MOST POPULAR

Popular Science

These octopuses just wanted a safe place to lay their eggs, but now they’re doomedAnimals Warmer isn't always better. Want to see something incredible? Head to a spot in the ocean 155 miles west of Costa Rica. Get in a sub and descend 9,482 feet beneath the surface to a stretch of…
58min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Eyes of adolescents could reveal risk of cardiovascular disease, study findsNew research has found that poorer well-being or 'health-related quality of life' (HRQoL) in adolescence could be an indicator of future cardiovascular disease risk. Researchers found that adolescents with poorer scores in the social and mental well-being domains of HRQoL have structural changes in their retinal blood vessels that could be associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular diseas
32min
The Atlantic

What’s Next for the Man Who Brought Down Lance ArmstrongUpdated: 2018-04-19 A t 5:19 p.m. on Friday , April 30, 2010, Floyd Landis hit send on what would prove the most consequential email of his life. Addressed to the then-CEO of USA Cycling, Steve Johnson, the email bore the subject line “nobody is copied on this one so it’s up to you to demonstrate your true colors….” It went on to detail, year by year, how Landis and other members of the United St
4min

LATEST

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers achieve HD video streaming at 10,000 times lower powerEngineers have developed a new HD video streaming method that doesn't need to be plugged in. Their prototype skips power-hungry components and has something else, like a smartphone, process the video instead.
4min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More students report carrying guns in Chicago than New York or Los AngelesMore students report carrying guns in Chicago than in New York or Los Angeles, a new study shows. The findings provide historical background for Chicago's 2016 spike in gun violence, which occurred mostly among youth and young adults.
4min
NYT > Science

F.D.A. Panel Recommends Approval of Cannabis-Based Drug for EpilepsyEpidiolex was developed to treat two rare and devastating forms of the disease. It contains a chemical compound found in marijuana but not the one that makes people high.
5min
Futurity.org

Survey finds reasons to worry about U.S. democracyA new survey of political science scholars and the general public finds reasons to be concerned about American democracy. “One of the greatest threats to democracy is the idea that it is unassailable,” is the tagline of Bright Line Watch. Made up of four political scientists, the non-partisan initiative aims to monitor democratic practices in the United States and potential threats to those pract
6min
Futurity.org

Here’s how effective the next flu shot will beThis fall’s flu shot, a new H3N2 formulation for the first time since 2015, won’t be any more effective than the vaccine given in 2016 and 2017, experts warn. Researchers say that’s due to viral mutations related to vaccine production in eggs. Scientists created a method, known as pEpitope (pronounced PEE-epih-tope), more than 10 years ago as a fast, inexpensive way of gauging the effectiveness o
20min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Integrating optical components into existing chip designsA new technique can assemble optical and electronic components separately on the surface of a computer chip, enabling the addition of optical components to existing chips with little design modification.
32min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dementia diagnosis linked to unnecessary medication useA new study has found that medication use increases in newly diagnosed dementia patients, particularly unnecessary or inappropriate medications.
32min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Anyone can be an innovator, research findsInnovators aren't born, but they can be made, a recent study suggests. Researchers created a contest -- for engineering and computer science students -- designed to answer the question: Are persuaded innovators less capable than those who naturally gravitate to innovative activities?
32min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Elderly less likely to benefit from simultaneous radio- & chemotherapy for lung cancerAn analysis of elderly patients treated in a phase II trial of radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer has shown that they were less likely to benefit than younger patients if the two treatments were given at the same time. The study is presented at ESTRO37 -- Europe's largest radiation oncology conference.
44min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Handgrip strength test is good indicator of survival in lung cancer patientsA simple test of handgrip strength is a good indicator of short- and long-term survival in patients with early, stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to new findings to be presented at ESTRO 37 -- Europe's largest radiation oncology conference.
44min
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: The Cherry on TopWhat We’re Following Space Time: Voting along party lines, the Senate confirmed Jim Bridenstine as the administrator of NASA, 15 months after his predecessor stepped down. Bridenstine, a Republican congressman from Oklahoma, has been criticized for his lack of scientific credentials, controversial statements about climate change, and alleged misuse of resources at the Tulsa Air and Space Museum.
44min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Museum researchers rediscover animal not seen in 30 yearsResearchers have rediscovered the San Quintin kangaroo rat (Dipodomys gravipes) in Baja California. The Museum is partnering with Terra and local authorities on a conservation plan for the species, which was last seen in 1986, and was listed as endangered by the Mexican government in 1994. It was held as an example of modern extinction due to agricultural conversion.
47min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Clear as mud: Desiccation cracks help reveal the shape of water on MarsAs Curiosity rover marches across Mars, the red planet's watery past comes into clearer focus.
47min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New strategies for hospitals during mass casualty incidentsUsing the layout of a typical urban hospital, the authors investigated a hospital's capacity and capability to handle mass casualty incidents of various sizes with various characteristics, and assessed the effectiveness of designed demand management and capacity-expansion strategies. Average performance improvements gained through capacity-expansion strategies were quantified and best response act
47min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Male contraceptive compound stops sperm without affecting hormones: Study in monkeysA new study details how a compound called EP055 binds to sperm proteins to significantly slow the overall mobility of the sperm without affecting hormones, making EP055 a potential 'male pill' without side effects.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Variants in non-coding DNA contribute to inherited autism riskIn recent years, researchers have firmly established that gene mutations appearing for the first time, called de novo mutations, contribute to approximately one-third of cases of autism spectrum disorder. In a new study scientists have identified a culprit that may explain some of the remaining risk: rare inherited variants in regions of non-coding DNA.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vitamin D deficiency linked to greater risk of diabetesAn epidemiological study suggests that persons deficient in vitamin D may be at much greater risk of developing diabetes.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Atoms may hum a tune from grand cosmic symphonyResearchers playing with a cloud of ultracold atoms uncovered behavior that bears a striking resemblance to the universe in microcosm. Their work forges new connections between atomic physics and the sudden expansion of the early universe.
1h
Big Think

Companies need diverse, global talent. Cryptocurrencies are here to help.The global population is becoming more diverse. As a result, if companies in developed economies don't diversify their hiring, they may lose out on crucial talent. Cryptocurrencies are here to help. Read More
1h
The Atlantic

Will Andrew McCabe Be Prosecuted?Andrew McCabe FBI ReferralAndrew McCabe, the former deputy FBI director and frequent target of President Trump, who was recently fired days short of retirement, has been referred for criminal prosecution by the Justice Department Inspector General. Although former prosecutors described the referral as routine, it comes in the context of McCabe’s extraordinary status as a frequent scapegoat for the president’s legal woes.
1h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Baby StepsToday in 5 Lines The Senate confirmed Jim Bridenstine , a Republican congressman from Oklahoma, to serve as the new NASA administrator. Illinois Senator Tammy Duckworth, the first sitting senator to give birth while in office, brought her newborn baby to the floor to cast her “no” vote. The Justice Department’s inspector general reportedly referred its findings on former FBI Deputy Director Andre
1h
Popular Science

A new study on concussions and Parkinson's provides one more reason to protect your nogginHealth Even a minor brain injury might raise your risk. A new study is making waves for suggesting a single traumatic brain injury, even a mild one, can significantly increase the risk of developing Parkinson’s. But that…
1h
The Scientist RSS

NIH Wont Use Industry Money for Opioid Research InitiativeThe announcement comes after an agency working group recommends against an industry partnership on ethical grounds.
1h
The Scientist RSS

Jim Bridenstine Confirmed to Lead NASAThe US Senate narrowly approved the politician, who does not have a science background.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global

Traffic Deaths Increase after 4:20 P.M. on 4/20A look at a database of fatal traffic accidents found a 12 percent increase on the informal marijuana holiday 4/20 after 4:20 P.M. compared with nearby dates. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Museum researchers rediscover animal not seen in 30 yearsResearchers from the San Diego Natural History Museum (The Nat) and the non-profit organization Terra Peninsular A.C. have rediscovered the San Quintin kangaroo rat (Dipodomys gravipes) in Baja California. The Museum is partnering with Terra and local authorities on a conservation plan for the species, which was last seen in 1986, and was listed as endangered by the Mexican government in 1994. It
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New strategies for hospitals during mass casualty incidentsUsing the layout of a typical urban hospital, the authors investigated a hospital's capacity and capability to handle mass casualty incidents of various sizes with various characteristics, and assessed the effectiveness of designed demand management and capacity-expansion strategies. Average performance improvements gained through capacity-expansion strategies were quantified and best response act
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pregnant moms and their offspring should limit added sugars in their diets to protect childhood cognitionA new study has determined that poorer childhood cognition occurred, particularly in memory and learning, when pregnant women or their offspring consumed greater quantities of sugar. Substituting diet soda for sugar-sweetened versions during pregnancy also appeared to have negative effects. However, children's fruit consumption had beneficial effects and was associated with higher cognitive scores
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vast stellar nursery of Lagoon NebulaThis colorful cloud of glowing interstellar gas is just a tiny part of the Lagoon Nebula, a vast stellar nursery. This nebula is a region full of intense activity, with fierce winds from hot stars, swirling chimneys of gas, and energetic star formation all embedded within a hazy labyrinth of gas and dust.
2h
Science | The Guardian

Spacewatch: Tess embarks on planet-hunting mission for NasaThe Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite will take an elliptical path around Earth to observe stars for evidence of exoplanets Nasa’s next planet-hunting mission has launched from Cape Canaveral air force station in Florida. The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (Tess) took to the skies at 23.51 BST (18.51 EDT). It was deployed into Earth orbit 49 minutes later, to start a series of manoeuvr
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Male contraceptive compound stops sperm without affecting hormonesA new study published today in the journal PLOS ONE details how a compound called EP055 binds to sperm proteins to significantly slow the overall mobility of the sperm without affecting hormones, making EP055 a potential 'male pill' without side effects.
2h
Science : NPR

New Study Says Ancient Humans Hunted Big Mammals To ExtinctionAs humans spread around the globe, other big mammals vanished. Researchers believe it's because they were tasty. (Image credit: British Library/Science Source)
2h
Science : NPR

Novelist Richard Powers Finds New Stories Deep In Old Growth ForestsIn The Overstory, Powers explores how humans can revere ancient trees with "the same kind of sanctity that we reserve exclusively for ourselves." (Image credit: NPS)
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dogs could be more similar to humans than we thoughtDog and human gut microbiomes have more similar genes and responses to diet than we previously thought, according to a new study
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using the right plants can reduce indoor pollution and save energyA plant physiologist concludes that a better knowledge of plant physiology, along with integration of smart-sensor-controlled air cleaning technologies, could improve indoor air quality in a cost-effective and sustainable way.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study predicts 2018 flu vaccine will likely have 20 percent efficacyA new study of 6,610 human flu sequences predicts that this fall's flu vaccine will likely have the same reduced efficacy against the dominant circulating strain of influenza A as the vaccine given in 2016 and 2017 due to viral mutations related to vaccine production in eggs.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Clear as mud: Desiccation cracks help reveal the shape of water on MarsAs Curiosity rover marches across Mars, the red planet's watery past comes into clearer focus.
2h
Live Science

Do You Need a Vaccine to Go to the Kentucky Derby?Kentucky Derby fans may need to take some extra precautions before heading off to the races.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Clear as mud: Desiccation cracks help reveal the shape of water on MarsAs Curiosity rover marches across Mars, the red planet's watery past comes into clearer focus.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Your grandchildren may retire before we achieve gender equality in STEMMNew research has calculated that without further interventions, the gender gap for women working in STEMM is very likely to persist for generations, particularly in surgery, computer science, physics and maths.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gene variant increases empathy-driven fear in miceA small difference in a gene affecting brain circuitry explains variations in empathic fear among different inbred mice strains. As empathy is evolutionarily conserved from rodents to humans, the study brings new insights into the workings of the mammalian brain in social behavior.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global

Some Mutations Tied to Autism May Be Passed Down from FathersThe findings go against previous studies that suggest mutations are inherited from mothers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump's divisive pick to run NASA wins narrow confirmationNASA's latest nail-biting drama was far from orbit as the Senate narrowly confirmed President Donald Trump's choice of a tea party congressman to run the space agency in an unprecedented party-line vote.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Integrating optical components into existing chip designsTwo and a half years ago, a team of researchers led by groups at MIT, the University of California at Berkeley, and Boston University announced a milestone: the fabrication of a working microprocessor, built using only existing manufacturing processes, that integrated electronic and optical components on the same chip.
3h
BBC News - Science & Environment

UK weather: Why this isn't a heatwave... yetPeople across the UK have been enjoying unusually warm weather, but when can we call it a heatwave?
3h
Feed: All Latest

Facebook’s 2017 Privacy Audit Didn’t Catch Cambridge AnalyticaAudit by PwC came two years after Facebook learned that a university researcher gave personal data on millions of Facebook users to Cambridge Analytica.
3h
Ingeniøren

Efter kabellægning for milliarder: 170 km nye luftledninger på vejStatens energiselskab erstatter flere steder i landet velfungerende højspændingsledninger med jordkabler alene for at slippe for synet af dem. Samtidig vil selskabet rejse nye master på en 170 km strækning i Syd- og Vestjylland. Vi begår samme fejl igen, frygter borgmester.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Want to be seen as cool? Just say, 'cheese!'What makes a person cool? One University of Arizona researcher says the difference in being seen as cool or not can be found in something as simple as a smile.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists identify 170 potential lung cancer drug targets using unique cellular libraryAfter testing more than 200,000 chemical compounds, UT Southwestern's Simmons Cancer Center researchers have identified 170 chemicals that are potential candidates for development into drug therapies for lung cancer.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Integrating optical components into existing chip designsA new technique co-developed at MIT can assemble optical and electronic components separately on the surface of a computer chip, enabling the addition of optical components to existing chips with little design modification.
3h
The Atlantic

Your Lyft Ride Is Now Carbon-Neutral. Your Uber Isn't.Taking a Lyft is about to be a little easier on the planet—and on the conscience. The ride-hailing service announced that starting this week it will go carbon-neutral. Lyft will actively offset the carbon-dioxide pollution produced by its more than 10 million rides worldwide each week. In short, this means that taking a Lyft will probably not make global warming worse. Lyft says the program will
3h
Big Think

Seven thought experiments that will make you question everythingPhilosophers love to use thought experiments, here are seven of the most useful for making you reflect on everything around you. Read More
3h
Popular Science

There’s still time for us to save the Great Barrier ReefEnvironment Just how much trouble is coral in? The answer is complicated. "It's been pretty well established that if you take the present day coral and you put it into the future conditions, it will most likely die,” Mikhail Matz explains. The…
3h
Big Think

Video games + cardboard: A look at Nintendo’s new STEM-friendly Labo systemOn April 20, Nintendo will release Labo, a new gaming system that tasks kids with creating interactive games with cardboard cutouts and the Nintendo Switch. Read More
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vitamin D deficiency linked to greater risk of diabetesAn epidemiological study conducted by researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Seoul National University suggests that persons deficient in vitamin D may be at much greater risk of developing diabetes. The findings are reported April 19 in PLOS One.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists re-create brain neurons to study obesity and personalize treatmentScientists have re-created brain neurons of obese patients using 'disease in a dish' technology, offering a new method to study the brain's role in obesity and possibly help tailor treatments to specific individuals.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

Robots are about as good as you at assembling IKEA furniture
3h
Live Science

Are Those Gravitational Waves? Nope, They're Just Thirsty RavensBizarre data glitches have set gravitational-wave scientists — and a conspiracy of ravens — all aflutter.
3h
The Atlantic

The Future of Elite Schools, ContinuedLast week I quoted a long dispatch from a Harvard graduate now living in New Haven, on why he thought the Trump era held more perils for elite-level schools like Harvard and Yale than they might be anticipating. Readers chimed in to agree, disagree, and share parallel experiences here. I’ve received a flood of mail since then—supportive, angry, provocative in various ways—which I’ll work through
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Variants in non-coding DNA contribute to inherited autism riskIn recent years, researchers have firmly established that gene mutations appearing for the first time, called de novo mutations, contribute to approximately one-third of cases of autism spectrum disorder. In a new study, a team led by scientists at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have identified a culprit that may explain some of the remaining risk: rare inherited variants in
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dementia diagnosis linked to unnecessary medication useA new international study led by University of Sydney has found that medication use increases in newly diagnosed dementia patients, particularly unnecessary or inappropriate medications.
3h
New Scientist - News

Plants love carbon dioxide, but too much could be bad for themMost plants were expected to grow more as CO2 levels rise, but a 20-year experiment suggests that the extra CO2 is somehow stunting plant growth, which could make climate change worse
3h
New Scientist - News

Super-tough diamonds have been made bendy and springyDiamonds may be tough, but they can also be surprisingly flexible. A team of researchers grew diamond nanoneedles that bent and then sprang back upright
3h
New Scientist - News

Poking tiny dents into solar panels makes them work betterMost solar cells are limited by how much energy their electrons can absorb. Denting their materials could help them harvest more electricity and breeze past that limit
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Los Angeles port commission approves SpaceX rocket facilityLos Angeles harbor commissioners have approved a permit for Space Exploration Technologies to build a facility on 19 acres of port land to manufacture a Mars rocket that will be so big it will require an oceangoing barge for transport to launch sites.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

GPM data used to evaluate Hawaii's flooding rainfallA weather system moving slowly westward through the northwestern Hawaiian Islands has caused destructive flooding and mudslides and NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite analyzed the heavy rainfall.
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Larger spleens may help ‘sea nomads’ stay underwater longerThe Bajau people of Southeast Asia have a gene variant associated with larger spleens, boosting their oxygen while breath-hold diving, researchers say.
4h
NYT > Science

Trump’s NASA Nominee, Jim Bridenstine, Confirmed by Senate on Party-Line VoteNASA Jim BridenstineThe Oklahoma congressman’s nomination languished for more than seven months as senators raised objections to his record, and now additional concerns have been raised.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA GPM data used to evaluate Hawaii's flooding rainfallA weather system moving slowly westward through the northwestern Hawaiian Islands has caused destructive flooding and mudslides and NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite analyzed the heavy rainfall.
4h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Poison projectScientist Vladimir Uglev has no doubt the agent that poisoned the Skripals was made in Russia.
4h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Bajau people 'evolved bigger spleens' for free-divingBajau Diving Sea SpleensIn an example of human natural selection, Asia's Bajau people have evolved bigger spleens for diving.
4h
New on MIT Technology Review

Fork this: What an unprecedented court battle says about the future of cryptocurrencyA new class action suit seeks a court-ordered “rescue fork” to recover $170 million in lost funds.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How to bend and stretch a diamondBrittle diamond can turn flexible and stretchable when made into ultrafine needles, researchers at MIT and elsewhere have discovered.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The bugs in your gut could make you weak in the kneesScientists have long thought that osteoarthritis in people who are obese was a consequence of excess wear and tear on joints, but a new study suggests that the microbiome is the culprit. The study shows that a high fat diet (like the Western diet) can alter gut microbes, increase inflammation throughout the body, and speed deterioration of joints. An interesting twist: a common dietary supplement
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hurricane Harvey: Most fatalities occurred outside flood zones, Dutch-Texan research showsScientists found that most Houston-area drowning deaths from Hurricane Harvey occurred outside the zones designated by government as being at higher risk of flooding: the 100- and 500-year floodplains. Harvey, one of the costliest storms in US history, hit Texas on Aug. 25, 2017, causing unprecedented flooding and killing dozens.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers find new way of exploring the afterglow from the Big BangResearchers have developed a new way to improve our knowledge of the Big Bang by measuring radiation from its afterglow, called the cosmic microwave background radiation. The new results predict the maximum bandwidth of the universe, which is the maximum speed at which any change can occur in the universe.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hydrogenation of levulinic acid over carbon supported small ruthenium nanoparticlesAn improved performance (activity, selectivity and stability) catalyst for the LA hydrogenation reaction is developed based on carbon supported ruthenium with low metal particle size (1.2 nm).
4h
The Atlantic

NASA Finally Gets a New LeaderNASA Jim BridenstineAfter an unprecedented wait, the nation’s space agency has a Trump-picked, Senate-approved, permanent leader at last. Lawmakers voted 50–49 on Thursday to approve the nomination of Jim Bridenstine, a Republican congressman from Oklahoma, for NASA administrator, following months of debate over his qualifications and growing uncertainty over leadership at the agency. The vote was split along party
4h
The Atlantic

Why Do Trump’s Defenders Assume He’s Guilty?The presumption of innocence is essential to the American legal system. Sometimes prosecutors and the press need to be reminded of this. It’s not as often that the allies of a defendant, or even a prospective defendant, forget. Yet allies of President Trump have made some peculiar comments over the last few days, as Jonathan Chait , Josh Barro , and Orin Kerr note. Anthony Scaramucci says Michael
4h
Science : NPR

To Curb Ocean Pollution, U.K. May Ban Plastic Straws, Stirrers And Cotton SwabsPrime Minister Theresa May called plastic waste "one of the greatest environmental challenges facing the world." The government said it will work with industry to develop alternatives. (Image credit: Thn Rocn Khosit Rath Phachr Sukh / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm)
4h
Big Think

Is the blood in our bodies sometimes blue or is it just a myth?The answer is not only telling of our biology but that of other organisms as well. Read More
4h
Live Science

Exploding Ants Kill Foes, and Themselves, with a Blast of Toxic GooTreetop-dwelling ants have an explosive defensive move.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel antioxidant makes old blood vessels seem young againOlder adults who take an antioxidant that specifically targets mitochondria see age-related changes in blood vessels reverse by the equivalent of 15 to 20 years within six weeks, a new study shows.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unprecedented wave of large-mammal extinctions linked to ancient humansHomo sapiens, Neanderthals and other recent human relatives may have begun hunting large mammal species down to size - by way of extinction - at least 90,000 years earlier than previously thought, says a new study published in the journal Science. The magnitude and scale of the extinction wave surpassed any other recorded during the last 66 million years, according to the study.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A complete cell atlas and lineage tree of the immortal flatwormFrom one stem cell to many differentiated body cells: Scientists from the MDC in Berlin, along with collaborating researchers in Munich, have published a comprehensive lineage tree of a whole adult animal in the journal Science. This was made possible by a combination of RNA and computational technologies.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

World's hardest material, diamond, is flexibleDiscovery by NTU's Professor Subra Suresh and his international research team that diamonds can be stretched by 9 percent without breaking.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Defect in debilitating neurodegenerative disease reversed in mouse nervesScientists have developed a new drug compound that shows promise as a future treatment for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, an inherited, often painful neurodegenerative condition that affects nerves in the hands, arms, feet and legs. The researchers used the compound to treat the nerves of mice harboring the genetic defects that cause the disease.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to bend and stretch a diamondBrittle diamond can turn flexible and stretchable when made into ultrafine needles, researchers at MIT and elsewhere have discovered.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research could literally squeeze more power out of solar cellsPhysicists at the University of Warwick have published new research in the journal Science April 19, 2018, (via the Journal's First Release pages) that could literally squeeze more power out of solar cells by physically deforming each of the crystals in the semiconductors used by photovoltaic cells.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New record on squeezing light to one atom: Atomic Lego guides light below one nanometerICFO researchers, in collaboration with MIT and University of Minho, are able to confine and guide light down to a space of 1-atom thick in dimension.Graphene and 2-D materials have been key ingredients in the development of this atom-scale Lego that can channel light.The study has been published in Science.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What's needed for the next WHO Biosafety HandbookIn this Policy Forum, Kazunobu Kojima et al. highlight key issues that should be addressed through the next revision of the World Health Organization (WHO) Laboratory Biosafety Manual (LBM).
4h
Live Science

No, Having a Little Extra Fat Won't Make You Live LongerIf you dig through medical data on people's weight and risk of dying, you may spot something curious.
4h
Viden

Hvad er Bitcoin mining?Hvordan kan man fremtrylle penge med en kraftig computer? Og hvad er en mining-computer egentlig?
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists identify connection between dopamine and behavior related to pain and fearScientists have for the first time found direct causal links between the neurotransmitter dopamine and avoidance -- behavior related to pain and fear. Researchers have long known that dopamine plays a key role in driving behavior related to pleasurable goals, such as food, sex and social interaction. In general, increasing dopamine boosts the drive toward these stimuli. But dopamine's role in allo
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Machine-learning system processes sounds like humans doUsing a machine-learning system known as a deep neural network, researchers have created the first model that can replicate human performance on auditory tasks such as identifying a musical genre. This type of model can shed light on how the human brain may be performing the same tasks.
4h
New Scientist - News

Augmented reality glasses help kids with autism relate to othersA smart glasses app may help children with autism to focus on and interact with other people by overlaying bullseye targets and cartoon faces
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New record on squeezing light to one atom: Atomic Lego guides light below one nanometerAll electronic devices consist of billions of transistors, the key building block invented in Bell Labs in the late 1940s. Early transistors were as large as one centimeter, but now measure about 14 nanometers. There has also been a race to further shrink devices that control and guide light. Light can function as an ultra-fast communication channel, for example, between different sections of a co
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unprecedented wave of large-mammal extinctions linked to ancient humansHomo sapiens, Neanderthals and other recent human relatives may have begun hunting large mammal species down to size - by way of extinction - at least 90,000 years earlier than previously thought, says a new study published in the journal Science.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A complete cell atlas and lineage tree of the immortal flatwormFrom one stem cell to many differentiated body cells: Scientists from the MDC in Berlin, along with collaborating researchers in Munich, have published a comprehensive lineage tree of a whole adult animal in the journal Science. This was made possible by a combination of RNA and computational technologies.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US to drop curbs on drone tech to boost arms salesThe United States dropped some restrictions Thursday on sales of its advanced drones in order to reinforce the armies of its allies and compete with China on the world arms market.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genome Jenga study reveals unexpected gene alliances in the cellTo understand how a cell works, biologists like to take it apart. By removing genes from cells in diverse combinations, researchers have now uncovered how different genes work together to keep cells alive. The research will help scientists understand how faults in multiple genes combine to drive common diseases such as cancer or heart disease.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Diamond can turn flexible when made into ultrafine needles, researchers findDiamond is well-known as the strongest of all natural materials, and with that strength comes another tightly linked property: brittleness. But now, an international team of researchers from MIT, Hong Kong, Singapore, and Korea has found that when grown in extremely tiny, needle-like shapes, diamond can bend and stretch, much like rubber, and snap back to its original shape.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research could literally squeeze more power out of solar cellsPhysicists at the University of Warwick have today, Thursday 19th April 2018, published new research in the fournal Science today 19th April 2018 (via the Journal's First Release pages) that could literally squeeze more power out of solar cells by physically deforming each of the crystals in the semiconductors used by photovoltaic cells.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Your grandchildren may retire before we achieve gender equality in STEMMResearchers from the University of Melbourne analysed the numbers of men and women authors listed on more than 10 million academic papers, allowing them to calculate the gender gap among researchers, as well as its rate of change for most disciplines of science and medicine.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Great Barrier Reef corals can survive global warming for another centuryUsing genetic samples and computer simulations, evolutionary biologists have made a glass-half-full forecast: Corals in the Great Barrier Reef have enough genetic variation to adapt to and survive rising ocean temperatures for at least another century, or more than 50 years longer than previous estimates have suggested.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New microscope captures detailed 3-D movies of cells deep within living systemsOur window into the cellular world just got a whole lot clearer.
5h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Rising CO2 levels might not be as good for plants as we thoughtA 20-year experiment spots a reversal in the way two kinds of plants take up extra carbon from the atmosphere.
5h
Blog » Languages » English

Alice in Neuroland: Accuracy Happy HoursThe rabbit-hole went straight on like a tunnel for some way, and then dipped suddenly down, so suddenly that Alice had not a moment to think about stopping herself before she found herself falling down what seemed to be a very deep well. Either the well was very deep, or she fell very slowly, for she had plenty of time as she went down to look about her, and to wonder what was going to happen nex
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

3-D human 'mini-brains' shed new light on genetic underpinnings of major mental illnessResearchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital are leveraging gene-editing tools and mini-organs grown in the lab to study the effects of DISC1 mutations in cerebral organoids -- 'mini brains' -- cultured from human stem cells.
5h
The Atlantic

When Will the Gender Gap in Science Disappear?Sixteen years. That’s how long it will take before the number of women on scientific papers is equal to the number of men. Luke Holman from the University of Melbourne got that estimate by working out the number of female and male authors on almost 10 million academic papers, published over the last 15 years. With help from Melbourne colleagues Cindy Hauser and Devi Stuart-Fox, he then used the d
5h
The Atlantic

In a Few Centuries, Cows Could Be the Largest Land Animals LeftThere used to be a type of elephant called Palaeoloxodon that could have rested its chin on the head of a modern African elephant. There was a hornless rhino called Paraceratherium , which was at least 10 times heavier than living rhinos. There was once a giant wombat that could have looked you level in the eye, a ground sloth the size of an elephant, a short-faced bear that would have loomed ove
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

German court rules that ad blockers are legalGermany's Supreme Court on Thursday threw out a case brought by media giant Axel Springer seeking to ban a popular application that blocks online advertising, in a landmark ruling that deals a blow to the publishing industry.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

No-go warning as Japan volcano erupts for first time in 250 yearsA volcano in southern Japan erupted for the first time in 250 years on Thursday, spewing steam and ash hundreds of metres into the air, as authorities warned locals not to approach the mountain.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

British cybersecurity expert faces key hearing in US caseA British cybersecurity expert once heralded as a hero for stopping the WannaCry worldwide computer virus is due in a Milwaukee courtroom Thursday, where he will ask the judge to toss statements he made to the FBI after his arrest for allegedly writing and distributing malicious software use to steal banking passwords.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neurons derived from super-obese people respond differently to appetite hormonesScientists have successfully generated hypothalamic-like neurons from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) taken from the blood and skin cells of super-obese individuals and people with a normal body weight. The researchers found that the brain cells derived from the super obese were more likely to dysregulate hormones related to feeding behavior and hunger, as well as obesity-related gen
5h
Quanta Magazine

How Many Genes Do Cells Need? Maybe Almost All of ThemBy knocking out genes three at a time, scientists have painstakingly deduced the web of genetic interactions that keeps a cell alive. Researchers long ago identified essential genes that yeast cells can’t live without, but new work, which appears today in Science , shows that looking only at those gives a skewed picture of what makes cells tick: Many genes that are inessential on their own become
5h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube

Whale Sharks at Risk | Racing Extinction (360 Video)The largest fish on the planet – they can grow up to 46 feet in length, and weigh up to 15 tons – whale sharks are gentle giants. Filmed off the coast of Mexico, our footage captured them as they were feeding while migrating to points south. Join a conservation biologist on an interactive mission to learn how animals critical to the world’s ecosystem thrive and survive in the wild. For a more imm
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists create gold nanoparticles in waterAn experiment that, by design, was not supposed to turn up anything of note instead produced a "bewildering" surprise, according to the Stanford scientists who made the discovery: a new way of creating gold nanoparticles and nanowires using water droplets.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Irish drugmaker Shire facing potential $60bn bidding warIreland's Shire Pharmaceuticals on Thursday faced the prospect of a bidding war after rejecting a $60-billion takeover from Japan's Takeda, as Botox-maker Allergan revealed it was mulling an offer.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New US aviation safety inspections after Southwest mishapThe US Federal Aviation Administration said it is set to issue new guidelines to inspect jet engines like the one that ruptured during a recent Southwest Airlines flight.
5h
Science current issue

Biases in forensic experts
5h
Science current issue

News at a glance
5h
Science current issue

NASA lander to probe interior of Mars
5h
Science current issue

Department of State's air pollution sensors go global
5h
Science current issue

Cannabis, opium use part of ancient Near Eastern cultures
5h
Science current issue

Plan for 2020 U.S. census is fatally flawed, critics say
5h
Science current issue

Ancient DNA untangles South Asian roots
5h
Science current issue

Proposal to rescue postdocs from limbo draws darts
5h
Science current issue

Omen in the blood
5h
Science current issue

Risk-based reboot for global lab biosafety
5h
Science current issue

Plant responses to CO2 are a question of time
5h
Science current issue

On the quest for the strongest materials
5h
Science current issue

Whispering neurons fuel cortical highways
5h
Science current issue

Parkin function in Parkinson's disease
5h
Science current issue

If two deletions don't stop growth, try three
5h
Science current issue

A unifying concept in vascular health and disease
5h
Science current issue

Reconsidering the Nobel Prize
5h
Science current issue

Wielding new genomic tools wisely
5h
Science current issue

Ivory crisis: Growing no-trade consensus
5h
Science current issue

Ivory crisis: Role of bioprinting technology
5h
Science current issue

Response--Ivory crisis
5h
Science current issue

Insurance coverage for genomic tests
5h
Science current issue

Megafaunal loss
5h
Science current issue

A strongly oxidizing Paleoproterozoic era
5h
Science current issue

Transient instruction changes migration
5h
Science current issue

Inherited variation contributes to autism
5h
Science current issue

An innovative approach for a rare disease
5h
Science current issue

Taking an active interest in HIV latency
5h
Science current issue

Reserving the right to stretch
5h
Science current issue

Earlier detection of ovarian cancer
5h
Science current issue

Recurring coherence
5h
Science current issue

Trigenic interactions in yeast link bioprocesses
5h
Science current issue

Continuing the resolution revolution
5h
Science current issue

Large-scale integrated quantum optics
5h
Science current issue

Light confined to a single atomic layer
5h
Science current issue

Small, smooth, and bendable diamonds
5h
Science current issue

Images frozen in time
5h
Science current issue

A short-term trend reversed
5h
Science current issue

The cellular composition of H3K27M gliomas
5h
Science current issue

First steps of translocation elucidated
5h
Science current issue

Conformation changes or cooperativity?
5h
Science current issue

Restoring blood vessel stability
5h
Science current issue

Estrogen accentuates autoimmunity
5h
Science current issue

Potent platelets
5h
Science current issue

Tuning the soil for growth
5h
Science current issue

Tying genotype to phenotype, cell by cell
5h
Science current issue

Weathering life after death
5h
Science current issue

Explaining uneven mass loss
5h
Science current issue

Manipulating an antiferromagnet
5h
Science current issue

Reconfigurable metasurfaces
5h
Science current issue

Even more genes control cell growth
5h
Science current issue

Multidimensional quantum entanglement with large-scale integrated opticsThe ability to control multidimensional quantum systems is central to the development of advanced quantum technologies. We demonstrate a multidimensional integrated quantum photonic platform able to generate, control, and analyze high-dimensional entanglement. A programmable bipartite entangled system is realized with dimensions up to 15 x 15 on a large-scale silicon photonics quantum circuit. Th
5h
Science current issue

Probing the ultimate plasmon confinement limits with a van der Waals heterostructureThe ability to confine light into tiny spatial dimensions is important for applications such as microscopy, sensing, and nanoscale lasers. Although plasmons offer an appealing avenue to confine light, Landau damping in metals imposes a trade-off between optical field confinement and losses. We show that a graphene-insulator-metal heterostructure can overcome that trade-off, and demonstrate plasmo
5h
Science current issue

Capillarity-induced folds fuel extreme shape changes in thin wicked membranesSoft deformable materials are needed for applications such as stretchable electronics, smart textiles, or soft biomedical devices. However, the design of a durable, cost-effective, or biologically compatible version of such a material remains challenging. Living animal cells routinely cope with extreme deformations by unfolding preformed membrane reservoirs available in the form of microvilli or
5h
Science current issue

Ultralarge elastic deformation of nanoscale diamondDiamonds have substantial hardness and durability, but attempting to deform diamonds usually results in brittle fracture. We demonstrate ultralarge, fully reversible elastic deformation of nanoscale (~300 nanometers) single-crystalline and polycrystalline diamond needles. For single-crystalline diamond, the maximum tensile strains (up to 9%) approached the theoretical elastic limit, and the corre
5h
Science current issue

Five-dimensional imaging of freezing emulsions with solute effectsThe interaction of objects with a moving solidification front is a common feature of many industrial and natural processes such as metal processing, the growth of single crystals, the cryopreservation of cells, or the formation of sea ice. Interaction of solidification fronts with objects leads to different outcomes, from total rejection of the objects to their complete engulfment. We imaged the
5h
Science current issue

Recurrences in an isolated quantum many-body systemThe complexity of interacting quantum many-body systems leads to exceedingly long recurrence times of the initial quantum state for all but the smallest systems. For large systems, one cannot probe the full quantum state in all its details. Thus, experimentally, recurrences can only be determined on the level of the accessible observables. Realizing a commensurate spectrum of collective excitatio
5h
Science current issue

Body size downgrading of mammals over the late QuaternarySince the late Pleistocene, large-bodied mammals have been extirpated from much of Earth. Although all habitable continents once harbored giant mammals, the few remaining species are largely confined to Africa. This decline is coincident with the global expansion of hominins over the late Quaternary. Here, we quantify mammalian extinction selectivity, continental body size distributions, and taxo
5h
Science current issue

Synaptic transmission from subplate neurons controls radial migration of neocortical neuronsThe neocortex exhibits a six-layered structure that is formed by radial migration of excitatory neurons, for which the multipolar-to-bipolar transition of immature migrating multipolar neurons is required. Here, we report that subplate neurons, one of the first neuron types born in the neocortex, manage the multipolar-to-bipolar transition of migrating neurons. By histochemical, imaging, and micr
5h
Science current issue

Unexpected reversal of C3 versus C4 grass response to elevated CO2 during a 20-year field experimentTheory predicts and evidence shows that plant species that use the C 4 photosynthetic pathway (C 4 species) are less responsive to elevated carbon dioxide ( e CO 2 ) than species that use only the C 3 pathway (C 3 species). We document a reversal from this expected C 3 -C 4 contrast. Over the first 12 years of a 20-year free-air CO 2 enrichment experiment with 88 C 3 or C 4 grassland plots, we fo
5h
Science current issue

Two-billion-year-old evaporites capture Earths great oxidationMajor changes in atmospheric and ocean chemistry occurred in the Paleoproterozoic era (2.5 to 1.6 billion years ago). Increasing oxidation dramatically changed Earth’s surface, but few quantitative constraints exist on this important transition. This study describes the sedimentology, mineralogy, and geochemistry of a 2-billion-year-old, ~800-meter-thick evaporite succession from the Onega Basin
5h
Science current issue

Structure of a prehandover mammalian ribosomal SRP{middle dot}SRP receptor targeting complexSignal recognition particle (SRP) targets proteins to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). SRP recognizes the ribosome synthesizing a signal sequence and delivers it to the SRP receptor (SR) on the ER membrane followed by the transfer of the signal sequence to the translocon. Here, we present the cryo–electron microscopy structure of the mammalian translating ribosome in complex with SRP and SR in a c
5h
Science current issue

Paternally inherited cis-regulatory structural variants are associated with autismThe genetic basis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is known to consist of contributions from de novo mutations in variant-intolerant genes. We hypothesize that rare inherited structural variants in cis-regulatory elements (CRE-SVs) of these genes also contribute to ASD. We investigated this by assessing the evidence for natural selection and transmission distortion of CRE-SVs in whole genomes of
5h
Science current issue

Developmental and oncogenic programs in H3K27M gliomas dissected by single-cell RNA-seqGliomas with histone H3 lysine27-to-methionine mutations (H3K27M-glioma) arise primarily in the midline of the central nervous system of young children, suggesting a cooperation between genetics and cellular context in tumorigenesis. Although the genetics of H3K27M-glioma are well characterized, their cellular architecture remains uncharted. We performed single-cell RNA sequencing in 3321 cells f
5h
Science current issue

MFN2 agonists reverse mitochondrial defects in preclinical models of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2AMitofusins (MFNs) promote fusion-mediated mitochondrial content exchange and subcellular trafficking. Mutations in Mfn2 cause neurodegenerative Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2A (CMT2A). We showed that MFN2 activity can be determined by Met 376 and His 380 interactions with Asp 725 and Leu 727 and controlled by PINK1 kinase–mediated phosphorylation of adjacent MFN2 Ser 378 . Small-molecule mimi
5h
Science current issue

New Products
5h
Science current issue

Academia's forgotten footnote
5h
Science current issue

Observing the cell in its native state: Imaging subcellular dynamics in multicellular organismsTrue physiological imaging of subcellular dynamics requires studying cells within their parent organisms, where all the environmental cues that drive gene expression, and hence the phenotypes that we actually observe, are present. A complete understanding also requires volumetric imaging of the cell and its surroundings at high spatiotemporal resolution, without inducing undue stress on either. W
5h
Science current issue

Systematic analysis of complex genetic interactionsTo systematically explore complex genetic interactions, we constructed ~200,000 yeast triple mutants and scored negative trigenic interactions. We selected double-mutant query genes across a broad spectrum of biological processes, spanning a range of quantitative features of the global digenic interaction network and tested for a genetic interaction with a third mutation. Trigenic interactions of
5h
Science current issue

Erratum for the Report "A precise measurement of the magnetic field in the corona of the black hole binary V404 Cygni" by Y. Dallilar, S. S. Eikenberry, A. Garner, R. D. Stelter, A. Gottlieb, P. Gandhi, P. Casella, V. S. Dhillon, T. R. Marsh, S. P. Littlefair, L. Hardy, R. Fender, K. Mooley, D. J. Walton, F. Fuerst, M. Bachetti, A. J. Castro-Tirado, M. Charcos, M. L. Edwards, N. M. Lasso-Cabrera, A. Marin-Franch, S. N. Raines, K. Ackley, J. G. Bennett, A. J. Cenarro, B. Chinn, H. V. Donoso, R. Frommeyer, K. Hanna, M. D. Herlevich, J. Julian, P. Miller, S. Mullin, C. H. Murphey, C. Packham, F. Varosi, C. Vega, C. Warner, A. N. Ramaprakash, M. Burse, S. Punnadi, P. Chordia, A. Gerarts, H. de Paz Martin, M. Martin Calero, R. Scarpa, S. Fernandez Acosta, W. M. Hernandez Sanchez, B. Siegel, F. Francisco Perez, H. D. Viera Martin, J. A. Rodriguez Losada, A. Nunez, A. Tejero, C. E. Martin Gonzalez, C. Cabrera Rodriguez, J. Molgo, J. Esteban Rodriguez, J. I. Fernandez Caceres, L. A. Rodriguez…Erratum for the Report "A precise measurement of the magnetic field in the corona of the black hole binary V404 Cygni" by Y. Dallilar, S. S. Eikenberry, A. Garner, R. D. Stelter, A. Gottlieb, P. Gandhi, P. Casella, V. S. Dhillon, T. R. Marsh, S. P. Littlefair, L. Hardy, R. Fender, K. Mooley, D. J. Walton, F. Fuerst, M. Bachetti, A. J. Castro-Tirado, M. Charcos, M. L. Edwards, N. M. Lasso-Cabrera,
5h
Viden

VIDEO Helikopterbil skal lette trafikken i megabyerEt fransk-italiensk samarbejde har resulteret i en drone-taxa, der kan bestilles med en smartphone.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Jack Ma says Alibaba 'doing a lot of research' on driverless carsE-commerce giant Alibaba is steering resources towards driverless car technology, its CEO Jack Ma confirmed on Thursday, joining a global race to shape the future of driving.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Holey cow! Evidence of Stone Age veterinary 'surgery'A hole in the skull of a Stone Age cow was likely made by humans about 5,000 years ago, probably by a primitive veterinarian or trainee surgeon, scientists said Thursday.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Natural selection gave a freediving people in Southeast Asia bigger spleensBajau Diving Sea SpleensThe Bajau people of Southeast Asia, known as Sea Nomads, spend their whole lives at sea, working eight-hour diving shifts with traditional equipment and short breaks to catch fish and shellfish for their families. Researchers now report that the extraordinary diving abilities of the Bajau may be thanks in part to their unusually large spleens, a rare example of natural selection in modern humans.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Republicans more persuasive than scientists on climate changeRegardless of political affiliation, people are more likely to believe facts about climate change when they come from Republicans speaking against what has become a partisan interest in this country, according to a new study.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Obesity linked with higher chance of developing rapid, irregular heart ratePeople with obesity are more likely to develop a rapid and irregular heart rate, called atrial fibrillation, which can lead to stroke, heart failure and other complications, according to Penn State researchers. They found that people with obesity had a 40 percent higher chance of developing atrial fibrillation than people without obesity.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US Air Force awards nearly $1 bn for hypersonic missileThe US Air Force is awarding almost $1 billion to Lockheed Martin to design and develop a hypersonic missile that can be launched from a warplane.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Maryland bill seeks transparency in online political adsIn the wake of alleged Russian meddling in the 2016 U.S. presidential race, Maryland is close to enacting a law that some experts say would set a new standard for how states deal with foreign interference in local elections and increase overall transparency in online political ads.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Toward a new water paradigmGood intentions are not the same as good results - as much as half of all water and sanitations systems in developing countries fail after five years. To reduce widespread inefficiencies and duplication of efforts, and measure what matters most to vulnerable communities, the Conrad N. Hilton Foundation recently awarded a four-year $1.9 million grant to Stanford's Program on Water, Health & Develop
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Virtually modelling the human brain in a computerNeurons that remain active even after the triggering stimulus has been silenced form the basis of short-term memory. The brain uses rhythmically active neurons to combine larger groups of neurons into functional units. Until now, neuroscientists have, for the most part, studied these and other properties with the help of network models, each of which is only able to recreate a single property. Sci
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UCalgary researchers develop a new method to discover drugs to treat epilepsyFor more than a third of children living with epilepsy, the currently approved medications do not stop their seizures. Researchers at the Cumming School of Medicine have developed a new drug screening method to discover drugs to treat epilepsy.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A novel way of creating gold nanoparticles in waterThe discovery that water microdroplets can replace potentially toxic agents in the creation of gold nanoparticles and nanowires could help usher in a new era of 'green chemistry.'
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Algorithm tool works to silence online chatroom sex predatorsAn algorithm tool developed by Purdue Polytechnic Institute faculty will help law enforcement filter out and focus on sex offenders most likely to set up face-to-face meetings with child victims.
5h
NYT > Science

Design Review: At This Museum Show, You’re Encouraged to Follow Your Nose“The Senses: Design Beyond Vision” at the Cooper Hewitt asks visitors to consider sound, taste and smell.
5h
NYT > Science

Hans Asperger Aided Nazi Child Euthanasia, Study SaysThe autism researcher collaborated with the Third Reich and actively assisted in the killing of disabled children, a new report says.
5h
Science | The Guardian

Vaginal mesh surgery exposed women to 'unacceptable risks'Government finally acknowledges the ‘tragedy’ inflicted on thousands of women, and agrees mesh should only have been used as an extreme measure Women have been exposed to unacceptable risks through the use of vaginal mesh surgery, the government has acknowledged for the first time, as fresh evidence has revealed that thousands of women have suffered traumatic complications . In a parliamentary de
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

New Evidence Ties Hans Asperger to Nazi Eugenics ProgramSome experts call for discarding the physician's name from the medical term -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Students given incentives to innovate are just as skilled as the self-motivated, research findsInnovators aren't born, they can be made, according to recent research from the University of California San Diego's School of Global Policy and Strategy.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Putting proteins in their proper placeA host of special molecules called nuclear RNA-binding proteins (RBPs), when misplaced outside the nucleus, form the harmful clumps seen in several brain disorders, including frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). "Clumps that form from these disease proteins are composed of sticky fibrils that damage nerve cells," said James Shorter, PhD, an associate professor of
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tiny fly blows bubbles to cool off: studyHumans sweat, dogs pant, cats lick their fur. Animals have adopted an interesting array of techniques for regulating body temperature through evaporation.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Belarus to require internet comments to be authorizedThe parliament in Belarus has passed a measure prohibiting internet users from commenting on forums without authorization and requiring online publications to register with the government as mass media.
5h
The Scientist RSS

Free Divers From Southeast Asia Evolved Bigger SpleensThe adaptation gives better endurance to the Bajau people, known as sea nomads, by increasing spleen size and, in turn, boosting the number of oxygenated red blood cells when diving.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Engineering a better cancer blood test to detect tumors earlyA new innovative microfluidic device uses magnetic particles and wavy-herringbone design to capture and release circulating tumor cells with an 80-95% capture efficiency rate at different tumor cell concentrations.
5h
New Scientist - News

Male fruit flies feel pleasure when they ejaculateMale insects have been genetically engineered to climax on command, and it seems they get a real buzz out of it – perhaps even a fly orgasm
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cell phones, biometrics fuel jump in bank account ownershipRoughly seven out of every 10 adults worldwide now have some form of bank account, the World Bank said Thursday, largely due to the proliferation of cell phone-based bank accounts and other simple bank account programs in places like India and Sub-Saharan Africa.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient coins, bracelets looted from Romania return homeCoins and bracelets from the 1st century that were looted from western Romania years ago and smuggled out of the country were put on display Thursday after a joint investigation with Austria brought them back home.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study provides video evidence of parental infanticide in a grassland bird speciesBaby birds go missing from their nests all the time. Usually, the disappearances are chalked up to predation, but in extremely rare cases, parents have been observed removing their own chicks from their nests. In a new study from the University of Illinois, the mysterious and fatal behavior is documented in dickcissels for the first time.
5h
Popular Science

Saving pollinators is about more than just honeybeesAnimals Wild insects are the most important and vulnerable pollinators. The decline of pollinators is linked with destruction of natural habitats like forests and meadows, the spread of pests such as Varroa mite and diseases like foulbrood,…
6h
Ingeniøren

Lunefuld atomkraft: Indisk tøven og ny dansk debatbogIndien bygger fortsat mange atomkraftværker, men ikke helt så hurtigt, som tidligere planer indikerede. På langt sigt har Indien planer om at gå til thoriumreaktorer – det bør Danmark også gøre, mener dansk debattør.
6h
Big Think

Was Elvis Presley a cultural appropriator of black music?The fascinating HBO documentary 'Elvis Presley: The Searcher' looks at Elvis’s practice of re-making black hits for his white audience. Was it cultural appropriation or just love of the material? Read More
6h
Inside Science

For Male Flies, Pleasure Comes with EjaculationFor Male Flies, Pleasure Comes with Ejaculation Studying fly sex may lead to a better understanding of addiction in humans. redfruitfly.jpg Image credits: Avi Jacob, BIU Microscopy unit Rights information: Credit Required Creature Thursday, April 19, 2018 - 12:30 Marcus Woo, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Birds do it. Bees do it. And, of course, humans do it. Sex is almost universal, and most an
6h
NeuWrite San Diego

taste of science: a fest to feed your curiosityI’m a firm believer that science and beer pair well together. Luckily for me, taste of science San Diego highlights the best of both in a week–long festival. As the city coordinator, I’ve worked with an incredible team to create a festival that provides San Diegans a unique opportunity to get a flavor for the […]
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

Human "Sea Nomads" May Have Evolved to Be the World's Elite DiversNew genetic evidence suggests these indigenous Southeast Asians are singularly suited for underwater hunting -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Homemade microscope reveals how a cancer-causing virus clings to our DNAUsing a homemade, high-tech microscope, scientists at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have revealed how a cancer-causing virus anchors itself to our DNA. That discovery could pave the way for doctors to cure incurable diseases by flushing out viruses, including HPV and Epstein-Barr, that now permanently embed themselves in our cells.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

For nuclear weapons reduction, a way to verify without revealingIn past negotiations aimed at reducing the arsenals of the world's nuclear superpowers, chiefly the U.S. and Russia, a major sticking point has been the verification process: How do you prove that real bombs and nuclear devices—not just replicas—have been destroyed, without revealing closely held secrets about the design of those weapons?
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

GLUT5 fluorescent probe fingerprints cancer cellsDetermining the presence of cancer, as well as its type and malignancy, is a stressful process for patients that can take up to two weeks to get a diagnosis. With a new bit of technology—a sugar-transporting biosensor—researchers at Michigan Technological University hope to reduce that timeframe down to minutes.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Improving public engagement with science museumsA team of computer science, education and museum researchers is launching a project to better understand how museum visitors interact with educational exhibits. The ultimate goal: helping museums capture public interest.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

USGS and DOE release nationwide wind turbine map and databaseToday, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in partnership with DOE's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the American Wind Energy Association, released the United States Wind Turbine Database (USWTDB) and the USWTDB Viewer to access this new public dataset.
6h
The Atlantic

A Perfect Circle's Hard Rock Against Hard TimesSomething long buried in me shivered when I first listened to “ TalkTalk ” off A Perfect Circle’s new album, Eat the Elephant . “Get the fuck out of my way,” Maynard James Keenan shouts, seeming to expel a mouthful of ashes, stretching the final syllable so that it merges with the jet-roar guitar tone below. The emotion expressed felt more complex than rage; the way it was rendered as slow-motion
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In the surcharge blame game, companies tend to finish lastCompanies may bear the brunt of the blame for imposing surcharges on consumers, even when an outside agency foisted those charges on the company, according to an international team of researchers.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Rip Van Winkle' plants hide underground for up to 20 yearsScores of plant species are capable of living dormant under the soil for up to 20 years, enabling them to survive through difficult times, a new study has found.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Electrochemical tuning of single layer materials relies on defectsPerfection is not everything, according to an international team of researchers whose 2-D materials study shows that defects can enhance a material's physical, electrochemical, magnetic, energy and catalytic properties.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Feather replacement or parental care? Migratory birds desert their offspring to moltA new study shows that when feather replacement and parental care overlap in time, migratory songbirds make a striking trade-off; they desert their offspring, leaving their mates to provide all remaining parental care.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study provides video evidence of parental infanticide in a grassland bird speciesBaby birds go missing from their nests all the time. Usually, the disappearances are chalked up to predation, but in extremely rare cases, parents have been observed removing their own chicks from their nests. In a new study from the University of Illinois, the mysterious and fatal behavior is documented in dickcissels for the first time.
6h
Popular Science

Exclusive first look: Daisy is Apple's new robot that eats iPhones and spits out recyclable partsTechnology A two-minute journey through this machine renders a smartphone into recyclable materials. This 30-foot robotic line breaks up iPhones with a mix of precision and percussion.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

What's Next for TESS, NASA's New Exoplanet Hunter?The spacecraft is headed to its science orbit and prepping to discover thousands of alien worlds -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Science | The Guardian

Victory over Pret a Manger means the fight against misleading labels is on | Joanna BlythmanChallenging terms such as ‘natural’ is difficult, but the Real Bread Campaign’s win against the chain proves it can be done When it comes to labelling, food retailers run rings around their customers, and mainly get away with it. They weave a lexicon of feelgood terms – “fresh”, “handmade”, “artisan”, “local”, “farmhouse”, “healthy”, “natural” – into their marketing messages, which just happens to
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Homemade microscope reveals how a cancer-causing virus clings to our DNAUsing a homemade, high-tech microscope, scientists have revealed how a cancer-causing virus anchors itself to our DNA. That discovery could pave the way for doctors to cure incurable diseases by flushing out viruses, including HPV and Epstein-Barr, that now permanently embed themselves in our cells.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Certain PTSD therapies prove effective long after patients stop treatmentReducing severity of PTSD symptoms long-term holds significant public-health and economic implications.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Landmark study links tumor evolution to prostate cancer severityFindings from Canadian Prostate Cancer Genome Network (CPC-GENE) researchers and their collaborators, published today in Cell, show that the aggressiveness of an individual prostate cancer can be accurately assessed by looking at how that tumor has evolved. This information can be used to determine what type and how much treatment should be given to each patient, or if any is needed at all.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study may explain why some triple-negative breast cancers are resistant to chemotherapyTriple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive form of the disease accounting for 12 to 18 percent of breast cancers. It is a scary diagnosis, and even though chemotherapy can be effective as standard-of-care, many patients become resistant to treatment. A team at The University of Texas MD Anderson led a study which may explain how resistance evolves over time, and potentially which patien
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Putting proteins in their proper placeA host of nuclear RNA-binding proteins, when misplaced outside the nucleus, form the harmful clumps seen in several brain disorders, including FTD and ALS. Clumps that form from these disease proteins are composed of sticky fibrils that damage nerve cells. Researchers are trying to reverse the formation of these and put the RNA-binding proteins back in their proper place, inside the nucleus.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neurodegenerative diseases: Deadly dropletsLudwig-Maximilians-Universitaet in Munich researchers have characterized the mechanism that initiates the pathological aggregation of the protein FUS, which plays a central role in two distinct neurodegenerative diseases.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene variant increases empathy-driven fear in miceA small difference in a gene affecting brain circuitry explains variations in empathic fear among different inbred mice strains. As empathy is evolutionarily conserved from rodents to humans, the study brings new insights into the workings of the mammalian brain in social behavior.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pathways to spatial recognitionAt the Janelia Research Campus, postdoctoral research scientist Mark Cembrowski, who is part of Group Leader Nelson Spruston's lab, has been leading an effort to parse the cellular, molecular, and behavioral components of spatial recognition. Their discoveries, described April 19 in the journal Cell, offer new insight into the neuroscience of memory-guided navigation.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Protein can slow intestinal tumor growthA new mechanism for regulating stem cells in the intestine of fruit flies has been discovered by researchers at Stockholm University. In addition, it was discovered that a certain protein can slow the growth of tumors in intestinal tissue. A better understanding of these mechanisms can teach us more about how diseases in human intestines occur, as well as contribute to the development of new medic
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery adds to evidence that some children are predisposed to develop leukemiaSt. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have discovered a fourth gene that can predispose carriers to the most common childhood cancer, expanding the list of genes to include in cancer screening.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Machine-learning system processes sounds like humans doUsing a machine-learning system known as a deep neural network, MIT researchers have created the first model that can replicate human performance on auditory tasks such as identifying a musical genre. This type of model can shed light on how the human brain may be performing the same tasks.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists identify connection between dopamine and behavior related to pain and fearScientists have for the first time found direct causal links between the neurotransmitter dopamine and avoidance -- behavior related to pain and fear. Researchers have long known that dopamine plays a key role in driving behavior related to pleasurable goals, such as food, sex and social interaction. In general, increasing dopamine boosts the drive toward these stimuli. But dopamine's role in allo
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Human protein important for cellular communication resembles bacterial toxinA protein that plays an important role in embryonic development and nervous system wiring in humans appears to have been borrowed from bacteria. In a new study, scientists from the UChicago and Stanford describe the three-dimensional structure of proteins called teneurins for the first time.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Let's talk about sex chromosomesVincent Pasque from KU Leuven, Belgium, and Kathrin Plath from UCLA led an international study into how specialized cells reprogram to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS). The researchers discovered that female and male cells behave differently after the reprogramming process and that this is due to their different number of X chromosomes.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetic adaptations to diving discovered in humans for the first timeEvidence that humans can genetically adapt to diving has been identified for the first time in a new study. The evidence suggests that the Bajau, a people group indigenous to parts of Indonesia, have genetically enlarged spleens which enable them to free dive to depths of up to 70 meters. The relationship between spleen size and dive capacity has never before been examined in humans at the genetic
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

BIDMC-lead team develops new approach to study long non-coding RNAsIn a groundbreaking paper, investigators at the Cancer Research Institute Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center developed a novel approach to identify and determine the functional role of lncRNAs relevant to chemotherapy resistance in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). The new technique integrates information from publicly-available pharmacological data bases with leading-edge CRISPR technologies to scr
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Molecule that dilates blood vessels hints at new way to treat heart diseaseAmericans die of heart or cardiovascular disease at an alarming rate. In fact, heart attacks, strokes and related diseases will kill an estimated 610,000 Americans this year alone. Some medications help, but to better tackle this problem, researchers need to know exactly how the heart and blood vessels stay healthy in the first place.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using the right plants can reduce indoor pollution and save energyIn a Review published April 19 in Trends in Plant Science, Frederico Brilli, a plant physiologist at the National Research Council of Italy - Institute for Sustainable Plant Protection, and colleagues conclude that a better knowledge of plant physiology, along with integration of smart-sensor-controlled air cleaning technologies, could improve indoor air quality in a cost-effective and sustainable
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neurons derived from super-obese people respond differently to appetite hormonesUS scientists have successfully generated hypothalamic-like neurons from human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) taken from the blood and skin cells of super-obese individuals and people with a normal body weight. The researchers found that the brain cells derived from the super obese were more likely to dysregulate hormones related to feeding behavior and hunger, as well as obesity-related
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Enlarged spleen key to diving endurance of Indonesian 'sea nomads'The Bajau, a population of sea nomads in Indonesia, are known for their ability to conduct prolonged and repeated deep dives while holding their breath. A new analysis by University of Copenhagen and UC Berkeley scientists shows that they evolved this ability by enlarging their spleen about 50 percent. A genetic analysis links this to upregulated thyroid hormone. This is a unique adaptation to liv
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Optogenetic study shows that male flies find ejaculation pleasurableResearchers reporting in Current Biology on April 19 show that male fruit flies find sex -- and more specifically ejaculation -- to be an inherently rewarding experience. The study is the first to show that the rewarding nature of ejaculation is conserved among animals, from flies and mammals. It also adds to evidence that manipulating sexual experience in flies affects their interest in consuming
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Natural selection gave a freediving people in Southeast Asia bigger spleensThe Bajau people of Southeast Asia, known as Sea Nomads, spend their whole lives at sea, working eight-hour diving shifts with traditional equipment and short breaks to catch fish and shellfish for their families. In a study published April 19 in the journal Cell, researchers report that the extraordinary diving abilities of the Bajau may be thanks in part to their unusually large spleens, a rare
6h
Live Science

Humans Probably Practiced Brain Surgery on This Cow 5,000 Years AgoAbout 5,000 years ago, humans used crude stone tools to puncture a hole in a cow's head, making it the earliest known instance of skull surgery in an animal.
6h
Live Science

Is Sparkling Water As Healthy As Regular Water?So refreshing. But is it hydrating?
6h
Live Science

Nazi Germany's Most High-Tech Submarine Found 73 Years After It Was Blown UpThe deadly quiet, superfast U-boat was sunk by an Allied aerial assault on May 6, 1945.
6h
Science | The Guardian

Mystery of sea nomads' amazing ability to freedive is solvedScientists have uncovered the secrets of the Bajau people, long-famed for their ability to hold their breath for extraordinary lengths of time The secret behind the ability of a group of “sea nomads” in Southeast Asia to hold their breath for extraordinary periods of time while freediving to hunt fish has finally been revealed – and it’s down to evolution. The Bajau people are able to dive tens o
6h
Big Think

Britain just set a new record: 55 hours without using the dirtiest fossil fuel out thereFor 55 hours, not a speck of coal was used to toast crumpets in England. How did the U.K. give up the dirtiest fossil fuel? Read More
6h
New Scientist - News

Why climate engineers are targeting Earth’s last pristine spotsSome of the last great wildernesses are being considered as likely candidates for geoengineering. It's a sad reflection of climate failings, says Olive Heffernan
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why male and female cells behave differently after being reprogrammed into stem cellsVincent Pasque from KU Leuven, Belgium, and Kathrin Plath from UCLA led an international study into how specialized cells are reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS). The researchers discovered that female and male cells behave differently after the reprogramming process and that this is due to their different number of X chromosomes.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using the right plants can reduce indoor pollution and save energyPeople in industrialized countries spend more than 80% of their lives indoors, increasingly in air-tight buildings. These structures require less energy for heating, ventilating, and air conditioning, but can be hazardous to human health if particulate matter and potentially toxic gases, including carbon monoxide, ozone, and volatile organic compounds, from sources such as furniture, paints, carpe
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Human protein important for cellular communication resembles bacterial toxinA protein that plays an important role in embryonic development and nervous system wiring in humans appears to have been borrowed from bacteria. In a study published April 19, 2018, in Cell, scientists from the University of Chicago and Stanford University describe the three-dimensional structure of proteins called teneurins for the first time.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genetic adaptations to diving discovered in humans for the first timeBajau Diving Sea SpleensEvidence that humans can genetically adapt to diving has been identified for the first time in a new study. The evidence suggests that the Bajau, a people group indigenous to parts of Indonesia, have genetically enlarged spleens which enable them to free dive to depths of up to 70m.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Optogenetic study shows that male flies find ejaculation pleasurableResearchers reporting in Current Biology on April 19 show that male fruit flies find sex—and more specifically ejaculation—to be an inherently rewarding experience. The study is the first to show that the rewarding nature of ejaculation is conserved among animals, from flies and mammals. It also adds to evidence that manipulating sexual experience in flies affects their interest in consuming alcoh
7h
NYT > Science

Matter: Bodies Remodeled for a Life at SeaBajau Diving Sea SpleensThe Bajau, who spend most of their time on the ocean, are among the best divers in the world. Evolution is remaking them, a new study finds.
7h
NYT > Science

E. Coli Outbreak Tied to Romaine Lettuce Expands to 16 StatesAt least 53 people have been infected so far, and more than half have been hospitalized.
7h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Male fruit flies enjoy ejaculationRed light exposure made some genetically engineered fruit flies ejaculate, spurring a surge of a brain reward compound — and less desire for booze.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For nuclear weapons reduction, a way to verify without revealingMIT researchers have found a new way of verifying nuclear weapons reduction agreements without revealing secret information, using a physical cryptographic key and nuclear resonant phenomena.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers achieve HD video streaming at 10,000 times lower powerEngineers at the University of Washington have developed a new HD video streaming method that doesn't need to be plugged in. Their prototype skips power-hungry components and has something else, like a smartphone, process the video instead.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Spider silk key to new bone-fixing compositeUConn researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.
7h
New on MIT Technology Review

Why Facebook wants to design its own AI chips
7h
The Atlantic

Scientists Genetically Engineered Flies to Ejaculate Under Red LightHumans have spent a lot of time figuring out ways to get animals to ejaculate. They have fashioned artificial vaginas , inserted electric probes , and donned helmets that encourage birds to hump their heads . Now, Shir Zer-Krispil, from Bar-Ilan University in Israel, has developed perhaps the greatest technique of all: She genetically engineered flies to automatically ejaculate whenever they walk
7h
The Atlantic

Is It Too Late to Stop the Rise of Marijuana, Inc.?The marijuana wars are entering a new phase. The first phase, over whether or not to legalize the recreational use of cannabis, is over. The partisans of legalization have won the battle for public opinion. Soon, I suspect, marijuana legalization will be entrenched in federal law. At this point, to fight against legalization is to fight against the inevitable. The only question now is what form A
7h
The Economist: The world this week

Politics this week
7h
The Economist: The world this week

Business this week
7h
The Economist: The world this week

KAL's cartoon
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Lagoon Nebula (visible-light view)This mayhem is all happening at the heart of the Lagoon Nebula, a vast stellar nursery located 4,000 light-years away and visible in binoculars simply as a smudge of light with a bright core.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Running facial recognition on buildings to unlock architectural secretsAbout a decade ago, a modest update to Apple's iPhoto software showed me a new way to study architectural history. The February 2009 update added facial recognition, allowing users to tag friends and loved ones in their photos. After a few faces were tagged, the software would begin to offer suggestions.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Atoms may hum a tune from grand cosmic symphonyResearchers playing with a cloud of ultracold atoms uncovered behavior that bears a striking resemblance to the universe in microcosm. Their work, which forges new connections between atomic physics and the sudden expansion of the early universe, will be published in Physical Review X and highlighted by Physics.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smartphone app successfully promotes child car seat safetyA smartphone app designed to promote proper child car seat use among parents proved effective in a study led by researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

British pilots score high on burnout scale -- but still perform wellA study among British airline pilots shows that 20 percent of them have scores on a burnout scale that are comparable to those of people that are under burnout treatment. Surprisingly, the same study shows that only one of the 1147 pilots that participated, did not meet the performance standards at the regular flight simulator training. The authors argue that airline companies need to offer better
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Young victims of cyberbullying twice as likely to attempt suicide and self-harmNew research suggests that it is not just the victims of cyberbullying that are more vulnerable to suicidal behaviours, but the perpetrators themselves are also at higher risk of experiencing suicidal thoughts and behaviours.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More students report carrying guns in Chicago than New York or Los AngelesMore students report carrying guns in Chicago than in New York or Los Angeles, a new Northwestern Medicine study shows. The findings provide historical background for Chicago's 2016 spike in gun violence, which occurred mostly among youth and young adults.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chip-based blood test for multiple myeloma could make bone biopsies a relic of the pastA University of Kansas research effort has resulted in a low-cost, reliable blood test that uses a small plastic chip about the size of a credit card that can deliver the same diagnostic information as a bone biopsy -- but using a simple blood draw instead.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blowfly uses saliva to keep coolOn warm days the Oriental latrine blowfly (Chrysomya megacephala) keeps cool by moving a droplet of saliva repeatedly in and out of its buccal apparatus, or mouth, and then swallowing it.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Converting CO2 to store renewable energyYuvraj Birdja converted CO2 to formic acid to store energy in a sustainable way, with different catalysts. With this new knowledge, scientists are a step closer in industrially converting CO2 to chemicals and fuels. This can help reduce CO2 emission and the greenhouse effect.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

NASA planet hunter on its way to orbitNASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) launched on the first-of-its-kind mission to find worlds beyond our solar system, including some that could support life. Researchers will use spectroscopy to determine a planet's mass, density and atmospheric composition. Water, and other key molecules, in its atmosphere can give us hints about a planets' capacity to harbor life.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biofeedback relaxation app may help kids during medical proceduresA new study indicates that biofeedback-assisted relaxation may help manage pain and anxiety in children undergoing medical procedures.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Frog embryos can fully regrow their eyes after injury, debunking a belief that they can'tScientists have found that frog embryos can fully regrow their eyes after injuries, a breakthrough that may lead one day to the ability to orchestrate tissue regeneration in humans.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Synthetic cancer indicator: An artificial mole as an early warning systemResearchers have developed an early warning system for the four most common types of cancer. Should a tumor develop, a visible mole will appear on the skin.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cities and communities in the US losing 36 million trees a yearNationally, urban/community tree cover declined from 42.9 percent to 42.2 percent between 2009-2014. This translates to losing an estimated 36 million trees or approximately 175,000 acres of tree cover annually.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Drug combination targeting HSP90 and BRAF is safe and effective in advanced melanomaA team of researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center have been working to learn more about how melanoma becomes resistant to BRAF inhibitors in order to develop new treatment strategies. They tested whether a drug targeting heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) combined with the BRAF inhibitor vemurafenib could be a safe and potentially effective strategy to treat patients with melanoma. Their study was publish
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Energy conversion: Optical 'overtones' for solar cellsNIM scientists from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have found a new effect regarding the optical excitation of charge carriers in a solar semiconductor. It could facilitate the utilization of infrared light, which is normally lost in solar devices.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two Hubble views of the same stellar nurseryThese NASA Hubble Space Telescope images compare two diverse views of the roiling heart of a vast stellar nursery, known as the Lagoon Nebula. The images, one taken in visible and the other in infrared light, celebrate Hubble's 28th anniversary in space.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hubble celebrates 28th anniversary with a trip through the Lagoon NebulaThis colorful cloud of glowing interstellar gas is just a tiny part of the Lagoon Nebula, a vast stellar nursery. This nebula is a region full of intense activity, with fierce winds from hot stars, swirling chimneys of gas, and energetic star formation all embedded within a hazy labyrinth of gas and dust. Hubble used both its optical and infrared instruments to study the nebula, which was observed
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

GLUT5 fluorescent probe fingerprints cancer cellsGetting the results of a cancer biopsy can take up to two weeks. What if it could happen in 10 minutes? In two new papers, a team of chemists and engineers from Michigan Technological University lay the groundwork for cancer detection and diagnostics based on a fluorescent GLUT5 probe. Documented in the new research, a cancer's type and malignancy changes the GLUT5 activity in a cell, creating a d
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Rip Van Winkle' plants hide underground for up to 20 yearsScores of plant species are capable of living dormant under the soil for up to 20 years, enabling them to survive through difficult times, a new study has found.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UPV/EHU researchers account for the complex symptoms of Angelman syndromeA research group at the Faculty of Science and Technology of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country has managed to reliably identify the changes in the proteins altered by the UBE3A enzyme, responsible for Angelman syndrome. This disease causes problems in intellectual and motor development, epilepsy, difficulties in communication, and very few hours of sleep. Funding provided by the Angelma
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Judges as susceptible to gender bias as laypeople -- and sometimes more soA new study of trial court judges suggests these arbiters of the law sometimes let their personal ideas about gender roles influence their decision-making. The findings, which are part of a broader study of judicial behavior, revealed that the judges were just as likely as laypeople to discriminate -- in ways that harmed both men and women -- in decisions involving child custody or workplace discr
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What factors are associated with an increased risk of temporary hearing loss after attending an outdoor music festivalPeople who attended an outdoor music festival who did not use earplugs, used alcohol and/or drugs and were male were more likely to experience temporary hearing loss.
7h
The Atlantic

When Even Legal Residents Face DeportationIn the aftermath of World War II, the British government invited thousands of people from Caribbean countries in the British Commonwealth to immigrate to the United Kingdom and help address the war-torn country’s labor shortages. Now, nearly 70 years later, many of those same people, now elderly, are having their legal status in the country questioned and are facing deportation. Though the deport
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change could alter ocean food chains, leading to far fewer fish in the seaClimate change is rapidly warming the Earth and altering ecosystems on land and at sea that produce our food. In the oceans, most added heat from climate warming is still near the surface and will take centuries to work down into deeper waters. But as this happens, it will change ocean circulation patterns and make ocean food chains less productive.
7h
Ingeniøren

Forbud mod kamprobotter kræver en katastrofeUdbredelsen af autonome kamprobotter på slagmarken tegner til at blive afgjort af i hvor høj grad vi accepterer antallet af civile tab dræbt af algoritmer og AI.
7h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Why it's worth listening to people you disagree with | Zachary R. WoodWe get stronger, not weaker, by engaging with ideas and people we disagree with, says Zachary R. Wood. In an important talk about finding common ground, Wood makes the case that we can build empathy and gain understanding by engaging tactfully and thoughtfully with controversial ideas and unfamiliar perspectives. "Tuning out opposing viewpoints doesn't make them go away," Wood says. "To achieve pr
7h
Futurity.org

Weight might not be why obesity damages kneesThe gut microbiome could be the culprit behind arthritis and joint pain that plagues people who are obese, according to a new study. Osteoarthritis, a common side effect of obesity, is the greatest cause of disability in the US, affecting 31 million people. Sometimes called “wear and tear” arthritis, osteoarthritis in people who are obese was long assumed to simply be a consequence of undue stres
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Social values of masculinity and honor fuel contact with mafia-type groupsAdherence to masculine honour among young Italian men is a strong indication they are likely to engage in contact with the mafia-type groups, new research led by a University of Kent psychologist has shown.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spider silk key to new bone-fixing compositeUConn researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How bacteria could help turn a potent greenhouse gas into renewable fuelBacteria can become a workforce that helps redefine our energy sector.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two Hubble views of the same stellar nurseryThese NASA Hubble Space Telescope images compare two diverse views of the roiling heart of a vast stellar nursery, known as the Lagoon Nebula. The images, one taken in visible and the other in infrared light, celebrate Hubble's 28th anniversary in space.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using tooth sensors to detect diseaseAn interdisciplinary team of researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the School of Engineering & Applied Science is redefining the notion of a wisdom tooth.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Small changes in rainforests cause big damage to fish ecosystemsFreshwater fish diversity is harmed as much by selective logging in rainforests as they are by complete deforestation, according to a new study.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The US is stingier with child care and maternity leave than the rest of the worldIn most American families led by couples, both parents are in the workforce. At the same time, nearly 1 in 4 U.S. children are being raised by single moms.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In the surcharge blame game, companies tend to finish lastCompanies may bear the brunt of the blame for imposing surcharges on consumers, even when an outside agency foisted those charges on the company, according to an international team of researchers.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How does the brain learn categorization for sounds? The same way it does for imagesCategorization, or the recognition that individual objects share similarities and can be grouped together, is fundamental to how we make sense of the world. Previous research has revealed how the brain categorizes images. Now, researchers funded by the National Science Foundation have discovered that the brain categorizes sounds in much the same way.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pregnant moms and their offspring should limit added sugars in their diets to protect childhood cognitionA new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine has determined that poorer childhood cognition occurred, particularly in memory and learning, when pregnant women or their offspring consumed greater quantities of sugar. Substituting diet soda for sugar-sweetened versions during pregnancy also appeared to have negative effects. However, children's fruit consumption had beneficia
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Online ads help pregnant smokers quitNew research shows that online ads encouraging pregnant women to take up stop smoking support could be more effective than advice delivered in a clinical setting.The new study shows that commercial online advertising about cessation support could engage large numbers of women earlier in their pregnancies, and at a lower cost.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New ant species from Borneo explodes to defend its colonyWhen their colony is threatened by an intruder, workers of a newly discovered species of ant can actually tear their own body apart, in order to release toxins and either kill or hold off the enemy. Discovered by an interdisciplinary team of researchers from Austria, Thailand and Brunei, the new species is the first of the so-called 'exploding ants' to be described since 1935. The study is publish
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

"Warm Transplants" Save Livers and LivesA machine that maintains organs at body temperature may help alleviate shortages -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

We Can Make Large Dams More Friendly to the EnvironmentWe're unlikely to tear them all down, but math can help us figure out how to reduce their ecosystem impact -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scalable manufacturing process spools out strips of graphene for use in ultrathin membranesEngineers have developed a scalable manufacturing process that spools out strips of graphene for use in ultrathin membranes.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bike-share companies are transforming US cities – and they're just getting startedResidents of major U.S. cities are becoming used to seeing docks for bike sharing programs nestled into parking spaces or next to subway station entrances. Adorned with stylish branding and corporate sponsors' logos, these facilities are transforming transportation in cities across the country.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deepwater horizon—the lasting impact of America's largest oil spillOn April 20, 2010, the Deepwater Horizon oil platform operated by BP, was disconnecting from a recently discovered oil reservoir 50 miles south of Louisiana when a cascade of equipment malfunctions caused a high-pressure explosion, killing 11 rig workers. For two days the rig burned then sank. As response crews worked to extinguish surface fires, oil and gas from the broken drill pipe was spewing
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Optical 'overtones' for solar cellsNIM scientists from LMU Munich have found a new effect regarding the optical excitation of charge carriers in a solar semiconductor. It could facilitate the utilization of infrared light, which is normally lost in solar devices.
8h
cognitive science

The Impact of Handedness, Sex, and Cognitive Abilities on Left–Right Discrimination: A Behavioral Studysubmitted by /u/Wizs [link] [comments]
8h
Futurity.org

Growing liver cancer in the lab may speed up drug testingResearchers have developed a method for growing liver cancer cells in the lab. Liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma or HCC) is the fourth leading cause of cancer death worldwide. A major challenge in developing effective drugs for liver cancer is the inability of current pre-clinical tumor models to accurately replicate features of the cancer and the environment in the human body in which the t
8h
Ingeniøren

Illegalt elektronikskrot gemt i gamle danske biler havner i NigeriaKortlægning af en hidtil næsten ukendt importmetode afslører omfattende ulovlig indførelse af ødelagt eller forbudt elektronisk udstyr fra især EU – herunder Danmark.
8h
New on MIT Technology Review

True scale of Bitcoin ransomware extortion revealedBy tracking the Bitcoin accounts associated with ransomware, researchers have calculated how much cybercriminals extracted from their victims.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Atoms may hum a tune from grand cosmic symphonyResearchers playing with a cloud of ultracold atoms uncovered behavior that bears a striking resemblance to the universe in microcosm. Their work, which forges new connections between atomic physics and the sudden expansion of the early universe, was published April 19 in Physical Review X and featured in Physics.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows rapid rise in mass school shootings in the USMore people have died or been injured in mass school shootings in the US in the past 18 years than in the entire 20th century. In a new study published in Springer's Journal of Child and Family Studies, researchers have reviewed the history of mass school shootings in the US and found some alarming trends. Lead author Antonis Katsiyannis of Clemson University in the US, together with his colleague
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An eye toward regenerationA UNLV scientist and her team have found that frog embryos can fully regrow their eyes after injuries, a breakthrough that may lead one day to the ability to orchestrate tissue regeneration in humans.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Thousands of tons of e-waste is shipped illegally to Nigeria inside used vehiclesA two-year study into used electrical and electronic equipment (UEEE) sent to Nigeria, mostly from European ports, has revealed a continuing "severe problem" of non-compliance with international and national rules governing such shipments.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fossilized algae hold promise for improved food safety testingResearchers have used the fossilized remains of algae to take a key step toward being able to more sensitively detect harmful contaminants in food.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A scale-up nanoporous membrane centrifuge for reverse osmosis desalination without foulingRecent research published in a paper in TECHNOLOGY reported a novel design of a scale-up nanoporous membrane centrifuge (see Figure 1 (a), (b), (c), and (d)) proposed for reverse osmosis desalination, with proof of concept demonstrated through large scale molecular dynamics simulations.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers find new way of exploring the afterglow from the Big BangResearchers have developed a new way to improve our knowledge of the Big Bang by measuring radiation from its afterglow, called the cosmic microwave background radiation. The new results predict the maximum bandwidth of the universe, which is the maximum speed at which any change can occur in the universe.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Porous salts for fuel cellsScientists have developed a new class of crystalline porous organic salts with high proton conductivity for applications such as proton-exchange membranes for fuel cells. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, polar channels that contain water play a critical role in proton conduction. At about 60 °C and high humidity, their proton conductivity is one of the best yet found in a porous mater
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

Recent Ocean Heat Waves Have "Forever" Altered Great Barrier ReefAt least 30 percent of corals died off in 2016, and more extreme heat is likely in store -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Big Think

Got a question for a real NASA astronomer? Ask it here!NASA astronomer Michelle Thaller is coming back to Big Think to answer YOUR questions! Here's all you need to know to submit your science-related inquiries. Read More
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Small changes in rainforests cause big damage to fish ecosystemsUsing lasers, researchers have connected, arranged and merged artificial cells, paving the way for networks of artificial cells acting as tissues.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Peace agreements have always only succeeded with genuine trust'Gifts, peace banquets and reconciliation rituals: according to historians, peace agreements have historically been reached if, above all, specific trust could be established between opponents.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blowfly uses saliva to keep coolThe insect moves droplet of saliva in and out of its mouth to promote evaporation and lower body temperature, according to study by researchers in Brazil.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Does concussion recovery and symptom severity differ between men and women?A new study comparing male and female athletes examined whether there are clear sex-related differences in post-concussion symptom severity and length of recovery.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Feather replacement or parental care? Migratory birds desert their offspring to moltA new study shows that when feather replacement and parental care overlap in time, migratory songbirds make a striking trade-off; they desert their offspring, leaving their mates to provide all remaining parental care.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Electrochemical tuning of single layer materials relies on defectsPerfection is not everything, according to an international team of researchers whose 2-D materials study shows that defects can enhance a material's physical, electrochemical, magnetic, energy and catalytic properties.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why traffic accidents with cyclists are becoming increasingly more commonThe bicycle is a cheap and ecological way of transport, and it is also a healthy option. This is why the number of cyclists in cities has increased in recent years, but so has the accident rate. A study confirms that these incidents are caused by a combination of inadequate infrastructures and risk behavior on the part of drivers and cyclists.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medical doctors remain trapped in their substance-use disordersFear of dismissal or of losing their authorization keeps medical doctors trapped in their substance-use disorders, and instead of seeking help they attempt self-treatment. This is shown by a new study from Aarhus University.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Age affects how we predict and respond to stress at homeA recent study finds that older adults are better than younger adults at anticipating stressful events at home -- but older adults are not as good at using those predictions to reduce the adverse impacts of the stress.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study predicts 2018 flu vaccine will have 20 percent efficacyA Rice University study of 6,610 human flu sequences predicts that this fall's flu vaccine will likely have the same reduced efficacy against the dominant circulating strain of influenza A as the vaccine given in 2016 and 2017 due to viral mutations related to vaccine production in eggs.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study calls for industry legislation to build a better future in developing countriesNew research from the University of Portsmouth has called for stronger industry legislation in developing countries to help fight business monopolies reducing competition.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New ant species from Borneo explodes to defend its colonyAmongst the countless fascinating plants and animals inhabiting the tropical rainforests of Southeast Asia, there are the spectacular "exploding ants", a group of arboreal, canopy dwelling ants nicknamed for their unique defensive behaviour.
8h
The Atlantic

Zama Is a Surreal Satire of ColonialismDon Diego de Zama (Daniel Giménez Cacho) stands on the beach in the opening shot of Zama with a preening air of authority. Wearing a tri-corner hat and clutching a ceremonial sword, he casts a look down at the lapping waves as if pondering whether he could even order them to turn back. But there’s a frayed quality to the scene. Zama’s regalia looks faded and droopy, his brow is sweaty, and the be
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Developing oral medicines that work more efficientlyResearchers at the University of Minnesota and The Dow Chemical Company have joined forces to tackle one of the biggest challenges in health care—how to get life-saving medicines to work faster and better with fewer side effects.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why you should talk to your children about Cambridge AnalyticaFormer Cambridge Analytica employee Christopher Wylie blew the whistle last month. He revealed the data analytics agency harvested Facebook data from more than 50 million individual profiles, matched these with electoral rolls, and then devised an algorithm that can use this data to predict and influence voting behaviours.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Musk says that SpaceX will use a giant party balloon to bring an upper stage backWhen Elon Musk of SpaceX tweets something interesting, it generates a wave of excitement. So when he tweeted recently that SpaceX might be working on a way to retrieve upper stages of their rockets, it set off a chain of intrigued responses.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The recycling crisis in Australia—easy solutions to a hard problemIpswich residents have been told their recycling waste will now be dumped into landfill because it is too expensive for the local council to recycle.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How police underestimate break-ins as gateway crimes for sex predatorsConventional thinking has suggested for years that predatory offences like exhibitionism or actual sexual assaults are typically the early crimes committed by future serial sex predators.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shaping proteins to understand chaperone-related diseasesChaperones are a set of proteins that are specialised to assist proteins in the human body. They help proteins to fold to the right shape and protect them from adapting wrong shapes. The research group of Alireza Mashaghi, assistant professor and principal investigator at LACDR, investigates these structures. Vahid Satarifard, graduate student in the research group: "More than fifty diseases have
8h
Futurity.org

Implant would put a mole on your skin to warn of tumorA prototype early warning system for the four most common types of cancer makes a visible mole appear on the skin when calcium levels indicate a tumor has developed. Many cancer patients only receive a diagnosis after a tumor has developed extensively. This often significantly reduces the chance of recovery: the cure rate for prostate cancer is 32 percent and only 11 percent for colon cancer. The
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Far-red fluorescent silk can kill harmful bacteria as biomedical and environmental remedyA silk hybrid material attacks bacteria when illuminated by a green light, thanks to a far-red fluorescent protein researchers transferred to its genetic makeup.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Porous salts for fuel cellsScientists have developed a new class of crystalline porous organic salts with high proton conductivity for applications such as proton-exchange membranes for fuel cells. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, polar channels that contain water play a critical role in proton conduction. At about 60 °C and high humidity, their proton conductivity is one of the best yet found in a porous mater
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Decision-making predicts future drug addiction in recreational usersActivity in decision-making brain regions of people who use recreational stimulants predicts who will discontinue use and who will develop a drug use disorder, according to a new study led by Martin Paulus, Ph.D., of Laureate Institute of Brain Research, Tulsa, Okla.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study calls for industry legislation to build a better future in developing countriesNew research from the University of Portsmouth has called for stronger industry legislation in developing countries to help fight business monopolies reducing competition.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weight-loss surgery improves lives and saves moneyA new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) study indicates that weight-loss surgery is cost-effective over 10 years and can save healthcare systems money over a lifetime.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows rapid rise in mass school shootings in the USMore people have died or been injured in mass school shootings in the US in the past 18 years than in the entire 20th century. In a new study published in Springer's Journal of Child and Family Studies, researchers have reviewed the history of mass school shootings in the US and found some alarming trends.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bedside art therapy decreases pain and anxiety in patients with cancerA brief bedside visual art intervention (BVAI) facilitated by art educators improved mood and reduced pain and anxiety in a study of inpatients with hematological cancers.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study examines sperm production in men with testicular cancerIn a study of men with testicular cancer, increasing tumor size relative to testis size was linked with a reduced ability to produce sperm.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

DOR protein deficiency favors the development of obesityAccording to a recent study published by researchers at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) and CIBERDEM in Nature Cell Biology, deficiency in the protein DOR (also called TP53INP2) stimulates the generation of new adipose cells (which store fat) and leads to a less harmful kind of obesity.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Effort seeks to increase the number of trained rheumatology nurse practitioners and physician assistantsDue to an aging population and increasing prevalence of rheumatic disease, there are growing demands on clinicians who specialize in rheumatology.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Which pain medication is safest for arthritis patients?In a recent Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics study, arthritis patients taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for pain plus a stomach acid-reducing medicine called esomeprazole had infrequent gastrointestinal side effects.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Coronary heart disease: DMP could be extended by two topicsAlmost all health care aspects need to be updated. The already third search update for guidelines shows that their number and quality have increased notably in 10 years.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Erectile dysfunction drugs may help treat many other conditionsA new British Journal of Pharmacology review examines how phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitors, which were originally approved to treat erectile dysfunction, are finding clinical uses for a wide variety of conditions.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dartmouth College brings smartwatch innovations to CHI2018The latest developmental research seeks to increase the functionality of wearables while also adding to the overall user experience.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals how antiepileptic drug causes problems during pregnancyDuring pregnancy, use of the antiepileptic drug valproic acid has been associated with worse outcomes -- including fetal loss, impaired growth, major congenital malformations, increased risk of developmental problems, and autism -- compared with all other antiepileptic drugs.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Media alert: New articles in The CRISPR JournalThis press release is issued on behalf of The CRISPR Journal, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert Inc. delivering outstanding research and commentary on all aspects of CRISPR and gene editing research. The Journal is dedicated to validating and publishing research in CRISPR biology, technology and genome editing, and providing a forum for commentary and debate of key policy, regulatory,
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers use CRISPR to edit DNA outside of the cell for the first timeScientists at Christiana Care Health System's Gene Editing Institute have developed a potentially breakthrough CRISPR gene-editing tool. It could allow researchers to take fragments of DNA extracted from human cells, put them into a test tube, and quickly and precisely engineer multiple changes to the genetic code, according to a new study published today in the CRISPR Journal.
8h
Viden

Sælg selv dine data, så andre ikke gør detNy EU-lov giver almindelige borgere mulighed for at kontrollere, hvad virksomheder gør med deres viden om dig
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Your next pilot could be drone softwareWould you get on a plane that didn't have a human pilot in the cockpit? Half of air travelers surveyed in 2017 said they would not, even if the ticket was cheaper. Modern pilots do such a good job that almost any air accident is big news, such as the Southwest engine disintegration on April 17.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How plastic-eating bacteria actually work—a chemist explainsThe plastic bottles we throw away today will be around for hundreds of years. It's one of the key reasons why the mounting plastic pollution problem, which is having a deadly effect on marine life, is so serious.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Diamond-like carbon is formed differently to what was believed – machine learning enables development of new modelResearchers at Aalto University and Cambridge University have made a significant breakthrough in computational science by combining atomic-level modeling and machine learning. For the first time, the method has been used to realistically model how an amorphous material is formed at the atomic level: that is, a material that does not have a regular crystalline structure. The approach is expected to
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Where is the universe's missing matter?Astronomers using ESA's XMM-Newton space observatory have probed the gas-filled haloes around galaxies in a quest to find 'missing' matter thought to reside there, but have come up empty-handed – so where is it?
8h
Dagens Medicin

Patienters sikkerhed i fare: Holbæk Sygehus får fem påbudStyrelsen for Patientsikkerhed kræver, at Holbæk Sygehus igangsætter en række initiativer med henblik på at forbedre patientsikkerheden. Vicedirektør siger, at ledelsen længe har været i fuld gang med at løse problemerne, bl.a. ved at nedbringe antallet af patienter.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tech giants are battling it out to supply the global internet—here's why that's a problemThe US Federal Communications Commission last month granted Elon Musk's SpaceX permission to launch 4,425 satellites that will provide affordable high speed broadband internet to consumers.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Machine-learning software predicts behavior of bacteriaIn a first for machine-learning algorithms, a new piece of software developed at Caltech can predict behavior of bacteria by reading the content of a gene. The breakthrough could have significant implications for our understanding of bacterial biochemistry and for the development of new medications.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Modern science shows Roman wheat farming advice was highly accuratePlant biologists from The University of Western Australia have made an important discovery about rising temperatures and wheat crops—and subsequently learned that the Romans suspected the effect more than 2000 years ago.
9h
Feed: All Latest

Motorola Moto G6 and Moto E5: Price, Specs, Release DateMoto G6 Play PhonesWith the Moto G6 and E5, the king of budget phones has no plans to abdicate its throne in 2018.
9h
Feed: All Latest

Physics Explains Why Braves Fans Can’t Beat the FreezeA spandex-clad superhero keeps beating Atlanta Braves fans...even when they have a huge head start.
9h
Science-Based Medicine

How rabid dog saliva became an approved and endorsed remedy in CanadaA recent blog post by a British Columbia naturopath is raising questions from health professionals about the practice of naturopathy, and the use of homeopathic remedies to treat children with serious behaviour problems.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

If (Virtual) Reality Feels Almost Right, It's Exactly WrongHow adding touch to VR can lead to an “uncanny valley” of sensations—and what we can do about it -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Big Think

What is the average tax refund?With tax season in full swing, how much money can you get back from the government? Would it be fairer if everyone paid the same rate? Read More
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Skin cancers linked with reduced risk of Alzheimer's diseasePrevious studies have demonstrated a decreased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in individuals with various cancers, including non-melanoma skin cancers (including squamous cell cancers and basal cell cancers).
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Social values of masculinity and honor fuel contact with mafia-type groupsAdherence to masculine honor among young Italian men is a strong indication they are likely to engage in contact with the mafia-type groups, new research led by a University of Kent psychologist has shown.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tai Chi improves brain metabolism and muscle energetics in older adultsA new Journal of Neuroimaging study provides insights into the biochemical mechanisms by which Tai Chi -- a mind-body exercise -- may provide both physical and psychological benefits.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biofeedback relaxation app may help kids during medical proceduresA new Pain Practice study indicates that biofeedback-assisted relaxation may help manage pain and anxiety in children undergoing medical procedures.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Molecular motor: Four states of rotationWith the help of ultrafast spectroscopy and quantum mechanical calculations, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have characterized the complete rotational cycle of the light-driven, chemical motor molecule hemithioindigo.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Depression during and after pregnancy may affect children's developmentMaternal depressive symptoms during pregnancy, in the first year postpartum, and in early childhood were linked with poorer child neurodevelopment in a recent Depression & Anxiety study.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How can medical marijuana benefit older adults?Managing symptoms such as pain, nausea, and psychiatric illness can be challenging as people age.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel discoveries on aggressive NK-cell leukemia pave the way for new treatmentsInternational research consortium led by researchers from the University of Helsinki, Finland, discovered new information related to a rare form of leukemia called aggressive NK-cell leukemia. Potential new treatment options were found which are highly warranted as currently this disease usually leads to rapid death of patients.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers use CRISPR to edit DNA outside of the cell for the first timeScientists at Christiana Care Health System's Gene Editing Institute have developed a potentially breakthrough CRISPR gene-editing tool. It could allow researchers to take fragments of DNA extracted from human cells, put them into a test tube, and quickly and precisely engineer multiple changes to the genetic code, according to a new study published today in the CRISPR Journal.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When our view of the world is distorted by algorithmsAlgorithms are used to personalize our newsfeed on social media. But the risk is that the points of view we are presented with become increasingly limited and extreme. EPFL researchers have developed a solution that would make users' personalized content more balanced, and their project has already generated interest among human rights campaigners.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Corporations with strong reputations don't recover as quickly from PR crises as previously thought, study showsFor many years, the conventional wisdom held that if a corporation had a strong prior reputation, it could recover more quickly from a public relations crisis. New research from the University of Kansas has found that may no longer be the case.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Field guide highlights the need to conserve pristine watersA new colour publication A Field Guide to the Freshwater Fishes of the Kimberley has been launched, detailing the Kimberley's fascinating freshwater fishes, many unique to the region, and including newly described species.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In pursuit of perfect chemistry—a vision for unifying catalysisSeveral fields of research have sprung up around the chemical drivers, called catalysts, at work in many industrial processes – including those that boost the production of fuels, fertilizers, and foods. These research efforts have developed more useful catalysts that accelerate chemical reactions and make the reactions more efficient without being consumed in the process.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bundling big science tools to shed light on flexible proteinsNearly a dozen scientists across Oak Ridge National Laboratory are teaming with medical researchers and leveraging ORNL's biggest science tools to solve a modern-day biology grand challenge: unlocking the secrets of disordered proteins. These flexible molecules are believed to constitute as much as half of the proteins in the human body yet are poorly understood because we have not found a way to
9h
The Atlantic

The Episode That Captured the Best and Worst of ScandalRomantic intrigue, White House drama, fancy coats, vintage wine, and the melodrama of the morally bankrupt—ABC’s Scandal has all the intoxicating elements of escapist television. Inspired by the real-life crisis manager Judy Smith, the show has followed Olivia Pope (Kerry Washington), a Washington, D.C., political fixer running her own firm while navigating a tumultuous long-term affair with the
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New cancer monitoring technology worth its weight in goldA new blood test using gold nanoparticles could soon give oncologists an early and more accurate prognosis of how cancer treatment is progressing and help guide the on-going therapy of patients.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

California's next major earthquake could cause $100 billion in losses, strand 20,000 in elevatorsWhat will happen when the next big earthquake hits northern California? A team of researchers including CU Boulder Professor Keith Porter will explore that question at an event today marking the anniversary of the 1906 temblor that leveled much of San Francisco.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Invasive bullfrogs linked to spread of deadly fungus in western USScientists have uncovered a strong historical link between the introduction of the American bullfrog into the western United States and the emergence of the deadly chytrid fungus, a pathogen that has caused declines and extinctions of amphibians around the world.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers use diamond impurities to see on the microscopic scaleIt's not often that you see 50-year-old equipment in a modern physics laboratory, let alone find it at the center of cutting-edge research. But then, most such labs aren't run by Ronald Walsworth.
9h
Popular Science

Neolithic surgeons might have practiced their skull-drilling techniques on cowsScience Trepanation may not have been limited to humans. Bovine brain surgery is pretty rare. So if you were visiting the Neolithic dig site at Champ-Durand in France and you found a roughly 5,200 year-old cow skull with a…
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study investigates whether Hans Asperger actively assisted the Nazi euthanasia programPediatrician Hans Asperger, after whom the condition of Asperger syndrome was named, actively cooperated with the Nazi regime, according to a study published in the open-access journal Molecular Autism.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers find new way of exploring the afterglow from the Big BangResearchers have developed a new way to improve our knowledge of the Big Bang by measuring radiation from its afterglow, called the cosmic microwave background radiation. The new results predict the maximum bandwidth of the universe, which is the maximum speed at which any change can occur in the universe.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Swapping cars for shared bicycles would avoid up to 73 deaths per yearA new study underscores the health and economic benefits of the 12 largest European bicycle-sharing systems.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cancer: Tumor transition statesResearchers at the Université libre de Bruxelles define for the first time the tumor transition states occurring during cancer progression and identify the tumor cell populations responsible for metastasis.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diamond-like carbon is formed differently to what was believed -- machine learning enables development of new modelResearchers at Aalto University and Cambridge University have made a significant breakthrough in computational science by combining atomic-level modelling and machine learning. For the first time, the method has been used to realistically model how an amorphous material is formed at the atomic level: that is, a material that does not have a regular crystalline structure. The approach is expected t
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fossilized algae hold promise for improved food safety testingResearchers have used the fossilized remains of algae to take a key step toward being able to more sensitively detect harmful contaminants in food.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UC San Diego study: Anyone can be an innovatorInnovators aren't born, they can be made, according to recent research from the University of California San Diego's School of Global Policy and Strategy.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Salt boosts creation of 2-D materialsSalt simplifies the process of making novel two-dimensional materials. As reported in Nature, simulations by Rice University scientists show how labs in Singapore, China and Taiwan were able to make dozens of 2-D compounds, including many novel materials.
9h
Science | The Guardian

Destruction at the ancient site of Mari in SyriaThe ancient city was one of the first archaeological sites to be occupied by Islamic State. Now new photos are revealing the fate of this important site as archaeologists continue to count the cultural cost of Isis Three weeks ago, the Syrian antiquities directorate released new photos showing another devastated archaeological site. Outside Syria the news has received fairly limited press attenti
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Light-controlled current transport by charged atoms demonstrated for the first timeLight makes some materials conductive in a previously unforeseen way. In silicon solar cells, electrons flow when the sun shines. However, scientists at the Stuttgart-based Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research have now come up with a surprise: in a special perovskite, another material used for solar cells, light not only releases electrons, but also electrically charged atoms, known as io
9h
Dagens Medicin

Iltrobot skal forbedre sikkerheden for KOL-patienterLedende overlæge på Medicinsk enhed på Hvidovre Hospital, Ejvind Frausing, begyndte i sidste uge at teste den iltrobot, han siden 2011 har haft under udvikling. De første resultater ser lovende ud, og han forventer, at robotten vil øge patientsikkerheden, forkorte indlæggelsestiden og frigøre sygeplejerskeressourcer på de medicinske afdelinger landet over.
9h
Dagens Medicin

Danmarks første professor i tobaksforebyggelse vil råbe politikerne opDanmarks første professor i tobaksforebyggelse, Charlotta Pisinger, ser sin nye stilling som en mulighed for at få politikerne op af stolene. For magthaverne skal råbes op, hvis Danmark skal blive et røgfrit land, mener hun. Et af de steder, hun vil sætte ind, er at gøre rygestoptilbud mere tilgængelige for KOL-patienter.
9h
Futurity.org

Devices ease limitations for doctors with disabilitiesA new device could help doctors with disabilities overcome the challenges of performing standard patient examinations. Instead of using a traditional stethoscope or otoscope to examine a patient, Molly Fausone, a physician-in-training at the University of Michigan, uses a long, flexible wire with a camera at its tip. A live video feed plays diagnostic information back on her cell phone. After a s
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Innovations for investigating the plant tree of lifeAdvances in genome sequencing are providing vast amounts of genetic information that researchers are using to explore the plant family tree. This special issue showcases cutting-edge techniques that are providing solutions to challenges in the study of evolution of species (or phylogenetics); issue highlights include an overview of current options for phylogenomic studies, a new natural language p
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Policy driver of soil organic carbon accumulation in Chinese croplands identifiedScientists from the Institute of Soil Science and collaborators conducted a comprehensive study that determined changes in SOC over the last three decades and identified the dominant agronomic, economic and policy drivers behind these changes and their implications for future carbon sequestration in Chinese croplands.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research: Eyes of adolescents could reveal risk of cardiovascular diseaseNew research has found that poorer well-being or 'health-related quality of life' (HRQoL) in adolescence could be an indicator of future cardiovascular disease risk. Researchers at The Westmead Institute for Medical Research found that adolescents with poorer scores in the social and mental well-being domains of HRQoL have structural changes in their retinal blood vessels that could be associated
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists identify unique binding mechanism of antifreeze moleculeAntifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs), produced by polar fishes, are known as the inhibitor of ice growing while its mechanism has remained a mystery. Using molecular simulations, scientists have identified a unique molecular binding mechanism that helps keep non-mammalian creatures in sub-zero temperatures from freezing. The finding has potential future applications for better preserving food and biol
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientific guidelines for using cannabis to treat stress, anxiety and depressionIn a first-of-a-kind study, Washington State University scientists examined how peoples' self-reported levels of stress, anxiety and depression were affected by smoking different strains and quantities of cannabis at home.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The bugs in your gut could make you weak in the kneesScientists have long thought that osteoarthritis in people who are obese was a consequence of excess wear and tear on joints, but a new study in JCI Insight suggests that the microbiome is the culprit. The study shows that a high fat diet (like the Western diet) can alter gut microbes, increase inflammation throughout the body, and speed deterioration of joints. An interesting twist: a common diet
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Thousands of tons of e-waste is shipped illegally to Nigeria inside used vehiclesA study into used electrical and electronic equipment sent to Nigeria, mostly from Europe, reveals a continuing 'severe problem' of non-compliance with rules governing such shipments. Of roughly 60,000 metric tons sent from other countries in 2015 and 2016, at least 15,400 tons was non-functioning e-waste, exports/imports of which are illegal.Almost 70 percent -- 41,500 tons -- arrived inside vehi
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A scale-up nanoporous membrane centrifuge for reverse osmosis desalination without foulingA novel design of a scale-up nanoporous membrane centrifuge (see Figure 1 (a), (b), (c), and (d)) is proposed for reverse osmosis desalination, and the proof of concept is demonstrated through large scale molecular dynamics simulations reported in this article.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Algorithms reveal changes in stereotypes, according to new Stanford researchNew Stanford research shows that, over the past century, linguistic changes in gender and ethnic stereotypes correlated with major social movements and demographic changes in the US Census data.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An eye toward regenerationUNLV scientist Kelly Tseng, Ph.D. and her team have found that frog embryos can fully regrow their eyes after injuries, a breakthrough that may lead one day to the ability to orchestrate tissue regeneration in humans.
9h
New Scientist - News

Flies cool themselves down by constantly blowing bubbles of spitBlowflies repeatedly blow bubbles of saliva, which look like brown bubble gum – and it turns out this odd behaviour helps them keep cool
9h
Feed: All Latest

Virtual Reality Takes a Political Turn in the Trump EraFrom climate change to reforming white supremacists: At this year's Tribeca Film Festival, it's about the medium and the message.
9h
Science | The Guardian

Did neolithic man practise surgery on cows?Archaeologists in Champ-Durand, France, have found a cow skull with a small round hole cut into it A stone age cow skull boasting a hole the size of a biscuit has been hailed as a first by archeologists, who say the gouge is the earliest evidence of either a veterinary attempt or animal experimentation. Human skulls from around the world, some dating as far back as almost 10,000 years ago , have
9h
New on MIT Technology Review

Facebook still wants to gobble up your dataFacebook Privacy GDPR
9h
Dagens Medicin

SAMMENHÆNG ‘Sundhedsklynger’ – hvordan i praksis?PLO er meget enig i de problemstillinger, som får tre prominente debattører til stille forslaget om at skabe ‘sundhedsklynger’. Men hvilken form for ledelse forestiller de sig egentlig? Det er ikke klart. Til gengæld vil vi gerne være med til at udfordre den nuværende struktur.
10h
Dagens Medicin

FEJL Når tillid er livsvigtigTilliden og respekten mellem alle parter er i sidste ende er afgørende for, om om sundhedsvæsenet effektivt kan lære af sine fejl, skriver en far til en dreng, som døde af meningitis.
10h
Dagens Medicin

SUNDHEDSVÆSENET Bent Hansen, der er nok at kommentere påEn erfaren læge vil gerne deltage i demaskering af de sundhedspolitiske aktører og deres bevæggrunde. Der er nok at skrive om.
10h
Dagens Medicin

StikpillenEr der lægemangel i Danmark?
10h
Dagens Medicin

Kommuner protesterer mod flytning af misbrugsbehandling til regionerKommuner er stærkt bekymret over regeringens plan, hvor regionerne skal overtage misbrugsbehandlingen af borgere med en psykisk lidelse. Danske Regioner forstår ikke bekymringerne.
10h
Latest Headlines | Science News

A hole in an ancient cow’s skull could have been surgery practiceBefore performing skull operations on people, ancient surgeons may have rehearsed on cows.
10h
NYT > Science

Frenchman Is First in World to Get 2 Full Face TransplantsJérôme Hamon, a bookseller who has a genetic disease, underwent a second transplant after his body rejected the first because he had taken an antibiotic for a cold.
10h
NYT > Science

As Opioid Prescriptions Fall, Prescriptions for Drugs to Treat Addiction RiseNew data suggests progress in efforts to curb the epidemic but raises questions about whether tightened prescribing may be leading some people to heroin and fentanyl.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

Industrial Steel Method from 1968; Industrial Candy in 1868Innovation and discovery as chronicled in Scientific American -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
The Atlantic

The Post-Millennial Generation Is HereT o get a job at the Museum of Ice Cream, hopeful future employees show up at the weekly casting call, Tuesdays at noon. They head to the former Savings Union Bank in San Francisco’s financial district, where pink banners announce, in minimalist font, the name of the employer-to-be. Inside, there are giant animal cookies on carousel mounts. Gardens of gummies. A minty scent wafting through a jung
10h
Feed: All Latest

Can This Man Help Uber Recover From the Travis Kalanick Era?CEO Dara Khosrowshahi champions everything Uber once rejected: caution, discipline, and tact. Can he reform Silicon Valley's most audacious company?
10h
Dagens Medicin

Hvorfor kæmper I ikke noget mere for medlemmernes arbejdsvilkår?OK18: Det kan undre, at organisationerne ikke i større grad bruger overenskomstforhandlingerne til at kæmpe for at sikre deres medlemmer bedre arbejdsvilkår. Faglig stolthed og empati betyder for mange mere end den sidste hundredlap i lønforhøjelse. Det er også vigtigt for arbejdsgiverne at levere kvalitet, og derfor er vinderen af overenskomstforhandlingerne ikke den part, som har klemt de sidste
10h
Dagens Medicin

Beskyttelse af data er en grundrettighedI jagten på at dele og bruge patientdata så meget som muligt glemmer dele af branchen hurtigt, at der også er en bagside af medaljen. "Vi bliver hurtigt forført af alle de data, vi kan indsamle," lyder det fra jurist.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Her er genomcentrets samtykkeerklæringDer har været heftig debat om patienternes rettigheder og rammerne for samtykke, når Nationalt Genom Center kommer til verden. Nu har regeringen fremlagt et udkast til en samtykkeerklæring.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Human breeding practices found to be likely reason for lack of paternal DNA diversity in modern horsesA team of researchers from across Europe has found that human breeding practices, particularly during the Iron Age, are likely the cause of a lack of variability in paternally inherited DNA in modern horses. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes the DNA study they undertook to better understand the genetic history of the modern horse and what they f
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

How Seashells Take ShapeMathematical modeling reveals the mechanical forces that guide the development of mollusk spirals, spines and ribs -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
cognitive science

Old school cogsci paper argues that counter-intuitive probability problems like Monty Hall may only be tricky because the questions are poorly wordedsubmitted by /u/SweetDoggoPresident [link] [comments]
10h
The Atlantic

The GOP's Problems Are Bigger Than TrumpConventional wisdom holds that Donald Trump has taken over the Republican Party. That’s been the conclusion of articles in The New Yorker , Mother Jones , New York , The Washington Post , The Hill , Politico , Rolling Stone , The New York Times , The Telegraph , USA Today , Time , the New York Post , The Boston Globe , and beyond. Most recently, the PBS show Frontline titled an episode “ Trump’s
10h
Popular Science

How to purge all your search historiesDIY Asking for a friend... Your browser makes it relatively easy to purge your search history, but many sites keep their own records of your past queries. Here's how to delete that data.
10h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Sad Clownfish?Climate change is bleaching sea anemones, and it's stressing out the clownfish that live in them.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New insight into the never-ending arms-race between viruses and their hostsViruses have been infecting all forms of life – from single-celled bacteria to humans – for as long as there has been life on Earth. Because of this, ancient mechanisms of virus resistance co-exist in our bodies alongside our more-recently evolved and highly sophisticated adaptive immune system.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers find that swarms of tiny organisms mix nutrients in ocean watersSwarms of tiny oceanic organisms known collectively as zooplankton may have an outsize influence on their environment. New research at Stanford shows that clusters of centimeter-long individuals, each beating tiny feathered legs, can, in aggregate, create powerful currents that may mix water over hundreds of meters in depth.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Ny teknologi kan sikre udveksling af patientdataPatientdata skal i højere grad samles frem for at blive sendt rundt mellem aktørerne. Professor Carsten Obel og et kor af eksperter mener, at vi har de teknologiske muligheder til at sikre udvekslingen af patientdata – til gengæld mangler den overordnede mission.
11h
Ingeniøren

Dankortet flytter ind i dig: Betal med din fingerNu behøver du ikke huske andet end din finger, når du skal betale. Nets og Fingopay er klar med en løsning, der scanner blodkarrene i din finger for at modtage dine betalingsoplysninger.
11h
Feed: All Latest

The Clever Vine-Like Robot That Grows and Steers With AirVinebot is part of the first generation of advanced “soft robots,” which promise to go where no traditional robot can tread—literally.
11h
Feed: All Latest

Biotech Gets Some Silicon Valley Shine at Illumina’s New CampusWith tons of amenities, the DNA sequencing giant hopes to attract the Bay Area's top life science talent.
11h
Feed: All Latest

Minds Is the Anti-Facebook That Pays You For Your TimeFacebook Data PrivacyIn the wake of privacy scandals, Facebook users are newly realizing their data makes the company rich. What if platforms paid them for their contributions?
11h
The Atlantic

The Female Persuasion Should Be a Literary Breakout. Will It Be?L ast November, I went to a swanky party to celebrate the release of advance copies of The Female Persuasion , Meg Wolitzer’s 11th novel. Bartenders created bespoke cocktails named after sections of the book; the evening’s highlight was a public conversation between Wolitzer and New York magazine’s Rebecca Traister. The mood was festive verging on jubilant. The Harvey Weinstein scandal had broken
11h
New Scientist - News

Doctors who prescribe homeopathy ignore other medical guidelinesFamily doctors who offer homeopathy - not recommended by the NHS - are also more likely to practice other bad habits such as the overuse of antibiotics
11h
Live Science

Why Is a Train Filled with Human Poop Stuck Outside This Alabama Town?A train filled with smelly human excrement from New York City has been stranded in a small Alabama town for two months, according to news sources.
11h
Dagens Medicin

Skyld, straf, tillid – og Hans og Matthias
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Far-red fluorescent silk can kill harmful bacteria as biomedical and environmental remedyA silk hybrid material attacks bacteria when illuminated by a green light, thanks to a far-red fluorescent protein researchers transferred to its genetic makeup.
11h
Science : NPR

After Alert On Russian Hacks, Bigger Push To Protect Power GridHomeland Security and the FBI have blamed Russia for a series of cyberattacks on U.S. power plants. The industry is stepping up efforts to protect the electric grid. (Image credit: PJM Interconnection)
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Graphene changes elastic properties depending on applied forceA group of scientists, including specialists from Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITF), has described a universal characteristic in which many unique graphene properties are "hidden." Abnormal graphene behavior can be fully characterised by the Poisson ratio, which determines a material's capability to shrink or extend in a transverse dimension. Moreover,scientists found key factors that
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Peptide induces chirality evolution in a single gold nanoparticleFor the first time, scientists have successfully created optically active, chiral gold nanoparticles using amino acids and peptides. Many chemicals significant to life have mirror-image twins (left-handed and right-handed structures), a characteristic that is conventionally called chirality. This study describes how chirality, which is typically observed in organic molecules, can be extended to th
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Electromagnetic wizardry: Wireless power transfer enhanced by backward signalAn international research team including scientists from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and ITMO University has proposed a way to increase the efficiency of wireless power transfer over long distances and tested it with numerical simulations and experiments. To achieve this, they beamed power between two antennas, one of which was excited with a back-propagating signal of specific
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ultrafast electron oscillation and dephasing monitored by attosecond light sourceCollaborative research team of Prof. Jun Takeda and Associate Prof. Ikufumi Katayama in the laboratory of Yokohama National University (YNU) and Nippon Telegraph and Telephone (NTT) have reported petahertz electron oscillation. The periodic electron oscillations of 667-383 attoseconds (10-18 of a second) is the fastest that has ever been measured in direct time-dependent spectroscopy in solid-stat
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unique protein is a vulnerability in the malaria parasiteThe malaria parasite is highly dependent on a unique protein for infecting new mosquitoes. This protein could be a target for the development of new drugs. It was discovered recently by researchers from Radboud university medical center and colleagues from the Humboldt University of Berlin. The results were published in Cell Reports on April 18.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Building crystals on a very hot surfaceA KAUST chemical reactor that operates at extremely high temperatures could improve the efficiency and economy of a commonly used process in the semiconductor industry, with benefits for Saudi Arabia's chemical industry.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Writing and deleting magnets with lasersScientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia have found a way to write and delete magnets in an alloy using a laser beam, a surprising effect. The reversibility of the process opens up new possibilities in the fields of material processing, optical technology, and data storage.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Charge density wave inhomogeneity and pseudogap in 1T-TiSe21T-TiSe2 has been widely studied in the past few decades as one of the typical charge density wave (CDW) materials. Recently, superconductivity was realized in this system through Cu intercalation, pressure or electric gating, forming a dome-shaped superconductivity phase diagram. Owing to this resemblance to high -Tc cuprates, much attention has been paid to 1T-TiSe2 to understand the superconduc
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How does the Pacific Walker circulation respond to strong tropical volcanism?Recently, Mount Agung in Bali erupted again, attracting considerable attention. A potentially very large eruption could also take place in Bali. Strong tropical volcanic eruptions (SVEs) like this not only pose serious human risk, but can affect Earth's climate.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Robot developed for automated assembly of designer nanomaterialsVan der Waals heterostructures are assemblies of atomically thin two-dimensional (2-D) crystalline materials that display attractive conduction properties for use in advanced electronic devices.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flight paths of bees and cuckoos could bring savings to airlinesThe flight routes of passenger aircraft are generally well established. In practice, unforeseen factors, mainly related to the weather, often force pilots to cover more kilometres than anticipated. A Polish-Colombian team of scientists and engineers, inspired by the behaviour of insects and birds, has developed software that allows real-time rational modification of flight routes. The system showe
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Urban life leaves behind traces in the genome of bumblebeesBumblebees living in the city have genes that differ from those of their relatives in the countryside. Although genetic differences are not major, they nevertheless may influence how well the insects adapt to their habitat. For example, urban bumblebees are probably better able to react to environmental challenges that come with city life, such as higher temperatures. These differences in their ge
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Eurasian atmospheric circulation anomalies can persist from winter to the following springSurface air temperature (SAT) anomalies have pronounced impacts on agriculture, socioeconomic development, and people's daily lives. For example, the record-breaking hot summer over many parts of the Eurasia resulted in broad wildfires and serious economic losses. Many studies have demonstrated that atmospheric circulation anomalies play an important role in modulating the SAT variations. Hence, t
11h
Feed: All Latest

Browser Standard WebAuthn Could Usher in a Password-Free FutureA new web browser standard may spell the end of passwords, but all the big websites will have to play along first.
11h
Feed: All Latest

How DNA Transfer Nearly Convicted an Innocent Man of MurderWe leave traces of our genetic material everywhere, even on things we’ve never touched. That got Lukis Anderson charged with a brutal crime he didn’t commit.
11h
Feed: All Latest

Airbus Is Making Beds for Economy Fliers—in the Cargo HoldComing attractions for economy fliers could include actual lie-flat beds, just not in the cabin.
11h
Latest Headlines | Science News

This plastic-gobbling enzyme just got an upgradeScientists tweaked a bacterial enzyme and made it more efficient in breaking down plastics found in polyester and plastic bottles.
12h
Scientific American Content: Global

Should Quantum Anomalies Make Us Rethink Reality?Inexplicable lab results may be telling us we’re on the cusp of a new scientific paradigm -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Science | The Guardian

Forensic science: the tip of the iceberg?Forensic science is nowhere near as robust and reliable as many people think We all want to live in a world where there is justice; where wrongs are righted, where the system is trustworthy and just works. But we have seen a growing body of reports that raise questions about that system. I was particularly challenged when I started doing research that was based on a murder case tried in 2002, whi
12h
Ingeniøren

Galleri: Her ryges osten efter klassiske håndværkstraditionerDer skal flere oste gennem rygeovnen på Gundestrup Mejeri. Derfor rykker der snart robotter ind til udskæring af ostene. Men her kan du se en rygeost blive til på det gamle mejeri.
12h
Ingeniøren

Robotter skal tage sig nænsomt af den fynske rygeostSydfynsk mejeri med speciale i rygeoste automatiserer udskæring og pakning af ostene. Omstillingen er nødvendig for at imødekomme efterspørgslen og kunne eksportere den fynske specialitet til udlandet.
12h
Ingeniøren

Nye cookie-regler på vej i sneglefart: Kæmpe lobby-apparat arbejder mod ændringerDen manglende brik i EU’s privacy-lovgivning er stadig uden klar deadline. En hær af lobbyister er på sagen.
12h
Science | The Guardian

Albert Einstein: brain for medical research- archive, 19 April 195519 April 1955 One of the greatest and probably most original of the minds which have created modern science, dies at the age of 76 We much regret to announce the death at Princeton, New Jersey, yesterday of Dr Albert Einstein. He was 76. Dr Einstein had entered hospital in Friday for treatment of arterio-sclerosis. Related: From the archive, 19 April 1955: Einstein as a man Continue reading...
12h
Ingeniøren

Ødelagt flymotor har måske samme fejl som ved ulykke i 2016For 20 måneder siden fik et fly af typen Boeing 737-700 ødelagt en motor. Fejlen ligner den, som mandag resulterede i, at et lignende fly måtte nødlande i USA. Nu tjekker flyselskaber over hele verden deres motorer for samme fejl.
12h
Live Science

Why More Vitamin D May Not Always Be a Good ThingA new study finds that high levels of vitamin D in the blood are linked with an increased risk of some cancers.
12h
Ingeniøren

Brandslukningsanlæg gik amok: Lukker nordiske fondsbørser i fem timerFondsbørsen i København, Stockholm, Reykjavik, og Helsinki var lukket i fem timer efter alvorlig fejl på et brandslukningssystem i et svensk datacenter.
12h
Futurity.org

These interruptions slow down E.R. nursesWorkflow interruptions in the emergency department are most likely to occur as nurses document electronic medical records and while they directly care for patients, research finds. A new paper in International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction suggests that changes could increase efficiency and help patients. “Our analysis showed that when emergency department nurses were interrupted in patie
12h
The Atlantic

New York’s Double-Jeopardy LoopholeNew York state has long functioned as the ace up the sleeve of President Trump’s critics. The reasoning goes like this: Trump could attempt to pardon people implicated in the Russia probe, whether Michael Cohen, Paul Manafort, or someone else, thus preventing a trial or perhaps insulating himself from legal ramifications. The vast discretion affording the chief executive in the pardon power would
12h
The Atlantic

Why Stormy Daniels Poses a Problem for DemocratsIt was telling that as Tax Day arrived this week, the media’s focus was riveted not on the massive tax overhaul that President Trump recently signed into law, but on James Comey, Stormy Daniels, and Michael Cohen. In their own ways, these three players in the Trump drama symbolize the ethical storms and moral challenges constantly buffeting the president. Those tempests have imposed an unmistakab
12h
Science | The Guardian

Not one, but three Jurassic worlds, in new UK museum exhibitionYorkshire’s Jurassic World, at the Yorkshire Museum, includes a pregnant ichthyosaur, a Mesozoic virtual reality experience, and a dinosaur called Alan If you say the word Jurassic to people in the UK, the chances are that their first thoughts will be of a certain hugely successful film franchise. Most palaeontologists are fine with this, because it gives us an excuse to wheel out our well-honed
13h
Ingeniøren

Japan har fundet et enormt lager af sjældne metaller til havsLandet kan overtage markedet fra Kina og dække behovet for visse sjældne jordarter flere hundrede år.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Enduring cold temperatures alters fat cell epigeneticsA new study in fat cells has revealed a molecular mechanism that controls how lifestyle choices and the external environment affect gene expression. This mechanism includes potential targets for next-generation drug discovery efforts to treat metabolic diseases including diabetes and obesity.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fuzzy crab, shiny-eyed shrimp discovered on Java expeditionA hermit crab, a shiny-eyed shrimp and a crab with fuzzy spines are among over a dozen new species discovered in a deep-sea expedition off the Indonesian island of Java, scientists said.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers at LSTM take a novel approach to snakebite treatmentResearchers at LSTM's Alistair Reid Venom Research Unit are looking at treatment for snakebite in a completely different way and have shown that it is possible to treat the bite from one snake with antivenom produced from a completely different species that causes the same pathology in humans.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Men younger than 50: The more you smoke, the more you strokeThe more cigarettes men younger than 50 smoked, the more likely they were to have a stroke. Researchers say, while smoking cessation is the goal, just reducing the number of cigarettes younger men smoke could help reduce their stroke risk.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Alpine grassland productivity not sensitive to climate warming on third poleThe Tibetan Plateau has experienced more rapid climate warming than the global average, coupled with greater inter-annual variation in precipitation over the past 50 years. How will such dramatic climate change influence the structure and function of alpine grasslands? Interest in this topic is high because of its importance to the sustainable development of animal husbandry and the livelihood of
13h
Science : NPR

Rwandan Reconciliation Through Radio Soap OperaIn the ruins of the recently-ended Rwandan civil war, a team of radio performers attempted to unite Hutus and Tutsis through a soap opera. (Image credit: Stephanie Aglietti/AFP/Getty Images)
13h
Dagens Medicin

Herlev og Gentofte Hospital får nye stråleapparater til kræftbehandlingHerlev og Gentofte Hospital har købt 17 forskellige stråleapparater, der skal give kræftpatienter en mere effektiv og skånsom behandling.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers take a novel approach to snakebite treatmentResearchers at LSTM's Alistair Reid Venom Research Unit are looking at treatment for snakebite in a completely different way and have shown that it is possible to treat the bite from one snake with antivenom produced from a completely different species that causes the same pathology in humans.
14h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Nasa's Tess: Planet-hunting satellite lifts offNasa's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (Tess) searches for new planets.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fox rejected an offer from Comcast before Disney buyout: filingMedia giant 21st Century Fox, which was sold to Disney in December, rejected a higher buyout offer from Comcast over fears of regulatory risks, a filing showed Wednesday.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China: Qualcomm plan 'has difficulty' resolving concernsThe Chinese government says Qualcomm Inc.'s plan for its $44 billion acquisition of NXP Semiconductors "has difficulty" resolving concerns of anti-monopoly regulators.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Boosting livelihoods and conservation practices among small-scale fishermenAround the UK, there are hundreds of coastal communities supporting the livelihoods of hard-working small-scale fishermen.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Exercise after a heart attack -- it could save your lifeBecoming more physically active after a heart attack reduces the risk of death, according to research presented today at EuroPrevent 2018, a European Society of Cardiology congress. The study, which followed more than 22,000 patients, found that those who became more physically active after a heart attack halved the risk of death within four years.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists show how salt lowers reaction temperatures to make novel materialsA dash of salt can simplify the creation of two-dimensional materials, and thanks to Rice University scientists, the reason is becoming clear.
15h
Ingeniøren

Plugin-hybridbiler udleder mindre CO2 end både benzin- og elbilerHvis CO2-emissionen fra en plugin-hybridbil sammenlignes med en dieseldrevet Golf, skal hybridbilen køre 15.000 km, før den ekstra ‘CO2-omkostning’ til produktion af batterier og forbrug af el er udlignet. En gennemsnitlig elbil skal køre 43.000 km, og for en stor elbil er det tilsvarende tal min...
16h
NYT > Science

Damage to Great Barrier Reef From Global Warming Is Irreversible, Scientists SayA huge heat wave killed 30 percent of the reef’s coral in 2016, and continuously high temperatures are preventing its recovery.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research findings suggest that most vulnerable patients across Africa are at risk of receiving sub-optimal malaria treatmentA large proportion of malaria patients in endemic countries in Africa are likely to receive doses of malaria medicine that are too low to offer effective treatment, according to new research presented at the MIM Conference taking place in Dakar this week. Researchers found that an estimated 21.3 million people -- or 24 percent of all confirmed malaria cases--were at risk of being prescribed inadeq
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Support rises for controversial Canada pipelineSupport in Canada for a pipeline expansion to move oil to the Pacific coast for shipping to new markets overseas is rising, polling showed Wednesday as protests against it followed the prime minister to Britain.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hurricane Harvey: Research shows most fatalities occurred outside flood zonesA Dutch-Texan team found that most Houston-area drowning deaths from Hurricane Harvey occurred outside the zones designated by government as being at higher risk of flooding: the 100- and 500-year floodplains. Harvey, one of the costliest storms in US history, hit southeast Texas on 25 August 2017 causing unprecedented flooding and killing dozens. Researchers at Delft University of Technology in t
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon's reveals its Prime service has 100 million membersAmazon has persuaded more than 100 million shoppers to subscribe to its Prime service that offers free two-day shipping and other perks that help bind people to the company and its ever-expanding empire.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

California has worst US air pollution: reportCalifornia has the most polluted cities in the United States, a report issued on Wednesday said, as President Donald Trump's administration seeks to force the state to weaken its vehicle emissions standards.
16h
Viden

Op at stå: Motion virker som "hjemmelavet viagra"Intensiv motion flere gange ugentligt kan forbedre erektionen væsentligt hos mænd med rejsningsbesvær, viser studie.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's Tess spacecraft embarks on quest to find new planetsNASA's Tess spacecraft embarked Wednesday on a quest to find new worlds around neighboring stars that could support life.
17h
Ingeniøren

Dansk Tor-udvikler: Sådan vil vi gøre det lettere at være anonym på mobilenI erkendelse af, at en del brugere anvender anonymiserings-tjenesten Tor på mobiltelefonen, forsøger folkene bag teknologien at forbedre den mobile oplevelse.
17h
Ingeniøren

KU-forskere vælger skyen fra: For dyrt og for langsomtKøbenhavns Universitets naturvidenskabelige fakultet vil være førende inden for håndtering af forskningsdata. For at håndtere eksplosionen i forskernes datamængder har fakultetet bygget sit eget datacenter i kælderen under H.C. Ørsted Instituttet.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hurricane Harvey: Dutch-Texan research shows most fatalities occurred outside flood zonesScientists found that most Houston-area drowning deaths from Hurricane Harvey occurred outside the zones designated by government as being at higher risk of flooding: the 100- and 500-year floodplains. Harvey, one of the costliest storms in US history, hit Texas on Aug. 25, 2017, causing unprecedented flooding and killing dozens. Researchers at Delft University of Technology and Rice University pu
17h
Science | The Guardian

Researchers create super sponge that mops up oil spillsAustralian scientists say new polymer can remove crude oil and diesel from seawater • Sign up to receive the top stories in Australia every day at noon Oil spills could be soaked up by a new floating substance that combines waste from the petroleum industry and cooking oil, according to new research led by South Australia’s Flinders University. The new polymer, made from sulphur and canola cookin
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Low total testosterone in men widespread, linked to chronic diseaseNew research finds that more men have suboptimal testosterone levels than previously known, and it may be putting these men at risk.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How environmental pollutants and genetics work together in rheumatoid arthritisNew research documents how chemicals and a certain gene activate an enzyme to increase the risk and severity of RA and bone destruction.
18h
Viden

Nasa sender satellit op for at lede efter nye planeterDTU Space og Danmark har en stor aktie i missionen, hvor man håber at opdage 20.000 exoplaneter.
18h
New on MIT Technology Review

Sitting with the cyber-sleuths who track cryptocurrency criminalsCrypto­currency networks are turning out to be far less private than we thought, and forensic investigators are turning that to their advantage.
19h
Scientific American Content: Global

NYC Mice Are Packed with PathogensMice trapped in New York City apartment buildings harbored disease-causing bacteria and antibiotic resistance genes. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Plastic straw and cotton bud ban proposedPlan for a ban in England is announced as Commonwealth leaders are urged to tackle plastic waste.
21h
The Scientist RSS

Inside the OSTP: Q&A With a Senior Science Policy AdvisorSara Brenner discusses why she took a break from academia to join the White House's Office of Science and Technology Policy, and what she hopes to accomplish there.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Practices with poor prescribing performance more likely to prescribe homeopathyNew research published today by the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine finds that general practices in England with the worst prescribing quality scores are 2.1 times more likely to prescribe homeopathy than practices with the best prescribing quality scores.
22h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Keeping livers 'alive' boosts transplant success, trial findsThe alternative to ice involves pumping livers with blood, nutrients and medicines while in a machine.
22h
Popular Science

We're so close with dogs, even our poop looks similarAnimals A new study finds that human and dog microbiomes have more in common than you might expect. Evidence of our relationship with dogs goes deep—far into the gut, in fact. A new study published today in the journal Microbiome suggests that our microbiomes and those…
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Optimizing space travel efficiencySending a human into space and doing it efficiently presents a galaxy of challenges. Scientists have explored ways to integrate the logistics of space travel by looking at a campaign of lunar missions, spacecraft design, and conducting research, to create a framework to optimize fuel and other resources.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Peptide induces chirality evolution in a single gold nanoparticleScientists have created a synthesis method to make optically active and chiral gold nanoparticles using amino acids and peptides for the first time. Many chemicals significant to life have mirror-imaged twins and such characteristics are conventionally called as chirality. This study describes how the chirality, typically observed in organic molecules, can be extended to three-dimensional metallic
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

We can recognize speakers only from how faces move when talkingResults of a new study by psychologists and speech scientists should help to settle a long-standing disagreement among cognitive psychologists about the information we use to recognize people speaking to us. The study shows that listeners can use visual dynamic features to learn to recognize who is talking.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Better species mapping can improve conservation effortsThe scientific models that ecologists and conservation biologists rely on to determine which species and habitats to protect lack critical information to help them make effective decisions, according to a new study.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Battery's hidden layer revealedAn international team makes breakthrough in understanding the chemistry of the microscopically thin layer that forms between the liquid electrolyte and solid electrode in lithium-ion batteries. The results are being used in improving the layer and better predicting battery lifetime.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New ancestor of modern sea turtles found in AlabamaA sea turtle discovered in Alabama is a new species from the Late Cretaceous epoch, according to a new study.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain processes sight and sound in same mannerNeuroscientists have found that the human brain learns to make sense of auditory and visual stimuli in the same two-step process.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Leptin's neural circuit identifiedScientists have identified a neural circuit in the hypothalamus as the primary mechanism mediating the hormone leptin's anti-obesity and anti-diabetes effects and found two mechanisms underlying leptin's inhibition of appetite. The work in mice advances efforts to treat human obesity and diabetes.
22h
Science | The Guardian

Hans Asperger aided and supported Nazi programme, study saysEight-year study finds pioneer of paediatrics assisted in Third Reich’s ‘euthanasia’ programme The Austrian doctor after whom Asperger syndrome is named was an active participant in the Nazi regime, assisting in the Third Reich’s so called euthanasia programme and supporting the concept of racial hygiene by deeming certain children unworthy to live, according to a study by a medical historian . H
22h
Live Science

Why This New Exoplanet-Hunting Telescope Blows Kepler Out of the WaterTESS will have the ultimate view of the night sky from a perfect orbit around Earth.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dogs could be more similar to humans than we thoughtDog and human gut microbiomes have more similar genes and responses to diet than we previously thought, according to a study published in the open access journal, Microbiome.
23h




Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.