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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Six in 7 women at high risk of breast cancer shun tamoxifen as a preventative measureSix in seven women with a family history of breast cancer opt out of taking tamoxifen as a preventative measure, according to a study funded by Cancer Research UK and published in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment today.
19h
Futurity.org

Lack of iron and B12 tied to aggression in boysSignificant iron deficiency and low blood levels of vitamin B12 in boys around age 8 are associated with behavior problems when they get to middle school, according to new research. These problems exhibit as both internalizing behaviors, such as anxiety and depression, and externalizing actions, including being aggressive and breaking rules. “Iron deficiency is still highly prevalent in many regi
19h
Ingeniøren

Bidræber-pesticider: For første gang skal vagthund undersøge dispensationerEU-Kommissionen finder de mange dispensationer til at benytte pesticiderne neonikotinoider så mistænkelige, at den har bestilt en kulegravning hos agenturet for fødevaresikkerhed.
15h

LATEST

Latest Headlines | Science News

Genetically modified plant may boost supply of a powerful malaria drugUsing a DNA study and genetic engineering, researchers tripled the amount of an antimalarial compound naturally produced by sweet wormwood plants.
4min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Deep water aquifer acts like natural bio-reactor, allowing microbes to consume carbonResearchers have shown that underground aquifers along the mid-ocean ridge act like natural biological reactors, pulling in cold, oxygenated seawater, and allowing microbes to break down more -- perhaps much more -- refractory carbon than scientists ever believed.
11min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What if you could know that your mild cognitive impairment wouldn't progressResearchers found that, in some mild cognitive impairment patients, real neuropsychological stability over a decade is possible and that long-term stability could be predicted based on neuropsychological tests measuring memory and non-verbal abstract reasoning.
11min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How 'partner and rival' strategies can foster or destroy cooperationA new study shows that in repeated interactions winning strategies are either partners or rivals, but only partners allow for cooperation.
11min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High immune function tied to stunted growthElevated immune function during childhood results in as much as 49 percent growth reduction in Ecuador's indigenous Shuar population, researchers report.
11min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

In Huntington's disease, heart problems reflect broader effects of abnormal proteinResearchers investigating a key signaling protein in Huntington's disease describe deleterious effects on heart function, going beyond the disease's devastating neurological impact. By adjusting protein levels affecting an important biological pathway, the researchers improved heart function in experimental animals, shedding light on the biology of this fatal disease.
11min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Leading genetics study method may need reconsideration, significant distortions discoveredMany conclusions drawn from a common approach to the study of human genetics could be distorted because of a previously overlooked phenomenon.
11min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Land use and pollution shift female-to-male ratios in snapping turtlesCurrent research shows that increasing global temperatures as a result of climate change are expected to produce more female turtles since their offspring are influenced by the nest's temperature. But now, a team of biologists has found that the nesting environment of turtles in agricultural habitats, which can ultimately lower nesting temperatures, can actually produce more males.
11min
Quanta Magazine

Chronological Clues to Life’s Early History Lurk in Gene TransfersScientists who want to uncover the details of life’s 3.8-billion-year history on Earth find themselves in murky territory as soon as they look earlier than half a billion years ago. Before then, microorganisms dominated the planet, but — unlike the animals and plants that later emerged — they left behind barely any fossils to mark their ancient pasts, and attempts to infer their family trees from
12min
Popular Science

The world’s best freedivers seem to have evolved super-sized spleensHealth If you want to be a successful freediver, work out your spleen. The indigenous group live among the islands of Indonesia, Malaysia, and the Philippines. To find food, groups of the Bajau take daily plunges, often more than 230 feet…
14min
The Atlantic

Trump and Macron See the World Very DifferentlyEmmanuel Macron had something surprising to say about the United States last week, given that the president of the United States would soon be hosting his French counterpart for an elaborate state visit. Hard-edged “national selfishness”—of the kind that plunged the world into war nearly eight decades ago, long before the 40-year-old leader was born—is resurgent and endangering Europe’s “model” o
20min
The Scientist RSS

Fungus Repurposed a Bacterial Gene to Sense Gravity with CrystalsRather than getting a gene for its original function, a horizontal gene transfer provides the raw material for evolutionary innovation.
22min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientist in Facebook data scandal says being scapegoatedThe academic behind the app that allowed consulting firm Cambridge Analytica to farm the data of some 87 million Facebook users said Tuesday he was being scapegoated while the social network was being "mined left and right by thousands" of companies.
23min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dark chocolate consumption reduces stress and inflammationFindings from two new studies show dark chocolate consumption reduces stress and inflammation, while improving memory, immunity and mood.
25min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US senators introduce social media privacy billTwo US senators, one Democrat and one Republican, introduced legislation Tuesday aimed at better protecting online privacy in response to the Facebook data scandal.
35min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US court rules monkey does not own selfie copyrightMonkey Copyright SelfieA US court has ruled that a monkey who snapped a selfie on a wildlife photographer's camera does not own the copyright to the image, which became an internet sensation.
35min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spotify ramps up free service in bid for expansionSpotify Music App UsersSpotify on Tuesday announced a major expansion of its free service, hoping that a more option-rich platform will boost its ambitions to make music streaming even bigger worldwide.
35min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Billions of gallons of water saved by thinning forests.There are too many trees in Sierra Nevada forests, say scientists affiliated with the National Science Foundation (NSF) Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory (CZO). That may come as a surprise to those who see dense, verdant forests as signs of a healthy environment. After all, green is good, right? Not necessarily. When it comes to the number of trees in California forests, bigger isn't alway
40min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Millennials aren't getting the message about sun safety and the dangers of tanningMany millennials lack knowledge about the importance of sunscreen and continue to tan outdoors in part because of low self-esteem and high rates of narcissism that fuel addictive tanning behavior, a new study from Oregon State University-Cascades has found.
40min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Electrode shape improves neurostimulation for small targetsA cross-like shape helps the electrodes of implantable neurostimulation devices to deliver more charge to specific areas of the nervous system, possibly prolonging device life span, says research published in March in Nature Scientific Reports.
40min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research explains link between exercise and appetite lossEver wonder why intense exercise temporarily curbs your appetite? In research described in today's issue of PLOS Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine researchers reveal that the answer is all in your head -- more specifically, your arcuate nucleus.
40min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research shows possible new target for immunotherapy for solid tumorsResearch from the University of Cincinnati (UC) reveals a potential new target to help T cells (white blood cells) infiltrate certain solid tumors.
40min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Girls with type 2 diabetes have a high rate of irregular periodsGirls diagnosed with type 2 diabetes have a high frequency of menstrual irregularities, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
40min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When hypothalamic cells warm up, feeding goes down: Exercise-induced appetite suppressionExercise heats up the hypothalamus to drive down food intake, according to a study publishing on April 24 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Jae Hoon Jeong, Young-Hwan Jo, and colleagues at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. The findings answer a long-standing question about the cause of exercise-induced reduction in appetite.
40min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early childhood interventions show mixed results on child developmentEarly childhood interventions may have some efficacy in boosting measures of child health and development in low income countries, but more work is needed to sort out how to implement these interventions, according to a new set of studies published this week in PLOS Medicine.
40min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Attacks on healthcare in Syria are likely undercountedAttacks on health facilities and health workers in Syria are likely more common than previously reported, and local data collectors can help researchers more accurately measure the extent and frequency of these attacks, according to a new study published this week in PLOS Medicine.
40min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Children of youngest and oldest mothers at increased risk of developmental vulnerabilitiesChildren born to the youngest mothers have the highest risk of developmental vulnerabilities at age 5, largely due to social and economic disadvantage, according to research on almost 100,000 children published this week in PLOS Medicine by Kathleen Falster of the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, and colleagues.
40min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fungus senses gravity using gene borrowed from bacteriaThe pin mold fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus forms a dense forest of vertically growing fruiting bodies, but how does it know which way is 'up'? New research publishing April 24 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, from Gregory Jedd's group at the Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory, National University of Singapore, reveals that the fungi have acquired and re-modeled a gene from bacteria to help
40min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ex-Yahoo paying $35M to settle SEC charges over 2014 hackThe company formerly known as Yahoo is paying a $35 million fine to resolve federal regulators' charges that the online pioneer deceived investors by failing to disclose one of the biggest data breaches in internet history.
41min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Electrode shape improves neurostimulation for small targetsA cross-like shape helps the electrodes of implantable neurostimulation devices to deliver more charge to specific areas of the nervous system, possibly prolonging device life span, says research published in March in Scientific Reports.
41min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cambridge Analytica fights back on data scandalCambridge Analytica unleashed its counterattack against claims that it misused data from millions of Facebook accounts, saying Tuesday it is the victim of misunderstandings and inaccurate reporting that portrays the company as the evil villain in a James Bond movie.
41min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Committee hits pause on solar project over visual concernsA regional planning committee has refused to sign off on a proposed solar project in Rutland amid concerns over its visual impact on a neighboring home.
41min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Archeologists open burial chambers in Sudanese pyramidSudan's official news agency says archeologists have reopened burial chambers in an ancient pyramid north of the capital, Khartoum.
41min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Supreme Court upholds challenged patent review practiceThe Supreme Court has upheld a challenged practice that is used to invalidate patents without the involvement of federal courts.
41min
Big Think

Doctors perform first-ever scrotum and penis transplant for U.S. veteranDoctors at Johns Hopkins Hospital have completed the most complex penis transplant to date, marking the third-ever successful operation of its kind. Read More
45min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Macedonia: 8 million-year-old elephant-like remains foundPaleontologists from Bulgaria and Macedonia are excavating the fossilized remains of a prehistoric elephant believed to pre-date the mammoth, after its bones were discovered accidentally by a man working in a field.
47min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Airborne dust threatens human health in SouthwestIn 1935, at the height of the Dust Bowl, a team of researchers from the Kansas Board of Health set out to understand the impact of dust on human health. In areas impacted by dust storms, the researchers documented an increase in respiratory infections, a 50-to-100 percent increase in pneumonia cases and an overall increase in "morbidity and mortality from the acute infections of the respiratory tr
47min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Killer whale genetics raise inbreeding questionsA new genetic analysis of Southern Resident killer whales found that two male whales fathered more than half of the calves born since 1990 that scientists have samples from, a sign of inbreeding in the small killer whale population that frequents Washington's Salish Sea and Puget Sound.
47min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Preconception zinc deficiency could spell bad news for fertilityThe availability of micronutrients in the ovarian environment and their influence on the development, viability and quality of egg cells is the focus of a growing area of research. A new study shows that zinc deficiency can negatively affect the early stages of egg development, reducing the ability of the egg cells to divide and be fertilized. This may affect fertility months in the future. Resear
54min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Engineered Chinese shrub produces high levels of antimalarial compoundArtemisinin is a potent antimalarial compound produced naturally in low amounts by the Chinese shrub Artemisia annua, commonly known as sweet wormwood. Researchers in China now report a high-quality draft genome sequence of A. annua and their use of this information along with gene expression data to metabolically engineer plant lines that produce high levels of artemisinin.
54min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fungus senses gravity using gene borrowed from bacteriaThe pin mold fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus forms a dense forest of vertically growing fruiting bodies, but how does it know which way is "up"? New research publishing 24 April in the open access journal PLOS Biology, from Gregory Jedd's group at the Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory, National University of Singapore, reveals that the fungi have acquired and re-modelled a gene from bacteria to hel
59min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Killer whale genetics raise inbreeding questionsA new genetic analysis of Southern Resident killer whales found that two male whales fathered more than half of the calves born since 1990 that scientists have samples from, a sign of inbreeding in the small killer whale population that frequents Washington's Salish Sea and Puget Sound.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study identifies overdose risk factors in youth with substance use disordersA team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has identified factors that may increase the risk of drug overdose in adolescents and young adults.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Soaking in hot tub improves health markers in obese womenAccording to new research, obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) may be able to improve their health outlook with a particularly enjoyable form of therapy: regular sessions in a hot tub.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mental, not physical, fatigue affects seniors' walking abilityLow 'mental energy' may affect walking patterns in older adults more than physical fatigue. New research shows the relationship between walking ability and self-reported mood.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cheap 3-D printer can produce self-folding materialsResearchers have used an inexpensive 3-D printer to produce flat plastic items that, when heated, fold themselves into predetermined shapes, such as a rose, a boat or even a bunny. These self-folding plastic objects represent a first step toward products such as flat-pack furniture that assume their final shapes with the help of a heat gun.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Aging: The natural stress reliever for many womenWhile some research suggests that midlife is a dissatisfying time for women, other studies show that women report feeling less stressed and enjoy a higher quality of life during this period.
1h
The Atlantic

The Paraplegic Possum, the Cross-Eyed Cat, and the Fish That Can't SwimGrowing up, Amy Nicholson would never have described her father as “one of those kooky pet people,” even though the family owned dogs, cats, ponies, rabbits, sheep, and chickens. “But they didn’t sleep in the house or go under the blow dryer,” Nicholson told The Atlantic . Years later, Nicholson’s father remarried, and the couple decided to rescue animals. But not just any animals—a menagerie of
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook rules at a glance: What's banned, exactly?Facebook Content PostsFacebook has revealed for the first time just what, exactly, is banned on its service in a new Community Standards document released on Tuesday. It's an updated version of the internal rules the company has used to determine what's allowed and what isn't, down to granular details such as what, exactly, counts as a "credible threat" of violence. The previous public-facing version gave a broad-strok
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Airborne dust threatens human health in SouthwestResearchers from Harvard Unviersity and the George Washington University have found that in the coming decades, increased dust emissions from severe and prolonged droughts in the American Southwest could result in significant increases in hospital admissions and premature deaths.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain activity linked to stress changes chemical codesUC San Diego scientists have identified light-induced electrical activity as the brain mechanism controlling chemical code switching in relation to stress. While investigating neurotransmitter switching in rats, the researchers found that specific brain neurons were responsible, with possible implications for chemical imbalances in the brain underlying mental illness.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What can a tasty milkshake teach us about the genetics of heart disease?Analysis of high-resolution genomic data in a large study population reveals novel low-frequency polymorphisms that drive response to dietary lipids and medication.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Opioid prescribing at veterans hospitals varies widely in treating chronic painA recently published article in the Journal of General Internal Medicine surveyed care provided to 1.1 million veterans at 176 VHA medical centers between 2010 and 2015. At some centers, as many as one-third of the veterans seeking care for chronic pain began long-term opioid therapy, compared with only 5 percent at other centers.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Aqua satellite sees wind shear affecting Tropical Cyclone FakirTropical Cyclone Fakir was southeast of La Reunion Island in the Southern Indian Ocean when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead in space. Visible imagery from Aqua showed that wind shear was affecting Fakir.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows newspaper op-eds change mindsReaders might nod along or roll their eyes at a newspaper opinion piece, but a new study provides evidence that op-ed columns are an effective means for changing people's minds about the issues of the day.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A non-coding RNA lasso catches proteins in breast cancer cellsA Danish-German research team has shown that not only the where and when of long non-coding RNA expression is important for their function but also the how. The results can have a big impact on our understanding of dynamic regulation of gene expression in biological processes.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

2.7 billion tweets confirm: Echo chambers on Twitter are very realA recent study of more than 2.7 billion tweets between 2009 and 2016 confirms that Twitter users are exposed mainly to political opinions that agree with their own. It is the largest study to characterize echo chambers by both the content in them and the networks they comprise. The findings indicate a strong correlation between biases in the content people both produce and consume. In other words,
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Natural barcodes enable better cell trackingResearchers have developed a new genetic analysis technique that harnesses the 10 million small nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found in the human genome as 'barcodes' to create a faster, cheaper, and simpler way to keep track of pooled cells from multiple individuals during multiplexed experiments, enabling large samples of cells from multiple people to be quickly analyzed for personalized medici
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New model could help build communities of climate change-defying treesResearchers in Australia have developed a model to help build plant communities that are more resilient to climate change.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA teams study the agency's future in astrophysics; tackle formidable technology challengesWhat does NASA's future look like? Will the next-generation telescope investigate the first black holes in the distant universe or will it look for life on an Earth-like planet light-years away? As in past decades, the agency won't make that decision in a vacuum or without understanding the technical obstacles, which are formidable.
1h
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Spotify Bolsters Free Service in Defense Against Apple MusicSpotify, under attack from bigger rivals Apple, Google, and Amazon, adds features to its free service.
1h
Scientific American Content: Global

Is "Friendly Fire" in the Brain Provoking Alzheimer's Disease?Scientists want to combat dementia and neurodegeneration by keeping the brain’s immune system from going rogue -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
New on MIT Technology Review

Jeff Bezos wants to help you get your junk in your trunk
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Milky Way's supermassive black hole may have 'unseen' siblingsAstronomers are beginning to understand what happens when black holes get the urge to roam the Milky Way.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New model could help build communities of climate change-defying treesResearchers in Australia have developed a model to help build plant communities that are more resilient to climate change.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Soaking in hot tub improves health markers in obese womenAccording to new research, obese women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) may be able to improve their health outlook with a particularly enjoyable form of therapy: regular sessions in a hot tub.
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Genomic insights into the origin and diversification of late maritime hunter-gatherers from the Chilean Patagonia [Genetics]Patagonia was the last region of the Americas reached by humans who entered the continent from Siberia ∼15,000–20,000 y ago. Despite recent genomic approaches to reconstruct the continental evolutionary history, regional characterization of ancient and modern genomes remains understudied. Exploring the genomic diversity within Patagonia is not just a valuable...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Roles of the CSE1L-mediated nuclear import pathway in epigenetic silencing [Genetics]Epigenetic silencing can be mediated by various mechanisms, and many regulators remain to be identified. Here, we report a genome-wide siRNA screening to identify regulators essential for maintaining gene repression of a CMV promoter silenced by DNA methylation. We identified CSE1L (chromosome segregation 1 like) as an essential factor for...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Distinct MHC class I-like interacting invariant T cell lineage at the forefront of mycobacterial immunity uncovered in Xenopus [Immunology and Inflammation]The amphibian Xenopus laevis is to date the only species outside of mammals where a MHC class I-like (MHC-like) restricted innate-like (i) T cell subset (iVα6 T cells) reminiscent of CD1d-restricted iNKT cells has been identified and functionally characterized. This provides an attractive in vivo model to study the biological...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Programmed self-assembly of peptide-maȷor histocompatibility complex for antigen-specific immune modulation [Immunology and Inflammation]A technology to prime desired populations of T cells in the body—particularly those that possess low avidity against target antigen—would pave the way for the design of new types of vaccination for intractable infectious diseases or cancer. Here, we report such a technology based on positive feedback-driven, programmed self-assembly of...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Macrophages impede CD8 T cells from reaching tumor cells and limit the efficacy of anti-PD-1 treatment [Immunology and Inflammation]In a large proportion of cancer patients, CD8 T cells are excluded from the vicinity of cancer cells. The inability of CD8 T cells to reach tumor cells is considered an important mechanism of resistance to cancer immunotherapy. We show that, in human lung squamous-cell carcinomas, exclusion of CD8 T...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Genome-wide CRISPR screen identifies FAM49B as a key regulator of actin dynamics and T cell activation [Immunology and Inflammation]Despite decades of research, mechanisms controlling T cell activation remain only partially understood, which hampers T cell-based immune cancer therapies. Here, we performed a genome-wide CRISPR screen to search for genes that regulate T cell activation. Our screen confirmed many of the known regulators in proximal T cell receptor signaling...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

PARP-1 protects against colorectal tumor induction, but promotes inflammation-driven colorectal tumor progression [Medical Sciences]Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common tumor entities, which is causally linked to DNA repair defects and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Here, we studied the role of the DNA repair protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) in CRC. Tissue microarray analysis revealed PARP-1 overexpression in human CRC, correlating with...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Human hydroxymethylbilane synthase: Molecular dynamics of the pyrrole chain elongation identifies step-specific residues that cause AIP [Medical Sciences]Hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS), the third enzyme in the heme biosynthetic pathway, catalyzes the head-to-tail condensation of four molecules of porphobilinogen (PBG) to form the linear tetrapyrrole 1-hydroxymethylbilane (HMB). Mutations in human HMBS (hHMBS) cause acute intermittent porphyria (AIP), an autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by life-threatening neurovisceral attacks. Althou
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Harmonics added to a flickering light can upset the balance between ON and OFF pathways to produce illusory colors [Neuroscience]The neural signals generated by the light-sensitive photoreceptors in the human eye are substantially processed and recoded in the retina before being transmitted to the brain via the optic nerve. A key aspect of this recoding is the splitting of the signals within the two major cone-driven visual pathways into...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Ultradian rhythmicity of plasma cortisol is necessary for normal emotional and cognitive responses in man [Physiology]Glucocorticoids (GCs) are secreted in an ultradian, pulsatile pattern that emerges from delays in the feedforward-feedback interaction between the anterior pituitary and adrenal glands. Dynamic oscillations of GCs are critical for normal cognitive and metabolic function in the rat and have been shown to modulate the pattern of GC-sensitive gene...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Neddylation mediates ventricular chamber maturation through repression of Hippo signaling [Physiology]During development, ventricular chamber maturation is a crucial step in the formation of a functionally competent postnatal heart. Defects in this process can lead to left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy and heart failure. However, molecular mechanisms underlying ventricular chamber development remain incompletely understood. Neddylation is a posttranslational modification that attaches u
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Glucagon contributes to liver zonation [Physiology]Liver zonation characterizes the separation of metabolic pathways along the lobules and is required for optimal function. Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls metabolic zonation by activating genes in the perivenous hepatocytes, while suppressing genes in the periportal counterparts. We now demonstrate that glucagon opposes the actions of Wnt/β-catenin signaling on gene expression...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

KELCH F-BOX protein positively influences Arabidopsis seed germination by targeting PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR1 [Plant Biology]Seeds employ sensory systems that assess various environmental cues over time to maximize the successful transition from embryo to seedling. Here we show that the Arabidopsis F-BOX protein COLD TEMPERATURE-GERMINATING (CTG)-10, identified by activation tagging, is a positive regulator of this process. When overexpressed (OE), CTG10 hastens aspects of seed...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The plant hormone ethylene restricts Arabidopsis growth via the epidermis [Plant Biology]The gaseous hormone ethylene plays a key role in plant growth and development, and it is a major regulator of stress responses. It inhibits vegetative growth by restricting cell elongation, mainly through cross-talk with auxins. However, it remains unknown whether ethylene controls growth throughout all plant tissues or whether its...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for DuBose et al., Everolimus rescues multiple cellular defects in laminopathy-patient fibroblasts [Correction]GENETICS Correction for “Everolimus rescues multiple cellular defects in laminopathy-patient fibroblasts,” by Amanda J. DuBose, Stephen T. Lichtenstein, Noreen M. Petrash, Michael R. Erdos, Leslie B. Gordon, and Francis S. Collins, which was first published March 26, 2018; 10.1073/pnas.1802811115. The authors note that Fig. 6 appeared incorrectly. The corrected figure...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Kobayashi et al., B and T lymphocyte attenuator inhibits LPS-induced endotoxic shock by suppressing Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in innate immune cells [Correction]IMMUNOLOGY Correction for “B and T lymphocyte attenuator inhibits LPS-induced endotoxic shock by suppressing Toll-like receptor 4 signaling in innate immune cells,” by Yoshihisa Kobayashi, Arifumi Iwata, Kotaro Suzuki, Akira Suto, Saki Kawashima, Yukari Saito, Takayoshi Owada, Midori Kobayashi, Norihiko Watanabe, and Hiroshi Nakajima, which was first published March 11,...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Serr et al., miRNA92a targets KLF2 and the phosphatase PTEN signaling to promote human T follicular helper precursors in T1D islet autoimmunity [Correction]IMMUNOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION Correction for “miRNA92a targets KLF2 and the phosphatase PTEN signaling to promote human T follicular helper precursors in T1D islet autoimmunity” by Isabelle Serr, Rainer W. Fürst, Verena B. Ott, Martin G. Scherm, Alexei Nikolaev, Füsun Gökmen, Stefanie Kälin, Stephanie Zillmer, Melanie Bunk, Benno Weigmann, Nicole Kunschke,...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Kristensen et al., Ibuprofen alters human testicular physiology to produce a state of compensated hypogonadism [Correction]MEDICAL SCIENCES Correction for “Ibuprofen alters human testicular physiology to produce a state of compensated hypogonadism,” by David Møbjerg Kristensen, Christèle Desdoits-Lethimonier, Abigail L. Mackey, Marlene Danner Dalgaard, Federico De Masi, Cecilie Hurup Munkbøl, Bjarne Styrishave, Jean-Philippe Antignac, Bruno Le Bizec, Christian Platel, Anders Hay-Schmidt, Tina Kold Jensen, Laurianne Le
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Brewer’s yeast engineered to produce potential cancer drug Brewer’s yeast. Noscapine, a widely used nonnarcotic cough suppressant, can act as a potential cancer drug with purportedly fewer side effects than conventional chemotherapy when administered in high doses. The drug is extracted from opium poppy straws, but poppy farming is time-consuming,...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Hydrologic regulation of plant rooting depth: Pay attention to the widespread scenario with intense seasonal groundwater table fluctuation [Physical Sciences]In PNAS, Fan et al. (1) demonstrate that water table depth (WTD) is a vital determinant and a good predictor of plant rooting depth at a global scale. However, Pierret and Lacombe (2) point out that there are some plants extending their roots far below the WTD [figure 3F and...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Xi et al.: Water table fluctuation is well recognized and discussed in our study [Physical Sciences]We appreciate the comments by Xi et al. (1) and agree that a fluctuating groundwater table is one of the reasons that roots are observed below the water table. We discuss this issue in Fan et al. (2), with roots found below the water table for reasons that include groundwater...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Models of the complement C1 complex [Biological Sciences]Almitairi et al. (1) present structural information on the interaction between the proteases C1r and C1s, both consisting of six domains, called CUB1-EGF-CUB2-CCP1-CCP2-SP. The authors also propose a model for the C1 complex where the C1r2s2 tetramer is bound to C1q. Using our published and deposited small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS)...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Mortensen et al.: The zymogen form of complement component C1 [Biological Sciences]In their letter, Mortensen et al. (1) query our model of zymogen C1. It was assembled from overlapping crystal structures with constraints imposed by known interactions (2). The starting point was the protease subcomponent, C1r2C1s2, which comprises two antiparallel C1r-C1s dimers (mediated via CUB1-EGF-CUB2 contacts) linked through a central interaction...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Profile of Alexander Y. Rudensky, winner of the 2018 Vilcek Prize in Biomedical Science [Profile]In October 2017, the Chicago-based MacArthur Foundation announced the names of the latest winners of the renowned “genius” grants: fellowships awarded for “originality, insight, and potential,” to outstanding scientists, writers, visual artists, and members of other professions. Of the 24 fellows selected, at least one-third are immigrants to the United...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Profile of Warren J. Leonard [Profile]The immune system is the human body’s natural defense against disease. Many molecules and cells take part in the immune response, including cytokines, a critical group of intercellular signaling molecules that influence the development and actions of immune cells. Warren J. Leonard. Image courtesy of Bill Branson (National Institutes of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

New zoning laws enforced by glucagon [Physiology]The liver exerts important systemic functions at multiple levels. Even though the tissue looks macroscopically uniform, it is very heterogeneous at the cellular level. Beyond hepatocytes, stellate cells, endothelial cells, and Kupffer cells, many additional cell types contribute to its architecture. Beyond the cellular heterogeneity, there is a significant degree...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Expressway to partially oxidized phosphorene [Chemistry]Few-layer black phosphorus or phosphorene is an intriguing and important 2D material. It is a single-layer material that consists of corrugated and condensed six-membered phosphorus rings (Fig. 1). Each phosphorene layer can be weakly bonded to neighboring ones by van der Waals-like interactions to form few-layer arrangements, which are also...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

NATure of actin amino-terminal acetylation [Biochemistry]Actins constitute a highly structurally conserved family of proteins found in virtually all eukaryotic cells, in which they participate in processes such as production of contractile force, structural stabilization of the cell, cell motility, endocytosis, and exocytosis (1). The actin monomer, or G-actin, has a nucleotide-binding cleft separating two large...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

New insight into the early stages of biofilm formation [Microbiology]Biofilms are loosely defined as aggregates of bacteria encased in a self-produced matrix (1–3). Many bacterial species are known to produce biofilms when they attach to surfaces. They are commonly found in the natural environment, industrial settings, and the clinic where they can be either beneficial or problematic depending upon...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Extracting neuronal functional network dynamics via adaptive Granger causality analysis [Applied Mathematics]Quantifying the functional relations between the nodes in a network based on local observations is a key challenge in studying complex systems. Most existing time series analysis techniques for this purpose provide static estimates of the network properties, pertain to stationary Gaussian data, or do not take into account the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Transcriptome-wide discovery of coding and noncoding RNA-binding proteins [Chemistry]Transcriptome-wide identification of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) is a prerequisite for understanding the posttranscriptional gene regulation networks. However, proteomic profiling of RBPs has been mostly limited to polyadenylated mRNA-binding proteins, leaving RBPs on nonpoly(A) RNAs, including most noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) and pre-mRNAs, largely undiscovered. Here we present a click chemistry-assi
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Facet-specific interaction between methanol and TiO2 probed by sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy [Chemistry]The facet-specific interaction between molecules and crystalline catalysts, such as titanium dioxides (TiO2), has attracted much attention due to possible facet-dependent reactivity. Using surface-sensitive sum-frequency vibrational spectroscopy, we have studied how methanol interacts with different common facets of crystalline TiO2, including rutile(110), (001), (100), and anatase(101), under amb
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

A Mesoproterozoic iron formation [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]We describe a 1,400 million-year old (Ma) iron formation (IF) from the Xiamaling Formation of the North China Craton. We estimate this IF to have contained at least 520 gigatons of authigenic Fe, comparable in size to many IFs of the Paleoproterozoic Era (2,500–1,600 Ma). Therefore, substantial IFs formed in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Widespread changes in transcriptome profile of human mesenchymal stem cells induced by two-dimensional nanosilicates [Engineering]Two-dimensional nanomaterials, an ultrathin class of materials such as graphene, nanoclays, transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), and transition metal oxides (TMOs), have emerged as a new generation of materials due to their unique properties relative to macroscale counterparts. However, little is known about the transcriptome dynamics following exposure to these nanomaterials....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Tradeoffs between immune function and childhood growth among Amazonian forager-horticulturalists [Anthropology]Immune function is an energetically costly physiological activity that potentially diverts calories away from less immediately essential life tasks. Among developing organisms, the allocation of energy toward immune function may lead to tradeoffs with physical growth, particularly in high-pathogen, low-resource environments. The present study tests this hypothesis across diverse timeframes,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Complete biosynthesis of noscapine and halogenated alkaloids in yeast [Applied Biological Sciences]Microbial biosynthesis of plant natural products from simple building blocks is a promising approach toward scalable production and modification of high-value compounds. The pathway for biosynthesis of noscapine, a potential anticancer compound, from canadine was recently elucidated as a 10-gene cluster from opium poppy. Here we demonstrate the de novo...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Crystal structure and mechanism of human carboxypeptidase O: Insights into its specific activity for acidic residues [Biochemistry]Human metallocarboxypeptidase O (hCPO) is a recently discovered digestive enzyme localized to the apical membrane of intestinal epithelial cells. Unlike pancreatic metallocarboxypeptidases, hCPO is glycosylated and produced as an active enzyme with distinctive substrate specificity toward C-terminal (C-t) acidic residues. Here we present the crystal structure of hCPO at 1.85-Å...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Conformational sampling of membranes by Akt controls its activation and inactivation [Biochemistry]The protein kinase Akt controls myriad signaling processes in cells, ranging from growth and proliferation to differentiation and metabolism. Akt is activated by a combination of binding to the lipid second messenger PI(3,4,5)P3 and its subsequent phosphorylation by phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 and mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 2. The relative...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Molecular mechanism of activation of human musk receptors OR5AN1 and OR1A1 by (R)-muscone and diverse other musk-smelling compounds [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Understanding olfaction at the molecular level is challenging due to the lack of crystallographic models of odorant receptors (ORs). To better understand the molecular mechanism of OR activation, we focused on chiral (R)-muscone and other musk-smelling odorants due to their great importance and widespread use in perfumery and traditional medicine,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Crystal structures of a pentameric ion channel gated by alkaline pH show a widely open pore and identify a cavity for modulation [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Pentameric ligand-gated ion channels (pLGICs) constitute a widespread class of ion channels, present in archaea, bacteria, and eukaryotes. Upon binding of their agonists in the extracellular domain, the transmembrane pore opens, allowing ions to go through, via a gating mechanism that can be modulated by a number of drugs. Even...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Stoichiometry and compositional plasticity of the yeast nuclear pore complex revealed by quantitative fluorescence microscopy [Cell Biology]The nuclear pore complex (NPC) is an eightfold symmetrical channel providing selective transport of biomolecules across the nuclear envelope. Each NPC consists of ∼30 different nuclear pore proteins (Nups) all present in multiple copies per NPC. Significant progress has recently been made in the characterization of the vertebrate NPC structure....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In vivo CRISPR screening unveils histone demethylase UTX as an important epigenetic regulator in lung tumorigenesis [Cell Biology]Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Inactivation of tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) promotes lung cancer malignant progression. Here, we take advantage of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9-mediated somatic gene knockout in a KrasG12D/+ mouse model to identify bona fide TSGs. From individual knockout...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Heterochromatin protects retinal pigment epithelium cells from oxidative damage by silencing p53 target genes [Cell Biology]Oxidative stress (OS)-induced retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cell apoptosis is critically implicated in the pathogenesis of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a leading cause of blindness in the elderly. Heterochromatin, a compact and transcriptional inert chromatin structure, has been recently shown to be dynamically regulated in response to stress stimuli. The...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

TMEM59 potentiates Wnt signaling by promoting signalosome formation [Cell Biology]Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls development and adult tissue homeostasis by regulating cell proliferation and cell fate decisions. Wnt binding to its receptors Frizzled (FZD) and low-density lipoprotein-related 6 (LRP6) at the cell surface initiates a signaling cascade that leads to the transcription of Wnt target genes. Upon Wnt binding, the receptors...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Earth BioGenome Project: Sequencing life for the future of life [Evolution]Increasing our understanding of Earth’s biodiversity and responsibly stewarding its resources are among the most crucial scientific and social challenges of the new millennium. These challenges require fundamental new knowledge of the organization, evolution, functions, and interactions among millions of the planet’s organisms. Herein, we present a perspective on the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Individually addressable and dynamic DNA gates for multiplexed cell sorting [Applied Biological Sciences]The ability to analyze and isolate cells based on the expression of specific surface markers has increased our understanding of cell biology and produced numerous applications for biomedicine. However, established cell-sorting platforms rely on labels that are limited in number due to biophysical constraints, such as overlapping emission spectra of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Fermentation of dihydroxyacetone by engineered Escherichia coli and Klebsiella variicola to products [Applied Biological Sciences]Methane can be converted to triose dihydroxyacetone (DHA) by chemical processes with formaldehyde as an intermediate. Carbon dioxide, a by-product of various industries including ethanol/butanol biorefineries, can also be converted to formaldehyde and then to DHA. DHA, upon entry into a cell and phosphorylation to DHA-3-phosphate, enters the glycolytic pathway...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Light-activated helical inversion in cholesteric liquid crystal microdroplets [Applied Physical Sciences]Cholesteric liquid crystal (CLC) droplets exhibit nontrivial topological features, which are controlled by the ratio between the cholesteric pitch and the droplet radius. The radial spherical structure (RSS) is of particular interest, as it reveals an onion-like concentric organization of the cholesteric helices, leading to the expression of spherical Bragg...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Exolytic and endolytic turnover of peptidoglycan by lytic transglycosylase Slt of Pseudomonas aeruginosa [Biochemistry]β-Lactam antibiotics inhibit cell-wall transpeptidases, preventing the peptidoglycan, the major constituent of the bacterial cell wall, from cross-linking. This causes accumulation of long non–cross-linked strands of peptidoglycan, which leads to bacterial death. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a nefarious bacterial pathogen, attempts to repair this aberrantly formed peptidoglycan by the function of the..
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

NAA80 is actin’s N-terminal acetyltransferase and regulates cytoskeleton assembly and cell motility [Biochemistry]Actin, one of the most abundant proteins in nature, participates in countless cellular functions ranging from organelle trafficking and pathogen motility to cell migration and regulation of gene transcription. Actin’s cellular activities depend on the dynamic transition between its monomeric and filamentous forms, a process exquisitely regulated in cells by...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structural determinants and cellular environment define processed actin as the sole substrate of the N-terminal acetyltransferase NAA80 [Biochemistry]N-terminal (Nt) acetylation is a major protein modification catalyzed by N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs). Methionine acidic N termini, including actin, are cotranslationally Nt acetylated by NatB in all eukaryotes, but animal actins containing acidic N termini, are additionally posttranslationally Nt acetylated by NAA80. Actin Nt acetylation was found to regulate cytoskeletal...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Translation initiation in bacterial polysomes through ribosome loading on a standby site on a highly translated mRNA [Biochemistry]During translation, consecutive ribosomes load on an mRNA and form a polysome. The first ribosome binds to a single-stranded mRNA region and moves toward the start codon, unwinding potential mRNA structures on the way. In contrast, the following ribosomes can dock at the start codon only when the first ribosome...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correlating structural and photochemical heterogeneity in cyanobacteriochrome NpR6012g4 [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Phytochrome photoreceptors control plant growth, development, and the shade avoidance response that limits crop yield in high-density agricultural plantings. Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are distantly related photosensory proteins that control cyanobacterial metabolism and behavior in response to light. Photoreceptors in both families reversibly photoconvert between two photostates via photoisomer
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Spontaneous oscillation and fluid-structure interaction of cilia [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The exact mechanism to orchestrate the action of hundreds of dynein motor proteins to generate wave-like ciliary beating remains puzzling and has fascinated many scientists. We present a 3D model of a cilium and the simulation of its beating in a fluid environment. The model cilium obeys a simple geometric...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Unique organization of photosystem I-light-harvesting supercomplex revealed by cryo-EM from a red alga [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Photosystem I (PSI) is one of the two photosystems present in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms and functions to harvest and convert light energy into chemical energy in photosynthesis. In eukaryotic algae and higher plants, PSI consists of a core surrounded by variable species and numbers of light-harvesting complex (LHC)I proteins, forming...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Nucleus-specific expression in the multinuclear mushroom-forming fungus Agaricus bisporus reveals different nuclear regulatory programs [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Many fungi are polykaryotic, containing multiple nuclei per cell. In the case of heterokaryons, there are different nuclear types within a single cell. It is unknown what the different nuclear types contribute in terms of mRNA expression levels in fungal heterokaryons. Each cell of the mushroom Agaricus bisporus contains two...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

New class of transcription factors controls flagellar assembly by recruiting RNA polymerase II in Chlamydomonas [Cell Biology]Cells have developed regulatory mechanisms that underlie flagellar assembly and maintenance, including the transcriptional regulation of flagellar genes, an initial step for making flagella. Although transcriptional regulation of flagellar gene expression is required for flagellar assembly in Chlamydomonas, no transcription factor that regulates the transcription of flagellar genes has been...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Molecular spherical nucleic acids [Chemistry]Herein, we report a class of molecular spherical nucleic acid (SNA) nanostructures. These nano-sized single molecules are synthesized from T8 polyoctahedral silsesquioxane and buckminsterfullerene C60 scaffolds, modified with 8 and 12 pendant DNA strands, respectively. These conjugates have different DNA surface densities and thus exhibit different levels of nuclease resistance,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Facile bottom-up synthesis of partially oxidized black phosphorus nanosheets as metal-free photocatalyst for hydrogen evolution [Chemistry]Few-layer black phosphorus (BP) nanosheets were first reported as a 2D material for the application of field-effect transistors in 2014 and have stimulated intense activity among physicists, chemists, and material and biomedical scientists, driving research into novel synthetic techniques to produce BP nanosheets. At present, exfoliation is the main route...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Chemical trends in ocean islands explained by plume-slab interaction [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Earth’s surface shows many features, of which the genesis can be understood only through their connection with processes in Earth’s deep interior. Recent studies indicate that spatial geochemical patterns at oceanic islands correspond to structures in the lowermost mantle inferred from seismic tomographic models. This suggests that hot, buoyant upwellings...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Life history variation is maintained by fitness trade-offs and negative frequency-dependent selection [Ecology]The maintenance of diverse life history strategies within and among species remains a fundamental question in ecology and evolutionary biology. By using a near-complete 16-year pedigree of 12,579 winter-run steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) from the Hood River, Oregon, we examined the continued maintenance of two life history traits: the number of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Symbiont selection via alcohol benefits fungus farming by ambrosia beetles [Ecology]Animal–microbe mutualisms are typically maintained by vertical symbiont transmission or partner choice. A third mechanism, screening of high-quality symbionts, has been predicted in theory, but empirical examples are rare. Here we demonstrate that ambrosia beetles rely on ethanol within host trees for promoting gardens of their fungal symbiont and producing...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Experimental demonstration of an isotope-sensitive warhead verification technique using nuclear resonance fluorescence [Engineering]Future nuclear arms reduction efforts will require technologies to verify that warheads slated for dismantlement are authentic without revealing any sensitive weapons design information to international inspectors. Despite several decades of research, no technology has met these requirements simultaneously. Recent work by Kemp et al. [Kemp RS, Danagoulian A, Macdonald...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Core Concept: Microgrids offer flexible energy generation, for a price [Environmental Sciences]In the 1990s, University of Wisconsin researcher Robert Lasseter was working in an academic no-man’s land. Lasseter was investigating small devices of less than 100 kilowatts called microturbines that were used in buildings as backup power generators. Some buildings had several of these devices, and Lasseter and his students wanted...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Aspect controls the survival of ice cliffs on debris-covered glaciers [Environmental Sciences]Supraglacial ice cliffs exist on debris-covered glaciers worldwide, but despite their importance as melt hot spots, their life cycle is little understood. Early field observations had advanced a hypothesis of survival of north-facing and disappearance of south-facing cliffs, which is central for predicting the contribution of cliffs to total glacier...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Pervasive contingency and entrenchment in a billion years of Hsp90 evolution [Evolution]Interactions among mutations within a protein have the potential to make molecular evolution contingent and irreversible, but the extent to which epistasis actually shaped historical evolutionary trajectories is unclear. To address this question, we experimentally measured how the fitness effects of historical sequence substitutions changed during the billion-year evolutionary history...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

The gene regulatory program of Acrobeloides nanus reveals conservation of phylum-specific expression [Evolution]The evolution of development has been studied through the lens of gene regulation by examining either closely related species or extremely distant animals of different phyla. In nematodes, detailed cell- and stage-specific expression analyses are focused on the model Caenorhabditis elegans, in part leading to the view that the developmental...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Shortwave infrared fluorescence imaging with the clinically approved near-infrared dye indocyanine green [Medical Sciences]Fluorescence imaging is a method of real-time molecular tracking in vivo that has enabled many clinical technologies. Imaging in the shortwave IR (SWIR; 1,000–2,000 nm) promises higher contrast, sensitivity, and penetration depths compared with conventional visible and near-IR (NIR) fluorescence imaging. However, adoption of SWIR imaging in clinical settings has...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Multigenerational memory and adaptive adhesion in early bacterial biofilm communities [Microbiology]Using multigenerational, single-cell tracking we explore the earliest events of biofilm formation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. During initial stages of surface engagement (≤20 h), the surface cell population of this microbe comprises overwhelmingly cells that attach poorly (∼95% stay <30 s, well below the ∼1-h division time) with little increase in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Alpha-v-containing integrins are host receptors for the Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite surface protein, TRAP [Microbiology]Malaria-causing Plasmodium sporozoites are deposited in the dermis by the bite of an infected mosquito and move by gliding motility to the liver where they invade and develop within host hepatocytes. Although extracellular interactions between Plasmodium sporozoite ligands and host receptors provide important guidance cues for productive infection and are...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Neural precursors of future liking and affective reciprocity [Neuroscience]Why do certain group members end up liking each other more than others? How does affective reciprocity arise in human groups? The prediction of interpersonal sentiment has been a long-standing pursuit in the social sciences. We combined fMRI and longitudinal social network data to test whether newly acquainted group members’...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

{beta}-Amyloid accumulation in the human brain after one night of sleep deprivation [Neuroscience]The effects of acute sleep deprivation on β-amyloid (Aβ) clearance in the human brain have not been documented. Here we used PET and 18F-florbetaben to measure brain Aβ burden (ABB) in 20 healthy controls tested after a night of rested sleep (baseline) and after a night of sleep deprivation. We...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Long-wavelength (reddish) hues induce unusually large gamma oscillations in the primate primary visual cortex [Neuroscience]Gamma oscillations (∼30–80 Hz) are a prominent signature of electrophysiological signals, with a purported role in natural vision. Previous studies in the primary visual cortex (area V1) have shown that achromatic gratings or gabor stimuli generate salient gamma oscillations, whose strength and frequency depend on stimulus properties such as their...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Spider toxin inhibits gating pore currents underlying periodic paralysis [Neuroscience]Gating pore currents through the voltage-sensing domains (VSDs) of the skeletal muscle voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.4 underlie hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HypoPP) type 2. Gating modifier toxins target ion channels by modifying the function of the VSDs. We tested the hypothesis that these toxins could function as blockers of the pathogenic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

GHSR-D2R heteromerization modulates dopamine signaling through an effect on G protein conformation [Pharmacology]The growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) and dopamine receptor (D2R) have been shown to oligomerize in hypothalamic neurons with a significant effect on dopamine signaling, but the molecular processes underlying this effect are still obscure. We used here the purified GHSR and D2R to establish that these two receptors assemble...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Physical interaction of junctophilin and the CaV1.1 C terminus is crucial for skeletal muscle contraction [Physiology]Close physical association of CaV1.1 L-type calcium channels (LTCCs) at the sarcolemmal junctional membrane (JM) with ryanodine receptors (RyRs) of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) is crucial for excitation–contraction coupling (ECC) in skeletal muscle. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the JM targeting of LTCCs is unexplored. Junctophilin 1 (JP1) and JP2...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

E3 ubiquitin ligase SOR1 regulates ethylene response in rice root by modulating stability of Aux/IAA protein [Plant Biology]Plant hormones ethylene and auxin synergistically regulate plant root growth and development. Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of Aux/IAA transcriptional repressors by the E3 ubiquitin ligase SCFTIR1/AFB triggers a transcription-based auxin signaling. Here we show that rice (Oryza sativa L.) soil-surface rooting 1 (SOR1), which is a RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligase identified...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Land use and pollution shift female-to-male ratios in snapping turtlesMost of us know that our biological sex is decided by the pairing of X and Y chromosomes during conception.
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Dana Foundation

National Parkinson’s Awareness Month Interview with Robert Edwards, M.D.Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a chronic, degenerative neurological disorder that affects roughly one in 100 people over the age of 60. With no biomarker or objective test to make a definitive diagnosis, PD has kept researchers searching for clues on how to treat, and hopefully prevent, the disease. April is National Parkinson’s Disease Awareness Month, and so we sat down with Dana Alliance member R
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients in major prostate cancer study older, sicker than average patient populationResearchers at Henry Ford Hospital compared the patient population of a major US prostate cancer study with patients found in three US cancer databases, ultimately finding the patients of the study to be inconsistent with the average prostate cancer patient. The researchers found the patients of the Prostate Cancer Intervention versus Observation Trial (PIVOT) to be between three and eight times m
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Scientific American Content: Global

Why Are Some E. Coli Strains Deadly While Others Live Peacefully in Our Bodies?You have a variety of strains of E. coli in your intestine, including one that’s busy making the antioxidant vitamin K crucial for your and its survival -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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BBC News - Science & Environment

GM plant tech boosts malaria drug yieldScientists have modified a plant's genes to make it produce high levels of a key malaria drug, potentially helping meet the large global demand.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stricter gun control could stop violent men killing their partners and themselvesMen who use guns to kill their partner are also likely to commit suicide. Those planning to commit suicide are not deterred by severe penalties, and therefore the most successful way of preventing such homicides is to restrict gun access to batterers, experts say.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flavins keep a handy helper in their pocketResearchers show for the first time in detail how a flavin-containing enzyme interacts with oxygen.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Artificial leaf as mini-factory for medicineUsing sunlight for sustainable and cheap production of, for example, medicines. The 'mini-factory' in the form of a leaf that chemical engineers developed in 2016 showed that it is possible. Now the researchers have come with an improved version: their 'mini-factory' is now able to keep production at the same level, irrespective of the variation in sunlight due to cloudiness or time of the day. As
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Popular Science

Is Masdar City a ghost town or a green lab?Environment Tour Abu Dhabi’s ambitious, and incomplete, eco-utopia. It’s not quite a mirage, but it is a work-in-progress: Masdar City, the most ambitious—and expensive—urban planning experiment on the planet today.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows newspaper op-eds change mindsResearchers have found that op-ed pieces have large and long-lasting effects on people's views among both the general public and policy experts. The study, published in the Quarterly Journal of Political Science, also found that Democrats and Republicans altered their views in the direction of the op-ed piece in roughly equal measure.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Healthcare costs for adults with autism more than double those for general populationResearchers compared total annual healthcare costs for adults on the autism spectrum to costs for adults with attention-deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and adults in the general population and found them to be 20 percent and 70 percent higher, respectively.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cognitive behavioral therapy can improve emotion regulation in children with autismNew research from York University's Faculty of Health shows cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can help children with autism manage not only anxiety but other emotional challenges, such as sadness and anger. study shows CBT can lead to significant improvements in children's emotional regulation. It also shows -- for the first time -- that CBT can improve more than just anxiety. This is the first t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Milky Way's supermassive black hole may have 'unseen' siblingsIn a new study published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters, researchers from Yale, the University of Washington, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, and University College London predict that galaxies with a mass similar to the Milky Way should host several supermassive black holes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's Aqua satellite sees wind shear affecting Tropical Cyclone FakirTropical Cyclone Fakir was southeast of La Reunion Island in the Southern Indian Ocean when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead in space. Visible imagery from Aqua showed that wind shear was affecting Fakir.
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NYT > Science

F.D.A. Cracks Down on Sales of E-Cigarettes to MinorsThe agency issued warning letters to retailers not to sell to teenagers and demanded that the manufacturer JUUL submit marketing and research documents.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US renewables firm takes Poland to court over U-turn on windmillsA US renewable energy group Invenergy said on Tuesday it had begun international arbitration against Poland, claiming it stands to lose hundreds of millions of dollars (euros) after the EU country reneged on its commitments to build wind farms.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Though often forgotten, the placenta has a huge role in baby’s healthRecent research in mice suggests that a lot of early problems in the embryo may actually have roots in the placenta.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Reconstructing what makes us tickA major issue that limits modeling to predict cardiac arrhythmia is that it is impossible to measure and monitor all the variables that make our hearts tick, but researchers have now developed an algorithm that uses artificial intelligence to model the electrical excitations in heart muscle. Their work draws on partial differential equations describing excitable media and echo state networks to cr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Technology used to map Mars now measuring effect of treatment on tumorsA machine learning approach for assessing images of the craters and dunes of Mars has now been adapted to help scientists measure the effects of treatments on tumors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Commonly prescribed heartburn drug linked to pneumonia in older adultsResearchers have found a statistical link between pneumonia in older people and a group of medicines commonly used to neutralize stomach acid in people with heartburn or stomach ulcers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Collapse of the Atlantic Ocean heat transport might lead to hot European summersSevere winters combined with heat waves and droughts during summer in Europe. Those were the consequences as the Atlantic Ocean heat transport nearly collapsed 12,000 years ago. The same situation might occur today.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists unearth vital link between fat, immunity and heat regulationScientists have discovered a key, previously unknown role for a population of cells that live in our fat -- these cells regulate our body heat and protect us against cold shock. The discovery opens the door to future treatments in which weight loss (or gain) is the desired goal, as activating the pathway involved may stimulate the body to burn (or not burn) white fat.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biophysics -- lighting up DNA-based nanostructuresBiophysicists have used a new variant of super-resolution microscopy to visualize all the strands of a DNA-based nanostructure for the first time. The method promises to optimize the design of such structures for specific applications.
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The Atlantic

How Gabriel García Márquez Created a World in a SentenceBy Heart is a series in which authors share and discuss their all-time favorite passages in literature. See entries from Colum McCann, George Saunders, Emma Donoghue, Michael Chabon, and more. Doug McLean When I was her student at the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, the novelist Marilynne Robinson told our class it was almost unthinkable for women of her generation to become writers. Society afforded wom
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Takeda lifts Shire takeover bid again (Update)Irish-based pharmaceuticals firm and takeover target Shire said Tuesday that Japanese drugs firm Takeda has lifted its informal bid again.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Future wearable device could tell how we power human movementFor athletes and weekend warriors alike, returning from a tendon injury too soon often ensures a trip right back to physical therapy. However, a new technology developed by University of Wisconsin-Madison engineers could one day help tell whether your tendons are ready for action.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Surgery recovery program slashes opioid use, benefits patients, cuts costs, study findsA special recovery program for thoracic surgery patients developed at the University of Virginia Health System is getting patients home sooner while decreasing both healthcare costs and opioid use, a review of the first year of the program shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Land use and pollution shift female-to-male ratios in snapping turtlesCurrent research shows that increasing global temperatures as a result of climate change are expected to produce more female turtles since their offspring are influenced by the nest's temperature. But now, a team of Virginia Tech biologists has found that the nesting environment of turtles in agricultural habitats, which can ultimately lower nesting temperatures, can actually produce more males.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In Huntington's disease, heart problems reflect broader effects of abnormal proteinResearchers investigating a key signaling protein in Huntington's disease describe deleterious effects on heart function, going beyond the disease's devastating neurological impact. By adjusting protein levels affecting an important biological pathway, the researchers improved heart function in experimental animals, shedding light on the biology of this fatal disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Leading genetics study method may need reconsideration, significant distortions discoveredMany conclusions drawn from a common approach to the study of human genetics could be distorted because of a previously overlooked phenomenon, according to researchers at the Department of Genetics and Genomics Sciences at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and collaborators from Massachusetts General Hospital and the Broad Institute. Their conclusions and a unique method they developed t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New studies show dark chocolate consumption reduces stress and inflammationFindings from two Loma Linda University Health studies being presented today at the Experimental Biology 2018 annual meeting in San Diego show dark chocolate consumption reduces stress and inflammation, while improving memory, immunity and mood.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How colorectal cancer cells spread to the liverA new study by Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) researchers helps explain the connection between a tumor suppressor called protein kinase C zeta (PKC zeta) and metastatic colorectal cancer.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Changes in breast tissue increase cancer risk for older womenResearchers in Norway, Switzerland, and the United States have identified age-related differences in breast tissue that contribute to older women's increased risk of developing breast cancer. The findings, published April 24 in the journal Cell Reports, may help scientists better understand how breast cells change during the aging process, enabling doctors to catch the signs of cancer earlier.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Engineered Chinese shrub produces high levels of antimalarial compoundArtemisinin is a potent antimalarial compound produced naturally in low amounts by the Chinese shrub Artemisia annua, commonly known as sweet wormwood. In a study published by April 24 in the journal Molecular Plant, researchers in China report a high-quality draft genome sequence of A. annua and their use of this information along with gene expression data to metabolically engineer plant lines th
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Preconception zinc deficiency could spell bad news for fertilityThe availability of micronutrients in the ovarian environment and their influence on the development, viability and quality of egg cells is the focus of a growing area of research. A new study shows that zinc deficiency can negatively affect the early stages of egg development, reducing the ability of the egg cells to divide and be fertilized. This may affect fertility months in the future. Resear
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mental, not physical, fatigue affects seniors' walking abilityLow 'mental energy' may affect walking patterns in older adults more than physical fatigue. New research about the relationship between walking ability and self-reported mood will be presented today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego.
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Live Science

A Google Street View Car Drove Right Through the Path of the 2017 Solar EclipseThe most-viewed eclipse in history had an unexpected witness: A Google Street View car drives right through totality, offering a surprising celestial treat for visitors scoping out the event in Maryland Heights, Missouri.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Music business grows at record pace as digital dominatesThe global music industry soared a record 8.1 percent last year as digital sales for the first time made up the majority of revenue thanks to the streaming boom, the industry said Tuesday.
2h
The Atlantic

Europe's Last-Ditch Effort to Save the Iran DealIt’s not easy seeking to mollify President Trump, and seldom satisfying. Just ask French President Emmanuel Macron, who is visiting Washington and who has been more successful dealing with Trump than many of his foreign counterparts. He has forged a good personal rapport with the U.S. president—to the point of being granted this White House’s first state visit—and he enjoys more influence over th
2h
The Atlantic

The Negligent Nomination of Ronny JacksonRonny Jackson D. TrumpFor the third time in four months, Rear Admiral Ronny Jackson is at the center of a surprising report. The first time came in January, when Jackson, the White House physician, announced that President Trump was in excellent physical and mental health, offering an endorsement so effusive that some were led to question Jackson’s judgment. The second came in March, when President Trump fired Veteran
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5 Comics to Read Before You See 'Avengers: Infinity War'Marvel fans have had Thanos thirst for years. These comics reveal why.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The 'missing link' in conducting molecules, butadiene -- solvedTrans 1,3-butadiene, the smallest polyene, has challenged researchers over the past 40 years because of its complex excited-state electronic structure and its ultrafast dynamics. Butadiene remains the 'missing link' between ethylene, which has only one double bond, and longer linear polyenes with three or more double bonds. Now, an experimental team has solved trans 1,3-butadiene's electronic-stru
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Soccer heading -- not collisions -- cognitively impairs playersWorse cognitive function in soccer players stems mainly from frequent ball heading rather than unintentional head impacts due to collisions, researchers have found. The findings suggest that efforts to reduce long-term brain injuries may be focusing too narrowly on preventing accidental head collisions.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Getting electrons to move in a semiconductorResearchers have shown that a wide-bandgap semiconductor called gallium oxide can be engineered into nanometer-scale structures that allow electrons to move much faster within the crystal structure. With electrons that move with such ease, Ga2O3 could be a promising material for applications such as high-frequency communication systems and energy-efficient power electronics.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gender inequality is 'drowning out' the voices of women scientistsA researcher is calling for the voices of women to be given a fairer platform at a leading scientific conference.
2h
Blog » Languages » English

Alice in Neuroland: The Queen of Hearts’ MarathonIt turns out that attending the Mad Tea Party really might be helping you out: partway through, the White Rabbit leaps out of some neuro-bushes and frantically scampers across the table. “Wait just a minute!” you call, finally managing to throw your arms out and stop it in its tracks. “Stop running! Have you seen Alice?” “Yes, of course I’ve seen her, but you must let me go or I’ll be late for th
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Diet Coke grows for first time in 8 years after makeoverDiet Coke's makeover, which put the sugar-free drink in skinny colorful cans, helped the low-calorie brand sell more soda in North America for the first time in nearly eight years.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Volkswagen makes 15-bn-euro bet on electric cars in ChinaCar giant Volkswagen announced Tuesday investments of 15 billion euros ($18 billion) in electric and autonomous vehicles in China by 2022, in a massive bet on the vital market.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineered Chinese shrub produces high levels of antimalarial compoundArtemisinin is a potent antimalarial compound produced naturally by the Chinese shrub Artemisia annua, commonly known as sweet wormwood. Currently,however, the low amount of artemisinin produced in the leaves of this plant does not meet the global demand. In a study published by April 24 in the journal Molecular Plant, researchers in China report a high-quality draft genome sequence of A. annua an
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study examines how 'partner and rival' strategies can foster or destroy cooperationIf you're an optimist, you probably believe that humanity is inherently cooperative and willing to sacrifice for the greater good of all. If you're a pessimist, on the other hand, chances are you believe that, in the end, people will always do what is in their own self-interest.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rheumatology leaders respond to Short-Term, Limited-Duration Insurance proposed ruleIn comments submitted to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the American College of Rheumatology expressed concern that the Short-Term, Limited-Duration Insurance proposed rule could weaken consumer protections that enable individuals living with rheumatic diseases to access quality, affordable care.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A wearable device intervention to increase exercise in peripheral artery diseaseA home-based exercise program, consisting of wearables and telephone coaching, did not improve walking endurance for patients with peripheral artery disease, according to a study published in JAMA.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High immune function tied to stunted growthElevated immune function during childhood results in as much as 49 percent growth reduction in Ecuador's indigenous Shuar population, researchers reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
3h
Live Science

The Truth Behind This Amazing Video from the Surface of a CometA Twitter user managed to turn 25 minutes worth of images from the ESA's comet lander into a dramatic short film.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Audi recalls about 1.2M vehicles; coolant pumps can overheatAudi is recalling about 1.2 million cars and SUVs worldwide because the electric coolant pumps can overheat and possibly cause a fire.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Poll: For many online Americans, Facebook is a habitSocial media is a daily way of life for many Americans.
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New Scientist - News

Amazing GIF shows dust and cosmic rays raining down on comet 67PCosmic rays, dust and stars swirl above a rocky cliff on the comet 67P. The images that make up this cool GIF were taken in 2016 by ESA's Rosetta spacecraft
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Comments on social networks also reinforce socialization during adolescenceWithout overlooking the risks of using social networks in adolescence, a study analyzes little known information about cybergossiping among high school students.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Factors promoting physical activity in childhoodResearchers show that the more accurately children assess their motor competences, the more positive is the effect on their physical activity.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Graphene origami as a mechanically tunable plasmonic structure for infrared detectionResearchers have successfully developed a tunable infrared filter made from graphene, which would allow a solider to change the frequency of a filter in infrared goggles simply by controlled mechanical deformation of the filter (i.e., graphene origami), and not by replacing the substance on the goggles used to filter a particular spectrum of colors.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Record concentration of microplastic in Arctic sea iceExperts have recently found higher amounts of microplastic in arctic sea ice than ever before. However, the majority of particles were microscopically small.
3h
The Atlantic

How Marvel Is Rewriting Its World OrderIn 1986, the famed comic-book creator Frank Miller wrote a seven-part story for Daredevil called “Born Again,” a dark tale of betrayal and redemption that helped usher in the gritty modern age of the medium. Though Miller’s recent turn toward more extreme politics in his work has alienated many fans , his influence in the mid-’80s was crucial to the evolution of mainstream comics. Near the end of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Graphene origami as a mechanically tunable plasmonic structure for infrared detectionSoldiers often need to see through smoke, fog, dust or any other airborne obscurant and detect the presence of toxins or other chemicals in the field or on the front lines. To identify those chemicals, they use infrared (IR) sensors and spectroscopy, which allow a specific color of light to shine at a particular frequency corresponding to each chemical. Identifying each chemical will require a sol
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple, Ireland strike deal on 13-billion-euro tax payment (Update)Ireland's government on Tuesday said it was signing a deal with Apple for the US tech giant to pay 13 billion euros ($16 billion) in back taxes as ordered by the European Commission.
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Viden

Forskning: Screening af udsatte familier fejlerForebyggelse, der skal hjælpe udsatte familier, virker ikke efter hensigten. Det viser ét af de forskningsprojekter, der er blandt finalisterne ved PhD Cup 2018.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Evolving cooperationA new study shows that in repeated interactions winning strategies are either partners or rivals, but only partners allow for cooperation.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel pathway identified in development of acute myeloid leukemia with poor prognosisNUS researchers have discovered a new pathway by which a severe form of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) develops. The main player in the pathway, a protein called SHARP1, promotes leukemia development and maintenance, both on its own and through its actions on other genes. The discovery could lead to the development of novel SHARP1-specific treatments for this difficult-to-treat form of AML.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fruit fly study identifies new gene linked to aortic aneurysmsAn interdisciplinary team of researchers has identified a new gene linked to human aortic aneurysms.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The dispute about the origins of terahertz photoresponse in graphene results in a drawPhysicists at MIPT and their British and Russian colleagues revealed the mechanisms leading to photocurrent in graphene under terahertz radiation. The paper published in Applied Physics Letters not only puts a period to a long-lasting debate about the origins of direct current in graphene illuminated by high-frequency radiation but also sets the stage for the development of high-sensitivity terahe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What if you could know that your mild cognitive impairment wouldn't progress?Researchers from the Lisbon School of Medicine, University of Lisbon found that, in some mild cognitive impairment patients, real neuropsychological stability over a decade is possible and that long-term stability could be predicted based on neuropsychological tests measuring memory and non-verbal abstract reasoning.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Carbon consumersA team of researchers, led by Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology Peter Girguis and Suni Shah Walter, then a post-doctoral fellow in Girguis' lab, has shown that underground aquifers along the mid-ocean ridge act like natural biological reactors, pulling in cold, oxygenated seawater, and allowing microbes to break down more -- perhaps much more -- refractory carbon than scientists eve
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Graphene origami as a mechanically tunable plasmonic structure for infrared detectionResearchers at the University of Illinois have successfully developed a tunable infrared filter made from graphene, which would allow a solider to change the frequency of a filter in infrared goggles simply by controlled mechanical deformation of the filter (i.e., graphene origami), and not by replacing the substance on the goggles used to filter a particular spectrum of colors.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

User control and transparency are key to trusting personalized mobile appsAs concerns about privacy increase for people using mobile apps, users' trust and engagement may hinge on perceptions about how the app uses their data and whether it seeks user input before delivering personalized services, according to researchers. However, their reactions may also depend on how familiar a user is with technology, they added.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Silk-based devices with antisense-miRNA therapeutics may enhance bone regenerationResearchers have incorporated therapeutic microRNAs (miRNAs) into bioresorbable, silk-based medical devices such as screws and plates to achieve local delivery of factors that can improve bone growth and mineralization at the site of bone repair. The study, which demonstrated the promise of silk-based orthopedic devices combined with bioactive miRNA-based therapeutics, is published in Tissue Engin
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ride-sharing platforms may be taking the place of managers in the gig economyRatings, ride assignments and other aspects of Uber's ride-sharing computer platform in some ways subtly serve as the manager for the company's drivers, according to an international team of researchers.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ESA teams ready for spaceTomorrow's launch of Sentinel-3B will complete the Sentinel-3 constellation and represents the culmination of months of training to fly Europe's latest Copernicus satellite.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mining the data—latest five-year PA DEP report on effects and remediation of underground coal mining subsidenceAlthough Pennsylvania's vast coal resources have been mined since before the creation of the United States, protection of the environment from the effects of mining have slowly evolved and expanded since the Surface Mining Conservation and Reclamation Act of 1945. Act 54 of 1994 amended the Commonwealth's mining statutes to include a new set of repair and compensation provisions for structures and
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: Burning ice from the ocean floorMethane hydrate is a crystalline complex of water and methane that forms beneath the ocean floor. It resembles regular ice, but it can easily be set aflame after it's brought to the surface.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Online paedophile tactics exposed in forensic linguistic studyThe deceptive methods of a sex offender who abused several children online have been exposed by academics at Aston University to help police catch other predators.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Space smash—simulating when satellites collideSatellites orbiting Earth are moving at many kilometres per second – so what happens when their paths cross? Satellite collisions are rare, and their consequences poorly understood, so a new project seeks to simulate them, for better forecasting of future space debris.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Artificial leaf as mini-factory for medicineUsing sunlight for sustainable and cheap production of, for example, medicines. The 'mini-factory' in the form of a leaf that chemical engineers from Eindhoven University of Technology presented in 2016 showed that it is possible. Now the researchers have come with an improved version: their 'mini-factory' is now able to keep production at the same level, irrespective of the variation in sunlight
3h
cognitive science

A research replication project, involving over 20 labs and more than 2100 participants, failed to reproduce findings from a previous study that suggested that self-control is a depletable resource.submitted by /u/randomusefulbits [link] [comments]
3h
Scientific American Content: Global

EPA Declares Biomass Plants Carbon Neutral, Amid Scientific DisagreementAgency argues that the nation’s forests compensate for carbon released from burning wood -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Science | The Guardian

Women not getting a fair say at academic conferences, research revealsMale conference organisers disproportionately choose men over women when assigning speaking slots Women get fewer chances than men to speak about their work at scientific conferences, largely because those in the upper echelons of academia are male, research has revealed. While speaking at conferences is a key part of academic life, not only raising the profile of researchers but helping them to
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Aging: The natural stress reliever for many womenWhile some research suggests that midlife is a dissatisfying time for women, other studies show that women report feeling less stressed and enjoy a higher quality of life during this period.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Significant advances detected in knowledge about renal cancerThe prestigious journal Cell is today publishing three papers on renal cancer signed by an interdisciplinary group known as the TRACERx Renal Consortium, a member of which is Dr Jose Ignacio López, a pathologist at University Hospital Cruces and tenured lecturer in the Faculty of Medicine and Nursing of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country. These studies offer fresh data on different aspec
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Münster researchers identify factors promoting physical activity in childhoodResearchers at Münster University (Germany) show in a study published in the 'Scientific Reports' journal that the more accurately children assess their motor competences, the more positive is the effect on their physical activity.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reconstructing what makes us tickA major issue that limits modeling to predict cardiac arrhythmia is that it is impossible to measure and monitor all the variables that make our hearts tick, but researchers have now developed an algorithm that uses artificial intelligence to model the electrical excitations in heart muscle. Their work, appearing in Chaos, draws on partial differential equations describing excitable media and echo
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gender inequality is 'drowning out' the voices of women scientistsA University of Cambridge researcher is calling for the voices of women to be given a fairer platform at a leading scientific conference.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

AWI researchers measure a record concentration of microplastic in Arctic sea iceExperts at the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have recently found higher amounts of microplastic in arctic sea ice than ever before. However, the majority of particles were microscopically small.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Effect of a home-based exercise program with wearable activity monitor, telephone coaching on walking endurance for peripheral artery diseaseA home-based exercise program that consisted of a wearable activity monitor and telephone coaching to promote walking by patients with peripheral artery disease didn't improve walking endurance.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Use of 2 anti-clotting medications following bypass surgery improves outcomes for grafted veinsTaking aspirin plus an anti-clotting medication for one year after heart bypass surgery resulted in less narrowing of the vein used to bypass a blocked artery than taking aspirin alone.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Getting electrons to move in a semiconductorIn new experiments reported in Applied Physics Letters, researchers have shown that a wide-bandgap semiconductor called gallium oxide can be engineered into nanometer-scale structures that allow electrons to move much faster within the crystal structure. With electrons that move with such ease, Ga2O3 could be a promising material for applications such as high-frequency communication systems and en
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The 'missing link' in conducting molecules, butadiene -- solvedTrans 1,3-butadiene, the smallest polyene, has challenged researchers over the past 40 years because of its complex excited-state electronic structure and its ultrafast dynamics. Butadiene remains the 'missing link' between ethylene, which has only one double bond, and longer linear polyenes with three or more double bonds. Now, an experimental team has solved trans 1,3-butadiene's electronic-stru
3h
Popular Science

In photos: a rare glimpse inside the heart of a quantum computerTechnology Inside the lab where computing makes a quantum leap. For decades, the promise of quantum computing has tickled the neurons of drug-makers, spies, and tech CEOs.
3h
Feed: All Latest

How to Clean Your Computer Inside and OutScrub down those keys, wipe the fingerprints off your screen, and delete all the files that have been clogging your tubes.
3h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Record concentration of microplastics found in ArcticDiscovery prompts fear that melting ice will allow more plastic to be released back into the oceans.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New technique drawing on echo state networks fills in the gaps to simulate how arrhythmic electrical signals go chaoticCardiac arrhythmia results when the usual symphony of electric pulses that keep the heart's muscles in sync becomes chaotic. Although symptoms are often barely noticeable, arrhythmia leads to hundreds of thousands of deaths from unexpected, sudden cardiac arrest in the United States each year. A major issue that limits modeling to predict such events is that it is impossible to measure and monitor
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gender inequality is 'drowning out' the voices of women scientistsA University of Cambridge researcher is calling for the voices of women to be given a fairer platform at a leading scientific conference.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gallium oxide shows high electron mobility, making it promising for better and cheaper devicesThe next generation of energy-efficient power electronics, high-frequency communication systems, and solid-state lighting rely on materials known as wide bandgap semiconductors. Circuits based on these materials can operate at much higher power densities and with lower power losses than silicon-based circuits. These materials have enabled a revolution in LED lighting, which led to the 2014 Nobel P
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The 'missing link' in conducting molecules, butadiene—solvedLinear polyenes are hydrocarbon chains with unusual optical and electrical properties. They have become a paradigm for studying photoisomerization—when molecular structures rearrange from absorbing light—because of their straightforward molecular structure, potential for electrical conductivity, and role in vision. Understanding how these molecules simultaneously rearrange through photoisomerizati
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers measure a record concentration of microplastic in Arctic sea iceExperts at the Alfred Wegener Institute, Helmholtz Centre for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) have recently found higher amounts of microplastic in Arctic sea ice than ever before. However, the majority of particles were microscopically small. Ice samples from five regions throughout the Arctic Ocean contained up to 12,000 microplastic particles per litre of sea ice. Further, the types of plastic
3h
Live Science

Baby-Eating Ants Use Espionage, Chemical Warfare To Score Free RentWorst. Roommates. Ever.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heart disease may only be a matter of time for those with healthy obesityPeople who are 30 pounds or more overweight may want to slim down a bit even if they don't have high blood pressure or any other heart disease risk, according to scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Five ways to help cancer patients avoid the emergency roomUnnecessary emergency department visits and hospitalizations are debilitating for patients with cancer and far too common -- and costly -- for the United States health care system. To reverse the trend, researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center, the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, and the Wharton School, all at the University of Pennsylvania, have identified the five best practices to
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cheap 3-D printer can produce self-folding materialsResearchers at Carnegie Mellon University have used an inexpensive 3-D printer to produce flat plastic items that, when heated, fold themselves into predetermined shapes, such as a rose, a boat or even a bunny. Lining Yao, assistant professor in the Human-Computer Interaction Institute, said these self-folding plastic objects represent a first step toward products such as flat-pack furniture that
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Natural barcodes enable better cell trackingA group of researchers from the Wyss Institute at Harvard University and Harvard Medical School has developed a new genetic analysis technique that harnesses the 10 million small nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) found in the human genome as 'barcodes' to create a faster, cheaper, and simpler way to keep track of pooled cells from multiple individuals during multiplexed experiments, enabling large s
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Getting a better look at living cellsNanoscale-level imaging of living cells has become a reality in the past few years using transmission electron microscopy and sealed sample holders that keep cells alive in a liquid environment. But do the high-resolution images obtained using these tools truly reflect the structures and functions of cells?
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ride-sharing platforms may be taking the place of managers in the gig economyRatings, ride assignments and other aspects of Uber's ride-sharing computer platform in some ways subtly serve as the manager for the company's drivers, according to an international team of researchers.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

User control and transparency are key to trusting personalized mobile appsAs concerns about privacy increase for people using mobile apps, users' trust and engagement may hinge on perceptions about how the app uses their data and whether it seeks user input before delivering personalized services, according to researchers. However, their reactions may also depend on how familiar a user is with technology, they added.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Silk-based devices with antisense-miRNA therapeutics may enhance bone regenerationResearchers have incorporated therapeutic microRNAs (miRNAs) into bioresorbable, silk-based medical devices such as screws and plates to achieve local delivery of factors that can improve bone growth and mineralization at the site of bone repair.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global

To Make Autonomous Vehicles Safe, We Have to Rethink "Autonomous" and "Safe"Coming generations of AVs won’t be risk-free in all circumstances, but that’s not necessarily a bad thing -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Scientific American Content: Global

Why Too Much Experience Can BackfireSometimes expertise gets in the way of making the right call -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

War and what comes after | Clemantine WamariyaClemantine Wamariya was six years old when the Rwandan Civil War forced her and her sister to flee their home in Kigali, leaving their parents and everything they knew behind. In this deeply personal talk, she tells the story of how she became a refugee, living in camps in seven countries over the next six years -- and how she's tried to make sense of what came after.
4h
Big Think

Is Atheism a cult?Atheism has been called many things over the years. Is it a cult, and what is a cult anyway? Read More
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Viden

Medie: Amazon udvikler talende robot til hjemmetRobotten kan allerede næste år finde vej til almindelige brugeres hjem, rapporterer Bloomberg. Det er dog uklart, hvad den kan.
4h
Ingeniøren

Miljøstyrelsen: Svært at undgå, at elektronikskrot havner i fattige landeFN-rapport afslører, at Danmark også bidrager til, at store mængder illegalt elektronisk udstyr ender i Nigeria.
4h
Live Science

Why Dead Fingers (Usually) Can't Unlock a PhoneIn March, two detectives went to a funeral home and asked to see a body. The reason? They wanted to unlock the man's phone.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

2.7 billion tweets confirm: Echo chambers on Twitter are very realA recent study of more than 2.7 billion tweets between 2009 and 2016 confirms that Twitter users are exposed mainly to political opinions that agree with their own. It is the largest study to characterize echo chambers by both the content in them and the networks they comprise. The findings indicate a strong correlation between biases in the content people both produce and consume. In other words,
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Comments on social networks also reinforce socialization during adolescenceWithout overlooking the risks of using social networks in adolescence, a study analyzes little known information about cybergossiping among high school students.
4h
BBC News - Science & Environment

How to revive drowsy beesA vet gives advice on how to assist dehydrated bumblebees emerging from hibernation.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: To Europe's spaceportMeet our new space explorers, the spacecraft of the BepiColombo mission, as they begin their adventure to planet Mercury. But first, they have to navigate through Amsterdam Schiphol airport to reach Europe's Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Artificial leaf as mini-factory for medicineUsing sunlight for sustainable and cheap production of, for example, medicines. The 'mini-factory' in the form of a leaf that chemical engineers from Eindhoven University of Technology presented in 2016 showed that it is possible. Now the researchers have come with an improved version: their 'mini-factory' is now able to keep production at the same level, irrespective of the variation in sunlight
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Controlled nuclear transition will make clocks hugely more precise than atomic onesA Russian scientist from Skobelitsyn Research Institute of Nuclear Physics, MSU theoretically substantiated that the speed of transition of thorium-229 from ground to excited state may be managed depending on external conditions. The frequency of transitions may be increased or decreased by dozens of times. This effect will help create extremely precise clocks exceeding even the best atomic ones.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flavins keep a handy helper in their pocketFreiburg researchers show for the first time in detail how a flavin-containing enzyme interacts with oxygen.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New mechanism of radio emission in neutron stars revealedYoung scientists from ITMO University have explained how neutron stars generate intense directed radio emission. They developed a model based on the transitions of particles between gravitational states, i.e. quantum states in gravitational field. The researchers were the first to describe such states for electrons on the surface of neutron stars. Physical parameters obtained with the developed mo
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stricter gun control could stop violent men killing their partners and themselvesMen who use guns to kill their partner are also likely to commit suicide. Those planning to commit suicide are not deterred by severe penalties, and therefore the most successful way of preventing such homicides is to restrict gun access to batterers. So says Sierra Smucker of Duke University Sanford School of Public Policy in the US. She is the lead author of a study in Springer's Journal of Urba
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Power of negative exampleWhile peers are significant, family remains highly important for adolescents as well, according to HSE researchers. However, many young people do not see their parents as role models.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biophysics -- lighting up DNA-based nanostructuresBiophysicists from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have used a new variant of super-resolution microscopy to visualize all the strands of a DNA-based nanostructure for the first time. The method promises to optimize the design of such structures for specific applications.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stem cells from adults function just as well as those from embryosA review of research on induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) finds that donor age does not appear to influence their functionality. This validates iPSCs as a viable alternative to embryonic stem cells in regenerative medicine, and highlights the enormous potential of iPSCs derived from elderly patients to treat their age-related diseases.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making the nitrate problem of agriculture vanish into airNitrate concentrations of our groundwater are among the highest in the European Union. The main reason is over-fertilization of fields with feces from livestock farming. Every year, a "liquid manure shower" of 200 million tons goes down onto German fields, the result being too high nitrate levels at one third of the groundwater quality measurement points. Researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Tech
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists' warning—biodiversity in Europe continues to declineAt its meeting in Medellin (Colombia), the World Biodiversity Council (IPBES) presented its studies on biodiversity and ecosystem services in various regions of the world. They show that the increasing intensity of conventional agriculture and forestry is leading to a decline in biodiversity. Findings concerning Europe and Central Asia indicate that the appropriation of nature for human needs, suc
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New take on early evolution of photosynthesisScientists have begun re-thinking the evolutionary history of photochemical reaction centers (RCs). Their analysis describes a new pathway that ancient organisms may have taken to evolve the great variety of photosynthetic RCs seen today across bacteria, algae, and plants.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Escalation of competition leads to conflict in competitive networks of F1 driversA new study has revealed that people with similar social status in similar age groups are more likely to clash with each other. This rivalry could likely lead to taking more risks in fair weather conditions. A research team examined the link between status similarity and conflict as well as the conditions under which this link holds by using panel data on Formula 1 races from 1970 through 2014.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Climate change not the key driver of human conflict and displacement in East AfricaOver the last 50 years climate change has not been the key driver of the human displacement or conflict in East Africa, rather it is politics and poverty, according to new research.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Glowing contact lens could prevent a leading cause of blindnessA glow-in-the-dark contact lens could help stave off blindness in the hundreds of millions of people who suffer from diabetes across the globe.
4h
Ingeniøren

Ultraviolet bakteriedræber skal desinficere passagerflyAmerikanere har udviklet en vogn, som kan dræbe 99,9 procent af alle bakterier og vira på et passagerfly på blot 10 minutter. Grundlæggeren vil have et opgør med flybranchens hygiejnestandarder.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New mechanism of radio emission in neutron stars releasedYoung scientists from ITMO University have explained how neutron stars generate intense directed radio emission. They developed a model based on the transitions of particles between gravitational states, i.e. quantum states in a gravitational field. The researchers were the first to describe such states for electrons on the surface of neutron stars. Physical parameters obtained with the developed
4h
The Atlantic

Armenia's Democratic TriumphEach time street protests oust the leader of a former Soviet republic, Vladimir Putin probably sees the West’s hidden hand. But when it comes to Monday’s shocking resignation of Armenian Prime Minister Serzh Sargsyan following 11 days of peaceful protest, such an assumption would be a big mistake. What happened on Monday in Yerevan, Armenia’s capital, was a genuine expression of the will of the p
4h
Futurity.org

Paint transforms walls into interactive touchpadsWith a few applications of conductive paint and some electronics, researchers can create walls that sense human touch, and detect things like gestures and when appliances are in use. The researchers found that they could transform dumb walls into smart walls at relatively low cost—about $20 per square meter—using simple tools and techniques, such as a paint roller. These new capabilities might en
4h
Popular Science

How to log into your computer with your fingerprint or faceDIY Upgrade to biometric security. Your phone isn't the only device that accepts a fingerprint log-in. Your computer will also let you verify your identity with your finger or even your face.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why are some E. coli deadly while others live peacefully within our bodies?E. coli outbreaks hospitalize people and cause food recalls pretty much annually in the United States. This year is no different.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

The daunting math of climate change means we’ll need carbon captureOne leading expert describes what it would take to do it economically—and on a huge scale.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Thousands of mobile apps for children might be violating their privacyThousands of the most popular apps and games available, mostly free of charge, in the Google Play Store, make potentially illegal tracking of children's use habits, according to a large-scale international study co-authored by Narseo Vallina-Rodriguez, a researcher at the IMDEA Networks Institute in Madrid and ICSI, the International Computer Science Institute at the University of California, Berk
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists unearth vital link between fat, immunity and heat regulationScientists from Trinity College Dublin have discovered a key, previously unknown role for a population of cells that live in our fat -- these cells regulate our body heat and protect us against cold shock. The discovery opens the door to future treatments in which weight loss (or gain) is the desired goal, as activating the pathway involved may stimulate the body to burn (or not burn) white fat.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A non-coding RNA lasso catches proteins in breast cancer cellsA Danish-German research team has shown that not only the where and when of long non-coding RNA expression is important for their function but also the how. The results can have a big impact on our understanding of dynamic regulation of gene expression in biological processes.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Music lessens pain and anxiety in patients undergoing surgeryMusic can reduce the anxiety and pain of invasive surgery, according to an analysis of all relevant randomized controlled trials published since 1980.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Collapse of the Atlantic Ocean heat transport might lead to hot European summersSevere winters combined with heat waves and droughts during summer in Europe. Those were the consequences as the Atlantic Ocean heat transport nearly collapsed 12,000 years ago. The same situation might occur today, according to a new study published in Nature Communications.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Commonly prescribed heartburn drug linked to pneumonia in older adultsResearchers at the University of Exeter have found a statistical link between pneumonia in older people and a group of medicines commonly used to neutralise stomach acid in people with heartburn or stomach ulcers.
5h
Futurity.org

Wounded veteran receives first penis transplantA reconstructive surgery team that performed the country’s first bilateral arm transplant in a wounded warrior has successfully performed the first total penis and scrotum transplant in the world. “When I first woke up, I felt finally more normal…” Many soldiers returning from combat bear visible scars, or even lost limbs, caused by blasts from improvised explosive devices, or IEDs. However, some
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Smart phone as a faster infection detectorResearchers have developed a low-cost, portable laboratory on a phone that works nearly as well as clinical laboratories to detect common viral and bacterial infections. The work could lead to faster and lower-cost lab results for fast-moving viral and bacterial epidemics, especially in rural or lower-resource regions where laboratory equipment and medical personnel are sometimes not readily avail
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

2.7 billion tweets confirm echo chambers in Twitter are very realA recent study of more than 2.7 billion tweets between 2009 and 2016 confirms that Twitter users are exposed mainly to political opinions that agree with their own. It is the largest study to characterise echo chambers by both the content in them and the networks they comprise. The findings indicate a strong correlation between biases in the content people both produce and consume. In other words,
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

Poor nations will feel climate change before rich ones
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Technology used to map Mars now measuring effect of treatment on tumorsA machine learning approach for assessing images of the craters and dunes of Mars, which was developed at The University of Manchester, has now been adapted to help scientists measure the effects of treatments on tumors.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

State-of-the-art reviews in osteoimmunologyA series of outstanding, well illustrated reviews by leading experts in osteoimmunology provide new insights and point to future directions in one of the most rapidly evolving areas of research within the bone field.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Escalation of competition leads to conflict in competitive networks of F1 driversA new study has revealed that people with similar social status in similar age groups are more likely to clash with each other. This rivalry could likely lead to taking more risks in fair weather conditions. A research team of KAIST, the US Treasury, INSEAD, and the European School of Management and Technology examined the link between status similarity and conflict as well as the conditions under
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Uncovering the secret law of the evolution of galaxy clustersUsing observational data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Subaru Telescope, the size and mass of galaxy clusters have precisely been measured. Osaka University-led research team analyzed those data and found a simple law that regulates the growth of the clusters. They also showed that the clusters are still young and growing. The newfound law will serve as a tool to clarify the evolutionary
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Maximum' security as Philippines readies Boracay shutdownPolice with assault rifles patrolled entry points to Boracay island on Tuesday just days before a six-month shutdown and clean-up of one of the Philippines' top tourist attractions.
5h
Futurity.org

3D-printed bio-ink brings platelets to injuriesResearchers have incorporated platelet-rich plasma into a bio-ink: a 3D-printed mixture of cells and gel that could eventually be part of skin grafts and regenerative tissue implants. If injury strikes during their 10-day cruise through the bloodstream, platelets flock toward the scene of a cut or bruise to engage their signature superpower: clotting. But platelets also release so-called growth f
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Children are as fit as endurance athletesResearchers discover how young children seem to run around all day without getting tired: their muscles resist fatigue and recover in the same way as elite endurance athletes. The study, which compared energy output and post-exercise recovery rates of young boys, untrained adults and endurance athletes, can be used to develop athletic potential in children and improve our knowledge of how disease
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Managing chronic pain with lightScientists have identified the population of nerve cells in the skin that are responsible for sensitivity to gentle touch, and which cause severe pain in neuropathic pain patients. The team developed a light-sensitive chemical that selectively binds to this type of nerve cell. By first injecting the affected skin area with the chemical and then illuminating it with near-infrared light, the targete
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Winter wave heights and extreme storms on the rise in Western EuropeStudy reveals average winter wave heights along the Atlantic coast of Western Europe have been rising for almost seven decades.
5h
Dagens Medicin

Ny professor i lungemedicin ser behov for større aktivitet i kræftforskningOle Hilberg er ny professor i lungemedicin på Vejle Sygehus og SDU. Han mener, at der er behov for at danske lungemedicinere tager mere aktiv del i den kliniske forskning i lungekræft.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

How the EU’s new privacy laws could actually boost Facebook and Google
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Electrogates offer stop-and-go control in microfluidicsAlthough microfluidics devices have a wide variety of uses, from point-of-care diagnostics to environmental analysis, one major limitation is that they cannot be modified for different uses on the fly, since their flow paths are set during fabrication. In a new study, researchers have addressed this limitation by designing electrogates that can regulate the flow of liquid at different points along
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Caterpillar lifts outlook on strong demand; shares soarIndustrial machinery manufacturer Caterpillar reported a large jump in first-quarter earnings and significantly upgraded its full-year forecast Tuesday, citing strong demand across the construction, mining and energy sectors.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team discovers a new take on early evolution of photosynthesisA team of scientists from Arizona State University's School of Molecular Sciences has begun re-thinking the evolutionary history of photochemical reaction centers (RCs). Their analysis was recently published online in Photosynthesis Research and describes a new pathway that ancient organisms may have taken to evolve the great variety of photosynthetic RCs seen today across bacteria, algae, and pla
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sluggish ocean currents caused European heat wave some 12,000 years agoA study published today in Nature Communications investigates how the strong cooling of the North Atlantic Ocean impacted the European climate around 12,000 years ago. The findings could help scientists predict how climate change will exacerbate European heat waves and droughts in the future.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Availability of orphan medicines varies between European countriesThere are differences in the availability of orphan medicines between different European countries, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. The study focused on the availability and distribution channels of ten orphan medicines used in outpatient care in 24 European countries. On average, five of the 10 medicines were available on the markets.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change not the key driver of human conflict and displacement in East AfricaOver the last 50 years climate change has not been the key driver of the human displacement or conflict in East Africa, rather it is politics and poverty, according to new research by UCL.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Early treatment for leg ulcers gets patients back on their feetTreating leg ulcers within two weeks by closing faulty veins improves healing by 12 percent compared to standard treatment, according to new findings.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Soccer heading -- not collisions -- cognitively impairs playersWorse cognitive function in soccer players stems mainly from frequent ball heading rather than unintentional head impacts due to collisions, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have found. The findings suggest that efforts to reduce long-term brain injuries may be focusing too narrowly on preventing accidental head collisions. The study published online today in the Frontiers in Neu
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Age-related decline in mid-back and low back muscle mass and quality is not associated with kyphosisResearchers from Hebrew SeniorLife's Institute for Aging Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute's Framingham Heart Study and Boston University have found that poor back muscle quality is not associated with worsening kyphosis (forward curvature or 'hunch' of the upper spine) in older adults. The study was published today in the Journal of Geront
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ASU team discovers a new take on early evolution of photosynthesisA team of scientists from Arizona State University's School of Molecular Sciences has begun re-thinking the evolutionary history of photochemical reaction centers (RCs). Their analysis was recently published online in Photosynthesis Research and describes a new pathway that ancient organisms may have taken to evolve the great variety of photosynthetic RCs seen today across bacteria, algae, and pla
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Doctors prescribe opioids at high rates to those at increased overdose riskThe number of first-time prescriptions for opioid drugs has not risen since about 2010. However, patients taking a class of drug known to increase the risk for overdoses were likelier to receive a first-time opioid prescription -- a combination that could be linked to the current surge in opioid-related deaths.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

By 2040, artificial intelligence could upend nuclear stabilityA new paper finds that artificial intelligence has the potential to upend the foundations of nuclear deterrence by the year 2040. While AI-controlled doomsday machines are considered unlikely, the hazards of artificial intelligence for nuclear security lie instead in its potential to encourage humans to take potentially apocalyptic risks, according to the paper.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Imagining a positive outcome biases subsequent memoriesImagining that an event will go well 'colors' how people remember that event after learning how it actually went, according to new findings. The findings showed that participants were more likely to mistakenly identify positive details from the event as 'true' if they had previously imagined the event going well.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Poll: Privacy debacle prompts social-media changesFacebook Content PostsIf you've made changes to how you use social media since Facebook's Cambridge Analytica privacy debacle, you're not alone.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Asian elephants said at risk from Chinese demand for skinA report by a British-based conservation group says rising Chinese demand for products made from elephant skin is driving poaching and posing an even greater threat to Asia's wild herds than the ivory trade.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research gives new ray of hope for solar fuelA team of Renewable Energy experts from the University of Exeter has pioneered a new technique to produce hydrogen from sunlight to create a clean, cheap and widely-available fuel.
5h
Ingeniøren

Regering: Teknologineutrale udbud skal skaffe de næste 1000 MWIfølge regeringens oplæg skal alle teknologier i teorien konkurrere om de 4,2 mia. kroner, der er afsat til teknologineutrale udbud.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change not the key driver of human conflict and displacement in East AfricaOver the last 50 years climate change has not been the key driver of the human displacement or conflict in East Africa, rather it is politics and poverty, according to new research by UCL.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amateur mathematician partially solves 60-year-old problemProfessional biologist and amateur mathematician Aubrey de Grey has partially solved the Hadwiger-Nelson problem, which has vexed mathematicians since 1950. He has published a paper describing the solution on the arXiv preprint server.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Organic agriculture is going mainstream, but not the way you think it isOne of the biggest knocks against the organics movement is that it has begun to ape conventional agriculture, adopting the latter's monocultures, reliance on purchased inputs and industrial processes.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

South Africa wine production drying up in water crisisSouth Africa is set for a steep decline in wine production in 2018 as the country grapples with a water crisis ravaging Cape Town and surrounding areas, a Paris-based global organisation said Tuesday.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook unveils appeal process for when it removes postsFacebook Content PostsFacebook said Tuesday it will give users the right to appeal decisions if the social network decides to remove photos, videos or written posts deemed to violate community standards.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

AkzoNobel splashes out as Q1 profits paint rosy pictureLeading global paintmaker AkzoNobel Tuesday posted rising first quarter profits and after a turbulent year in 2017 hailed its transformation into a focused paints company.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Get Into My Car ... Amazon begins delivery to vehiclesAmazon Car DeliveryAmazon's latest perk ... free delivery to your car.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Where you live is more influential than where you worship in shaping racial attitudesWhites in multiracial congregations have more diverse friendship networks and are more comfortable with minorities—but that is more because of the impact of neighbors and friends of other races than due to congregations' influence, a Baylor University study has found.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers develop smartphone reader for quicker infection testingWashington State University researchers have developed a low-cost, portable laboratory on a phone that works nearly as well as clinical laboratories to detect common viral and bacterial infections.
5h
Feed: All Latest

Delivery Bots Have Awkward Sidewalk Interactions, TooMarble wants to make these things proficient enough to find their own way around the people and the buskers and the intersections.
5h
Feed: All Latest

Flipboard's Answer to Fake News: More Human CurationThe news aggregator is focusing on human curation at a time when people distrust the news.
5h
Dagens Medicin

Screening for tarmkræft finder sygdommen i et tidligt stadieNyt studie fra Regionshospital Randers viser, at tarmkræft diagnosticeres i et tidligere stadie hos dem, der deltager i en screening. Det øger sandsynligheden for overlevelsen.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers use smart phone to make a faster infection detectorWashington State University researchers have developed a low-cost, portable laboratory on a phone that works nearly as well as clinical laboratories to detect common viral and bacterial infections.The work could lead to faster and lower-cost lab results for fast-moving viral and bacterial epidemics, especially in rural or lower-resource regions where laboratory equipment and medical personnel are
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Removing the enablers: Reducing number of tumor-supporting cells to fight neuroblastomaInvestigators at the Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases at Children's Hospital Los Angeles provide preclinical evidence that the presence of tumor-associated macrophages -- a type of immune cell -- can negatively affect the response to chemotherapy against neuroblastoma. Their findings suggest that combination therapy might be effective in patients with high-risk disease, even those w
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Where you live is more influential than where you worship in shaping racial attitudesWhites in multiracial congregations have more diverse friendship networks and are more comfortable with minorities -- but that is more because of the impact of neighbors and friends of other races than due to congregations' influence, a Baylor University study has found.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fracking can cause social stress in nearby areas, according to researchThe question of opening the Northern Territory and South Australia to fracking has re-ignited concerns about environmental and health impacts.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New invention revolutionizes exoskeletonsAalborg researchers have developed a new type of mechanical joint that can support shoulders and hips smarter than ever before. The joint which is compact enough to be worn hidden under clothing, has already won international honors and will likely be the standard in future wearable exoskeletons
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lighting up DNA-based nanostructuresBiophysicists from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have used a new variant of super-resolution microscopy to visualize all the strands of a DNA-based nanostructure for the first time. The method promises to optimize the design of such structures for specific applications.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Joining metals without weldingWelding is still the standard technique for joining metals. However, this laborious process carried out at high temperatures is not suitable for all applications. Now, a research team from the "Functional Nanomaterials" working group at Kiel University, together with the company Phi-Stone AG from Kiel, has developed a versatile alternative to conventional welding and gluing processes. Based on a s
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers describe one of the darkest planets ever foundA team of researchers with Keele University in the U.K. has described one of the darkest planets ever observed. In their paper uploaded to the arXiv preprint server, the team describes the planet and where it appears to stand among other dark planets.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Will electric vehicles take over the world?As more people and goods move around the planet, our cars, planes, trains, and ships are having a growing impact on the climate. Transportation now generates almost a quarter of the world's greenhouse gas emissions, and in 2016, transportation (including ships, aircraft and railroads) in the U.S. produced more carbon dioxide emissions than any other sector. Shifting from vehicles that burn fossil
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Small, dark and baffling: the top five dark matter candidatesWhat if the universe we know is just one runty part of a larger, mostly invisible universe, and the only way we can interact is via gravity?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The science of cryopreserving the human bodyA small group of companies are offering an alternative to the traditional options that follow death: preserving corpses by freezing your body for future scientists to revive. But is this even possible?
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trapdoor spiders of PerthPerth's coolest spiders, the woman on a mission to protect them and her 89-year-old inspiration.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Molecular machines and the place of physics in the biology curriculumThe other day, through no fault of my own, I found myself looking at the courses required by our molecular biology undergraduate degree program. I discovered a requirement for a 5 credit hour physics course, and a recommendation that this course be taken in the students' senior year – a point in their studies when most have already completed their required biology courses. Befuddlement struck me,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient Amazonians lived sustainably – and this matters for conservation todayOur colleague, the archaeologist Santiago Rivas, recently made a remarkable discovery. On a small plateau above the outskirts of Iquitos, a town in the northern Peruvian Amazon, he found a layer in the soil which contained small pieces of ceramic pottery, that were around 1,800-years-old. Digging deeper, he found another layer of soil, this time containing pottery that was about 2,500 years old.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Photosynthesis in plants key to speedy evolutionIn a study of 11 different plant species, published in Molecular Biology and Evolution, researchers at the University of Oxford have shown that the speed at which plants evolve is linked to how good they are at photosynthesis.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Britain's mass surveillance regime is directly opposing human rightsIn light of the Facebook data scandal more people are beginning to challenge the web's pervasive surveillance culture. But few British citizens seem to be aware of the government's own online surveillance regime – significant parts of which have been deemed unlawful.
6h
The Atlantic

An Indian Politician Claimed Ancient Hindus Invented the InternetLast week, a weird story popped to national prominence in India. The new chief minister of Tripura, a small state that borders Bangladesh, said that the internet existed during the ancient times, back when the Sanskrit epic the Mahabharata was written. “Communication was possible because our technology was sophisticated and developed during those times. We had internet and a satellite communicati
6h
The Scientist RSS

Opinion: Drug Sanctuaries Offer Hope to a Post-Antibiotic WorldDrug-free environments, such as a designated ward in a hospital, might reduce the strength of selection for resistance.
6h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Ant Attack!A new species of ant discovered in Borneo fends off invaders with a uniquely suicidal strategy.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Inequality in science fundingNew research shows that winners of a large research grant programme in the Netherlands have a 2.5 times greater chance of obtaining a follow-up grant than nonwinners. The research, which focused on NWO Vidi Grants, was jointly carried out by sociologists from the University of Amsterdam, Utrecht University and the University of California, Berkeley.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uncovering the secret law of the evolution of galaxy clustersAs science enthusiasts around the world bid farewell to legendary cosmologist Stephen Hawking, researchers continue to make important discoveries about the evolution of galaxy clusters that capture the imagination.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

AI used by humanitarian organisations could deepen neocolonial tendenciesArtificial intelligence, or AI, is undergoing a period of massive expansion. This is not because computers have achieved human-like consciousness, but because of advances in machine learning, where computers learn from huge databases how to classify new data. At the cutting edge are the neural networks that have learned to recognise human faces or play Go.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

3-D nanoprinting facilitates communication with lightAt Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), researchers have developed a flexible and efficient concept to combine optical components in compact systems. They use a high-resolution 3-D printing process to produce tiny beam-shaping elements directly on optical microchips or fibers and, hence, enable low-loss coupling. This approach replaces complicated positioning processes that represent a high ob
6h
Popular Science

You’d have to give birth to a 30-pound baby to truly know how a kiwi bird feelsAnimals If it looks like a fruit and acts like a mammal, what is it? Kiwis are as un-bird-like as you can get while still being a nationally treasured bird. And they lay unbelievably large eggs. Check out this x-ray image showing an egg…
6h
Ingeniøren

Kronik: Kortlæg energiforbruget i bygninger systematisk
6h
Feed: All Latest

Competition Is at the Heart of Facebook’s Privacy ProblemFacebook Content PostsOpinion: Until consumers can easily control their data, competitors to Facebook won't thrive.
6h
Dagens Medicin

Psykiatri-overlæge er bekymret for at overtage kommunernes misbrugsbehandlingUdsigten til at skulle overtage misbrugsbehandlingen af psykiatriske patienter fra kommunerne bekymrer ledende overlæge i Psykiatri Øst, da han er bange for, at kommunernes store engagement på området vil forsvinde.
6h
New Scientist - News

Almost 1500 bird species face extinction and we’re to blameOne-eighth of the world’s 11,000 bird species are now threatened, and in most cases farming is the biggest threat thanks to our increasingly meat-rich diets
7h
New Scientist - News

War veteran gets world’s first penis and scrotum transplantA man in the US who was injured by an exploding bomb in Afghanistan has become the first to receive a combined penis and scrotum transplant
7h
Viden

Aske fra kæmpevulkan skal forhindre nyt flykaosDansk forsker undersøger aske fra den islandske vulkan Katla for at kunne forudsige - og måske reducere omkostningerne ved - den næste store askesky.
7h
Ingeniøren

Nye lasere fjerner kræfttumorer uden indlæggelse og narkoseLægerne på urologisk afdeling, Herlev og Gentofte Hospitaler, har i samarbejde med ingeniører og fysikere udviklet et setup, som kan resultere i kræftoperationer uden narkose.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Strained materials make cooler superconductorsUniversity of Wisconsin-Madison engineers have added a new dimension to our understanding of why straining a particular group of materials, called Ruddlesden-Popper oxides, tampers with their superconducting properties.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Designing urban energy systems based on the urban climateAs cities grow at an ever-faster pace, concerns about global warming rise and fossil fuels become increasingly scarce, cities will have to adopt more sustainable energy solutions. EPFL researchers have developed a model that can be used to design urban energy systems by analyzing the building not as a standalone structure but as one piece in an urban puzzle.
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Dagens Medicin

Svendborgsagen: Kunne man ikke lige så godt have trukket lod?Jeg vil foreslå bevægelsen bag #detkuhaveværetmig at ændre navn til #hvembliverdennæste og fortsætter det politiske pres indtil der kommer en nærmere afklaring af de juridiske forhold.
7h
Dagens Medicin

Kaster vi vores dårlige samvittighed i hovedet på en svag patientgruppe?Hvad er egentlig evidensen for, at en livsstilsintervention for psykisk syge patienter rent faktisk vil øge deres samlede livslængde og -kvalitet?
7h
The Atlantic

American Nostalgia on a BunThe series Riverdale owes its ratings success to a number of factors, not least of which is its appeal to a relentless and sometimes revisionist nostalgia. The characters are lifted from the classic Archie comics, for one, which are synonymous with the wholesome, mid-century aesthetic they retained from the late ’50s through the 21st century. But the show’s nostalgia for a supposedly simpler time
7h
Science | The Guardian

VIP lab tours for child patients is healthcare innovation of the yearMalcolm Robinson, scientist and founder of charity Harvey’s Gang, named overall winner at Advancing Healthcare awards A biomedical scientist has scooped top honours in the annual awards for therapists and health scientists for his idea of giving child patients VIP tours of the laboratories where their blood samples are analysed. Malcolm Robinson, from Western Sussex hospitals NHS foundation trust
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows undocumented immigration doesn't increase violent crimeUndocumented immigrants reduce the rate of violent crime in the United States, according to a new study, despite immigrants struggling with many socioeconomic factors shared by people who are more likely to commit crimes.
7h
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Handpicked Tech Deals: Samsung, Echo Spot, Playstation 4 Pro, NintendoAdd Alexa to your home, or accessorize your GoPro Hero camera on the cheap this week.
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When John Doerr Brought a ‘Gift’ to Google’s FoundersIn an excerpt from his book, "Measure What Matters," venture capitalist John Doerr describes introducing "Objectives and Key Results" to Larry Page and Sergey Brin in Google's early days.
7h
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Lyft Delivers Carbon-Neutral RidesThe ride-hailing company announced last week that it plans to become one of the largest voluntary purchasers of carbon offsets in the world.
7h
Live Science

Why Does Microwave Popcorn Smell So Bad?That microwave popcorn smell has a history. And while some people love it, others say it smells like vomit or urine.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers apply experimental economics to Mexican water scarcityAriel Dinar considers himself transformed.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A switch in ocean circulation that helped end the Ice AgeChanges in the circulation of the North Pacific Ocean about 15,000 years ago released large amounts of CO2 to the atmosphere, helping warm the planet and end the last Ice Age, according to research by scientists at the University of St Andrews.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Faulty and Dangerous Logic of Missile Defense-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Billions of gallons of water saved by thinning forestsThere are too many trees in Sierra Nevada forests, say scientists affiliated with the National Science Foundation (NSF) Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory (CZO).
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microbes in underground aquifers beneath deep-sea Mid-Atlantic Ridge 'chow down' on carbonAll life on Earth—from blue whales to microbes—uses carbon in one form or another. But all carbon is not created equal.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers uncover mechanism of scar-free wound healing in fruit fly embryosStitches help deep cuts heal, but can leave a scar. Now, a new study conducted by a team of researchers at the University of Toronto may help scientists and medical professionals move toward scar-free wound repair.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineer invents one-of-a-kind surf rover machineFor his first job during college, William Dally worked in what he calls the surf zone—the area from the shoreline up to an ocean depth of 25 feet—placing rods to gather scientific data. Battered by the waves, the then 20-year-old civil engineering major thought there must be a better way.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Machine speak: Left to their own devices, computers can figure it outUsing novel machine learning techniques, a research team from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory is teaching electronic devices how to speak for themselves.
8h
New Scientist - News

We need hope, not eulogies, for the Great Barrier ReefWriting obituaries for the world’s greatest coral reef is attention-grabbing but scientifically wrong and ethically irresponsible
8h
New Scientist - News

Ants build a medieval ‘torture rack’ to catch grasshoppersA species of tropical ant builds traps on tree trunks that allow them to catch prey almost fifty times their size, by biting their legs and spread-eagling them on the tree surface
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ocean warming can predict land warming with simple modelThe temperature trend of continents can be estimated by measuring warming of nearby oceans, revealing a simple behaviour of the climate system.
8h
Ingeniøren

»Grotesk«, »mærkeligt«, »ulogisk«: Politikere modsætter sig nye luftledningerEt stort flertal af partierne i Folketinget valgte først at gå til milliarddyr kamp mod luftledninger og master - for at droppe samme kamp blot otte år senere. Det har banet vej for nye master og luftledninger på en 170 km lang strækning i Jylland. »Vi havde ikke overblik over konsekvenserne,« si...
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

Stellar Effort: Chart of the Milky Way Includes More Than 1 Billion StarsThe second data set release from Europe’s Gaia mission could provide clues to the galaxy’s past and future -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Live Science

How the Heck Was a Foil Ball Transformed into This Smooth, Shiny Sphere?Can you really make a polished metal sphere from a ball of aluminum foil?
8h
Live Science

Stephen Hawking Signed This Book Before His ALS Took Over. Now It's Up for Auction.A book that the late physicist Stephen Hawking signed in 1973, back when he was still able to hold a pen and scrawl out his autograph, is hitting the auction blocks.
8h
Science | The Guardian

How do you discover a dinosaur?Technology has revolutionised science but it can’t beat good eyes for finding fossils Science and technology go hand in hand, spurring each other on with new insights and techniques. Palaeontology has benefitted too with everything from scanning electron microscopes and XROMM videos to 3D printing and photogrammetric models playing a role in uncovering the secrets of the past. But the most fundam
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists roll 2-D cadmium telluride into nanoscrollsA team of scientists from the Faculty of Chemistry and the Faculty of Materials Science, MSU, together with foreign colleagues, discovered that two-dimensional sheets of cadmium telluride can spontaneously fold into nanoscrolls. This effect may be used in electronics and photonics. The results of the study were published in Chemistry of Materials.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Complete skin regeneration system of fish unraveledFish and amphibians such as newts can perfectly regenerate tissue without scar tissue in the event that they lose organs such as their limbs. Studying the mechanisms of regeneration and homeostasis of tissues has potential for application in human regenerative medicine. Not much has been known about the mechanism and the source of cells involved in the regeneration of tissue.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Translating elephant seal data into a symphony provides surprising insightsA recent paper published in Frontiers in Marine Science on the visualization and sonification of animal tracks showcases the collaboration between the Red Sea Research Center and the Visualization Core Lab. The authors of the paper, including Carlos Duarte, Paul Riker and Madhu Srinivasan from King Abdullah University of Science & T, conducted a sonification experiment in which they explored the c
8h
Viden

Ny forskning: Tidlig screening for tarmkræft øger chancen for at overleveDanske forskere har fundet dokumentation for, at en screening for tarmkræft betaler sig.
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Viden

Regeringen vil slippe markedskræfterne løs i kampen mellem sol og vindRegeringen vil fundamentalt ændre måden, der gives støtte til nye, vedvarende energiprojekter på.
8h
Ingeniøren

Dansk it-hus gør klar til GDPR: Koder på printere og ingen ulåste computereDu skal optimere dine interne dataprocesser. Og så skal du gøre det igen og igen, lyder anbefalingen fra Acubiz.
8h
Ingeniøren

Ministre skyder teknologipagt i gang: Skal skabe flere teknologi-studerendeI dag har ministre og repræsentanter for uddannelsesinstitutioner og foreninger giver håndslag på en teknologipagt efter hollandsk forbillede. Målet er at få flere unge til at vælge teknologiske uddannelser. IDAs formand er sikker på, at de private virksomheder vil deltage aktivt.
8h
The Atlantic

Democrats Hope For Another Upset in ArizonaDemocrats’ recent winning streak in special elections might be coming to an end with Tuesday’s contest in Arizona’s 8th congressional district. But the party still plans to count it as a victory. Two women, Democrat Hiral Tipirneni, a cancer-research advocate, and Republican state Senator Debbie Lesko, are vying to fill the House seat vacated by Republican Trent Franks, who resigned in December a
8h
The Atlantic

The City With the Most Expensive ACA Insurance in the U.S.CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va.—When Garnett and Dave Mellen sent their 19-year-old daughter, Gita, off to college an hour away at Virginia Commonwealth University last fall, they didn’t expect to follow her. But in November, the family received notice that their monthly health-insurance premium in Charlottesville would triple for 2018, from $1,200 to an unaffordable $3,600. So, the Mellens, both longtime l
8h
The Atlantic

Why Is a Liberal LGBT Activist One of Trump's Nominees?Social conservatives love them some Donald Trump. The reason is hardly a mystery. Despite the swirling tales of porn stars and Playboy bunnies, Russian hookers and general degeneracy, this president has delivered on some key issues for traditional-values voters, especially when it comes to appointments. (“Gorsuch!” has become an all-purpose rejoinder to any awkward questions about Trump’s fitness
8h
The Atlantic

The Cowardice of Covering for Too-Violent CopsLast May, a 16-year-old without a driver’s license was steering his parents’ sedan down a street in Carteret, New Jersey, when a police car pulled behind him with its lights flashing. The young man, who wasn’t wearing his seat belt, either tried to flee or panicked and hit the gas pedal instead of the brakes. He crashed the vehicle into a guy-wire beside a utility pole, triggering its airbags. Of
8h
The Atlantic

The Girl Who Smiled Beads Defies Easy UpliftThe prologue of this remarkable memoir is likely to send readers to the YouTube clip of the occasion it describes: the 2006 Oprah show on which 18-year-old Clemantine Wamariya and her older sister were reunited with the rest of their long-lost family, 12 years after the pair had fled the Rwandan genocide. Oprah later pronounced it “one of the deepest, most joyful moments I’ve ever experienced.” S
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Science | The Guardian

Stop mansplaining my dog to me: decoding my pup's DNAA writer dives into at-home dog DNA testing to learn all she can about her pooch – and so that know-it-alls will stop pestering her at the dog park Everyone thinks my dog is a puppy. His large, wide-set eyes; small, soft body; and playful demeanor belie his maturity and emotional depth – attributes that become obvious once you get to know him. The truth is he’s about four, though the exact date o
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Managing chronic pain with lightScientists from EMBL Rome have identified the population of nerve cells in the skin that are responsible for sensitivity to gentle touch, and which cause severe pain in neuropathic pain patients. The team developed a light-sensitive chemical that selectively binds to this type of nerve cell. By first injecting the affected skin area with the chemical and then illuminating it with near-infrared lig
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Children are as fit as endurance athletesResearchers discover how young children seem to run around all day without getting tired: their muscles resist fatigue and recover in the same way as elite endurance athletes. The study, which compared energy output and post-exercise recovery rates of young boys, untrained adults and endurance athletes, can be used to develop athletic potential in children and improve our knowledge of how disease
9h
Ingeniøren

Resistent hybrid-skadedyr kan true landbrugForskere har fundet nyt skadedyr i Brasilien med pesticid-resistente gener. Det kan true landbruget verden over.
9h
Science | The Guardian

The unhealthy truth about doctors - books podcastIn her furious new book, Also Human, psychologist Caroline Elton exposes the crisis among doctors in the UK, who spend their lives caring for others without receiving any support themselves. She explains why she felt she had to go public about her counselling work with overstressed pillars of the medical profession. Plus, Claire, Richard and Sian examine the literature of consulting room and oper
9h
NYT > Science

Trilobites: Why It Seems Like Everyone Is Always Angry With YouIt’s possible that they aren’t, it’s just that you have trouble reading neutral facial expressions because of your family experience, a new study suggests.
9h
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Here's What Facebook Won’t Let You PostFacebook Content PostsFacebook's newly public, 27-page community standards document reveals the hard work of balancing toxic content with free speech.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

PSA Peugeot Citroen rides to higher sales, backed by Opel VauxhallFrench carmarker PSA Peugeot Citroen said Tuesday its acquisition of the Opel and Vauxhall brands last year helped drive sales up more than 42 percent in the first quarter.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Australia's mammal extinction rate could worsen: scientistsAustralia's extinction rate for mammals, already the highest in the world, could worsen unless efforts are made to protect the most endangered species over the next two decades, scientists said Tuesday.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mummified body found in Iran could be father of last shahThe discovery in Iran of a mummified body near the site of a former royal mausoleum has raised speculation it could be the remains of the late Reza Shah Pahlavi, founder of the Pahlavi dynasty.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

SAP more ambitious after soaring Q1 profitsGerman business software maker SAP lifted its full-year forecasts Tuesday, as it hailed a lift-off in profits in the first quarter and saw new opportunities after buying a US software firm.
10h
New on MIT Technology Review

Why artificial intelligence might trigger a nuclear war
10h
Ingeniøren

Ekspert om V2G: Glem de private – sats på store elbilflåderDet er for tidligt at afskrive V2G, mener DTU-forsker. Dansk Energi mener, man skal satse på de større elbilflåder.
10h
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Mercedes' Electric Maybach SUV Has a Built-In Tea KettleA tea kettle surrounded by rose gold, white leather, and lots of swanky features.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientist at centre of Facebook data scandal faces MPsThe Russian-American academic who developed an app that allowed political consulting firm Cambridge Analytica to farm the data of 87 million Facebook users faces questions Tuesday by British lawmakers.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Lykke Friis stopper som prorektorLykke Friis forlader Københavns Universitet til sommer. Derfor vil Københavns Universitet...
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

SK Hynix posts big jump in Q1 net profitSouth Korea's SK Hynix, the world's second-largest memory chip maker, on Tuesday announced a big jump in first-quarter net profit thanks to strong global demand.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Software better at tackling IS propaganda, Facebook saysFacebook on Monday said new detection tools wielded by its counterterrorism team are quickly detecting and removing extremist propaganda for the Islamic State group and al-Qaeda.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deaf 'bird whisperer' forms rare bond with feathered friendsDeaf since childhood, Razali Bin Mohamad Habidin has developed a closer bond with the creatures under his care than any other keeper at Singapore's Jurong Bird Park, where other staff refer to him simply as the "bird whisperer".
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's 'makers' battle mistrust in hi-tech communityEngineers, computer programmers and children tinker with self-made radio-controlled toy cars and robotic arms in China's southern city of Shenzhen, home to "makers" who belie the country's reputation as a hub for technology copycats.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Power-sucking Bitcoin 'mines' spark backlashBitcoin "miners" who use rows of computers whirring at the same time to produce virtual currencies began taking root along New York's northern border a couple of years ago to tap into some of the nation's cheapest hydroelectric power, offering an air of Silicon Valley sophistication to this often-snowy region.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Winter wave heights and extreme storms on the rise in Western EuropeAverage winter wave heights along the Atlantic coast of Western Europe have been rising for almost seven decades, according to new research.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Winter wave heights and extreme storms on the rise in Western EuropeStudy reveals average winter wave heights along the Atlantic coast of Western Europe have been rising for almost seven decades.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

By 2040, artificial intelligence could upend nuclear stabilityA new RAND Corporation paper finds that artificial intelligence has the potential to upend the foundations of nuclear deterrence by the year 2040.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why have all Western-owned digital firms failed in China?A new study from Cass Business School examines the failures of Western Internet Firms (WIFs) in China and why this phenomenon is singularly prevalent in this region.
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Science | The Guardian

Archeologists say early Caribbeans were not 'savage cannibals', as colonists wroteResearchers in Antigua hope to correct ‘speculative and erroneous’ colonial accounts that depict the Carib people as ferocious man-eaters For centuries, historians held that the Caribbean’s earliest inhabitants were peaceful farmers who were wiped out by the ferocious man-eating Carib people. But archaeologists in Antigua say new evidence from one of the most important sites in the region is help
11h
Science-Based Medicine

Brittany Auerbach aka Montreal Healthy Girl Gives Unhealthy AdviceMontreal Healthy Girl Brittany Auerbach spreads misinformation, pseudoscience, and outright fantasy. She could hurt people who believe her nonsense about cancer, viruses, and vaccines
12h
Science | The Guardian

The Order of Time by Carlo Rovelli review – a worthy heir to Stephen HawkingIs time real or simply a useful measurement of change? The author of Seven Brief Lessons on Physics takes us to the limits of our understanding with clarity and style In Hitler’s Germany, a handful of physicists bristled at the mere mention of quantum theory. The troubling uncertainties of Einsteinian relativity and other physical exotica were viewed as “Jewish science” inimical to German nationho
12h
Dagens Medicin

Nyt studie viser store regionale forskelle i behandling af atrieflimmerOmfattende dansk studie finder en betydelig geografisk ulighed i Danmark, når det gælder brug af blodfortyndende behandling.
12h
Ingeniøren

Det behøver ikke være så svært at få styr på sikkerheden i Scada- og ICS-systemerBedre it-sikkerhed i tudsegamle produktionssystemer behøver ikke koste spidsen af en jetjager, mener Energinets beredskabskoordinator.
13h
Science | The Guardian

What is HTLV-1? The devastating health crisis afflicting central AustraliaBetween 5% and 10% of those with the virus will develop a rapidly fatal form of leukaemia Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 is spread through contaminated blood, unprotected sex and breastmilk. Like HIV, there is no cure. Like HIV, the virus causes potentially fatal complications but unlike HIV it takes much longer for symptoms to appear. Some people may carry the virus for 30 years before chroni
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Imagining a positive outcome biases subsequent memoriesImagining that an event will go well 'colors' how people remember that event after learning how it actually went, according to findings in published in Psychological Science. The findings showed that participants were more likely to mistakenly identify positive details from the event as 'true' if they had previously imagined the event going well.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

By 2040, artificial intelligence could upend nuclear stabilityA new RAND Corporation paper finds that artificial intelligence has the potential to upend the foundations of nuclear deterrence by the year 2040. While AI-controlled doomsday machines are considered unlikely, the hazards of artificial intelligence for nuclear security lie instead in its potential to encourage humans to take potentially apocalyptic risks, according to the paper.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Radiotherapy offers new treatment option for liver cancerA novel technique that delivers high doses of radiation to tumors while sparing the surrounding normal tissue shows promise as a curative treatment option for patients with early-stage liver cancer, according to a new study.
14h
New on MIT Technology Review

Let’s destroy BitcoinThree ways Bitcoin could be brought down, co-opted, or made irrelevant.
14h
Live Science

Lemons: Health Benefits & Nutrition FactsLemons are full of vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients and antioxidants, and they are especially good sources of vitamin C and folate.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prolonged acetaminophen use during pregnancy linked to increased ASD and ADHD riskAcetaminophen is one of the most common medications used for treatment of pain and fever reduction during pregnancy and is considered safe in humans. Now, in a first-of-its-kind meta-analysis, researchers at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have found a link between prolonged use of drugs containing acetaminophen (paracetamol or Tylenol) during pregnancy, and increased risk of autism spectrum di
16h
Scientific American Content: Global

Bees Have a Goldilocks Lawn Mow ScheduleLawns mowed every two weeks hosted more bees than lawns mowed every three weeks. Jason G. Goldman reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
16h
cognitive science

The Culturally Co-opted Brain: How Reading Changes the Way We Thinksubmitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]
17h
Big Think

Random fact roundup: Luck, death, and TexasWhat do luck, death, and Texas have in common? They're all part of our weekly random fact roundup. Read More
17h
The Scientist RSS

Study: Winning an Early-Career Research Grant Begets More FundingThe relationship is independent of grantees' scientific accomplishments.
17h
Science : NPR

Emma, Carrie, Vivian: How A Family Became A Test Case For Forced SterilizationsThe eugenicists were utopians, convinced that they were doing hard but necessary things. And that included making decisions about who gets to have children. (Image credit: M.E. Grenander Department of Special Collections and Archives, University at Albany, SUNY)
17h
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Atlanta Spent $2.6M to Recover From $52,000 Ransomware ScareWhether to pay ransomware is a complicated—and costly—calculation.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why have all Western-owned digital firms failed in China?Cass Business School publishes new study examining the failures of Western-owned digital firms in China and why this phenomenon is singularly prevalent in this region.
18h
Futurity.org

What is ‘acoustic cloaking’ and how does it work?A model for directing sound waves to go around, instead of colliding with, an object—effectively cloaking it from detection—could have a wide range of applications from military to medical. Andrew Norris , a professor in the department of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Rutgers University-New Brunswick and pioneer in the field of cloaking, which can help make underwater objects appear inv
18h
NYT > Science

Trump Administration Pushes Abstinence in Teen Pregnancy ProgramsNew rules don’t explicitly exclude teaching about contraception and protected sex, but favor “sexual risk avoidance” and don’t require as rigorous evidence of efficacy.
18h
Futurity.org

Exercise and meditation ease PTSD after sexual assaultA combination of meditation and aerobic exercise can help women decrease negative thoughts and enhance self-worth after sexual assault, a new study suggests. The findings show that doing meditation and aerobic exercise for one hour twice a week for six weeks significantly reduced post-traumatic and ruminative thoughts in women with a history of sexual violence. “Despite the undeniable connection
18h
Futurity.org

New bird-of-paradise has killer dance movesOrnithologists have classified the Vogelkop superb bird-of-paradise as its own species after recognizing differences in two similar-looking kinds of the birds. For years, people mistook the Vogelkop superb bird-of-paradise for the wider spread and closely related Superb Bird-of-Paradise. “After you see what the Vogelkop form looks like and acts like in the wild, there’s little room for doubt that
19h
Futurity.org

Bias hinders women in science looking for grantsFemale health researchers who applied for grants from Canada’s major health research funder received funding less often than male counterparts because of potential bias, a new study shows. The study also indicates that characteristics of peer reviewers can affect the result. Additionally, researchers found that applicants who had not previously received funding also received lower scores, making
19h
Futurity.org

Birds on a wire act a lot like people in lineBirds on a wire space themselves out for the same reason that we put distance between the person in front of us in line at the movies. “It’s an attraction. You want to talk to the person in front of you but you don’t want to be in their personal space,” says Bill Saidel, associate professor of biology at Rutgers University-Camden. “That’s a repulsion. It’s the same thing with birds.” As reported
19h
Futurity.org

Insects help scientists solve century-old evolution mysteryBiology researchers have found that polyploidy, the duplication of whole genomes, has occurred many times during the evolution of insects, the most diverse group of animals. The discovery helps resolve a conundrum puzzling scientists for more than a century. Evolutionary biologists long have known that genome duplication was a common part of the evolution of plants, and Barker specializes in meth
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wiping out the gut microbiome could help with heart failureThe bacteria that reside on and within our bodies are known to have a significant influence on our health. New research suggests wiping out the gut microbiota could improve heart functioning and potentially slow the cardiac damage that occurs with heart failure.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sense of control and meaning helps protect women from anxietyPeople who feel in control of their lives and who find purpose and meaning in life are less likely to have anxiety disorders even when going through the toughest times, according to a study led by the University of Cambridge.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Depressed, inactive and out of work -- study reveals lives of lonely young adultsNew research from King's College London shows that lonely young adults are more likely to experience mental health problems and more likely to be out of work than their peers. The study, published today in Psychological Medicine, gives a detailed snapshot of the lives of lonely 18-year-olds and shows how loneliness goes hand-in-hand with a wide range of problems in health and wellbeing.
19h
Science | The Guardian

Loneliness linked to major life setbacks for millennials, study saysLonely millennials found to be more likely to have mental health problems and be out of work Share your views on the causes of loneliness in young people Lonely millennials are more likely to have mental health problems, be out of work and feel pessimistic about their ability to succeed in life than their peers who feel connected to others, regardless of gender or wealth, research has revealed. L
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Science | The Guardian

Fatberg 'autopsy' reveals growing health threat to LondonersPotentially deadly bacteria thriving in huge clots of waste in sewers, Channel 4 study shows Fatbergs, the congealed mass of fat and discarded items that are increasingly blocking Britain’s sewers, are the consequence of the plastic crisis in Britain and contain potentially deadly antibiotic-resistant bacteria, tests show. A study by Channel 4 in conjunction with Thames Water has analysed the con
19h
Futurity.org

U.S. Ebola coverage got personal when the virus arrivedNews coverage of Ebola cases in the United States focused on telling individual stories that humanized those affected, research shows. Based on these findings, the researchers suggest that reporters covering health crises might have a greater positive impact on their audiences if they write human interest stories that share helpful information. “In this case, a focus on individuals and their stor
19h
Futurity.org

Having an audience makes us better at performingWe tend to think performing in front of others will make us mess up, but new research says the opposite: being watched makes people do better. When people know they have an audience, parts of the brain associated with social awareness and reward invigorate a part of the brain that controls motor skills, improving their performance at skilled tasks. The findings, published in the journal Social Co
19h
Live Science

Does Drinking Alcohol Raise the Risk of PMS?A new study finds drinking alcohol is linked with an increase risk of PMS. But experts are cautious about the findings.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Alcohol intake may be linked to premenstrual syndromeDrinking alcohol may be linked to premenstrual syndrome, or PMS for short, suggests a pooled analysis of published study data in the online journal BMJ Open.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vigorous physical activity may be linked to heightened risk of motor neurone diseaseVigorous physical activity, either in leisure time or in work, may be linked to a heightened risk of developing motor neurone disease, also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS for short, suggests research published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fetal exposure to moderate/high caffeine levels linked to excess childhood weight gainExposure to moderate to high caffeine levels while in the womb is linked to excess weight gain in early childhood, suggests a large observational study published in the online journal BMJ Open.
20h
The Atlantic

Mike Pompeo Barely Avoids an Unprecedented ReproachNever in its 202-year history had the Senate Foreign Relations Committee given a public thumbs-down to a presidential nominee for secretary of state. Until a few minutes before the panel met late Monday afternoon, it looked like CIA Director Mike Pompeo would carry that unprecedented blemish to the Senate floor later this week as he bids to replace Rex Tillerson atop the State Department. But jus
20h
Popular Science

It's rude to ask a galaxy's age. Luckily, its shape offers a clue.Space Younger galaxies appear flatter than their more well-rounded elders Previous research suggested the 3-D shape of a galaxy may hold important hints about its history. Now astrophysicists find these shapes may reveal clues about the age of…
20h
New on MIT Technology Review

Former regulator under Obama says more than 1,000 ICOs are not following the lawGary Gensler, now a lecturer at MIT, says some popular cryptocurrencies should be regulated as securities.
20h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: What Do Americans Ask of a President?What We’re Following Fireproofing Measures: A bipartisan Senate bill seeks to protect Special Counsel Robert Mueller from being fired by President Trump by making Justice Department regulations federal law, but legal scholars are debating whether the bill is constitutional. And an obscure case argued Monday in the Supreme Court could add insight into how the justices would respond if the presiden
20h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Macron America Great AgainToday in 5 Lines After a 34-hour manhunt, authorities said the suspect in a deadly shooting at a Waffle House in Nashville, Tennessee, was taken into custody . Travis Reinking is accused of killing four people at the restaurant early Sunday morning. French President Emmanuel Macron and his wife, Brigitte, arrived in Washington, D.C., for the Trump administration’s first state visit. They will hav
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Suicide and homicide rates show large racial disparities across US statesSouthern and Western states have the highest rates of white firearm suicide, while Midwestern states have highest rates of black firearm homicide, according to new research from McGill University. The findings place a spotlight on states where firearm policies may help reduce homicide and suicide rates.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Young athletes interested in healthy protein, not French friesThe greasy food being served at hockey rinks isn't really what young hockey players want, according to a new study.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Upswings in older-age cognitive ability may not be universalA study of a majority-black cohort finds no clear upward trend in cognitive abilities among older adults.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Carbon capture could be a financial opportunity for US biofuelsWith recent tax credits and other policies, removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and storing it underground is not only possible but profitable for US biofuel refineries.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Applying network analysis to natural historyBy using network analysis to search for communities of marine life in the fossil records of the Paleobiology Database, biologists were able to quantify the ecological impacts of major events like mass extinctions and may help us anticipate the consequences of a 'sixth mass extinction.'
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Earth BioGenome Project aims to sequence genomes of 1.5 million speciesScientists is proposing a massive project to sequence, catalog and analyze the genomes of all eukaryotic species on the planet, an undertaking the researchers say will take 10 years, cost $4.7 billion and require more than 200 petabytes of digital storage capacity. Eukaryotes include all organisms except bacteria and archaea. There are an estimated 10-15 million eukaryotic species on Earth.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hemp shows potential for treating ovarian cancerResults from some of the first studies to examine hemp's ability to fight cancer show that it might one day be useful as plant-based treatment for ovarian cancer. Hemp is part of the same cannabis family as marijuana but doesn't have any psychoactive properties or cause addiction.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google parent Alphabet profit leaps on ad growth (Update)Google parent Alphabet reported a surge in quarterly profits Monday, lifted by strong growth in the digital advertising segment it dominates along with Facebook.
22h
NeuWrite West

Strategies addressing a “chilly climate” transform women’s experience, relationships, and achievement in engineeringThis article is part of an ongoing blog series, titled Inequality in STEM: a Dive Into the Data . In this series, we cover recent research exploring and quantifying inequality in STEM. We'll discuss different aspects of inequality, including barriers to career advancement and a chilly social climate, as well as the efficacy of various interventions to combat bias. Our goal with these pieces is to
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Robot helps seriously ill Everton fan make historyA seriously ill teenage Everton fan made history on Monday by becoming the world's first 'virtual matchday mascot' ahead of his beloved team's home Premier League match with Newcastle United.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New NASA boss gets 'hearty congratulations' from spaceNASA's new boss is already getting cheers from space.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Upswings in older-age cognitive ability may not be universalA study of a majority-black cohort, led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher, finds no clear upward trend in cognitive abilities among older adults.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hippo pathway found essential to orchestrate the development of the heartA team of researchers has discovered that during development, when progenitor heart cells progressively differentiate into various cell types, the Hippo pathway is essential to coordinate the progress of these cell types into a working heart
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UNC scientists create better laboratory tools to study cancer's spreadIn the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering, UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center's Andrew Wang, MD, and colleagues report they have developed tissue-engineered models for cancer metastases that reflect the microenvironment around tumors that promotes their growth.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

California to 'whiplash' between drought, floods: studyCalifornia will zigzag between droughts and floods which will become more intense and more frequent in the coming decades unless global emissions of planet-warming greenhouse gases are checked, researchers said Monday.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher in Facebook data scandal apologizesThe academic at the center of the Facebook data-misuse scandal apologized for his actions, but said he thought he did nothing wrong at the time.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Telling job seekers how many other people have applied increases applications, could boost diversityTelling job applicants how many people applied for a job on LinkedIn - regardless of whether the number of applicants was high or low - increased the number of applications, a finding that could help companies that are seeking more diverse applicant pools, according to new research.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Did last ice age affect breastfeeding in Native Americans?Biologists have been puzzled by the evolutionary adaptation behind a common tooth trait of northern Asians and Native Americans: shovel-shaped incisors. An analysis of archeological specimens shows that nearly 100 percent of early Native Americans had shoveled incisors, and genetic evidence pinpoints the selection to the Beringian standstill 20,000 years ago. One researcher proposes that a trait l
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Swirling liquids work similarly to bitcoinThe physics involved with stirring a liquid operate the same way as the mathematical functions that secure digital information. This parallel could help in developing even more secure ways of protecting digital information.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Promise for safer opioid pain relieverResearchers have engineered a new compound that animal tests suggest could offer the pain-relieving properties of opioids such as morphine and oxycodone without the risk of addiction.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Girls more likely than boys to struggle with social, behavioral, academic needsThe more failing grades students have during eighth grade, the more likely they are to experience social-emotional learning problems, academic difficulties and behavioral problems during their freshman year in high school, researchers found in a new study. And despite the gender stereotype that boys are more likely to be the problem children in school, the researchers found that girls constitute t
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists generate an atlas of the human genome using stem cellsScientists have generated an atlas of the human genome that illuminates the roles our genes play in health and disease. The gene atlas, created using a state-of-the-art gene editing technology and human embryonic stem cells, enables a new functional view on how we study the human genome, and provides a tool that will change how we study and treat cancer and genetic disorders.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How do you get teens to stop cellphone use while driving? Survey says, show them the moneyTeens who admit to texting while driving may be convinced to reduce risky cellphone use behind the wheel when presented with financial incentives such as auto-insurance apps that monitor driving behavior, according to a new survey. However, while more than 90 percent of teens surveyed said they were willing to give up sending or reading text messages, almost half indicated that they would want to
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Light at end of the tunnel for world's wildlife and wild placesA new article finds that the enormous trends toward population stabilization, poverty alleviation, and urbanization are rewriting the future of biodiversity conservation in the 21st century, offering new hope for the world's wildlife and wild places.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Girls more likely than boys to struggle with social, behavioral, academic needsThe more failing grades students have during eighth grade, the more likely they are to experience social-emotional learning problems, academic difficulties and behavioral problems during their freshman year in high school, a new study found.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fake news, the First Amendment and failure in the marketplace of ideasThe rise of social media and fake news challenge long-held assumptions about the First Amendment and are undermining the functioning of the "the marketplace of ideas," a Duke professor argues in a new article.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers use 'environmental DNA' to identify killer whales in Puget SoundWhen endangered killer whales swim through the sheltered waters of Puget Sound, they leave behind traces of "environmental DNA" that researchers can detect as much as two hours later, a new study has found.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy makes a window into the nanoscaleFrom energy materials to disease diagnostics, new microscopy techniques can provide more nuanced insight. Researchers first need to understand the effects of radiation on samples.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How do you get teens to stop cellphone use while driving? Survey says, show them the moneyTeens who admit to texting while driving may be convinced to reduce risky cellphone use behind the wheel when presented with financial incentives such as auto-insurance apps that monitor driving behavior, according to a new survey conducted by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). However, while more than 90
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

GPM sees Tropical Cyclone Fakir forming near MadagascarThe southwest Indian Ocean cyclone season started on November 15, 2017 and will officially end on April 30, 2018. A tropical cyclone called Fakir formed on April 23 near northeastern Madagascar and the Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite looked at the storm's rainfall rates.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New guideline: Start taking MS drugs early onFor most people, it's better to start taking drugs for multiple sclerosis (MS) early on rather than letting the disease run its course, according to a new guideline for treating MS from the American Academy of Neurology. The guideline is published in the April 23, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology, and presented at the 70th AAN Annual Meetin
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Landmark paper finds light at end of the tunnel for world's wildlife and wild placesA new WCS paper published in the journal BioScience finds that the enormous trends toward population stabilization, poverty alleviation, and urbanization are rewriting the future of biodiversity conservation in the 21st century, offering new hope for the world's wildlife and wild places.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists use rocket scanner to learn how whales hearResearchers have used a scanner designed for rockets to collect the first-ever computed tomography (CT) scan of an entire minke whale. By combining the CT scan results with custom-developed computer simulation tools, the researchers model how the whales hear sounds produced by other whales or by human-created (anthropogenic) sources such as ship propellers.
22h
Live Science

This Man Had a Key Lodged in His Brain. Here's How He Survived.A young man in India survived having a key lodged more than an inch into his skull.
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