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Science : NPR

It's The Hubble Space Telescope's Birthday. Enjoy Amazing Images Of The Lagoon NebulaThis month marks the Hubble Space Telescope's 28 years in space, and as a gift to us earthlings, NASA and the European Space Agency issued photos of colorful, explosive beauty. (Image credit: NASA, ESA, STScI)
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The Atlantic

Bad News for President TrumpOne feature of the truth is that it doesn’t change much. A lie is hard to sustain. The details may change in each retelling because the liar is not actually remembering the events, but instead remembering the telling of the events. The truth, by contrast, is sticky. Consistency is not the only hallmark of truth—some people’s memories are better than other people’s memories, to be sure—but there’s
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Ingeniøren

Nyt system kan omdanne CO2 til miljøvenligt biproduktEn canadisk virksomhed har udviklet et modul til installa­tion i mindre virksomheder og beboelsesejendomme. Det opfanger og binder CO2 som karbonater, der efter­følgende kan videresælges og skabe omsætning.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New theory shows how strain makes for better catalystsA new theory of how compression and tension can affect the reactivity of metal catalysts could be helpful in designing new and better catalysts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Meditation could help anxiety and cardiovascular healthIn a student-led study, one hour of mindfulness meditation shown to reduce anxiety and some cardiovascular risk markers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Research debunks 'myth' that strenuous exercise suppresses the immune systemNew research suggests that rather than dampen immunity, endurance sports can actually boost the body's ability to fight off illness.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wood formation model to fuel progress in bioenergy, paper, new applicationsNeed stronger timber, better biofuels or new sources of green chemicals? A systems biology model developed over decades of research will accelerate progress in engineering trees for specific needs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Faster walking heart patients are hospitalized lessFaster walking patients with heart disease are hospitalized less, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Compound improves stroke outcome by reducing lingering inflammationAn experimental compound appears to improve stroke outcome by reducing the destructive inflammation that can continue months after a stroke, scientists report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New 'brain health index' can predict how well patients will do after strokeA new computer program can assess whole brain deterioration and help predict cognitive function after stroke up to ten times more accurately than current methods.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Judges as susceptible to gender bias as laypeople -- and sometimes more soA new study of trial court judges suggests these arbiters of the law sometimes let their personal ideas about gender roles influence their decision-making. The findings, which are part of a broader study of judicial behavior, revealed that the judges were just as likely as laypeople to discriminate - in ways that harmed both men and women - in decisions involving child custody or workplace discrim
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Squeezing more power out of solar cellsPhysicists have published new research that could literally squeeze more power out of solar cells by physically deforming each of the crystals in the semiconductors used by photovoltaic cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Avoid piperacillin-tazobactam when treating BSI cause by ceftriaxone-resistant pathogensThe antibiotic combination treatment piperacillin-tazobactam was significantly less effective than meropenem when treating potentially fatal bloodstream infections (BSI) caused by ceftriaxone-resistant Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae and should be avoided when treating these organisms, according to research presented at the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Correcting tiny differences in patient's position for radiotherapy could increase survival chancesVery small differences in the way a patient lies during radiotherapy treatment for lung or esophageal cancer can have an impact on how likely they are to survive, according to research presented at the ESTRO 37 conference.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Seven-day antibiotic course delivers similar outcomes to 14-days for Gram-negative bacteraemiaA seven-day course of antibiotic treatment for Gram-negative bacteraemia (GNB), a serious infection that occurs when bacteria get into the bloodstream, was shown to offer similar patient outcomes as a 14-day course, according to research presented at the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genome Jenga study reveals unexpected gene alliances in the cellThe largest study of its kind sheds light on how genes work together to keep cells healthy, paving the way for predicting a person's risk of disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Defect in debilitating neurodegenerative disease reversed in mouse nervesScientists have developed a new drug compound that shows promise as a future treatment for Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, an inherited, often painful neurodegenerative condition that affects nerves in the hands, arms, feet and legs. The researchers used the compound to treat the nerves of mice harboring the genetic defects that cause the disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New method to discover drugs to treat epilepsyFor more than a third of children living with epilepsy, the currently approved medications do not stop their seizures. Researchers have developed a new drug screening method to discover drugs to treat epilepsy.
24min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Certain PTSD therapies prove effective long after patients stop treatmentReducing severity of PTSD symptoms long-term holds significant public-health and economic implications.
24min
The Atlantic

The Island Where France's Colonial Legacy Lives OnLong before it became the first slavery memorial in the French West Indies, the Darboussier Sugar Factory powered France’s Caribbean empire. In the 19th century, the 77,000-square-foot factory, located in Pointe-à-Pitre, the largest city on the butterfly-shaped island of Guadeloupe, exported goods produced by slaves to mainland France. In the process, it transformed the Lesser Antilles from a for
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel antioxidant makes old blood vessels seem young againOlder adults who take an antioxidant that specifically targets mitochondria see age-related changes in blood vessels reverse by the equivalent of 15 to 20 years within six weeks, a new study shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New microscope captures detailed 3-D movies of cells deep within living systemsMerging lattice light sheet microscopy with adaptive optics reveals the most detailed picture yet of subcellular dynamics in multicellular organisms.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Paleo Profile: Martin's Sea TurtleThis Cretaceous chelonian is close to the origin of the hard-shelled sea turtles that still swim the oceans -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Robot designed for faster, safer uranium plant pipe cleanupOhio crews cleaning up a massive former Cold War-era uranium enrichment plant in Ohio plan this summer to deploy a high-tech helper: an autonomous, radiation-measuring robot that will roll through miles of large overhead pipes to spot potentially hazardous residual uranium.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Animal study connects fear behavior, rhythmic breathing, brain smell centerThere's increasing physiological evidence connecting breathing patterns with the brain regions that control mood and emotion. Now researchers have added neurons associated with the olfactory system to the connection between behavior and breathing. Connecting patterns in these interactions may help explain why practices such as meditation and yoga that rely on rhythmic breathing can help people ove
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What's in a name? Researchers track PTSD's many identities during warPosttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been associated with military activities for as long as wars have been fought -- but this disorder was only named in the 1980s. A new article documents a different kind of war -- a war of words -- that has been fought over the name of the disorder, and may have slowed clinical and scientific progress on the disorder.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Grassland plants react unexpectedly to high levels of carbon dioxidePlants are responding in unexpected ways to increased carbon dioxide in the air, according to a 20-year study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fat cells seem to remember unhealthy dietFat cells can be damaged in a short amount of time when they are exposed to the fatty acid palmitate or the hormone TNF-alpha through a fatty diet, a new study shows. The researchers hope this new knowledge may be used to develop new preventive strategies for diabetes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Protein can slow intestinal tumor growthA new mechanism for regulating stem cells in the intestine of fruit flies has been discovered. In addition, it was discovered that a certain protein can slow the growth of tumors in intestinal tissue. A better understanding of these mechanisms can teach us more about how diseases in human intestines occur, as well as contribute to the development of new medicine to cure them.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pathways to spatial recognitionResults from research aimed at parsing the cellular, molecular, and behavioral components of spatial recognition offer new insight into the neuroscience of memory-guided navigation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

DOR protein deficiency favors the development of obesityDeficiency in the protein DOR (also called TP53INP2) stimulates the generation of new adipose cells (which store fat) and leads to a less harmful kind of obesity, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Medical doctors remain trapped in their substance-use disorders, study findsFear of dismissal or of losing their authorization keeps medical doctors trapped in their substance-use disorders, and instead of seeking help they attempt self-treatment, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Electrochemical tuning of single layer materials relies on defectsPerfection is not everything, according to an international team of researchers whose 2-D materials study shows that defects can enhance a material's physical, electrochemical, magnetic, energy and catalytic properties.
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The Scientist RSS

Long-Term Study Reveals Flip in Plant Responses to Carbon DioxideThe 20-year project calls into question the conventional wisdom about the role plants will play in mitigating future climate change.
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The Atlantic

Salad PanicThese are nervous days for salad enthusiasts. The green, beating heart of the American salad, romaine lettuce, has been ripped from shelves and refrigerators at the insistence of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in response to a small but potentially serious outbreak. On Friday the same agency that has long urged people to eat more leafy greens issued an alert to Americans: “Do not
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New leads in the development and treatment of liver diseaseA treatment gap remains for many conditions involving damage to the liver, the body's main organ for removing toxins, among other functions. The Experimental Biology 2018 meeting (EB 2018) will feature important research announcements related to the causes of liver degradation and possible treatments.
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Big Think

Who is the biggest musician of all time?After Beyoncé’s landmark Coachella performance, a look back at the biggest musical stars ever. It’s impossible to pick just one as the biggest, but fun to try. Read More
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The Atlantic

North Korea Is Not De-NuclearizingNorth Korea Kim Jong UnOver the past four months, North Korea has been saying all the right things. After weeks of silence regarding his intentions for upcoming summits with South Korea and the United States, Kim Jong Un, the leader of North Korea, made a dramatic announcement on Saturday morning, pledging unilateral limits on his nuclear weapons and missile programs. Though the announcement has been widely hailed as e
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tiny microenvironments in the ocean hold clues to global nitrogen cycleA new study shows that nitrogen-feeding organisms exist all over the deep ocean, and not just in large oxygen-depleted 'dead zones,' changing the way we think about the delicate nitrogen cycle.
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Scientific American Content: Global

If Singing's Tough, Try WhistlingA new study claims it's easier to accurately whistle a melody than to sing it. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New hope for treating diabetic wounds that just won't healNew research uncovers the role of a particular protein in maintaining diabetic wounds and suggests that reversing its effects could help aid wound healing in patients with diabetes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Porous salts for fuel cellsScientists have developed a new class of crystalline porous organic salts with high proton conductivity for applications such as proton-exchange membranes for fuel cells.
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Big Think

Did 'illuminati' conspiracy theories originate in ancient Greece?You might think conspiracies that say everything that happens is caused by a group of the powerful are a modern phenomenon. Karl Popper says they are two thousand years old. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

After Facebook scrutiny, is Google next?Facebook has taken the lion's share of scrutiny from Congress and the media about data-handling practices that allow savvy marketers and political agents to target specific audiences, but it's far from alone. YouTube, Google and Twitter also have giant platforms awash in more videos, posts and pages than any set of human eyes could ever check. Their methods of serving ads against this sea of conte
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How can medical marijuana benefit older adults?Managing symptoms such as pain, nausea, and psychiatric illness can be challenging as people age. A new review highlights what's currently known about the indications and risks of medical marijuana use for older adults.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study examines sperm production in men with testicular cancerIn a study of men with testicular cancer, increasing tumor size relative to testis size was linked with a reduced ability to produce sperm.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Weight-loss surgery improves lives and saves money, study findsA new study indicates that weight-loss surgery is cost-effective over 10 years and can save healthcare systems money over a lifetime.
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Blog » Languages » English

Alice in Neuroland: TriviaJust when it looks like the optic nerve would never actually come to an end: behold, a door appears before you, with a sign stating that this leads to the “Lateral Geniculate Nucleus.” Whatever that could be, you aren’t sure, but this is the only way Alice and the rabbit could likely have gone, so you see yourself through the door and are immediately confronted by a beautifully peaceful neural fo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Path to a new era of microelectronicsA new microchip technology capable of optically transferring data could solve a severe bottleneck in current devices by speeding data transfer and reducing energy consumption by orders of magnitude, according to a new article.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why traffic accidents with cyclists are becoming increasingly more commonThe bicycle is a cheap and ecological way of transport, and it is also a healthy option. This is why the number of cyclists in cities has increased in recent years, but so has the accident rate. A study confirms that these incidents are caused by a combination of inadequate infrastructures and risk behavior on the part of drivers and cyclists.
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Viden

Den danske undergrund kan lagre enorme mængder CO2Under Tønder og Stenlille kan vi gemme store dele af vores CO2-forbrug, vurderer forskere fra DTU og GEUS.
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The Atlantic

Remembering Peter ClaeysI was very sorry to learn this week that Peter Claeys, whom you see in action above and in the family photo below, had died recently in Lille, at age 62. With his family’s permission, here is their announcement, followed by my appreciation: A notice from the family of Peter Claeys, in Belgium. Read On »
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Large Candida auris outbreak linked to multi-use thermometers in UK ICUOutbreaks of the fungal pathogen Candida auris in healthcare settings, particularly in intensive care units (ICUs), may be linked to multi-use patient equipment, such as thermometers, according to new research.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New infection prevention tool improve transparency and standardization of practiceResearchers developed a new color-coded visual tool called Infection Risk Scan, or IRIS, which is set to make it easier for healthcare workers to measure in which areas a hospital complies with guidelines and where it needs to implement measures to improve infection control and the use antimicrobial therapies, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

West Nile virus reemerged and spread to new areas in Greece in 2017West Nile virus (WNV), which is transmitted via mosquito bites, reemerged and spread to new territories of Greece in 2017 following a two-year hiatus in reported human cases, according to new findings. Greece provides the appropriate ecological and climatic conditions for WNV circulation. The virus has been established in Greece and disease transmission may continue in the future.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists discover gene controlling genetic recombination ratesGenetic recombination is vital to natural selection, yet some species display far more crossover than others. Scientists have discovered a gene in fruit flies that is responsible for the evolution of these recombination rates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Measles serious threat for babies, toddlers, unvaccinated youthsThe vast majority of measles cases in Europe were reported in unvaccinated patients, and children younger than two years old were at a higher risk of dying from measles than older patients, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

E. coli's internal bomb may provide novel target for treatment strategyBacteria's internal bomb, the so-called toxin-antitoxin (TA) system that is part of the normal bacterial makeup, may be triggered to make bacteria turn on themselves, providing a valuable target for novel antimicrobial approaches in drug design, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How social networking sites may discriminate against womenUsing the photo-sharing site Instagram as a test case, researchers demonstrate how two common recommendation algorithms amplify a network effect known as homophily in which similar or like-minded people cluster together. They further show how algorithms turned loose on a network with homophily effectively make women less visible; they found that the women in their dataset, whose photos were slight
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fungus: The good, the bad and their fortuitous differencesGenetic differences between two very similar fungi, one that led to Quorn™, the proprietary meat substitute, and another that ranks among the world's most damaging crop pathogens, have exposed the significant features that dictate the pair's very different lifestyles, features that promise targets for controlling disease.
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Space Photos of the Week: Light a Candle for Hubble, Still Gazing StrongThe best way to mark the space telescope’s birthday is by looking at nebulae.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Saving lives: Swapping cars for shared bicyclesA new study underscores the health and economic benefits of the 12 largest European bicycle-sharing systems.
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Science | The Guardian

Neurosurgeon Eric Leuthardt: ‘An interface between mind and machine will happen’The US researcher – and sci-fi author – on how brain implants will drive the next turning point in human evolution Dr Eric C Leuthardt, 45, is a neurosurgeon at Washington University in St Louis. He is also the co-founder of NeuroLutions, a research laboratory developing direct interfaces between mind and computer . Leuthardt is pioneering the use of electrical brain implants to help restore motor
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The Atlantic

How the Pulitzers Chose Kendrick Lamar, According to a JurorWhen violinist Regina Carter heard that Kendrick Lamar had won the Pulitzer Prize for Music, she was taken aback. “I was actually a bit shocked!” she says. Her reaction wasn’t unique—the award for Lamar’s Damn is the most discussed prize in the category in years—but she at least had some warning: Carter served on the jury that selected the finalists for the Pulitzer. Still, after she and her peer
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What If Aliens Were Totally Obsessed With Us?The extraterrestrials in author Mercurio D. Rivera's 'The Love War' have a soft spot for humanity.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Zombie Cicadas' Bodies Are Literally Falling ApartParasitic fungus manipulates bodies and bedroom behavior of hapless insects -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

How to Stop Abandoning ProjectsDr. Ellen Hendriksen offers five ways to stop abandoning projects and finally cross the finish line. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

Forslag: Sluse skal løfte skibe over LangebroEn arkitekt og to ingeniører mente i 1930 at have fundet den optimale løsning på, at Langebro ustandseligt måtte åbne og lukke for skibene i Københavns havn: Med »et efter danske forhold Storværk af Ingeniørkunst« foreslog de at bygge et sluseværk, der løftede skibene henover broens vejbaner og s...
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Big Think

Where Is My Mind? – Antonio Damasio – Think Again - a Big Think Podcast #144Where do cultures come from? The answer is as old as life itself. Read More
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Xbox Hacking, LinkedIn Bugs, and More Security News This WeekXbox hacking, LinkedIn bugs, and more security news this week.
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Machine Learning’s ‘Amazing’ Ability to Predict ChaosIn new computer experiments, artificial-intelligence algorithms can tell the future of chaotic systems.
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Live Science

Famed Doctor Hans Asperger Helped with Nazi Child Euthanasia, Notes RevealHans Asperger, a pioneer in autism research whose name is used to describe high-functioning people with the disorder, had a previously unknown dark past that included sending children with disabilities to a Nazi regime "euthanasia" program.
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The Atlantic

When Calling the Police Is a PrivilegeThe call was brief, and had the relaxed feel of someone making a reservation at a restaurant. “I have two gentlemen at my cafe who are refusing to make a purchase or leave,” the manager of the Starbucks told the 911 dispatcher. She calmly gave her address, and after being reassured that law enforcement would be on the way shortly, she thanked the dispatcher and hung up. The call, of which audio w
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The Atlantic

Germany’s Unicorn CrazeSometime in 2016 , as Germany was reeling from disagreements over migration, politics, and national identity, the country received a magical visitor. The unicorn appeared on hats, liqueur bottles, cereal boxes , condom wrappers . By last summer, it seemed as much a part of the German landscape as bratwurst. In Frankfurt, a stately painting of a unicorn overlooks the businessmen dining inside the
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Live Science

Watch the Sky Fall Before the World 'Ends' on MondayA stunning meteor shower — and the end of the world — are both expected to show up over the weekend.
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New on MIT Technology Review

The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending April 21, 2018)This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.
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The Atlantic

The Family Weekly: Women of the Past and FutureThis Week in Family Caroline Kitchener, an associate editor at The Atlantic , wrote about how Millennial married couples are more likely than previous generations to split their finances . Joint bank accounts were once considered a mark of happy commitment, but now, as young couples get married later and establish careers of their own, they often keep their separate accounts. The couples Kitchene
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Thermal Imaging Cameras Could Keep Self-Driving Cars SafeA heat-seeking view of the world could provide one more way for robo-cars to stay out of danger.
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Feed: All Latest

Just How Random Are Two Factor Authentication Codes?Have you noticed patterns in those ephemeral, six-digit tokens? There's a reason for that.
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Science : NPR

When Teens Cyberbully ThemselvesIn this latest form of self-harming behavior, adolescents anonymously post mean or derogatory comments about themselves on social media as a way of managing feelings of sadness or self-loathing. (Image credit: Jasmin Merdan/Getty Images)
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Ingeniøren

Færre gravide ryger – men sønnernes sædkvalitet er fortsat i bundAt ens mor røg under graviditeten, har været mistænkt som afgørende for dårlig sædkvalitet. Men at færre og færre gravide ryger, har ikke hjulpet på danske mænds sædkvalitet, viser nyt studie fra Rigshospitalet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

DOJ looks into how AT&T, Verizon handle defecting customersThe Justice Department has opened an antitrust investigation into whether AT&T, Verizon and a standards-setting group worked together to stop consumers from easily switching wireless carriers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Legendary scientist at lab that developed atomic bomb diesScientist Nerses "Krik" Krikorian, who was born a refugee and later became a legend in the once-secret New Mexico city where the atomic bomb was developed, has died. He was 97.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

California regulators investigating worker safety at TeslaWorkplace safety regulators say they are investigating two incidents at automaker Tesla's factory in Northern California.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New testing of model improves confidence in the performance of ITERScientists seeking to bring fusion—the power that drives the sun and stars—down to Earth must first make the state of matter called plasma superhot enough to sustain fusion reactions. That calls for heating the plasma to many times the temperature of the core of the sun. In ITER, the international fusion facility being built in France to demonstrate the feasibility of fusion power, the device will
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

FAA orders emergency jet engine inspections after US plane failureThe Federal Aviation Administration on Friday ordered emergency inspections of jet engines like the one that ruptured during a recent Southwest Airlines flight, leaving one passenger dead.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Daniel Craig's Aston Martin fetches $468,500 in New YorkJames Bond actor Daniel Craig's Aston Martin, numbered with the character's signature 007, sold at auction Friday for $468,500.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Science Says: Amount of straws, plastic pollution is hugeCities and nations are looking at banning plastic straws and stirrers in hopes of addressing the world's plastic pollution problem. The problem is so large, though, that scientists say that's not nearly enough.
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Viden

Brite kureret for super-gonoré: Var heldig, at der stadig var én slags antibiotika tilbageEn britisk mand blev smittet med, hvad lægerne kalder det værste tilfælde af resistent gonoré.
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Viden

Google klar med næste generation af SMS-beskedenGoogle går sammen med teleselskaber og smartphone-producenter om at skabe afløseren til SMS
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Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor begynder syntetisk tøj så hurtigt at lugte?En læser synes, at tøj af syntetiske materialer begynder at lugte meget hurtigt. Postdoc i polymerkemi forklarer hvorfor.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Rare brown bear dies in Italy capture operationThe endangered animal died in Italy during an attempt to fit him with a collar to track movements.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

The best and worst space films, according to NasaThe best and worst space films, according to Nasa
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Science | The Guardian

'It's about expanding Earth': could we build cities in space?Meet the startup hoping to colonise the final frontier, one zero-gravity 3D printer at a time During the early weeks of his 167-day stint aboard the International Space Station in 2014, astronaut Barry “Butch” Wilmore noticed that a torque wrench was missing. “It’s not uncommon for things to disappear in space,” he tells me over the phone from the Johnson Space Center in Houston. “You just don’t
15h
Live Science

What Is CRISPR?CRISPR technology is a simple yet powerful tool for editing genomes. It allows researchers to easily alter DNA sequences and modify gene function.
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Live Science

Tooth Sensitivity: Causes, Remedies & TreatmentTooth sensitivity is a common dental problem that involves discomfort or pain in teeth when encountering certain substances and temperatures.
19h
Live Science

CDC Says to Avoid All Romaine Lettuce Amid E. Coli OutbreakConsumers are being warned to avoid even more romaine lettuce products.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Measles serious threat for babies, toddlers, unvaccinated youths, ECDC saysThe vast majority of measles cases in Europe were reported in unvaccinated patients, and children younger than two years old were at a higher risk of dying from measles than older patients, according to research presented at the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

E. coli's internal bomb may provide novel target for treatment strategyBacteria's internal bomb, the so-called toxin-antitoxin (TA) system that is part of the normal bacterial makeup, may be triggered to make bacteria turn on themselves, providing a valuable target for novel antimicrobial approaches in drug design, according to research presented at the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID).
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Large Candida auris outbreak linked to multi-use thermometers in UK ICUOutbreaks of the fungal pathogen Candida auris in healthcare settings, particularly in intensive care units (ICUs), may be linked to multi-use patient equipment, such as thermometers, according to research presented at the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brachytherapy for cervical cancer does not increase the risk of ureteral strictureNew research presented at the ESTRO 37 conference from two large international trials, shows that intracavitary and interstitial brachytherapy is safe and does not increase the risk of ureteral stricture in cervical cancer patients. Until now, there have been concerns that brachytherapy might increase the risk of this serious, sometimes life-threatening complication, although the treatment itself
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New infection prevention tool improve transparency and standardization of practiceResearchers developed a new color-coded visual tool called Infection Risk Scan, or IRIS, which is set to make it easier for healthcare workers to measure in which areas a hospital complies with guidelines and where it needs to implement measures to improve infection control and the use antimicrobial therapies, according to research presented at the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

West Nile virus reemerged and spread to new areas in Greece in 2017, researchers showWest Nile virus (WNV), which is transmitted via mosquito bites, reemerged and spread to new territories of Greece in 2017 following a two-year hiatus in reported human cases, according to findings presented at the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID). Greece provides the appropriate ecological and climatic conditions for WNV circulation. The virus has be
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Adapt to the SunlightWhat We’re Following Memo Highlights: Copies of the memos written by former FBI Director James Comey about his conversations with Donald Trump—both before and after the president took office—were leaked to the press after the Justice Department released them to Congress. Here are their four key revelations. While some of the president’s supporters had hoped the memos would vindicate him of any ap
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Popular Science

How to become a space tourist: 8 companies (almost) ready to launchSpace How much are you willing to pay to become an astronaut? From heavy-hitters to newcomers to the space tourism scene, here are the most recent commercial space programs that would love to take you out of this world—for a…
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cognitive science

Using human stem cells, researchers create 3-D model of the brain to study a mutation tied to schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depressionsubmitted by /u/SophiaDevetzi [link] [comments]
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Science : NPR

Betting On Artificial Intelligence To Guide Earthquake ResponseA California tech firm believes that artificial intelligence can help communities prepare for, and respond to, quakes. (Image credit: Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chip-based blood test for multiple myeloma could make bone biopsies a relic of the pastA new research effort has resulted in a low-cost, reliable blood test that uses a small plastic chip about the size of a credit card that can deliver the same diagnostic information as a bone biopsy -- but using a simple blood draw instead.
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NYT > Science

Global Health: Ethicists Call for More Scrutiny of ‘Human-Challenge’ TrialsA vaccine study in which subjects are to be deliberately infected with Zika is on pause after ethicists said it had “insufficient value.”
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blood biomarkers may allow easier detection, confirmation of concussionsResearchers have found that specific small molecules in blood plasma may be useful in determining whether someone has sustained a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), commonly known as a concussion.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A complete cell atlas and lineage tree of the immortal flatwormFrom one stem cell to many differentiated body cells: Scientists have now published a comprehensive lineage tree of a whole adult animal. This was made possible by a combination of RNA and computational technologies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Age affects how we predict and respond to stress at homeA recent study finds that older adults are better than younger adults at anticipating stressful events at home -- but older adults are not as good at using those predictions to reduce the adverse impacts of the stress.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Rip Van Winkle' plants hide underground for up to 20 yearsScores of plant species are capable of living dormant under the soil for up to 20 years, enabling them to survive through difficult times, a new study has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cancer: Tumor transition statesResearchers define for the first time the tumor transition states occurring during cancer progression and identify the tumor cell populations responsible for metastasis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Algorithms reveal changes in stereotypesNew research shows that, over the past century, linguistic changes in gender and ethnic stereotypes correlated with major social movements and demographic changes in the US Census data.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Blunt TalkToday in 5 Lines In a statement, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer announced plans to introduce legislation to decriminalize marijuana on the federal level, saying his thinking on the issue “has evolved.” The Democratic National Committee filed a lawsuit against the Trump campaign, the Russian government, and the WikiLeaks organization, alleging that the three parties conspired to disrupt the
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Inside Science

Wasted Food and Lost ResourcesEarth New study looks at the nearly 300 million pounds of food Americans discard every day -- and its cost to our resources. 04/20/2018 Jason Socrates Bardi, Editor https://www.insidescience.org/news/wasted-food-and-lost-resources
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Cicadas on different schedules can hybridizeA new genetic study suggests that cicadas that emerge every 17 years have swapped genetic material with those that emerge every 13 years.
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Feed: All Latest

DNC Lawsuit Against Russia Reveals New Details About 2016 HackIn suing Russia, the Trump campaign, and others over the hack of its systems in 2016, the Democratic National Committee has also filled in important timeline details.
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The Atlantic

The Comey Memos Won't Derail the Mueller ProbeThe release of former FBI Director James Comey’s memos detailing his early interactions with Donald Trump are unlikely to harm Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation, legal experts say. “Ordinarily, prosecutors conducting grand-jury investigations need to keep their cards close to the vest. That goes double for obstruction-of-justice investigations. If corrupt witnesses know what evidence
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Big Think

Mystery map of best-selling musicians by state of birthWhat’s Eminem doing in Missouri? Kanye West in Georgia? And Wiz Khalifa in, of all places, North Dakota? Read More
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Science : NPR

Malibu Moves To Ban Single-Use PlasticWhether you think it's time or a waste of time, the city of Malibu decided to ban the use of plastic straws, utensils and stirrers as a means of reducing their harmful effects on the environment. (Image credit: Reed Saxon/AP)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How installing hi-tech windows helped a DFW Airport bar sell twice as many drinksAt DFW International Airport, the coolest seats in the house can be found near Gate A28.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Graphene sets a new record on squeezing light to one atomResearchers reach the ultimate level of light confinement -- the space of one atom. This will pave the way to ultra-small optical switches, detectors and sensors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New testing of model improves confidence in the performance of ITERArticle describes production of multiscale turbulence in fusion plasmas through heating of ions and electrons.
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The Scientist RSS

Adolescent Psychiatrist Beatrix Hamburg DiesA champion of peer counseling and a barrier-breaker for black women, she passed away after a battle with Alzheimer's disease.
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The Atlantic

What Comey Did WrongAs mentioned last week , I’m nostalgically trying to piece together some elements of the olden-days blogging culture in the current, very different online environment. Today’s installment: A long note from a reader working through why he has changed his mind about Comey’s Choice™—former FBI Director James Comey’s decision to ignore the practice of his predecessors and comment openly about the inv
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Inside Science

Wasted Food and Lost ResourcesWasted Food and Lost Resources New study looks at the nearly 300 million pounds of food Americans discard every day -- and its cost to our resources. FoodScraps.jpg Image credits: imray/shutterstock Earth Friday, April 20, 2018 - 16:15 Jason Socrates Bardi, Editor (Inside Science) -- Uneaten food thrown into the dustbins of American life accounts for a staggering amount of waste according to a ne
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Trees are not as 'sound asleep' as you may thinkHigh-precision three-dimensional surveying of 21 different species of trees has revealed a yet unknown cycle of subtle canopy movement during the night. The 'sleep cycles' differed from one species to another. Detection of anomalies in overnight movement could become a future diagnostic tool to reveal stress or disease in crops.
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Viden

Facebook flytter 1,5 milliarder brugeres data hjem til USANy regulering gør det sværere for Facebook at tjene penge i EU.
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New on MIT Technology Review

If we weren’t the first industrial civilization on Earth, would we ever know?Fossils and objects are unlikely to survive more than a few million years. Searching for chemical traces of industrialization offers an intriguing alternative.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: What a Scientist Learned From Studying the ‘Synchronized Swimming of Sea Monkeys’Tiny crustaceans complete a massive daily vertical migration in the world’s oceans. New research suggests their commute may play an important role in the health of the planet.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers illuminate the path to a new era of microelectronicsA new microchip technology capable of optically transferring data could solve a severe bottleneck in current devices by speeding data transfer and reducing energy consumption by orders of magnitude, according to an article published in the April 19, 2018 issue of Nature.
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Blog » Languages » English

Eyewire Release Report 4/20/2018Happy Friday! To give you a comprehensive picture of everything new on Eyewire, here are all changes since the last report a few weeks ago. Due to the cloud move, the leaderboard was unexpectedly resetting at midnight UTC instead of midnight HQ time. This is now resolved. It then seemed like this had some residual effects on automated competition events, such as points awarding twice, but this sh
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Feed: All Latest

How to Build Custom Alexa Skills for the Amazon EchoThe new Blueprints tool makes it easy for anyone to build custom skills for Alexa.
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Popular Science

11 easy ways you can help save the planet this Earth DayEnvironment Little changes can make a big difference Don’t let the scope of the problem get you down. Here are concrete things that you (yes, you!) can do to help make the world a better place.
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The Atlantic

This Is Not the 'End of an Era' in CubaCuba’s new president, Miguel Diaz-Canel, boasts relative youth and Castro-free genes. But the myth that his election will yield significant change on the island is flat-out wrong. His 86-year-old predecessor, General Raul Castro, was due for departure. Fidel was 81 when he handed power over to his little brother. At age 57, Diaz-Canel seems a mere babe when compared to his octogenarian predecesso
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