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Ingeniøren

Danmark modarbejder forbud mod bidræbende pesticiderRegeringen vil kun støtte EU's forsøg på at stramme forbud mod kendt insektgift, hvis de danske landmænd fortsat må smøre frø ind i pesticiderne. Biavlere er oprørte.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Chemotherapy without Pills or NeedlesA promising new class of lung-cancer therapies can simply be inhaled, minimizing the side effects to other, healthy organs -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Muons spin tales of undiscovered particlesScientists at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories are collaborating to test a magnetic property of the muon. Their experiment could point to the existence of physics beyond our current understanding, including undiscovered particles.
5h

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New on MIT Technology Review

AI expert salaries are topping $1 million—even at non-profits
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Spit and polish: The beauty of saliva for epigenetic studiesAccounting for cell components in saliva increases the reliability of biochemical tests for experience-driven epigenetic changes.
6min
Feed: All Latest

Gadget Lab Podcast: The Tech We Can't Live WithoutThis week, we discuss our personal relationships with our most beloved gadgets.
8min
Live Science

This Ice Is Nearly As Hot As the Sun. Scientists Have Now Made It on EarthFor the first time, researchers re-created the high-pressure water ice likely found in the interiors of Uranus and Neptune.
12min
Scientific American Content: Global

Panel Recommends FDA Approval of Epilepsy Drug Derived from MarijuanaDecision paves path to the U.S.'s first medication made from marijuana -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
18min
The Atlantic

The Rift Between McCabe and Comey Could Help TrumpThe growing tension between two frequent targets of President Trump, former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe and his old boss, former FBI Director James Comey, was laid bare Friday morning. “Andy is upset and disappointed in some of the things Comey has said,” McCabe’s lawyer Michael Bromwich said at a briefing for reporters Friday morning. Comey told the Justice Department’s internal watchdog t
18min
Live Science

U.K. Man With 'Worst Ever' Drug-Resistant Gonorrhea Is Now CuredThe U.K. man who caught the "worst ever" case of antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea has been cured.
32min
The Atlantic

The Post-Parkland Unity Is Officially OverColumbine School StudentsAt 10 o’clock on Friday morning, thousands of students across the country commemorated a moment that not one of them was alive to experience: the shooting at Columbine High School in Colorado that killed 13 people 19 years ago today. Kids walked out of their classrooms on Friday to remember and to protest in the latest iteration of the student-led movement against gun violence that burgeoned afte
38min
The Atlantic

Growing Up Without Jane the VirginAt the age of 5, I heard the first lie I ever recognized. It was the 1990s and I was in elementary school, an endeavor that included being woken up before sunrise by my mother. “You have to get up,” she would say. My mom was in nursing school and had long days, meaning I had long days too, ones that began before early-morning cartoons excited my older brother and sister and me into being. Days we
38min
Big Think

Study on female fans of the ‘The X-Files’ backs up ‘Scully Effect’A new study sheds light on the "Scully Effect," which describes how female fans of "The X-Files" have cited the character of Dana Scully as inspiration for entering careers in STEM fields. Read More
42min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Texas appeals court dismisses 'revenge porn' lawA Texas appeals court has ruled unconstitutional a state law that punishes those who post intimate images from previous or current relationships online without consent.
47min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What's in a name? Yale researchers track PTSD's many identities during warPosttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been associated with military activities for as long as wars have been fought -- but this disorder was only named in the 1980s. A new Yale paper published April 16, 2018 in Chronic Stress documents a different kind of war -- a war of words -- that has been fought over the name of the disorder, and may have slowed clinical and scientific progress on the diso
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blood biomarkers may allow easier detection, confirmation of concussionsResearchers from the University of California, Irvine, Georgetown University and the University of Rochester have found that specific small molecules in blood plasma may be useful in determining whether someone has sustained a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), commonly known as a concussion.
48min
Live Science

Scientists Built A New Microscope To Watch Cells, And The Footage is BreathtakingStunning new microscope images reveal human cancer cells slinking through blood cells and show molecules coursing through a zebrafish embryo's tiny ear canal.
51min
Live Science

Dark Photons Probably Don't Exist, and If They Did, They'd Be Super WeirdA measurement of the fine structure constant puts significant limitations on the existence of these dark partners to ordinary light particles.
51min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The good, the bad and their fortuitous differencesGenetic differences between two very similar fungi, one that led to Quorn, the proprietary meat substitute, and another that ranks among the world's most damaging crop pathogens, have exposed the significant features that dictate the pair's very different lifestyles.
53min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How social networking sites may discriminate against womenSocial media and the sharing economy have created new opportunities by leveraging online networks to build trust and remove marketplace barriers. But a growing body of research suggests that old gender and racial biases persist, from men's greater popularity on Twitter to African Americans' lower acceptance rates on Airbnb.
53min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tiny microenvironments in the ocean hold clues to global nitrogen cycleNitrogen is essential to marine life and cycles throughout the ocean in a delicately balanced system. Living organisms—especially marine plants called phytoplankton—require nitrogen in processes such as photosynthesis. In turn, phytoplankton growth takes up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and helps regulate global climate.
53min
Popular Science

Anyone can compost their food waste (and everyone should)Environment And it doesn’t have to smell. If you think composting is a dirty, unpleasant activity, that’s far from the truth. It can be really fun, like one big science experiment. Here’s how to get started:…
55min
Scientific American Content: Global

In 200 Years Cows May Be the Biggest Land Mammals on the PlanetHumans may be driving large mammals to extinction -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
57min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How social networking sites may discriminate against womenUsing the photo-sharing site Instagram as a test case, Columbia researchers demonstrate how two common recommendation algorithms amplify a network effect known as homophily in which similar or like-minded people cluster together. They further show how algorithms turned loose on a network with homophily effectively make women less visible; they found that the women in their dataset, whose photos we
1h
cognitive science

How does the brain learn categorization for sounds? The same way it does for imagessubmitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]
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The Atlantic

Photos of the Week: Newborns, Chocolate Hills, Teacher of the YearA baby visits the U.S. Senate floor, a sandstorm descends on Iran, a rabbit watches Austrian asparagus, ruins remain after an ISIS occupation in Malawi, the sun sets behind a St. Petersburg skyscraper, Boston Marathoners end up miserably wet, orca whales hunt seal pups in Argentina, Israel celebrates its independence day, and much more.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rochester scientists discover gene controlling genetic recombination ratesGenetic recombination is vital to natural selection, yet some species display far more crossover than others. Scientists in Rochester have discovered a gene in fruit flies that is responsible for the evolution of these recombination rates.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fight, flight, or freezeThere's increasing physiological evidence connecting breathing patterns with the brain regions that control mood and emotion. Now researchers have added neurons associated with the olfactory system to the connection between behavior and breathing. Connecting patterns in these interactions may help explain why practices such as meditation and yoga that rely on rhythmic breathing can help people ove
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Popular Science

Here’s an amazing new picture of the Lagoon Nebula to celebrate Hubble’s 28th birthdaySpace Happy birthday to the best space telescope ever! Love, PopSci. It’s pretty amazing even with low-tech binoculars or higher-tech telescopes. But to really appreciate the scale of the nebula, check out this new view of the nebula just…
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Medical chemists discover peptic ulcer treatment metallodrug effective in 'taming' superbugsA novel solution to antimicrobial resistance -- medical chemists discover peptic ulcer treatment metallodrug effective in 'taming' superbugs.
1h
The Atlantic

Is Rural America Getting Tired of Tough-on-Crime Policies?Incarceration policy represents the reddest of red meat. From Richard Nixon’s calls for “ law and order ,” to George H.W. Bush’s Willie Horton ads, to President Trump’s promises to jail or deport “bad dudes,” modern American leaders have reliably used punitive rhetoric to get elected—and have overseen the expansion of the carceral society that inevitably followed. There’s evidence now, however, t
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Live Science

A Marijuana-Derived Drug Is on Track for FDA ApprovalThe drug, which contains cannabidiol, may soon gain official U.S. approval to treat severe forms of epilepsy.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Late, but not too late -- screening for olfactory dysfunctionIn a large population-based study of randomly selected participants in Germany, researchers found that participants aged 65-74 years with olfactory dysfunction showed impaired cognitive performance. Interestingly, this strong association was not present in younger (55-64 years) or older (75-86 years) participants. Additionally, the effect was more present in women than men.
1h
Feed: All Latest

'Westworld': Here's What Needs to Happen in Season 2HBO's futuristic thriller has a whole lot of explaining to do.
1h
Popular Science

Five rad and random products I found this weekGadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 45. My job is to find cool stuff. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap. Often times, these…
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Structured light and nanomaterials open new ways to tailor light at the nanoscaleNew research has shown that carefully structured light and matching arrangements of metal nanostructures can be combined to alter the properties of the generated light at the nanometer scale. The teams have shown that the efficiency of nonlinear optical fields generated from the oligomers is strongly influenced by how the constituents of the oligomer constituents are illuminated by structured ligh
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New DNA screening reveals whose blood the vampire bat is drinkingThe vampire bat prefers to feed on domestic animals such as cows and pigs. When it does so, there is a risk of transmission of pathogens. Now, a new study describes a new DNA method to efficiently screen many vampire bat blood meal and fecal samples with a high success rate and thereby determine which animals the vampire bats have fed on blood from.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biomarkers for irritable bowel syndromeLittle is still known about the exact causes of irritable bowel syndrome. An international team has provided initial clues about the organic triggers of the disease, which affects an estimated one out of six people.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lupus treatment generates positive results in Phase III clinical trialNew research indicates that belimumab, a monoclonal antibody therapy that targets a component of the immune system, provides considerable benefits to patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a predominately female, chronic inflammatory disease that can affect virtually any organ.
1h
The Atlantic

India’s Vicious PatriarchyIndian law prohibits the identification of a rape victim by name or appearance without explicit permission from the survivor or their next of kin. Yet for the last three months, the name and face of an eight-year-old child, raped and murdered in the small town of Kathua in January this year, circulated widely in the Indian media. Perhaps her details were published due to early confusion over the
1h
Live Science

This Is Your Brain on Drugs (Really)Readers of a certain age will know the reference.
2h
Live Science

A Bunch of Rich Guys Want to Watch the Earth at All Times from SpaceA bunch of very big corporations and rich men, including Bill Gates, are hoping to start watching the whole Earth at all times with video cameras in outer space.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tiny microenvironments in the ocean hold clues to global nitrogen cycleA new University of Rochester study shows that nitrogen-feeding organisms exist all over the deep ocean, and not just in large oxygen-depleted "dead zones," changing the way we think about the delicate nitrogen cycle.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The good, the bad and their fortuitous differencesGenetic differences between two very similar fungi, one that led to Quorn™, the proprietary meat substitute, and another that ranks among the world's most damaging crop pathogens, have exposed the significant features that dictate the pair's very different lifestyles, features that promise targets for controlling disease.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global

Antarctic Glaciers Are Helping Drive Their Own MeltMeltwater is fueling a feedback loop that lets warm seawater eat away at them from below -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Grassland plants react unexpectedly to high levels of carbon dioxidePlants are responding in unexpected ways to increased carbon dioxide in the air, according to a 20-year study conducted by researchers at the University of Minnesota.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tampons can cause toxic shock syndromeThe use of intravaginal menstrual pads may be responsible for rare cases of menstrual toxic shock syndrome in women whose vaginas have been colonized by Staphylococcus aureus producing toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1). Menses can serve as a growth medium for S. aureus.
2h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Closing the gender gap in some science fields may take over 100 yearsIn some STEM fields, the gender gap won’t disappear for decades or even centuries, a new study suggests.
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New Scientist - News

The US army has made a virtual North Korea to train its soldiersThe US army has built a system that can quickly create virtual locations for soldiers to train in. It took only three days to make North and South Korea
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New Scientist - News

Distant Jupiter-like world may be the darkest planet ever foundThe clouds on WASP-104b – an exoplanet orbiting a star 466 light years away – have been swept away by radiation, leaving a surface that reflects almost no light
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Science | The Guardian

The science behind why we fight – Science Weekly podcastThis week, Ian Sample asks: why do humans fight? Can science tell us anything about what drives us to violence? Subscribe and review on Acast , Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom and Mixcloud . Join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Experts have been fighting about fighting throughout the ages. While theories have emerged to explain why we fight, there isn’t a consensus in the research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

SLU students learn Italian playing Assassin's CreedIn a paper published in Profession, the Modern Language Association's journal about modern languages and literatures, a Saint Louis University professor discusses how he uses video games to teach Italian, allowing his students to master two semesters worth of language acquisition through one intensive class for students new to the Italian language.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Remote-control shoots laser at nano-gold to turn on cancer-killing immune cellsCancer immune cell therapy has made headlines with astounding successes like saving former US President Jimmy Carter from brain cancer. But immunotherapy has also had many tragic flops. Researchers working to optimize the innovative treatment have implanted a genetic switch that activates T-cells when they are inside of tumors. Remote-control light waves resembling those used in a TV remote combin
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rare earth magnet recycling is a grind -- this new process takes a simpler approachA new recycling process turns discarded hard disk drive magnets into new magnet material in a few steps, and tackles both the economic and environmental issues typically associated with mining e-waste for valuable materials.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Treatment of cancer could become possible with adenovirusResearchers have shown that adenovirus binds to a specific type of carbohydrate that is overexpressed on certain types of cancer cells. The discovery opens up new opportunities for the development of virus-based cancer therapy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Soil metals linked with cancer mortalityEpidemiologists and geologists have found associations between esophageal cancer and soils where lead is abundant, lung cancer and terrains with increased copper content, brain tumor with areas rich in arsenic, and bladder cancer with high cadmium levels. These statistical links do not indicate that there is a cause-effect relationship between soil type and cancer, but they suggest that the influe
2h
The Guardian's Science Weekly

The science behind why we fight – Science Weekly podcastThis week, Ian Sample asks: why do humans fight? Can science tell us anything about what drives us to violence?
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Meijer to launch self-scanning app to speed grocery checkoutMeijer plans to launch a self-scanning mobile application in Chicago-area stores by the end of the summer, a move likely to be followed by some larger retailers in the near future.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Forget tech's bad bros: Stanford, Berkeley boost female computing gradsMore and more women are getting computer science and electrical engineering degrees from the Bay Area's two elite universities, a goal U.S. colleges have been pursuing for decades. But in the midst of the #MeToo era's focus on sexual misconduct, harassment and gender discrimination in tech, some of these young women say they're worried about what their future workplace holds.
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Popular Science

China is building drone planes for its aircraft carriersEastern Arsenal They're robotics wingmen for China's carrier pilots. China is flying helicopter drones on its warships. The military plans to fly drones on carriers, pair drones with manned fighters, and export stealth attack drones.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When there's an audience, people's performance improvesOften people think performing in front of others will make them mess up, but a new study found the opposite: being watched makes people do better.
2h
Live Science

A Single Concussion May Increase Parkinson's RiskHaving a single concussion may increase a person's risk for Parkinson's disease, a new study suggests — but the overall risk of developing the disease still remains low.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SLU students learn Italian playing Assassin's CreedA Saint Louis University professor has developed a method for teaching a new language through gaming.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Air France CEO threatens to resign if strikes continueThe embattled CEO of Air France-KLM, Jean-Marc Janaillac, threatened Friday to resign if Air France staff continue to reject his wage proposals following nine days of strikes in the past two months.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK teen who hacked CIA chief gets two-year prison termA British teenager who accessed the email accounts of top US intelligence and security officials including the head of the CIA was sentenced to two years in prison on Friday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nissan to cut hundreds of jobs at UK car plant: sourceJapanese automaker Nissan will axe hundreds of staff at its car plant in northeastern England due to a sharp fall in diesel car sales, a source told AFP on Friday.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Audit clears Facebook despite Cambridge Analytica leaksAn audit of Facebook's privacy practices for the Federal Trade Commission found no problems even though the company knew at the time that a data-mining firm improperly obtained private data from millions of users—raising questions about the usefulness of such audits.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Professor voices concerns over robots and AI taking over PRRobots are on the rise in the field of communication and news gathering. Does this threaten not only jobs but the ethical basis of society?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Studying Midwest soil erosion from spaceGeologist and geochemist Isaac Larsen at the University of Massachusetts Amherst is used to tramping around in the dirt to conduct his soil research, but satellite photos of the Iowa farmhouse where he grew up have added a new dimension to the work, and he now has a grant from NASA to study soils in a whole new way, from space.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

European fish and canoes bump into barriers almost every kilometerA new study, led by Swansea University, reveals that the density of barriers in European rivers is much higher than indicated by available databases - up to one barrier in every kilometre of river. Information about the location and density of smaller barriers is often unknown, but these smaller barriers present the biggest problem for the health of Europe's streams and rivers.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study recommends strong role for national labs in 'second laser revolution'A new study calls for the U.S. to step up its laser R&D efforts to better compete with major overseas efforts to build large, high-power laser systems, and notes progress and milestones at the Department of Energy's Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) Center and other sites.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wood formation model to fuel progress in bioenergy, paper, new applicationsA new systems biology model that mimics the process of wood formation allows scientists to predict the effects of switching on and off 21 pathway genes involved in producing lignin, a primary component of wood. The model, built on more than three decades of research led by Vincent Chiang of the Forest Biotechnology Group at North Carolina State University, will speed the process of engineering tre
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sports tech firm Stats looks to bring A.I. to the broadcast booth and sidelineWhen a baseball announcer rattles off your favorite player's batting average with two outs and runners on first and third, he's not pulling that figure from the back of his mind. There's a good chance that timely information was provided by Stats, a Chicago-based sports data and technology company.
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Big Think

Infographic: How dangerous is your daily commute?Infographics present the latest NHTSA statistics on the likelihood of having a fatal accident while commuting to and from work. Read More
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Big Think

What is the Great Attractor, and will it destroy us?Our understanding of the universe has expanded tremendously in the last few decades. But there are still some mysteries out there, and the Great Attractor is one of them. Read More
3h
Live Science

This Contorted Mystery Squid May Be the 'Most Bizarre' Ever SeenAn unidentified species of squid recently performed an unusual "twisted" ballet.
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Science | The Guardian

What Lord of the Flies is really about | Letter from Judy Golding CarverMy father distrusted simple judgments, but he did say his novel was about the importance of the rule of law, and the complexity of human beings, says William Golding’s daughter Judy Golding Carver David Shariatmadari’s account of my father’s novel Lord of the Flies was a little sweeping when he declared: “William Golding sought to show that boys were, by their nature, little devils” ( A real-life
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The Atlantic

A Uniquely American Starbucks ScandalStarbucks is embroiled in one of its largest scandals to date after two black men were arrested for trespassing in a Philadelphia coffeeshop when they were waiting for a business associate without immediately making a purchase. Video of the incident , which shows police handcuffing 23-year-olds Rashon Nelson and Donte Robinson, quickly went viral, and a protest was organized. Starbucks issued an
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

Alibaba is developing its own AI chips, too
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Wood formation model to fuel progress in bioenergy, paper, new applicationsNeed stronger timber, better biofuels or new sources of green chemicals? A systems biology model developed over decades of research led by NC State University will accelerate progress in engineering trees for specific needs.
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New Scientist - News

Grandchildren of migrants more likely to get anxiety problemsPeople who migrate are at heightened risk of anxiety disorders, and these mental health problems may linger and get more severe through subsequent generations
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Scientific American Content: Global

What's It Like to Be Queer in STEM?A nationwide project is surveying the experiences of LGBTQ+ scientists to find out -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mysterious red spots on Mercury get names – but what are they?Mercury is the closest planet to the sun, but far from being a dull cinder of a world, it has instead turned out to be a real eye opener for geologists. Among the revelations by NASA's MESSENGER probe, which first flew past Mercury in 2008 and orbited it between 2011 and 2015, is the discovery of a hundred or so bright red spots scattered across the globe. Now they are at last being named.
3h
The Atlantic

White Evangelicals Can't Quit Donald TrumpWith two alleged extramarital affairs looming over the presidency, white evangelicals are doubling down on their support for Donald Trump. But the near-term political gains their support is yielding may come at a high cost for the future of the faith. A new survey released this week by PRRI, where I serve as the CEO, finds white evangelical support for Trump remains strikingly high, with 75 perce
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Turning off the tapIn May 2018, South Africa's Cape Town may become the first city in the world to fully shut off its water.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ericsson shares fly as Swedish telecom giant caps lossesSwedish telecoms firm Ericsson posted improved first quarter results Friday, as it presses a massive cost-saving drive that has prompted thousands of jobs cuts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Selection of a pyrethroid metabolic enzyme CYP9K1 by malaria control activitiesResearchers from LSTM, with partners from a number of international institutions, have shown the rapid selection of a novel P450 enzyme leading to insecticide resistance in a major malaria vector.
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Science | The Guardian

Murder most fowl: Oxford dodo 'shot in the back of the head'Revelation astonishes experts, who thought the renowned bird lived out its life in London as a money-spinning curiosity With its plump head and bulbous beak, the renowned remains of a dodo at the Oxford University Museum of Natural History have long captivated visitors, Lewis Carroll among them. Now researchers say they have uncovered how the dodo died – a discovery that makes the old bird’s past
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Futurity.org

Why U.S. Supreme Court rejected deportation provisionOn April 17, the Supreme Court of the United States struck down a part of the Immigration and Nationality Act that authorizes the government to deport some immigrants, including lawful permanent residents, who have been convicted of “aggravated felonies.” Jayashri Srikantiah, director of the Immigrants’ Rights Clinic at Stanford University, discusses why the decision in Sessions v. Dimaya is so i
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Big Think

Hubble telescope celebrates 28 years in space with a dip in the dazzling Lagoon NebulaHubble telescope celebrates 28 years of being a space sleuth with these dazzling images of the Lagoon Nebula, 4,000 light-years away. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

German police arrest Porsche manager over diesel scandalGerman police have detained a Porsche manager in a probe into the diesel emissions cheating scandal that the luxury car brand's parent company Volkswagen has struggled to shed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Python leads researchers to a big snake sex party with six males and a 15-foot, 115-pound femaleWildlife experts call it a "breeding aggregation." It's a more respectable way of saying snake sex party.
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The Atlantic

"Rivers of Blood:" The Legacy of a Speech That Divided BritainOn April 20, 1968, Enoch Powell, a leading member of the Conservative Party in the British parliament, made a speech that would imprint itself into British memory—and divide the nation with its racist, incendiary rhetoric. Speaking before a group of conservative activists, Powell said that if immigration to Britain from the country’s former colonies continued, a violent clash between white and bl
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study recommends strong role for national labs in 'second laser revolution'A new study calls for the US to step up its laser R&D efforts to better compete with major overseas efforts to build large, high-power laser systems, and notes progress and milestones at the BELLA Center at the Department of Energy's Berkeley Lab, and at other sites.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Graphene sets a new record on squeezing light to one atomGraphene Flagship researchers reach the ultimate level of light confinement -- the space of one atom. This will pave the way to ultra-small optical switches, detectors and sensors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers deliver open-source simulator for cyber physical systemsCyber physical systems (CPS) are attracting more attention than ever thanks to the rapid development of the Internet of Things (IoT) and its combination with artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning and the cloud. These interacting networks of physical and computational components will provide the foundation of critical infrastructure, form the basis of 'smart' services, and improve the qual
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Popular Science

Rising temperatures are opening new territories for venomous creatures—including your backyardAnimals Welcome to the neighborhood, fire ants! Sure is hot out today! “There’s always winners and losers, and it seems that some of the organisms that are doing well and may do well into the future are the venomous species,” says Isabelle…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Oops...Deutsche Bank makes 28bn euro transfer in errorGermany's biggest lender Deutsche Bank on Friday admitted to a massive erroneous transfer of 28 billion euros ($34 billion) in a routine operation, more than the entire bank is worth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

General Electric reports $1.2 bn loss in 1Q; reaffirms outlookGeneral Electric reported a $1.2 billion loss in the first quarter Friday following a large legal charge, but shares surged after operating profits topped analyst expectations.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

SunTrust warns 1.5 million clients of potential data theftSunTrust Banks Inc. says accounts for 1.5 million clients could be compromised following a potential case of data theft.
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Futurity.org

Enter your info to calculate poverty riskWhat are your odds of experiencing poverty? This online tool can predict. The poverty calculator determines an American’s expected risk of poverty based on their race, education level, gender, marital status, and age. “Many Americans will now be able to estimate the sizable amount of economic insecurity that they will face in the future,” says Mark Rank, professor of social welfare at the Brown S
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New theory shows how strain makes for better catalystsBrown University researchers have developed a new theory to explain why stretching or compressing metal catalysts can make them perform better. The theory, described in the journal Nature Catalysis, could open new design possibilities for new catalysts with new capabilities.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Processing power beyond Moore's LawIn 1965, businessman and computer scientist Gordon Moore observed that the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit doubles approximately every two years, which means a doubling of computer processing power. The prediction was so accurate that this phenomenon was dubbed "Moore's Law."
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The Atlantic

I Feel Pretty Is a Message Movie That Can't Stay on MessageWhere’s Judd Apatow when you need him? The comedy I Feel Pretty seems like an Apatowian undertaking in almost every regard: modestly high-concept, gently moralistic, and starring Amy Schumer, who had her big-screen breakthrough in Apatow’s 2015 movie Trainwreck . All that’s missing is any actual participation by Apatow himself—which is a pity, because the intelligence and nuance (not to mention h
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The Atlantic

Why More Young Married Couples Are Keeping Separate Bank AccountsA joint bank account has, traditionally, been a sign of commitment. As newlyweds start their lives together, it is perhaps the clearest way for them to say, to each other and to the world, “What’s mine is yours, and what’s yours is mine.” But these days, some young couples are skeptical. “There has been a generational change,” said Joanna Pepin, a doctoral candidate at the University of Maryland
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Heat waves are roasting reefs, but some corals may be resilientThe latest research on coral reefs clarifies the devastation of heat waves and looks at how coral might be able to adapt to warming waters.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Smarter fiber data transmission doubles capacity to the homeResearchers of Eindhoven University of Technology and fiber broadband equipment supplier Genexis have developed data transmission techniques that can double or even triple the data transmission capacity of existing fiber to the home connections. Enjoying this increase requires you to upgrade your modem. But even if only your neighbors do, you can get a higher data capacity as well.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Crawling social media to understand outlaw motorcycle gang dynamicsUnderstanding and isolating the factors in the recruitment to organised crime and terrorist networks is the ambitious mission of the PROTON project. The first step in this three-year-long venture is, of course, to investigate what we already know about those processes—that's what Dr. Stefan Rilling has been working on for the project's first year, with his team at Fraunhofer Institute for Intellig
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sweden's new road powers electric vehicles – what's the environmental impact?Sweden has built the first smart road that will allow electric vehicles to charge as they drive. The eRoadArlanda pilot scheme, which covers two kilometres of road outside Stockholm, is an attempt to solve one of the biggest challenges that the transport industry faces. Namely, how to move freight and people in a way that neither damages the climate through greenhouse gas emissions nor the quality
4h
Live Science

Iridescent Algae Glow with Their Very Own OpalsAlgae can be glamorous, too.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research debunks 'myth' that strenuous exercise suppresses the immune systemNew research suggests that rather than dampen immunity, endurance sports, like this weekend's London Marathon, can actually boost the body's ability to fight off illness.
4h
Blog » Languages » English

Alice in Neuroland: Curious CubesFinally, you seem to be out of that retinal thicket, but only to find yourself chasing the White Rabbit down some new passageway, one that seems even longer than the first! It’s simply packed with neurons transmitting bursts of data in the same direction you’re going. This must be the optic nerve, which funnels visual information from the eye to the brain. Alice loves neuroscience at least as muc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is dark matter made of primordial black holes?Astronomers studying the motions of galaxies and the character of the cosmic microwave background radiation came to realize in the last century that most of the matter in the universe was not visible. About 84 percent of the matter in the cosmos is dark matter, much of it located in halos around galaxies. It was dubbed dark matter because it does not emit light, but it is also mysterious: it is no
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stars are born in loose groupingsBased on previously published data from the Gaia Mission, researchers at Heidelberg University have derived the conditions under which stars form. The Gaia satellite is measuring the three-dimensional positions and motions of stars in the Milky Way with unprecedented accuracy. Using these data, Dr. Jacob Ward and Dr. Diederik Kruijssen determined the positions, distances and speeds of a large numb
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Measuring devices for the world's most extreme environmentNorwegian research scientists are contributing to the development of the world's hottest geothermal well in a non-volcanic area. The goal is to exploit the inexhaustible supply of heat from the interior of the Earth, and this calls for equipment that can withstand the most extreme conditions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change may scuttle Caribbean's post-hurricane plans for a renewable energy boomPuerto Rico lost electricity again on April 18, seven months after Hurricane Maria first knocked out the island's power grid. For people in some remote rural areas, the blackout was more of the same. Their power had yet to be restored.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Structured light and nanomaterials open new ways to tailor light at the nanoscaleWhat happens when you excite novel assemblies of nanomaterials using structured light? Joint research between Tampere University of Technology (TUT) (Finland) and University of Tübingen (Germany) has shown that carefully structured light and matching arrangements of metal nanostructures (so-called "plasmonic oligomers") can be combined to alter the properties of the generated light at the nanomete
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The dark side of cichlid fish—from cannibal to caregiverCannibalism, the eating of conspecifics, has a rational background in the animal kingdom. It may serve as a source of energy-rich nutrition or to increase reproductive success. Some species do not even spare their own brood. Researchers from the Vetmeduni Vienna have now been able to show the trigger of this peculiarity in African cichlids. When their eggs were taken away for a prolonged period, t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plastic packaging is often pollution for profitYou benefit from plastic from the moment you get up and use your toothbrush or kettle. Plastic is embedded in agriculture – and it keeps you alive if you end up in hospital. Even some of our money is made from it. Yet I can't watch the news without being bombarded by the evils of plastic. As a polymer scientist, it feels like my life's work is dismissed as immoral by even my hero Sir David Attenbo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tiny particles high up in the sky give insight into climate changeScientists have observed extremely high concentrations of aerosol particles at 8- to 14-km altitudes over the Amazon Basin. This finding could have significant implications for climate change.
4h
The Atlantic

Trump’s Attacks on Comey Collide With RealitySamuel Johnson once stood talking with James Boswell about a theory expressed by a certain Bishop Berkeley that the external world was made up entirely of representations. There was no reality, only beliefs. Disgusted, Johnson said : “I refute it thus!”—and aimed a kick at a nearby boulder. The point being: You can believe what you want, but if you ignore the rocks, you’ll badly hurt your toe. Th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Meditation could help anxiety and cardiovascular healthIn a student-led study, one hour of mindfulness meditation shown to reduce anxiety and some cardiovascular risk markers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fat cells seem to remember unhealthy dietFat cells can be damaged in a short amount of time when they are exposed to the fatty acid palmitate or the hormone TNF-alpha through a fatty diet, a new study shows. The researchers from Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research hope this new knowledge may be used to develop new preventive strategies for diabetes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For heavy lifting, use exoskeletons with cautionYou can wear an exoskeleton, but it won't turn you into a superhero. In the journal Applied Ergonomics, researchers report that that a commercially available exoskeleton relieved stress on the arms just as it was supposed to -- but it increased stress on the back by more than 50 percent.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New theory shows how strain makes for better catalystsA new theory of how compression and tension can affect the reactivity of metal catalysts could be helpful in designing new and better catalysts.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Immune diversity among the KhoeSan populationBy analyzing genes of two distinct groups of the KhoeSan, investigators were able to find a level of diversity and divergence in immune cell repertoires much higher than identified in any other population. The findings are described in an article published this month in The Journal of Immunology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New microscope reveals biological life as you've never seen it beforeAstronomers developed a 'guide star' adaptive optics technique to obtain the most crystal-clear and precise telescopic images of distant galaxies, stars and planets. Now a team of scientists are borrowing the very same trick. They've combined it with lattice light-sheet to create a new microscope to capture unprecedented images of biology. The work -- a collaboration between researchers at Howard
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A fat belly is bad for your heartBelly fat, even in people who are not otherwise overweight, is bad for the heart, according to results from the Mayo Clinic presented today at EuroPrevent 2018, a European Society of Cardiology congress.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The challenges of an alien spaceflight program—escaping super-Earths and red dwarf starsSince the beginning of the Space Age, humans have relied on chemical rockets to get into space. While this method is certainly effective, it is also very expensive and requires a considerable amount of resources. As we look to more efficient means of getting out into space, one has to wonder if similarly advanced species on other planets (where conditions would be different) would rely on similar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists introduce magnetic data storage of the futureSingle-molecule magnets (SMMs) have been attracting a lot of attention recently. This is because of the increased demand for faster, longer-lasting and lower-energy IT systems, and the need for higher data storage capacity.
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Science | The Guardian

Space Rocks celebrates astronomy and music at London's O2Space Rocks, an event celebrating astronomy and music, kicks off this Sunday. The twinned nature of the disciplines it celebrates stretch back millennia Somehow music and astronomy seem to go together. The association was made in the 6th century BC by the philosopher Pythagoras, who suggested each planet made a different sound and that together these notes made up the musica universalis , the har
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Science : NPR

Major Earthquake On Bay Area Fault Could Kill 800 People, USGS PredictsThe U.S. Geological Survey simulated a 7.0 magnitude earthquake on the Hayward Fault near Oakland, Calif., and found that such a quake could kill hundreds and cause more than $100 billion in damage. (Image credit: Ben Margot/AP)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Innovative imaging technology leads to automated pathological diagnosisFUJIFILM Corporation has developed surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) imaging technology capable of analyzing large areas of unlabeled/unstained tissue metabolites with high precision using SERS that enhances the Raman scattering light when the target substance is irradiated with light, detecting substances with a high sensitivity.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Henderson IslandHenderson Island lies in the South Pacific, about halfway between New Zealand and Chile. As one of the best examples of a coral atoll, Henderson Island is a UN World Heritage site and one of the world's biggest marine reserves. However, while this remote, uninhabited, tiny landmass may look idyllic and untouched by humans, it's one of the most plastic-polluted places on Earth.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Archaeologist finds red and yellow paint on antonine wallUniversity of Glasgow archaeologist using cutting edge technology on remnants of the Antonine Wall has shown parts of it were painted in bright colours.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rare earth magnet recycling is a grind, but new process takes a simpler approachA new recycling process developed at the U.S. Department of Energy's Critical Materials Institute (CMI) turns discarded hard disk drive (HDD) magnets into new magnet material in a few steps, and tackles both the economic and environmental issues typically associated with mining e-waste for valuable materials.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mind the gap – does age difference in relationships matter?Romantic couples with a large age gap often raise eyebrows. Studies have found partners with more than a ten-year gap in age experience social disapproval. But when it comes to our own relationships, both men and women prefer someone their own age, but are open to someone 10-15 years their junior or senior.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research reveals pressures facing tour guidesThe rapid growth of adventure tourism has created opportunities in New Zealand, but the well-being of tourist guides is often overlooked.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using nanotechnology to improve efficiency in petroleum extractionWho is making sure the world meets its energy needs while minimizing risks to the planet? Your first guess might not be the world's largest petroleum company. But during a sabbatical research project with Saudi Aramco, WPI professor Nancy Burnham—an avowed environmentalist—learned that, in fact, the company uses methods such as nanotechnology to extract resources with the least possible disruption
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research models how deadly virus moves among Pacific salmon, troutFor the first time researchers studying a deadly virus modeled how it spreads to young trout and salmon in the waters of the Columbia River Basin, showing that migrating adult fish are the main source of exposure.
5h
The Atlantic

Four Things the Comey Memos RevealThursday evening, after a long legal battle, the Department of Justice turned over to Congress a set of memos written by FBI Director James Comey about his interactions with Donald Trump. And within about an hour, predictably, the memos had leaked to the press. The documents are a fascinating read: a window into Comey’s mind at the moment of his encounters with the president-elect and then presid
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

England behind other countries in maths performance of disadvantaged pupilsMaths performance of disadvantaged pupils in England ranks in the lower half of developed countries, new analysis by UCL Institute of Education and the Education Policy Institute (EPI) reveals.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tilapia—freak farmed fish or evolutionary rock star?Posts are appearing on my Facebook feed warning against the dangers of eating tilapia. So I decided to do a little research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Algae as a viable alternative to food, animal feed and care productsToday, 90 percent of organic chemicals are based on fossil fuels, meaning they are based on non-renewable resources. 70 percent of proteins in the European Union are imported. An alternative is needed. Due to their high growth rate and the small land area required, algae could become that alternative. We're not at that stage just yet. The challenge is to optimise the algae value chain, from local
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Business in Key Biodiversity Areas: Minimizing the risk to natureA roadmap for businesses operating in some of the most biologically significant places on the planet has been issued this week by the Key Biodiversity Area Partnership involving 12 of the world's leading conservation organizations -- including IUCN, International Union for Conservation of Nature.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

On the shape of the 'petal' for the dissipation curveTopological insulators are new materials that have been studied by many research groups around the world for more than ten years. The main advantage of such materials is the presence (under certain symmetry conditions) of dissipationless states at the sample boundary, while the bulk material retains the properties of an insulator. In view of these properties, it is hoped that topological insulator
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genomics study in Africa: Demographic history and deleterious mutationsScientists from the Institut Pasteur set out to understand how the demographic changes associated with the Neolithic transition also influenced the efficacy of natural selection. By comparing the genome diversity of more than 300 individuals from groups of forest hunter-gatherers (pygmies) and farmers (Bantu-speaking peoples), from western and eastern Central Africa, they discovered that the reaso
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trees are not as sound asleep as you may thinkHigh-precision three-dimensional surveying of 21 different species of trees has revealed a yet unknown cycle of subtle canopy movement during the night. The 'sleep cycles' differed from one species to another. Detection of anomalies in overnight movement could become a future diagnostic tool to reveal stress or disease in crops.
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These Surreal Portraits Are Like Mathematical PuzzlesKensuke Koike adds nothing and takes away nothing from the portraits he alters—just rearranges the parts.
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The Selfie as We Know It Is DeadSelfies may not be cool anymore, but their spirit lives on—just as it always has.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Optical path recognition made audibleStudents of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have developed an image recognition algorithm that identifies obstacles and recognizes free pathways. Based on this, the iXpoint software company has now developed the Camassia smartphone app as an assistance system for the visually impaired. It generates acoustic signals that enable users to follow the desired pathway. It is the first interactiv
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Optimized positioning of geothermal boreholes reduces seismicityWhen constructing geothermal systems for the extraction of heat from underground hot water reservoirs, optimal positioning of the boreholes can considerably reduce seismicity. This is the result of induced seismicity studies by scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT). Induced seismicity means shocks caused by human activities. Based on the change of water pressure in the rock (pore p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can we better prepare hens for cage-free living?Consumers are clamoring for cage-free eggs, and producers are scrambling to meet the demand.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Remote-control shoots laser at nano-gold to turn on cancer-killing immune cellsA remote command could one day send immune cells on a rampage against a malignant tumor. The ability to mobilize, from outside the body, targeted cancer immunotherapy inside the body has taken a step closer to becoming reality.
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It’s 4/20, and an FDA Panel Just OK’d a Drug Made From MarijuanaThe treatment was fast-tracked for approval, and the first person to use the drug in the US was our writer's son.
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Science | The Guardian

Halt population slump by easing access to donor sperm, EU urgedWorld’s biggest sperm bank calls for fewer regulations to revive Europe’s childbirth rates The world’s biggest sperm bank has warned the EU that access to donor sperm must be improved to reinvigorate childbirth rates amid the continent’s slump in population growth. Sperm banks across Europe have closed after the enforcement of new EU regulations on staffing levels, executives at the Danish firm C
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The Atlantic

The Skillful Foreshadowing of Neil GorsuchJustice Neil Gorsuch may have had a slightly awkward first year, but he just racked up a hell of a week. In his public and judicial personas so far, Gorsuch has seemed a bit tone-deaf and clumsy. Court-watchers have mildly ridiculed his ponderous writing style. And his public appearances in highly partisan venues (including parading around Kentucky as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s in-p
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Live Science

Quantum Radar Could Make Stealth Technology ObsoleteUsing entangled photons, scientists want to create a 'quantum radar' that can detect stealth bombers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

HKU medical chemists discover peptic ulcer treatment metallodrug effective in 'taming' superbugsA novel solution to antimicrobial resistance -- HKU medical chemists discover peptic ulcer treatment metallodrug effective in 'taming' superbugs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How do people die in Switzerland today?Today, almost two thirds of deaths in Switzerland aren't unexpected. How does the cultural context specific to each linguistic region influence end-of-life decisions? Researchers from the universities of Zurich and Geneva noticed significant differences between regions. However, these differences are not always more important than those observed between these regions and the countries with which t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A study links soil metals with cancer mortalitySpanish epidemiologists and geologists have found associations between esophageal cancer and soils where lead is abundant, lung cancer and terrains with increased copper content, brain tumor with areas rich in arsenic, and bladder cancer with high cadmium levels. These statistical links do not indicate that there is a cause-effect relationship between soil type and cancer, but they suggest that th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Treatment of cancer could become possible with adenovirusAn international team of researchers led by professor Niklas Arnberg at Umeå University, shows that adenovirus binds to a specific type of carbohydrate that is overexpressed on certain types of cancer cells. The discovery opens up new opportunities for the development of virus-based cancer therapy. The study is published in the latest issue of the scientific journal "Proceedings of the National Ac
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

A Parkland teacher's homework for us all | Diane Wolk-RogersDiane Wolk-Rogers teaches history at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, site of a horrific school shooting on Valentine's Day 2018. How can we end this senseless violence? In a stirring talk, Wolk-Rogers offers three ways Americans can move forward to create more safety and responsibility around guns -- and invites people to come up with their own answers, too. Above all, s
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New on MIT Technology Review

A 2017 audit said Facebook’s data practices were A-OK
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Futurity.org

DNA to store Massive Attack album for near eternityAn album by trip hop pioneers Massive Attack is headed for near-eternal storage in DNA molecules within tiny glass beads. It’s been 20 years since the release of Mezzanine , the British band’s most successful project to date. To mark the album’s 20th anniversary, the band is having it stored in DNA molecules. “This method allows us to archive the music for hundreds to thousands of years,” says Ro
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Popular Science

How to throw a punchDIY Without hurting yourself more than your opponent. Understanding how to throw a punch—before you go all John Wayne on a bad guy—will prevent you from hurting yourself more than whatever you’re swinging at.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Small changes in rainforests cause big damage to fish ecosystemsUsing lasers, researchers have connected, arranged and merged artificial cells, paving the way for networks of artificial cells acting as tissues.
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Futurity.org

Drug dials down intense opioid-related itchingChronic itching is a common side effect of opioids—a problem for some people who need the drugs for pain relief and for others fighting addiction. A new study with mice finds a drug delivers itch relief by targeting particular opioid receptors on neurons in the spinal cord. Nalfurafine hydrochloride (brand name Remitch) is approved in Japan to alleviate itching in dialysis patients with chronic k
5h
The Atlantic

I Sat Through the First Stop on Facebook's Feel-Good Road ShowSome time ago, a man named Stephen found himself yearning for his home-state’s famous peaches. He’d grown up in Georgia, but lived in Nashville, Tennessee, where the peaches—desiccated, tasteless things—barely merited the name. Sensing a market, Stephen started selling Georgia peaches out of the back of his truck. The peach truck was a hit, as was Stephen’s subsequent online peach store. In just
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lupus treatment generates positive results in Phase III clinical trialNew research indicates that belimumab, a monoclonal antibody therapy that targets a component of the immune system, provides considerable benefits to patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a predominately female, chronic inflammatory disease that can affect virtually any organ.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biomarkers for irritable bowel syndromeLittle is still known about the exact causes of irritable bowel syndrome. An international team with significant involvement from the Technical University of Munich has provided initial clues about the organic triggers of the disease, which affects an estimated one out of six people.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New DNA screening reveals whose blood the vampire bat is drinkingThe vampire bat prefers to feed on domestic animals such as cows and pigs. When it does so, there is a risk of transmission of pathogens. Now, a new study describes a new DNA method to efficiently screen many vampire bat blood meal and fecal samples with a high success rate and thereby determine which animals the vampire bats have fed on blood from.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Structured light and nanomaterials open new ways to tailor light at the nanoscaleJoint research between Tampere University of Technology, (Finland) and University of Tübingen (Germany) has shown that carefully structured light and matching arrangements of metal nanostructures can be combined to alter the properties of the generated light at the nanometer scale. The teams have shown that the efficiency of nonlinear optical fields generated from the oligomers is strongly influen
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Russian scientists learned to perform a diagnosis by analyzing salivaResearchers of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) within the framework of the Project 5-100 developed a unique method of immune diseases diagnosing before the symptoms appear. Scientists proposed a laser-correlation spectroscopic technique (also called dynamic light scattering) for studying the immune response in body fluids, for example, in saliva.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Successive solid transformations induced electron transfer and switchable functionsElectron-transfer in solid is crucial to switchable magnetic, electrical, optical, and mechanical properties. However, it is a formidable challenge to control electron-transfer behaviors via manipulation of solid states. Herein, three solid states of an {Fe2Co2} compound were obtained via enhancement of intermolecular π* * * π interactions induced successive solid transformations accompanying diff
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research reveals stronger people have healthier brainsA study of nearly half a million people has revealed that muscular strength, measured by handgrip, is an indication of how healthy our brains are. The study, published in Schizophrenia Bulletin, also showed that maximal handgrip was strongly correlated with both visual memory and reaction time in over one thousand people with psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia.
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Ingeniøren

Opposition: Regeringen udvander beskyttelsen af dansk natur og vores bierRød blok advarer regeringen mod at modarbejde et strammet forbud mod neonikotinoider. SF forventer at blive hørt,, fordi partiet gik med i sidste års pesticidforlig.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bottlenose dolphins recorded for the first time in Canadian Pacific watersA large group of common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) have been spotted in Canadian Pacific waters -- the first confirmed occurrence of the species in this area.
6h
New on MIT Technology Review

The US-China tech trade war is getting dialed up a notch
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Scientists discover mechanism behind motor neurone diseaseAn international team found that a protein causes brain cells to die when it is stuck in the jelly phase.
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Scientific American Content: Global

New NASA Chief Jim Bridenstine Faces "Uphill Climb" after Contentious ConfirmationPartisanship and his past statements about climate change could hinder Bridenstine’s leadership of the space agency -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When there's an audience, people's performance improvesOften people think performing in front of others will make them mess up, but a new study found the opposite: being watched makes people do better.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Primary pancreatic organoid tumor models for high-throughput phenotypic drug screeningA multidisciplinary team of scientists share recent advancements in innovative in-vitro cancer biology methods for screening drug-like molecules in cancer tissue relevant models in a new report published online ahead-of-print at SLAS Discovery. Entitled Advanced Development of Primary Pancreatic Organoid Tumor Models for High-Throughput Phenotypic Drug Screening, the report can be accessed for fre
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rare earth magnet recycling is a grind -- this new process takes a simpler approachA new recycling process developed at the US Department of Energy's Critical Materials Institute turns discarded hard disk drive magnets into new magnet material in a few steps, and tackles both the economic and environmental issues typically associated with mining e-waste for valuable materials.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Remote-control shoots laser at nano-gold to turn on cancer-killing immune cellsCancer immune cell therapy has made headlines with astounding successes like saving former US President Jimmy Carter from brain cancer. But immunotherapy has also had many tragic flops. Georgia Tech researchers working to optimize the innovative treatment have implanted a genetic switch that activates T-cells when they are inside of tumors. Remote-control light waves resembling those used in a TV
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Ingeniøren

Fingrenes mønster af blodårer er unikke persondataNu kan man betale for frokosten ved at føre sin finger ind i en nærinfrarød scanner. Men betaling med den slags biometriske metoder kan rende ind i problemer med opbevaring af persondata, mener forsker i biometri.
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New Scientist - News

Trees may have a ‘heartbeat’ that is so slow we never noticed itTrees repeatedly move their branches up and down during the night, and this may reflect water being pumped along the branches – just like a human pulse
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'The Bay Area is broken': Why Silicon Valley startups are hiring elsewhereSilicon Valley may be the world's tech paradise, but it's a hiring nightmare for many local startups now forced to venture from Portland to Boise in search of talent.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Airbus, Bill Gates and others back video imaging satellite ventureAirbus, Bill Gates and Japanese billionaire Masayoshi Son have joined to back a spinoff from Bellevue, Wash.-based Intellectual Ventures that aims to launch a constellation of imaging satellites "that will deliver real-time, continuous video of almost anywhere on Earth."
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Science's "Reproducibility Crisis" Is Now Political AmmunitionA report from the National Association of Scholars takes on the reproducibility crisis in science. Not everyone views the group’s motives as pure.
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Why Police Should Monitor Social Media to Prevent CrimeOpinion: Citizens may object to their social media posts being mined by law enforcement, but the practice can keep the public safe.
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Uber's Peace Process, Tesla's Tantrum, and More Car News This WeekPlus: Electric scooters invade American cities and Lyft goes after its carbon emissions.
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Beyoncé, Kendrick Lamar, Kanye West, and How the World Seeks to Limit Black GeniusThis week, the precision and thunder of artistic exceptionalism were on full display. So were critics.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Sonning 2018: Rørt von Trier takkede for prisLars von Trier fik overrakt Københavns Universitets Sonningpris den 19. april 2018 i universitetets...
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Science | The Guardian

The week in wildlife – in picturesA newly hatched turtle, a roaming peacock and egrets in China are among this week’s pick of images from the natural world Continue reading...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Simulations suggest Saturn may have helped create Jupiter's big moonsA team of researchers from France and the U.S. has created a computer simulation of the development of the solar system focusing on Jupiter and the origins of its moons. In their paper uploaded to the arXiv preprint server, the group describes the simulation showing that Saturn may have played a role in the creation of Jupiter's largest moons.
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Futurity.org

Activating these ‘keyhole’ receptors stops hungerResearchers have characterized a complex, little-understood receptor type that, when activated, shuts off hunger. The findings may open up opportunities to fight obesity at the cellular level. Jens Meiler, a professor of chemistry and pharmacology at Vanderbilt University, says pharmaceutical companies have long attempted to develop a small-molecule drug that can do just that. But until now, nobo
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The Scientist RSS

Male Fruit Flies Take Pleasure in Having SexSex-deprived males seek out alcohol.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Brain, Heal ThyselfWhen a mouse's brain undergoes traumatic injury, immune cells clear the dead from the affected area, after which blood cells swoop in to repair blood vessels.
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Viden

Facebooks ansigtsgenkendelse er muligvis ulovligFacebook er begyndt at analysere ansigter på europæiske brugere. Men teknologien kan være på kant med den kommende persondataforordning, GDPR.
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Futurity.org

‘Sea Monkeys’ show how tiny critters churn oceanSwarms of tiny ocean organisms known collectively as zooplankton may have an outsize influence on their environment. These clusters of centimeter-long individuals, each beating tiny feathered legs, can, in aggregate, create powerful currents that may mix water over hundreds of meters in depth. Although the work was carried out in the lab, the research is the first to show that migrating zooplankt
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Popular Science

This year's Lyrid meteor shower coincides with Earth Day, but light pollution is ruining the showEnvironment Light pollution makes it hard for many people to appreciate the stars. The Lyrids are one of the year’s most impressive displays of shooting stars, and though most Americans can stand outside and spot a few streaks, the vast majority won’t…
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Dagens Medicin

Rørbæk: Lovændring er et skridt i den rigtige retningDen stærkt kritiske læge Kristian Rørbæk Madsen tager godt imod sundhedsministerens melding om, at sundhedsloven skal ændres oven på Svendborg-sagen. Han advarer dog Christiansborg-politikerne mod at lægge hele ansvaret hos regioner og sygehusledelser.
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Dagens Medicin

Sundhedsminister: Regioner har ansvar for pressede afdelingerMange afdelinger kan ikke stille nødberedskab under lockout. Sundhedsministeren erkender i samråd, at nogle afdelinger er enormt pressede, men at det er regionernes opgave at sikre forholdene.
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Calling Facebook a Utility Would Only Make Things WorseFacebook is ubiquitous, yes—but we shouldn't put it on the same regulatory plane as telecom giants.
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The 'Do Not Disturb' App Protects Your Mac From 'Evil Maid' AttacksDetecting an insidious physical attack on your MacBook may often be as simple as alerting you when its lid opens.
7h
The Atlantic

Amazon May Have a Counterfeit ProblemA decade ago, when I was a reporter for the Los Angeles Times, I tagged along with Chris Johnson, an attorney representing True Religion jeans, as he searched for counterfeits in the stores of Santee Alley, Los Angeles’s hub for knockoffs. We’d go into a store undercover, look around, and ask if they sold any True Religion jeans. The store owner would sometimes lead us into a back room where the
7h
The Atlantic

A Silicon Valley Pot DealImagine, for a moment, a marijuana producer. See his Crocs. Admire his hacky-sack. Inhale his earthy musk. Whoever comes to mind—it’s not John Russo. Stepping to the podium in the San Jose Hilton’s tasteful ballroom earlier this month, Russo, a real-life marijuana manufacturer, looked a lot like my gastroenterologist: white ring of hair around the periphery of his head, wire-rimmed glasses, styli
7h
The Atlantic

Letters: ‘And Now, Now Will We Go to War?’What If There Is No Ethical Way to Act in Syria Now? Last week, Sigal Samuel spoke with a variety of philosophers and ethicists about America’s moral responsibility in Syria. Many of them were at a loss. The philosophers dropping in for comments throughout Sigal Samuel’s piece left me utterly baffled and frustrated. I have no doubts of their sincerity, let alone any good intentions. However, firs
7h
Science : NPR

For One Fine-Dining Chef, Cutting Food Waste Saves The Planet And The Bottom LineAfter nearly going bankrupt, chef Tim Ma cut costs by cooking creatively with every last bit of ingredients. Some dishes born of frugality have become favorites at his acclaimed D.C. restaurant. (Image credit: Becky Harlan/NPR)
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

How Deep Is Your Carbon Footprint?--Celebrate Earth Day with DataAn infographic reveals the most effective ways to live more sustainably -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Review: Apple's New iPad is the best tablet for almost everybodyThe Apple iPad is a gadget that appeals to a really wide audience.
7h
New Scientist - News

Driverless cars are dodging pedestrians and pheasants in OxfordAutonomous cars are preparing to drive from Oxford to London. The thorny route includes motorways, pedestrian packed streets and an occasional pheasant
7h
Live Science

These 'Dirty' Thunderstorms Fill the Sky with As Much Smoke As a Volcanic EruptionWildfires can fuel "dirty" thunderstorms that fill the stratosphere with as much smoke as a volcanic eruption.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Model suggests well-designed subsidies can help farmers and give consumers better food choicesWhen it comes to pegging the blame for the obesity crisis, farm subsidies are a popular target. Subsidies, the argument goes, encourage farmers to grow less-healthy foods—corn, turned into corn syrup, is the common culprit here—and fewer unsubsidized fruits and vegetables.
8h
Ingeniøren

Grønt lys for luftledninger banede vej for EnglandskabelHvis politikerne havde holdt fast i, at nye kabelforbindelser skulle graves ned, havde det været for dyrt at etablere det omdiskuterede Viking Link til England.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How does a city get to be 'smart'? This is how Tel Aviv did itSmart cities, digital cities, virtual cities, connected cities. Are these just trendy buzzwords? Perhaps. But these types of cities are supported by infrastructure that is more than bricks and mortar.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Single-cell database to propel biological studiesA team at Whitehead Institute and MIT has harnessed single-cell technologies to analyze over 65,000 cells from the regenerative planarian flatworm, Schmidtea mediterranea, revealing the complete suite of actives genes (or "transcriptome") for practically every type of cell in a complete organism. This transcriptome atlas represents a treasure trove of biological information on planarians, which is
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gauging the effects of water scarcity on an irrigated planetGrowing global food demand, climate change, and climate policies favoring bioenergy production are expected to increase pressures on water resources around the world. Many analysts predict that water shortages will constrain the ability of farmers to expand irrigated cropland, which would be critical to ramping up production of both food and bioenergy crops. If true, bioenergy production and food
8h
New Scientist - News

Antibiotic-resistant bacteria cross oceans hidden in cargo shipsSeveral types of dangerous bacteria​,​ carrying genes that our antibiotics cannot fight​,​ are travelling the world hidden in ships' ballast tanks
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Will rising carbon dioxide levels really boost plant growth?Plants have become an unlikely subject of political debate. Many projections suggest that burning fossil fuels and the resulting climate change will make it harder to grow enough food for everyone in the coming decades. But some groups opposed to limiting our emissions claim that higher levels of carbon dioxide (CO₂) will boost plants' photosynthesis and so increase food production.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

It's Full of Stars: New 3-D Milky Way Map Could Settle Debate over Who Discovered the First ExoplanetBetter data from the Gaia spacecraft also promises to shed light on mysterious brown dwarfs -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers find polyploidy has occurred many times during the evolution of insectsUniversity of Arizona biology researchers have made a discovery that helps resolve a conundrum that has puzzled scientists for more than a century.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists discover gene controlling genetic recombination ratesGenetics is a crapshoot. During sexual reproduction, genes from both the mother and the father mix and mingle to produce a genetic combination unique to each offspring. In most cases, the chromosomes line up properly and crossover. In some unlucky cases, however, "selfish DNA" enters the mix, causing abnormal crossovers with deletions or insertions in chromosomes, which can manifest as birth defec
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA engineers dream big with small spacecraftMany of NASA's most iconic spacecraft towered over the engineers who built them: think Voyagers 1 and 2, Cassini or Galileo—all large machines that could measure up to a school bus.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unveiling the secrets of the Milky Way galaxyA multinational team of astronomers involving the University of Adelaide has catalogued over 70 sources of very high energy gamma rays, including 16 previously undiscovered ones, in a survey of the Milky Way using gamma ray telescopes.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers build DNA replication in a model synthetic cellResearchers at Delft University of Technology, in collaboration with colleagues at the Autonomous University of Madrid, have created an artificial DNA blueprint for the replication of DNA in a cell-like structure. Creating such a complex biological module is an important step towards an even more ambitious goal: building a complete and functioning synthetic cell from the bottom up.
8h
The Atlantic

How Asia's Super Divers Evolved for a Life At SeaThe Bajau people of Southeast Asia are among the most accomplished divers in the world. In the summer of 2015, Melissa Ilardo got to see how good they are firsthand. She remembers diving with Pai Bayubu, who had already gone fairly deep when he saw a giant clam, 30 to 50 feet below him. “He just dropped down,” Ilardo recalls. “He pointed at it, and then he was there. Underwater, the Bajau are as
8h
The Atlantic

'I Expected to Have a Day Job for the Rest of My Life'At age 12, Philip Glass started working in a Baltimore record store owned by a man he called Ben. Ben was, in fact, Glass’s father, but he and his brother, Marty, both referred to him by his first name because they didn’t want anyone to know they were his children. Of course everyone still knew who they were. Even before working in that small record store and spending countless evenings with Ben,
8h
Feed: All Latest

23andMe Wants You to Share Even More Health DataOn a new health portal, 23andMe encourages customers to share how they manage common health conditions. It’s not hard to see who gets the better side of the deal.
8h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Celebrity names now mark places on Pluto’s moon CharonPluto’s largest moon, Charon, now has 12 new names for its topological features.
8h
BBC News - Science & Environment

ExoMars: Getting ready to drive on the Red PlanetEngineers finish assembly of the test model for Europe's ExoMars rover mission.
8h
NYT > Science

Ask Well: Can You Miss the Signs of Heart Disease or a Heart Attack?It’s not always easy to tell if you have heart disease or have had a heart attack.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

End the War on WeedFederal marijuana laws are counterproductive and overly harsh -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Science-Based Medicine

Separating Fact from Fiction in Maternal-Fetal Medicine: Anti-D Immunoglobulin for the Prevention of Hemolytic Disease of the Fetus and NewbornThe Healthy Home Economist, a pseudoexpert in health and wellness with no actual education or training in medicine, is telling mothers to avoid a safe and effective approach to preventing a deadly pregnancy complication that used to result in the death of thousands of babies every year.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Drought returns to huge swaths of US, fueling fears of a thirsty futureLess than eight months after Hurricane Harvey pelted the Texas Gulf Coast with torrential rainfall, drought has returned to Texas and other parts of the West, Southwest and Southeast, rekindling old worries for residents who dealt with earlier waves of dry spells and once again forcing state governments to reckon with how to keep the water flowing.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

From promposals to Snaps, smartphones are crashing the prom partySmartphones have forever changed our lives. They also have forever changed the experience of the all-important high school ritual of going to the prom.
8h
Live Science

Exorcisms Enter 21st Century with Cellphone-Enabled Demon BustingCatholic priests have flocked to Rome for this year's exorcism training. Here's what that entails.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Earth Day and the Hockey Stick: A Singular MessageOn the 20th anniversary of the graph that galvanized climate action, it is time to speak out boldly -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Ingeniøren

Vandspild stoppes med data fra gamle rørFejl kan opdages hurtigere med fjernaflæste målere, hvor forbruget registreres med langt kortere intervalle.Ny Kamstrup-software skal reducere vandspild
9h
Ingeniøren

Britisk politi gemmer 20 millioner ulovlige billeder af borgerne: »For dyrt at slette«Når det er for krævende at overholde loven - jamen, så lader man da bare være, er næsten forklaringen fra det britiske politi, der ikke vil slette billeder af folk, der er blevet frifundet.
9h
Ingeniøren

MIT: Nu kan du kommunikere med din indre stemmeDet er ikke selvhjælp, men en ny teknologi, der netop er blevet præsenteret fra MIT Media Lab. Det er ikke kønt, men du bliver i stand til at kommunikere - uden ord eller bevægelser - med al elektronik omkring dig.
9h
Big Think

Do moose (and other animals) eat fermented fruit to get drunk?Are all those drunk animals on YouTube actually drunk? Zoologist Lucy Cooke examines what's really going on when animals go, er, wild. Read More
9h
Science | The Guardian

Is it time to worry about human cloning again?People are copying pets to preserve a physical – and spiritual – connection to dead children. MIT Technology Review reports. When Barbra Streisand revealed to Variety magazine that she’d had her dog cloned for $50,000, many people learned for the first time that copying pets and other animals is a real business. That’s right: you can pay to clone a dog, a horse or a top beef bull and get a living
9h
Ingeniøren

Hør ugens podcast om nye højspændingsledningerIngeniørens ugentlige podcast, Transformator, handler denne gang om 170 km nye højspændingsledninger, som der er planer om at rejse master til i Jylland, samtidig med at man andre steder har spenderet milliarder på at fjerne højspændingsmaster og lægge kablerne i jorden.
9h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Oxford Dodo was shot in head, scans findThe world-famous specimen is the world's best-preserved example of the extinct bird.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Swapping cars for shared bicycles could prevent up to 73 deaths per yearThe 12 largest bicycle sharing systems in Europe offer health and economic benefits. Currently, the use of shared bicycles by people who previously used cars prevents five deaths and saves €18 million per year. If all public bicycle trips were made by previous car users, 73 deaths and €226 million would be saved every year. These are the conclusions of a new study by the Barcelona Institute for Gl
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Policy driver of soil organic carbon accumulation in Chinese croplands identifiedChina's croplands have experienced drastic changes in management practices related to fertilization, tillage and residue treatment since the 1980s. The impact of these changes on soil organic carbon (SOC) has drawn major attention from the scientific community and decision-makers because changes in SOC may not only affect future food production but also water and soil quality, as well as greenhous
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists identify unique binding mechanism of antifreeze moleculeScientists have identified a unique molecular binding mechanism that helps keep non-mammalian creatures in sub-zero temperatures from freezing. Antifreeze glycoproteins (AFGPs), produced by polar fishes, inhibit ice growth to prevent their bodies from freezing. This ice binding mechanism, which scientists knew was soft and flexible, remained a mystery until now. Using molecular simulations, scient
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

T-Mobile expands jobs, services for veteransT-Mobile has launched a campaign geared toward veterans, with a hiring effort, discounts on phone lines, and investments in its network near military bases.
10h
NYT > Science

Nonfiction: A Brand-New Version of Our Origin StoryThe Harvard geneticist David Reich details his groundbreaking research into ancient DNA in “Who We Are and How We Got Here.”
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dead whale ingested 64 pounds of plastic and wasteA young sperm whale that washed ashore in Spain had 64 pounds of waste and plastic inside its stomach.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Molecular motor: Four states of rotationWith the help of ultrafast spectroscopy and quantum mechanical calculations, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich researchers have characterized the complete rotational cycle of the light-driven, chemical motor molecule hemithioindigo.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

One step closer to realityThe software 'PyFRAP' is an accurate and reliable tool for the analysis of molecular movement, employing numerical simulations rather than simplified assumptions.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to be smarter about buying organicYou see the labels out there—organic, cage-free, natural—but what does it all mean?
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Preview: Shadow streaming service may succeed where OnLive, others failedThe biggest obstacle for Blade's Shadow service is the past.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Regeringen ændrer sundhedsloven efter SvendborgsagenRegeringen vil ændre sundhedsloven, så det tydeligt fremgår, om det er et organisatorisk ansvar eller den enkelte læges. Ændringen sker på baggrund af Svendborgsagen.
10h
Science : NPR

How Pokemon Inspired A Citizen Science Project To Monitor Tiny StreamsHow do we accurately forecast the amount of water that will be available any given year? It's not easy. But some Colorado scientists think they're onto a possible solution — inspired by Pokemon. (Image credit: Kira Puntenney-Desmond/Colorado State University)
10h
Science : NPR

8 Years After Deepwater Horizon Explosion, Is Another Disaster Waiting To Happen?Eight years after the deadly Deepwater Horizon explosion, a safety watchdog aims to prevent another disaster. But it faces multiple challenges, and a shift in focus under the Trump administration. (Image credit: Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement)
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

One step closer to realityDiffusion is the process that lets the color spread through tea, but there is way more to it than that: It's also one of the most fundamental principles underlying the inner workings of living cells. The ability of molecules to move in or between cells determines where—and if—they can carry out their function. Consequently, the motility of molecules can reveal a lot about their tasks in the living
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gadgets: Treat your pearly whites to a sonic cleanI've been brushing my teeth this week with the Swedish made Foreo ISSA 2, which the company touts as the world's first silicone sonic toothbrush.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon worker's median pay in 2017: $28,446Amazon says its median employee pay was $28,446 last year.
11h
Ingeniøren

Flykaptajn fortæller: Svært at nødlande med eksploderet motor og 469 om bordKaptajnen på Qantas Flight 32 fortæller om en dramatiske nødlanding med A380 i 2010.
11h
Ingeniøren

Sådan skal regeringens 30 mio. kroner årligt til life science fordelesI de kommende fire år har regeringen afsat i alt 120 millioner kroner til life science-området. Se her, hvordan de overordnet skal fordeles.
11h
Ingeniøren

Ingeniøren går i luften med nichemedie for energibranchenGridTech er navnet på Ingeniørens første nichemedie. Ambitionen er at skabe et unikt værktøj for professionelle, der arbejder mod et elektrificeret og CO2-neutralt samfund.
11h
New Scientist - News

Global cancer scheme lets people share data across the worldThe Universal Cancer Databank will let anyone with cancer share their medical and genetic data with researchers globally, with the aim of speeding up new treatments
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In many countries, bone health may be at risk due to low calcium intakeAt a special symposium held today at the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases in Krakow, Poland, experts discussed the findings of the newly launched IOF Global Map of Dietary Calcium Intake in Adults and the implications of low calcium intake for the global population.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US Senate narrowly confirms Trump's new NASA chiefThe US Senate on Thursday narrowly confirmed President Donald Trump's pick to head the space agency NASA, over objections from Democrats who warned he lacked a technical background.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's ZTE vows to fight US supplier banChinese telecom giant ZTE vowed on Friday to fight back against a US order banning it from purchasing and using US technology for seven years, a move that has angered Beijing.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

AT&T chief says merger would boost value of Time WarnerAT&T chief Randall Stephenson on Thursday defended his company's planned mega-merger with Time Warner, arguing in court that the combination would enhance the value of the media-entertainment giant in a sector being roiled by Big Tech.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Brazil prosecutor recommends denying Total oil license near AmazonA Brazilian prosecutor warned of "ecocide" in recommending against a drilling license for French oil major Total close to a huge coral reef near the mouth of the Amazon River.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

As doors close in the US, China's Huawei shifts to EuropeAs trade disputes simmer, Chinese telecommunications giant Huawei, the No. 3 smartphone brand, is shifting its growth efforts toward Europe and Asia in the face of mounting obstacles in the U.S. market.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Archaeologists discover Cornish barrow siteAn Archaeologist at The Australian National University (ANU) has discovered a prehistoric Bronze-Age barrow, or burial mound, on a hill in Cornwall and is about to start excavating the untouched site which overlooks the English Channel.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Faster walking heart patients are hospitalized lessFaster walking patients with heart disease are hospitalized less, according to research presented today at EuroPrevent 2018, a European Society of Cardiology congress, and published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Museum researchers rediscover animal not seen in 30 yearsResearchers from the San Diego Natural History Museum (The Nat) and the non-profit organization Terra Peninsular A.C. have rediscovered the San Quintin kangaroo rat (Dipodomys gravipes) in Baja California; the Museum is partnering with the organization and local authorities on a conservation plan for the species.
13h
Viden

Kirkens verdensbillede blev fastholdt mod bedre videndeModerne fladjordsteoretikere taler mod bedre vidende. Men det gjorde de fleste før i tiden.
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Stella McCartney: Fashion is swamping our planetDesigner Stella McCartney says fashion is a medieval industry, which produces a huge amount of waste.
13h
Live Science

Quinoa: Health Benefits & Nutrition FactsQuinoa, a plant from the Andes, is packed with protein, fiber and various vitamins and minerals.
13h
Science | The Guardian

‘Magical' mushroom mix to boost regrowth of lost Scottish forestsReturn of Great Caledonian forest speeded up with fungi spores to help saplings flourish The return of the Great Caledonian forest that once covered much of Scotland’s highlands is being boosted with a special mix of mushroom spores that should help saplings survive better on the hills. Fungi living on the roots of trees play a vital role in the ecology, helping to break down nutrients in the soi
14h
Ingeniøren

Pacemakere og infusionspumper er sårbare over for cyberangrebPatienter risikerer at blive udsat for cyberangreb, når medicinsk udstyr forbindes med omverdenen. Nye supersygehuse skal stille større krav til leverandører, lyder det fra eksperter
14h
Ingeniøren

Data om danskernes sygdom og liv på én platformEt nyt system skal samle 60 nationale registre om danskernes liv, sygdomshistorie og død. Platformen skal bruges til forskning og monitorering og er næsten færdig.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Læger søger ikke hjælp til behandling af misbrugEt nyt studie viser, at læger ikke søger hjælp for deres misbrug. I stedet forsøger de selv at behandle misbruget.
14h
Ingeniøren

Leder: Sløve myndigheder baner vejen for digitalt privatlivsrøveri
14h
Viden

Faktatjek: Er børn i dag de sundeste i flere årtier?I dag er børn og unge inaktive og overvægtige, lyder påstanden. Men var forældrene meget bedre, da de selv gik i skole?
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Compound improves stroke outcome by reducing lingering inflammationAn experimental compound appears to improve stroke outcome by reducing the destructive inflammation that can continue months after a stroke, scientists report.Rats consuming compound 21 following a clot-based stroke -- the most common type in humans -- don't have a smaller stroke size but do have better memory and movement in its aftermath, says Dr. Adviye Ergul, vascular physiologist and Regents'
15h
Dagens Medicin

»Når jeg rejser hjem, vil jeg gerne afløses af en grønlænder«Professor Peter Vedsted og hans ægtefælle, praktiserende læge Marianne Vedsted, begynder 1. maj som henholdsvis ledende regionslæge for Grønlands nordlige region og regionslæge sammesteds. En grænseoverskridende opgave – og et meget gammelt løfte de to imellem.
15h
The Atlantic

Radio Atlantic: The Syria Disaster, Seven Years InLong the crossroads of civilizations, Syria has now spent seven years as the proxy warzone of great powers. With over half a million dead and millions more displaced, the conflict is now “arguably the world’s largest humanitarian disaster since World War II,” writes Andrew Tabler in The Atlantic . “The Syrian Civil War now threatens to morph into the Syria War—a regional conflagration which seems
15h
New on MIT Technology Review

Is the crypto world sexist? That might be the wrong question.“Inclusion happens when people in power use that power to bring people in rather than keep people out.”
15h
Dagens Medicin

Hvidovre skræddersyr specialiseret palliationFra standardkontroller til en individuelt tilpasset indsats. Det er grundtanken bag et nyt specialiseret palliativt tilbud, som Hvidovre Hospital har udviklet til patienter med livstruende lungesygdom. Håbet er at løfte den basale palliation i lungemedicinsk regi, så de alvorligt syge lungepatienter sikres bedre livskvalitet i deres sidste levetid.
16h
Dagens Medicin

Ny vejledning skal forenkle valget af KOL-behandlingInternationale vejledninger har skabt forvirring om farmakologisk behandling af KOL og har gjort det sværere at klassificere patienter korrekt. Ny vejledning fra Dansk Lungemedicinsk Selskab skærer ind til benet og gør det enklere at vælge den rette behandling.
16h
Dagens Medicin

Korsang skal give KOL-patienter bedre kontrol over deres sygdomEt landsdækkende forskningsprojekt undersøger, om sangtræning kan afhjælpe åndenød, hoste og manglende åndedrætskontrol samt øge KOL-patienters livskvalitet på samme niveau, som fysisk træning kan. Viser det sig at være tilfældet, vil det åbne op for at udvide paletten af rehabiliteringstilbud til patientgruppen, vurderer projektets leder.
16h
Dagens Medicin

Nævn klar med ny anbefaling af tilskud til astma- og KOL-medicinLæger udskriver for meget inhalationssteroid til patienter med KOL, mener Medicintilskudsnævnet, der efter tre års arbejde er klar med anbefalinger for revurdering af tilskud til medicin mod astma og KOL.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Molecule that dilates blood vessels hints at new way to treat heart diseaseAmericans die of heart or cardiovascular disease at an alarming rate. In fact, heart attacks, strokes and related diseases will kill an estimated 610,000 Americans this year alone. Some medications help, but to better tackle this problem, researchers need to know exactly how the heart and blood vessels stay healthy in the first place.
17h
The Atlantic

Rudy Giuliani Isn't the Big Trump Legal StoryRudy Giuliani TeamSometimes the biggest news items on a given day aren’t the most telling ones. Consider three stories on Thursday about President Trump’s legal issues. First, Bloomberg reported that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein told the president last week that he is not a target of either Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation nor of a separate investigation in Manhattan that produced a raid on
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

3-D human 'mini-brains' shed new light on genetic underpinnings of major mental illnessResearchers are leveraging gene-editing tools and mini-organs grown in the lab to study the effects of DISC1 mutations in cerebral organoids -- 'mini brains' -- cultured from human stem cells.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

HIV-1 viruses transmitted at birth are resistant to antibodies in mother's bloodOf the genetically diverse population of HIV-1 viruses present in an infected pregnant woman, the few she might transmit to her child during delivery are resistant to attack by antibodies in her blood, according to new research.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gene-edited stem cells show promise against HIV in non-human primatesGene editing of bone marrow stem cells in pigtail macaques infected with simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) significantly reduces the size of dormant 'viral reservoirs' that pose a risk of reactivation.
18h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Closing gender gap in physics 'will take generations'The gender gap in science subjects like physics is likely to persist for hundreds of years, study suggests.
19h
Dagens Medicin

Tillykke. Men det handler ikke kun om den sidste femøreOK18: Det kan undre, at organisationerne ikke i større grad har kæmpet for at sikre deres medlemmer ordentlige arbejdsvilkår. Faglig stolthed og empati betyder for mange mere end den sidste hundredlap i lønforhøjelse. Det er også vigtigt for arbejdsgiverne at levere kvalitet, og derfor er vinderen af overenskomstforhandlingerne ikke den part, som har klemt de sidste mønter ud af modparten.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Great Barrier Reef coral predicted to last at least 100 years before extinction from climate changeA common Great Barrier Reef coral species has enough genetic diversity to survive at least 100 years before succumbing to global warming, researchers predict.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ramped up fight-or-flight response points to history of warfare for humans and chimpsHumans and chimpanzees recently evolved a more active fight-or-flight response compared to other primates, possibly in response to the threat of warfare.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Algorithm tool works to silence online chatroom sex predatorsAn algorithm tool developed by researchers will help law enforcement filter out and focus on sex offenders most likely to set up face-to-face meetings with child victims.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A novel way of creating gold nanoparticles in waterThe discovery that water microdroplets can replace potentially toxic agents in the creation of gold nanoparticles and nanowires could help usher in a new era of 'green chemistry.'
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rapid rise in mass school shootings in the United States, study showsMore people have died or been injured in mass school shootings in the United States in the past 18 years than in the entire 20th century. In a new study, researchers have reviewed the history of mass school shootings in the U.S. and found some alarming trends.
19h
Science | The Guardian

Cow could soon be largest land mammal left due to human activity – studyResearchers examining extinction of large mammals as humans spread across the world see worrying trend The cow could be left as the biggest land mammal on Earth in a few centuries, according to a new study that examines the extinction of large mammals as humans spread around the world. The spread of hominims – early humans and related species such as Neanderthals – from Africa thousands of years
19h
Science : NPR

Bottlenose Dolphins Spotted Off Canada's Pacific Coast For The First TimeThis was a bizarre sight because this kind of dolphin has never before been spotted in this northern area. They like the warmer waters farther south. About 200 were swimming in the group. (Image credit: Mike Hill/Getty Images)
19h
Feed: All Latest

The Security Risks of Login With FacebookFacebook Privacy DataNew research from Princeton University exposes vulnerabilities in the social network's universal login API.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Young victims of cyberbullying twice as likely to attempt suicide and self-harm, study findsChildren and young people under 25 who are victims of cyberbullying are more than twice as likely to self-harm and enact suicidal behavior, according to a new study. The research also suggests the perpetrators themselves are at higher risk of experiencing suicidal thoughts and behaviors as well.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bottlenose dolphins recorded for the first time in Canadian Pacific watersA large group of common bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) have been spotted in Canadian Pacific waters - the first confirmed occurrence of the species in this area. The sighting is reported in a study published in the open access journal Marine Biodiversity Records.
19h
BBC News - Science & Environment

National Trust needs to be 'radical'The new director-general of the National Trust says the charity needs to reach out to people in urban areas.
19h
Feed: All Latest

Airlines Check Their Engines for the Flaw That Hit SouthwestInvestigators says Flight 1380's engine showed signs of "metal fatigue," and now airlines are hoping to find similar problems before they cause another disaster.
19h
Futurity.org

Wireless camera streams HD video with way less powerEngineers have created a new way to stream HD video from a wireless camera with far less power than current technology. Wearable cameras offer incredible promise, but because these cameras must use smaller batteries to stay lightweight and functional, these devices can’t perform high-definition video streaming. The new prototype, however, skips the power-hungry parts and has something else, like
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unprecedented wave of large-mammal extinctions linked to prehistoric humansHomo sapiens, Neanderthals and other recent human relatives may have begun hunting large mammal species down to size -- by way of extinction -- at least 90,000 years earlier than previously thought, according to a new study. The magnitude and scale of the extinction wave surpassed any other recorded during the last 66 million years, according to the study.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Spider silk key to new bone-fixing compositeResearchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New device to help patients with rare disease access life-saving treatmentPatients with a rare medical condition can receive life-saving treatment at the touch of a button thanks to a new device developed by scientists.
20h
Live Science

'Alice in Wonderland' Dodo Was Murdered in Cold BloodDodos went extinct more than 300 years ago, but scientists are only now opening up a cold case after learning that one of the birds — the prized dodo specimen that likely inspired author Lewis Carroll to create a dodo character in the 1865 book "Alice in
20h

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