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Live Science

The 'End of the World' Is Today. Here's Why We're Still Here.Here's the numerical and cosmic gymnastics Meade used to come up with today's apocalypse — one that, of course, will not come to be.
9h
Ingeniøren

Hvad hjælper forbud mod bi-dræbende pesticider, hvis landmændene alligevel får dispensation?Sammen med 12 andre landet har Danmark tilladt landbruget at bringe de forhadte neonikotinoider ud på markerne, selv om samme landes miljøministre har forbudt dem – og EU's videnskabsfolk siger, at de er med til at slå bier ihjel.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Audit finds biodiversity data aggregators 'lose and confuse' dataBoth online repositories the Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) and the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) were found to 'lose and confuse' portions of the data provided to them, according to an independent audit of ca. 800,000 records from three Australasian museums. Genus and species names were found to have been changed in up to 1 in 5 records, and programming errors caused up to 100
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Salk Institute Suspends Cancer Scientist Inder VermaThe prominent researcher has been put on administrative leave pending an investigation into unspecified allegations.
2min
Big Think

Want to feel unique? Believe in the reptile peopleWhat do all conspiracy theorists have in common? Read More
5min
The Atlantic

The Dangerous Confusion of Trump's Celebrity FansAs Donald Trump’s approval ratings hover around 40 percent, two glimmering celebrity names appeared to come to his defense this weekend. Shania Twain, the Canadian country-pop pioneer, told The Guardian that if she could have participated in the U.S. election, she would have voted for Trump because “even though he was offensive, he seemed honest.” Kanye West, the rap institution who paid a contro
5min
Live Science

Uranus Has 'Very Unpleasant and Odiferous Conditions,' Says Oxford StudyThe upper cloud tops of Uranus are shot through with hydrogen sulfide, the gas that smells of rotten eggs.
9min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's GPM sees Tropical Cyclone Fakir forming near MadagascarThe southwest Indian Ocean cyclone season started on November 15, 2017 and will officially end on April 30, 2018. A tropical cyclone called Fakir formed on April 23 near northeastern Madagascar and the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite looked at the storm's rainfall rates.
12min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Market failure, fake news and the First AmendmentThe rise of social media and fake news challenge long-held assumptions about the First Amendment and are undermining the functioning of the 'the marketplace of ideas,' a Duke professor argues in a new article. Much of our thinking about the First Amendment assumes that the answer to false speech is more speech, or counter-speech, and that the truth will triumph in the marketplace of ideas, he says
12min
Popular Science

New poop sample analysis reveals interspecies monkey romanceAnimals The hybrid kids are alright. In 1994, when Kate Detwiler rode the bus to her research site in Gombe National Park, what she was going to observe wasn’t part of the mainstream scientific discourse.
20min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Landmark paper finds light at end of the tunnel for world's wildlife and wild placesA new WCS paper published in the journal BioScience finds that the enormous trends toward population stabilization, poverty alleviation, and urbanization are rewriting the future of biodiversity conservation in the 21st century, offering new hope for the world's wildlife and wild places.
26min
New on MIT Technology Review

A worldwide conservation effort aims to sequence the genomes of 1.5 million organisms
45min
Live Science

Fierce — and Free! Win a Book of Dinosaur Facts in Our Giveaway TuesdayHere's how to win a book that details the rise and fall of the dinosaurs, including facts about Tyrannosaurus rex, which had eyes the size of grapefruits and more than 50 knife-sharp teeth.
45min
The Atlantic

Kellyanne Conway's Double StandardKellyanne Conway has become a media legend for her snowblower method of dissimulation: scoop up everything and hurl it into the air, with no concern for where the stuff lands. So it was perhaps not surprising that when Dana Bash asked Conway an unwelcome question on CNN this weekend, Bash got buried under particulate matter. The exchange , which has gotten a lot of play in the past 24 hours, is a
45min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How do you get teens to stop cellphone use while driving? Survey says, show them the moneyTeens who admit to texting while driving may be convinced to reduce risky cellphone use behind the wheel when presented with financial incentives such as auto-insurance apps that monitor driving behavior, according to a new survey. However, while more than 90 percent of teens surveyed said they were willing to give up sending or reading text messages, almost half indicated that they would want to
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fight against Zika, dengue get boost from reliable spread of bacteriaHow a bacteria hijacked insect fertility remained a mystery for five decades, until Associate Professor of Biological Sciences Seth Bordenstein and his team helped solve it.
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Earth BioGenome Project aims to sequence DNA from all complex life on EarthAn international consortium of scientists is proposing what is arguably the most ambitious project in the history of biology: sequencing the DNA of all known eukaryotic species on Earth.
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Applying network analysis to natural historyBy using network analysis to search for communities of marine life in the fossil records of the Paleobiology Database, the team, including researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, was able to quantify the ecological impacts of major events like mass extinctions and may help us anticipate the consequences of a 'sixth mass extinction.'
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vitamin A derivative selectively kills liver cancer stem cellsAcyclic retinoid, an artificial compound derived from vitamin A, has been found to prevent the recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common form of liver cancer. Now, in research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, scientists have discovered that the compound targets one class of cancer stem cells, preventing them from giving rise to new tumors.
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Did last ice age affect breastfeeding in Native Americans?Biologists have been puzzled by the evolutionary adaptation behind a common tooth trait of northern Asians and Native Americans: shovel-shaped incisors. A UC Berkeley analysis of archeological specimens shows that nearly 100 percent of early Native Americans had shoveled incisors, and genetic evidence pinpoints the selection to the Beringian standstill 20,000 years ago. Leslea Hlusko proposes that
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CRISPR used to genetically edit coral, Stanford researchers reportCoral reefs on the precipice of collapse may get a conservation boost from the gene-editing tool known as CRISPR, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and their collaborators.
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Swirling liquids work similarly to bitcoinThe physics involved with stirring a liquid operate the same way as the mathematical functions that secure digital information. This parallel could help in developing even more secure ways of protecting digital information.
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Carbon capture could be a financial opportunity for US biofuelsWith recent tax credits and other policies, removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and storing it underground is not only possible but profitable for US biofuel refineries.
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Earth BioGenome Project aims to sequence genomes of 1.5 million speciesAn international consortium of scientists is proposing a massive project to sequence, catalog and analyze the genomes of all eukaryotic species on the planet, an undertaking the researchers say will take 10 years, cost $4.7 billion and require more than 200 petabytes of digital storage capacity. Eukaryotes include all organisms except bacteria and archaea. There are an estimated 10-15 million euka
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fear of losing status, not economic hardship, drove voters in 2016 presidential electionData gathered in 2012 and 2016 from a nationally representative panel found that many American voters -- especially whites, males, and Christians -- felt their status threatened by growing diversity and perceived loss of US global dominance. This led America's socially dominant groups to increase their support in 2016 for the candidate who most emphasized reestablishing status hierarchies of the p
48min
Popular Science

Last week in tech: A robot ate my iPhoneTechnology Apple's new recycling bot, Nike's new 3D-printed shoe, and Chrome finally shuts up auto-play videos. Be sure to download the latest edition of the Last Week in Tech podcast!
1h
The Atlantic

People Voted for Trump Because They Were Anxious, Not PoorFor the past 18 months, many political scientists have been seized by one question: Less-educated whites were President Trump’s most enthusiastic supporters. But why, exactly? Was their vote some sort of cri de coeur about a changing economy that had left them behind ? Or was the motivating sentiment something more complex and, frankly, something harder for policy makers to address? After analyzi
1h
Live Science

Aliens on Super-Earth Planets Could Be Stuck There...LiterallyAny alien civilizations born on "super-Earth" planets may be ground-bound by their home worlds' powerful gravity, a new study suggests.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists generate an atlas of the human genome using stem cellsScientists from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have generated an atlas of the human genome that illuminates the roles our genes play in health and disease. The gene atlas, created using a state-of-the-art gene editing technology and human embryonic stem cells, enables a new functional view on how we study the human genome, and provides a tool that will change how we study and treat cancer and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Carbon capture could be a financial opportunity for US biofuelsAlthough considered critical to avoiding catastrophic global warming, the feasibility of removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and storing it underground - known as negative emissions - has been in question.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fear of losing status, not economic hardship, drove voters in 2016 presidential electionIt has been a well-worn postmortem of the 2016 presidential election: the white working class, having faced job losses and stagnant wages under President Obama, voted with their pocketbooks when they chose Donald Trump.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Applying network analysis to natural history: Technique popularized through social media ranks impact of extinctionsA team of researchers is using network analysis techniques - popularized through social media applications - to find patterns in Earth's natural history, as detailed in a paper published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). By using network analysis to search for communities of marine life in the fossil records of the Paleobiology Database, the team, including resea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Did last ice age affect breastfeeding in Native Americans?The critical role that breast feeding plays in infant survival may have led, during the last ice age, to a common genetic mutation in East Asians and Native Americans that also, surprisingly, affects the shape of their teeth.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

CRISPR used to genetically edit coral, researchers reportCoral reefs on the precipice of collapse may get a conservation boost from the gene-editing tool known as CRISPR, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and their collaborators.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Swirling liquids work similarly to bitcoinFluid dynamics is not something that typically comes to mind when thinking about bitcoin. But for one Stanford physicist, the connection is as simple as stirring your coffee.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fight against Zika, dengue get boost from reliable spread of bacteriaA Vanderbilt team took the next leap forward in using a little-known bacteria to stop the spread of deadly mosquito-borne viruses such as Zika and dengue.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Earth BioGenome Project aims to sequence DNA from all complex life on EarthAn international consortium of scientists is proposing what is arguably the most ambitious project in the history of biology: sequencing the DNA of all known eukaryotic species on Earth.
1h
Dana Foundation

Sapolsky on the Biology of Good and EvilGuest post by Carl Sherman “We’re a miserably violent species,” said Dana Alliance member Robert M. Sapolsky . “But we’re also a profoundly empathic, compassionate species. “How do we make sense of this… how do we understand the biology of it?” Robert M. Sapolsky, Ph.D. In his keynote lecture that launched the “Learning & the Brain” conference in New York City last week, Sapolsky, Ph.D., professo
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Inside Science

What Rocket Science Explains About Whale HearingWhat Rocket Science Explains About Whale Hearing Using a device typically engaged to study rockets, researchers examined how whales hear. whale-CT_900x530.jpg Caption: Artist's rendition of the minke whale specimen inside the industrial CT scanner. The researchers scanned the two halves of the whale at the same time and combined the images together in the computer. Image credits: Ted Cranford, Sa
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The role of 'extra' DNA in cancer evolution and therapy resistanceResearchers tracked genomic alterations detected in patient samples during tumor cell evolution in culture, in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models from the cultures, as well as before and after treatment in patients. The team reports that tumor progression was often driven by cancer-promoting genes, known as oncogenes, on extrachromosomal pieces of DNA.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Girls more likely than boys to struggle with social, behavioral, academic needsThe more failing grades students have during eighth grade, the more likely they are to experience social-emotional learning problems, academic difficulties and behavioral problems during their freshman year in high school, University of Illinois social work professor Kevin Tan found in a new study.And despite the gender stereotype that boys are more likely to be the problem children in school, the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The role of 'extra' DNA in cancer evolution and therapy resistanceResearchers tracked genomic alterations detected in patient samples during tumor cell evolution in culture, in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models from the cultures, as well as before and after treatment in patients. In a recent paper in Nature Genetics, the team reports that tumor progression was often driven by cancer-promoting genes, known as oncogenes, on extrachromosomal pieces of DN
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists use rocket scanner to learn how whales hearResearchers have used a scanner designed for rockets to collect the first-ever computed tomography (CT) scan of an entire minke whale. By combining the CT scan results with custom-developed computer simulation tools, the researchers model how the whales hear sounds produced by other whales or by human-created (anthropogenic) sources such as ship propellers.
1h
Popular Science

Proving precognition, programming a screenwriter, and other tales from the fieldScience Scientists share their favorite stories. When one crow sees another dead on the ground, it caws an alarm. Then others—five to six on average, but in rare cases as many as 60—fly in and perch on branches,…
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Live Science

Doctors Perform World's First Full Penis-and-Scrotum TransplantDoctors at Johns Hopkins Medicine performed the world's first complete penis and scrotum transplant, the hospital announced today (April 23).
1h
New on MIT Technology Review

Tezos had a $200 million ICO. Then the lawsuits started. Now the CEO tells her side.The head of one of the most controversial “alt coin” companies discusses how things have changed since it launched.
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Big Think

Pluto’s moon Charon gets 12 new names sci-fi and mythology geeks will loveThe IAU has just approved a dozen new names for features on Pluto’s moon Charon. They draw from an array of famous authors, characters, mythical objects and one U.S. filmmaker. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hungry birds as climate change drives food 'mismatch'Warmer springs create a 'mismatch' where hungry chicks hatch too late to feast on abundant caterpillars, new research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Detecting Alzheimer's disease before it's too lateThe rate at which the protein beta-amyloid accumulates into the sticky plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is already slowing by the time a patient would be considered to have preclinical AD, according to a longitudinal study of healthy adults.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Found: A new form of DNA in our cellsIn a world first, researchers have identified a new DNA structure -- called the i-motif -- inside cells. A twisted 'knot' of DNA, the i-motif has never before been directly seen inside living cells.
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NYT > Science

Setting Fires and Restoring an American LandscapeWhere development and fragmentation have disrupted natural cycles, teams run controlled burns every spring to help sustain prairies and other ecosystems that have long been shaped by fire.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Meditation and aerobic exercise helps women recover after sexual assaultWomen who are sexually assaulted and suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can learn to decrease negative thoughts and enhance self-worth by a combination of meditation and aerobic exercise. A combination of mental and physical training with meditation and aerobic exercise done for one hour twice a week over a six-week period significantly reduced post-traumatic and ruminative thoughts
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Middle East energy subsidy reform updates 'patronage-based autocratic governance'A series of converging trends provided political cover for the reforms of long-standing energy subsidies launched by oil-exporting states in the Middle East and North Africa, according to a new paper by an expert in the Center for Energy Studies at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy. These subsidies are thought to be an important source of legitimacy for autocratic regimes.
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The Atlantic

Travel Monday: A Photo Trip to SocotraOff the coast of Yemen, in the Arabian Sea, lies isolated Socotra Island , where hundreds of plants and animals have developed into species unique to the island. Socotra is the largest island in an archipelago that includes three other islands. The Socotra Archipelago has been isolated from any large landmass for millions of years, and is now home to a surprising display of biodiversity. Probably
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The Atlantic

The Foreign Leaders Trump FavorsHe’s been known as the “French Obama” to some, and the Roman god “Jupiter” to others. But this week, French President Emmanuel Macron has earned himself a new nickname: “Trump Whisperer.” The French president was anointed with the new moniker on the eve of his visit to Washington, where this week he becomes the first foreign leader to be hosted by President Donald Trump for a formal state visit.
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New Scientist - News

Why the hockey stick graph will always be climate science’s iconTwo decades after it was first published, the chart linking carbon emissions and global warming is as relevant as ever, says Olive Heffernan
1h
New on MIT Technology Review

The tricky art (and emerging science) of valuing crypto-assetsChris Burniske is developing new tools for evaluating the financial performance of crypto-tokens.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A neurobiological link between PTSD and addictionRecalling traumatic memories enhances the rewarding effects of morphine in male rats, finds new research. These findings may help to explain the co-occurrence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and addiction.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Even a single mindfulness meditation session can reduce anxietyMindfulness meditation programs have shown promise for the treatment of anxiety, one of the most common mental health disorders in the US. New research suggests people can begin to derive psychological and physiological benefits from the practice after a single introductory session.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Paint job transforms walls into sensors, interactive surfacesWalls are what they are -- big, dull dividers. With a few applications of conductive paint and some electronics, however, walls can become smart infrastructure that sense human touch, and detect things like gestures and when appliances are used. Researchers found that they could transform dumb walls into smart walls at relatively low cost using simple tools and techniques, such as a paint roller.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Environmental DNA' used to identify killer whales in Puget SoundWhen endangered killer whales swim through the sheltered waters of Puget Sound, they leave behind traces of 'environmental DNA' that researchers can detect as much as two hours later has found.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy makes a window into the nanoscaleFrom energy materials to disease diagnostics, new microscopy techniques can provide more nuanced insight. Researchers first need to understand the effects of radiation on samples, which is possible with a new device developed for holding tightly sealed liquid cell samples for transmission electron microscopy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cigarillo packaging can influence product perceptionResearchers surveyed 2,664 young adults who were current users, never users, or past users of little cigars and cigarillos, finding cigarillo packs with colors and containing a flavor descriptor were rated more positively for taste and smell, and health warnings didn't fully mitigate the draw of the packaging.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dementia trend shows later onset with fewer years of the diseasePeople may be deteriorating into dementia later in life and living with it for a shorter period of time, a new study suggests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A better fake leather, inspired by plantsNature has inspired a coating for synthetic leather that repels oil and water -- and keeps the material from getting sticky in the heat.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Prenatal cannabis use associated with low birth weightsWith marijuana use during pregnancy on the rise, a new study shows that prenatal cannabis use was associated with a 50 percent increased likelihood of low birth weight, setting the stage for serious future health problems including infection and time spent in neonatal intensive care units.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Telling job seekers how many other people have applied could boost diversityTelling job applicants how many people applied for a job on LinkedIn - regardless of whether the number of applicants was high or low - increased the number of applications, a finding that could help companies that are seeking more diverse applicant pools, according to new research from Tufts University economist Laura Gee.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy makes a window into the nanoscaleFrom energy materials to disease diagnostics, new microscopy techniques can provide more nuanced insight. Researchers first need to understand the effects of radiation on samples, which is possible with a new device developed for holding tightly sealed liquid cell samples for transmission electron microscopy.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Solar sailingHow can you create public transport in the jungle without polluting it? The isolated Achuar peoples of Ecuador have created an ingenious solution.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Size, structure help poziotinib pose threat to deadly exon 20 lung cancerA drug that failed to effectively strike larger targets in lung cancer hits a bulls-eye on the smaller target presented by a previously untreatable form of the disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First total penis and scrotum transplantMany soldiers returning from combat bear visible scars, or even lost limbs, caused by blasts from improvised explosive devices, or IEDs. However, some servicemen also return with debilitating hidden injuries -- the loss of all or part of their genitals. Now, the reconstructive surgery team that performed the country's first bilateral arm transplant in a wounded warrior has successfully performed t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New control strategy helps reap maximum power from wind farmsResearchers have developed a way to extract more power from the wind. The researchers used supercomputers at the Texas Advanced Computing Center to filter out the effects of turbulence and apply control algorithms that can better manage the operation of wind farms. The approach has the potential to increase wind power generation by 6-7 percent with a estimated increase in revenue of more than $600
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Watch your step: How vision leads locomotionUsing new technologies to track how vision guides foot placement, researchers come one step closer in determining what is going on in the brain while we walk, paving the way for better treatment for mobility impairments -- strokes, aging and Parkinson's -- and technology development -- prosthetics and robots.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Data mining confirms that culture makes cities richerPhotos shared on Flickr turn out to provide valuable insights into the way cultural activities stimulate urban development, say researchers.
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The Atlantic

Josh Rosen and the NFL's 'Ideal' QuarterbackThere may be nothing in sports at once so essential and elusive as a franchise quarterback. NFL teams spend years, sometimes decades, searching for their own Peyton Manning or Aaron Rodgers: a signal-caller with the physical attributes to make pinpoint throws and the mental abilities to master a playbook and thrive under pressure, plus the ineffable “it factor” that helps rally teammates behind t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Guns used in cross-border crimes originate from states with more lax lawsOpponents of gun control have frequently pointed to high rates of gun violence in cities such as Chicago to argue that strong state gun control laws are not effective. But guns used in states with stricter gun laws typically flow from states with weaker laws, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Face recognition for galaxies: Artificial intelligence brings new tools to astronomyA machine learning method called 'deep learning,' which has been widely used in face recognition and other image- and speech-recognition applications, has shown promise in helping astronomers analyze images of galaxies and understand how they form and evolve. In a new study, researchers used computer simulations of galaxy formation to train a deep learning algorithm, which then proved surprisingly
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Playing quantum catch in new researchResearchers 'pitch' a qubit -- a tiny bit of quantum data -- from one physical point in a microwave cavity to a separate point in a different cavity. It is the first time an end-to-end quantum transmission has been done on demand.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bias keeps women with higher body weights away from the doctorThe stigma of weight and internalized feelings relating to it were found to be associated with healthcare avoidance in women with higher body weights.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study highlights need for strength training in older women to ward off effects of agingStudy looked at 46 women across two different age ranges, 60-74 and 75-90, to learn how physical activity affects frailty differently in the two groups.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New cell therapy aids heart recovery -- without implanting cellsMedical researchers have designed a creative new approach to help injured hearts regenerate by applying extracellular vesicles secreted by cardiomyocytes rather than implanting the cells. The study shows that the cardiomyocytes derived from human pluripotent stem cells (derived in turn from a small sample of blood) could be a powerful, untapped source of therapeutic microvesicles that could lead t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neutrons provide insights into increased performance for hybrid perovskite solar cellsNeutron scattering has revealed, in real time, the fundamental mechanisms behind the conversion of sunlight into energy in hybrid perovskite materials. A better understanding of this behavior will enable manufacturers to design solar cells with significantly increased efficiency.
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Live Science

'Mind-Reading' Headset Lets You Control a Computer with Your Thoughts … Sort OfA new "mind-reading" headset can track the minute movements of your vocal muscles whenever you read or imagine a word.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers use 'environmental DNA' to identify killer whales in Puget SoundWhen endangered killer whales swim through the sheltered waters of Puget Sound, they leave behind traces of 'environmental DNA' that researchers can detect as much as two hours later has found.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers identify brain mechanism linking PTSD and opioid addictionResearchers at Western University have shown that the recall of traumatic memories enhances the rewarding effects of morphine, shedding light on the neurobiological link between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and opioid addiction.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Detecting Alzheimer's disease before it's too lateThe rate at which the protein beta-amyloid accumulates into the sticky plaques associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is already slowing by the time a patient would be considered to have preclinical AD, according to a longitudinal study of healthy adults published in JNeurosci. The research suggests that anti-amyloid therapies would be most effective before individuals reach the threshold for pr
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A neurobiological link between PTSD and addictionRecalling traumatic memories enhances the rewarding effects of morphine in male rats, finds new research published in JNeurosci. These findings may help to explain the co-occurrence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and addiction.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Even a single mindfulness meditation session can reduce anxietyMindfulness meditation programs have shown promise for the treatment of anxiety, one of the most common mental health disorders in the US. New research suggests people can begin to derive psychological and physiological benefits from the practice after a single introductory session.
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Science | The Guardian

Let’s talk about cancer treatment, not ‘cancer journeys’ | LettersOversharing may be better than the dreadful silence that once surrounded ‘the big C’, but many patients might prefer more practical advice It is astonishing that “cancer diaries” ( Why I live in dread of another cancer confessional , 18 April) have proliferated to the extent that some of your correspondents ( As a cancer patient, I needed distraction , Letters, Anne Hay, 23 April) can describe the
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Popular Science

Scientists finally confirm that Uranus is surrounded by fart cloudsUranus Eggs CloudsSpace But the cold would kill you before the smell did. Sometimes science simply confirms what we already know to be true. You know what I’m talking about: researchers will find evidence that losing sleep makes you cranky and…
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Big Think

Scientists discover new DNA structure that's not a double helixScientists have identified an alternative DNA structure described as a "twisted knot" inside living human cells. They're calling it the i-motif. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Galaxies grow bigger and puffier as they ageA new international study has found that galaxies grow bigger and puffier as they age.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Just one more ash dieback spore could push European ash trees to the brinkEurope's ash dieback epidemic could well have been caused by just one or two mushroom-like fruiting bodies of a fungal pathogen from Asia, according to a comprehensive genome sequencing effort. This leaves even the most resistant ash trees at threat from the introduction of just one more spore from East Asia.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Rotten egg gas around planet UranusUranus Eggs CloudsThe planet Uranus has clouds made up of hydrogen sulphide, the gas that gives rotten eggs their unpleasant smell.
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Quanta Magazine

Cells Talk and Help One Another via Tiny Tube NetworksWhen the physician and scientist Emil Lou was an oncology fellow at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center about a decade ago, he was regularly troubled by the sight of something small but unidentifiable in his cancer-cell cultures. Looking through the microscope, he said, he “kept finding these long, thin translucent lines,” about 50 nanometers wide and 150 to 200 microns long, extending between
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Popular Science

Do you make the cut? Four of history's trickiest entrance exams.Science Psychologists are still arguing about the best methods to spot intelligence. Since the turn of the 20th century, psychologists have tried to pin down what it means to be smart. More than 100 years later, they're still arguing about the best…
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Big Think

A perfectly stated Tweet from Neil deGrasse Tyson for Earth DayEarth Day is over for this year, but what it means for our future is still being talked about. Read More
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Big Think

Study compares school shootings in the 21st century to the last: What's changed?There have already been more gun deaths from mass school shootings this century than during the entirety of the last century. Read More
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The Atlantic

How America Broke the Presidency“Many of the responsibilities that vex Trump are ones that were not part of the job’s original design,” writes The Atlantic contributing writer and co-host of CBS This Morning, John Dickerson. In his May cover article, "The Hardest Job in the World," Dickerson argues that the president’s office has ballooned. The responsibilities of the presidency—and the path to the office itself—makes the role
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Paint job transforms walls into sensors, interactive surfacesWalls are what they are -- big, dull dividers. With a few applications of conductive paint and some electronics, however, walls can become smart infrastructure that sense human touch, and detect things like gestures and when appliances are used. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University and Disney Research found that they could transform dumb walls into smart walls at relatively low cost using sim
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cigarillo packaging can influence product perception, study findsUNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers surveyed 2,664 young adults who were current users, never users, or past users of little cigars and cigarillos, finding cigarillo packs with colors and containing a flavor descriptor were rated more positively for taste and smell, and health warnings didn't fully mitigate the draw of the packaging.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global

Speaking Science to PowerA statement released by 317 members of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences challenges the widespread dismissal of science and scientific understanding by the current administration. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

Scientists plan huge European AI hub to compete with USExclusive: In an open letter, the scientists say the proposed Ellis institute is essential to avoid brain drain to big tech firms Leading scientists have drawn up plans for a vast multinational European institute devoted to world-class artificial intelligence (AI) research in a desperate bid to nurture and retain top talent in Europe. The new institute would be set up for similar reasons as Cern
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU probes Apple plan to buy music app ShazamShazam Apple EU MusicThe EU on Monday launched an in-depth probe of tech giant Apple's plan to buy leading song-recognition app Shazam because of fears the deal may reduce choice for consumers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Europe poised to launch ocean-monitoring satelliteEurope is set to launch a satellite on Wednesday to keep a close eye on Earth's oceans, under siege from pollution and damage caused by humans.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Neutrons provide insights into increased performance for hybrid perovskite solar cellsNeutron scattering has revealed, in real time, the fundamental mechanisms behind the conversion of sunlight into energy in hybrid perovskite materials. A better understanding of this behavior will enable manufacturers to design solar cells with increased efficiency.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neutrons provide insights into increased performance for hybrid perovskite solar cellsNeutron scattering at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has revealed, in real time, the fundamental mechanisms behind the conversion of sunlight into energy in hybrid perovskite materials. A better understanding of this behavior will enable manufacturers to design solar cells with significantly increased efficiency.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Special series examines the use of pasteurized donor human milk for vulnerable infantsIf the use of mother's own milk is contraindicated (such as with HIV positive mothers) or if a mother is unable to produce enough milk to meet her infant's needs, pasteurized donor human milk (PDHM) is the recommended alternative. In 2016, 5.25 million ounces of PDHM were distributed to hospitals caring for vulnerable infants across the United States and Canada.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Watch your step: How vision leads locomotionUsing new technologies to track how vision guides foot placement, researchers at the University of Texas at Austin come one step closer in determining what is going on in the brain while we walk, paving the way for better treatment for mobility impairments -- strokes, aging and Parkinson's -- and technology development -- prosthetics and robots.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New control strategy helps reap maximum power from wind farmsEvery two and a half hours, a new wind turbine rises in the U.S. In 2016, wind provided 5.6 percent of all electricity produced, more than double the amount generated by wind in 2010, but still a far cry from its potential.
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NYT > Science

The Healing Edge: ‘Whole Again’: A Vet Maimed by an I.E.D. Receives a Transplanted PenisA young soldier whose genitals were destroyed underwent extensive reconstructive surgery that doctors hope to offer to others who were wounded at war.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists identify genetic catalysts that speed up evolution of antibiotic resistanceResearchers at Oxford University have shown that it is possible to identify genetic catalysts that accelerate the evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacteria—and that this knowledge could be used to design treatments to stifle the development of resistance.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers invent nano-coating for synthetic leather that cleans itself—and won't get sticky on a hot dayIf you've ever stained your favorite leather-look jacket or had to peel your bare legs from a sticky vinyl car seat in the summer, the solution to your woes just might be found on the surface of a lotus leaf.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Special Eurobarometer: How fair do Europeans think life in the EU is?New poll shows most Europeans think life is generally fair, but have concerns over justice, political decisions and income inequality.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Five new blanket-hermit crab species described 130 years later from the PacificUnlike most hermit crabs, the blanket-hermit crab does not use empty shells for protection, and instead lives symbiotically with a sea anemone. The crab uses the anemone to cover its soft abdomen, and can pull the anemone's tissue over its head to protect itself whenever necessary. Since 1888, this crab had been considered a unique species until a research team recently described five new ones and
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Live Science

A Mysterious New Form of DNA Was Just Discovered in Human CellsWhen you think of DNA, odds are, you picture the famous double helix, a ladder-like structure elegantly twisted like a corkscrew. But DNA doesn't always assume this form.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

The health sector is being struck by cyber-espionage
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New control strategy helps reap maximum power from wind farmsResearchers from the University of Texas at Dallas developed a way to extract more power from the wind. The researchers used supercomputers at the Texas Advanced Computing Center to filter out the effects of turbulence and apply control algorithms that can better manage the operation of wind farms. The approach has the potential to increase wind power generation by 6-7 percent with a estimated inc
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study shows prenatal cannabis use associated with low birth weightsWith marijuana use during pregnancy on the rise, a new study led by the Colorado School of Public Health shows that prenatal cannabis use was associated with a 50 percent increased likelihood of low birth weight, setting the stage for serious future health problems including infection and time spent in neonatal intensive care units.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dementia trend shows later onset with fewer years of the diseasePeople may be deteriorating into dementia later in life and living with it for a shorter period of time, a new study suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Johns Hopkins performs first total penis and scrotum transplant in the worldMany soldiers returning from combat bear visible scars, or even lost limbs, caused by blasts from improvised explosive devices, or IEDs. However, some servicemen also return with debilitating hidden injuries -- the loss of all or part of their genitals. Now, the Johns Hopkins reconstructive surgery team that performed the country's first bilateral arm transplant in a wounded warrior has successful
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New Scientist - News

Complex life started a billion years earlier than we thoughtEarth’s air suddenly got a lot more oxygen around 1.6 billion years ago and that could have triggered the evolution of large multicellular organisms
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

The world needs blockchains that blend idealism with pragmatismAmber Baldet discusses how to create applications that will truly disrupt the global economy while making life better for everyone
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Scientific American Content: Global

Precarious Life of Texas Farmworkers Becomes Riskier with WarmingIncreasing heat, drought and mosquito-borne diseases make this work more dangerous -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Yale plays quantum catch in new researchYale's latest work expanding the reach of quantum information science is actually a game of quantum pitch and catch.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Face recognition for galaxies: Artificial intelligence brings new tools to astronomyA machine learning method called "deep learning," which has been widely used in face recognition and other image- and speech-recognition applications, has shown promise in helping astronomers analyze images of galaxies and understand how they form and evolve.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What do Uranus's cloud tops have in common with rotten eggs?Uranus Eggs CloudsHydrogen sulfide, the gas that gives rotten eggs their distinctive odor, permeates the upper atmosphere of the planet Uranus - as has been long debated, but never definitively proven. Based on sensitive spectroscopic observations with the Gemini North telescope, astronomers uncovered the noxious gas swirling high in the giant planet's cloud tops. This result resolves a stubborn, long-standing myst
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Galaxies grow bigger and puffier as they age: studyA new international study involving The Australian National University (ANU) and The University of Sydney has found that galaxies grow bigger and puffier as they age.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Let it go: Mental breaks after work improve sleepIf you've had a bad day at work thanks to rude colleagues, doing something fun and relaxing after you punch out could net you a better night's sleep.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New hope for treating diabetic wounds that just won't healNew research uncovers the role of a particular protein in maintaining diabetic wounds and suggests that reversing its effects could help aid wound healing in patients with diabetes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate change intensifies droughts in EuropeGlobal warming will exacerbate soil droughts in Europe - droughts will last longer, affect greater areas, and have an impact on more people. If the earth warms by three degrees Celsius, extreme events could become the normal state in the future.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Virulence switch in 'Iraqibacter': potential Achilles heel?Microbiologists have identified a component of a genetic switch, which they call a potential 'Achilles' heel,' for a type of bacteria often associated with wounded warriors. The switch makes it possible for Acinetobacter baumannii to change between a virulent, hardy form and an avirulent form that is better at surviving at lower temperatures outside a host. Defining the switch could map out target
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pediatric obesity, depression connected in the brainEarly-life obesity and depression may be driven by shared abnormalities in brain regions that process rewards, according to researchers.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Organic solar cells reach record efficiency, benchmark for commercializationIn an advance that makes a more flexible, inexpensive type of solar cell commercially viable, researchers have demonstrated organic solar cells that can achieve 15 percent efficiency.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Odd one out: Protein goes against the family to prevent cancerResearchers have made the surprise discovery that the 'odd one out' in a family of proteins known to drive cancer development is instead critical for preventing stomach cancers. The research team showed switching off a certain gene caused spontaneous development of stomach cancers, driven by chronic inflammation. The study also revealed that immunotherapy may prove to be a significant tool for tre
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A better fake leather, inspired by plantsNature has inspired a coating for synthetic leather that repels oil and water--and keeps the material from getting sticky in the heat.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New cell therapy aids heart recovery -- without implanting cellsA team led by Columbia University Biomedical Engineering Professor Gordana Vunjak-Novakovic has designed a creative new approach to help injured hearts regenerate by applying extracellular vesicles secreted by cardiomyocytes rather than implanting the cells. The study shows that the cardiomyocytes derived from human pluripotent stem cells (derived in turn from a small sample of blood) could be a p
4h
cognitive science

A paper in OBHDP explores how the types of comparisons in performance evaluations affects judgments of fairness.submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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Science : NPR

Flint Activist Wins Major Environmental PrizeLeeAnne Walters demanded action from local officials, confronting them with bottles of discolored water. They dismissed her for months. She meticulously documented lead levels in Flint homes. (Image credit: Michael Gleason/The Goldman Environmental Prize)
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Science | The Guardian

Did you solve it? The puzzle with a twistThe solutions to today’s puzzles On my puzzle blog earlier today , I set you the following puzzles: 1) What is numerically interesting about April 25, 1849 - the date of birth of the German mathematician Felix Klein - and why is this year’s anniversary particularly noteworthy? Continue reading...
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Feed: All Latest

Augmented Reality Is Transforming MuseumsThere are lots of possibilities when it comes to bringing AR into museums like MoMA—but will they embrace them?
4h
New Scientist - News

Finger-prick test reveals fetus’s sex in the first trimesterWomen can now find out whether they are having a boy or a girl using a single drop of blood as soon as they are eight weeks pregnant
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Complete skin regeneration system of fish unraveledResearchers have succeeded in observing the behavior of epidermal cells for the regeneration of smooth skin without remaining scar tissue using their model animal, the zebrafish.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New research modernizes rammed earth constructionA building method as old as dirt is being re-examined as a 'new' and viable modern construction material. Compressed soil, also known as rammed earth, is a method of construction that dates back centuries.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Animal cyborg: Behavioral control by 'toy' craving circuitChildren love to get toys from parents for their birthday present. This craving toward items also involves object hoarding disorders and shopping addiction. However, the biological meaning of why the brain pursues objects or items has remained unknown.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A blood test when it is safe to return to play after a sports-related concussionA high-sensitive blood test can aid concussed hockey players when it might be safe to return to play. Researchers have identified a superior blood-based biomarker for assessing subtle brain injury.
4h
Live Science

NASA Doesn't Know What Poked These Holes in the Arctic's Sea IceNASA scientists flying over the arctic earlier this month spotted strange shapes out the window, but they aren't sure what caused them.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study highlights need for strength training in older women to ward off effects of agingStudy looked at 46 women across two different age ranges, 60-74 and 75-90, to learn how physical activity affects frailty differently in the two groups.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bias keeps women with higher body weights away from the doctor -- Drexel studyThe stigma of weight and internalized feelings relating to it were found in a Drexel University study to be associated with healthcare avoidance in women with higher body weights.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Special Eurobarometer: How fair do Europeans think life in the EU is?A new poll shows most Europeans think life is generally fair, but have concerns over justice, political decisions and income inequality.
4h
New on MIT Technology Review

How to fix one of Bitcoin’s biggest problemsMIT professor Silvio Micali says his new system allows blockchains to operate efficiently at a large scale.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists create innovative new 'green' concrete using grapheneA new greener, stronger and more durable concrete that is made using the wonder-material graphene could revolutionise the construction industry.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Could eating moss be good for your gut?An international team of scientists has discovered a new complex carbohydrate in moss that could possibly be exploited for health or other uses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Attosecond physics: Molecules brilliantly illuminatedA new high-power laser system generates ultrashort pulses of light covering a large share of the mid-infrared spectrum.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Saving a penalty: How science helps predict soccer scoresEver since the first penalty kicks were introduced to soccer in 1891, experts, coaches and supporters have puzzled over the question of why some goalkeepers are better at stopping penalties than others. A new review now demonstrates that simply learning which corner to dive to is not enough. It is important that goalkeepers also perfectly calculate their dive to get to the corner at the right time
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Science | The Guardian

Graphene 'a game-changer' in making building with concrete greenerForm of carbon incorporated into concrete created stronger, more water-resistant composite material that could reduce emissions The novel “supermaterial” graphene could hold the key to making one of the oldest building materials greener, new scientific research suggests. Graphene has been incorporated into traditional concrete production by scientists at the University of Exeter, developing a com
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Science | The Guardian

Why Hunt's screen time limits for kids are scientific nonsenseShouldn’t policy be based on evidence – not the other way around? The future seems rosy for Jeremy Hunt. In his newest letter to social media firms, he envisions a future where every child gets a state-imposed and universal social media limit, similar to the alcohol units recommended by government. After a child surpasses a set cutoff point, their social media access is stopped for the day. Hunt
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Feed: All Latest

'Westworld' Recap, Season 2 Episode 1: No More HeroesThe second season of the HBO show opens on a world where the moral truths of the first are gone.
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The Atlantic

‘Wop’ Doesn’t Mean What Andrew Cuomo Thinks It MeansNew York Governor Andrew Cuomo recently attracted criticism from immigration advocacy groups for describing himself as “undocumented” during a bill-signing ceremony in Albany. “You want to deport an undocumented person, start with me, because I’m an undocumented person,” he said. What drew less attention was how he explained that provocative conclusion. “I came from poor Italian Americans who cam
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Hemsby: Clifftop home destroyed erosion spanning 40 yearsErosion of the cliff at Hemsby, Norfolk, has left 18 homes uninhabitable over the past five years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Yale plays quantum catch in new researchIn a new study published April 23 in the journal Nature Physics, Yale researchers 'pitch' a qubit -- a tiny bit of quantum data -- from one physical point in a microwave cavity to a separate point in a different cavity. It is the first time an end-to-end quantum transmission has been done on demand and represents the first of two Yale experiments involving 'pitch-and-catch' technologies that will
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Face recognition for galaxies: Artificial intelligence brings new tools to astronomyA machine learning method called 'deep learning,' which has been widely used in face recognition and other image- and speech-recognition applications, has shown promise in helping astronomers analyze images of galaxies and understand how they form and evolve. In a new study, researchers used computer simulations of galaxy formation to train a deep learning algorithm, which then proved surprisingly
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

BU: Guns used in cross-border crimes originate from states with more lax lawsOpponents of gun control have frequently pointed to high rates of gun violence in cities such as Chicago to argue that strong state gun control laws are not effective.But guns used in states with stricter gun laws typically flow from states with weaker laws, according to a new study from Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Organic solar cells reach record efficiency, benchmark for commercializationIn an advance that makes a more flexible, inexpensive type of solar cell commercially viable, University of Michigan researchers have demonstrated organic solar cells that can achieve 15 percent efficiency.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Size, structure help poziotinib pose threat to deadly exon 20 lung cancerA drug that failed to effectively strike larger targets in lung cancer hits a bulls-eye on the smaller target presented by a previously untreatable form of the disease, researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in Nature Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Just one more ash dieback spore could push European ash trees to the brinkEurope's ash dieback epidemic could well have been caused by just one or two mushroom-like fruiting bodies of a fungal pathogen from Asia, according to a comprehensive genome sequencing effort published in Nature Ecology & Evolution. This leaves even the most resistant ash trees at threat from the introduction of just one more spore from East Asia.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Galaxies grow bigger and puffier as they age: New studyA new international study involving the Australian National University and the University of Sydney has found that galaxies grow bigger and puffier as they age.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists identify genetic catalysts that speed up evolution of antibiotic resistanceResearchers at Oxford University have shown that it is possible to identify genetic catalysts that accelerate the evolution of antibiotic resistance in bacteria -- and that this knowledge could be used to design treatments to stifle the development of resistance.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What do Uranus's cloud tops have in common with rotten eggs?Hydrogen sulfide, the gas that gives rotten eggs their distinctive odor, permeates the upper atmosphere of the planet Uranus -- as has been long debated, but never definitively proven. Based on sensitive spectroscopic observations with the Gemini North telescope, astronomers uncovered the noxious gas swirling high in the giant planet's cloud tops. This result resolves a stubborn, long-standing mys
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hungry birds as climate change drives food 'mismatch'Warmer springs create a 'mismatch' where hungry chicks hatch too late to feast on abundant caterpillars, new research shows.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What learning looks like in the brainUsing advanced imaging technology, researchers observe new patterns of molecular organization as connections between neurons strengthen during learning.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanoparticle breakthrough could capture unseen light for solar energy conversionAn international team, led by Berkeley Lab scientists, has demonstrated a breakthrough in the design and function of nanoparticles that could make solar panels more efficient by converting light usually missed by solar cells into usable energy.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is sickle cell trait genetic risk factor for increased stroke risk?Sickle cell trait may not be associated with the occurrence of ischemic stroke (when a blood clot blocks a blood vessel in the brain) in African-Americans, according to a meta-analysis that combined the results of four studies with 19,464 African-American participants.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Parkinson's disease among patients with inflammatory bowel diseasePatients with inflammatory bowel disease appeared more likely than patients without the disorder to develop Parkinson's disease, while anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy for inflammatory bowel disease was associated with reduced incidence of Parkinson's in a new study that analyzed administrative claims data for more than 170 million patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What effect do new guidelines have on prevalence of high blood pressure in children?More US children are considered to have elevated blood pressure under new guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Health benefits will offset cost of China's climate policyChina's climate policy should pay for itself: A new MIT study finds that a four percent reduction per year in carbon emissions should net the country $339 billion in health savings.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A common anti-inflammatory therapy may help reduce risk of developing Parkinson's diseaseThe recent study, published in JAMA Neurology, shows that individuals with IBD are at a 28 percent higher risk of developing Parkinson's disease than those without IBD. However, if they are treated with anti-Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (anti-TNFα) therapy, a monoclonal antibody that is commonly used to control inflammation in IBD patients, then their risk of developing Parkinson's disease goes dow
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change intensifies droughts in EuropeGlobal warming will exacerbate soil droughts in Europe -- droughts will last longer, affect greater areas, and have an impact on more people. If the earth warms by 3 degrees Celsius, extreme events could become the normal state in the future. This scenario was described by an international team of scientists coordinated by the UFZ.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Virulence switch in 'Iraqibacter': Potential Achilles heel?Microbiologists have identified a component of a genetic switch, which they call a potential 'Achilles' heel,' for a type of bacteria often associated with wounded warriors. The switch makes it possible for Acinetobacter baumannii to change between a virulent, hardy form and an avirulent form that is better at surviving at lower temperatures outside a host. Defining the switch could map out target
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Found: A new form of DNA in our cellsIn a world first, Australian researchers have identified a new DNA structure -- called the i-motif -- inside cells. A twisted 'knot' of DNA, the i-motif has never before been directly seen inside living cells. The new findings, from the Garvan Institute of Medical Research, are published today in the leading journal Nature Chemistry.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pediatric obesity, depression connected in the brain, Stanford study findsEarly-life obesity and depression may be driven by shared abnormalities in brain regions that process rewards, according to researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Just one more ash dieback spore could push European ash trees to the brinkAsh dieback threatens 95% of all European ash trees and has already killed or severely damaged a quarter in southern Sweden and destroyed more than 80% of young ash trees in Norway.
4h
Popular Science

A lake full of algae will wreck more than your summer swimming plansNexus Media News Algae blooms in lakes and oceans generate pollution that harms people, pets, and the planet. Algae blooms are a serious problem for lakes, rivers, streams, and seas around the world. Farmers use fertilizer to grow crops, and fertilizer runoff empties into…
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: These Ants Explode, but Their Nests Live to See Another DayScientists described in depth a species of ants in Southeast Asia that fight attackers by rupturing their own abdomens to release a sticky fluid laced with toxins.
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NYT > Science

Q&A: What Lies Beneath Jupiter’s Great Red Spot?The mysterious, orangish storm has shrunk in diameter in recent decades, but has increased in height and depth.
4h
Live Science

Who Inherits the British Throne?Since days of yore, the royal line of succession to the British throne — like most monarchies — was based on primogeniture.
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Ingeniøren

Fra linje- til celleproduktion: SDU er klar med 100 millioner til industri 4.0Bløde robotter, ny modulbaseret automationsteknologi og virtual reality er nogle af de centrale teknologier, der skal købes i en ny strategisk industri 4.0-satsning på Syddansk Universitet
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Virulence switch in 'Iraqibacter': potential Achilles heel?Microbiologists have identified a component of a genetic switch, which they call a potential "Achilles' heel", for a type of bacteria often associated with wounded warriors.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanoparticle breakthrough could capture unseen light for solar energy conversionAn international team of scientists has demonstrated a breakthrough in the design and function of nanoparticles that could make solar panels more efficient by converting light usually missed by solar cells into usable energy.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Health benefits will offset cost of China's climate policy, study saysA new MIT study reports that, if China follows through with its international pledge to reduce carbon dioxide emissions, every one of its provinces will experience benefits to air quality and human health, with associated monetary savings that could offset the total cost of implementing the climate policy.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hungry birds as climate change drives food 'mismatch'Warmer springs create a "mismatch" where hungry chicks hatch too late to feast on abundant caterpillars, new research shows.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Uranus smells like rotten eggsPlanetary scientists detected hydrogen sulfide in Uranus’ upper clouds — the same compound that gives rotten eggs their terrible smell.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Young galaxies are flat, but old ones are more blobbyA survey of hundreds of star systems precisely links the shape of a galaxy to the ages of its stars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists have tracked down an elusive 'tangled knot' of DNAIt's DNA, but not as we know it. In a world first, Australian researchers have identified a new DNA structure—called the i-motif—inside cells. A twisted 'knot' of DNA, the i-motif has never before been directly seen inside living cells.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change intensifies droughts in EuropeGlobal warming will exacerbate soil droughts in Europe—droughts will last longer, affect greater areas, and have an impact on more people. If the Earth warms by three degrees Celsius, extreme events could become the normal state in the future. This scenario was described by an international team of scientists coordinated by the UFZ.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Where's mum? Three bear cubs rescued in BulgariaThree bear cubs have been rescued in Bulgaria after villagers found them roaming alone on a road in the country's southern Rhodope mountains, the Four Paws animal charity said Monday.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Supercomputing advances will improve analysis of Earth system variability and energy sector needsA new Earth-modeling system unveiled today will have weather-scale resolution and use advanced computers to simulate aspects of Earth's variability and anticipate decadal changes that will critically impact the U.S. energy sector in coming years.
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Feed: All Latest

California’s Water Whiplash Is Only Going to Get WorseGet ready for more dramatic shifts between severe drought and record-breaking rainfall.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Caregivers can help assess whether older adults are dealing with deliriumIn a new study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, researchers identified six tools that caregivers could use to detect delirium in the older adults they provide care for.
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Blog » Languages » English

Alice in Neuroland: Mad Hatter vs. March Hare“All right, I’ve answered your last question, but none of my answers sounded like anything to do with the White Rabbit,” you confess to the Cheshire Cat, realizing a whole two days have gone by. “Now I’m a little hungry.” “Well.” The Cheshire Cat looks a bit smug. “Maybe you should go have a spot of tea, and some biscuits.” You roll your eyes. “That’s not helpful at all! What an odd cat you are.”
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Audit finds biodiversity data aggregators 'lose and confuse' dataBoth online repositories the Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) and the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) were found to 'lose and confuse' portions of the data provided to them, according to an independent audit of ca. 800,000 records from three Australasian museums. Genus and species names were found to have been changed in up to 1 in 5 records, and programming errors caused up to 100
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

IBS patients obtain robust, enduring relief from home-based treatment programIn the largest federally funded non-drug clinical trial for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), patients with the most severe and persistent symptoms achieved robust and sustained relief by learning to control symptoms with minimal clinician contact.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How your brain learns to expect mud puddles in the park (and other things)Whenever there's a mismatch between what you expect to experience and what you actually experience, the brain has to register the error and update your expectation. These changing expectations are fundamental for making decisions. A new study is the first to show how your midbrain responds to the error, and the orbitofrontal cortex updates the information. That's how you know what to expect tomorr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New study shows wearable technology also contributes to distracted drivingA new study examines wearable technology and whether it affects drivers' concentration. Scientists have discovered that while a driver texting with a wearable device can marginally reduce their level of distraction, it ultimately makes texting while driving just as dangerous as with an ordinary cell phone.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

SpaceX's plan to fly you across the globe in 30 minutes | Gwynne ShotwellWhat's up at SpaceX? Engineer Gwynne Shotwell was employee number seven at Elon Musk's pioneering aerospace company and is now its president. In conversation with TED curator Chris Anderson, she discusses SpaceX's race to put people into orbit and the organization's next big project, the BFR (ask her what it stands for). The new giant rocket is designed to take humanity to Mars -- but it has anoth
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

Amazon is said to be building home robotsAmazon Robot Home Alexa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Acute aortic dissection should be suspected with pulse or neurologic deficit and hypotensionIn the appropriate clinical setting, suspicion for acute aortic dissection should be raised when patients present with findings that have a high specificity and high positive likelihood ratio (hypotension, pulse deficit, or neurologic deficit).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What the oldest peace treaty in the world teaches usToday's peace symbols go back to antiquity -- according to archaeologists, peace images were widespread, especially during wars, despite glorification of war. The oldest peace treaty attests to long negotiations instead of triumphant victory.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Application of mesenchymal stem cells stimulates nervous tissue regenerationThe research team used model spinal cord injuries in rats for their purposes. As a result, it was found out that therapy by adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells combined with fibrin matrix influences the restoration of motor functions. It also decreases the area of pathological cavities and reduces astroglial activation.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Five new blanket-hermit crab species described 130 years later from the PacificUnlike most hermit crabs, the blanket-hermit crab does not use empty shells for protection, and instead lives symbiotically with a sea anemone. The crab uses the anemone to cover its soft abdomen, and can pull the anemone's tissue over its head to protect itself whenever necessary. Since 1888, this crab had been considered a unique species until a research team recently described five new ones and
5h
The Atlantic

23andMe Wants Its DNA Data to Be Less White23andMe is best known for selling DNA test kits, but the company’s real value lies in the data of its 5 million customers . The bigger its genetic database, the more insights 23andMe can glean from DNA. That, in turn, means the more it can tell customers about their ancestry and health and the more valuable the data it shares with academic scientists and sells to pharmaceutical companies for rese
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The Atlantic

Alexa and the Age of Casual RudenessWhen I was a kid, in the early 1980s, I programmed a little in a language called BASIC. Recalling that long-ago era, I see myself, bowl cut and braces, tapping at the keyboard of some ancient computer: 10 PRINT “[Whatever]” 20 GOTO 10 And when I hit “return,” up jumps a digital column of whatever I’d entered between the quotation marks to fill the screen: [Whatever] [Whatever] [Whatever] And so o
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Futurity.org

‘Mind-based’ intervention for IBS eases symptomsIn a non-drug clinical trial for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), patients with the most severe and persistent symptoms achieved robust and sustained relief by learning to control symptoms with minimal clinician contact, a new study shows. Of 436 patients recruited for the study, 61 percent reported symptom improvement two weeks after home-based behavioral treatment ended compared to 55 percent in
5h
Futurity.org

MRIs of brain wiring promise better diagnosisFunctional connectivity MRI (fcMRI)—a kind of brain scan that shows how brain regions interact—can reliably detect fundamental differences in the wiring of individual brains, research shows. The technique could potentially help scientists distinguish healthy people from people with brain diseases or disorders, and provide insight into variations in cognitive ability and personality traits. Curren
5h
Dana Foundation

Public Event: Managing Neuropsychiatric Symptoms in Neurodegenerative DiseaseNeuropsychiatric symptoms such as agitation, aggression and psychosis are frequently found in patients with neurodegenerative disorders. These symptoms increase the already significant burden of neurodegenerative diseases and complicate diagnosis and disease management, yet effective diagnostics and treatments are lacking. Towards the goal of reducing this burden, this symposium will review state
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Viden

Svært ved at få børn? Bred vifte af kemikalier kan være årsagenHverdagsprodukter med bestemte kemikalier er måske skyld i, at sædceller ryger på afveje i livmoderen. Det viser dansk forskning fra én af fem finalister ved Ph.d. Cup 2018.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Saving a penalty: How science helps predict the scoreHave you ever wondered how top goal keepers such as Manuel Neuer or Gianluigi Buffon decide which corner to dive to in a penalty kick situation? You are in good company. Ever since the first penalty kicks were introduced to soccer in 1891, experts, coaches and supporters have puzzled over the question of why some goalkeepers are better at stopping penalties than others. A new review of the availab
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Five new blanket-hermit crab species described 130 years later from the PacificAt the turn of the twentieth century, two independent marine scientists—JR Henderson in 1888, and A Alcock in 1899, described two unusual blanket-hermit crabs from the Indo-West Pacific.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Evaluation of induced membrane vesicles fusion specificity with target cellsExtracellular vesicles (EV) represent a promising vector system for biomolecules and drug delivery due to their natural origin and participation in intercellular communication. As the quantity of EVs is limited, it was proposed to induce the release of membrane vesicles from the surface of human cells by treatment with cytochalasin B. Cytochalasin B-induced membrane vesicles (CIMVs) were successfu
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds differences in immune cells in pediatric asthma patients based on socioeconomic statusThere are considerable socioeconomic disparities in asthma control among children, but the molecular origins of these disparities are not well understood.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How to hijack degrading complexes to put cancer cells asleepPalbociclib is a drug used for the treatment of advanced estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer. Researchers at the Universities of Dundee and Newcastle and their colleagues investigated the drug's mode of action in more detail and uncovered the proteasome, a cellular degradation machinery vital for the control of cell proliferation, as its yet unknown target. Their discovery could potentially h
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Physicists gain control over transitions between different states of matterAn international group of physicists managed for the first time to experimentally observe the transition between two different states of matter: propagating polariton-solitons and a Bose-Einstein condensate. Furthermore, physicists developed a theoretical model to explain such transitions and found a way to switch between the different states by changing the laser pumping power in the polariton fo
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Saving a penalty: How science helps predict the scoreEver since the first penalty kicks were introduced to soccer in 1891, experts, coaches and supporters have puzzled over the question of why some goalkeepers are better at stopping penalties than others. A new review of the available literature now proves that simply learning which corner to dive to is not enough. It is important that goalkeepers also perfectly calculate their dive to get to the co
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists create innovative new 'green' concrete using grapheneA new greener, stronger and more durable concrete that is made using the wonder-material graphene could revolutionise the construction industry.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research modernizes rammed earth constructionA building method as old as dirt is being re-examined as a 'new' and viable modern construction material.
5h
Futurity.org

Keyboard tech speeds browsing for blind internet usersA new keyboard tool makes it easier for blind internet users or those who have low vision to quickly access options on popular websites. Browsing through offerings on Airbnb, for instance, means clicking on rows of photos to compare options from prospective hosts. This kind of table-based navigation is increasingly common, but can be tedious or impossible for people who are blind or have low visi
5h
Big Think

Are there any openly atheist politicians in America?We need a public mature enough to recognize that policy decisions and actions are more relevant to leadership than professed beliefs. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New report reveals cybercriminal spending behavioursA University of Surrey senior lecturer in Criminology has teamed up with virtualisation technology company Bromium to produce "Into the Web of Profit", a research study revealing the socio-economic and spending differences among cybercriminals.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why freeloader baby-eating ants are welcomed to the colonyIt might seem surprising that a colony of ants would tolerate the type of guests that gobble both their grub and their babies.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

AI beats astronomers in predicting survivability of exoplanetsArtificial intelligence is giving scientists new hope for studying the habitability of planets, in a study from astronomers Chris Lam and David Kipping. Their work looks at so-called "Tatooines," and uses machine learning techniques to calculate how likely such planets are to survive into stable orbits. The study is published in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dicer-like enzymes with sequence cleavage preferencesResearchers keep discovering new functions of small RNAs. For instance, they can be used as a defense mechanism against viruses or self-replicating genome invaders. These tiny pieces of RNA are often produced by a cleavage of long precursors by so called Dicer proteins. To their surprise, researchers from the University of Bern have found that some Dicers acquired a unique and as yet unknown featu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Delivering VR in perfect focus with nanostructure meta-lensesIf wearing a virtual reality or augmented reality headset is ever to become commonplace, hardware manufacturers will need to figure out how to make the devices small and lightweight while ensuring their images are sharp and clear. Unfortunately, this task faces a key limitation in optics: Conventional lenses are curved glass objects that focus different wavelengths of light in different locations,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bitcoin more vulnerable to attack than expectedCalculations by University of Twente researchers show that Bitcoin is more vulnerable to attack than people had always assumed. If some Bitcoin users were to form a group that controls 20 percent of the currency's computing power, they could launch an attack and, within a few days, force all other users to accept a new standard for Bitcoin. The researchers presented their results last week, at a s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What do we do about plastics?It's accumulating in the oceans, lakes and rivers; its microbeads are now embedded in our biology; it is disgusting and dangerous and doesn't biodegrade. It's our old friend, plastics. Last week, several New York City Council representatives proposed banning plastic bottles from vendors in our parks. New York State's Assembly has already overturned the city's effort to charge a fee for plastic bag
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Ingeniøren

Mini-rumfærge skal til ISS i 2020Dream Chaser er ikke som andre rumskibe. Den er kan sendes op med flere forskellige typer raketter og kan i teorien lande i enhver international lufthavn.
5h
Futurity.org

Childhood poverty in U.S. cost over $1 trillion in 2015Childhood poverty cost $1.03 trillion in 2015, about 5.4 percent of the gross domestic product of the United States, according to a new study. “It is estimated that for every dollar spent on reducing childhood poverty, the country would save at least $7…” “Impoverished children grow up having fewer skills and are thus less able to contribute to the productivity of the economy,” says Mark R. Rank,
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wind energy's swift growth, explainedThe wind industry is growing quickly around the world, especially in China and the U.S., where the total amount of electricity generated by wind turbines nearly doubled between 2011 and 2017.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Storm damage to forests costs billions – here's how artificial intelligence can helpHigh-intensity storms cause billions of pounds of damage every year, and climate change is set to make this worse in future. We already appear to be seeing more frequent and intense windstorms. Ex-hurricane Ophelia and Storm Eleanor both wreaked havoc in the British Isles over the winter, including injuries, power cuts and severe travel delays.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

High-power laser system generates ultrashort pulses of light covering a large share of the mid-infrared spectrumMolecules are the building blocks of life. Like all other organisms, we are made of them. They control our biorhythm, and they can also reflect our state of health. Researchers led by Ferenc Krausz at the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (LAP) – a joint venture between Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) and the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics (MPQ) in Munich – want to use brilliant infr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nanomedicine: Drugs can be made 'smarter'A new method has been developed to make drugs 'smarter' using nanotechnology so pharmacologists can tailor their drugs to more accurately target an area on the body, such as a cancer tumor.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Eating more fish could prevent Parkinson's diseaseParvalbumin, a protein found in great quantities in several different fish species, has been shown to help prevent the formation of certain protein structures closely associated with Parkinson's disease. A new study shines more light on the link between consumption of fish and better long-term neurological health.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

First genetic evidence of ongoing mating between 2 distinct species of guenon monkeysA new study of guenon monkeys in Gombe National Park is the first to provide genetic evidence of ongoing mating between two distinct species. These monkeys have successfully been producing hybrid offspring for hundreds maybe even thousands of years. Prior studies have suggested that the different physical characteristics of these monkeys keeps them from interbreeding. So, if their faces don't matc
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antibiotic resistance can be caused by small amounts of antibioticsAntibiotic-resistant bacteria are a global and growing problem in health care. To be able to prevent further development of resistance developing, it is important to understand where and how antibiotic resistance in bacteria arises. New research shows that low concentrations of antibiotics, too, can cause high antibiotic resistance to develop in bacteria.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hacking human 'drug trafficking' network could make diabetes treatments more effectiveMaking tiny changes to existing diabetes treatments can alter how they interact with cells, and potentially make the medicines more effective.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Trees with grassy areas soften summer heatTrees cool their environment and 'heat islands' benefit from it. However, the degree of cooling depends greatly on the tree species and the local conditions. In a recent study, scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) compared two species of urban trees.
6h
The Atlantic

The Supreme Court's 'Fire Mueller' Trial BalloonAn upcoming Supreme Court decision in a case most Americans have never heard of, and even lawyers will find obscure, could offer a clue about how the justices would react to President Trump firing Special Counsel Robert Mueller. Technically, the case of Raymond J. Lucia v. Securities and Exchange Commission, being argued Monday, involves only the arcane question of whether SEC Administrative Law
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists create innovative new 'green' concrete using grapheneA new greener, stronger and more durable concrete that is made using the wonder-material graphene could revolutionize the construction industry.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Measles vaccination gaps in teenagers and young adults highlighted in ECDC's reportECDC data show that up to 80 percent of teenagers and young adults who contracted measles in 2017 had not been vaccinated. ECDC analysis of sub-national data indicates that even countries with high overall levels of vaccine coverage may have groups that are unvaccinated. In recent and ongoing measles outbreaks, ECDC's recent rapid risk assessment identifies healthcare workers as among those affect
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals large differences in drug prescriptions for newborns between NICUsLittle is known concerning how extensively drugs are prescribed to newborns in different neonatal intensive care units (NICUs).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Attosecond physics: Molecules brilliantly illuminatedA new high-power laser system generates ultrashort pulses of light covering a large share of the mid-infrared spectrum.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Could eating moss be good for your gut?An international team of scientists including the University of Adelaide has discovered a new complex carbohydrate in moss that could possibly be exploited for health or other uses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Liquid nicotine used in e-cigarettes still a danger to children despite recent decline in exposuresA new study found that there were more than 8,200 calls to US poison centers regarding exposures to liquid nicotine and e-cigarettes among children younger than 6 years of age from January 2012 through April 2017, averaging 129 calls each month or more than four a day.
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Popular Science

Want to take a Mensa intelligence test? Here are four practice questionsScience The society is open only to people who score in the 98th percentile or higher on a preapproved intelligence test. The society is open only to people who score in the 98th percentile or higher on a preapproved intelligence test. To be a Mensa member, hopefuls must demonstrate…
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Popular Science

Can you pass IBM's test for entry-level roles?Science The Information Processing Aptitude test is notoriously difficult. The online evaluation consists of half math-based word problems and half number-sequence completions.
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Popular Science

Can you pass the U.S. Army's World War I-era intelligence test?Science Literate recruits took the written Alpha test, while illiterate applicants took a visual Beta. During World War I, the U.S. Army needed a system that would quickly sort recruits into their ideal roles.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A blood test when it is safe to return to play after a sports-related concussionA high-sensitive blood test can aid concussed hockey players when it might be safe to return to play. In a study published by the journal Neurology, researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy has identified a superior blood-based biomarker for assessing subtle brain injury.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Spider venom to treat paralysisA team of Russian scientists together with foreign colleagues found out that the venom of crab spider Heriaeus melloteei may be used as a basis for developing treatment against hypokalemic periodic paralysis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MSU scientists rolled 2-D cadmium telluride up into nanoscrollsA team of scientists from the Faculty of Chemistry and the Faculty of Materials Science, MSU together with foreign colleagues discovered that two-dimensional sheets of cadmium telluride can spontaneously fold into nanoscrolls. This effect may be used in electronics and photonics. The results of the study were published in the highly-rated Chemistry of Materials journal.
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Popular Science

It’s not just Syria—chemical weapons still pose a global threatMilitary What you need to know about chemical weapons. Despite most of the world condemning them, chemical weapons still cause harm around the globe. But what, exactly, are chemical weapons, and who has them?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Growing evidence that probiotics are good for your liverIncreased awareness of the importance of the microbes that live in our gut has spurred a great deal of research on the microbiome and fueled a booming probiotics industry. A new study suggests probiotics can improve not only the health of our gut but liver health, as well.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Human-like walking mechanics evolved before the genus HomoA close examination of 3.6-million-year-old hominin footprints discovered in Laetoli, Tanzania, suggests our ancestors evolved the hallmark trait of extended leg, human-like bipedalism substantially earlier than previously thought.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why zero-calorie sweeteners can still lead to diabetes, obesityIncreased awareness of the health consequences of eating too much sugar has fueled a dramatic uptick in the consumption of zero-calorie artificial sweeteners in recent decades. However, new research finds sugar replacements can also cause health changes that are linked with diabetes and obesity, suggesting that switching from regular to diet soda may be a case of 'out of the frying pan, into the f
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Endangered salamander offers clues on healing spinal cord injuryA new study takes a comparative approach to pinpoint what happens differently in humans versus other animals to explain why they can successfully regenerate neurons while we instead form scar tissue. By learning from the similarities and differences, researchers hope to find new leads in the treatment of spinal cord injury.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Potential source of gender differences in migrainesFindings from a new study conducted in rats reveal that females may be more susceptible to migraines and less responsive to treatment because of the way fluctuations in the hormone estrogen affect cells in the brain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New vaccine could help people overcome 'bath salts' abuseResearchers have developed a vaccine for one of the most dangerous types of synthetic cathinones, or bath salts. The vaccine blunts the illegal stimulant's effects on the brain, which could help recovering drug users who experience a relapse.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Trichomonosis discovered amongst myna birds in PakistanA strain of the disease responsible for killing nearly two thirds of the UK's greenfinch population has spread to myna birds in Pakistan. In 2011, the disease was discovered to have reached European finch populations. Now it has been found in an entirely separate songbird species -- the common myna, native to India and one of the world's most invasive species. Although it is not generally fatal to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers investigate 'why clothes don't fall apart'Cotton thread is made of many tiny fibers, each just 2-3 cm long, yet when spun together the fibers are capable of transmitting tension over indefinitely long distances. From a physics perspective, how threads and yarns transmit tension—making them strong enough to keep clothes from falling apart—is a long-standing puzzle that is not completely understood.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Maybe we should ask about Google’s data privacy
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Dagens Medicin

Folketinget overvejer at lukke helt for politiets adgang til genom-dataPartierne bag National Genom Center drøfter for tiden, om Politiets mulighed for at få adgang til oplysninger skal inddæmmes eller helt lukkes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Promising cell study provides hope of effective treatment of Parkinson's diseaseThere is a significant decrease in the level of calcium when nerve cells are affected by Parkinson's disease. If the calcium level is kept stable, severe symptoms in Parkinson's patients may be prevented. This is shown by a recent laboratory study from Aarhus University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Translating elephant seal data into a symphony provides surprising insightsSonification of 10 years of oceanic migration of these seals reveals coordinated swimming.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Odd one out: Protein goes against the family to prevent cancer donateMelbourne researchers have made the surprise discovery that the 'odd one out' in a family of proteins known to drive cancer development is instead critical for preventing stomach cancers.The research team showed switching off a gene called NF-κB1 caused spontaneous development of stomach cancers, driven by chronic inflammation. The study also revealed that immunotherapy may prove to be a significa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Animal cyborg: Behavioral control by 'toy' craving circuitChildren love to get toys from parents for their birthday present. This craving toward items also involves object hoarding disorders and shopping addiction. However, the biological meaning of why the brain pursues objects or items has remained unknown. Part of the answer may lie with a neural circuit in the hypothalamus associated with 'object craving,' says neuroscientist Daesoo Kim from the Depa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New research modernizes rammed earth constructionA building method as old as dirt is being re-examined as a 'new' and viable modern construction material.Compressed soil, also known as rammed earth, is a method of construction that dates back centuries. UBC Okanagan engineering professor Sumi Siddiqua, who has been researching the resurgence in rammed earth, says conventional cement is still the go-to for modern engineers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Complete skin regeneration system of fish unraveledResearchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have succeeded in observing the behavior of epidermal cells for the regeneration of smooth skin without remaining scar tissue using their model animal, the zebrafish.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Let it go: Mental breaks after work improve sleepIf you've had a bad day at work thanks to rude colleagues, doing something fun and relaxing after you punch out could net you a better night's sleep.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Multiple sclerosis may be linked to sheep disease toxinExposure to a toxin primarily found in sheep could be linked to the development of multiple sclerosis (MS) in humans, new research suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Addition precautions at hospital don't help prevent spread of resistant bacteriaContact precautions, used in addition to the standard precautions, the basic level of infection control applied to all patients, did not limit or prevent the spread of drug-resistant bacteria in non-intensive care unit (ICU) hospital wards, according to research presented at the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

6-day antibiotic cellulitis therapy results in faster, greater relapse than 12-day courseCellulitis treated with a six-day course of intravenous antibiotic flucloxacillin resulted in greater rates of relapse at 90 days post treatment despite having similar short-term results to that of the 12-day course, according to research presented at the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene linked to fatal outcomes in P. aeruginosa BSI may be used as marker, targetResearchers discovered an easily measured gene linked to a high fatality rate, which could be used as a novel prognostic biomarker in patients with a Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) bloodstream infection, according to research presented at the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID).
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Ingeniøren

Nu får kommuner hjælp til at fjerne skibsvragFolketinget afsætter 2,8 millioner kroner til at bugsere grundstødte herreløse skibe væk.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

500th rehabilitated black cockatoo released into wildAn endangered black cockatoo has become the 500th rehabilitated cockatoo to be released into the wild as part of a collaborative research project involving Murdoch University.
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Futurity.org

New imaging combo shows how cancer cells moveScientists have developed a new cell imaging technology that creates high-resolution “movies” of cells in their 3D environment and captures subcellular processes. Published in Science , the research reveals a technology that shows the phenotypic diversity within cells across different organisms and developmental stages and in conditions such as mitosis, immune processes, and in metastases. The te
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Asthma and hay fever linked to increased risk of psychiatric disordersA new study is the first to find a significant link between asthma, hay fever and a broad spectrum of psychiatric disorders. Over 15 years, 10.8 percent of patients with allergic diseases developed a psychiatric disorder, compared to only 6.7 percent of those without allergies. Monitoring the mental health of patients with allergies could help doctors care for their patients more effectively.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why freeloader baby-eating ants are welcomed to the colonyIt might seem surprising that a colony of ants would tolerate the type of guests that gobble both their grub and their babies. But new research shows there's likely a useful tradeoff to calmly accepting these parasite ants into the fold: They have weaponry that's effective against their host ants and a more menacing intruder ant.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Drinking water may help exercising seniors stay mentally sharpOlder people should drink more water to reap the full cognitive benefits of exercise, new research suggests. The study explores the association between hydration status before exercising and exercise-enhanced cognition in older adults.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A biomass-to-liquid plant to produce sustainable synthetic fuelAn EU project developed innovative nanocatalysts to create an integrated modular and highly efficient process for producing fuels from renewable energy sources.
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Feed: All Latest

Star Wars News: 'Solo' Isn't Really an Origin StoryIt's more of a tale of how Han became Han, you know?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why freeloader baby-eating ants are welcomed to the colonyIt might seem surprising that a colony of ants would tolerate the type of guests that gobble both their grub and their babies. But new research shows there's likely a useful tradeoff to calmly accepting these parasite ants into the fold: They have weaponry that's effective against their host ants and a more menacing intruder ant.
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The Scientist RSS

EPA Seeks to Restrict the Science Used in PolicymakingRepublican politicians have been trying to limit data to only those publicly available, but opponents say that would neglect private, yet important, information.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Immune Cell In ActionBy combining two new microscopy technologies, researchers filmed immune cells toiling away in the inner ear of a living zebrafish.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers detect almost one hundred new young stellar objects in Serpens SouthUsing NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have identified 152 X-ray sources, including 95 new young stellar objects (YSOs) in Serpens South star-forming cluster. The finding is detailed in a paper published April 13 in the arXiv pre-print server.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nuclear materials developed for a sustainable futureAn EU-funded project has fostered links between national and European programmes to harmonise and implement scientific and technical research into materials for a safe and sustainable nuclear sector.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The future of 'fracking' requires a social licenceDeciding on whether the UK will go ahead with extracting shale gas fracking, will depend as much on the industry securing a social licence as making a strong economic case, a new book by Professor Andreas Goldthau, of Royal Holloway, University of London suggests.
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Dagens Medicin

Nyt kræftmiddel er effektivt på børnEt nyt studie viser, at lægemidlet Larotrectinib udløser respons i 93 pct. af alle de kræftramte børn, der deltog i studiet.
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Dagens Medicin

Nordjylland har ansat de første læger i sammenhængende uddannelsesforløbDe første læger er blevet ansat i nye sammenhængende uddannelsesforløb. Initiativet skal øge rekrutteringsmuligheder for læger inden for udvalgte specialer i lægedækningstruede områder i Nordjylland.
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Futurity.org

Climate cuts number of trash-eating Arctic bugsWarmer summer and fall seasons and fewer winter freeze-thaw events have led to changes in the relative numbers of different types of bugs in the Arctic, research shows. Compared with colder years in the past, there are now more plant-eating and parasitic arthropods, and fewer detritivores (the insects that literally consume the living world’s garbage). The research appears in the journal Royal So
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Conservation through religion? Scientists confirm that sacred natural sites confer biodiversity advantageSacred natural sites (SNS) are found all over the world. They are thought to play an important role in conservation but until recently there was little systematic investigation of this claim. Now, new research published in the journal Biological Conservation by an international and multidisciplinary team, led by the University of Ioannina and including Bangor University, has shown that there is a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Angola loses first satellite, plans successorAngola on Monday confirmed the premature death of its first national telecoms satellite, Angosat-1, which was launched in December and was expected to have a working life of 15 years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nigerians demand air quality data over pollution fearsBolatito Joseph has strong suspicions about what is causing her breathing problems and a mucus build up: a building site near her home and noxious fumes from a rubbish dump close to her church.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Qatar Airways to expand despite 'large loss': chiefQatar Airways will continue to expand even as it prepares to announce "large" annual losses due to a blockade by neighbours, the airline's chief executive said on Monday.
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NYT > Science

Her Daughter’s Diagnosis Made Her Work as a Scientist PersonalSoo-Kyung Lee had been studying the FOXG1 gene for years. Her research took on new meaning when she learned that her daughter, Yuna, had a rare defect on that gene.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists control transitions between different states of matterAn international group of physicists managed for the first time to experimentally observe the transition between two states of matter, propagating polariton-solitons and a Bose-Einstein condensate. Furthermore, physicists developed a theoretical model to explain such transitions and found a way to switch between the states by changing the laser pumping power in the polariton formation process. The
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Neural network trained to assess fire effectsSkoltech's Aeronet Lab has developed an algorithm that makes it possible to analyze satellite images of areas affected by fires and other natural disasters and to make a quick assessment of the economic damage. The algorithm is based on machine learning and computer vision.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can desert cities such as Tucson and Phoenix make water sources sustainable?Can a place where water is hard to come by and heat is hard to escape sustain a growing population?
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Dagens Medicin

Kun hver anden nyansat får officiel oplæring i SundhedsplatformenHospitalsafdelinger holder nyansatte væk fra Region Hovedstadens officielle undervisning i Sundhedsplatformen, fordi kvaliteten af kurserne ikke er gode nok.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New method significantly improves the production of biohydrogen and other biochemicalsA joint study by the University of Turku and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has shown that the ability of photosynthesising microbial cells to produce biohydrogen from solar energy can be markedly improved by attaching the cells to a transparent nanocellulose film. The method is also expected to enhance the production of other biochemicals from microalgal cells. The results have been pub
7h
Popular Science

Homeopathic and natural remedies aren’t the same thing—and only one of them is total nonsenseHealth Therapies from nature sometimes work, but diluted dog rabies does not. Willow bark has a long and storied history, but it wasn’t until the turn of the 20th century that anyone bothered to isolate the active ingredient into the pills we know…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists generate an atlas of the human genome using stem cellsScientists from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have generated an atlas of the human genome using a state-of-the-art gene editing technology and human embryonic stem cells, illuminating the roles that our genes play in health and disease. The scientists have reported their findings in the journal Nature Cell Biology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Financial expert taking Facebook to UK court over fake adsFacebook Martin LewisA personal finance expert launched a lawsuit against Facebook in Britain on Monday, claiming the social media company is allowing the publication of scam ads featuring his name.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Clouds in three dimensionsETH computer graphics specialists have analysed cloud formation and air flow in high resolution weather situations and visualised a high resolution weather situation in 3-D. The aviation industry and meteorologists may be able to benefit from this visualisation method in the future.
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Futurity.org

How to make gold nanoparticles on water dropletsScientists have discovered a new way to create gold nanoparticles and nanowires using water droplets. The experiment wasn’t designed to turn up anything of note but instead produced a “bewildering” surprise, they say. The technique is the latest discovery in the field of on-droplet chemistry and could lead to more environmentally friendly ways to produce nanoparticles of gold and other metals, sa
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

IBS patients obtain robust, enduring relief from home-based treatment programIn the largest federally funded non-drug clinical trial for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), patients with the most severe and persistent symptoms achieved robust and sustained relief by learning to control symptoms with minimal clinician contact. Led by University at Buffalo researchers in collaboration with colleagues at New York University and Northwestern University, the study was published onl
7h
New Scientist - News

Worst mass extinctions may have been caused by rising mountainsA pair of mass extinctions struck in quick succession just before the dinosaur era, and the birth of a mountain range in South Africa may have been partly to blame
7h
New Scientist - News

The fight for gender equality can be informed by scienceWith the rise of movements like #MeToo, now is a good time to ask why the patriarchy exists and why it persists
7h
Science : NPR

For 50 Years, Deep-Water Trawls Likely Caught More Fish Than Anyone ThoughtUsing historical data and estimates from deep-sea trawls that drag nets along the ocean floor, researchers estimate that millions of tons of catch have gone unreported in the last 50 years. (Image credit: Monty Rakusen/Getty Images/Cultura RF)
7h
Ingeniøren

Undersøgelse: Mikroplast forurener ikke grundvandetDTU har undersøgt, om mikroplast kan forurene vores grundvand. Det er ikke sandsynligt, lyder konklusionen.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Race and gender still an issue at academic conferencesIn the midst of social justice movements such as #MeToo, pervasive sexist and racist attitudes are being examined across all sectors, including academia.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mideast ride-sharing app Careem says it was hackedThe Mideast ride-sharing app Careem says it has been hacked.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Merkel party warns competition 'impossible' against FacebookA leading politician from German Chancellor Angela Merkel's conservative party warned Monday that Facebook's dominance makes competition "impossible", joining a broadside against the social network from Berlin.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook rejects Australia media calls for regulationTech giant Facebook has opposed calls by Australian media companies for digital platforms to be regulated, amid an inquiry into their impact on competition in news and advertising markets.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

India's TCS crosses $100-bln market valueTata Consultancy Services (TCS) became the first Indian company in a decade to breach the $100-billion market value barrier after stocks in the IT giant soared on Monday.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU probes Italy's latest Alitalia rescue loanEU anti-trust regulators on Monday opened an in-depth probe to establish whether a massive rescue loan by the Italian government to troubled airline Alitalia constituted illegal state aid.
8h
Feed: All Latest

Corals Are in Serious Trouble. This Lab Could Help Save ThemScientists reach a milestone in establishing a captive coral population that could reproduce year after year, allowing researchers to perform crucial studies.
8h
The Atlantic

The Reinvention of AmericaIhave seen the future, and it is in the United States. After a several-year immersion in parts of the country that make the news mainly after a natural disaster or a shooting, or for follow-up stories on how the Donald Trump voters of 2016 now feel about Trump, I have a journalistic impulse similar to the one that dominated my years of living in China. That is the desire to tell people how much m
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The 20-year-old entrepreneur is a myth, according to studyForget what you've heard about 22-year-old wunderkinds, sitting in the corner offices of their wildly popular Silicon Valley startups—if you want to find the most successful entrepreneurs, you have to go back a few decades.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In ancient Mesopotamia, sex among the gods shook heaven and earthSexuality was central to life in ancient Mesopotamia, an area of the Ancient Near East often described as the cradle of western civilisation roughly corresponding to modern-day Iraq, Kuwait, and parts of Syria, Iran and Turkey. It was not only so for everyday humans but for kings and even deities.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Helping farmers and reducing car crashes—the surprising benefits of predatorsHumans may be Earth's apex predator, but the fleeting shadow of a vulture or the glimpse of a big cat can cause instinctive fear and disdain. But new evidence suggests that predators and scavengers are much more beneficial to humans than commonly believed, and that their loss may have greater consequences than we have imagined.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Minor cereals offer major promise for organic farmingThe potential benefits of less cultivated varieties of cereals are garnering more interest in a drive towards healthy nutrition.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Worldwide evidence of the link between inequalities in education and cognitive functioning of older adultsA recent article published in Economics & Human Biology by LISER and UniLu researchers (J. Olivera, F. Andreoli, A. K. Leist and L. Chauvel) documents the persistent effects of educational inequalities suffered in the past on the differences of cognitive functioning observed today among the older adults in 29 countries. Intact cognitive functioning in old age refers to attention, thinking, underst
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Is it time to regulate targeted ads and the web giants that profit from them?In the wake of Facebook's massive breach of personal data of 87 million users, CEO Mark Zuckerberg answered questions from US politicians over two days of congressional hearings. These questions mostly focussed on the tight link between Facebook's business model of selling targeted personalised advertising and its need to capture, and exploit, large amounts of personal information from its users.
8h
Live Science

How a Guy in the Netherlands Spotted the Top Secret X-37B Space PlaneThe spy craft is on its fifth mission, but the U.S. Air Force is mum on what the X-37B is doing right now.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Meet the mud dragon—the tiny animal that lives on the beachYou might not know it, but you have probably met the mud dragon before. They live at the beach, hidden in the sand and floating in the shallows.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Studying dwarf galaxies to get the big pictureEPFL scientists have completed the fastidious task of analyzing 27 dwarf galaxies in detail, identifying the conditions under which they were formed and how they've since evolved. These small-scale galaxies are perfect for studying the mechanisms of new star formation and the very first steps in the creation of the universe.
8h
Ingeniøren

Analyse: Én stor havmøllepark kan langtfra indfri regeringens VE-målRegeringens energiudspil på torsdag vil indeholde forslag om en 800 MW stor havmøllepark. Men en enkelt park er slet ikke nok, lyder de allerfleste reaktioner – og det har de ret i.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sticky tape and simulations help assess microplastic riskTiny pieces of plastic, now ubiquitous in the marine environment, have long been a cause of concern for their ability to absorb toxic substances and potentially penetrate the food chain. Now scientists are beginning to understand the level of threat posed to life, by gauging the extent of marine accumulation and tracking the movement of these contaminants.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How are the bacteria in our guts related to each other? New technique provides insightResearchers at the University of California Center for Microbiome Innovation (CMI) have validated a new method for use in microbiome studies that could help detect subtle changes in the composition of a microbial community and provide insight into the evolutionary history of community members. The method is more sensitive than current technologies, and could revolutionize the way microbiome data i
9h
Feed: All Latest

Silicon Valley's Latest Revolution: Cutting Out Wall StreetCompanies like Uber and Spotify don’t need IPOs anymore, and that's turning the finance industry on its head.
9h
Feed: All Latest

What's Not Included in Facebook's 'Download Your Data'Facebook says users own their data and touts its "download your data" tool. But the download doesn't include everything Facebook knows about you.
9h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Informed wisdom trumps rigid rules when it comes to medical evidenceNarrative reviews of medical evidence offer benefits that the supposedly superior systematic approach can’t.
9h
The Atlantic

How Tutus Took Over Runners’ WardrobesBy mile nine, Kelly Lewis and her friends knew they were on to something. She and her pals Elise Wallace and Carrie Lundell had donned sparkly skirts that Lundell, a seamstress, had whipped up as a way to stand out while they ran the 2010 Surf City USA Marathon. At the time, wearing something so outlandish on a non-costume run was such an anomaly that Wallace was reluctant to join in. “She said,
9h
Science-Based Medicine

Homeopathy, rabid dogs, and naturopathic propagandaLast week, a story of a bizarre homeopathic remedy used by a Canadian naturopath made the news. Today,American naturopaths are in Washington, DC lobbying for increased prescribing power, including for controlled substances. Lawmakers should be reminded of the quackery at the heart of naturopathy.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Poachers versus PoopThe key to saving elephants and other species may lie in the DNA contained in their droppings, says conservation biologist Samuel Wasser -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Dagens Medicin

Flere børn bliver vaccineretHøjere tilslutning til vaccinerne i børnevaccinationsprogrammet glæder sundhedsministeren.
9h
Dagens Medicin

Her er det fælles styringsudspilLægeforeningen, Danske Patienter og Danske Regioner har fremlagt et fælles udspil til styringen af sundhedsvæsenet. Se udspillet her.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Studies show some types of life can survive conditions found on MarsTwo new studies by University of Arkansas researchers bolster the case for some types of life being able to survive the harsh conditions found on Mars.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Quantum radar will expose stealth aircraftStealth aircraft in the Canadian arctic will be no match for a new quantum radar system.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Could an Industrial Prehuman Civilization Have Existed on Earth Before Ours?A provocative new paper suggests some ways to find out -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Could eating moss be good for your gut?An international team of scientists including the University of Adelaide has discovered a new complex carbohydrate in moss that could possibly be exploited for health or other uses.
9h
Viden

Grøn førertrøje? Havvindmøllepark er godt, men Danmark sakker bagudRegeringens planer om flere vindmøller er gode, siger ekspert. Men Danmark er bagud på vigtige områder som fx elbiler.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Four years of NASA NEOWISE dataNASA's Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) mission has released its fourth year of survey data. Since the mission was restarted in December 2013, after a period of hibernation, the asteroid- and comet-hunter has completely scanned the skies nearly eight times and has observed and characterized 29,375 objects in four years of operations. This total includes 788 near-Eart
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Antibiotic resistance can be caused by small amounts of antibioticsAntibiotic-resistant bacteria are a growing problem in health care globally. To prevent further development of resistance, it is important to understand where and how antibiotic resistance in bacteria arises. New research from Uppsala University shows that low concentrations of antibiotics can cause high antibiotic resistance to develop in bacteria.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trees with grassy areas soften summer heatTrees cool their environment, and so-called "heat islands" like Munich benefit from it. However, the degree of cooling depends greatly on the tree species and the local conditions. In a recent study, scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) compared two species of urban trees.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New method to analyze the dissipation curve of topological insulatorsTopological insulators are new materials that have been studied by many research groups around the world for more than 10 years. The main advantage of such materials is the presence of dissipationless states at the sample boundary under certain symmetry conditions, while the bulk material retains the properties of an insulator. In view of these properties, it is hoped that topological insulators c
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New DNA screening reveals blood sources for vampire batsThe vampire bat's diet consists of blood. It prefers to feed on domestic animals such as cows and pigs, but when it does so, there is a risk of transmitting pathogens such as rabies. Now, a new study lead by Assistant Professor Kristine Bohmann from the Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, describes a new DNA method to screen vampire bat stomach and faecal samples to determ
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers report overnight cycle of water movement in treesA high-precision, three-dimensional survey of 21 different species of trees has revealed an as-yet unknown cycle of subtle canopy movement during the night. Such 'sleep cycles' differed from one species to another. Detection of anomalies in overnight movement could become a future diagnostic tool to reveal stress or disease in crops.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genomics study in Africa—demographic history and deleterious mutationsScientists from the Institut Pasteur set out to understand how the demographic changes associated with the Neolithic transition also influenced the efficacy of natural selection. By comparing the genome diversity of more than 300 individuals from groups of forest hunter-gatherers (pygmies) and farmers (Bantu-speaking peoples), from western and eastern Central Africa, they discovered that the reaso
9h
Ingeniøren

Techtopia #49: Når teknologien sanser vores verdenPodcast: IBM har skilt BMW’s topmodel i8 ad for at udstille sportsvognens batteri af indbyggede sensorer. De sladrer om, hvordan vi kører, og hvornår vi skal på værksted.
10h
The Atlantic

Learning from 1968's Leading Anti-Immigration AlarmistEditor’s Note: This is part of The Atlantic’s ongoing series looking back at 1968. All past articles and reader correspondence are collected here . New material will be added to that page through the end of 2018. Fifty years ago, the Conservative Member of Parliament Enoch Powell delivered what may be the most controversial speech in postwar British history: an attack on mass immigration comparin
10h
The Atlantic

The Bill to Protect Mueller May Not Survive the Supreme CourtLegislation to protect Special Counsel Robert Mueller has been hailed as a ray of bipartisan sunshine in a divided Congress. The only problem is that even if it could pass both chambers with a veto-proof majority, there may not be enough votes on the Supreme Court to save it from President Trump’s opposition. The Special Counsel Independence and Integrity Act, sponsored by Republican Senators Tho
10h
NYT > Science

Infinitesimal Odds: A Scientist Finds Her Child’s Rare Illness Stems From the Gene She StudiesWhen it comes to studying the genetics of the brain, Soo-Kyung Lee is a star, yet she was stunned to discover the cause of her daughter’s devastating disabilities.
10h
Ingeniøren

Robot-patenter breder sig i danske virksomhederFlere danske robotvirksomheder får patenter på deres robotteknologier. Det giver bedre muligheder for at tage skridtet fra iværksætter-virksomhed til markedsmodne virksomheder.
10h
Ingeniøren

Partier benytter omstridt Facebook-tracker til overvågning af deres besøgendeFlere danske partier bruger Facebook Pixels til at målrette Facebook-reklamer mod folk, der besøger deres hjemmesider. Hyklerisk, lyder det fra kritikere.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Lægeforeningen vælger ny næstformandPrivatpraktiserende speciallæge Kirsten Ilkjær afløser Michael Dupont som næstformand i Lægeforeningen.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How your brain learns to expect mud puddles in the park (and other things)Whenever there's a mismatch between what you expect to experience and what you actually experience, the brain has to register the error and update your expectation. These changing expectations are fundamental for making decisions. A new study is the first to show how your midbrain responds to the error, and the orbitofrontal cortex updates the information. That's how you know what to expect tomorr
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hacking human 'drug trafficking' network could make diabetes treatments more effectiveMaking tiny changes to existing diabetes treatments can alter how they interact with cells, and potentially make the medicines more effective.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antibiotic resistance can be caused by small amounts of antibioticsAntibiotic-resistant bacteria are a global and growing problem in health care. To be able to prevent further development of resistance developing, it is important to understand where and how antibiotic resistance in bacteria arises. New research from Uppsala University shows that low concentrations of antibiotics, too, can cause high antibiotic resistance to develop in bacteria.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Asthma and hay fever linked to increased risk of psychiatric disordersA new study is the first to find a significant link between asthma, hay fever and a broad spectrum of psychiatric disorders. Over 15 years, 10.8 percent of patients with allergic diseases developed a psychiatric disorder, compared to only 6.7 percent of those without allergies. Monitoring the mental health of patients with allergies could help doctors care for their patients more effectively.
10h
Science : NPR

Anxiety Relief Without The High? New Studies On CBD, A Cannabis ExtractAn FDA advisory committee last week urged approval of a drug containing cannabidiol to treat a form of epilepsy. Other scientists wonder if CBD might ease anxiety or other disorders, too. (Image credit: Stefan Wermuth/Bloomberg Creative Photos/Getty Images)
11h
The Atlantic

A Trade War Isn't a Real WarSince assuming the presidency, Donald Trump has dragged age-old protectionism out of the past. He has imposed new tariffs, blocked international mergers, and manipulated global trade—particularly U.S. trade with China. The two nations have become so enmeshed in this standoff, with China instituting tariffs and halting U.S. mergers of its own, that it has become common to suggest that the two nati
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Campaign against online video-game bullies flopsIt seemed like a killer idea: combat sexist harassment in online video games by unleashing hit squads of talented female players to slay the bullies.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Survey finds public trust in Facebook plummeted after Cambridge Analytical scandalMuch of America believed in Facebook as the unassuming social network, connecting friends and family on the internet while protecting their privacy.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google launches Chat to compete with Apple's iMessageGoogle is launching a new text messaging system for its Android platform to challenge Apple's iMessage in smartphone text messaging supremacy.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mystery disease spreads, threatens coral reefs in Lower Florida KeysA mysterious disease hammering Florida's dwindling reefs was found for the first time this week in the Lower Keys, alarming scientists who have used epoxy Band-Aids, amputated sick coral and even set up underwater "fire breaks" in a four-year battle to contain the outbreak.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Electronics giant Philips posts 27% drop in Q1 profitsDutch electronics giant Philips Monday posted a 27 percent drop in first quarter profits, hit partly by the costs of restructuring and some acquisitions as it evolves its portfolio.
11h
Ingeniøren

Specialister på jobjagt skal finde deres indre generalistEksperter beskyldes ofte for at have en enstrenget faglighed, men specialistrollen kan gemme på masser af generalistkompetencer, som kan bringe dem videre til et lederjob, mener karriererådgiver.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's 'men only' job culture slammed in new reportLeading Chinese firms including e-commerce giant Alibaba were heavily criticised Monday for gender discrimination in job adverts in a new report which said the landscape for the female workforce in China was deteriorating.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Online myth busters fight tide of fake news in IndiaAs grief and outrage over the rape and murder of an eight-year-old crescendoed in India last week, a wrenching video of the supposed victim singing "her last song" lit up phones across the country.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Threatened Cambodia river dolphins making 'historic' reboundThe population of Cambodia's critically endangered river dolphin is growing for the first time in decades, conservations said Monday, hailing a major turnaround for the freshwater species.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Professor defends role in Cambridge Analytica data scandalThe psychologist behind an app that harvested data from 50 million Facebook users defended his role in the scandal Sunday, saying he "never heard a word" of opposition from the social media giant.
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Environment prize goes to Flint water activistAn activist who helped expose a water crisis in a US town has been awarded a prestigious environment prize.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Potential gender bias against female researchers in peer review of research grantsIs peer review biased? Female health researchers who applied for grants from Canada's major health research funder were funded less often than male counterparts because of potential bias, and characteristics of peer reviewers can also affect the result, found a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Human-like walking mechanics evolved before the genus HomoEver since scientists realized that humans evolved from a succession of primate ancestors, the public imagination has been focused on the inflection point when those ancestors switched from ape-like shuffling to walking upright as we do today. Scientists have long been focused on the question, too, because the answer is important to understanding how our ancestors lived, hunted and evolved.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Black parents can help bridge cultural divide between students and white teachersBringing black parents into school settings can work toward shifting and closing the cultural disconnects between black families and predominantly white school personnel, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Audit finds biodiversity data aggregators 'lose and confuse' dataIn an effort to improve the quality of biodiversity records, the Atlas of Living Australia (ALA) and the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) use automated data processing to check individual data items. The records are provided to the ALA and GBIF by museums, herbaria and other biodiversity data sources.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First genetic evidence of ongoing mating between two distinct species of guenon monkeysA researcher from Florida Atlantic University is the first to document that two genetically distinct species of guenon monkeys inhabiting Gombe National Park in Tanzania, Africa, have been successfully mating and producing hybrid offspring for hundreds maybe even thousands of years. Her secret weapon? Poop.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trichomonosis discovered amongst myna birds in PakistanA strain of the disease responsible for killing off nearly two thirds of the UK's greenfinches has been discovered in myna bird populations in Pakistan.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanomedicine: Drugs can be made 'smarter'A new method has been developed to make drugs 'smarter' using nanotechnology so they will be more effective at reaching their target.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study shows wearable technology also contributes to distracted drivingA new study by Murtuza Jadliwala, assistant professor of computer science at The University of Texas at San Antonio, examines wearable technology and whether it affects drivers' concentration. Jadliwala and his collaborators discovered that while a driver texting with a wearable device can marginally reduce their level of distraction, it ultimately makes texting while driving just as dangerous as
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shanghai gets automated bank with VR, robots, face scanningMissed paying dues on your Communist Party membership? There's a bank for that - and it's fully automated.
13h
Science | The Guardian

Can you solve it? The puzzle with a twistA one-sided story UPDATE: The solutions are now up here Hi guzzlers, Today’s puzzles are in honour of the German mathematician Felix Klein, who was born this week 169 years ago, on April 25, 1849. Continue reading...
13h
Ingeniøren

Gartner: Vanvittigt at give ansatte adgang til missionskritisk data uden certificeringMenneskehjernen har tendens til at fejlfortolke data. Den tendens er uheldig, hvis vi træffer datadrevne beslutninger uden først at sikre de rette kompetencer.
14h
BBC News - Science & Environment

'Exploding ant' species found in South East AsiaThe newly discovered canopy-dwelling ants are nicknamed after their bizarre defensive behaviour.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First genetic evidence of ongoing mating between 2 distinct species of guenon monkeysA new study of guenon monkeys in Gombe National Park is the first to provide genetic evidence of ongoing mating between two distinct species. These monkeys have successfully been producing hybrid offspring for hundreds maybe even thousands of years. Prior studies have suggested that the different physical characteristics of these monkeys keeps them from interbreeding. So, if their faces don't matc
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New UTSA study shows wearable technology also contributes to distracted drivingA new study by Murtuza Jadliwala, assistant professor of computer science at The University of Texas at San Antonio, examines wearable technology and whether it affects drivers' concentration. Jadliwala and his collaborators discovered that while a driver texting with a wearable device can marginally reduce their level of distraction, it ultimately makes texting while driving just as dangerous as
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Young athletes interested in healthy protein, not French friesThe greasy food being served at hockey rinks isn't really what young hockey players want, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trees with grassy areas soften summer heatTrees cool their environment and 'heat islands' like Munich benefit from it. However, the degree of cooling depends greatly on the tree species and the local conditions. In a recent study, scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) compared two species of urban trees.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Eating more fish could prevent Parkinson's diseaseParvalbumin, a protein found in great quantities in several different fish species, has been shown to help prevent the formation of certain protein structures closely associated with Parkinson's disease. A new study from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, shines more light on the link between consumption of fish and better long-term neurological health.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanomedicine: Drugs can be made 'smarter'A new method has been developed to make drugs 'smarter' using nanotechnology so pharmacologists can tailor their drugs to more accurately target an area on the body, such as a cancer tumor.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Black parents can help bridge cultural divide between students and white teachersBringing black parents into school settings can work toward shifting and closing the cultural disconnects between black families and predominantly white school personnel, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

People with false-positive cancer screening results may be more likely to receive future screeningAn analysis of electronic medical records indicates that patients who previously had a false-positive breast or prostate cancer screening test are more likely to obtain future recommended cancer screenings.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Potential gender bias against female researchers in peer review of research grantsIs peer review biased? Female health researchers who applied for grants from Canada's major health research funder were funded less often than male counterparts because of potential bias, and characteristics of peer reviewers can also affect the result, found a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Opioid use linked to increased risk of falls, death in older adultsOpioid use linked to increased risk of falls, death in older adults. Recent opioid use is associated with an increased risk of falls in older adults and an increased risk of death, found new research in CMAJ.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Liquid nicotine used in e-cigarettes still a danger to children despite recent decline in exposuresThe study found that there were more than 8,200 calls to US poison centers regarding exposures to liquid nicotine and e-cigarettes among children younger than 6 years of age from January 2012 through April 2017, averaging 129 calls each month or more than four a day.
15h
New on MIT Technology Review

A glossary of blockchain jargonThe terminology makes the technology seem either baffling or boring. Here’s a guide.
16h
New on MIT Technology Review

Explainer: What is a blockchain?Where it came from, what it does, and how you make one.
16h
New on MIT Technology Review

The problem with ICOs is that they’re called ICOsRobleh Ali, former crypto specialist for the Bank of England, on why initial coin offerings are dangerous and how to make them more useful.
16h
Science | The Guardian

New Zealand: hot summer leads to a tenfold explosion in rat populationFertile breeding conditions caused by hottest summer since records began leads to surge of rats and mice A record-breaking long, hot summer has led to a tenfold explosion in New Zealand’s rodent population, with the country’s urban areas worst hit. The 2017-2018 summer in New Zealand was the hottest since records began , and fertile breeding conditions have led to a surge in rat and mice numbers.
16h
Ingeniøren

Forskere graver i ‘lyd- angreb’ på amerikanske diplomaterSkyldes symptomer hos amerikanske diplomater i Cuba målrettede lyd- eller mikrobølgevåben, massehysteri, intermodulationsforvrængning eller fårekyllinger? Forskerne har flere bud, og den amerikanske ambassade kører stadig med minimal bemanding.
16h
The Atlantic

Westworld: 'Everything Is Code'Every week for the second season of Westworld , three Atlantic staffers will discuss new episodes of HBO’s cerebral sci-fi drama. David Sims: Probably my favorite line in Jurassic Park is, unsurprisingly, delivered by Jeff Goldblum (playing the sardonic mathematician Ian Malcolm). As John Hammond (Richard Attenborough), the kindly inventor of the malfunctioning dino-park, defends himself by point
17h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Why I live in a plastic bottle castleThe man building a four-storey castle out of recycled plastic bottles.
20h
Futurity.org

2 things in food mess up fat cells in just 24 hoursJust 24 hours of exposure to the fatty acid palmitate or the hormone TNF-alpha via a fatty diet can damage fat cells, research shows. The researchers hope this new knowledge may be useful for developing new preventive strategies for diabetes. Precursor cells are cells that have not yet matured to undertake a specific function in the body, e.g. the function of a muscle or fat cell. Palmitate and T
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Human-like walking mechanics evolved before the genus HomoA close examination of 3.6-million-year-old hominin footprints discovered in Laetoli, Tanzania, suggests our ancestors evolved the hallmark trait of extended leg, human-like bipedalism substantially earlier than previously thought.
20h
Futurity.org

Can texting prevent an opioid relapse?A new automated text messaging service may curb opioid abuse, reduce the likelihood of relapse, and decrease treatment costs, a small study suggests. The service provides automated text messages and phone calls to patients in treatment for opioid addiction. Texts ask patients if they’re feeling OK or struggling with potential relapse. Participants can also activate a panic button for immediate he
20h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Climate change: Michael Bloomberg pledges $4.5m for Paris dealNew York City's ex-mayor pledges $4.5m to help cover the lapsed US contribution to the Paris accord.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trichomonosis discovered amongst myna birds in PakistanA strain of the disease responsible for killing nearly two thirds of the UK's greenfinch population has spread to myna birds in Pakistan.In 2011, the disease was discovered to have reached European finch populations. Now it has been found in an entirely separate songbird species -- the common myna, native to India and one of the world's most invasive species.Although it is not generally fatal to t
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brainy new approaches to autism, chronic pain, concussion and moreTechnological advances have ushered in a new era of discovery in neuroscience. The Experimental Biology 2018 meeting (EB 2018) will feature an array of research findings on the brain and nervous system. The studies shed new light on the intricate circuitry behind our thought processes, feelings and behaviors and offer leads for both high-tech and low-tech treatment approaches.
20h
Futurity.org

As ancient humans spread out, average mammal shrankHomo sapiens , Neanderthals, and other recent human relatives may have begun “downsizing” large mammal species—by way of extinction—at least 90,000 years earlier than previously thought. Elephant-dwarfing wooly mammoths, elephant-sized ground sloths, and various saber-toothed cats were some of the massive mammals roaming Earth between 2.6 million and 12,000 years ago. Prior research suggested tha
21h
Big Think

Bespoke suicide pods now available for death in styleSarco assisted suicide pods come in three different styles, and allow you to die quickly and painlessly. They're even quite beautiful to look at. Read More
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shorter courses of prostate cancer radiotherapy are safe and effectiveRadiotherapy given in high doses over a shorter period of time is safe and effective for prostate cancer patients, according to research presented at the ESTRO 37 conference today. Researchers say this method of giving radiotherapy saves time for patients. It also frees up radiotherapy equipment, saving money and benefiting other patients on the waiting list for treatment.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers describe role of novel mutations in fosfomycin resistanceResearchers identified novel chromosomal mutations and described their role in the development of resistance of Escherichia coli (E. coli) to broad-spectrum antibiotic fosfomycin, according to research presented at the 28th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ECCMID).
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Endangered salamander offers clues on healing spinal cord injuryA new study takes a comparative approach to pinpoint what happens differently in humans versus other animals to explain why they can successfully regenerate neurons while we instead form scar tissue. By learning from the similarities and differences, researchers hope to find new leads in the treatment of spinal cord injury.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Growing evidence that probiotics are good for your liverIncreased awareness of the importance of the microbes that live in our gut has spurred a great deal of research on the microbiome and fueled a booming probiotics industry. A new study suggests probiotics can improve not only the health of our gut but liver health, as well.
22h
The Atlantic

The Desperate Search for Lebanon's Mass GravesBEIRUT—In a neighborhood in east Beirut, you’ll come across a nondescript parking lot, backed up on one side by an Ottoman-era house and on another by a sleek high-rise, casting its shadow across a mix of old shops and upscale design stores below. It was from inside one of these old shops in the late 1970s—a few years into Lebanon’s long, violent civil war—that Avedis Manoukian, a shop owner, saw
23h
Science | The Guardian

Starwatch: the lion in springThe constellation Leo dominates the southern sky, with Regulus its brightest star One of the most prominent constellations in the spring sky is Leo. During the winter, it has climbed out of the eastern sky and now dominates the south. The constellation is one of the oldest to be recognised in its current form. The Mesopotamians recognised this grouping of stars about 4,000 years ago. Continue rea
23h
NYT > Science

Reporter’s Notebook: How’s the Air in London? ‘We Should Be Worried’Our reporter visited an artist’s “pollution pods” to sample the smog and haze he recreated from some of the world’s most contaminated cities.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers discover potential source of gender differences in migrainesFindings from a new study conducted in rats reveal that females may be more susceptible to migraines and less responsive to treatment because of the way fluctuations in the hormone estrogen affect cells in the brain.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New vaccine could help people overcome bath salts abuseResearchers have developed a vaccine for one of the most dangerous types of synthetic cathinones, or bath salts. The vaccine blunts the illegal stimulant's effects on the brain, which could help recovering drug users who experience a relapse.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Four innovations that aim to improve the environmentThe Experimental Biology 2018 meeting (EB 2018) will showcase exciting new research aimed at understanding contamination and improving the environment.
1d

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