to probe Facebook before the end of the year after blocking access in the country to the popular messaging app Telegram, its head said on Wednesday.
11h
Live Science

How Would We Know If Intelligent Life Existed on Earth Before Humans?This is a serious question, and serious scientists are speculating about what traces these potential predecessors might have left behind.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Iceland: Bitcoin heist suspect has likely fled to SwedenA man suspected of masterminding the theft of about 600 computers used to mine bitcoins and other virtual currencies has likely fled to Sweden after breaking out of a prison in Iceland, officials said Wednesday.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Sounding rocket launches CHESS mission to study the matter between starsThe Colorado High-resolution Echelle Stellar Spectrograph, or CHESS 4, was successfully launched on a NASA Black Brant IX sounding rocket at 12:47 p.m. EDT, April 16 (4:47 a.m. local, April 17) from the Kwajalein Atoll in The Republic of the Marshall Islands.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deep Italian cave provides clues for how to detect life on MarsWhat can a massive cave in Italy tell us about life on Mars and other planets? According to new research by Penn State scientists, a whole lot.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's new space 'botanist' arrives at launch siteA new instrument that will provide a unique, space-based measurement of how plants respond to changes in water availability has arrived at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to begin final preparations for launch to the International Space Station this summer aboard a cargo resupply mission.
12h
Science-Based Medicine

New Study Finds that Statins Prevent Cardiovascular DeathsA new meta-analysis shows that statin drugs are effective at preventing cardiovascular events and death, especially in patients with a baseline LDL cholesterol >100.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Religiously engaged adolescents demonstrate habits that help them get better gradesAdolescents who practice religion on a regular basis do better in school than those who are religiously disengaged, according to new research from Stanford Graduate School of Education (GSE).
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scalable manufacturing process spools out strips of graphene for use in ultrathin membranesMIT engineers have developed a continuous manufacturing process that produces long strips of high-quality graphene.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: First light from HyperScout imagerThis first-light image from the miniature HyperScout instrument aboard ESA's newly launched GomX-4B CubeSat, shows the southern coast of Cuba.
12h
Live Science

Polar Explorer Shackleton's Lost Ship Could Be Hidden Under Antarctic IceJust over a century after the polar explorer's Endurance sank, another scientific expedition will search of the wreck.
12h
Live Science

In Photos: Searching for Shackleton's 'Endurance' ShipwreckIn his bid to be the first to cross Antarctica, Sir Ernest Shackleton and his crew set out on the Endurance, only for the ship to be overtaken by ice in the Weddell Sea.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New species of ancient whale identified and named by Otago palaeontologistsUniversity of Otago palaeontologists are rewriting the history of New Zealand's ancient whales by describing a previously unknown genus of baleen whale, alive more than 27.5 million years ago and found in the Hakataramea Valley.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sharp claws helped ancient seals conquer the oceansIf you've ever seen seals frolicking in the water, you know they are agile swimmers, with perfectly adapted paddle-like limbs. But if you think those flippers are just for swimming, then think again.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New Zealand's large moa did not disperse large seedsA new study about New Zealand's extinct moa, involving acid baths and concrete mixers, by researchers from the University of Canterbury and Landcare Research, has revealed a surprising finding about their ability to disperse tree seeds.
12h
Live Science

Hurricane Irma Turned the Everglades into a Tree 'Graveyard,' NASA Lasers RevealThere were mass tree casualties.
12h
The Atlantic

Madeleine Albright: Trump Is 'The Least Democratic President of Modern History'“I am an optimist who worries a lot,” Madeleine Albright said Monday night when asked about the future of democracy. It’s a quotable phrase, but the former secretary of state is serious—both about her belief in the power of democracy and the fact that today, there’s substantial reason to worry about it. In a wide-ranging conversation with The Atlantic ’s editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg in Washin
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Algorithm tool works to silence online chatroom sex predatorsAn algorithm tool developed by Purdue Polytechnic Institute faculty will help law enforcement filter out and focus on sex offenders most likely to set up face-to-face meetings with child victims.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nuclear techniques unlock the structure of a rare type of superconducting intermetallic alloyNuclear techniques have played an important role in determining the crystal structure of a rare type of intermetallic alloy that exhibits superconductivity.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chip developed by Brazil researchers will be linchpin of LHC upgradeA Brazilian chip will be used to upgrade the detection system used in A Large Ion Collider Experiment ( ALICE), one of the four major experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's most powerful particle accelerator, located on the Franco-Swiss border. The chip is called SAMPA and was designed at the University of São Paulo's Engineering School (Poli-USP) in Brazil.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New highly selective antitumor photodynamic therapy agents synthesizedA team of researchers from Lobachevsky University (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia) headed by Professor Alexei Fedorov, chair of the Organic Chemistry Department, is working to create a new generation of targeted anti-cancer drugs for photodynamic therapy.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Carbon dioxide as a raw materialResearchers at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have found a way to turn climate-damaging CO2 into an alcohol that could serve as a raw material for the chemical industry without producing large amounts of salt waste. The reaction mechanism is described by Timo Wendling and Prof Dr. Lukas Goossen, together with a colleague of the Technical University of Kaiserslautern, in the journal Chemistry—A Europe
12h
Live Science

Mushroom Clouds Burst Through Neutron Stars, and NASA Can Watch It HappenThe energetic explosions release clouds of debris similar to those launched from nuclear explosions.
12h
Feed: All Latest

Trouble Detected in Infamous Dark Matter SignalNew results from a decades-old experiment were initially touted as further evidence for dark matter. But independent scientists have cast serious doubt on that claim.
12h
Feed: All Latest

TED 2018: Soul-Searching at the Inspiration Assembly LineThe TED conference has always been a place of high-stakes emotional manipulation. This year, it all feels darker.
12h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Facebook Controversy: Privacy Is Not the IssueThe real danger is that the information and social platforms on the internet are being corrupted in the service of con men, political demagogues and thieves -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Scientific American Content: Global

Otter Poop Helps Scientists Track Pollution at a Superfund SiteIn a contaminated Seattle river, what the mammals leave behind may be a good gauge of cleanup efforts -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
Ingeniøren

Hullet it-sikkerhed i kommuner: Ansatte gav adgang til følsomme persondataKommunale medarbejderne er ikke bange for at klikke på noget, også selv om det kan give adgang til følsomme data, er konklusionen på en penetrationstest, udført af KPMG og Tv2.
13h
Dagens Medicin

Fire nye ydernumre skal afhjælpe lægemangel i Region SjællandDer er brug for fire nye ydernumre i Region Sjælland, hvis lægedækningen skal bevares. Det blev konklusionen på et møde i Forretningsudvalget 16. april, som nu har sendt indstillingen videre til godkendelse i Regionsrådet.
13h
Dagens Medicin

986 lægepraksisser er nu akkrediteretArbejdet med akkreditering i almen praksis skal være afsluttet ved årsskiftet. Indtil videre er 986 lægepraksisser blevet akkrediteret, viser ny opgørelse. Særligt fire dele af akkrediteringen har voldt de praktiserende læger problemer.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Simulation of the AsqJ enzyme opens up new options for pharmaceutical chemistryPractically all biochemical processes involve enzymes that accelerate chemical reactions. A research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now for the first time deciphered the molecular mechanism of the enzyme AsqJ. Their findings might open up new options in the production of pharmaceutically active molecules.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Novel thermal phases of topological quantum matter in the labFor the first time, a group of researchers from Universidad Complutense de Madrid, IBM, ETH Zurich, MIT and Harvard University have observed topological phases of matter of quantum states under the action of temperature or certain types of experimental imperfections. The experiment was conducted using quantum simulator at IBM.
13h
The Atlantic

Why a Statue of the 'Father of Gynecology' Had to Come DownJ. Marion Sims is known as the “father” of modern gynecology, and also as a monster. On Tuesday, the city of New York took down a statue honoring Sims in Central Park and will move it to his grave, after a city commission convened by Mayor Bill de Blasio decided that the founder of the nation’s first women’s hospital was no longer worthy of uncritical celebration. The debate over the Sims statue
13h
The Atlantic

Trump Is Making Everyone a Little Like HimIn an interview Tuesday morning, NPR’s Steve Inskeep asked former FBI Director James Comey about some of the most discussed portions of his new book. No, not the ones where he calls President Trump a chronic liar untethered from reality, or where he discusses briefing Trump on the Steele dossier: The ones where he notes the president’s over-long tie, or his hand size, or the bags under his eyes.
13h
The Atlantic

American Voters Are Turning to Direct DemocracyAmerican democracy is in trouble—and that’s expert opinion. According to The Economist ’s annual Democracy Index report , the United States in 2017 qualified as a “flawed democracy” for the second year running, which indicates citizens’ deepening distrust of the country’s electoral system and its politicians , among other issues. Other recent analyses have sounded alarm bells, too. Congressional
13h
Ingeniøren

Regeringen spørger: Er det for bøvlet at sende raketter op i Danmark?En tværministeriel arbejdsgruppe skal vurdere lovgivningen omkring danske raketopsendelser. Raketgruppe hilser tiltaget velkommen, men håber ikke, det medfører et større regelsæt end i dag.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study paves way for healthier and more robust eggsThe results of a study recently published in the prestigious international journal Science Advances have enabled researchers to better understand the role of eggshells in embryo development and hatching. An eggshell is made up of both organic and inorganic matter that contains calcium carbonate. One of the important findings of the study was that the nanostructure was closely linked to the presenc
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers establish crystal structure of gastric proton pumpThe highly acidic environment in the stomach is essential for digestion. Furthermore, it acts as an important barrier to invasive pathogens. However, excessive stomach acidification leads to ulcers. Although this is not a life-threatening condition, it can considerably impair the health of affected individuals. Acid suppression in combination with antibiotics is the recognized treatment to eradica
13h
NYT > Science

Pursuits: A Birder’s Paradise in ZimbabweOne of the greatest concentrations of birds of prey in the world can be found among the towering rock formations and thick forests of Matobo National Park.
13h
NYT > Science

Feature: Can Dirt Save the Earth?Agriculture could pull carbon out of the air and into the soil — but it would mean a whole new way of thinking about how to tend the land.
13h
New on MIT Technology Review

Here’s how hackers could cause chaos in this year’s US midterm electionsDespite efforts to boost security, critical parts of America’s voting infrastructure are still vulnerable to cyberattack.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team develops sodium ion batteries using copper sulfideA KAIST research team recently developed sodium ion batteries using copper sulfide anode. This finding will contribute to advancing the commercialization of sodium ion batteries (SIBs) and reducing the production cost of any electronic products with batteries.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Polymer-graphene nanocarpets to electrify smart fabricsResearchers from Tomsk Polytechnic University, together with their international colleagues, have discovered a method to modify and use graphene, a one-atom thin conductor of current and heat, without destroying it. Thanks to the method, the researchers were able to synthesize a well-structured polymer with a strong covalent bond on single-layer graphene. They call the result "polymer carpets." Th
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists make counterintuitive observations in hybrid quantum systemsA team of researchers from the National Institute of Informatics (NII) in Tokyo and NTT Basic Research Laboratories (BRL, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation) in Japan have published an explanation of how quantum systems may be able to heat up by cooling down. Their paper appeared recently in Physical Review Letters.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Overcoming bias about music takes workExpectations and biases play a large role in our enjoyment of experiences such as art and wine. Now, researchers at the University of Arkansas, Arizona State University and the University of Connecticut have found that simply being told that a performer is a professional or a student changes the way the brain responds to music, and overcoming this bias takes a deliberate effort. The results will b
14h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Dansk-indisk forskningssamarbejde skal styrke eksportenLars Løkke Rasmussen og den indiske premierminister Narendra Modi mødes i dag for at udveksle...
14h
Ingeniøren

Motor eksploderet: Amerikansk passagerfly tvunget til nødlandingEt fly på vej fra New York til Dallas måtte nødlande i Philadelphia, efter at en eksplosion i venstre motor gav skader på vinger, vinduer og kabine. En kvinde har mistet livet.
14h
Science | The Guardian

Donald Trump’s ‘kakistocracy’ is not the first, but it’s revived an old word | André SpicerWhen John Brennan used a 17th-century word to describe the US presidency, Twitter went wild – but what does it mean? Rarely does an ancient Greek portmanteau word spark a Twitterstorm. But that’s what happened when the former director of the CIA John Brennan took to Twitter and accused Donald Trump of running a “ kakistocracy ”. This tweet sparked a 13,700% increase in people looking up the word u
15h
Ingeniøren

Nu er innovation også ‘made in China’Flemming Møller Pedersen har oplevet Kinas igangværende vandring fra kopiland til innovationsland indefra som innovationschef for den kinesiske fladskærmsproducent TCL. Han advarer mod at undervurdere den hastighed, som kinesisk industri bevæger sig frem med.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Quebec wary of bitcoin gold rushAt the site of a former cocoa factory in Canada's Quebec province, tiny holes punctured in the walls of a warehouse allow fresh air to cool thousands of whirring processors connected by a tangle of wires.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook rolling out privacy choices under EU rulesFacebook Data GDPRFacebook announced Wednesday it would begin rolling out changes to how it handles private data this week to comply with forthcoming EU rules, with European residents seeing the measures first.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Arcades seek to take virtual reality gaming mainstreamGamers wearing headsets and wielding rifles adorned with flashing lights battle a horde of zombies, letting out the occasional terrified shriek.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bitcoin's true believers vow to ride out currency rollercoasterThe crowds have thinned somewhat at Bitcoin Center, leaving just the true believers in the volatile cryptocurrency.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

San Francisco to require permits for rental scootersSan Francisco is ordering three companies that began renting motorized foot-pedal scooters in the city last month to stop operating until they can ensure riders are obeying state laws and that the devices are not a hazard to the public.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Glitch means extra day for Americans to file taxesUS tax authorities will give Americans an extra day to send in their tax returns after the government computer system for filing them electronically failed on the day of the deadline.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Thinking about hitching a ride on a mission to Mars? One hazard you haven't consideredThe hazards of space flight are well known: freezing temperatures, the vacuum of space, radiation, isolation. But there's a lesser-known risk getting the attention of researchers - a possible danger to vision. Retired NASA astronaut David Wolf, M.D., will provide insight into how space flight affects the eye on Thursday, April 19, when he gives the keynote address during a conference attended by m
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Root exudates affect soil stability, water repellencyAs the growing season progresses, you might not notice much about what's happening to plants under the soil. Most of us pay attention to new shoots, stems, leaves, and eventually the flowers and crop we intend to grow. We might think of roots as necessary, but uninteresting, parts of the crop production process.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

350,000 stars' DNA interrogated in search for sun's lost siblingsAn Australian-led group of astronomers working with European collaborators has revealed the "DNA" of more than 340,000 stars in the Milky Way, which should help them find the siblings of the Sun, now scattered across the sky.
17h
Ingeniøren

IDA: Konflikten afgøres inden 14 dageForligsmanden valgte her til morgen at sende parterne endnu en tur i ringen. Beslutningen glæder IDAs chefforhandler, som forventer forlig eller forlis på fredag.
17h
NeuWrite West

White People in Black Bodies: How to Reduce Implicit Bias for a Long TimeThis article is part of an ongoing blog series, titled Inequality in STEM: a Dive Into the Data . In this series, we cover recent research exploring and quantifying inequality in STEM. We'll discuss different aspects of inequality, including barriers to career advancement and a chilly social climate, as well as the efficacy of various interventions to combat bias. Our goal with these pieces is to
17h
Viden

Pesten fik os til at handle mod bedre videndeEn ubalance i verdens vand, jord, ild og luft førte til ubalance i kroppens væsker. Sådan lød forklaringen på pesten, dengang vi handlede mod bedre vidende.
17h
Ingeniøren

Dansk chef for Google Research:»AI er fortsat science fiction«Nyt center for kunstig intelligens på Københavns Universitet officielt indviet af Corinna Cortes, professor i machine learning og leder af Google Research i New York. Hun mener, at vi skal betragte AI en fremtidsteknologi, mens machine learning er de håndgribelige byggesten.
18h
Science | The Guardian

Why I dread yet another cancer confessional | Mike AddelmanMy wife has terminal cancer. While there’s a place for broadcasters airing their personal stories, their impact can be devastating We live in the age of the confessional. In the not too distant past, private and intimate thoughts remained just that – and if we felt we needed to talk, a frank discussion with friends and loved ones often did the trick. But especially when it comes to cancer, this re
18h
NYT > Science

Australia Diary: Weathering the WeatherGrowing up in Queensland means understanding the difference between hot, stinking hot and unbearably hot.
19h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Porpoise plucked from shallow watersThe young female porpoise had become stranded at Grange burn near to Grangemouth.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Low-income HIV patients suffer with healthcare accessQuebecers do not have equal access to anti-retroviral treatment (ART) for HIV and AIDS, a long-term study undertaken by a team from the Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (RI-MUHC) in collaboration with Montreal clinics and university health centres, has revealed. Researchers observed HIV-infected persons who count on social assistance and other income security programs in Q
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Root exudates affect soil stability, water repellencyWe might think of roots as necessary, but uninteresting, parts of the crop production process. New research, however, focuses on what's going on in the soil with the plant's roots and the chemicals they produce.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mayo Clinic study finds no evidence that anesthesia in young children lowers intelligenceA Mayo Clinic study finds no evidence that children given anesthesia before their third birthdays have lower IQs than those who did not have it. A more complex picture emerges among people who had anesthesia several times as small children: Although their intelligence is comparable, they score modestly lower on tests measuring fine motor skills, and their parents are more likely to report behavior
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Active young adults with Type 1 diabetes have muscle complications: StudyA new study from McMaster and York universities has found that poor muscle health may be a complication of Type 1 diabetes, even among active twenty-somethings. The researchers found structural and functional changes in the power generation parts of the cell, or mitochondria, of those with diabetes. Not only were the mitochondria less capable of producing energy for the muscle, they were also rele
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Active young adults with Type 1 diabetes have muscle complications: StudyThe research team analyzed muscle biopsies of young adults with and without Type 1 diabetes who exceed Diabetes Canada's recommended weekly levels for physical activity. The researchers found structural and functional changes in the power generation parts of the cell, or mitochondria, of those with diabetes.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Active young adults with Type 1 diabetes have muscle complicationsA new study from McMaster and York universities in Canada has found that poor muscle health may be a complication of Type 1 diabetes, even among active twenty-somethings.
19h
The Scientist RSS

Children With Malaria Smell More Attractive to MosquitoesThe parasite changes people's scent, primarily due to an increase in aldehydes.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Smooth dance moves confirm new bird-of-paradise speciesNewly publicized audiovisuals support full species status for one of the dancing birds-of-paradise in New Guinea. This new species, called the Vogelkop Superb Bird-of-Paradise, is found only in the island's far-western Bird's Head, or Vogelkop, region.
20h
Ingeniøren

FM-sluk: Staten sparer håndører og kan ikke genbruge frekvensernePrisen for at udsende DR’s kanaler på FM er forsvindende lille i forhold til brugernes udgifter ved at skifte til DAB+. Samtidig kan frekvenserne ikke genbruges til DAB-radio.
20h
New Scientist - News

Most UK plants will flower at once in short ‘condensed spring’Plants in the UK are set to blaze into flower virtually simultaneously, because flowering has been delayed two weeks by the unusually cold weather
20h
New Scientist - News

Big tech can digitally erase us – do we need new protections?In an age when a person's online presence can be quickly removed by technology corporations, there's a case for a new right… to be remembered, says Jamais Cascio
20h
New Scientist - News

World’s biggest bird feeder will use 500 tonnes of shellfishA crucial feeding ground for migrating birds has been almost destroyed by pollution and a bad winter, but help is at hand in the form of an all-you-can-eat buffet
20h
Science | The Guardian

Scientists explain how plastic-eating enzyme can help fight pollution – videoScientists in Britain and the US say they have engineered an enzyme that eats plastic , a breakthrough that could help in the fight against pollution. The enzyme is able to digest polyethylene terephthalate, or PET. The team from the University of Portsmouth and the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory hope to one day produce the enzyme on an industrial scale Continue re
21h
Live Science

Canada Pulls Diplomat Families from Cuba Over Mystery IllnessScientists can't explain why some diplomats in Cuba hear bizarre noises before experiencing brain issues and hearing loss.
23h
Feed: All Latest

San Francisco Passes a Law to Rein In Shared Electric ScootersIt's not the only discombobulated city struggling to divide precious space.
23h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Blue Planet: Plankton named after David Attenborough seriesScientists at University College London (UCL) decide to honour Sir David Attenborough and the team.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

350,000 stars' DNA interrogated in search for sun's lost siblingsAn international team of astronomers has revealed the 'DNA' of more than 350,000 stars in the Milky Way, which should help them find the siblings of the sun, now scattered across the sky. This is the first major announcement of an ambitious survey as part of a quest to uncover the formulation and evolution of galaxies -- after the Australian-led Galactic Archaeology survey, called GALAH, commenced
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What happens to our muscles during spaceflight and when living on Mars?The inactivity of astronauts during spaceflights presents a significant risk to their muscles, says a new study in The Journal of Physiology. Scientists have simulated the impact of 21-day spaceflights on the body, and the impact of low gravity environments such as the moon or Mars.
23h
Futurity.org

How plants avoid ‘sunburn’If the ultraviolet radiation from the sun damages human DNA to cause health problems, does UV radiation also damage plant DNA? The answer is yes, but because plants can’t come in from the sun or slather on sunblock, they have a super robust DNA repair kit. Research finds that this powerful DNA repair system in plants closely resembles a repair system found in humans and other animals. The study,
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Futurity.org

This fish flashes a switchblade on its faceStonefishes—some of the deadliest, armored fishes on the planet—are packing switchblades called “lachrymal sabers” in their faces, new research shows. Now, a new study details the evolution of the lachrymal saber unique to stonefishes—a group of rare and dangerous fishes inhabiting Indo-Pacific coastal waters. The new finding rewrites scientific understanding of relationships among several groups
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Futurity.org

Ice cliffs make these Himalayan glaciers melt fasterResearchers have confirmed their suspicion that north-facing ice cliffs on debris-covered glaciers in the Himalayas accelerate ice melt. Glaciers in the high mountain regions of the Himalayas offer a different picture to those in the Alps: many of them are completely covered in debris, and steep ice walls—vertical cliffs up to 30 meters high—overlook many areas. From a distance, this makes their
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New findings to help in the fight against wombat mangeNew answers have been uncovered in the fight against bare-nosed wombat sarcoptic mange, thanks to the latest research by the University of Tasmania.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Competition between males improves resilience against climate changeAnimal species with males who compete intensively for mates might be more resilient to the effects of climate change, according to research by Queen Mary University of London.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Costa Coffee vows 'cup recycling revolution'The UK's biggest coffee chain says it will recycle as many disposable cups as it sells by 2020.
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Futurity.org

Why scientists thought Ebola would mutate really fastAt the start of the epidemic in West Africa, the Ebola virus did not change as rapidly as thought at the time. New research explains why scientists misjudged it. The culprit is probably methodological biases, according to research led by Tanja Stadler, a professor in ETH Zurich’s department of biosystems science and engineering in Basel. The work appears in PNAS . When Ebola developed into an epi
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Futurity.org

Treating manure doesn’t remove all the antibioticsTwo of the most elite waste treatment systems available today on farms do not fully remove antibiotics from manure, research finds. “We were hoping that these advanced treatment technologies could remove antibiotics. As it turns out, they were not as effective as we thought they could be.” Each year, farmers in the US purchase tens of millions of pounds of antibiotics for use in cows, pigs, fowl,
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Latest Headlines | Science News

These seals haven’t lost their land ancestors’ hunting waysClawed pawlike forelimbs help true seals hunt like their land-dwelling ancestors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Warmer active seasons and fewer freeze-thaw events lead to big changes for the tiniest Arctic ambassadorsStep aside, charismatic polar bear stranded on a melting iceberg. The springtail may be the new flag bearer of an uncertain Arctic future.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Mine Social Media Posts to Predict FluResearchers used Twitter searches for nonflu words associated with behavior to predict flu outbreaks two weeks in advance. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New findings to help in the fight against wombat mangeNew answers have been uncovered in the fight against bare-nosed wombat sarcoptic mange, thanks to the latest research by the University of Tasmania.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Competition between males improves resilience against climate changeAnimal species with males who compete intensively for mates might be more resilient to the effects of climate change, according to research by Queen Mary University of London.
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Science | The Guardian

Scientists unveil new tool in fight against US coastline erosion – video reportScientists working on solutions to fight the decades of erosion suffered by Louisiana's coastline have unveiled a new tool: an enormous replica of the Mississippi river. The model will help scientists devise a state plan that will involve diverting nutrient-rich river water into marshes and wetlands that have been overwhelmed by salty water from the Gulf of Mexico Scientists unveil new tool in fi
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Futurity.org

Diamonds and quantum mechanics ‘light up’ MRI scansResearchers have figured out a way to improve MRI scans by “lighting up” certain parts of the body using thin layers of diamonds and quantum mechanics. Imagine a harmless solution or gas containing sub-atomic particles manipulated by quantum technology that when injected or inhaled would “light up” your molecular insides, so they could be scanned at a detail hundreds of times that of the stronges
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Feed: All Latest

Inside the Unnerving CCleaner Supply Chain AttackCCleaner owner Avast is sharing more details on the malware attackers used to infect legitimate software updates with malware.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First long-term study finds half trillion dollars spent on HIV/AIDSSpending on HIV/AIDS globally between 2000 and 2015 totaled more than half a trillion dollars, according to a new scientific study, the first comprehensive analysis of funding for the disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study finds people covered by universal health coverage will fall far below SDGsAn estimated 5.4 billion people globally are expected to be covered under some form of universal health care (UHC) by 2030, up from 4.3 billion in 2015, but far below the related target in United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 3, according to a new scientific study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Adolescents' cooking skills strongly predict future nutritional well-beingEvidence suggests that developing cooking and food preparation skills is important for health and nutrition, yet the practice of home cooking is declining and now rarely taught in school. A new study found that developing cooking skills as a young adult may have long-term benefits for health and nutrition.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Boosting employment rate is unlikely to curb opioid useImproving job prospects for people in economically depressed parts of the United States is unlikely to help curb the opioid epidemic, according to a new study. On the other hand, opioid use may actually help some women -- but not men -- stay in the labor force when they would otherwise leave because of chronic pain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Text messaging tool may help fight opioid epidemicMedical researchers have created a new automated text messaging service that may curb opioid abuse and prevent relapse. Patients receive text messages to gauge if they're feeling OK or struggling with potential relapse. Patients also can activate a panic button to request immediate help.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Marine fish won an evolutionary lottery 66 million years agoWhy do the Earth's oceans contain such a staggering diversity of fish of so many different sizes, shapes, colors and ecologies? The answer, biologists report, dates back 66 million years ago, when a six-mile-wide asteroid crashed to Earth, wiping out the dinosaurs and approximately 75 percent of animal and plant species worldwide.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: The Mess Before ThemWhat We’re Following Legal Links: Though the Fox News host Sean Hannity denies he was a legal client of Michael Cohen, a longtime attorney and fixer for President Trump, Rosie Gray reports that Hannity has been represented by two other lawyers connected to Trump. Cohen was ordered to disclose Hannity’s name in court on Monday, when a federal judge also denied his lawyers’ request to block prosecu
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Popular Science

Changes to conservation policy could put the future of migratory birds up in the airAnimals U.S. policies for protecting them could be shifting drastically. The Trump administration has announced a position on protecting migratory birds that is a drastic pullback from policies in force for the past 100 years.
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Feed: All Latest

How Southwest Pilots Could Have Landed Safely With a Blown EngineOne person died on Southwest Airlines Flight 1380 after an engine failed and blew a hole in the cabin at 32,500 feet.
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NYT > Science

How This Beetle Evolved to Mimic AntsAt least 12 types of rove beetle have evolved to convince ants and termites that it is one of them, all the while stealing their food and eating their young.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Solving the structure of ATP synthaseScientists have solved the structure of mitochondrial ATP synthase, an enzyme that makes ATP, adenosine triphosphate, the major energy source of cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An AI that makes road maps from aerial imagesMap apps may have changed our world, but they still haven't mapped all of it yet. In particular, mapping roads can be tedious: even after taking aerial images, companies like Google still have to spend many hours manually tracing out roads. As a result, they haven't yet gotten around to mapping the vast majority of the more than 20 million miles of roads across the globe.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Top-down approach gets to the bottom of cancerBy studying patient colorectal tumors, a research team characterizes a fully intact protein that results from a mutation of the RAS gene, the first cancer gene ever pinpointed in human cancer cells. This finding opens the door for new targets for treatment of a gene currently thought to be 'undruggable.'
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Catch A SketchToday in 5 Lines During an interview on ABC’s The View , adult-film star Stormy Daniels released a sketch of the man she claims threatened her to “leave Trump alone” in 2011. Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley announced that his office may have discovered evidence of criminal wrongdoing by state Governor Eric Greitens, who denied the allegations. Representative Charlie Dent said he will resign
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Live Science

A New Lung Cancer Drug Is Shaking Up Treatment: How Does It Work?A drug that acts on the immune system appears to help extend the lives of patients with advanced lung cancer when given alongside standard chemotherapy.
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Live Science

Knife-Armed Man Leaves World's Coolest SkeletonLosing a hand should have killed him. Instead, it made him an even bigger badass.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Divorce and low socioeconomic status carry higher risk of second heart attack or strokeHeart attack survivors who are divorced or have low socioeconomic status have a higher risk of a second attack, according to research from Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden, published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a European Society of Cardiology journal.
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Popular Science

Anker's smart home brand is crowdfunding a new security systemGadgets Improved battery, picture quality, and security. The new Eufy EverCam smart home security system is now on Kickstarter. Read on.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Statins save lives of people with high levels of LDL cholesterolCholesterol-lowering drugs are more likely to save thousands of additional lives when used in people with higher levels of LDL cholesterol, or 'bad' cholesterol, according to a new study.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Meteorite diamonds 'came from lost planet'The space rock that exploded in 2008 seems to have come from the early Solar System.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Cambridge Analytica sought to create its own cryptocurrency, because of course it did
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

People who use medical marijuana more likely to use and misuse prescription drugsCan medical marijuana help to fight the opioid epidemic? Many believe that it can. But a new study finds that people who use medical marijuana actually have higher rates of medical and non-medical prescription drug use--including pain relievers. The study appears in the Journal of Addiction Medicine, the official journal of the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM), published by Wolters Kl
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Workplace anxiety isn't always a bad thing: It can boost performanceResearchers have developed a new comprehensive model of workplace anxiety. It includes triggers for anxiety in the workplace and its effect on employee performance.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The 'bread basket' of the tropics? Study explores tropical grain productionAgricultural economists wanted to learn more about the productivity of grain production in the tropics. They examine input and output factors for several large-scale farms located in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Opioid-related hospitalizations rising in Medicare patients without opioid prescriptionsA 2014 federal change that limited the dispensing of hydrocodone products may be indirectly contributing to the illegal use of some of those drugs, a study by University of Texas Medical Branch researchers has found.
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Live Science

Elon Musk Says 'Humans Are Underrated'Tesla founder and CEO Elon Musk just paid a rare compliment to his own species, calling humans "underrated" on Twitter last week.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Data shows migration more strongly linked to aspiration than desperationThe Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, analyze global survey data which sheds light on the motivations of people who decide to migrate.
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Science | The Guardian

Plantwatch: Planning loophole threatens ancient woodlandsAncient woods are being destroyed for development. A consultation is their only hope Many of Britain’s ancient woodlands are being threatened by a loophole in national planning policy. Ancient woodlands cover less than 3% of the UK, and have existed since 1600 in England and Wales, and 1750 in Scotland. These are our richest places for wildlife on land, home to more threatened species than any ot
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Science : NPR

As Climate Costs Grow, Some See A Moneymaking OpportunityExtreme weather cost Americans over $300 billion last year. Scientists say climate change will bring more of that. Entrepreneurs and businesses see a new market in gauging risk. (Image credit: David McNew/Getty Images)
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Big Think

Why do women gossip? Study reveals dark, strategic reasons.A new paper explores why women gossip about each other, and identifies some key factors that influence how women choose gossiping targets. Read More
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Feed: All Latest

Ultrasonic Signals Are the Wild West of Wireless TechInaudible signals that your phone can hear—but you can't—are often based on ad hoc tech, which makes for risky security.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Adolescents' cooking skills strongly predict future nutritional well-beingEvidence suggests that developing cooking and food preparation skills is important for health and nutrition, yet the practice of home cooking is declining and now rarely taught in school. A new study published in the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior found that developing cooking skills as a young adult may have long-term benefits for health and nutrition.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When others fail, new migraine treatment may workPeople who have tried unsuccessfully to prevent migraine with other treatments may find relief with a drug called erenumab, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 70th Annual Meeting in Los Angeles, April 21 to 27, 2018.
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Live Science

The Weird Pit of Magma Beneath Yellowstone Is Still a MysteryBut researchers are now closer than ever to understanding how magma got into the hot bowels of the supervolcano where it lies today.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Getting e-mail on your skin is actually a thing now, thanks to FacebookResearchers for the social network taught people to feel 100 words on their arms with a wearable prototype.
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The Atlantic

Big, Ambitious Plans From Smaller-Town LeadersIn a few days, the May issue of the magazine will arrive for subscribers ( ! ) and appear on newsstands. It includes an article I’ve done as a more analytically explicit companion to Our Towns , the mainly narrative book that I’ve written with my wife, Deb, and that will come out next month. In the Atlantic article I elaborate on a claim that I’ve been exploring in this space over the past five y
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New York investigates cryptocurrency trading exchangesNew York state authorities on Tuesday said they have launched a probe into platforms that trade cryptocurrencies like bitcoin, including potential fraud and conflicts of interest.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Ibuprofen, acetaminophen more effective than opioids in treating dental painIbuprofen and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) alone or in combination with acetaminophen are better at easing dental pain than opioids, according to new research conducted with the School of Dental Medicine at Case Western Reserve University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel proteomics strategies aid cancer researchThis month's issue of the journal Molecular & Cellular Proteomics features several studies using novel proteomics methods to address unanswered questions in cancer research, including protein variation within tumors; the failure of some candidate cancer drugs; and how chemotherapeutic combinations act synergistically.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tech firms sign pledge to refrain from helping cyberattacksThirty-four global technology companies and organizations signed a pact Tuesday calling for a stronger defense against cyberattacks in any form and pledging to refrain from helping governments attack "innocent" civilians or enterprises.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Starbucks to shut US stores for 'racial-bias education'Starbucks will close stores and corporate offices across the United States on May 29 to conduct "racial-bias education," the company announced Tuesday, following outrage over the arrest of two black men in one of its cafes.
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Popular Science

Scientists stumbled upon a plastic-eating bacterium—then accidentally made it strongerEnvironment Hungry, hungry enzymes. We’re slowly suffocating a lot of natural ecologies with our trash. Fish, birds, and other animals all unwittingly consume the five trillion tons of plastic (and…
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Popular Science

The Lighthouse security camera uses AI to recognize your family and your petsGadgets This $300 security camera recognizes you, your family, and even your pets. Lighthouse is a pricy, but intelligent solution for a connected security camera.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineers develop technique to make adaptive materialsEngineers at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and the University of Maryland have developed a technique that causes a composite material to become stiffer and stronger on-demand when exposed to ultraviolet light.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smooth dance moves confirm new bird-of-paradise speciesNewly publicized audiovisuals support full species status for one of the dancing birds-of-paradise in New Guinea. This new species, called the Vogelkop Superb Bird-of-Paradise, is found only in the island's far-western Bird's Head, or Vogelkop, region.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop first gene drive targeting worldwide crop pestBiologists at the University of California San Diego have developed a method of manipulating the genes of an agricultural pest that has invaded much of the United States and caused millions of dollars in damage to high-value berry and other fruit crops.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Army engineers develop technique to make adaptive materialsEngineers at the US Army Research Laboratory and the University of Maryland have developed a technique that causes a composite material to become stiffer and stronger on-demand when exposed to ultraviolet light.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Chien: Clarification of the effect of ligand on {gamma}{delta}-TCR repertoire selection [Biological Sciences]In our recent publication (1), we report that the EGYEL motif, previously found to promote T22-reactivity, was depleted from the mature CD24low pool of γδ-T cells that developed in H-2T–deficient mice, indicating that ligand was influencing the γδ-T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire (1). In her letter, Chien (2) suggests that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Genetic variation in VAC14 is associated with bacteremia secondary to diverse pathogens in African children [Biological Sciences]Performing a genome-wide association study of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) invasion, Alvarez et al. (1) identify a trait-associated SNP, rs8060947, in VAC14. rs8060947 is an expression quantitative trait locus for VAC14 RNA expression, and carriage of the A allele is associated with reduced VAC14 RNA and protein expression,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Gilchrist et al.: Possible roles for VAC14 in multiple infectious diseases [Biological Sciences]Our studies of the SNP rs8060947 determine that the A allele is associated with increased invasion of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi and increased susceptibility to typhoid fever (1). Gilchrist et al. (2) now provide evidence that the A allele is also associated with increased risk for bacteremia, and the association...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Does selecting ligand shape {gamma}{delta}-TCR repertoire? [Biological Sciences]In a recent publication entitled “Role of a selecting ligand in shaping the murine γδ-TCR repertoire,” Fahl et al. (1) report that the expression of nonclassic MHC T10 and its related molecule T22 influences the T10/T22 specific γδ-T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire. We maintain that caveats in their experimental approaches...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Thermodynamic limits of energy harvesting from outgoing thermal radiation [Applied Physical Sciences]We derive the thermodynamic limits of harvesting power from the outgoing thermal radiation from the ambient to the cold outer space. The derivations are based on a duality relation between thermal engines that harvest solar radiation and those that harvest outgoing thermal radiation. In particular, we derive the ultimate limit...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Roll maneuvers are essential for active reorientation of Caenorhabditis elegans in 3D media [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Locomotion of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is a key observable used in investigations ranging from behavior to neuroscience to aging. However, while the natural environment of this model organism is 3D, quantitative investigations of its locomotion have been mostly limited to 2D motion. Here, we present a quantitative analysis of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Molecular excitonic seesaws [Chemistry]The breaking of molecular symmetry through photoexcitation is a ubiquitous but rather elusive process, which, for example, controls the microscopic efficiency of light harvesting in molecular aggregates. A molecular excitation within a π-conjugated segment will self-localize due to strong coupling to molecular vibrations, locally changing bond alternation in a process...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Word embeddings quantify 100 years of gender and ethnic stereotypes [Computer Sciences]Word embeddings are a powerful machine-learning framework that represents each English word by a vector. The geometric relationship between these vectors captures meaningful semantic relationships between the corresponding words. In this paper, we develop a framework to demonstrate how the temporal dynamics of the embedding helps to quantify changes in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Fluctuations uncover a distinct class of traveling waves [Physics]Epidemics, flame propagation, and cardiac rhythms are classic examples of reaction–diffusion waves that describe a switch from one alternative state to another. Only two types of waves are known: pulled, driven by the leading edge, and pushed, driven by the bulk of the wave. Here, we report a distinct class...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Soft self-assembly of Weyl materials for light and sound [Physics]Soft materials can self-assemble into highly structured phases that replicate at the mesoscopic scale the symmetry of atomic crystals. As such, they offer an unparalleled platform to design mesostructured materials for light and sound. Here, we present a bottom-up approach based on self-assembly to engineer 3D photonic and phononic crystals...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Topological order in the pseudogap metal [Physics]We compute the electronic Green’s function of the topologically ordered Higgs phase of a SU(2) gauge theory of fluctuating antiferromagnetism on the square lattice. The results are compared with cluster extensions of dynamical mean field theory, and quantum Monte Carlo calculations, on the pseudogap phase of the strongly interacting hole-doped...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Pharmacological activation of estrogen receptor beta augments innate immunity to suppress cancer metastasis [Biochemistry]Metastases constitute the greatest causes of deaths from cancer. However, no effective therapeutic options currently exist for cancer patients with metastasis. Estrogen receptor β (ERβ), as a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, shows potent tumor-suppressive activities in many cancers. To investigate whether modulation of ERβ could serve as a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mechanosensitivity of Jagged-Notch signaling can induce a switch-type behavior in vascular homeostasis [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Hemodynamic forces and Notch signaling are both known as key regulators of arterial remodeling and homeostasis. However, how these two factors integrate in vascular morphogenesis and homeostasis is unclear. Here, we combined experiments and modeling to evaluate the impact of the integration of mechanics and Notch signaling on vascular homeostasis....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Accurate and sensitive quantification of protein-DNA binding affinity [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Transcription factors (TFs) control gene expression by binding to genomic DNA in a sequence-specific manner. Mutations in TF binding sites are increasingly found to be associated with human disease, yet we currently lack robust methods to predict these sites. Here, we developed a versatile maximum likelihood framework named No Read...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Comprehensive, high-resolution binding energy landscapes reveal context dependencies of transcription factor binding [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Transcription factors (TFs) are primary regulators of gene expression in cells, where they bind specific genomic target sites to control transcription. Quantitative measurements of TF–DNA binding energies can improve the accuracy of predictions of TF occupancy and downstream gene expression in vivo and shed light on how transcriptional networks are...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Spatial organization and dynamics of RNase E and ribosomes in Caulobacter crescentus [Biophysics and Computational Biology]We report the dynamic spatial organization of Caulobacter crescentus RNase E (RNA degradosome) and ribosomal protein L1 (ribosome) using 3D single-particle tracking and superresolution microscopy. RNase E formed clusters along the central axis of the cell, while weak clusters of ribosomal protein L1 were deployed throughout the cytoplasm. These results...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Insight from the maximal activation of the signal transduction excitable network in Dictyostelium discoideum [Cell Biology]Cell migration requires the coordination of an excitable signal transduction network involving Ras and PI3K pathways with cytoskeletal activity. We show that expressing activated Ras GTPase-family proteins in cells lacking PTEN or other mutations which increase cellular protrusiveness transforms cells into a persistently activated state. Leading- and trailing-edge markers were...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Evolutionary emergence of the rac3b/rfng/sgca regulatory cluster refined mechanisms for hindbrain boundaries formation [Developmental Biology]Developmental programs often rely on parallel morphogenetic mechanisms that guarantee precise tissue architecture. While redundancy constitutes an obvious selective advantage, little is known on how novel morphogenetic mechanisms emerge during evolution. In zebrafish, rhombomeric boundaries behave as an elastic barrier, preventing cell intermingling between adjacent compartments. Here, we identify
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Autochthonous tumors driven by Rb1 loss have an ongoing requirement for the RBP2 histone demethylase [Genetics]Inactivation of the retinoblastoma gene (RB1) product, pRB, is common in many human cancers. Targeting downstream effectors of pRB that are central to tumorigenesis is a promising strategy to block the growth of tumors harboring loss-of-function RB1 mutations. One such effector is retinoblastoma-binding protein 2 (RBP2, also called JARID1A or...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Interrelated role of Klotho and calcium-sensing receptor in parathyroid hormone synthesis and parathyroid hyperplasia [Medical Sciences]The pathogenesis of parathyroid gland hyperplasia is poorly understood, and a better understanding is essential if there is to be improvement over the current strategies for prevention and treatment of secondary hyperparathyroidism. Here we investigate the specific role of Klotho expressed in the parathyroid glands (PTGs) in mediating parathyroid hormone...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

FAM210A is a novel determinant of bone and muscle structure and strength [Medical Sciences]Osteoporosis and sarcopenia are common comorbid diseases, yet their shared mechanisms are largely unknown. We found that genetic variation near FAM210A was associated, through large genome-wide association studies, with fracture, bone mineral density (BMD), and appendicular and whole body lean mass, in humans. In mice, Fam210a was expressed in muscle...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Targeting galectin-1 inhibits pancreatic cancer progression by modulating tumor-stroma crosstalk [Medical Sciences]Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) remains one of the most lethal tumor types, with extremely low survival rates due to late diagnosis and resistance to standard therapies. A more comprehensive understanding of the complexity of PDA pathobiology, and especially of the role of the tumor microenvironment in disease progression, should pave...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The Vibrio cholerae type VI secretion system can modulate host intestinal mechanics to displace gut bacterial symbionts [Microbiology]Host-associated microbiota help defend against bacterial pathogens; however, the mechanisms by which pathogens overcome this defense remain largely unknown. We developed a zebrafish model and used live imaging to directly study how the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae invades the intestine. The gut microbiota of fish monocolonized by symbiotic strain Aeromonas...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Plasticity in early immune evasion strategies of a bacterial pathogen [Microbiology]Borrelia burgdorferi is one of the few extracellular pathogens capable of establishing persistent infection in mammals. The mechanisms that sustain long-term survival of this bacterium are largely unknown. Here we report a unique innate immune evasion strategy of B. burgdorferi, orchestrated by a surface protein annotated as BBA57, through its...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

SAMHD1 suppresses innate immune responses to viral infections and inflammatory stimuli by inhibiting the NF-{kappa}B and interferon pathways [Microbiology]Sterile alpha motif and HD-domain–containing protein 1 (SAMHD1) blocks replication of retroviruses and certain DNA viruses by reducing the intracellular dNTP pool. SAMHD1 has been suggested to down-regulate IFN and inflammatory responses to viral infections, although the functions and mechanisms of SAMHD1 in modulating innate immunity remain unclear. Here, we...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Multiple nuclear-replicating viruses require the stress-induced protein ZC3H11A for efficient growth [Microbiology]The zinc finger CCCH-type containing 11A (ZC3H11A) gene encodes a well-conserved zinc finger protein that may function in mRNA export as it has been shown to associate with the transcription export (TREX) complex in proteomic screens. Here, we report that ZC3H11A is a stress-induced nuclear protein with RNA-binding capacity that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Spatial eye-hand coordination during bimanual reaching is not systematically coded in either LIP or PRR [Neuroscience]We often orient to where we are about to reach. Spatial and temporal correlations in eye and arm movements may depend on the posterior parietal cortex (PPC). Spatial representations of saccade and reach goals preferentially activate cells in the lateral intraparietal area (LIP) and the parietal reach region (PRR), respectively....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Identification of long-lived synaptic proteins by proteomic analysis of synaptosome protein turnover [Neuroscience]Memory formation is believed to result from changes in synapse strength and structure. While memories may persist for the lifetime of an organism, the proteins and lipids that make up synapses undergo constant turnover with lifetimes from minutes to days. The molecular basis for memory maintenance may rely on a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Negative regulator of E2F transcription factors links cell cycle checkpoint and DNA damage repair [Plant Biology]DNA damage poses a serious threat to genome integrity and greatly affects growth and development. To maintain genome stability, all organisms have evolved elaborate DNA damage response mechanisms including activation of cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair. Here, we show that the DNA repair protein SNI1, a subunit of the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Phytophthora palmivora establishes tissue-specific intracellular infection structures in the earliest divergent land plant lineage [Plant Biology]The expansion of plants onto land was a formative event that brought forth profound changes to the earth’s geochemistry and biota. Filamentous eukaryotic microbes developed the ability to colonize plant tissues early during the evolution of land plants, as demonstrated by intimate, symbiosis-like associations in >400 million-year-old fossils. However, the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Origins and spread of fluted-point technology in the Canadian Ice-Free Corridor and eastern Beringia [Anthropology]Fluted projectile points have long been recognized as the archaeological signature of early humans dispersing throughout the Western Hemisphere; however, we still lack a clear understanding of their appearance in the interior “Ice-Free Corridor” of western Canada and eastern Beringia. To solve this problem, we conducted a geometric morphometric shape...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Human bony labyrinth is an indicator of population history and dispersal from Africa [Anthropology]The dispersal of modern humans from Africa is now well documented with genetic data that track population history, as well as gene flow between populations. Phenetic skeletal data, such as cranial and pelvic morphologies, also exhibit a dispersal-from-Africa signal, which, however, tends to be blurred by the effects of local...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Hip extensor mechanics and the evolution of walking and climbing capabilities in humans, apes, and fossil hominins [Anthropology]The evolutionary emergence of humans’ remarkably economical walking gait remains a focus of research and debate, but experimentally validated approaches linking locomotor capability to postcranial anatomy are limited. In this study, we integrated 3D morphometrics of hominoid pelvic shape with experimental measurements of hip kinematics and kinetics during walking and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Multiscale mixing patterns in networks [Applied Mathematics]Assortative mixing in networks is the tendency for nodes with the same attributes, or metadata, to link to each other. It is a property often found in social networks, manifesting as a higher tendency of links occurring between people of the same age, race, or political belief. Quantifying the level...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Dramatic pressure-sensitive ion conduction in conical nanopores [Applied Physical Sciences]Ion transporters in Nature exhibit a wealth of complex transport properties such as voltage gating, activation, and mechanosensitive behavior. When combined, such processes result in advanced ionic machines achieving active ion transport, high selectivity, or signal processing. On the artificial side, there has been much recent progress in the design...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Oversized galactosides as a probe for conformational dynamics in LacY [Biochemistry]Binding kinetics of α-galactopyranoside homologs with fluorescent aglycones of different sizes and shapes were determined with the lactose permease (LacY) of Escherichia coli by FRET from Trp151 in the binding site of LacY to the fluorophores. Fast binding was observed with LacY stabilized in an outward-open conformation (kon = 4–20...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Observation of acetyl phosphate formation in mammalian mitochondria using real-time in-organelle NMR metabolomics [Biochemistry]Recent studies point out the link between altered mitochondrial metabolism and cancer, and detailed understanding of mitochondrial metabolism requires real-time detection of its metabolites. Employing heteronuclear 2D NMR spectroscopy and 13C3-pyruvate, we propose in-organelle metabolomics that allows for the monitoring of mitochondrial metabolic changes in real time. The approach identified...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Molecular structural diversity of mitochondrial cardiolipins [Biochemistry]Current strategies used to quantitatively describe the biological diversity of lipids by mass spectrometry are often limited in assessing the exact structural variability of individual molecular species in detail. A major challenge is represented by the extensive isobaric overlap present among lipids, hampering their accurate identification. This is especially true...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Cell contraction induces long-ranged stress stiffening in the extracellular matrix [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Animal cells in tissues are supported by biopolymer matrices, which typically exhibit highly nonlinear mechanical properties. While the linear elasticity of the matrix can significantly impact cell mechanics and functionality, it remains largely unknown how cells, in turn, affect the nonlinear mechanics of their surrounding matrix. Here, we show that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Label-free and charge-sensitive dynamic imaging of lipid membrane hydration on millisecond time scales [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Biological membranes are highly dynamic and complex lipid bilayers, responsible for the fate of living cells. To achieve this function, the hydrating environment is crucial. However, membrane imaging typically neglects water, focusing on the insertion of probes, resonant responses of lipids, or the hydrophobic core. Owing to a recent improvement...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structural dynamics is a determinant of the functional significance of missense variants [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Accurate evaluation of the effect of point mutations on protein function is essential to assessing the genesis and prognosis of many inherited diseases and cancer types. Currently, a wealth of computational tools has been developed for pathogenicity prediction. Two major types of data are used to this aim: sequence conservation/evolution...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Microbes vs. chemistry in the origin of the anaerobic gut lumen [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The succession from aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria to obligate anaerobes in the infant gut along with the differences between the compositions of the mucosally adherent vs. luminal microbiota suggests that the gut microbes consume oxygen, which diffuses into the lumen from the intestinal tissue, maintaining the lumen in a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Direct electrochemical observation of glucosidase activity in isolated single lysosomes from a living cell [Cell Biology]The protein activity in individual intracellular compartments in single living cells must be analyzed to obtain an understanding of protein function at subcellular locations. The current methodology for probing activity is often not resolved to the level of an individual compartment, and the results provide an extent of reaction that...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Increased autophagy blocks HER2-mediated breast tumorigenesis [Cell Biology]Allelic loss of the autophagy gene, beclin 1/BECN1, increases the risk of patients developing aggressive, including human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive, breast cancers; however, it is not known whether autophagy induction may be beneficial in preventing HER2-positive breast tumor growth. We explored the regulation of autophagy in breast...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

TWEAK and RIPK1 mediate a second wave of cell death during AKI [Cell Biology]Acute kidney injury (AKI) is characterized by necrotic tubular cell death and inflammation. The TWEAK/Fn14 axis is a mediator of renal injury. Diverse pathways of regulated necrosis have recently been reported to contribute to AKI, but there are ongoing discussions on the timing or molecular regulators involved. We have now...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Precise characterization of KRAS4b proteoforms in human colorectal cells and tumors reveals mutation/modification cross-talk [Chemistry]Mutations of the KRAS gene are found in human cancers with high frequency and result in the constitutive activation of its protein products. This leads to aberrant regulation of downstream pathways, promoting cell survival, proliferation, and tumorigenesis that drive cancer progression and negatively affect treatment outcomes. Here, we describe a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Characterizing the human hippocampus in aging and Alzheimer’s disease using a computational atlas derived from ex vivo MRI and histology [Computer Sciences]Although the hippocampus is one of the most studied structures in the human brain, limited quantitative data exist on its 3D organization, anatomical variability, and effects of disease on its subregions. Histological studies provide restricted reference information due to their 2D nature. In this paper, high-resolution (∼200 × 200 ×...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Transient fibrosis resolves via fibroblast inactivation in the regenerating zebrafish heart [Developmental Biology]In the zebrafish (Danio rerio), regeneration and fibrosis after cardiac injury are not mutually exclusive responses. Upon cardiac cryoinjury, collagen and other extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins accumulate at the injury site. However, in contrast to the situation in mammals, fibrosis is transient in zebrafish and its regression is concomitant with...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Critical impact of vegetation physiology on the continental hydrologic cycle in response to increasing CO2 [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Predicting how increasing atmospheric CO2 will affect the hydrologic cycle is of utmost importance for a range of applications ranging from ecological services to human life and activities. A typical perspective is that hydrologic change is driven by precipitation and radiation changes due to climate change, and that the land...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Effects of iron on the lattice thermal conductivity of Earth’s deep mantle and implications for mantle dynamics [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Iron may critically influence the physical properties and thermochemical structures of Earth’s lower mantle. Its effects on thermal conductivity, with possible consequences on heat transfer and mantle dynamics, however, remain largely unknown. We measured the lattice thermal conductivity of lower-mantle ferropericlase to 120 GPa using the ultrafast optical pump-probe technique...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Constraining the climate and ocean pH of the early Earth with a geological carbon cycle model [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The early Earth’s environment is controversial. Climatic estimates range from hot to glacial, and inferred marine pH spans strongly alkaline to acidic. Better understanding of early climate and ocean chemistry would improve our knowledge of the origin of life and its coevolution with the environment. Here, we use a geological...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Energetic tradeoffs control the size distribution of aquatic mammals [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Four extant lineages of mammals have invaded and diversified in the water: Sirenia, Cetacea, Pinnipedia, and Lutrinae. Most of these aquatic clades are larger bodied, on average, than their closest land-dwelling relatives, but the extent to which potential ecological, biomechanical, and physiological controls contributed to this pattern remains untested quantitatively....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Economics- and policy-driven organic carbon input enhancement dominates soil organic carbon accumulation in Chinese croplands [Biological Sciences]China’s croplands have experienced drastic changes in management practices, such as fertilization, tillage, and residue treatments, since the 1980s. There is an ongoing debate about the impact of these changes on soil organic carbon (SOC) and its implications. Here we report results from an extensive study that provided direct evidence...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Impact of the tree prior on estimating clock rates during epidemic outbreaks [Evolution]Bayesian phylogenetics aims at estimating phylogenetic trees together with evolutionary and population dynamic parameters based on genetic sequences. It has been noted that the clock rate, one of the evolutionary parameters, decreases with an increase in the sampling period of sequences. In particular, clock rates of epidemic outbreaks are often...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Everolimus rescues multiple cellular defects in laminopathy-patient fibroblasts [Genetics]LMNA encodes the A-type lamins that are part of the nuclear scaffold. Mutations in LMNA can cause a variety of disorders called laminopathies, including Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), atypical Werner syndrome, and Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy. Previous work has shown that treatment of HGPS cells with the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin or...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

High-accuracy lagging-strand DNA replication mediated by DNA polymerase dissociation [Genetics]The fidelity of DNA replication is a critical factor in the rate at which cells incur mutations. Due to the antiparallel orientation of the two chromosomal DNA strands, one strand (leading strand) is replicated in a mostly processive manner, while the other (lagging strand) is synthesized in short sections called...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Transcriptional mutagenesis mediated by 8-oxoG induces translational errors in mammalian cells [Genetics]Reactive oxygen species formed within the mammalian cell can produce 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) in mRNA, which can cause base mispairing during gene expression. Here we found that administration of 8-oxoGTP in MTH1-knockdown cells results in increased 8-oxoG content in mRNA. Under this condition, an amber mutation of the reporter luciferase is...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Learned immunosuppressive placebo responses in renal transplant patients [Medical Sciences]Patients after organ transplantation or with chronic, inflammatory autoimmune diseases require lifelong treatment with immunosuppressive drugs, which have toxic adverse effects. Recent insight into the neurobiology of placebo responses shows that associative conditioning procedures can be employed as placebo-induced dose reduction strategies in an immunopharmacological regimen. However, it is uncl
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ablation of insulin receptor substrates 1 and 2 suppresses Kras-driven lung tumorigenesis [Medical Sciences]Non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide, with 25% of cases harboring oncogenic Kirsten rat sarcoma (KRAS). Although KRAS direct binding to and activation of PI3K is required for KRAS-driven lung tumorigenesis, the contribution of insulin receptor (IR) and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R)...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Intron retention induced by microsatellite expansions as a disease biomarker [Medical Sciences]Expansions of simple sequence repeats, or microsatellites, have been linked to ∼30 neurological–neuromuscular diseases. While these expansions occur in coding and noncoding regions, microsatellite sequence and repeat length diversity is more prominent in introns with eight different trinucleotide to hexanucleotide repeats, causing hereditary diseases such as myotonic dystrophy type 2...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A small-molecule fragment that emulates binding of receptor and broadly neutralizing antibodies to influenza A hemagglutinin [Microbiology]The influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein mediates receptor binding and membrane fusion during viral entry in host cells. Blocking these key steps in viral infection has applications for development of novel antiinfluenza therapeutics as well as vaccines. However, the lack of structural information on how small molecules can gain a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Flavivirus internalization is regulated by a size-dependent endocytic pathway [Microbiology]Flaviviruses enter host cells through the process of clathrin-mediated endocytosis, and the spectrum of host factors required for this process are incompletely understood. Here we found that lymphocyte antigen 6 locus E (LY6E) promotes the internalization of multiple flaviviruses, including West Nile virus, Zika virus, and dengue virus. Perhaps surprisingly,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Second-order spinal cord pathway contributes to cortical responses after long recoveries from dorsal column injury in squirrel monkeys [Neuroscience]Months after the occurrence of spinal cord dorsal column lesions (DCLs) at the cervical level, neural responses in the hand representation of somatosensory area 3b hand cortex recover, along with hand use. To examine whether the second-order spinal cord pathway contributes to this functional recovery, we injected cholera toxin subunit...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Psychophysical evidence for auditory motion parallax [Neuroscience]Distance is important: From an ecological perspective, knowledge about the distance to either prey or predator is vital. However, the distance of an unknown sound source is particularly difficult to assess, especially in anechoic environments. In vision, changes in perspective resulting from observer motion produce a reliable, consistent, and unambiguous...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ectopic neurogenesis induced by prenatal antiepileptic drug exposure augments seizure susceptibility in adult mice [Neuroscience]Epilepsy is a neurological disorder often associated with seizure that affects ∼0.7% of pregnant women. During pregnancy, most epileptic patients are prescribed antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) such as valproic acid (VPA) to control seizure activity. Here, we show that prenatal exposure to VPA in mice increases seizure susceptibility in adult offspring...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Long-term in vivo recording of circadian rhythms in brains of freely moving mice [Neuroscience]Endogenous circadian clocks control 24-h physiological and behavioral rhythms in mammals. Here, we report a real-time in vivo fluorescence recording system that enables long-term monitoring of circadian rhythms in the brains of freely moving mice. With a designed reporter of circadian clock gene expression, we tracked robust Cry1 transcription reporter...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Activation of AMPK by metformin improves withdrawal signs precipitated by nicotine withdrawal [Pharmacology]Cigarette smoking is the leading cause of preventable disease and death in the United States, with more persons dying from nicotine addiction than any other preventable cause of death. Even though smoking cessation incurs multiple health benefits, the abstinence rate remains low with current medications. Here we show that the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The computational form of craving is a selective multiplication of economic value [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Craving is thought to be a specific desire state that biases choice toward the desired object, be it chocolate or drugs. A vast majority of people report having experienced craving of some kind. In its pathological form craving contributes to health outcomes in addiction and obesity. Yet despite its ubiquity...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

China, the United States, and competition for resources that enable emerging technologies [Sustainability Science]Historically, resource conflicts have often centered on fuel minerals (particularly oil). Future resource conflicts may, however, focus more on competition for nonfuel minerals that enable emerging technologies. Whether it is rhenium in jet engines, indium in flat panel displays, or gallium in smart phones, obscure elements empower smarter, smaller, and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Effects of national ecological restoration projects on carbon sequestration in China from 2001 to 2010 [Biological Sciences]The long-term stressful utilization of forests and grasslands has led to ecosystem degradation and C loss. Since the late 1970s China has launched six key national ecological restoration projects to protect its environment and restore degraded ecosystems. Here, we conducted a large-scale field investigation and a literature survey of biomass...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Shifting plant species composition in response to climate change stabilizes grassland primary production [Biological Sciences]The structure and function of alpine grassland ecosystems, including their extensive soil carbon stocks, are largely shaped by temperature. The Tibetan Plateau in particular has experienced significant warming over the past 50 y, and this warming trend is projected to intensify in the future. Such climate change will likely alter...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Robust, linear correlations between growth rates and {beta}-lactam-mediated lysis rates [Systems Biology]It is widely acknowledged that faster-growing bacteria are killed faster by β-lactam antibiotics. This notion serves as the foundation for the concept of bacterial persistence: dormant bacterial cells that do not grow are phenotypically tolerant against β-lactam treatment. Such correlation has often been invoked in the mathematical modeling of bacterial...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Role of metabolic spatiotemporal dynamics in regulating biofilm colony expansion [Systems Biology]Cell fate determination is typically regulated by biological networks, yet increasing evidences suggest that cell−cell communication and environmental stresses play crucial roles in the behavior of a cell population. A recent microfluidic experiment showed that the metabolic codependence of two cell populations generates a collective oscillatory dynamic during the expansion...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Ramus et al,. An invasive foundation species enhances multifunctionality in a coastal ecosystem [Correction]ECOLOGY, SUSTAINABILITY SCIENCE Correction for “An invasive foundation species enhances multifunctionality in a coastal ecosystem,” by Aaron P. Ramus, Brian R. Silliman, Mads S. Thomsen, and Zachary T. Long, which was first published July 17, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1700353114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:8580–8585). The editors note that a conflict of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Chen et al., B7-H1 maintains the polyclonal T cell response by protecting dendritic cells from cytotoxic T lymphocyte destruction [Correction]IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION Correction for “B7-H1 maintains the polyclonal T cell response by protecting dendritic cells from cytotoxic T lymphocyte destruction,” by Ling Chen, Takeshi Azuma, Weiwei Yu, Xu Zheng, Liqun Luo, and Lieping Chen, which was first published March 5, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1722043115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:3126–3131). The...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Li et al., Regulator of G protein signaling 5 protects against cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis during biomechanical stress of pressure overload [Correction]MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for “Regulator of G protein signaling 5 protects against cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis during biomechanical stress of pressure overload,” by Hongliang Li, Chengwei He, Jinhua Feng, Yan Zhang, Qizhu Tang, Zhouyan Bian, Xue Bai, Heng Zhou, Hong Jiang, Scott P. Heximer, Mu Qin, He Huang, Peter. P....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Itkin et al., The biosynthetic pathway of the nonsugar, high-intensity sweetener mogroside V from Siraitia grosvenorii [Correction]PLANT BIOLOGY Correction for “The biosynthetic pathway of the nonsugar, high-intensity sweetener mogroside V from Siraitia grosvenorii,” by Maxim Itkin, Rachel Davidovich-Rikanati, Shahar Cohen, Vitaly Portnoy, Adi Doron-Faigenboim, Elad Oren, Shiri Freilich, Galil Tzuri, Nadine Baranes, Shmuel Shen, Marina Petreikov, Rotem Sertchook, Shifra Ben-Dor, Hugo Gottlieb, Alvaro Hernandez, David R....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Brain atlas reveals differential effects of aging and Alzheimer’s disease 3D model of average anatomy of the hippocampus. Each color represents a different subfield. Existing data on the anatomical variability and 3D organization of the human hippocampus—as well as the effects of age and disease on this brain region—are limited...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The labyrinth of human variation [Anthropology]Morphological analyses of the human temporal labyrinth (cochlea and especially the semicircular canals) have progressed (along with advances in tomography) from using the labyrinth to orient crania (1), to document the earlier hominin ancestral pattern (2), to document an apparently derived “Neandertal” configuration (3), to establish Neandertal persistence into the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Physiological constraints on marine mammal body size [Evolution]Body size has widely been recognized as one of the most important determinants of organismal form and function (1). Extremes in size can be especially illuminating of the drivers and constraints in body size evolution, and marine mammals provide a remarkable set of test cases because their independent invasions of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Auditory motion parallax [Neuroscience]When an object vibrates and produces an audible sound, many animals locate the position of the sound source based on only the sound. The horizontal (azimuth), vertical (elevation), and distance (range) of sound sources can often be determined, in some cases with high acuity (1). As most auditory systems have...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Climate change, human impacts, and carbon sequestration in China [Introductions]The scale of economic growth in China during the past three decades is unprecedented in modern human history. China is now the world’s second largest economic entity, next to the United States. However, this fast economic growth puts China’s environment under increasing stresses. China can be viewed as a massive...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Processes and patterns of interaction as units of selection: An introduction to ITSNTS thinking [Evolution]Many practicing biologists accept that nothing in their discipline makes sense except in the light of evolution, and that natural selection is evolution’s principal sense-maker. But what natural selection actually is (a force or a statistical outcome, for example) and the levels of the biological hierarchy (genes, organisms, species, or...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Plant diversity enhances productivity and soil carbon storage [Biological Sciences]Despite evidence from experimental grasslands that plant diversity increases biomass production and soil organic carbon (SOC) storage, it remains unclear whether this is true in natural ecosystems, especially under climatic variations and human disturbances. Based on field observations from 6,098 forest, shrubland, and grassland sites across China and predictions from...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

News Feature: The quest to solve sepsis [Medical Sciences]Researchers are learning more about the baffling, deadly condition. Treatments are elusive, but one thing’s for certain: timing is everything. At first, it looked like the flu. So doctors in Tolima, Colombia, advised Olga Peña’s 70-year-old father to rest and get plenty of fluids. Three days later, the elder Peña...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Carbon pools in China’s terrestrial ecosystems: New estimates based on an intensive field survey [Biological Sciences]China’s terrestrial ecosystems have functioned as important carbon sinks. However, previous estimates of carbon budgets have included large uncertainties owing to the limitations of sample size, multiple data sources, and inconsistent methodologies. In this study, we conducted an intensive field campaign involving 14,371 field plots to investigate all sectors of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Patterns of plant carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus concentration in relation to productivity in China’s terrestrial ecosystems [Biological Sciences]Plant nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) content regulate productivity and carbon (C) sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems. Estimates of the allocation of N and P content in plant tissues and the relationship between nutrient content and photosynthetic capacity are critical to predicting future ecosystem C sequestration under global change. In this...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Marine fish won an evolutionary lottery 66 million years agoWhy do our oceans contain such a staggering diversity of fish of so many different sizes, shapes and colors? A UCLA-led team of biologists reports that the answer dates back 66 million years, when a six-mile-wide asteroid crashed to Earth, wiping out the dinosaurs and approximately 75 percent of the world's animal and plant species.
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Dutch Universities, Journal Publishers Agree on Open-Access DealsDespite some difficult negotiations, academic institutions in the Netherlands have been securing subscriptions that combine publishing and reading into one fee.
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A Vast Majority of the Worlds Population Breathes Unsafe AirA new report estimates that 95 percent of people live in areas with dangerously high levels of fine particulate matter such as dust and soot.
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Big Think

All Starbucks shops will close May 29th for racial bias training. Will it help?After the wrongful arrest of two black men, the coffee shop chain will be closing down for an afternoon in order to educate up to 175,000 employees on racial bias in the workplace. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Army research rejuvenates older zinc batteriesArmy scientists, with a team of researchers from the University of Maryland and the National Institute of Standards and Technology, have created a water-based zinc battery that is simultaneously powerful, rechargeable and intrinsically safe.
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Researchers develop first gene drive targeting worldwide crop pestUC San Diego biologists have created the world's first gene drive system--a mechanism for manipulating genetic inheritance--in Drosophila suzukii, an agricultural pest that has invaded much of the United States and caused millions of dollars in damage to high-value berry and other fruit crops.
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Smooth dance moves confirm new bird-of-paradise speciesNewly publicized audiovisuals support full species status for one of the dancing birds-of-paradise in New Guinea.
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The Atlantic

Scenes From Coachella 2018Last weekend, the first part of the 2018 Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival took place in Indio, California. Thousands of music fans gathered to hear performances by artists on multiple stages, including headliner Beyoncé on Saturday. Also featured were Kendrick Lamar, David Byrne, Jean-Michel Jarre, X Japan, Cardi B, Miguel, St. Vincent, and many more. The festival wraps up next weekend, A
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Modeling prosocial behavior increases helping in 16-month-oldsShortly after they turn 1, most babies begin to help others, whether by handing their mother an object out of her reach or giving a sibling a toy that has fallen. Researchers have long studied how this helping behavior develops, but why it develops has been examined less. A new study looked at the role of imitation to find that when 16-month-olds observe others' helping behavior, they're more like
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Multidisciplinary study provides new insights about French RevolutionNew research from experts in history, computer science and cognitive science shines fresh light on the French Revolution, showing how rhetorical and institutional innovations won acceptance for the ideas that built the French republic's foundation and inspired future democracies.
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Digital remains should be treated with the same care and respect as physical remainsA new study advises that people's digital remains, such as, social media activity and online history, should be viewed in the same way as the human body, and treated with care and respect rather than manipulated for commercial gain. The paper suggests regulation akin to those used in museums and commercial use of organic human remains, is the best way to create explicit boundaries around acceptabl
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Could statins ease deadly heart condition in rare neuromuscular disease?Decreased HDL and ApoA-l levels in the general population are associated with an increased risk of death from cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Researchers found the FA patients had serum ApoA-I levels lower than healthy control subjects. In preclinical studies using cell models that mimicked liver cells of patients with the rare disease Friedreich's ataxia (FA), a widely used cholesterol-lowering
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'Striosome' neurons in the basal ganglia play a key role in learningResearchers have successfully isolated and recorded the activity of a subset of neurons in the striatum in the brain, shedding light on one mechanism underlying learning and decision making in animals.
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Performing under pressure: Modeling oxidation in high-stress materialsEach year, the effects of corroding materials sap more than $1 trillion from the global economy. As certain alloys are exposed to extreme stress and temperatures, an oxide film begins to form, causing the alloys to break down even more quickly. What precisely makes these conditions so conducive for corrosion, however, remains poorly understood, especially in microelectromechanical devices. Chinese
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Machine learning techniques may reveal cause-effect relationships in protein dynamics dataMachine learning algorithms excel at finding complex patterns within big data, so researchers often use them to make predictions. Researchers are pushing the technology beyond finding correlations to help uncover hidden cause-effect relationships and drive scientific discoveries. Researchers are integrating machine learning techniques into their work studying proteins. One of their challenges has
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Understanding Mercury's magnetic tailTheoretical physicists used simulations to explain the unusual readings collected in 2009 by the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging mission. The origin of energetic electrons detected in Mercury's magnetic tail has puzzled scientists. This new study provides a possible solution to how these energetic electrons form.
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Some human cancers are 'evolutionary accidents'New research has found some type of cancers unique to humans may be a result of evolutionary accidents.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New way that HIV evades the immune systemHIV uses our own cellular machinery to disable a signalling pathway (an assembly line of molecules) that produces anti-viral weaponry in the body. The scientists behind the discovery believe It should open the door to a new era of HIV research aiming to cure and eradicate this deadly virus.
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New type of 'opal' formed by common seaweedScientists have discovered a completely new type of opal formed by a common seaweed which harnesses natural technology by self-assembling a nanostructure of oil droplets to control how light reflects from its cells to display a shimmering array of colours that until now, has only been seen in the gem stone.
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Big Think

What was Project MKUltra? Inside the CIA's mind-control programSometimes conspiracy theories turn out to be true, like the one about how the CIA tried to use LSD to find a mind-control drug. Read More
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New on MIT Technology Review

New York attorney general to crypto exchanges: Please, tell us more about yourselves
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The Atlantic

The Humbling of Mike PompeoUpdated on April 17 at 5:46 p.m ET President Trump’s second round of Cabinet picks haven’t drawn the attention his original selections did last year, but they aren’t getting a free pass in the Senate. CIA Director Mike Pompeo’s nomination to serve as secretary of state is facing opposition from most Democrats and a key Republican on the Foreign Relations Committee, raising the possibility that he
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The Atlantic

Sean Hannity’s Ties to Two More Trump-Connected LawyersThis post was updated on April 17 at 4:24 p.m. Sean Hannity has had no shortage of lawyers. In court on Monday, his name was disclosed as the third “mystery client” of Donald Trump’s personal lawyer Michael Cohen. Though Hannity says he was never actually Cohen’s client, he does appear to have used the legal services of other well-connected Trump-world lawyers in a different matter a year ago. On
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Your immune system holds the line against repeat invaders, thanks to this moleculehis new insight may allow researchers to design drugs that improve immune responses to vaccines.
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Mark Zuckerberg Plays the Scapegoat for Our Facebook SinsPhilosopher René Girard's theory of "mimetic desire" explains much of the Facebook congressional hearings.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Confined gas research could expand natural gas marketResearchers are developing new ways to store, separate, and transport gases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New tool speeds up the design of wearable techPeople could soon power items such as their mobile phones or personal health equipment by simply using their daily movements, thanks to a new research tool that could be used by manufacturers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Carbon dioxide as a raw materialResearchers have found a way to turn climate-damaging CO2 into an alcohol that could serve as a raw material for the chemical industry - without producing large amounts of salt waste that usually arise.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Beta-amyloid dimers found in brains of patients with Alzheimer'sA new study proposes that the presence of two beta-amyloid molecules bound together (beta-amyloid dimers) could provide a new biomarker for AD.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Honeybees are struggling to get enough good bacteriaModern monoculture farming, commercial forestry and even well-intentioned gardeners could be making it harder for honeybees to store food and fight off diseases, a new study suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Preserving fertility during chemotherapyOne of the most significant impairments of the quality of life after a chemotherapy is infertility. Researchers have now identified the mechanism of chemotherapy-induced infertility in females.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Marine fish won an evolutionary lottery 66 million years ago, UCLA biologists reportWhy do the Earth's oceans contain such a staggering diversity of fish of so many different sizes, shapes, colors and ecologies? The answer, a UCLA-led team of biologists reports, dates back 66 million years ago, when a six-mile-wide asteroid crashed to Earth, wiping out the dinosaurs and approximately 75 percent of animal and plant species worldwide.
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The Atlantic

What Does Being Trump's Friend Get You?The question looming over Shinzo Abe’s visit to Mar-a-Lago this week is of profound interest to all allies of the transactional, mercurial, America-First occupant of the White House: Does cultivating a special relationship with Donald Trump get you anything special? Nearly from the moment Trump defeated Hillary Clinton, when Abe caught a flight to New York and became the first foreign leader to m
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Live Science

Lab 'Accident' Becomes Mutant Enzyme That Devours PlasticA new enzyme unintentionally produced by researchers has a voracious appetite for plastic.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Resilience counteracts effects of childhood abuse and neglect on healthResearchers have determined that psychological resilience has a positive effect on health outcomes for people living with schizophrenia. This is the first study to quantitatively assess the effects of both childhood trauma and psychological resilience on health and metabolic function in people living with schizophrenia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Studying oxygen, scientists discover clues to recovery from mass extinctionA research team is helping to understand why the Permian-Triassic mass extinction event happened and why it took life so long to recover.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Simulation of the AsqJ enzyme opens up new options for pharmaceutical chemistryPractically all biochemical processes involve enzymes that accelerate chemical reactions. A research team has now for the first time deciphered the molecular mechanism of the enzyme AsqJ. Their findings might open up new options in the production of pharmaceutically active molecules.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists make counter-intuitive observations in hybrid quantum systemsScientist have found that the cooling of quantum systems coupled to a common reservoir can lead to counter-intuitive behavior, where one of the quantum systems actually heats up.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sodium ion batteries using copper sulfide developedResearchers recently developed sodium ion batteries using copper sulfide anode. This finding will contribute to advancing the commercialization of sodium ion batteries (SIBs) and reducing the production cost of any electronic products with batteries.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Efficient control of leukemia with treatment by dual immune-checkpoint blockadeChronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a hematological malignancy. When infiltrating tissues, CLL cells come in contact with healthy cells, including immune cells. Researchers have now characterized the composition of immune cells and circulating cytokines of the CLL microenvironment in mouse models using mass cytometry. Based on this knowledge, they propose an immunotherapeutic strategy with two i
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A new, streamlined approach to diagnosing and treating bowel cancerResearchers have discovered a faster, more cost-effective way to determine which DNA mutations cause human bowel cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Possible novel method for stopping untreatable pediatric brain cancersResearchers used an experimental molecular therapy in preclinical laboratory tests to effectively treat several types of deadly pediatric brain cancer and now propose advancing the treatment to clinical testing in children. Scientists report testing the small molecule 6-thio-2'deoxyguanosine (6-thio-dG) in brain cancer stem cells derived from tumor cells donated by patients. Researchers also teste
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More than 12,000 marine creatures uncovered during West Java deep-sea explorationScientists who participated in the South Java Deep Sea Biodiversity Expedition 2018 had collected more than 12,000 creatures during their 14-day voyage to survey the unexplored deep seas off the southern coast of West Java, Indonesia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Observing inflammatory cells in the bodyResearchers have developed a new method that enables them to genetically modify immune cells, multiply them and visualize them in living organisms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Safety concerns over tungstenNew research shows how and where tungsten accumulates in bones of mice exposed to the element through drinking water. The findings, by a team of chemists and biologists, could add to doubts over the once-universal assumption that tungsten poses little or no health risk to the general human population.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flipping the classroom approach in public health -- does student performance improve?A study analyzed the traditional model of education versus the flipped classroom model -- where pre-recorded lectures are viewed outside of the classroom and in-person class time is devoted to interactive exercises, discussions, and group projects. The results showed there were no statistically significant differences in test scores or students' assessments of the flipped classes. However, student
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New on MIT Technology Review

Tesla shuts down Model 3 production to “improve automation”
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OncoDNA announces publication of peer-reviewed study in Oncotarget assessing the utility of its unique biomarker analysis and interpretation platform in clinical decision makingOncoDNA treatment recommendation followed in 60% of cases. 93% of treatment decisions were made based on a holistic approach combining next generation sequencing (NGS) and multiple biomarker analysis provided by OncoDNA. 27% of late-stage patients treated with OncoDNA-recommended therapies had overall survival >12 months, compared to a typical average of no more than six months.
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Abramson Cancer Canter studies show promise of immunotherapy combinations, including CAR TAs immunotherapies continue to make up a larger share of new cancer drugs, researchers are looking for the most effective ways to use these cutting edge treatments in combination with each or with other pre-existing options. New studies from the Abramson Cancer Center are providing clues on potentially effective combinations with CAR T therapy in brain cancer as well as a novel therapeutic target
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Study finds high rates of type 1 diabetes near food swampsHotspots of type 1 diabetes in New York City are found in food swamps, areas with a higher proportion of fast food restaurants, for children and adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D), according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of the Endocrine Society.
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Trials in Africa support conditional day 3 follow-up for children with feverChildren in sub-Saharan African settings with uncomplicated fever may be safely managed with conditional, rather than universal, three-day follow-up with a community health worker (CHW), according to two cluster-randomized, community-based non-inferiority trials published this week in PLOS Medicine.
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Inside Science

Microbes in Soil Help Sorghum Stay Strong Against DroughtsMicrobes in Soil Help Sorghum Stay Strong Against Droughts Bacteria that help sorghum survive drought could someday be used as probiotics for crops. Sorghum-harvest.jpg Image credits: mailsonpignata via Shutterstock Creature Tuesday, April 17, 2018 - 12:30 Anna Katrina Hunter, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Scientists want to know how one of the world's most important grain crops, sorghum, can t
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New process to differentiate stem cellsAs scientists try to find therapy options to fight back and neck pain, considerable interest exists in harnessing stem cells to restore nucleus pulposus, the chief material in discs. Previous research shows human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) can express markers for a wide variety of cells, including those that secrete NP. Scientists have developed a new process to generate NP-like cells
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Bacterial 'gene swapping' sparks disease outbreaksA new study documents how the ability of bacteria to swap genetic material with each other can directly affect the emergence and spread of globally important infectious diseases.
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Strong carbon fiber artificial muscles can lift 12,600 times their own weightSome researchers working on artificial muscles are seeing results even the fittest individuals would envy, designing muscles capable of lifting up to 12,600 times their own weight. The new muscles are made from carbon fiber-reinforced siloxane rubber and have a coiled geometry.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gene affects how some women store fat -- and ups their diabetes riskCruelly, the gene is sex specific: men with the same variation of the gene have a much less heightened diabetes risk.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Combination therapy strengthens T cells in melanoma pre-clinical studyA pre-clinical study of two drugs designed to boost T cell performance, has revealed the agents, when give in combination, may enhance the immune system's ability to kill melanoma tumors deficient in the tumor suppressor gene PTEN.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cultivating cartilage from stem cellsStable joint cartilage can be produced from adult stem cells originating from bone marrow. This is made possible by inducing specific molecular processes occurring during embryonic cartilage formation, as researchers now report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Engineering a plastic-eating enzymeScientists have engineered an enzyme which can digest some of our most commonly polluting plastics, providing a potential solution to one of the world's biggest environmental problems.
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Viden

Google-biler helt uden chauffør klar til Californiens vejeGoogles bildivision, Waymo, bliver blandt de første, der sender helt førerløse biler på gaden i firmaets hjemstavn, Californien.
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Text messaging tool may help fight opioid epidemicWashington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Epharmix, a digital health company, have created a new automated text messaging service that may curb opioid abuse and prevent relapse. Patients receive text messages to gauge if they're feeling OK or struggling with potential relapse. Patients also can activate a panic button to request immediate help.
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Gene mapping lays groundwork for precision chemotherapyDespite the great successes of targeted cancer drugs and the promise of novel immunotherapies, the vast majority of people diagnosed with cancer are still first treated with chemotherapy. Now a new study by UCSF researchers using techniques drawn from computational biology could make it much easier for physicians to use the genetic profile of a patient's tumor to pick the chemotherapy treatment wi
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Latest Headlines | Science News

This ancient Maya city may have helped the Snake King dynasty spreadA rural hub in an ancient Maya state gets its due with some laser help.
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The Atlantic

Emmanuel Macron Could Be Trump's Tony BlairAhead of Donald Trump’s decision to launch strikes against Syria’s chemical-weapons program, the U.S. president signaled a desire to leave Syria altogether. His advisers, based on their public pronouncements advocating leaving in place the 2,000 American troops there, likely tried to convince him otherwise. But then another, unexpected source claimed credit for changing his mind—the president of
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Can a simple blood test rule out lung cancer?A blood test to measure the levels of two proteins in plasma that are common predictors of lung cancer was 98 percent effective in a multicenter clinical trial at distinguishing benign from malignant lung nodules when combined with a patient's clinical characteristics to form an integrated classifier.
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Algorithm to locate fake users on many social networksResearchers have developed a new generic method to detect fake accounts on most types of social networks, including Facebook and Twitter.
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Biophysics: Making patterns robustCorrect protein localization is crucial for many fundamental cellular processes. Physicists have now asked how to confer robustness against variations in protein concentrations on pattern formation mechanisms.
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Can we tell black holes apart?Astrophysicists have created and compared self-consistent and realistic images of the shadow of an accreting supermassive black hole. The goal was to test if Einsteinian black holes can be distinguished from those in alternative theories of gravity.
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Cells respond to surface curvature in clever waysCells can sense and respond to surface curvature in very clever ways, as shown in research. The results, which revealed that curvature is a profound biological cue, could pave the way to new tools in the field.
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Can your dog predict an earthquake? Evidence is shaky, say researchersFor centuries people have claimed that strange behavior by their cats, dogs and even cows can predict an imminent earthquake, but the first rigorous analysis of the phenomenon concludes that there is no strong evidence behind the claim.
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Looking for extrasolar planets: DARKNESS lights the wayAn international team of scientists has developed a new instrument to detect planets around the nearest stars. It is the world's largest and most advanced superconducting camera.
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NanoString: Comprehensive Gene Expression Profiling of NeuroinflammationTargeting Neuroinflammatory and Neurodegenerative Diseases
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Climate Change Could Shift Timing of Species InteractionsThe alterations have been greater under rapidly-climbing global temperatures, suggesting key ecological relationships could be disrupted in the future.
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Science | The Guardian

Thatcher forecast to return in 2276 | Brief lettersPlastic-eating enzymes | Class in the north | Brown cars | Spring politics | Female newsreaders | Comet Thatcher I hope the artificially created enzymes will begin to help clean up the exponential increase in plastic waste ( Researchers make plastic-eating mutant enzyme better , 17 April). Maybe better not to let the cultivated variants out into the wild though – and on no account call them Mutant
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The Atlantic

How the FBI Helped Sink Clinton’s CampaignPublic statements from former FBI Director James Comey, as well as an internal investigation focusing on former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, have shed light on the extent to which leaks from the Bureau influenced a series of late-October decisions that damaged Hillary Clinton’s chances in the 2016 election. Pressure from the FBI officials investigating the Clinton Foundation, who leaked the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Greenpeace finds coral reef in Total's Amazon drilling areaEnvironmental campaigners Greenpeace said Tuesday that a massive coral reef has been found to extend right into where France's oil company Total plans to drill near the mouth of the Amazon.
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Live Science

The Amazing Tech in 'Black Panther' Is More Realistic Than You ThinkMuch of the tech that is part of everyday life in Wakanda is grounded in technologies that are used today.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bat that helps make tequila gets off endangered species listWildlife managers in the American Southwest say a once-rare bat important to the pollination of plants used to produce tequila has made a comeback and is being removed from the federal endangered species list.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Iceland resumes fin whale hunt after two-year pauseIcelandic whaling company Hvalur said Tuesday it would resume its controversial hunt of endangered fin whales after a two-year suspension, sparking angry protests from animal rights activists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Full of hot air and proud of it: Improving gas storage with MOFsOf the four states of matter, gases are the hardest to pin down. Gas molecules move quickly and wildly and don't like to be confined. When confined, heat and pressure build in the container, and it doesn't take long before the gas blows the lid off the place, literally. Luckily, gases are superficial. Provide them with an attractive internal surface area, and they'll pin themselves down in no time
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Studying oxygen, scientists discover clues to recovery from mass extinctionAbout 252 million years ago, more than 90 percent of all animal life on Earth went extinct. This event, called the "Permian-Triassic mass extinction," represents the greatest catastrophe in the history of life on Earth. Ecosystems took nearly five million years to recover and many aspects of the event remain a mystery.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Digital remains should be treated with the same care and respect as physical remainsFrom live-streaming funerals to online memorial pages and even chat-bots that use people's social media footprints' to act as online ghosts, the digital afterlife industry (DAI) has become big business.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trust in science, news and experts is influenced by sound quality"Believe nothing you hear, and only one half that you see," Edgar Allen Poe once wrote.
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Inside Science

Anna Katrina HunterContributor Anna Katrina Hunter is a science writer based in Santa Cruz, California, who is an entomophile and outdoor enthusiast. Follow her on Twitter: @ akatrinahunter
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Big Think

Scientists accidentally engineer mutant bacteria that gorges on plastic bottlesIt's not a solution yet, but perhaps the start of one. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trust in science, news and experts is influenced by sound qualityNew research using manipulated audio clips from NPR's Science Friday and YouTube videos of academic presentations indicates that poor audio quality can create distrust -- in both the information and the source, while high audio quality strengthens their credibility.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers find resilience counteracts effects of childhood abuse and neglect on healthResearchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have determined that psychological resilience has a positive effect on health outcomes for people living with schizophrenia. This is the first study to quantitatively assess the effects of both childhood trauma and psychological resilience on health and metabolic function in people living with schizophrenia. The findings are publ
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Multidisciplinary study provides new insights about French RevolutionNew research from experts in history, computer science and cognitive science shines fresh light on the French Revolution, showing how rhetorical and institutional innovations won acceptance for the ideas that built the French republic's foundation and inspired future democracies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flipping the classroom approach in public health—does student performance improve?A study conducted at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health analyzed the traditional model of education versus an increasingly popular approach to learning in the health sciences fields—the flipped classroom model—where pre-recorded lectures are viewed outside of the classroom and in-person class time is devoted to interactive exercises, discussions, and group projects. The results
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Science : NPR

The Renewable Energy Movement Ramps Up In Red StatesWhere might you find a city that uses only renewable energy? Try Texas. (Image credit: Photo by Drew Anthony Smith for Smithsonian magazine)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Solving the structure of ATP synthaseA team of scientists headed by Rosalind Franklin University Professor David M. Mueller, PhD, has solved the structure of mitochondrial ATP synthase, an enzyme that makes ATP, adenosine triphosphate, the major energy source of cells.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can your dog predict an earthquake? Evidence is shaky, say researchersFor centuries people have claimed that strange behavior by their cats, dogs and even cows can predict an imminent earthquake, but the first rigorous analysis of the phenomenon concludes that there is no strong evidence behind the claim.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The 'bread basket' of the tropics? Study explores tropical grain productionIt wasn't until the late-1990s that the tropics began to emerge as a possible region for growing grain crops, particularly soybean. But, today, farmers in central Brazil are running productive farm businesses, largely due to a new tropical system of production known as safrinha, or succession farming, which results in two large crops—soybean and maize—per year.
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The Atlantic

The Tax Experiment That FailedIn May 2012, all eyes were on Kansas as its former governor, Republican Sam Brownback, signed into law “the nation’s most aggressive experiment in conservative economic policy,” as Russell Berman wrote in The Atlantic . Kansas Senate Bill HB 2117 was one of the largest income tax cuts in the state’s history, entirely eliminating income taxes for the owners of nearly 200,000 pass-through businesse
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Data shows migration more strongly linked to aspiration than desperationA new global analysis of intentions to migrate suggests that individuals preparing to move abroad are more likely to do so out of aspiration for a better life, economic opportunities and development of skills, rather than sheer desperation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Honeybees are struggling to get enough good bacteriaModern monoculture farming, commercial forestry and even well-intentioned gardeners could be making it harder for honeybees to store food and fight off diseases, a new study suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

GPM catches line of strong storms responsible for tornadoes in eastern USOn Sunday April 15th, a line of strong storms at one point stretched from the Florida Straits below the Florida Keys all the way up the East Coast and into Ohio. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite analyzed the severe storms as it passed overhead. GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Calculus III for cellsLast year, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania revealed surprising insights into how cells respond to surface curvature. Specifically, they investigated how cells respond to cylindrical surfaces, which are common in biology. They found that cells change the static configurations of their shapes and internal structures.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Studying oxygen, scientists discover clues to recovery from mass extinctionA research team, led by scientists from Arizona State University and funded by NASA and the National Science Foundation, is helping to understand why the Permian-Triassic mass extinction event happened and why it took life so long to recover.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Full of hot air and proud of itResearchers at the University of Pittsburgh are developing new ways to store, separate, and transport gases. Their recently published study 'Thermal Transport in Interpenetrated Metal-Organic Frameworks' appeared in the American Chemical Society journal Chemistry of Materials. The issue's cover also featured an image designed by Kutay Sezginel, a chemical engineering graduate student in Dr. Wilmer
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Digital remains should be treated with the same care and respect as physical remainsAn Oxford University study published in Nature advises that people's digital remains, such as, social media activity and online history, should be viewed in the same way as the human body, and treated with care and respect rather than manipulated for commercial gain.The paper suggests regulation akin to those used in museums and commercial use of organic human remains, is the best way to create ex
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Scientific American Content: Global

What the History of Math Can Teach Us About the Future of AIDoomsayers say it will put us all out of work, but experience suggests otherwise -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

More than 12,000 marine creatures uncovered during first-ever exploration of West Java seasDespite a stormy start thanks to Cyclone Marcus, scientists who participated in the South Java Deep Sea Biodiversity Expedition 2018 (SJADES 2018) had collected more than 12,000 creatures during their 14-day voyage to survey the unexplored deep seas off the southern coast of West Java, Indonesia.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Strong carbon fiber artificial muscles can lift 12,600 times their own weightThe pull-up, an exercise dreaded by most, answers a basic question: are your muscles strong enough to lift your own body weight?
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Multidisciplinary study provides new insights about French RevolutionNew research from experts in history, computer science and cognitive science shines fresh light on the French Revolution, showing how rhetorical and institutional innovations won acceptance for the ideas that built the French republic's foundation and inspired future democracies.
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Modeling prosocial behavior increases helping in 16-month-oldsShortly after they turn 1, most babies begin to help others, whether by handing their mother an object out of her reach or giving a sibling a toy that has fallen. Researchers have long studied how this helping behavior develops, but why it develops has been examined less. A new study looked at the role of imitation to find that when 16-month-olds observe others' helping behavior, they're more like
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For aggressive breast cancer in the brain, researchers clarify immune responseIn a preliminary study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2018 in Chicago, researchers from the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center revealed findings for what kind of immune response the body is staging against triple negative breast cancer that has spread to the brain. They hope they can use these findings to improve patient responses to drugs that wor
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An AI that makes road maps from aerial imagesMIT CSAIL's 'RoadTracer' system could reduce workload for developers of apps like Google Maps
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New highly selective antitumor photodynamic therapy agents synthesizedA team of researchers from Lobachevsky University (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia) headed by Professor Alexei Fedorov, Chair of the Organic Chemistry Department, is working to create a new generation of targeted anti-cancer drugs for photodynamic therapy.
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Popular Science

These diamonds are tiny, flawed, and may come from a long-lost planetSpace The early solar system was a wild, world-destroying place. A study published in Nature Communications offers a dramatic origin story for the meteorite. Based on materials found inside the diamonds, researchers think this may be…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team creates new tool to speed up the design of wearable techIn a new paper published by Nano Energy, experts from the Advanced Technology Institute (ATI) at the University of Surrey detail a new methodology that allows designers of smart-wearables to better understand and predict how their products would perform once manufactured and in use.
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New on MIT Technology Review

The EU may order tech firms to hand over terror suspects’ data inside 6 hours
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Quanta Magazine

Decades-Old Graph Problem Yields to Amateur MathematicianIn 1950 Edward Nelson, then a student at the University of Chicago, asked the kind of deceptively simple question that can give mathematicians fits for decades. Imagine, he said, a graph — a collection of points connected by lines. Ensure that all of the lines are exactly the same length, and that everything lies on the plane. Now color all the points , ensuring that no two connected points have
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Science : NPR

Welcome, 'Little One': Critically Endangered Gorilla Born At National ZooHe's named "Moke," which is a Lingala word meaning "little one." He's the first of his kind to be born at the National Zoo in nine years, perfect and wrinkly and clinging to his mother. (Image credit: Roshan Patel/Smithsonian's National Zoo )
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Unlikely Triumph of DinosaursNew fossils and analyses topple the long-standing explanation of how dinosaurs came to rule the earth -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NeuWrite West

Randomized controlled trials of interventions to reduce gender bias in academic hiringThis article is part of an ongoing blog series, titled Inequality in STEM: a Dive Into the Data . In this series, we cover recent research exploring and quantifying inequality in STEM. We'll discuss different aspects of inequality, including barriers to career advancement and a chilly social climate, as well as the efficacy of various interventions to combat bias. Our goal with these pieces is to
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New Scientist - News

A melting ice shelf can cause rapid ice loss 900 kilometres awayIf one part of an ice shelf starts to thin, it can trigger rapid ice losses in other regions as much as 900 kilometres away – contributing to sea level rise
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can a simple blood test rule out lung cancer?A blood test to measure the levels of two proteins in plasma that are common predictors of lung cancer was 98 percent effective in a multicenter clinical trial at distinguishing benign from malignant lung nodules when combined with a patient's clinical characteristics to form an integrated classifier. These results were reported by a team of investigators at the Medical University of South Carolin
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Rosalind Franklin University leads study in solving the structure of ATP synthaseA team of scientists headed by Rosalind Franklin University Professor David M. Mueller, Ph.D., has solved the structure of mitochondrial ATP synthase, an enzyme that makes ATP, adenosine triphosphate, the major energy source of cells.
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High-quality nursing homes lower risks for long-term care placement for older adultsIn a new study, researchers decided to examine the role that skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) play with regard to older adults' placements in long-term care facilities.
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Statins save lives of people with high levels of LDL cholesterolCholesterol-lowering drugs are more likely to save thousands of additional lives when used in people with higher levels of LDL cholesterol, or 'bad' cholesterol, according to a new study from the University of Iowa, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).
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A new Listeria species from Costa Rica identifiedListeria costaricensis is the official name given to the new bacterial species described by investigators from the Costa Rican Institute of Technology and the WHO-collaborating center on Listeria at Institut Pasteur.
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The 'bread basket' of the tropics? Study explores tropical grain productionAgricultural economists at the University of Illinois wanted to learn more about the productivity of grain production in the tropics. In a study published in the International Journal of Agricultural Management, they examine input and output factors for several large-scale farms located in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's GPM catches line of strong storms responsible for tornadoes in eastern USOn Sunday, April 15, a line of strong storms at one point stretched from the Florida Straits below the Florida Keys all the way up the East Coast and into Ohio. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite analyzed the severe storms as it passed overhead. GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Boosting employment rate is unlikely to curb opioid useImproving job prospects for people in economically depressed parts of the United States is unlikely to help curb the opioid epidemic, according to a study by researchers at Princeton University. On the other hand, opioid use may actually help some women -- but not men -- stay in the labor force when they would otherwise leave because of chronic pain.
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New study finds that workplace anxiety isn't always a bad thingResearchers have developed a new comprehensive model of workplace anxiety. It includes triggers for anxiety in the workplace and its effect on employee performance.
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The enzyme designersPractically all biochemical processes involve enzymes that accelerate chemical reactions. A research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now for the first time deciphered the molecular mechanism of the enzyme AsqJ. Their findings might open up new options in the production of pharmaceutically active molecules.
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New clues point to relief for chronic itchingStudying mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that a drug called nalfurafine hydrochloride (Remitch) can deliver itch relief by targeting particular opioid receptors on neurons in the spinal cord. The research suggests that the drug may be effective against many types of chronic itching that don't respond to conventional drugs such as antihistamines
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Researchers uncover origin of virus-fighting plasma B cellsA group of researchers led by RIKEN and Osaka University have discovered an important mechanism that governs how B cells are chosen to become plasma B cells, which move through the body releasing antibodies, acting as an important component of the body's fight against viral infections and other invaders.
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Global ROS1 initiative: A patient-researcher collaboration targeting ROS1 cancerCU presentation at AACR2018 describes the first research-focused group of patients organized around the genetic mutation that creates their cancer, namely changes to the gene ROS1.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Siblings' experiences in middle childhood predict differences in college graduation statusGraduating from college has significant implications for adults' long-term success, including employment, family formation, and health. A new longitudinal study found that when siblings in middle childhood experienced less warmth in their relationships with each other, spent different amounts of time with their fathers, or thought their parents treated them unfairly relative to their siblings, the
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New Scientist - News

Diamond meteorites may come from a lost ancient planetWe may have found signs of a planet destroyed during the era of Earth’s formation. Meteorites with pockets of diamond could be the shards of this ancient world
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Big Think

Why Meek Mill is a symbol of the broken American justice systemRapper Meek Mill is stuck in jail, caught in the U.S. justice system’s perpetual probation trap that keeps a disproportionate number of black people in America incarcerated. Read More
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Scientists identify potential targets for new autoimmune disease treatmentsResearchers have provided new insight into how a gene associated with autoimmunity contributes to disease in humans.
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Could statins ease deadly heart condition in rare neuromuscular disease?Decreased HDL and ApoA-l levels in the general population are associated with an increased risk of death from cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Researchers found the FA patients had serum ApoA-I levels lower than healthy control subjects. In preclinical studies using cell models that mimicked liver cells of patients with the rare disease Friedreich's ataxia (FA), a widely used cholesterol-lowering
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Data shows migration more strongly linked to aspiration than desperationThe Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, analyze global survey data which sheds light on the motivations of people who decide to migrate.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Siblings' experiences in middle childhood predict differences in college graduation statusGraduating from college has significant implications for adults' long-term success, including employment, family formation, and health. A new longitudinal study found that when siblings in middle childhood experienced less warmth in their relationships with each other, spent different amounts of time with their fathers, or thought their parents treated them unfairly relative to their siblings, the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Surrey creates new tool to speed up the design of wearable techPeople could soon power items such as their mobile phones or personal health equipment by simply using their daily movements, thanks to a new research tool that could be used by manufacturers.
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Model can predict success of treatments that manipulate the gut microbiotaA new mathematical model can predict the effectiveness of microbiome therapies that manipulate the immune system through live bacteria and could help doctors choose the most appropriate treatment for people with inflammatory or allergic diseases, a study in eLife reveals.
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FDA approves new standard of care for kidney cancerThe US Food and Drug Administration granted approval to the combination of two immunotherapy drugs, ipilimumab and nivolumab, for the treatment of metastatic kidney cancer.
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Simple one-page tool improves patient satisfaction with doctor visitA simple, one-page form given to patients ahead of their doctor visit can significantly improve satisfaction with the care they receive, according to a study by Duke Health researchers.
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Gene affects how some women store fat -- and ups their diabetes riskCruelly, the gene is sex specific: men with the same variation of the gene have a much less heightened diabetes risk.
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Strong carbon fiber artificial muscles can lift 12,600 times their own weightSome Illinois researchers working on artificial muscles are seeing results even the fittest individuals would envy, designing muscles capable of lifting up to 12,600 times their own weight.Assistant professor of mechanical science and engineering Sameh Tawfick, Beckman postdoctoral fellow Caterina Lamuta, and Simon Messelot recently published a study on how to design super strong artificial muscle
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The Atlantic

The Michael Cohen Case: A Definitive Guide to Key PlayersThe longtime attorney for President Donald Trump’s real-estate empire, Michael Cohen, went to federal court on Monday in a bid to block federal prosecutors from reading documents and other materials that were seized from Cohen’s home in a sweeping raid. The porn star Stormy Daniels, whom Cohen allegedly paid off to protect Trump, was there to watch. And the hearing was presided over by Judge Kimb
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Scientific American Content: Global

U.S. Environmental Group Wins Millions to Develop Methane-Monitoring SatelliteThe Environmental Defense Fund is working with researchers at Harvard University on the probe -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Here’s why putting a missile defense system in space could be a bad ideaExpanding missile defense capabilities could put the world on a slippery slope to space warfare.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Are drivers for Amazon, Lyft or Uber today's version of factory workers?About a year ago, 60-year-old Johnny Pollard found himself in need of a job—fast.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook paid over $8.8 million for Mark Zuckerberg's security and travel last yearMark Zuckerberg's Facebook salary may only be $1, but don't think that is all the Facebook co-founder receives in benefits from the social network he helped create.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can your dog predict an earthquake? Evidence is shaky, say researchersFor centuries people have claimed that strange behavior by their cats, dogs and even cows can predict an imminent earthquake, but the first rigorous analysis of the phenomenon concludes that there is no strong evidence behind the claim.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Top-down approach gets to the bottom of cancerBy studying patient colorectal tumors, a Northwestern University research team characterizes a fully intact protein that results from a mutation of the RAS gene, the first cancer gene ever pinpointed in human cancer cells. This finding opens the door for new targets for treatment of a gene currently thought to be 'undruggable.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Calculus III for cellsCells can sense and respond to surface curvature in very clever ways, as shown in research led by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania. The results, which revealed that curvature is a profound biological cue, could pave the way to new tools in the field.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flipping the classroom approach in public health -- does student performance improve?A study analyzed the traditional model of education versus the flipped classroom model -- where pre-recorded lectures are viewed outside of the classroom and in-person class time is devoted to interactive exercises, discussions, and group projects. The results showed there were no statistically significant differences in test scores or students' assessments of the flipped classes. However, student
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Preserving fertility during chemotherapyOne of the most significant impairments of the quality of life after a chemotherapy is infertility. Researchers of the Goethe University and the University Tor Vergata in Rome have now identified the mechanism of chemotherapy-induced infertility in females.
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Bacterial 'gene swapping' sparks disease outbreaksA new study by scientists at the University of Liverpool documents, for the first time, how the ability of bacteria to swap genetic material with each other can directly affect the emergence and spread of globally important infectious diseases.
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PharmaMar discovers new data on the mechanism of action of plitidepsin in tumor cellsPharmaMar (MSE: PHM) has presented during the AACR meeting (American Association for Cancer Research) in Chicago new data about how plitidepsin works on the tumor cells.
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Researchers demonstrate the presence of beta-amyloid dimers in the brains of patients with Alzheimer'sA study headed by researchers at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) and the Institut Européen de Chimie et Biologie (IECB) in France proposes that the presence of two beta-amyloid molecules bound together (beta-amyloid dimers) could provide a new biomarker for AD.
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Safety concerns over tungstenNew research shows how and where tungsten accumulates in bones of mice exposed to the element through drinking water. The findings, by a team of chemists and biologists at McGill University, could add to doubts over the once-universal assumption that tungsten poses little or no health risk to the general human population.
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Carbon dioxide as a raw materialResearchers at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum have found a way to turn climate-damaging CO2 into an alcohol that could serve as a raw material for the chemical industry - without producing large amounts of salt waste that usually arise. The reaction mechanism is described by the team around Timo Wendling and Prof Dr Lukas Goossen together with a colleague of the Technical University of Kaiserslautern
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Honeybees are struggling to get enough good bacteriaModern monoculture farming, commercial forestry and even well-intentioned gardeners could be making it harder for honeybees to store food and fight off diseases, a new study suggests.
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Viden

Køresyge skyldes en forvirret hjerneMange lider af transportsyge, men forskerne er stadig usikre på, hvorfor nogle bliver ramt, og andre går fri.
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Pornhub Will Now Accept Verge CryptocurrencyBy accepting Verge, Pornhub could help make cryptocurrency transactions in general more mainstream.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

T-Mobile to pay $40 million after using fake ring tones on some customer callsBellevue, Wash., telecom T-Mobile has been cited by the federal government for using fake ring tones on some customers' calls—sounds that made the caller think the phone was ringing on the recipient's side, when it really wasn't.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Prague zookeepers use puppet to raise endangered magpieZookeepers in Prague have turned into puppeteers in an effort to save the critically endangered Javan green magpie.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: What is flame jetting?We know fuels like gasoline and alcohol can burn. But sometimes, when the conditions are just right, a hand-held container of fuel being poured near an ignition source can shoot out a ten-foot jet of flame. Flame jetting is extremely dangerous and has caused several deaths.
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The Atlantic

Netflix Is Suddenly a Huge Political Issue in BrazilIn April 2016, Netflix announced it had greenlit a fictional television series based on a very large, very much ongoing corruption investigation in Brazil. Titled O Mecanismo , or “The Mechanism,” the show, which debuted in March, follows a team of federal police investigators working to uncover a multi-billion-dollar kickback scheme implicating much of Brazil’s political and economic elite. Lava
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Observing inflammatory cells in the bodyResearchers at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence develop a new method that enables them to genetically modify immune cells, multiply them and visualize them in living organisms.
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New capabilities at NSLS-II set to advance materials scienceThe Hard X-ray Nanoprobe at Brookhaven Lab's National Synchrotron Light Source II now offers a combination of world-leading spatial resolution and multimodal imaging.
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Study reports possible novel method for stopping untreatable pediatric brain cancersResearchers used an experimental molecular therapy in preclinical laboratory tests to effectively treat several types of deadly pediatric brain cancer and now propose advancing the treatment to clinical testing in children. Scientists report in the journal Molecular Cancer Therapeutics testing the small molecule 6-thio-2'deoxyguanosine (6-thio-dG) in brain cancer stem cells derived from tumor cell
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Back to the beginningAs scientists try to find therapy options to fight back and neck pain, considerable interest exists in harnessing stem cells to restore nucleus pulposus, the chief material in discs. Previous research shows human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) can express markers for a wide variety of cells, including those that secrete NP. A collaborative team of scientists at Washington University has d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More than 12,000 marine creatures uncovered during West Java deep-sea explorationScientists who participated in the South Java Deep Sea Biodiversity Expedition 2018 had collected more than 12,000 creatures during their 14-day voyage to survey the unexplored deep seas off the southern coast of West Java, Indonesia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What is flame jetting? (video)We know fuels like gasoline and alcohol can burn. But sometimes, when the conditions are just right, a hand-held container of fuel being poured near an ignition source can shoot out a 10-foot jet of flame. Flame jetting is extremely dangerous and has caused several deaths. In this video from Reactions, the bizarre phenomenon is explained with help from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New type of opal formed by common seaweed discoveredScientists have discovered a completely new type of opal formed by a common seaweed which harnesses natural technology by self-assembling a nanostructure of oil droplets to control how light reflects from its cells to display a shimmering array of colours that until now, has only been seen in the gem stone.
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Novel thermal phases of topological quantum matter in the labA quantum simulation of topological phases of matter at finite temperature has be realized for the first time by a group of researchers from Universidad Complutense, IBM, ETH Zurich, MIT and Harvard University. These findings open the door to unexpected applications in robust quantum technologies against thermal fluctuations such as quantum computers or memories.
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Scientists discover new way that HIV evades the immune systemHIV uses our own cellular machinery to disable a signalling pathway (an assembly line of molecules) that produces anti-viral weaponry in the body. The scientists behind the discovery believe It should open the door to a new era of HIV research aiming to cure and eradicate this deadly virus.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new, streamlined approach to diagnosing and treating bowel cancerResearchers at the South Australian Health and Medical Research Institute (SAHMRI) and the University of Adelaide have discovered a faster, more cost-effective way to determine which DNA mutations cause human bowel cancer.
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Diabetes drug may not reduce risk of deathOne class of drug used to treat type 2 diabetes may not reduce the risk of death when compared with placebo, suggests new findings.
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Preventing fractures and falls: Shedding light on the USPSTF's new recommendationsThe US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has released new recommendation statements on preventing fractures and falls in older adults, casting doubt on vitamin D and calcium supplements but advocating for exercise and other interventions. JoAnn Manson, M.D., and Shalender Bhasin, M.D., are available to speak with reporters and can offer context and take-home messages for the new recommendati
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Though most prolapse surgeries regress over time, symptoms remain improvedA Duke-led study publishing April 17 in the Journal of the American Medical Association followed women for five years after two common prolapse surgeries and found failure rates for both procedures were equally high, at over 60 percent.
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USPSTF recommendation statement on vitamin D, calcium supplementation to prevent fracturesThe US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concludes current scientific evidence is insufficient regarding the use of vitamin D and calcium, alone or in combination, to prevent fractures in men and premenopausal women. The USPSTF recommends against daily supplementation with 400 IU or less of vitamin D and 1,000 mg or less of calcium to prevent fractures in postmenopausal women.
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Exercise to prevent falls recommended for older adults at increased risk for fallsFor adults 65 years or older who are at increased risk of falling, the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends exercise, such as supervised individual and group classes and physical therapy, to prevent falls, and that clinicians selectively check older adults' risks for falls and then offer tailored interventions that address those specific risks. The USPSTF recommends against vitami
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Comparison of type 2 diabetes treatments in improving survivalIn a comparison of different classes of drugs used to lower blood sugar levels for patients with type 2 diabetes, sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitors or glucagon-like peptide 1(GLP-1) agonists were associated with a lower risk of death than dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP-4) inhibitors or control (placebo or no treatment).
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Understanding Mercury's magnetic tailTheoretical physicists used simulations to explain the unusual readings collected in 2009 by the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging mission. The origin of energetic electrons detected in Mercury's magnetic tail has puzzled scientists. This new study, appearing in Physics of Plasmas, provides a possible solution to how these energetic electrons form.
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Machine learning techniques may reveal cause-effect relationships in protein dynamics dataMachine learning algorithms excel at finding complex patterns within big data, so researchers often use them to make predictions. Researchers are pushing the technology beyond finding correlations to help uncover hidden cause-effect relationships and drive scientific discoveries. At the University of South Florida, researchers are integrating machine learning techniques into their work studying pr
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Performing under pressure: Modeling oxidation in high-stress materialsEach year, the effects of corroding materials sap more than $1 trillion from the global economy. As certain alloys are exposed to extreme stress and temperatures, an oxide film begins to form, causing the alloys to break down even more quickly. What precisely makes these conditions so conducive for corrosion, however, remains poorly understood, especially in microelectromechanical devices. Chinese
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Science | The Guardian

Lawrence Brown obituaryAs an x-ray crystallographer from the late 1940s onwards, my father, Lawrence Brown, who has died aged 95, was one of a select band of British scientists who helped to determine the atomic and molecular structure of crystals. He put the knowledge he gained to good use in the then growing field of synthetic fibres, particularly with the textile company Courtaulds, where he rose to become head of i
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Science | The Guardian

Diamonds in Sudan meteorite 'are remnants of lost planet'Scientists say rock fragments that hit the Earth in 2008 contain evidence of a lost planet that was part of the early solar system Diamonds found in a meteorite that exploded over the Nubian desert in Sudan a decade ago were formed deep inside a “lost planet” that once circled the sun in the early solar system, scientists say. Microscopic analyses of the meteorite’s tiny diamonds revealed they co
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Popular Science

Worried about breaking a hip? There might be something better than calcium.Health New recommendations suggest vitamin supplements probably won’t help stave off falls and breaks. Vitamin supplement companies want you to believe their products stave off disease. They can save you from heart attacks and broken bones and common colds. Or at least…
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Scientific American Content: Global

Cars Threaten Climate Goals in Blue StatesWith few coal plants left to shutter, transportation is the main hurdle to meeting emissions targets -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Better butterfly learners take longer to grow upThe ability of animals to vary their phenotypes, or physical expression of their genes, in different environments is a key element to survival in an ever-changing world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Russia blocks some Google, Amazon servers after Telegram banRussia's communications watchdog says it is blocking access to some servers owned by tech giants Google and Amazon in order to comply with a court order to block a popular messaging app.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study: Diamond from the sky may have come from 'lost planet'Fragments of a meteorite that fell to Earth more than a decade ago provide compelling evidence of a lost planet that once roamed our solar system, according to a study published Tuesday.
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New on MIT Technology Review

A band of tech firms has pledged to protect you from cyber attacks
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Former Cambridge Analytica chief ducks fresh grillingFormer Cambridge Analytica boss Alexander Nix has refused to appear for a second grilling by British lawmakers, the MPs' scrutiny panel investigating him said Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tesla shuts down Model 3 assembly again to fix bottlenecksShares of Tesla Inc. traded lower Tuesday after reports that the company had shut down production of its Model 3 mass-market electric car again to solve manufacturing bottlenecks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Supreme Court dismisses Microsoft search caseThe Supreme Court has dismissed a dispute between the Trump administration and Microsoft over emails the government wanted as part of a drug trafficking investigation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Exhibit focuses on homes that adapt and change with usMost housing is designed for nuclear families, but most U.S. households don't meet that description.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Performing under pressure: Modeling oxidation in high-stress materialsEach year, the effects of corroding materials sap more than $1 trillion from the global economy. As certain alloys are exposed to extreme stress and temperatures, an oxide film begins to form, causing the alloys to break down even more quickly. What precisely makes these high-temperature, high-stress conditions so conducive for corrosion, however, remains poorly understood, especially in microelec
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Machine learning techniques may reveal cause-effect relationships in protein dynamics dataMachine learning algorithms excel at finding complex patterns within big data, so researchers often use them to make predictions. Researchers are pushing this emerging technology beyond finding correlations to help uncover hidden cause-effect relationships and drive scientific discoveries.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers have evidence that might explain the unexpected presence of energetic electrons in Mercury's magnetic tailTheoretical physicists used simulations to explain the unusual readings collected in 2009 by the Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission. The origin of energetic electrons detected in Mercury's magnetic tail has puzzled scientists. This new study, appearing in Physics of Plasmas, provides a possible solution to how these energetic electrons form.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Supply chains at risk as wild pollinators declineCompanies are facing potential shortages of raw materials, a fall in crop quality and challenges around security of supply because of an emerging pollination deficit, a new report funded by the Cambridge Conservation Initiative has found.
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Feed: All Latest

A Glimpse of Life Along China's Border With North KoreaElijah Hurwitz visited the region this winter amid heightened tensions between the two countries.
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Ingeniøren

Diamanter dannet i protoplanet faldt ned i ørkenenForskere fastslår, at en meteorit, der fladt til Jorden for ti år siden, indeholder diamanter med inklusioner af chromit og fosfat, der er dannet i en nu forsvunden protoplanet på størrelse med Merkur eller Mars.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: New York Mice Are Crawling With Dangerous Bacteria and VirusesColumbia University researchers analyzed feces from city mice and found bacteria, drug-resistant bugs and viruses never seen before.
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The Atlantic

Consider the 'Diner Lobster'“Who am I?” It’s a line famously sung by Jean Valjean in the musical Les Misérables. It’s also, now, a probing question of self, asked by a crustacean preparing to be boiled alive in one of Saturday Night Live ’s best recent sketches. On last weekend’s episode, which was hosted by the comedian John Mulaney , “Diner Lobster” stood out for its goofy surrealism, its high production values, and the f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop algorithm to locate fake users on many social networksBen-Gurion University of the Negev (Beer-Sheva, Israel) and University of Washington (Seattle) researchers have developed a new generic method to detect fake accounts on most types of social networks, including Facebook and Twitter.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists find some human cancers to be 'evolutionary accidents'New research, published in Biological Reviews and conducted by researchers from the University of Liverpool and Escola Superior de Ciências da Saúde (Brasília, Brazil) has found some type of cancers unique to humans may be a result of evolutionary accidents.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Polymer-graphene nanocarpets to electrify smart fabricsScientists developed a versatile modification method of graphene without destroying it, which can build strong covalent bonds with polymers. Conductive materials obtained through such method are promising for the development of flexible organic electronics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study paves way for healthier and more robust eggsAn eggshell is made up of both organic and inorganic matter that contains calcium carbonate. One of the important findings of the study was that the nanostructure was closely linked to the presence of osteopontin, a protein which is also found in bones.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can we tell black holes apart?Astrophysicists at Goethe University Frankfurt, and collaborators in the ERC-funded project BlackHoleCam in Bonn and Nijmegen have created and compared self-consistent and realistic images of the shadow of an accreting supermassive black hole. The goal was to test if Einsteinian black holes can be distinguished from those in alternative theories of gravity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team discovers mysterious head of a pharaohSwansea University Egyptology lecturer Dr Ken Griffin has found a depiction of one of the most famous pharaoh's in history Hatshepsut (one of only a handful of female pharaohs) on an object in the Egypt Centre stores, which had been chosen for an object handling session.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Horses can breathe easier thanks to new treatment for degenerative respiratory conditionMorris Animal Foundation-funded researchers have developed a new surgical technique for recurrent laryngeal neuropathy (RLN) that is improving outcomes and helping horses breathe a little bit easier.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How artificial intelligence is reshaping our livesIt's Saturday night and you've just finished watching the last episode of a Swedish crime drama that you somehow stumbled upon, although you can't quite remember how.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Giant group of octopus moms discovered in the deep seaWe know more about the surface of the moon that we do about the bottom of the ocean. The sea floor is an alien landscape, with crushing pressure, near-total darkness, and fluids wafting from cracks in the Earth's crust. It's also home to some weird animals that scientists are only just getting to know. Case in point: deep-sea expeditions and drones have revealed a giant group of octopuses and thei
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Futurity.org

Listen: What it’s like to discover a ‘missing link’ fishEvolutionary biologist Neil Shubin says he’ll never forget the day in 2004 when he unearthed the discovery of a lifetime. After spending six years in the Arctic searching for a fossil that could be a missing link between sea and land animals, Shubin finally found himself eye-to-eye with the 375-million-year-old creature that would come to be known as Tiktaalik roseae . “I had staring at me the sk
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Under-fives should be priority for snail fever therapy, study findsPre-school children in sub-Saharan Africa should be tested regularly for a common infection known as snail fever, which would reduce the spread of the disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Anthropogenic influence on channel evolution in Datong to Xuliujing reach of Yangtze RiverEvolution of river channel pose safety risks for embankments, navigation, and ports. A recent study reports the influence of human activities on river channel evolution in the Datong to Xuliujing reach of the Yangtze River in SCIENCE CHINA Earth Sciences.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biophysics: Making patterns robustCorrect protein localization is crucial for many fundamental cellular processes. LMU physicists have now asked how to confer robustness against variations in protein concentrations on pattern formation mechanisms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Efficient control of leukaemia with treatment by dual immune-checkpoint blockadeChronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a haematological malignancy. When infiltrating tissues, CLL cells come in contact with healthy cells, including immune cells. Researchers from the Luxembourg Institute of Health (LIH) succeeded in characterising in depth the composition of immune cells and circulating cytokines of the CLL microenvironment in mouse models using mass cytometry. Based on this kn
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

KAIST develops sodium ion batteries using copper sulfideA KAIST research team recently developed sodium ion batteries using copper sulfide anode. This finding will contribute to advancing the commercialization of sodium ion batteries (SIBs) and reducing the production cost of any electronic products with batteries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ben-Gurion University researchers develop algorithm to locate fake users on many social networksOverall, the results demonstrated that in a real-life friendship scenario we can detect people who have the strongest friendship ties as well as malicious users, even on Twitter,' the researchers say. 'Our method outperforms other anomaly detection methods and we believe that it has considerable potential for a wide range of applications particularly in the cyber-security arena.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Global first determination of crystal structure of gastric proton pumpNagoya University-centered researchers determined the first crystal structure the gastric proton pump H+, K+-ATPase responsible for acidifying gastric juice down to pH1. The team presented crystal structures of the H+, K+-ATPase in complex with two blockers, vonoprazan and SCH28080, at 2.8 Å resolution. This provides important information for refinement of existing drugs and discovery of new drugs
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An astronomical myth—astronaut ice creamAstronaut ice cream's failed mission and the snacks you can get up in space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Walking on the moon – underwaterIt's one of the deepest 'swimming pools' in Europe, but for three years has been helping preparations for a human return to the moon. ESA's Neutral Buoyancy Facility at the European Astronaut Centre has been the site of the 'moondive' study, using specially weighted spacesuits to simulate lunar gravity, which is just one sixth that of Earth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New type of opal formed by common seaweed discoveredScientists have discovered a completely new type of opal formed by a common seaweed which harnesses natural technology by self-assembling a nanostructure of oil droplets to control how light reflects from its cells to display a shimmering array of colours that until now, has only been seen in the gem stone.
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The Atlantic

The Sanctions on Russia That Never CameThere is a certain pattern to foreign-policy announcements from the Trump administration: A senior official foreshadows a new, tough announcement that’s widely applauded or criticized, depending on the policy. Later, it emerges that the president might actually want to do something else. The latest example: a fresh round of sanctions against Russia for its role in enabling the recent Syrian chemi
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Live Science

Scientists Spot the Shadow of a Strange Wind Blowing Past a Black HoleThe white-hot winds blowing through space, carrying vast pillars of matter away from the event horizons of black holes, are even stranger than scientists thought.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New ocean plankton species named after BBC Blue PlanetA newly discovered species of ocean plankton, Syracosphaera azureaplaneta, has been named by UCL researchers in honour of the critically acclaimed BBC Blue Planet series and its presenter Sir David Attenborough.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mouse study provides insights into how the metal accumulates in bone tissueNew research shows how and where tungsten accumulates in bones of mice exposed to the element through drinking water. The findings, by a team of chemists and biologists at McGill University, could add to doubts over the once-universal assumption that tungsten poses little or no health risk to the general human population.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Arctic Ocean may have been covered by an ice shelf nearly double the size of Greenland's ice sheetAn ice shelf over a kilometre thick once formed over the Arctic Ocean, a new study by researchers from the University of Sheffield has revealed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

With smart cities, your every step will be recordedModern cities are brimming with objects that receive, collect and transmit data. This includes mobile phones but also objects actually embedded into our cities, such as traffic lights and air pollution stations. Even something as simple as a garbage bin can now be connected to the internet, meaning that it forms part of what is called the internet of things (IoT). A smart city collects the data fr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

U.S. rivers are becoming saltier – and it's not just from treating roads in winterThe United States has made enormous progress in reducing water pollution since the Clean Water Act was passed nearly 50 years ago. Rivers no longer catch fire when oil slicks on their surfaces ignite. And many harbors that once were fouled with sewage now draw swimmers and boaters.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Could we detect an ancient industrial civilization in the geological record?As a species, we humans tend to take it for granted that we are the only ones that live in sedentary communities, use tools, and alter our landscape to meet our needs. It is also a foregone conclusion that in the history of planet Earth, humans are the only species to develop machinery, automation, electricity, and mass communications – the hallmarks of industrial civilization.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using AI to detect heart diseasePredicting and monitoring cardiovascular disease is often expensive and tenuous, involving high-tech equipment and intrusive procedures. However, a new method developed by researchers offers a better way. By coupling a machine learning model with a patient's pulse data, they are able to measure a key risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and arterial stiffness, using just a smart phone.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers chart a new way to look at concussionA research team studying concussion has published an interactive diagram showing the many facets of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) -- from sleep problems to mood disorders to the increased danger of dementia -- and how they connect with and affect each other.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Kids hit hard by junk food advertisingJunk food ads are shown more frequently on TV at times when many children are watching, new research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Foodborne illness caused by common agricultural practice, casts doubts on biocidal product labelingChlorine, commonly used in the agriculture industry to decontaminate fresh produce, can make foodborne pathogens undetectable, according to new research. The study may help explain outbreaks of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes among produce in recent years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Of mice and disease: Antibiotic-resistant bacteria discovered in NYC house miceScientists have found that New York City house mice carry bacteria responsible for mild to life-threatening gastroenteritis in people, and some of these bacteria may be resistant to antibiotics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

These ants have evolved a complex system of battlefield triage and rescueAnts are scary. They have a remorseless quality, seemingly indifferent to their individual welfare, their whole lives submerged in the collective. And that's just the small ones. Super-sized versions are the stuff of classic horror, radioactively enhanced, famously threatening American cities from down the storm drains in Them! to terrorising Joan Collins up the jungle in Empire of the Ants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The Adversarial Robustness Toolbox—securing AI against adversarial threatsRecent years have seen tremendous advances in the development of artificial intelligence (AI). Modern AI systems achieve human-level performance on cognitive tasks such as recognizing objects in images, annotating videos, converting speech to text, or translating between different languages. Many of these breakthrough results are based on Deep Neural Networks (DNNs). DNNs are complex machine learn
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Science | The Guardian

High-speed pig slaughter will be disastrous for everyone involved | Deborah Berkowitz and Suzanne McMillanA new rule in the US would eliminate food inspectors and lift limits on how quickly pigs can be killed. The impact on workers, animals and consumers would be disastrous The Trump administration has proposed a radical change in food safety protection. They’re misleadingly calling it the “Modernization of swine slaughter inspection rule”, but what it really does is roll back progress on protecting
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why the electric vehicle revolution will bring problems of its ownAfter years of being derided as a joke by car manufacturers and the public, interest in electric vehicles has increased sharply as governments around the world move to ban petrol and diesel cars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New capabilities at NSLS-II set to advance materials scienceBy channeling the intensity of x-rays, synchrotron light sources can reveal the atomic structures of countless materials. Researchers from around the world come to the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II)—a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory—to study everything from proteins to fuel cells. NSLS-II's ultra-bright x-rays
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists make counter-intuitive observations in hybrid quantum systemsScientist have found that the cooling of quantum systems coupled to a common reservoir can lead to counter-intuitive behavior, where one of the quantum systems actually heats up. Due to the symmetries originated by the coupling to the reservoir, each system does not individually decay to its ground state. When a system is much smaller than the other, the collective relaxation can drive the small d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Science and Twitter join forces to uncover a globally imperiled plant speciesWhat happens when researchers and social media combine forces in the name of science? A rare wildflower from the US and a team of Twitter-savvy botanists tell us a tale of symbiosis between science and modern technology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Kids hit hard by junk food advertising: New researchJunk food ads are shown more frequently on TV at times when many children are watching, new Heart Foundation-funded research shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Foodborne illness caused by common agricultural practice, casts doubts on biocidal product labelingChlorine, commonly used in the agriculture industry to decontaminate fresh produce, can make foodborne pathogens undetectable, according to new research published in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The study may help explain outbreaks of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes among produce in recent years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Of mice and disease: Antibiotic-resistant bacteria discovered in NYC house miceA study by scientists at the Center for Infection and Immunity (CII) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health finds New York City house mice carry bacteria responsible for mild to life-threatening gastroenteritis in people, and some of these bacteria may be resistant to antibiotics. Findings appear in the journal mBio.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Striosome' neurons in the basal ganglia play a key role in learningResearchers at OIST have successfully isolated and recorded the activity of a subset of neurons in the striatum in the brain, shedding light on one mechanism underlying learning and decision making in animals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cannes holds out olive branch in row with NetflixThe Cannes film festival said Tuesday that it was still in talks with Netflix despite the platform's dramatic withdrawal of its films last week.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bitcoin's wild ride and what's ahead for the cryptocurrencyBitcoin has been on a volatile ride in recent times, its value rising and falling like a kite caught in variable winds.
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Viden

Tesla sætter produktion af billig elbil på pauseElbil-firmaets produktion af Model 3 er sat på pause i 4-5 dage. For mange robotter får skylden.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What in the world is an exoplanet?Step outside on a clear night, and you can be sure of something our ancestors could only imagine: Every star you see likely plays host to at least one planet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Six ways to improve water quality in New Zealand's lakes and riversTwo years ago, New Zealanders were shocked when contaminated drinking water sickened more than 5,000 people in the small town of Havelock North, with a population of 14,000. A government inquiry found that sheep faeces were the likely source of bacterial pathogens, which entered an aquifer when heavy rain flooded surrounding farmland.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Foodborne illness caused by common agricultural practice, casts doubts on biocidal product labelingChlorine, commonly used in the agriculture industry to decontaminate fresh produce, can make foodborne pathogens undetectable, according to new research published in mBio, an open-access journal of the American Society for Microbiology. The study may help explain outbreaks of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes among produce in recent years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Science and Twitter join forces to uncover a globally imperiled plant speciesWhat happens when researchers and social media combine forces in the name of science? A rare wildflower from the US and a team of Twitter-savvy botanists tell us a tale of symbiosis between science and modern technology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Portland State researchers chart a new way to look at concussionA Portland State University research team studying concussion has published an interactive diagram showing the many facets of mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) -- from sleep problems to mood disorders to the increased danger of dementia -- and how they connect with and affect each other.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using AI to detect heart diseasePredicting and monitoring cardiovascular disease is often expensive and tenuous, involving high-tech equipment and intrusive procedures. However, a new method developed by researchers at USC Viterbi School of Engineering offers a better way. By coupling a machine learning model with a patient's pulse data, they are able to measure a key risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and arterial stiffnes
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Horses can breathe easier thanks to new treatment for degenerative respiratory conditionMorris Animal Foundation-funded researchers have developed a new surgical technique for recurrent laryngeal neuropathy (RLN) that is improving outcomes and helping horses breathe a little bit easier.
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The Atlantic

Why Sexual-Harassment Legislation Stalled in the SenateMcConnell Senate R. MuellerThe women of the Senate are confused, annoyed, and frustrated. When the omnibus was being hammered out last month, the widespread assumption was that it would include measures reforming how Congress deals with sexual misbehavior in its own ranks. A bipartisan collection of senators had been negotiating the fine print and, going into the home stretch, most expected some version of it to be include
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The Atlantic

Kendrick Lamar and the Shell Game of 'Respect'Here’s one among the many provocative questions raised by Kendrick Lamar’s Damn winning the Pulitzer Prize for Music: Is Damn the best work of rap or pop ever made? The Pulitzers, whose only stated criteria is “for distinguished musical composition by an American” in the eligible timeframe, have previously only awarded classical and jazz artists. By making an exception for Lamar, the Pulitzers co
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Feed: All Latest

The Deceptively Satisfying Micro-play of MinitThe black-and-white game is a minimalist triumph, paring the 2D adventure genre down to only its most compelling, most satisfying components.
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Feed: All Latest

Chef Erling Wu-Bower Pursues Wood-Fired Perfection, From Roast Fish to PizzaThe young chef explains his wood-fire cooking technique ahead of the opening of his new Chicago restaurant, Pacific Standard Time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bacterial 'gene swapping' sparks disease outbreaksA new study by scientists at the University of Liverpool documents, for the first time, how the ability of bacteria to swap genetic material with each other can directly affect the emergence and spread of globally important infectious diseases.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study looks at social media humour during US electionNew research from The Australian National University (ANU) has looked at the use of humour on Twitter during the 2016 US Presidential election.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers discover new mechanism of antibiotic resistance in leprosy and tuberculosisA Virginia Tech research team in collaboration with researchers from the University of Missouri-Columbia have discovered a mechanism responsible for antibiotic resistance in the bacteria that cause tuberculosis and leprosy.
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Big Think

Is Buddhism a religion or a philosophy?A longtime debate over Buddhism's religiosity has drawn a line between metaphysics and action. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Contrary to common belief, some forests get more fire-resistant with ageAn out-of-season bushfire raged through Sydney's southwest at the weekend, burning more than 2,400 hectares and threatening homes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making protein patterns robustCorrect protein localization is crucial for many fundamental cellular processes. LMU physicists have now asked how to confer robustness against variations in protein concentrations on pattern formation mechanisms.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Giant group of octopus moms discovered in the deep seaAt the bottom of the ocean, scientists discovered hundreds of small pink octopuses and their eggs. The colonies were in warmer water than is healthy for octopuses, which means that they probably won't survive. That makes the scientists think there are probably even bigger colonies thriving in the cool rock crevices nearby.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Elevation in buildings can affect the decisions we makeNew research shows that elevation in an office building can increase someone's willingness to take financial risks because it makes people feel more powerful.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The microbiome of a native plant is much more resilient than expectedThe microbiome, which consists of all microorganisms that live on or in plants, animals and also humans, is important for the health and development of these organisms. Scientists investigated how a plant responds to manipulations of its microbial associations. The results indicate that the enormous bacterial diversity residing in natural soils may account for the stability of the plant-microbiome
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Invertebrates inspire first fully 3-D printed active materials for robotsTo overcome the material rigidity and actuation limitations in current robotic systems, a joint US Army Research Laboratory and University of Minnesota research project sought inspiration from invertebrates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How does plant DNA avoid the ravages of UV radiation?Plants can't come in from the sun or slather on sunblock; instead they have a super robust DNA repair kit to combat UV radiation. Today, the lab of 2015 Nobel laureate Aziz Sancar published the first repair map of an entire multicellular organism to show how the 'nucleotide excision repair' system works much more efficiently in the active genes of plants as compared to humans. And this efficiency
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When toxins preserve populationsSome soil bacteria can alter their environment in such a way as to endanger their own survival – unless, that is, toxins do not impede their growth beforehand.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

IBM scientists measure the energy levels of single molecules on insulatorsOur understanding of single-molecule electronics has become clearer and the answer involved using a common household item – salt.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Russia is laying the foundations for huge future hacks
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Futurity.org

What if we’re not Earth’s first big civilization?How do we really know that there weren’t civilizations on Earth before ours? A new paper addresses this question. Imagine if, many millions of years ago, dinosaurs drove cars through cities of mile-high buildings. A preposterous idea, right? Over the course of tens of millions of years, however, all of the direct evidence of a civilization—its artifacts and remains—gets ground to dust. How do we
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Dana Foundation

Dana Press Offers Cerebrum Anthology 2017When the cardboard cartons containing Cerebrum: Emerging Ideas in Brain Science 2018 arrived at our offices in midtown Manhattan a few weeks ago, pulling them out for the first time felt a bit like the birth of a new child. And like a newborn baby, each of the five anthology’s I’ve edited since coming to the Dana Foundation has its own look, personality, and distinct characteristics. Let’s start
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Science isn't broken, but we can do better—here's howEvery time a scandal breaks in one of the thousands of places where research is conducted across the world, we see headlines to the effect that "science is broken".
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Improved method of delivering anti-cancer drugsA new non-toxic method for delivering anti-cancer drugs to specific parts of the human body could mean the end of the severe and nasty side effects associated with many cancer therapies, according to researchers at Cardiff University's School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.
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Popular Science

Expand your screen space with a virtual desktopDIY It's easier than buying a second computer monitor. To see all your files and windows more clearly, spread them out across a virtual desktop. Here's how to set up and use this tool on any computer.
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The Atlantic

The Hunt for Wonder Drugs at the North PoleG athered around a white plastic table, four scientists surgically explored a quaking pile of mud, freshly scraped from the bottom of the ocean and spiked with twitching tentacles and antennae. In the persistent dusk of an Arctic October, illuminated only by the navigation lights of their ship, the scientists’ orange rubber jumpsuits looked like a collection of traffic cones, bright and reflectiv
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NYT > Science

Mind: Antidepressants and Withdrawal: Readers Tell Their StoriesNearly 9,000 readers wrote to The Times to talk about their use of antidepressants. Here’s what we learned.
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Viden

Robotskelet kan give mormor og bygningsarbejdere superkræfterEt stort skridt for cyborgs: Danske forskere har udviklet et nyt led til exoskeletter, som er ligeså godt som menneskers.
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New on MIT Technology Review

The West’s spurning of Chinese hardware firm ZTE could backfire
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What children can teach us about looking after the environmentUnited States President Donald Trump sparked outrage last year when he announced that the US would pull out of the Paris climate agreement. The decision frustrated world leaders because it undermined the process of global cooperation, setting a bad precedent for future agreements to unify countries in the effort to avoid climate disaster.
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Big Think

This 'Great Polish Map of Scotland' tells a WWII story you never knewThe 'Great Polish Map of Scotland' is the coolest map story you've never heard of. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Are millennials taking over the supply chain?The way you get a cup of coffee, cook a meal at home and even purchase clothing is changing. Each consumer wants something completely unique, which has disrupted the entire supply chain and created the 'experiential supply chain.'
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scaling up efforts to restore forestsWe are at the cusp of a transformation that is changing societal perspectives and values on our environment. The Bonn Challenge – which seeks to restore 150 million hectares of forest by 2020 – represents a global response to deforestation, land degradation, and climate change.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Our Planet, Ourselves: How Climate Change Results in Emerging Diseases-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dagens Medicin

3,2 mio. kr. uddelt til forskning i almen praksisDe to læger Anders Prior og Rasmus Køster-Rasmussen har hver modtaget 1,6 mio. kr. til forskning inden for almen praksis og familiemedicin.
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Dagens Medicin

Overblik: Sådan kan du blive ramt af en storkonfliktI dag er sidste deadline for at nå til enighed om en ny overenskomst. Erklærer Forligsmanden forhandlingerne for at være brudt sammen, er en storkonflikt en realitet. Få overblik over, hvordan det rammer dig og din afdeling her.
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Science | The Guardian

Brexiters tend to dislike uncertainty and love routine, study saysThose in favour of leaving the EU are more categorical and ‘think outside the box’ less than remainers, researchers say Boris Johnson’s call to “take back control” in the 2016 EU referendum was a rallying cry that cut across political parties and split families , but quite why it had such a wide appeal has had academics puzzled. Now researchers say a fervour for Brexit could at least in part be l
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Giant group of octopus moms discovered in the deep seaAt the bottom of the ocean, scientists discovered hundreds of small pink octopuses and their eggs. The colonies were in warmer water than is healthy for octopuses, which means that they probably won't survive. That makes the scientists think there are probably even bigger colonies thriving in the cool rock crevices nearby.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rethinking the fight as surge of malaria deaths in conflict zones threatens to upend progressTen years of progress globally in the fight against malaria have masked the rapid rise of infections and deaths in African countries experiencing conflict and famine, though new strategies implemented in places like the Central African Republic, South Sudan, and northern Nigeria could provide a way forward, according to research presented this week at the 7th Multilateral Initiative on Malaria (MI
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Futurity.org

3D-printed cervixes teach how to screen for cancerA new device could help train doctors and nurses in developing countries and low-resource areas of the US to screen for cervical cancer—and improve the health outlook for women with the disease. Cervical cancer kills close to 300,000 women per year worldwide, with approximately 85 percent of deaths occurring in developing countries. “More than 90% of cervical cancer cases are preventable.” The ne
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers study extended X-ray emission in the PKS 1718−649 radio sourceAn international team of researchers has performed of extended X-ray emission in the radio source known as PKS 1718−649. The study, published April 11 in a paper on the arXiv pre-print repository, reveals more details about physics of the environment of this source and could be helpful in disclosing its real nature.
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Ingeniøren

CO2-udledningen fra nye biler steg i 2017Skoda og VW trækker tallene op. Kun to af de største mærker oplevede nedgang.
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Feed: All Latest

The Shipping Industry Sets Sail Toward a Carbon-Free FutureCargo-shipping regulators have struck a historic deal to set their dirty fuel-burning industry on a low-carbon course.
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Feed: All Latest

'The Moth Podcast' Looks Back at a Decade of StoriesCelebrating what might have been the very first podcast to capitalize on the medium’s unique capacity to conjure intimacy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New discovery in shear-thickening fluids such as detergentsWhat do paint, dishwasher detergent, ketchup and blood have in common? All are composed of particles suspended in a carrier liquid, flow when stirred or forced, but remain thick or even gel-like at rest.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Miniature Human Brains Grow for Months When Implanted in Mice SkullsThe lab-grown cerebrums are about the size of a lentil -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

Sensordata skal flyde over radio- og tv-sendenettetSvenske Teracom, der står for driften af det danske digitale tv- og radiosendenet, vil etablere et nyt netværk dedikeret til sensordata med det langtrækkende Lorawan-netværksteknologi.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

80 percent of teachers say character education would improve school grades80 percent of teachers surveyed across the UK say that character education would improve school grades – according to findings in a new poll.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

A printable, flexible, organic solar cell | Hannah BürckstümmerUnlike the solar cells you're used to seeing, organic photovoltaics are made of compounds that are dissolved in ink and can be printed and molded using simple techniques. The result is a low-weight, flexible, semi-transparent film that turns the energy of the sun into electricity. Hannah Bürckstümmer shows us how they're made -- and how they could change the way we power the world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanomotor guided inside a living cell using a magnetic fieldA team of researchers at the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore has developed a type of nanomotor that can be guided inside of a living cell using an external magnetic field. In their paper published in the journal Advanced Materials, the group describes their nanomotor, how it works, and possible uses for it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Cognitive flexibility' associated with voting attitudes in EU Referendum, study findsLatest research combining social and political surveys with objective cognitive testing suggests that "cognitive flexibility" contributes to formation of ideology. The study finds correlations between cognitive thinking styles and support for Brexit.
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Dagens Medicin

Ny vejledning skal forenkle valget af KOL-behandlingInternationale vejledninger har skabt forvirring om farmakologisk behandling af KOL og har gjort det sværere at klassificere patienter korrekt. Ny vejledning fra Dansk Lungemedicinsk Selskab skærer ind til benet og gør det enklere at vælge den rette behandling.
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Dagens Medicin

Flere besparelser på Aarhus Universitetshospital kan koste 150 stillingerStørre besparelser i forbindelse med udflytningen af Aarhus Universitetshospital kan betyde, at yderligere 150-200 stillinger skal nedlægges.
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Ingeniøren

Verdens første søstjernefabrik opføres i SkiveSøstjerner skal omdannes til fiskemel og blandes i økologisk dyrefoder som proteinkilde. Samtidig løser fabrikken et stort problem for Limfjordens blåmuslinge-produktion.
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Ingeniøren

Mobilepay: Opdater ikke vores appDen seneste opdatering til den populære mobil-betalingsløsning MobilePay får app'en til at crashe. Derfor opfordrer MobilePay brugere til ikke at opdatere og i stedet vente til problemet er løst.
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Ingeniøren

Teknisk problem på Falcon-raket udskyder exoplanet-missionOpsendelsen af exoplanet-missionen TESS er foreløbig udskudt to dage pga. problemer med Falcon 9-raketten.
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Ingeniøren

Bliver kunstig intelligens et masseødelæggelsesvåben?Forskere advarer om, at kamprobotter med kunstig intelligens vil opskalere krig til i et hidtil uset omfang. Men det er forkert at kategorisere autonome våben som masseødelæggelsesvåben, siger forfatteren til den første danske rapport om fænomenet.
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Ingeniøren

Hackere laver falske browser-opdateringerVi er vant til jævnligt at opdatere vores browsere. Nu er en hackergruppe begyndt at udnytte den tillid, vi viser browserne på det groveste.
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Ingeniøren

Fiberoptisk sonde måler temperatur og ser dybt ind i kroppenAustralske forskere håber, de næste generationer af sonden kan måle pH-værdi og ophobning af fedt i årerne.
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Ingeniøren

Universal-medstifter bygger brugervenlige laboratorierobotterKasper Støy var medstifter i robotsuccesen Universal Robots. Nu er han klar til at automatisere laboratorier i den nye robotvirksomhed Flow Robotics.
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Scientific American Content: Global

How to Reconcile with a Romantic PartnerStudy suggests the best strategy depends on gender -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New tool serves as digital logbook for drone usersA Purdue University researcher led development of a free, web-based application that will allow those using unmanned aerial systems (UAS) to easily log their flight-related data.
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Popular Science

Bat echolocation could help us understand ADHDAnimals Their brain cells adapt to help them navigate on the fly. While hunting for dinner, the big brown bat must hone in on flitting insects and keep track of its surroundings to avoid crashing into them. Now, scientists have taken a…
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Combination therapy strengthens T cells in melanoma pre-clinical studyA pre-clinical study of two drugs designed to boost T cell performance, has revealed the agents, when give in combination, may enhance the immune system's ability to kill melanoma tumors deficient in the tumor suppressor gene PTEN. The study was led by investigators at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diversified business groups offer improved growthFirms that belong to diversified business groups can better exploit growth opportunities, thanks to the ability to draw on the group's skilled human capital, according to new research from Cass Business School.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Association for Chemoreception Sciences (AChemS) 40th Annual MeetingSmell and taste are vital senses that bring pleasure to daily life, inform us about our environment, and guide fundamental behaviors in humans and animals. This month, about 500 scientists and clinicians will gather for the nation's leading forum on smell and taste research, the annual meeting of the Association for Chemoreception Sciences (AChemS). AChemS will feature over 260 presentations on th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

High concentrations of fluorinated chemical GenX found in watershedWhile searching for sources of bromide in the Cape Fear River watershed nearly five years ago, NC State environmental engineer Detlef Knappe and his team of researchers found more than they were looking for: high concentrations of a number of unexpected industrial chemicals in drinking water, including one—GenX—that has entered the popular vernacular in North Carolina.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Chinese entrepreneurs have some creative responses to the government’s crackdown on cryptoLast September’s official restrictions have unleashed a wave of below-the-radar innovation.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Retinal Cell ImplantFor the first time, a transplant of replacement tissue grown from stem cells has been shown to be feasible for patients with macular degeneration.
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The Scientist RSS

Immune Therapy Improves Lung Cancer Patients SurvivalPembrolizumab combined with chemotherapy nearly doubles survival rates and shrinks tumors in some individuals.
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Feed: All Latest

The Plan to Save California's Legendary Weed From 'Big Cannabis'Inside the sprawling new facility that wants to help small cannabis farmers survive the invasion of Big Cannabis.
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Feed: All Latest

Nest Cam Baby Monitor: How to Make It SecureA few ways to help keep the footage of your kids away from mean old hackers.
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The Atlantic

How You React When Startled Is a Window Into Your SoulTo understand the expressive range of the human face, nothing beats watching a colleague scream his head off in slow motion. When my lab began to study protective reflexes in the early 2000s, the video cameras came out and the place became a scare factory. Graduate students took to lurking in hidden corners and lunging out with Velociraptor shrieks. Sundry plastic bugs and a pair of taxidermized
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Dagens Medicin

Nye immunterapier for lungekræft forlænger overlevelsenPatienter med ikke-småcellet lungekræft ser ud til at kunne leve længere takket være nye banebrydende behandlinger, der kombinerer immunterapi med andre.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ramp compression of iron provides insight into core conditions of large rocky exoplanetsIn a paper published today by Nature Astronomy, a team of researchers from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Princeton University, Johns Hopkins University and the University of Rochester have provided the first experimentally based mass-radius relationship for a hypothetical pure iron planet at super-Earth core conditions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How the Pilbara was formed more than 3 billion years agoThe remote Pilbara region of northern Western Australia is one of Earth's oldest blocks of continental crust, and we now think we know how it formed, as explained in research published today in Nature Geoscience.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The current ability to test theories of gravity with black hole shadowsAstrophysicists at Frankfurt, the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, and Nijmegen, collaborating in the project BlackHoleCam, answer this question by computing the first images of feeding non-Einsteinian black holes: it is presently hard to tell them apart from standard black holes.
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Live Science

Sharks Lay Eggs. Here's Some Creepy Footage of What That Looks Like.An epic GIF shows the slithering specter of a shark embryo within. And apparently, Jaws Jr. is none too pleased about the bright light shining into its home.
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Dagens Medicin

Rundspørge: Læger i tvivl om journalføringMange læger er i tvivl, om de journalfører korrekt, viser ny rundspørge.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Margrethe Vestager bliver ny æresalumne på Københavns UniversitetEU’s konkurrencekommissær Margrethe Vestager bliver ny æresalumne ved Københavns...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists explore underwater frontiers with submersible tablet computersA team of experienced science divers has created the world's first submersible touchscreen for a tablet computer, whose applications are already helping marine scientists, law enforcement, explorers and other professionals toil beneath the waves and could usher in a new era of underwater ICT.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Invertebrates inspire first fully 3-D printed active materials for robotsTo overcome the material rigidity and actuation limitations in current robotic systems, a joint US Army Research Laboratory and University of Minnesota research project sought inspiration from invertebrates.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Timing is everything: Researchers describe genetic clockwork in germ cell developmentThe nematode C. elegans is a true organizational talent: The tiny life forms, just one millimetre long, live for only two to three weeks, with sexual maturity lasting only four days. They nevertheless manage to generate over 300 offspring during this brief period. For this ambitious development programme to function optimally, a large number of processes must be synchronised within their cells. Ge
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Virtual contact lenses for radar satellitesRadar satellites supply the data used to map sea level and ocean currents. However, up until now, the radar has been ineffective in regions where the oceans are covered by ice. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now developed a new analysis method to solve this problem.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

BESSY II sheds light on how the internal compass is constructed in magnetotactic bacteriaMagnetotactic bacteria can sense the Earth's magnetic field via magnetic nanoparticles in their interior that act as an internal compass. Spanish teams and experts at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin have now examined the magnetic compass of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense at BESSY II. Their results may be helpful in designing actuation devices for nanorobots and nanosensors for biomedical applications.
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Live Science

Ancient Egyptian Incantations Tell of Biblical Human SacrificeDeciphered text on a papyrus found near an Egyptian pyramid describes the biblical story of Isaac.
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Viden

Forskere: Alt gær stammer fra KinaNy undersøgelse tyder på , at gær oprindeligt opstod i Østasien.
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Feed: All Latest

Thanks to AI, These Cameras Will Know What They’re SeeingA new breed of chips incorporate artificial intelligence into relatively cheap cameras, enabling new apps but also more ubiquitous surveillance.
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Live Science

No One Knows How to Stop This 'Flesh-Eating' Disease in AustraliaScientists still don't know how the disease is spread, or how to prevent infection.
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Live Science

Teenager Finds King Bluetooth's Lost Treasures, Including a Thor's HammerA medieval treasure trove that belonged to the legendary King Harald Bluetooth — the Danish ruler who inspired the name for Bluetooth technology — was recently unearthed on a German island by a 13-year-old and an amateur archaeologist, according to news s
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Latest Headlines | Science News

A new plastic film glows to flag food contaminated with dangerous microbesPlastic patches that glow when they touch some types of bacteria could be built into food packaging to reduce the spread of foodborne illness.
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The Atlantic

Why a 'Lifesaving' Depression Treatment Didn't Pass Clinical TrialsSome medical experiments are more daunting than others. The one that the neurologist Helen Mayberg came up with to test a model of depression she had developed over about 15 years involved drilling two holes in the top of a patient’s skull and sliding two low-voltage electrodes deep into the brain until they reached a region known as Brodmann area 25. In a pair of pale-pink curves of neural flesh
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The Atlantic

Why Pop Culture Links Women and Killer PlantsThere’s an early scene in Annihilation , Alex Garland’s cerebral sci-fi-horror drama, where the biologist Lena (Natalie Portman) examines a cluster of kaleidoscopically mutated flowers. “They’re growing from the same branch structure, so it has to be the same species,” she mutters to her all-female squad of researchers. “You’d sure as hell call it a pathology if you saw this in a human.” The team
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Scientific American Content: Global

On "Darwinism"How a great name was turned into a slander -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Spice of Death: The Science behind Tainted "Synthetic Marijuana"Experts describe how rat poison linked to a recent bleeding outbreak does its damage -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

From insulator to conductor in a flashIn recent decades, computers have become faster and hard disks and storage chips have reached enormous capacities. But this trend cannot continue forever. Physical limits are preventing silicon-based computer technology from attaining additional speed gains. Researchers are optimistic that the next era of technological advancements will start with the development of novel information-processing ma
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Popular Science

Nike hacked a 3D printer to make its new shoe for elite marathon runnersTechnology The Flyprint sneakers are built to ditch water and increase airflow for long runs. Nike's 3D printed sneaker is making its debut at the London marathon.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Moss capable of removing arsenic from drinking water discoveredMoss capable of removing arsenic from contaminated water has been discovered by researchers from Stockholm University. Within just one hour, it reduces water arsenic to levels harmless enough for consumption. The study has been published in the journal Environmental Pollution.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Key tethering protein found to transport cellular cholesterolDespite its less-than-stellar reputation in the news, cholesterol is an essential molecule for living things. It serves as the building block for hormones and gives shape to the membranes that enclose cells and their internal parts (Fig.1). Consequently, many diseases arise from defects in the proper transport of cholesterol. Now, researchers at Osaka University have shed new light on one of the k
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First global carbon dioxide maps produced by Chinese observation satelliteAn Earth observation satellite called TanSat has produced its first global carbon dioxide maps. TanSat was launched by a collaborative team of researchers in China, and these maps are the first steps to provide global carbon dioxide measurements for future climate change research. The maps, based on data collected in April and July 2017, are published in the latest edition of the journal Advances
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers produce 50x more stable adsorbentA KAIST research team have developed a technology to increase the stability of amine-containing adsorbents by 50 times, moving another step toward commercializing stable adsorbents that last longer.
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Feed: All Latest

NASA’s New Exoplanet Satellite TESS Could Find Life Close to HomeTESS is designed to find and study the exoplanets closest to Earth.
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Feed: All Latest

The Rise and Feel of VR PornographyWatching pornography in virtual reality changes the experience dramatically: You feel like you're actually there. That triggers empathy rather than distance.
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Feed: All Latest

The Teens Who Hacked Microsoft's Videogame Empire—And Went Too FarAmong those involved in David Pokora's so-called Xbox Underground, one would become an informant, one would become a fugitive, and one would end up dead.
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Viden

Er du svimmel? Så lider du måske af ørestenOver halvdelen af dem, der døjer med uforklarlig svimmelhed, lider af øresten, som er små kalk-krystaller i det indre øre.
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The Atlantic

The End of the Strong SpeakerWhen House Speaker Paul Ryan announced that he would step down from his position and not run for reelection, the news didn’t come as that much of a surprise. Of course, it is a big deal to learn that the most powerful person in Congress is relinquishing their authority. But it is not the first time this has happened. The truth is that being speaker is not what it used to be. A position that once
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The Atlantic

The Backlash Against Trump's Syria StrikeLast week Donald Trump willfully violated the Constitution as even he once understood it, despite being warned against doing so by dozens of members of Congress. Hours before the president ordered the U.S. military to strike three targets in Syria, 88 members of Congress sent him a letter to remind him of his legal obligations. Strikes “when no direct threat to the United States exists” and “with
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The Atlantic

White Supremacy Is the Achilles Heel of American DemocracyThere are a million and one threads to the chaos currently unspooling about the Trump administration and the 2016 election. One might be forgiven for giving up on trying to navigate the intricacies of congressional Russia inquiries, Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s ever-widening probe, news about foreign intrusions into voting systems , investigations about Twitter bots, and the developing story
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Science : NPR

How Birds-To-Be Get Oxygen Inside EggsUnlike humans, bird embryos don't have an oxygen pipeline from their mothers. They develop inside eggs in a nest. Skunk Bear's latest video explains why these pre-hatchlings don't suffocate. (Image credit: Adam Cole/NPR's Skunk Bear)
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Kids ask Nasa astronaut about going to spaceKaren Nyberg, who's been to space twice, answers questions from primary school children.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers create new Bose-Einstein condensateResearchers at Aalto University, Finland, have created a Bose-Einstein condensate of light coupled with metal electrons, so-called surface plasmon polaritons. Nearly 100 years ago, Albert Einstein and Satyendra Nath Bose predicted that quantum mechanics could force a large number of particles to behave in concert as if they were only a single particle. This form of matter was called a Bose-Einstei
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When nuclei catch up with electronsIn an attosecond study of the H2 molecule, physicists at ETH Zurich found that for light atomic nuclei, as contained in most organic and biological molecules, the correlation between electronic and nuclear motions cannot be ignored.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Philippines to deploy riot police for Boracay tourist closureThe Philippines is set to deploy hundreds of riot police to top holiday island Boracay to keep travellers out and head off potential protests ahead of its six-month closure to tourists, the government said Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Poland broke EU law by logging in ancient forest: courtPoland's rightwing government broke the law by logging in one of Europe's last primeval forests, a UNESCO world heritage site, the European Union's top court ruled Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China to lift foreign ownership limits on automakersChina announced a timeline for lifting ownership limits on foreign automakers Tuesday, meeting a longtime demand of the United States and other countries seeking better access for their companies in the world's biggest car market.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The microbiome of a native plant is much more resilient than expectedWithout microorganisms humans would not be able to survive. Especially our gut flora is an extremely densely populated ecosystem that houses billions of bacteria which help us to digest or detoxify food, supply us with vitamins, or modulate our immune system. Similarly, plants have also a so-called microbiome. In contrast to animals and humans, microorganisms associated with plants are primarily s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How does plant DNA avoid the ravages of UV radiation?Plants can't come in from the sun or slather on sunblock; instead they have a super robust DNA repair kit to combat UV radiation. Today, the lab of 2015 Nobel laureate Aziz Sancar published the first repair map of an entire multicellular organism to show how the 'nucleotide excision repair' system works much more efficiently in the active genes of plants as compared to humans. And this efficiency
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How does plant DNA avoid the ravages of UV radiation?If the ultraviolet radiation from the sun damages human DNA to cause health problems, does UV radiation also damage plant DNA? The answer is yes, but because plants can't come in from the sun or slather on sunblock, they have a super robust DNA repair kit. Today, the UNC School of Medicine lab of 2015 Nobel laureate Aziz Sancar, MD, PhD, has published an exquisite study of this powerful DNA repair
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NYT > Science

Nonfiction: Freeman Dyson’s Life, Through His LettersIn “Maker of Patterns,” the renowned physicist presents his correspondence, revealing observations about the great minds of the 20th century.
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Science | The Guardian

Britain’s use of contaminated blood was no ‘tragedy’ – it was a scandal | Simon HattenstoneThe latest inquiry must discover how thousands of haemophiliacs contracted HIV or hepatitis C from blood products, and why it was covered up for so long In two weeks’ time Sir Brian Langstaff will take up his post as chair of the public inquiry into contaminated blood and contaminated blood products. Today, World Haemophilia Day, is the perfect occasion to remind Langstaff what the thousands of ha
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NYT > Science

ScienceTake: How a Common Beetle May Offer Deep Insights Into EvolutionA molecular biologist has turned a childhood obsession with a common beetle into a scientific quest.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The microbiome of a native plant is much more resilient than expectedThe microbiome, which consists of all microorganisms that live on or in plants, animals and also humans, is important for the health and development of these organisms. In a new study published in eLife, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, investigated how a plant responds to manipulations of its microbial associations. The results indicate that the enor
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Ingeniøren

Tesla når vigtigt produktionsmål og sætter produktionen på pauseMed en ugentlig produktion på over 2.700 eksemplarer af elbilen Model 3 har Tesla nået et vigtigt mål i kampen for at bringe elbilerne ud til masserne. Nu stopper produktionen i 4-5 dage for at løse produktionsproblemer.
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Science-Based Medicine

Psychodermatology?A new specialty, psychodermatology, was invented to address the interaction of the mind and the skin. The effects of stress on the skin are not well defined, and the need for this new specialty is questionable.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's ZTE halts share trading following US export banChinese telecom giant ZTE halted trading of its shares in Hong Kong and Shenzhen Tuesday following the announcement of a US ban on its purchase of sensitive technology that drew a pledge from China to "safeguard" its companies if necessary.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook hit with class action suit over facial recognition toolA US federal judge in California ruled Monday that Facebook will have to face a class action suit over allegations it violated users' privacy by using a facial recognition tool on their photos without their explicit consent.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's Weibo site backtracks on gay censorship after outcryOne of China's top social networking sites announced Monday that it will no longer be censoring content related to gay issues after the plan triggered a loud public outcry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hello DARKNESS: Physicists team up with astronomers to commission the most advanced camera in the worldSomewhere in the vastness of the universe another habitable planet likely exists. And it may not be that far—astronomically speaking—from our own solar system.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Backpage.com co-founder released from jail on a $1M bondA co-founder of the classified advertising site Backpage.com who has been jailed for the last 10 days on charges of facilitating prostitution was released on a $1 million bond Monday as he awaits trial.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mighty Mississippi: Scientists use model in land loss fightScientists working on new ways to battle the erosion that threatens Louisiana's coastline have a dramatic new tool: a massive replica of the lower Mississippi River.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microsoft turns to former rival to improve internet securityMicrosoft is turning to a former rival to improve the security of computing devices.
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Science | The Guardian

Caffeine might help people with heart troubles, research saysReview suggests coffee and tea drinkers might have lower risk of developing cardiac arrhythmias • Sign up to receive the top stories in Australia every day at noon Drinking coffee and tea every day may actually benefit people with heart troubles. New research has linked caffeine consumption from the two popular drinks to decreased rates of arrhythmias, or abnormal heart rhythms. Continue reading.
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Ingeniøren

Datatræning: Sportsfirma tracker fodboldspillere i realtidDeep learning og kameraer kan scanne og tracke alle fodboldspilleres bevægelser. Data kan bruges af både trænere, spillere, dommere og fans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

As Facebook embraces artificial intelligence tools, will it further spook consumers?Social media companies have embraced artificial intelligence tools to scrub their platforms of hate speech, terrorist propaganda and other content deemed noxious. But will those tools censor other content? Can a program judge the value of speech?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diagnosing, treating neuropathy symptoms in cancer patients not exact scienceMost of the roughly 15.5 million cancer survivors in the US receive chemotherapy, and roughly 65 percent develop some degree of the chemotherapy-induced nerve damage known as peripheral neuropathy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A potential setback in the personalized medicine of cancerOne of the most constant and exhaustive searches in cancer research is for a treatment aimed specifically at the Ras family of genes, the most common oncogenes and those that initiate many of the most lethal tumors. However, the results of this hypothetical treatment may be far less positive than speculated due to a manuscript published by the Genomic Instability Group at the Spanish National Canc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mother's depression might do the same to her child's IQRoughly one in 10 women in the United States will experience depression, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The consequences, however, may extend to their children, report researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, who found that a mother's depression can negatively affect a child's cognitive development up to the age of 16. The findings are pub
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The Scientist RSS

Antibody Combo Expands Response to Checkpoint Inhibitor in MiceGenetic analyses uncover cellular hallmarks of bladder cancer tumors that don't respond, but interfering with one of those characteristics in a mouse model causes tumors to shrink.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Here's how some tech companies are chipping away at bias against womenBridget Frey was the only woman on Redfin's engineering team in Seattle when she joined the online real-estate company more than six years ago. She wasn't surprised, having worked in the male-dominated tech field for much of her career.
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Ingeniøren

Femerns tyske trafikeksperter bestilt til at lede efter tunnelens ‘dynamiske effekter’Det statslige projektselskab Femern A/S har bestilt to forskellige analyser til at supplere sine trafikprognoser med. Selskabets tyske konsulenter skal lede efter mere trafik i form af dynamiske effekter, viser aktindsigt.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Large aggregates of ALS-causing protein might actually help brain cellsScientists add to evidence that small aggregates of SOD1 protein are the brain-cell killing culprits in ALS, but the formation of larger, more visible, and fibril-like aggregates of the same protein may protect brain cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New blood pressure guidelines could put lives at riskA new report weighs the risks and benefits of a recent change to blood pressure guidelines in the US.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Gorilla Calaya gives birth at Smithsonian National ZooCalaya, the western lowland gorilla, gave birth at the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, DC.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

From insulator to conductor in a flashA clever combination of novel technologies enables us to study promising materials for the electronics of tomorrow. Using short laser pulses, a research team have now shed light on the extremely rapid processes taking place within novel materials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Music intensifies effects of anti-hypertensive medicationResearch shows anti-hypertensive drugs improve heart rate more in patients who listen to music after taking medication. Among musical genres, classical music is the one with greatest efficiency at reducing arterial pressure; authors of the study speculate whether music acts on the patients' parasympathetic system, increasing their capability of absorbing medication.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Volunteering 2 hours per week reduces loneliness in widowed older adultsWidowed older adults can reduce the loneliness that results from the death of a spouse by volunteering 100 hours per year, which is about two hours per week, according to a recent study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When three months from now feels right around the cornerIf you've ever noticed yourself thinking about the timing of a plan in two opposing ways - something that feels longer off than your actual time calculation -- you're on to something. New research shows our different ways of estimating time don't necessarily move in lock-step.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First an alga, then a squid, enigmatic fossil is actually a fishA fossil slab discovered in Kansas 70 years ago and twice misidentified -- first as a green alga and then as a cephalopod -- has been reinterpreted as the preserved remains of a large cartilaginous fish, the group that includes sharks and rays. Researchers now describe the fishy characteristics of the animal, which lived between 70-85 million years ago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bay Area still dominates U.S. venture capital industry but cracks may be showingDespite all the talk of technology companies and workers leaving the Bay Area for cheaper pastures, Silicon Valley looks strong as ever—for now.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Planting Milkweed for Monarchs? Make Sure It's NativeNon-native milkweed species planted in the southern U.S. could harm monarch butterflies as temperatures rise. Jason G. Goldman reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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BBC News - Science & Environment

The first person on Mars 'should be a woman'A senior Nasa engineer has said the first person to set foot on Mars should be a woman.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists decipher the magma bodies under YellowstoneUsing supercomputer modeling, scientists have unveiled a new explanation for the geology underlying recent seismic imaging of magma bodies below Yellowstone National Park.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Malaria: Mosquitoes reveal fatal attractionMalaria causes the bodies of its human hosts to emit specific odors from the skin that make the hosts even more attractive to mosquitoes, which invites further bites and risks infection of more mosquitoes and wider transmission of the disease. It's a vicious circle but one that has enabled researchers to identify the odors as organic hydrocarbons whose discovery could bring relief to a disease tha
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Nasa's Tess planet-hunter: What stars sound likeUK astronomer Bill Chaplin demonstrates the "sounds" that stars make and why this is useful to know.
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Big Think

Why churches don't pay taxes and how much money the public could gain if they didChurches and religious organizations are tax-exempt. Should they continue to get such a benefit? Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

General aviation pilots struggle to interpret weather forecast and observation displaysWhen tested on their knowledge of 23 types of weather information, from icing forecasts and turbulence reports to radar, 204 general aviation (GA) pilots were stumped by about 42 percent of the questions. The findings are worrisome.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Reality CheckIt's not as easy to recycle your takeaway coffee cup as people may have thought.
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Feed: All Latest

The White House Warns on Russian Router Hacking, But Muddles the MessageBy scolding Russia for what looks like typical espionage, the US and UK are blurring red lines in cybersecurity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Warming climate could speed forest regrowth in eastern USWarming climate could speed the natural regrowth of forests on undeveloped or abandoned land in the eastern United States, according to a new study. Previous research has shown that the succession from field to forest can happen decades sooner in the southeastern US than in the Northeast. But it wasn't obvious why. A new study points to temperature as the major factor influencing the pace of refor
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Futurity.org

Scientist debunks 5 food allergy mythsA surge in childhood food allergies across the United States has turned classrooms into homemade-treat-free zones and parents into experts at scanning labels. But what’s fact and what’s fiction? Ruchi Gupta has been at the forefront of food allergy research, applying her findings both in her clinical practice and in her home. After Gupta began her career, her daughter was diagnosed with peanut, t
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Futurity.org

Sleepy kids may struggle with obesity laterChildren who get less than the recommended amount of sleep for their age are at higher risk of developing obesity. A new study shows that kids and adolescents who regularly sleep less than others of the same age gain more weight when they grow older and are more likely to become overweight or obese. “Being overweight can lead to cardiovascular disease and type-2-diabetes which is also on the incr
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Futurity.org

Lots more stroke patients end up at big hospitalsStroke patients are increasingly transferring out of smaller community and rural hospitals and going to larger medical centers for their care and rehabilitation, research finds. That’s a good thing for patients who need more advanced care—but the trend has drawbacks in terms of cost and highlights a need for more coordination of care between hospitals. “The underlying goal of stroke care is to ge
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Futurity.org