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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Drinking baking soda could be an inexpensive, safe way to combat autoimmune diseaseA daily dose of baking soda may help reduce the destructive inflammation of autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, scientists say.They have some of the first evidence of how the cheap, over-the-counter antacid can encourage our spleen to promote instead an anti-inflammatory environment that could be therapeutic in the face of inflammatory disease, Medical College of Georgia scientists repo
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers witness galaxy megamergerPeering deep into space—an astounding 90 percent of the way across the observable universe—astronomers have witnessed the beginnings of a gargantuan cosmic pileup, the impending collision of 14 young, starbursting galaxies.
1h
Ingeniøren

Hvert fjerde danske vandløb har for meget zink, og det meste kommer fra svinegylleEn undersøgelse udført for Miljøstyrelsen fastslår, at cirka 25 procent af de danske vandløb har så meget zink, at det risikerer at skade dyrelivet. Også på markerne risikerer vi store problemer i fremtiden pga. forbruget til svin.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tiny frequency combs are reliable measurement toolsIn an advance that could shrink many measurement technologies, scientists have demonstrated the first miniaturized devices that can generate desired frequencies, or colors, of light precisely enough to be traced to an international measurement standard.
2min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An ionic black boxWhile we embrace the way the Internet of Things already is making our lives more streamlined and convenient, the cybersecurity risk posed by millions of wirelessly connected gadgets, devices and appliances remains a huge concern. Even single, targeted attacks can result in major damage; when cybercriminals control and manipulate several nodes in a network, the potential for destruction increases.
10min
Latest Headlines | Science News

In China, coffee shop habits show cultural differences tied to farmingFarming histories have shaped behavior in northern and southern China.
23min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Massive study across western equatorial Africa finds more gorillas and chimpanzees than expectedA massive decade-long study of Western Equatorial Africa's gorillas and chimpanzees has uncovered both good news and bad about our nearest relatives. The good news: there are one third more western lowland gorillas and one tenth more central chimpanzees than previously thought. The bad news: the vast majority of these great apes (80 percent) exist outside of protected areas, and gorilla population
31min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Inducing labor at 39 weeks reduces risks of C-section and other complicationsLittle has been known about what happens to a fetus between 39 and 41 weeks. Through extensive study, researchers found the chances of C-section greatly increase if mothers deliver at 41 weeks, rather than inducing labor at 39 weeks.
31min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When the weather is good, we are happier on social networksWhen the weather is nice, posts on social networks are more cheerful, according to an international scientific study in which the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) took part. The study also shows that Facebook and Twitter are full of negative sentiments when it is very cold or very hot or it is raining a lot.
31min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New link between sleep arousals and body temperature may also be connected to SIDSWhat is the origin of these arousals? Scientists from Bar-Ilan University in Israel, together with colleagues from Boston University, have discovered that brief arousals are probably triggered by the intrinsic electrical noise from wake-promoting neurons (WPN) in the brain. Their research reveals a previously unrecognized neurophysiological mechanism that links sleep arousals with temperature regu
31min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Transparent eel-like soft robot can swim silently underwaterAn innovative, eel-like robot developed by engineers and marine biologists at the University of California can swim silently in salt water without an electric motor. Instead, the robot uses artificial muscles filled with water to propel itself. The foot-long robot, which is connected to an electronics board that remains on the surface, is also virtually transparent. The team details their work in
31min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fetal immune system rejects the mother in preterm laborPreterm labor, a common pregnancy complication, has long been a mystery to scientists. But a new study from UC San Francisco shows it may sometimes happen when the fetal immune system 'wakes up' too early and begins to reject the mother, causing the uterus to start contracting.
31min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In China, traits related to traditional rice or wheat farming affect modern behaviorAfter observing the behaviors of customers in cafes in several modern Chinese cities, researchers report that people from rice-growing regions -- many of whom aren't involved in farming at all -- showed interdependent behaviors, like sitting in groups or squeezing themselves through narrowly placed chairs, whereas people from wheat-growing regions (again, many of whom didn't farm) more often displ
31min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Many low-lying atoll islands could be uninhabitable by mid-21st centurySea-level rise and wave-driven flooding will negatively impact freshwater resources on many low-lying atoll islands in such a way that many could be uninhabitable in just a few decades.
31min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lab-on-a-chip delivers critical immunity data for vulnerable populationsA team of researchers from the University of Toronto has applied a hacker mentality to developing a portable, reconfigurable lab-on-a-chip diagnostic platform and field-tested the system in remote Kenya. Their validated platform can gauge the level of immunity to vaccine-preventable diseases among vulnerable populations.
31min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A portable test identifies populations vulnerable to infectious diseases in remote settingsResearchers have created a compact and portable device that can test human blood samples for the presence of antibodies against measles and rubella in only 35 minutes.
31min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study: What happens when sea levels rise and coastal land gets flooded?Don't just expect a disaster: coastal land has a strong potential to develop into well-functional marine ecosystems, if it gets flooded with seawater.
31min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Want new medicines? You need fundamental researchIdeological debate over support for science sometimes pits 'curiosity-driven' against 'utilitarian' research. Drug-discovery scientists at Harvard and Novartis reviewed the evidence and historical records. Large body of evidence shows that fundamental science lays the essential foundation for developing the best medicines in the future.
31min
Live Science

Baby's Immune System May Reject the Mom in Preterm BirthSometimes, premature birth may happen because the baby's immune system essentially "rejects" the mother, like a person's body rejects a transplanted organ.
33min
The Atlantic

Fossilized Human Footprint Found Nestled in a Giant Sloth FootprintLast April, Matthew Bennett was lying on a white salt flat in New Mexico, uncovering fossilized footprints that had been preserved in the white rock. The print belonged to a ground sloth —a bulky animal, whose large feet and curved claws left apostrophe-shaped impressions wherever it walked. There were many such tracks around, but Bennett found one that was very different . Inside the outline of
34min
Scientific American Content: Global

Drumming Beats Speech for Distant CommunicationThe Bora people in the northwestern Amazon use drums to send language-like messages across long distances. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
36min
New Scientist - News

To help heal the Korean peninsula try scientific cooperation tooResearch exchanges could help open up North Korea and reduce long-standing tensions with South Korea and its allies -if politicians will allow it, says Mark Zastrow.
38min
New Scientist - News

Austerity has put UK forensic labs in crisis and justice at riskThousands of criminal cases are under review, forensic labs are failing to meet basis standards and some are just going bust. Where did it all go wrong?
38min
New Scientist - News

Why growing human brain tissue in a dish is an ethical minefieldThe increasing ability to create mini human brains in labs or integrate human cells into animal brains is rightly provoking worries about their use, says Alex Pearlman
38min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What happens when sea levels rise and coastal land gets flooded?Due to climate change, sea levels are expected to rise and flood large, low-lying areas in many regions of the world. The big question is how we should cope—should we built dykes or let the sea in?
47min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Many low-lying atoll islands could be uninhabitable by mid-21st centurySea-level rise and wave-driven flooding will negatively impact freshwater resources on many low-lying atoll islands in such a way that many could be uninhabitable in just a few decades. According to a new study published in Science Advances, scientists found that such flooding not only will impact terrestrial infrastructure and habitats, but, more importantly, it will also make the limited freshwa
47min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ultrahigh-pressure laser experiments shed light on super-Earth coresUsing high-powered laser beams, researchers have simulated conditions inside a planet three times as large as Earth.
47min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Weather associated with sentiments expressed on social mediaSentiments expressed on Facebook and Twitter may be associated with certain weather patterns, according to a study published April 25, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Patrick Baylis from the Vancouver School of Economics, Canada, Nick Obradovich from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and colleagues.
47min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Projectile cannon experiments show how asteroids can deliver waterExperiments using a high-powered projectile cannon show how impacts by water-rich asteroids can deliver surprising amounts of water to planetary bodies. The research, by scientists from Brown University, could shed light on how water got to the early Earth and help account for some trace water detections on the Moon and elsewhere.
47min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Parasite eggs from ancient latrines hint at people's past dietsDNA in parasite eggs recovered from ancient latrines provides new clues to the foods eaten by past populations, as well as their animal domestication and hunting practices, according to a study published April 25, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Martin Søe of the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and colleagues.
47min
The Scientist RSS

Preterm Labor May Be Sparked by Fetal Immune ReactionImmune cells targeting maternal antigens are abundant in the blood of premature infants, suggesting fetal intolerance of mom may instigate early labor.
49min
The Scientist RSS

Mitochondrias Bacterial Origins UpendedContrary to some hypotheses, the organelle did not descend from any known lineage of Alphaproteobacteria, researchers find.
49min
Latest Headlines | Science News

Asteroids could have delivered water to the early EarthShooting mineral pellets at a simulated planet suggests an impact wouldn’t have boiled all of an asteroid’s water away.
51min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Drug-filled, 3-D printed dentures could fight off infectionsUniversity at Buffalo researchers have developed 3-D printed dentures filled with antifungal medication to better treat oral fungal infections.
52min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When do problems with memory and decision-making affect older adults' ability to drive?Recently, a team of researchers designed a study to learn more about cognitive health and older drivers' crash risks. The study, published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, focused on links between levels of cognitive function and crash risk among older drivers without dementia over a 14-year study period. They also assessed the link between changes in cognitive function over time
52min
Live Science

Stunning Cosmic Map Shows the Location of 1.7 Billion StarsThe stunning new map from the Gaia mission shows 1.7 billion stars in the Milky Way.
53min
Quanta Magazine

First Big Steps Toward Proving the Unique Games ConjectureA paper posted online in January takes theoretical computer scientists halfway toward proving one of the biggest conjectures in their field. The new study, when combined with three other recent papers , offers the first tangible progress toward proving the Unique Games Conjecture since it was proposed in 2002 by Subhash Khot , a computer scientist now at New York University. Over the past decade
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

3-D print electronics and cells printed directly on skinIn a groundbreaking new study, researchers used a customized, low-cost 3-D printer to print electronics on a real hand for the first time. The technology could be used by soldiers on the battlefield to print temporary sensors on their bodies to detect chemical or biological agents or solar cells to charge essential electronics.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Einstein's 'spooky action' goes massiveThe elusive quantum mechanical phenomenon of entanglement has now been made a reality in objects almost macroscopic in size. Results show how two vibrating drumheads, the width of a human hair, can display the spooky action that famously troubled Albert Einstein.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Assembly of massive galaxy cluster witnessed for the first timeFor the first time, astronomers have witnessed the birth of a colossal cluster of galaxies. Their observations reveal at least 14 galaxies packed into an area only four times the diameter of the Milky Way's galactic disk. Computer simulations of the galaxies predict that over time the cluster will assemble into one of the most massive structures in the modern universe.
1h
BBC News - Science & Environment

'Ground-breaking' galaxy collision detectedFourteen galaxies pile into a small region of space... only one can emerge.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Russian Arctic glacier loss doubles as temps warmIce mass loss in the Russian Arctic has nearly doubled over the last decade according to Cornell University research published in the journal Remote Sensing of Environment.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Will warm-water events in the Gulf of CA reduce seabird populations?Oceanic warm-water events in the Gulf of California have increased in frequency during the last three decades, passing from a historic mean of one or two warm anomalies per decade to five events in the 2007-2016 period. This can lead to massive failures in seabird nesting, as anomalously warm waters accumulate in the ocean's surface, preventing the upwelling of colder, nutrient-rich waters from th
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Balancing nuclear and renewable energyArgonne researchers explore the benefits of adjusting the output of nuclear power plants according to the changing supply of renewable energy such as wind and solar power.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers identify promising delivery method for immunotherapy combinationUsing nanoparticles to bind molecules that can unleash and stimulate immune cells, University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers found they could more effectively trigger the body's defenses system against cancer in laboratory studies.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers 3-D print electronics and cells directly on skinIn a groundbreaking new study, researchers at the University of Minnesota used a customized, low-cost 3D printer to print electronics on a real hand for the first time. The technology could be used by soldiers on the battlefield to print temporary sensors on their bodies to detect chemical or biological agents or solar cells to charge essential electronics.
1h
Science | The Guardian

Percy Lamb obituaryMy mentor, research supervisor and friend, the physicist WGP (Percy) Lamb, who has died aged 97, was a member of the celebrated King’s College London team that contributed to the unravelling of the structure of DNA in the early 1950s. His PhD work at King’s was supervised by John Randall and as a result Percy joined the team led by Randall and Maurice Wilkins , which also included Rosalind Frankl
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cheaper and easier way found to make plastic semiconductorsCheap, flexible and sustainable plastic semiconductors will soon be a reality thanks to a breakthrough by chemists.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

We still don't know how strange celibate animals evolveA new study has cast doubt on leading theory for how tiny creatures have evolved for 50 million years -- without ever having sex.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google ramps up Gmail privacy controls in major updateGmail Google FeaturesGoogle on Wednesday ramped up privacy controls in a Gmail overhaul, aiming first at businesses that use its suite of workplace tools hosted in the internet cloud.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers 3-D print electronics and cells directly on skinIn a groundbreaking new study, researchers at the University of Minnesota used a customized, low-cost 3-D printer to print electronics on a real hand for the first time. The technology could be used by soldiers on the battlefield to print temporary sensors on their bodies to detect chemical or biological agents or solar cells to charge essential electronics.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Fakir weakeningInfrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that Tropical Cyclone Fakir was getting weaker as it moved through the Southern Indian Ocean. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued their final bulletin on the system.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UNC researchers identify promising delivery method for immunotherapy combinationResearchers report in the journal Advanced Materials on a nanotechnology-based delivery method for an immunotherapy combination.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Switch controls light on a nanoscale for faster information processingPurdue researchers have helped design a compact switch that enables light to be more reliably confined to small computer chip components for faster information processing.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astronomers witness galaxy megamergerUsing the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), an international team of scientists has uncovered a startlingly dense concentration of 14 galaxies that are poised to merge, forming the core of what will eventually become a colossal galaxy cluster.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers redefine the origin of the cellular powerhouseIn a new study published by Nature, an international team of researchers led by Uppsala University in Sweden proposes a new evolutionary origin for mitochondria -- also known as the 'powerhouses of the cell.' Mitochondria are energy-converting organelles that have played key roles in the emergence of complex cellular life on Earth.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Long-sought structure of telomerase paves way for new drugs for aging, cancerTelomerase, because of its role in cancer and aging, has long been a target of drug companies who want to block it to stop the uncontrolled cell growth characteristic of cancer, or boost it to create a fountain of youth. The structure of the enzyme complex has been a mystery, however, until now. UC Berkeley scientists have finally obtained a detailed picture of the architecture of the RNA-protein
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Assembly of massive galaxy cluster witnessed for the first timeFor the first time, astronomers have witnessed the birth of a colossal cluster of galaxies. Their observations reveal at least 14 galaxies packed into an area only four times the diameter of the Milky Way's galactic disk. Computer simulations of the galaxies predict that over time the cluster will assemble into one of the most massive structures in the modern universe.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breaking bottlenecks to the electronic-photonic information technology revolutionResearchers at the University of Washington, working with researchers from the ETH-Zurich, Purdue University and Virginia Commonwealth University, have achieved an optical communications breakthrough that could revolutionize information technology. They created a tiny device, smaller than a human hair, that translates electrical bits (0 and 1 of the digital language) into light, or photonic bits,
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ancient galaxy megamergersThe ALMA and APEX telescopes have peered deep into space -- back to the time when the universe was one tenth of its current age -- and witnessed the beginnings of gargantuan cosmic pileups: the impending collisions of young, starburst galaxies. Astronomers thought that these events occurred around three billion years after the Big Bang, so they were surprised when the new observations revealed the
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Einstein's 'spooky action' goes massiveThe elusive quantum mechanical phenomenon of entanglement has now been made a reality in objects almost macroscopic in size. Results published in Nature show how two vibrating drumheads, the width of a human hair, can display the spooky action that famously troubled Albert Einstein.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIST team shows tiny frequency combs are reliable measurement toolsIn an advance that could shrink many measurement technologies, scientists at the National Institute ofStandards and Technology and partners have demonstrated the first miniaturized devices thatcan generate desired frequencies, or colors, of light precisely enough to be traced to an internationalmeasurement standard.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Something fishy: Mexico nabs traveler with endangered totoabaMexican authorities arrested a Chinese airline passenger after a strong smell emanating from his suitcases led to the discovery that he was transporting body parts from hundreds of endangered totoaba fish.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study examines denigration when people call a place a 'shithole'By tracing the use of the word and hashtag 'shithole' on Twitter, researchers have examined who is engaged in the stigmatizing discourse of denigration, the types of place that are stigmatized, and the responses to stigmatized places.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA finds Tropical Cyclone Fakir weakeningInfrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed that Tropical Cyclone Fakir was getting weaker as it moved through the Southern Indian Ocean. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center issued their final bulletin on the system.
1h
The Atlantic

What's Wrong With Growing Blobs of Brain Tissue?Last week, Rusty Gage and colleagues at the Salk Institute announced that they had successfully transplanted lab-grown blobs of human brain tissue into mice. Gage’s team grew the blobs, known as brain organoids, from human stem cells. Once surgically implanted into rodent brains, the organoids continued growing, and their neurons formed connections with those of the surrounding brains. It was the
1h
Science | The Guardian

Growing brains in labs: why it's time for an ethical debateExperts argue that experiments have edged so much closer to the possibility of consciousness that guidelines are needed “I have never seen so many brains out of their heads before!” declares Dr Michael Hfuhruhurr, the world-renowned neurosurgeon played by Steve Martin who has a love affair with a brain in a jar in the 1983 movie, The Man with Two Brains. Thirty five years on, the prospect of fall
1h
Scientific American Content: Global

Scientists Favor Transparency, but Say EPA Plan Will Limit ItDirective to exclude certain research will harm public health and environment, critics say -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Popular Science

We have too many jellyfish, so scientists want to cover them in chocolateAnimals From face cream to fertilizers, all sorts of products are under development to make use of soaring jellyfish populations. Recently, a collaboration of marine researchers from eight different countries began a project called GoJelly to create an array of jellyfish-based products, including…
1h
Big Think

Hotel room keys have been hacked in a lab. But don’t panic … yet. Here’s the story.Hotels Room Keys LocksIf you see the "VingCard" logo on your room key, that's the system in question. Read More
1h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Swedish archaeologists reveal 5th Century massacre at Sandby borgA new study says dozens at the Oland island fort were killed and left to rot where they fell.
1h
BBC News - Science & Environment

An unusually late start to the season for USA's Tornado AlleyThings are unusually quiet in Oklahoma and Kansas this year as 2018 could see the latest start to the tornado season on record.
1h
Science | The Guardian

The largest thing in the universe? Cosmic collision 12bn years ago created mega-galaxyA spectacular pileup of 14 galaxies soon after the Big Bang has been seen and recorded for the first time The colossal merger of 14 galaxies more than 12 billion years ago has been captured by astronomers who used the world’s most powerful telescopes to peer 90% of the way across the observable universe. The cosmic pileup occurred 12.4 bn years ago and the resultant gigantic galaxy will have cont
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Long-sought structure of telomerase paves way for new drugs for aging, cancerMore than 30 years ago, when University of California, Berkeley researchers discovered telomerase—an enzyme that lengthens chromosome ends and prevents them from fraying enough to kill a cell—speculation ran wild about its role in aging and cancer, setting off a full-court press to produce drugs to activate or block the enzyme.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Breaking bottlenecks to the electronic-photonic information technology revolutionResearchers at the University of Washington, working with researchers from the ETH-Zurich, Purdue University and Virginia Commonwealth University, have achieved an optical communications breakthrough that could revolutionize information technology.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Entanglement observed in near-macroscopic objectsPerhaps the strangest prediction of quantum theory is entanglement, a phenomenon whereby two distant objects become intertwined in a manner that defies both classical physics and a common-sense understanding of reality. In 1935, Albert Einstein expressed his concern over this concept, referring to it as "spooky action at a distance."
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Next step towards quantum network based on micromechanical beamsIn recent years, nanofabricated mechanical oscillators have emerged as a promising platform for quantum information applications. Quantum entanglement of engineered optomechanical resonators would offer a compelling route toward scalable quantum networks. Researchers at the TU Delft and the University of Vienna have now observed this entanglement and report their findings in this week's edition of
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sky 'welcomes' higher Comcast bid in Murdoch battleSky, the pan-European satellite TV group, withdrew support Wednesday for a full takeover by Rupert Murdoch's 21st Century Fox group after US cable giant Comcast lodged a higher offer.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers redefine the origin of the cellular powerhouseIn a new study published by Nature, an international team of researchers led by Uppsala University in Sweden proposes a new evolutionary origin for mitochondria—also known as the "powerhouse of the cell." Mitochondria are energy-converting organelles that have played key roles in the emergence of complex cellular life on Earth.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team shows tiny frequency combs are reliable measurement toolsIn an advance that could shrink many measurement technologies, scientists at the National Institute ofStandards and Technology (NIST) and partners have demonstrated the first miniaturized devices thatcan generate desired frequencies, or colors, of light precisely enough to be traced to an internationalmeasurement standard.
1h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Spooky quantum entanglement goes big in new experimentsScientists entangled the motions of two jiggling devices that are visible with a magnifying glass or even the naked eye — if you have keen vision.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study examines denigration when people call a place a 's---hole'By tracing the use of the word and hashtag 's---hole' on Twitter, researchers have examined who is engaged in the stigmatizing discourse of denigration, the types of place that are stigmatized, and the responses to stigmatized places.
1h
New on MIT Technology Review

Researchers are keeping pig brains alive outside the bodyIf it were tried on a person, it might mean awakening in the ultimate sensory deprivation chamber.
1h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Gaia telescope's 'book of the heavens' takes shapeGaia Stars Map Milky WayA European space telescope measures the precise positions and distances to over one billion stars.
1h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Sebastian Lourido (Whitehead Inst. & MIT) 2: Genetic approaches to study Toxoplasma gondiiSebastian Lourido explains why Toxoplasma gondii is an excellent system to study Apicomplexa, the phylum that includes the parasites that cause toxoplasmosis, malaria, and cryptosporidiosis. https://www.ibiology.org/microbiology/toxoplasma-gondii/ Talk Overview: Apicomplexa are evolutionarily distinct eukaryotes that play an important role in human disease worldwide. So how do scientists study th
1h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Sebastian Lourido (Whitehead Inst. & MIT) 1:Toxoplasma gondii: a model apicomplexanSebastian Lourido explains why Toxoplasma gondii is an excellent system to study Apicomplexa, the phylum that includes the parasites that cause toxoplasmosis, malaria, and cryptosporidiosis. https://www.ibiology.org/microbiology/toxoplasma-gondii/ Talk Overview: Apicomplexa are evolutionarily distinct eukaryotes that play an important role in human disease worldwide. So how do scientists study th
1h
The Atlantic

Scott Pruitt’s New Rule Could Completely Transform the EPAIn one sweeping move, the Trump administration may soon not only destabilize the last three decades of clean air and water rules, but also completely overhaul how the Environmental Protection Agency uses science in its work. If EPA administrator Scott Pruitt’s recently-proposed rule gets enacted, it will spark a revolution in environmental regulation. But the question is—will it stand up in court
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Boeing reports jump in 1Q profits, lifts 2018 forecastBoeing profits jumped, and the company upgraded its earnings forecast for this year Wednesday amid a strong commercial aviation market and as executives expressed optimism the US and China will avoid a trade war.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

WhatsApp bans European under-16s from using appWhatsApp has raised its minimum age for users in the European Union to 16 years, as the bloc prepares for a new online privacy law to come into force next month.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists lead the way in tackling Japanese knotweedFollowing extensive trials, a team of bioscientists at Swansea University have developed an effective way to tackle Japanese knotweed, listed by the World Conservation Union as one of the world's worst invasive species, and an issue of huge concern to householders in the UK.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uganda counts gorillas amid tourism-boosting 'baby boom'Uganda has begun counting its population of critically endangered mountain gorillas amid confidence their numbers are steadily rising, boosting prospects for its tourism industry that relies heavily on the primates.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Endangered petrels and trawl fishing clash in Tasman seaToday's shifting environmental conditions are creating an uncertain future for many top predators in marine ecosystems, but to protect the key habitat of a species, you first have to know where that habitat is and what threats might be affecting it. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications looks at where New Zealand's endangered Westland Petrel forages during its breeding season an
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

After a volcano erupts, bird colonies recoverWhere do seabirds go when their nesting colony is buried by a volcano? In 2008, the eruption of the Kasatochi volcano in the Aleutian archipelago provided a rare opportunity to track how the island's Crested and Least auklet populations responded when their nesting colony was abruptly destroyed. As a new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances shows, the birds were surprisingly adaptable, esta
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chernobyl disaster zone lures tourists as visitor numbers boomCamera? Check. Sunglasses? Check. And a Geiger counter? Check. For a growing number of thrill-seekers visiting Chernobyl's radiation-contaminated lands the device is used to help navigate the site of what remains the world's worst nuclear accident.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Businesses balance Facebook privacy concerns, ad needsFacebook Data PostsSome small businesses that use Facebook ads to promote themselves and attract new customers are wrestling with whether they need to change strategy after the company's data-misuse scandal.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sunlight reduces effectiveness of dispersants used to clean up oil spillsA new study shows that sunlight transforms oil spills on the ocean surface more quickly and significantly than previously thought, limiting the effectiveness of chemical dispersants that break up floating oil.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Endangered petrels and trawl fishing clash in Tasman seaToday's shifting environmental conditions are creating an uncertain future for many top predators in marine ecosystems, but to protect the key habitat of a species, you first have to know where that habitat is and what threats might be affecting it. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications looks at where New Zealand's endangered Westland Petrel forages during its breeding season an
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pennsylvania bear mange epidemic focus of Penn State and Game Commission projectPennsylvania's black bear population is experiencing a mange epidemic, and a Penn State research team will work with the state Game Commission to gain a better understanding of the disease and develop strategies to manage it.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rabies trick could help treat Parkinson's diseaseThe rabies virus wreaks havoc on the brain, triggering psychosis and death. To get where it needs to go, the virus must first trick the nervous system and cross the blood brain barrier—a process that makes it of interest in drug design. Now, scientists report in ACS Nano a way to exploit the rabies virus machinery to deliver a Parkinson's disease medication directly to the brain.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

To see the first-born stars of the universeASU-led team aims to use new NASA space telescope to capture light from the first stars to be born in the universe.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Protect forest elephants to conserve ecosystems, not DNANew research has found that forest elephant populations across Central Africa are genetically quite similar to one another. Conserving this critically endangered species across its range is crucial to preserving local plant diversity in Central and West African Afrotropical forests -- meaning conservationists could save many species by protecting one.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Agent 007: Organic Molecules as bearers of secretsIn the digital age, security of sensitive information is of utmost importance. Many data are encrypted these methods use a password for decryption, and in most cases, exactly this password is the entrance gate for hackers. Scientists use a new and highly secure approach by combining computer science with chemistry and a conventional encryption method with a chemical password.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Maternal binge drinking linked to mood problems and alcohol abuse in offspringA new study is the first to show that binge drinking by expectant mothers can impair the mental health of their offspring. Researchers report that rat mothers who drank in a binge-like manner during pregnancy and lactation were more prone to depressive behaviors -- and so were their offspring. Moreover, alcohol-triggered heritable changes in the mother made their offspring more vulnerable to mood
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Turning graphene into light nanosensorsGraphene has many properties, but it does not absorb light very well. To remedy this, physicists resort to embedding a sheet of graphene in a flat photonic crystal. Scientists now demonstrate that by altering the temperature in such a hybrid cavity structure, they can tune its capacity for optical absorption. This means graphene-based nano-devices could potentially be used as temperature-sensitive
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Molecular evolution: How the building blocks of life may form in spaceIn an experiment that mimics astrophysical conditions, with cryogenic temperatures in an ultrahigh vacuum, scientists used an electron gun to irradiate thin sheets of ice covered in basic molecules of methane, ammonia and carbon dioxide, the building blocks of life. The experiment tested how the combination of electrons and basic matter leads to more complex biomolecule forms -- and perhaps eventu
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Generic drug manufacturers see new opportunities aheadDeclining prices and a saturated market could spell doom-and-gloom for the generic pharmaceutical industry, but some in the business are turning lemons into lemonade, seeing opportunities instead. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, these companies are putting their special expertise in chemistry to work.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nuclear radiation detecting device could lead to new homeland security toolA Northwestern University and Argonne National Laboratory research team has developed an exceptional next-generation material for nuclear radiation detection that could provide a significantly less expensive alternative to the detectors now in commercial use.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research identifies easier way to predict how chemical compounds will interactNew research has revealed that simple, commercially available computer programmes could be used to design next generation drug-delivery systems by predicting more easily how different chemical compounds interact.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

After a volcano erupts, bird colonies recoverWhere do seabirds go when their nesting colony is buried by a volcano? In 2008, the eruption of the Kasatochi volcano in the Aleutian archipelago provided a rare opportunity to track how the island's crested and least auklet populations responded when their nesting colony was abruptly destroyed. As a new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances shows, the birds were surprisingly adaptable, esta
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SCAI updates consensus on length of stay for percutaneous coronary interventionRevised guidelines incorporating new data on discharge criteria for patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) will allow for flexibility in length of stay while ensuring patient safety.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SCAI releases consensus guidelines for PVD device selectionSCAI released new guidelines to address the selection of specific categories of devices when endovascular therapy (EVT) is indicated. The purpose of this document, which is the first of its kind, is to provide a review of comparative effectiveness data, including safety and efficacy of femoral-popliteal (FP) devices, and to provide clinicians with guidance and recommendations for device selection
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Imaging may allow safe tPA treatment of patients with unwitnessed strokesA study led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators may lead to a significant expansion in the number of stroke patients who can safely be treated with intravenous tPA, the 'clot busting' drug that has greatly reduced stroke-related disability and deaths in eligible patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stress hormones spike as the temperature risesA new study in medical students finds that summer, not winter, is the season when people are most likely to have higher levels of circulating stress hormones. These non-intuitive findings contradict traditional concepts of the taxing physical toll of winter and the relaxed ease of summer. Researchers will present their findings today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Ex
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Drinking kefir may prompt brain-gut communication to lower blood pressureDrinking kefir may have a positive effect on blood pressure by promoting communication between the gut and brain. Kefir is a fermented probiotic milk beverage known to help maintain the balance of beneficial bacteria in the digestive system. Researchers will present their findings today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego.
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Live Science

Does Marijuana Make You Forget to Remember?Stoners may not be as forgetful and absent-minded as the stereotype suggests.
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The Atlantic

Why Did It Take So Long to Expose Hans Asperger's Nazi Ties?At least no one ever put up a prominent statue to Hans Asperger, so we are spared the scene where they bring in the crane to drag another historical figure down from his pedestal. But essentially, that is what has just happened to Asperger, the Austrian pediatrician who lent his name to the syndrome that recognized autistic traits in verbally fluent individuals who demonstrate superior intelligen
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New Scientist - News

Why the US is wrong to say burning wood is carbon neutralThe US’s decision to regard wood as carbon neutral flies in the face of the evidence and will lead to increased emissions
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New Scientist - News

What to expect from the controversial new choice as NASA bossRepublican politician Jim Bridenstine has taken the reins at NASA after a long battle. What will his appointment mean for the space agency, asks Samantha Murphy
2h
The Atlantic

Mick Mulvaney Says the Quiet Part Out LoudThe problem isn’t that Mick Mulvaney wasn’t being honest. It’s that he was a little too honest. Speaking to the American Bankers Association at a conference in Washington on Tuesday, Mulvaney, who is head of the Office of Management and Budget and interim director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, had advice for those gathered: If you want to play, you better pay. “We had a hierarchy i
2h
Viden

Ph.d. Cup: Sådan udvider forskere vores samlede videnHver gang ph.d-afhandling bliver færdig, flyttes grænserne for vores samlede viden. Men hvad betyder forkortelsen? Og hvad vil det sige at blive ph.d?
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nuclear radiation detecting device could lead to new homeland security toolA Northwestern University and Argonne National Laboratory research team has developed an exceptional next-generation material for nuclear radiation detection that could provide a significantly less expensive alternative to detectors now in commercial use. Specifically, the high-performance material is used in a device that can detect gamma rays, weak signals given off by nuclear materials, and can
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers develop new tools in the fight against diabetic blindnessEstimates are that 600 million people will have some sort of diabetic retinopathy by 2040. Previously, no good animal models existed that scientists could use to study the disease, its diagnosis or potential treatments. Now, a team of researchers led by the University of Missouri has employed a mouse model exhibiting diabetic retinopathy symptoms that could lead to future translational research st
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain folding provides researchers with an accurate marker to predict psychosisBy using images of the brain to look at how the grey matter is folded on itself, researchers can predict which high-risk patients will develop psychosis with more than 80 per cent accuracy.Researchers from Western University and Lawson Health Research Institute collaborated with scientists at the University of Basel in Switzerland to develop an approach using an MRI of the brain that can identify
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel technique achieves 32-fold increase in nanometric bactericide's activitySilver nanoparticles used in hospital materials and cutting-edge medical research can be obtained by a method that intensifies their potency and also reduces production costs, as demonstrated by Brazilian researchers in a Scientific Reports article.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The equine herald of a new ageAs they had for more than a decade, Stuart Tyson Smith and his colleagues were excavating a tomb in what was Upper Nubia in their years-long UC Santa Barbara-Purdue University mission to understand the history of an ancient village on the fringes of Egyptian dominance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Millennial men value altruism and self-care above traditional male qualitiesContrary to popular stereotypes, young men today are likely to be selfless, socially engaged and health-conscious, according to a new study from the University of British Columbia and Intensions Consulting, a Vancouver-based market research firm.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why we need erasable MRI scansGas-filled protein structures could one day be used as 'erasable' contrast agents for MRI scans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mediterranean diet boosts beneficial bacteriaHere's another reason to eat a Mediterranean-type diet: it's good for your gut. Scientists at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center found that eating a plant-based diet enhanced the good bacteria living in the gut by up to 7 percent as compared to only 0.5 percent from eating a more meat-centric, Western diet.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bacteria boost antifungal drug resistance in severe childhood tooth decaySome young children experience severe tooth decay that resist normal therapies. New research led by Dongyeop Kim and Hyun (Michel) Koo of Penn's School of Dental Medicine shows how plaque's protective matrix can shield fungal cells from the drugs intended to kill them.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Back in black for singletons trying to find loveBlack beats red as the color of choice when it comes to finding new love, according to new research based on the hit TV series 'First Dates,' which shows that single people wear more of the darker hue when meeting a potential partner for the first time.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Indications of psychosis appear in cortical foldingImaging techniques can be used to detect the development of psychosis in the brains of high-risk patients at an early stage, as reported by researchers from the University of Basel and Western University in the journal JAMA Psychiatry.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Inadequate health literacy associated with poorer postoperative recovery for patients undergoing day surgeryLower health literacy in patients undergoing day surgery was associated with poorer postoperative recovery and health-related quality of life two weeks following surgery.
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New Scientist - News

Russia cuts off Google and Amazon by trying to ban Telegram appRussia has unintentionally knocked out several major cloud services in ongoing efforts to cut access to secure messaging app Telegram
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Ingeniøren

Satellitdata kortlægger for første gang danske bakker og daleFrie radarsatellitdata fra EU skal bruges til at kortlægge vertikale landbevægelser i Danmark. Givtigt når der skal anlægges motorveje og klimasikres.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

JFK was not shot from the grassy knoll, suggests new researchThe long-held conspiracy theory that John F. Kennedy was shot by a second gunman on the grassy knoll is wrong, according to a new analysis of video footage of the shooting, published in the journal Heliyon. The results support the official autopsy findings: JFK suffered a gunshot wound caused by the same type of rifle as that owned by Lee Harvey Oswald, fired from the vicinity of the Texas School
3h
Popular Science

New York should ban plastic bags—and so should the rest of the countryEnvironment New York’s governor has been drifting through the wind; wants to start again. Plastic bag bans work—the results are clear in cities and states that have taken the plunge. But that doesn’t mean they’re without controversy.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global

U.S. Government Considers Charging for Popular Earth-Observation DataImages from Landsat satellites and an agricultural-survey program are freely available to scientists—but for how long? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Turning graphene into light nanosensorsGraphene has many properties; it is e.g. an extremely good conductor. But it does not absorb light very well. To remedy this limiting aspect of what is an otherwise amazing material, physicists resort to embedding a sheet of graphene in a flat photonic crystal, which is excellent for controlling the flow of light. The combination endows graphene with substantially enhanced light-absorbing capabili
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Defending hospitals against life-threatening cyberattacksLike any large company, a modern hospital has hundreds – even thousands – of workers using countless computers, smartphones and other electronic devices that are vulnerable to security breaches, data thefts and ransomware attacks. But hospitals are unlike other companies in two important ways. They keep medical records, which are among the most sensitive data about people. And many hospital electr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The Matryoshka effect: Researchers describe underwater phenomenonResearchers at Utah State University are sending cascades of water into a tank to uncover a mystery of fluid dynamics.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

A woman's fury holds lifetimes of wisdom | Tracee Ellis RossThe global collection of women's experiences can no longer be ignored, says actress and activist Tracee Ellis Ross. In a candid, fearless talk, she delivers invitations to a better future to both men and women.
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Blog » Languages » English

Alice in Neuroland: The March Hare wins the Mad Tea Party!It sort of turned into a trial by combat, but the Hares averaged the most points, so that seems as good a way as any to decree that the March Hare’s argument was best! Congratulations for their triumph, although congratulations may be due to all for surviving these shenanigans. At least you got some tea. See how you fared on the leaderboard! Artwork by Daniela Gamba
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Protect forest elephants to conserve ecosystems, not DNAAlthough it is erroneously treated as a subspecies, the dwindling African forest elephant is a genetically distinct species. New University of Illinois research has found that forest elephant populations across Central Africa are genetically quite similar to one another. Conserving this critically endangered species across its range is crucial to preserving local plant diversity in Central and Wes
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team aims to use new NASA telescope to capture light from the first stars to be born in the universeAbout 200 to 400 million years after the Big Bang created the universe, the first stars began to appear. Ordinarily stars lying at such a great distance in space and time would be out of reach even for NASA's new James Webb Space Telescope, due for launch in 2020.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Google is giving Gmail an AI makeoverGmail Google Features
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research identifies easier way to predict how chemical compounds will interactNew research has revealed that simple, commercially available computer programmes could be used to design next generation drug-delivery systems by predicting more easily how different chemical compounds interact.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's James Webb Space Telescope could potentially detect the first stars and black holesThe first stars in the universe blazed to life about 200 to 400 million years after the big bang. Observing those very first individual stars across such vast distances of space normally would be a feat beyond any space science telescope. However, new theoretical work suggests that under the right circumstances, and with a little luck, NASA's upcoming James Webb Space Telescope will be able to cap
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Generic drug manufacturers see new opportunities aheadDeclining prices and a saturated market could spell doom-and-gloom for the generic pharmaceutical industry, but some in the business are turning lemons into lemonade, seeing opportunities instead. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, these companies are putting their special expertise in chemistry to work.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rabies trick could help treat Parkinson's DiseaseThe rabies virus wreaks havoc on the brain, triggering psychosis and death. To get where it needs to go, the virus must first trick the nervous system and cross the blood brain barrier -- a process that makes it of interest in drug design. Now, scientists report in ACS Nano a way to exploit the rabies virus machinery to deliver a Parkinson's disease medication directly to the brain.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rice U. turns deep-learning AI loose on software developmentComputer scientists at Rice University have created a deep-learning, software-coding application that can help human programmers by writing chunks of code in response to keywords.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

E. coli -- are we measuring the wrong thing?Work to improve sepsis detection, supported by the Bevan Commission Academy, suggests that hospitals may be measuring the wrong metrics for success.A sepsis awareness and management program has demonstrated overall success in terms of improved sepsis detection, but has led to an increase in the number of E. coli blood stream infection cases presented.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Move over Tupac! Life-size holograms set to revolutionize videoconferencingA Queen's University researcher will soon unveil TeleHuman 2 -- the world's first truly holographic videoconferencing system. TeleHuman2 allows people in different locations to appear before one another in life-size 3-D -- as if they were in the same room.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

BU: Obese patients underrepresented in cancer clinical trialsA new review by Boston University School of Public Health researchers found that less than one-fifth of participants in cancer-related clinical trials are obese.
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Big Think

How your name impacts your love life and your careerResearch suggests that your name affects the level of success you’ll achieve in your career and love life, and even where you choose to live. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How the pretzel went from soft to hard—and other little-known facts about one of the world's favorite snacksThe pretzel, one of the fastest-growing snack foods in the world, recently crossed a billion dollars a year in sales.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Surface engineering gets the red lightPerovskite particles could improve the performance of solar cells and light-emitting diodes via a simple process to stabilize the nanocrystal surface.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global

Here's How Scientists Can Become More Politically EngagedThey can act as pro bono science consultants to nonprofits and political campaigns—and many already are -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Watching nanomaterials form in 4-DA team has developed a new type of electron microscope that takes dynamic, multi-frame videos of nanoparticles as they form, allowing researchers to view how specimens change in space and time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How do marine mammals avoid the bends?Deep-diving whales and other marine mammals can get the bends -- the same painful and potentially life-threatening decompression sickness that strikes scuba divers who surface too quickly. A new study offers a hypothesis of how marine mammals generally avoid getting the bends and how they can succumb under stressful conditions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Corn with straw mulch builds yield, soil carbonHow do you boost soil water content and soil health without irrigating? Best cover it with a layer of straw, a new study concludes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Exercise could make the heart youngerAfter a heart attack, patients must create new heart muscle cells to heal. A new study shows that mice make more new heart muscle cells when they exercise compared to when they do not. This was true for both healthy mice and those that had experienced a heart attack. Findings demonstrate that one reason exercise is beneficial to health is that it increases the heart's capacity to regenerate.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

U.S. kids of color get kicked out of school at higher rates – here's how to stop itWhen two black men were arrested at a Philadelphia Starbucks where they had been waiting for a business meeting on April 12, the incident called renewed attention to the bias that racial minorities face in American society.
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Big Think

What will Kate Middleton name her new royal baby? Here are some informed guesses.A listing of some of the British royalty’s favorite family names as the name Prince William’s and Kate Middleton’s new baby. Read More
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New Scientist - News

G-spot surgery given to three women to boost sexual pleasureThe “G-spotplasty” is intended to improve G-spot sensitivity, but some worry it will make women who don’t orgasm vaginally think they have a medical problem
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New Scientist - News

Biggest ever 3D map of the galaxy pinpoints 1.7 billion starsGaia Stars Map Milky WayThe Gaia satellite has been scouring the sky for years. Over 22 months, it has located billions of stars and thousands of galaxies. Here’s what it found
4h
Ingeniøren

Lækket rapport: Sjusket renovering gjorde britisk højhus til brandfældeVar Grenfell-højhuset ikke blevet renoveret, ville branden formentlig ikke have kostet en eneste person livet, konkluderer lækket rapportudkast. Den påviser flere alvorlige fejl
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Science | The Guardian

Loneliness can’t be ‘cured’. We must learn to find value in solitude | Frank FurediInstead of medicalising loneliness and calling it an epidemic, we need to find better ways of engaging with ourselves Loneliness – the sense of isolation, accompanied by the feeling of alienation – has always been a feature of the human condition. References to the unhappy state of loneliness are scattered throughout the Bible. As the 17th century poet John Milton reminded us: “Loneliness is the f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to reason with flat earthers (it may not help though)Thinking that the earth might be flat appears to have grown in popularity in recent years. Indeed, flat earthers are gathering for their annual conference this year in Birmingham, just two miles from my own university.
4h
New on MIT Technology Review

The academic behind Facebook’s data scandal speaks out
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

JFK was not shot from the grassy knoll, suggests new researchThe long-held conspiracy theory that John F. Kennedy was shot by a second gunman on the grassy knoll is wrong, according to a new analysis of video footage of the shooting, published in the journal Heliyon. The results support the official autopsy findings: JFK suffered a gunshot wound caused by the same type of rifle as that owned by Lee Harvey Oswald, fired from the vicinity of the Texas School
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Retirement transition increases sitting during free timeAccording to Finnish longitudinal cohort study, the amount of sitting during free time increases after transitioning to retirement. In general, sedentary behavior is known to be associated with several health issues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Molecular evolution: How the building blocks of life may form in spaceIn an experiment that mimics astrophysical conditions, with cryogenic temperatures in an ultrahigh vacuum, scientists used an electron gun to irradiate thin sheets of ice covered in basic molecules of methane, ammonia and carbon dioxide, the building blocks of life. The experiment tested how the combination of electrons and basic matter leads to more complex biomolecule forms -- and perhaps eventu
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MSU scientists found the seeds of domestic plants in the burial sites of ancient nomadsAn international team of scientists including a professor of the Faculty of Soil Science, MSU studied burial sites dated back to the Bronze Age at the border between Kalmykia and Stavropol Territory and found traces of domestic barley on the walls of vessels. Local residents did not have agriculture at that time, so the barley was likely received from the peoples of leaving at the foothill of Cauc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Turning graphene into light nanosensorsGraphene has many properties, but it does not absorb light very well. To remedy this, physicists resort to embedding a sheet of graphene in a flat photonic crystal. In a new study published in EPJ B, Arezou Rashidi and Abdolrahman Namdar from the University of Tabriz, Iran demonstrate that by altering the temperature in such a hybrid cavity structure, they can tune its capacity for optical absorpt
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Maternal binge drinking linked to mood problems and alcohol abuse in offspringA new study is the first to show that binge drinking by expectant mothers can impair the mental health of their offspring. Italian researchers report that rat mothers who drank in a binge-like manner during pregnancy and lactation were more prone to depressive behaviors -- and so were their offspring. Moreover, alcohol-triggered heritable changes in the mother made their offspring more vulnerable
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The Atlantic

Beyond the Spectacle of Wild Wild CountryWhen Netflix’s hit series Wild Wild Country debuted in March, friends who know about my upbringing began messaging me. They wanted to hear what I thought about the documentary, which centers on the so-called cult my mother once belonged to. Even if I had wanted to skip the show, it’d have been impossible to avoid all the articles about the group’s leader, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh. He stared at me f
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The Atlantic

The Value of FailingEvery kid has that moment when she realizes that the adults she admires aren’t perfect. Few children ever learn, however, that the same is true for the inventors and intellectual giants whose distinguished portraits permeate their history textbooks. As it turns out, recognizing that visionaries such as Albert Einstein experienced failure can actually help students perform better in school. In 201
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Futurity.org

Stress poses double risk to women after heart attackWomen who’ve previously experienced a heart attack have twice the risk of later myocardial ischemia in response mental stress compared to men with a similar history, researchers report. A new study sampled 418 individuals and found that impaired microvascular function in response to mental stress was responsible for the increased risk of ischemia, or obstructed blood flow to the heart, in women.
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Futurity.org

3D-printed plastic folds itself into amazing shapes under heatResearchers have taken advantage of a common defect of the least-expensive kind of 3D printer to produce flat plastic items that, when heated, fold themselves into predetermined shapes, such as a rose, a boat, and even a bunny. The objects are a first step toward products such as flat-pack furniture that assume their final shapes with the help of a heat gun, says Lining Yao, assistant professor i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineers get a grip on slippery surfactantsA Rice University group's innovative surfactant theory removes limitations of a 100-year-old model for interfacial behavior in enhanced oil recovery.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why perovskite solar cells are so efficientSolar cells with efficiencies above 20% and produced at low costs – perovskites make this possible. Now, researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have gained fundamental insight into the function of perovskite solar cells. They found that bound states of electron-hole pairs can form during the absorption of light. Still, these pairs can be separated easily for current to flow. In add
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to overcome fierce debates about banning all trade in ivoryAfrica's elephants are under siege from rampant poaching for their ivory. Everyone agrees that Africa's elephants need protecting from the ongoing slaughter. But countries with wild elephant populations (range states) disagree vehemently on a central policy issue: should we ban all trade in ivory or not?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Secrets of solar flares can now be studied on EarthSolar flares, cosmic radiation, and the northern lights are well known phenomena. But exactly how their enormous energy arises is not as well understood. Now, physicists at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have discovered a new way to study these spectacular space plasma phenomena in a laboratory environment. The results have been published in the renowned journal Nature Communications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nanowires could make lithium ion batteries saferFrom cell phones and laptops to electric vehicles, lithium-ion batteries are the power source that fuels everyday life. But in recent years, they have also drawn attention for catching fire. In an effort to develop a safer battery, scientists report that the addition of nanowires can not only enhance the battery's fire-resistant capabilities, but also its other properties.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

As tellurium demands rise, so do contamination concernsAs technology advances, demands for tellurium, a rare element, are on the rise. Some forms of tellurium are toxic, so as the element finds applications in solar panels, rubber production, electronics and more, researchers are becoming concerned about possible environmental contamination. Now, one group reports that by studying lake sediments they can construct a history of tellurium as it was depo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Archaeologists on ancient horse find in Nile River ValleyAn ancient horse burial at Tombos along the Nile River Valley shows that a member of the horse family thousands of years ago was more important to the culture than previously thought, which provides a window into human-animal relationships more than 3,000 years ago.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain cell's Achilles' heel may prompt hydrocephalusViruses may spark hydrocephalus by exploiting a surprising weakness of cells that circulate fluid in the brain, called ependymal cells, report scientists. The researchers discovered that ependymal cells from mice require a continuous production of a transcription factor called Foxj1 to maintain their shape and function. Viruses known to infect the brain have found a way to shut down the production
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sunlight reduces effectiveness of dispersants used in oil spillsTwo new studies have shown that sunlight transforms oil spills on the ocean surface more significantly and quickly than previously thought. The phenomenon considerably limits the effectiveness of chemical dispersants, which are designed to break up floating oil and reduce the amount of oil that reaches coastlines.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Exposure to domestic violence costs US government $55 billion each yearThe federal government spends an estimated $55 billion annually on dealing with the effects of childhood exposure to domestic violence, according to new research by social scientists at Case Western Reserve University.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Magma ocean may be responsible for the moon's early magnetic fieldAround four billion years ago, the Moon had a magnetic field that was about as strong as Earth's magnetic field is today. How the Moon, with a much smaller core than Earth's, could have had such a strong magnetic field has been an unsolved problem in the history of the Moon's evolution.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers create precision optical components with inkjet printingResearchers have developed an inkjet printing technique that can be used to print optical components such as waveguides. Because the printing approach can also fabricate electronics and microfluidics, it could advance a variety of devices such as optical sensors used for health monitoring and lab-on-a-chip devices that integrate and automate multiple laboratory functions onto a small circuit, or c
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Ingeniøren

Dansk mobil-robot solgt for 1,7 milliarder kronerRobotvirksomheden MiR er blevet solgt til amerikanske Teradyne, som også ejer Universal Robots.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Agent 007: Organic Molecules as bearers of secretsIn the digital age, security of sensitive information is of utmost importance. Many data are encrypted these methods use a password for decryption, and in most cases, exactly this password is the entrance gate for hackers. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) use a new and highly secure approach by combining computer science with chemistry and a conventional encryption method with
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Who (really) wants gaydar to be accurate anyway?Heterosexual men want their sexuality to be known when meeting someone for the first time more than any other sexual orientation group, a new study in the Journal of the International Society for the Study of Individual Differences, reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Efficient universal quantum channel simulation in a cloud quantum computerThe study of quantum channels is the fundamental field and promises wide range of applications, because any physical process can be represented as a quantum channel transforming an initial state into a final state. The researchers demonstrate the construction of different qubit quantum channels experimentally using the universal IBM cloud quantum computer. It provides a universal way to explore va
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What happens to stolen guns?Only about 1 percent of all gun transactions in the US are thefts, and there is no evidence that theft is an important source of guns to those who use them to commit violent crimes. In an analysis of nationwide and state-specific data in Springer's Journal of Urban Health, Philip Cook of Duke University in the US emphasizes that what happens to stolen guns has not been studied systematically.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

TERRAs, the non-coding RNAs that protect telomeres, are important epigenetic regulatorsResearchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) have taken an important step forward by discovering that TERRAs play a decisive role in the assembly of telomeric heterochromatin by interacting with components of the Polycomb complex 2 (PRC), an important epigenetic regulator of gene expression.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

To see the first-born stars of the universeASU-led team aims to use new NASA space telescope to capture light from the first stars to be born in the universe.
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Science | The Guardian

World Penguin Day quiz: test your knowledge of our flightless friendsEverybody loves penguins – but how much do you know about them? It is World Penguin Day, so what better way to celebrate than to test your knowledge of penguins, and their appearances in history and popular culture, while also looking at pictures of penguins? You might even learn something along the way. Continue reading...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How the building blocks of life may form in spaceIn a laboratory experiment that mimics astrophysical conditions, with cryogenic temperatures in an ultrahigh vacuum, scientists used an electron gun to irradiate thin sheets of ice covered in basic molecules of methane, ammonia and carbon dioxide. These simple molecules are ingredients for the building blocks of life. The experiment tested how the combination of electrons and basic matter leads to
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using deep learning to predict emergency room visitsAt IBM Research, we are exploring new solutions for a range of health care challenges. One such challenge is emergency room (ER) overcrowding, which can lead to long wait times for treatment. Overcrowding results in part from people visiting the ER for non-emergency conditions rather than relying on primary physicians. Patients who use the ER for non-emergency situations are more likely to return
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Simple grid increases fuel cell efficiency by over 30 percentTurbuGrid is the name of a small plastic grid approximately 16 x 16 cm that can markedly increase the efficiency of an air-cooled fuel cell stack. Tests by AAU researchers show an increase in efficiency of at least 33.5 percent, but this may be even greater if the grid is added to entirely new fuel cell stacks. The increase is due to the fact that the grid adds turbulence to the air flowing into t
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Large surface area lends superpowers to ultra-porous materialsSome materials are special not for what they contain, but for what they don't contain. Such is the case with metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) – ultra-porous structures that are being developed for a variety of future applications from fire-proofing to drug-delivery.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spinning high-strength polymer nanofibersSpiderman has it figured out.
4h
The Atlantic

What Happens When Geneticists Talk Sloppily About RaceIn a recent op-ed in The New York Times , “ How Genetics is Changing Our Understanding of Race ,” the geneticist David Reich challenged what he called an “orthodoxy” in genetics. Due to concerns of political correctness, he argued, scientists are unwilling to do research on—or, in some cases, even discuss—genetic variation between human populations, despite the fact that genetic variations do exi
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rhythm crucial in drummed speechResearchers have carried out research into the drummed speech system of the Bora people of the Northwest Amazon. They found the Boras not only reproduce the melody of words and sentences in this endangered language, but also their rhythm. This suggests the crucial role of linguistic rhythm in language processing has been underestimated.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Exposure to domestic violence costs US government $55 billion each yearThe federal government spends an estimated $55 billion annually on dealing with the effects of childhood exposure to domestic violence, according to new research.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Incompatible' donor stem cells cure adult sickle cell patientsDoctors have cured seven adult patients of sickle cell disease, an inherited blood disorder primarily affecting the black community, using stem cells from donors previously thought to be incompatible, thanks to a new transplant treatment protocol.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Magma ocean may be responsible for the moon's early magnetic fieldAround four billion years ago, the moon had a magnetic field that was about as strong as Earth's magnetic field is today. How the moon, with a much smaller core than Earth's, could have had such a strong magnetic field has been an unsolved problem in the history of the moon's evolution. A new model proposes that a magma ocean may be responsible.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Human impact on sea urchin abundanceIn a 50-year study, researchers record the dynamics of three common species of sea urchins in Hatakejima Island, Wakayama.
4h
Feed: All Latest

The Future of Snapchat Looks a Lot Like Magic LeapSnapchat SnappablesSnapchat isn't just introducing games. It's building the next computing platform, one piece at a time.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Beaches are becoming safer for baby sea turtles, but threats await them in the oceanOn beaches from North Carolina to Texas and throughout the wider Caribbean, one of nature's great seasonal events is underway. Adult female sea turtles are crawling out of the ocean, digging deep holes in the sand and laying eggs. After about 60 days turtle hatchlings will emerge and head for the water's edge, fending for themselves from their first moments.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fossil teeth reveal new facts about a mass extinction 260 million years agoAround 260 million years, the Earth was dominated by mammal like reptiles called therapsids. The largest of these therapsids were the dinocephalians, a genus composed of several herbivorous and carnivorous species.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The potential habitability of TRAPPIST-1—no aliens yet, but a lot of dataOne year ago, I wrote an article about the remarkable discovery of the TRAPPIST-1 planetary system, a system of seven temperate terrestrial planets orbiting an ultra-cool red dwarf star. This was an enormous astronomical discovery because these low-mass stars are the most numerous ones in our galaxy, and the discovery of potentially habitable planets around one of them led many people to speculate
4h
New on MIT Technology Review

North Korean hacks are growing in skill and scale
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Jupiter's Great Red Spot, spottedThis image of Jupiter's iconic Great Red Spot and surrounding turbulent zones was captured by NASA's Juno spacecraft.
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Live Science

What If Earth Started Spinning Backward?If Earth were to spin in the opposite direction, it would transform the world as we know it.
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Science | The Guardian

Artificial intelligence: €20bn investment call from EU commissionMove to boost AI research amid concerns Europe is losing ground to US and China Brussels has called for a €20bn (£14bn) cash injection for artificial intelligence research, while pouring cold water over controversial plans to give robots human rights. The European commission wants governments and private companies to boost research and innovation spending on AI, amid rising concern that Europe is
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Poll: Younger Americans less apt to use unique passwordsThe number of online accounts compromised by hackers is now in the trillions—enough, perhaps, to make even technophobes think hard about the security of their passwords. Indeed, many are—especially older Americans, a new survey shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Geologists assist in solving the mystery of a gold treasureThe UPV/EHU's Geochronology and Isotopic Geochemistry Service has an internationally state-of-the-art laboratory that conducts isotopic analyses of lead for archaeological studies using minimally destructive techniques. Thanks to the data obtained at this laboratory, researchers at the University of Huelva and the Archaeological Museum of Seville have managed to come up with the source of the gold
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Protect forest elephants to conserve ecosystems, not DNANew University of Illinois research has found that forest elephant populations across Central Africa are genetically quite similar to one another. Conserving this critically endangered species across its range is crucial to preserving local plant diversity in Central and West African Afrotropical forests--meaning conservationists could save many species by protecting one.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study links night exposure to blue light with breast and prostate cancerA study published in Environmental Health Perspectives reports a link between exposure to blue light at night and higher risk of developing breast and prostate cancer. Blue light is a range of the visible light spectrum emitted by most white LEDs and many tablet and phone screens.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New breath and urine tests detect early breast cancer more accurately"Breast cancer survival is strongly tied to the sensitivity of tumor detection; accurate methods for detecting smaller, earlier tumors remains a priority," says Prof. Yehuda Zeiri, a member of Ben-Gurion University's Department of Biomedical Engineering. "Our new approach utilizing urine and exhaled breath samples, analyzed with inexpensive, commercially available processes, is non-invasive, acces
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

No future for egoists -- that's what their brain says!Some people are worried about the consequences of climate change, while others consider them too remote to have an impact on their well-being. UNIGE Researchers examined how these differences are reflected in our brains. With the help of neuro-imaging, the scientists found that people deemed 'egotistical' do not use the area of the brain that enables us to look into and imagine the distant future.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Children of youngest and oldest mothers at increased risk of developmental vulnerabilitiesChildren born to teenage mothers have the highest risk of developmental vulnerabilities at age 5, largely due to social and economic disadvantage, a UNSW Sydney-led study of almost 100,000 school children has found. The risk declines steadily with every additional year of a mother's age up to 30 years, then increases slightly after 35 years and older -- to a level similar to the risk for children
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Synaptic communication controls neuronal migrationDevelopment of the mammalian neocortex requires the precise migration of billions of neurons. Synapses are structures that allow neurons to communicate with each other. Scientists at the Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science have identified a novel role of synapses in neuronal migration during neocortical development. They show that transient synapses are formed between subplate neurons,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers create precision optical components with inkjet printingResearchers have developed an inkjet printing technique that can be used to print optical components such as waveguides, an approach that could advance a variety of devices such as optical sensors used for health monitoring and lab-on-a-chip devices.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Students' social relationships in the last year of secondary educationEstablishing friendships in the university context helps students to gain independence and to manage their lives in their new environment with more self-confidence. For this reason, those who were more rooted in the village or town that they came from were more likely to experience difficulties adapting to university life. Although they keep some of the original support figures in their lives, it
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The Matryoshka effect: USU researchers describe underwater phenomenonA team of engineers and fluid dynamicists uncovered the physics behind a unique underwater phenomenon that's been likened to the Matryoshka doll -- the traditional Russian doll within a doll.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Path of Panama disease fungus established for the first timeThe much-feared Tropical Race 4 strain of the Fusarium oxysporum soil fungus which causes Panama disease in Cavendish bananas has now been discovered in Myanmar. This follows closely on the heels of its discovery in Vietnam and Laos. The fungus is expected to have disastrous consequences on individual banana growers and the global banana industry. Scientists from Wageningen University & Research w
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Viden

Ph.d. Cup finalist: Vi har gået i dårlige sko siden 1600-talletSiden vi begyndte at gå med hæle og i spidse sko har vi døjet med ømme fødder og dårlig ryg. Det viser forskning udført af en af årets Ph.d.-Cup finalister.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Close relative of the cultivated tomato is resistant to many insectsA wild tomato species from the Galapagos Islands has been discovered by scientists from Wageningen University & Research to be resistant to a wide range of pest insects. This species is closely related to the cultivated tomato, making the resilience easier to interbreed into the latter and ultimately making it resistant to many different types of insects.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

International probe shuts down cyberattack providerDDoS Europol WebstresserIn a major hit against cybercriminals, an international police operation has taken down what investigators called the world's biggest provider of potentially crippling Distributed Denial of Service attacks.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Eavesdropping on the deep—New live streaming audio from a deep-sea hydrophoneFor centuries poets and writers have imagined the depths of the ocean as eerily quiet. But scientists now know that the oceans, and especially coastal areas, are full of sound from both natural and human activities. Starting this week, anyone can eavesdrop on sounds in the deep sea via a continuous streaming YouTube video that carries live sound from 900 meters (3,000 feet) below the surface of Mo
5h
Big Think

Smartphone addiction: Do we need a 'recommended daily intake' app?One of the makers of the iPhone is calling on Apple to study the smartphone's addictive nature. Will they listen? Will we? Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

One in every six deaths in young adults is opioid-related: StudyOne out of every six deaths among young adults in Ontario is related to opioids, suggests a study led by researchers at St. Michael's Hospital and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES).
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Influence of aquatic plants on long chain n-alkanes in lake sedimentsLong-chain n-alkane in lake sediments has been widely applied to reconstruct terrestrial paleoclimatic and paleohydrological changes, which is, however, few reported whether they are affected by aquatic-derived n-alkanes. Recent researchers in Xi'an have addressed this question and demonstrate that aquatic plants have significant contributions to sedimentary long-chain n-alkanes and the offset of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Oxidative stress makes difference between metabolically abnormal and healthy obesitiesScientists at Osaka University clarified that deletion of adipose oxidative stress (Fat ROS) decreased lipid accumulation in the liver, clinically improving insulin resistance and inducing metabolically healthy obesity. In fact, Fat ROS suppressed lipid accumulation and increased ectopic lipid accumulation in the liver, worsening insulin resistance.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How does urban-induced warming in Beijing interact with air temperature in summer?Beijing has undergone several important urbanization development stages since late 1978. Linked with urbanization, the so-called 'urban heat island effect' is a key problem caused by urban land expansion.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

We still don't know how strange celibate animals evolveA new study has cast doubt on leading theory for how tiny creatures have evolved for 50 million years -- without ever having sex.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Culprit in reducing effectiveness of insulin identifiedScientists at Osaka University discovered that Stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1) secreted from adipocytes reduced the effectiveness of insulin in adipocytes and decreased insulin-induced glucose uptake.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study explains antibiotic resistance in apple, pear diseaseWhen humans get bacterial infections, we reach for antibiotics to make us feel better faster. It's the same with many economically important crops. For decades, farmers have been spraying streptomycin on apple and pear trees to kill the bacteria that cause fire blight, a serious disease that costs over $100 million annually in the United States alone.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Exposure to domestic violence costs US government $55 billion each yearThe federal government spends an estimated $55 billion annually on dealing with the effects of childhood exposure to domestic violence, according to new research by social scientists at Case Western Reserve University.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Comcast challenges Murdoch with rival bid for UK-based SkyU.S. media giant Comcast offered Wednesday to buy British broadcaster Sky Plc for 22 billion pounds ($30 billion), topping a controversial bid from Rupert Murdoch's 21st Century Fox.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Airbus and Dassault to team up on combat fighterAirbus and Dassault Aviation announced Wednesday they intend to team up on the development of a French-German combat fighter, a project Paris and Berlin unveiled last year.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Twitter reports second straight quarterly profitTwitter Revenue ProfitTwitter reported its second consecutive quarterly profit Wednesday in a positive sign for the short messaging service after years in the red.
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Popular Science

A sting-free guide to becoming a DIY beekeeperDIY BEES!?! Keeping bees is hard and sometimes dangerous work. But the benefits are exactly as sweet as honey. Here’s how to do it right.
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Futurity.org

Here’s a feasible way for our devices to send data with lightResearchers have developed a method to fabricate silicon chips that can communicate with light and are no more expensive than current chip technology. The new microchip technology capable of optically transferring data could solve a severe bottleneck in current devices by speeding data transfer and reducing energy consumption by orders of magnitude. “Instead of a single wire carrying around 10 gi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanowires could make lithium ion batteries saferFrom cell phones and laptops to electric vehicles, lithium-ion batteries are the power source that fuels everyday life. But in recent years, they have also drawn attention for catching fire. In an effort to develop a safer battery, scientists report in the ACS journal Nano Letters that the addition of nanowires can not only enhance the battery's fire-resistant capabilities, but also its other prop
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Invisible magnetic sensors measure magnetic fields without disturbing themCurrently, most of the magnetic sensors used in today's computers, airplanes, cars, and other systems distort the magnetic fields that they are measuring. These distortions can cause major problems for some applications, in particular biomedical techniques, that require highly accurate measurements, and can also cause cross-talk in sensor arrays.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Human impact on sea urchin abundanceIn a 50-year study, researchers record the dynamics of three common species of sea urchins in Hatakejima Island, Wakayama.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Statistical designs accelerate the optimization of layered 2-D crystalsResearchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design have demonstrated that statistical optimization techniques provide substantial efficiency increases when engineering layered van der Waals heterostructures. The research team used the Sb2Te3 growth problem to demonstrate the power of fractional factorial design in materials science to uncover the statistically significant parameter
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Looking past peer influence: Genetic contributions to increases in teen substance use?Parents spend a lot of time worrying about the influence of peers on teen substance use. A new study examines if there is a genetic component that drives teens' desire for risk taking and novelty. A key finding revealed genetic influences that are unique to the growth in substance use. With each passing year, genetic differences between individuals become more and more important in explaining why
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Magma ocean may be responsible for the moon's early magnetic fieldAround four billion years ago, the moon had a magnetic field that was about as strong as Earth's magnetic field is today. How the moon, with a much smaller core than Earth's, could have had such a strong magnetic field has been an unsolved problem in the history of the moon's evolution. A new model proposes that a magma ocean may be responsible.
5h
Futurity.org

Carbon capture could pay off for biofuel plantsA new discovery offers hope for cost-effective carbon capture and sequestration (CCS). Although considered critical to avoiding catastrophic global warming, scientists have questioned the feasibility of carbon capture—removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and storing it underground, a process also known as negative emissions. “There’s really no scenario that meets the world’s climate goals
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Silicon as a new storage material for the batteries of the futureLonger life times, larger ranges and faster recharging—developments such as electric mobility or the miniaturisation of electronics require new storage materials for batteries. With its enormous storage capacity, silicon would potentially have decisive advantages over the materials used in commercial available lithium-ion batteries. But due to its mechanical instability, it has so far been almost
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

As tellurium demands rise, so do contamination concernsAs technology advances, demands for tellurium, a rare element, are on the rise. Some forms of tellurium are toxic, so as the element finds applications in solar panels, rubber production, electronics and more, researchers are becoming concerned about possible environmental contamination. Now, one group reports in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology that by studying lake sediments they can cons
5h
The Atlantic

The Handmaid's Tale and the Suffering of WomenThe most chilling scene in the early new episodes of The Handmaid’s Tale comes when a 15-year-old Econowife, Eden (Sydney Sweeney), shyly tells June (Elisabeth Moss) that her new husband refuses to lie with her. June gently explains that she should be patient, that the strangeness of the arranged marriage is hard for her husband, too. “I can’t wait,” Eden replies. “It’s our duty to God.” Then her
5h
Popular Science

Generation robot: From science fiction to realityTechnology A look at the companies bringing humans and robots together. This five-part series takes Grant around the world to explore the companies that are bringing humans and robots together.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ban on food waste as animal feed should be reconsidered – here's whyIn the spring of 2001, the UK countryside turned into a crematorium. A foul-smelling haze settled over parts of the country as 6m cows, sheep, pigs and goats were slaughtered and their carcasses burned in the fields. This was the result of a bid to control an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease – a contagious disease of livestock named after the ulcers it causes in the mouth and between the hooves
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The hypodermic effect—how propaganda manipulates our emotionsThe scandal surrounding the improper use of data by Cambridge Analytica and Facebook in the 2016 U.S. election is reminiscent of the old debates about propaganda and its ability to "violate the minds of the masses," according to Sergei Tchakhotin, an expert in the study of Nazi propaganda.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists design a novel formula that repels and kills mosquitoesLong-lasting insecticide treated nets and indoor spraying are the main malaria vector control interventions recommended by the World Health Organisation. Both target mosquitoes that feed indoors.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Powerful flare detected on an M-dwarf starAn international team of astronomers reports the finding of ASASSN-18di—a powerful white-light superflare on a previously undetected, mid-type M-dwarf star. The discovery is detailed in a paper published April 12 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Moving toward 100% renewable energy—drivers behind city policies and pledgesAs the United States federal government retreats from energy innovation and environmental regulation, local and regional efforts across the U.S. are scaling up. Cities, in particular, are intensifying their commitments to fighting climate change and are playing an increasingly important role in the sustainability of the planet. One such commitment is the Sierra Club's 'Ready for 100' campaign, whi
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Feed: All Latest

'God of War' Is a Messy, Beguiling Take on Fantasy Violence and Toxic MasculinityThe new PlayStation 4 sequel is conflicted, both reveling in its star's violence and trying to distance itself from it.
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Feed: All Latest

Turning an Amazon Echo Into a Spy Device Only Took Some Clever CodingEcho Amazon Alexa KidsResearchers didn't have to hack Amazon's Alexa voice assistant to use it for eavesdropping. They just took advantage of the system in place.
5h
Dagens Medicin

Nyt nationalt forskningsprogram skal hjælpe børn med hjernetumorerEt nyt forskningsprogram skal med 12 mio. kr. forbedre behandlingen af danske børn med hjernetumorer. Både Aarhus Universitetshospital og Rigshospitalet er med.
5h
Dagens Medicin

Horsens har fundet ny ledende overlæge til Kvindesygdomme og FødslerMarie Højriis Storkholm tiltræder 1. juni som ledende overlæge i Kvindesygdomme og Fødsler på Regionshospitalet Horsens.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study explains antibiotic resistance in apple, pear diseaseWhen humans get bacterial infections, we reach for antibiotics to make us feel better faster. It's the same with many economically important crops. For decades, farmers have been spraying streptomycin on apple and pear trees to kill the bacteria that cause fire blight, a serious disease that costs over $100 million annually in the United States alone.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The 'double edge' of pervasive personalisationFacebook Data PostsAnyone who uses online shopping, social media or even email is voluntarily – though not necessarily consciously – experiencing the influence of personalised technologies. The "profiling" which leads to advertisements for certain products stalking you across the web can be a nuisance. But recent news stories about Cambridge Analytica sourcing personal data from Facebook raises deeper concerns about
5h
Science : NPR

You Are Here: Scientists Unveil Precise Map Of More Than A Billion StarsGaia Stars Map Milky WayThe European Space Agency has released a chart of the exact positions of many stars in the Milky Way and neighboring galaxies. But the map only shows a small fraction of what's out there. (Image credit: ESA/Gaia/DPAC)
5h
Big Think

Glass ceiling study: Women have less power than men named 'John'Through an analysis of popular names vs. gender in leadership positions, The New York Times compiles a 'so sad it's almost funny' report on how real the glass ceiling is. Read More
5h
New on MIT Technology Review

Hackers have found yet another way into your hotel roomHotels Room Keys Locks
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research shows how brain-computer interaction is changing cinemaOver the past few years, we have seen the extraordinary development of neural prosthetic technologies that can replace or enhance functions of our central nervous system. For example, devices like Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs) allow the direct communication of the brain with a computer. The most common technique applied in these devices, is Electroencephalography (EEG) – a recording of the elec
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Bird-of-ParadiseA unique courtship dance clued researchers in to the fact that they had a new species on their hands.
5h
The Scientist RSS

Plant Engineered to Produce Higher Levels of Antimalarial CompoundResearchers used the genome sequence of Artemisia annua to boost the plant's production of artemisinin.
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The Scientist RSS

Gilson: HPLC QuestionsGet your HPLC questions answered!
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The Scientist RSS

Gilson: Preparative HPLCBe prepared for your next preparative HPLC run.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why we need erasable MRI scansMagnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, is a widely used medical tool for taking pictures of the insides of our body. One way to make MRI scans easier to read is through the use of contrast agents—magnetic dyes injected into the blood or given orally to patients that then travel to organs and tissues, making them easier to see. Recently, researchers have begun to develop next-generation contrast agent
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cracking the catalytic codeThe newly developed ability to tap previously inaccessible shale gas deposits during the last decade has created an abundant source of gases, including methane, ethane and propane, that are used to create chemical-based products such as plastics. But the U.S. chemical industry needs scientists, including those at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, to help turn that
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using a quantum blockchain to protect blockchains of the futureA pair of researchers with Victoria University of Wellington has suggested that the way to prevent future blockchains from future hackers using quantum computers is to use quantum blockchains. Theoretical physicists Del Rajan and Matt Visser explain their idea in a paper they have uploaded to the arXiv preprint server.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals remarkably high proportion of national elections are not free and fairResearchers from the University of Birmingham and the London School of Economics have found that the number of elections across the world has reached an all-time high, but that this has done little to increase the quality of democracy in the world.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Galileo: UK plan to launch rival to EU sat-nav systemThe UK is looking at its own sat-nav system if the EU locks it out of Galileo because of Brexit.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shows prejudiced attitudes—not economic concern—drove most voters to TrumpMuch of the narrative surrounding Donald Trump's surprising 2016 election victory has focused on economically stressed voters in Rust Belt states—feeling forgotten by both major parties and fretting over globalization—who rallied behind an outsider pushing for change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What we know (and don't know) about sea level riseIn 1969, Hurricane Camille, a Category 5 storm, destroyed every structure on the coast of Mississippi, including the beach home of Duke University geologist Orrin H. Pilkey's parents. Previously a specialist in deep-sea sediments, Pilkey began to investigate the relationships among climate, sea level, and beaches. As early as 1979, he began to sound the sea level alarm with books like The Beaches
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ants found to use trapping technique to capture much larger preyTwo researchers, one with Biofaction in Austria, the other with Université de Toulouse in France, report an example of ants (Azteca brevis) in Costa Rica who have developed a truly unique way of capturing prey that are much larger than they are. As Markus Schmidt and Alain Dejean describe in their paper published in the Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, the ants have found a way to take a
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Biomass-produced electricity in the US possible, but it'll costIf the U.S. wants to start using wood pellets to produce energy, either the government or power customers will have to pay an extra cost, a new University of Georgia study has found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: The colors in Saturn's ringsSaturn's rings display their subtle colors in this view captured on Aug. 22, 2009, by NASA's Cassini spacecraft. The particles that make up the rings range in size from smaller than a grain of sand to as large as mountains, and are mostly made of water ice. The exact nature of the material responsible for bestowing color on the rings remains a matter of intense debate among scientists.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

We still don't know how strange celibate animals evolveA new study has cast doubt on leading theory for how tiny creatures have evolved for tens of millions of years—without ever having sex.
6h
Futurity.org

Cheaper organic solar cells are finally ready for marketResearchers have demonstrated organic solar cells that can achieve 15 percent efficiency, an advance that makes a more flexible, inexpensive type of solar cell commercially viable. This level of efficiency is in the range of many solar panels, or photovoltaics, currently on the market. “Organic photovoltaics can potentially cut way down on the total solar energy system cost, making solar a truly
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

Indigenous Remains Do Not Belong to ScienceThe law that allows Native Americans to claim ancestral remains must be strengthened -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Science-Based Medicine

Bee Venom is Snake OilBee venom acupuncture is a double-barrel pseudoscience that provides new example of an old problem - the use of poor quality preclinical research to justify the inclusion of nonsense in medicine.
6h
New Scientist - News

Ancient Swedish massacre hints at chaos after the fall of RomeThe inhabitants of Sandby borg in southern Sweden were violently killed 1500 years ago, just decades after the collapse of the Western Roman Empire
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sunlight reduces effectiveness of dispersants used in oil spillsTwo new studies have shown that sunlight transforms oil spills on the ocean surface more significantly and quickly than previously thought. The phenomenon considerably limits the effectiveness of chemical dispersants, which are designed to break up floating oil and reduce the amount of oil that reaches coastlines.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Watching nanomaterials form in 4-DA team from Northwestern University and University of Florida has developed a new type of electron microscope that takes dynamic, multi-frame videos of nanoparticles as they form, allowing researchers to view how specimens change in space and time.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

As tellurium demands rise, so do contamination concernsAs technology advances, demands for tellurium, a rare element, are on the rise. Some forms of tellurium are toxic, so as the element finds applications in solar panels, rubber production, electronics and more, researchers are becoming concerned about possible environmental contamination. Now, one group reports in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology that by studying lake sediments they can cons
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sunlight works against oil clean-up effortsOil spills, whether minor leaks or major environmental disasters, are bound to happen. Chemical dispersants are one of the tools that can help mitigate the impact of such spills, but they become less effective as oil weathers in the environment. Now, one group reports in Environmental Science & Technology Letters that sunlight has a much greater impact than previously thought on the effectiveness
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nanowires could make lithium ion batteries saferFrom cell phones and laptops to electric vehicles, lithium-ion batteries are the power source that fuels everyday life. But in recent years, they have also drawn attention for catching fire. In an effort to develop a safer battery, scientists report in the ACS journal Nano Letters that the addition of nanowires can not only enhance the battery's fire-resistant capabilities, but also its other prop
6h
Ingeniøren

Enegang i forhandlinger: Drønærgerligt, siger IDANattens delaftale på det regionale område er »drønærgerlig«, mener IDA, der helst havde set, at fagbevægelsen stod sammen til det sidste.»Vi arbejder ufortrødent videre med OK18«
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Quantum dots enable faster, easier photon detection, more secure dataA team of researchers including U of A engineering and physics faculty has developed a new method of detecting single photons, or light particles, using quantum dots.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sizing up the measurable good of affirmative actionWant to start an argument at your next dinner party? Utter the words "affirmative action," and then bear down on your salad. The issue is particularly divisive because many people regard it as zero-sum: If your kid gets into that exalted university, mine doesn't.
6h
Popular Science

How to safely dispose of your old medicationsHealth A handy guide to help you, yes YOU, combat the opioid epidemic. The rising opioid epidemic has prompted a lot of folks to get a handle on their old medications. Three-quarters of all opioid abuse starts with misusing a prescription…
6h
The Atlantic

Dear Therapist: My Partner Wants Me to Cut Ties With My FriendsEditor’s Note: Every Wednesday, Lori Gottlieb answers questions from readers about their problems, big and small. Have a question? Email her at dear.therapist@theatlantic.com. Dear Therapist, My partner has a strong tendency to see everyone else’s behavior in black or white. People are either saintly and wonderful or diabolical and dangerous, and the switch between the two can be lightning fast.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A step toward faster, more accurate breast cancer detectionOver the course of her lifetime, a woman has a one in eight chance of developing breast cancer. The earlier the cancer is detected, the more likely bad luck can turn to good.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tick control program reveals high level of infection in white-footed miceA surprisingly high percent of the white-footed mice collected last summer in Howard County, Maryland, in an Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Areawide Integrated Tick Management Project turned out to be infected with the bacteria that cause Lyme disease.
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'Handmaid’s Tale' Season 2 Looks Eerily More Familiar Than Season 1The writers are moving beyond Margaret Atwood's book—and into familiar territory for news junkies.
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A One-Minute Attack Let Hackers Spoof Hotel Master KeysResearchers found—and helped fix—a flaw in Vingcard RFID locks that would let hackers break into any room in hotels around the world.
6h
Feed: All Latest

USC Wide Receiver Josh Imatorbhebhe's Crazy Floating JumpIs this normal physics, some type of optical illusion, or just plain magic?
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How microbes living in the gut affect the brain and behaviourResearchers at the University of Oxford have proposed an evolutionary framework to understand why microbes living in the gut affect the brain and behaviour, published in Nature Reviews Microbiology. Katerina Johnson (Department of Experimental Psychology) and Kevin Foster (Department of Zoology) assessed data from studies on the gut-brain axis to suggest how that gut feeling evolved.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gaia creates richest star map of our Galaxy—and beyondGaia Stars Map Milky WayESA's Gaia mission has produced the richest star catalogue to date, including high-precision measurements of nearly 1.7 billion stars and revealing previously unseen details of our home Galaxy.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sunlight reduces effectiveness of dispersants used in oil spillsTwo new studies have shown that sunlight transforms oil spills on the ocean surface more significantly and quickly than previously thought. The phenomenon considerably limits the effectiveness of chemical dispersants, which are designed to break up floating oil and reduce the amount of oil that reaches coastlines.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Watching nanomaterials form in 4-DWhen famed physicists Max Knoll and Ernst Ruska first introduced the transmission electron microscope (TEM) in 1933, it allowed researchers to peer inside cells, microorganisms and particles that were once too small to study.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global

Self-Driving Cars and Humans Face Inevitable CollisionsThe perceptions that driverless cars have of the world around them can be very different from those presented to human eyes -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
The Scientist RSS

Harvard Teaching and Research Assistants Vote to UnionizeThe decision affects about 5,000 graduate students at the university who are eligible to join the union.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New thermal coatings for spacecraft and satellites developed using metamaterialsA team of researchers, which includes the University of Southampton, have developed new technology which could prompt a significant change for a spacecraft or satellite.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

East vs. West Coast earthquakesWhy was an earthquake in Virginia felt at more than twice the distance than a similar-sized earthquake in California? The answer is one that many people may not realize. Earthquakes east of the Rocky Mountains can cause noticeable ground shaking at much farther distances than comparably-sized earthquakes in the West.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Novel ecosystems provide use for some native birdsEcosystems that have been altered by human activities can provide suitable habitat for native birds, according to scientists in the United States and Australia.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Selective catalysts for carbon dioxide recyclingNUS chemists have discovered key factors determining the selectivity of copper (Cu) catalysts for transforming carbon dioxide (CO2) and water into useful chemicals and fuels.
7h
Live Science

This Eerie, Human-Like Figure Is Twice As Old As Egypt's PyramidsArchaeologists also discovered a new "face" on the ancient carving, called the Shigir Idol.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shake those wingsThe solar arrays that will provide electricity to the Orion spacecraft were put through launch-day paces at ESA's Test Centre in the Netherlands to verify that they can handle the rigours of the trip around the Moon.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

5 Simple Ways to Boost Our IntelligenceCan we really boost our intelligence? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Purdue archaeologists on ancient horse find in Nile River ValleyAn ancient horse burial at Tombos along the Nile River Valley shows that a member of the horse family thousands of years ago was more important to the culture than previously thought, which provides a window into human-animal relationships more than 3,000 years ago.
7h
Ingeniøren

Peter Madsen idømt fængsel på livstidSagen mod opfinder Peter Madsen blev i dag afsluttet ved Københavns Byret.
7h
Ingeniøren

Storbank styrer kontanter med AI: Hver hævemaskine kræver sin egen analysemodelJPMorgan Chase bruger machine learning til at sikre, at hæveautomater ikke løber tør for penge.
7h
Science | The Guardian

Dose entire population with anti-malaria drugs to eradicate disease – studyResearch shows that treating whole populations could wipe out the illness, but it requires decisive political action and a lot of money Malaria could be quickly eliminated in south-east Asia by an all-out effort to dose whole populations with drugs that treat the disease, regardless of whether people have symptoms or are healthy, say experts. The radical programme may be the best way to outpace r
7h
Science | The Guardian

Swedish archaeologists uncover brutal 5th century massacreA three-year dig has uncovered the shocking violence with which the inhabitants of the coastal village of Sandby Borg were struck down Archaeologists in Sweden have uncovered startling evidence of a massacre more than 1500 years ago, when the inhabitants of a small village were struck down in their houses or as they fled along the street, and their bodies left to rot where they fell – with their
7h
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Here's How to Photograph a Lightning BoltStorm chaser Jason Weingart has mastered the art.
7h
Live Science

Massacre Victims Left to Rot on Island 1,500 Years AgoThe victims didn't even have time to look at their attackers.
7h
Live Science

Photos: 1,500-Year-Old Massacre Site UnearthedArchaeologists have uncovered the site of a 1,500-year-old massacre on the Swedish island of Oland.
7h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Clues to an Iron Age massacre lie in what the assailants left behindAncient Scandinavian massacre may reflect power struggles after Rome’s fall.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

Health Care Professionals Make Mistakes, and That's OkayBut a medical culture that punishes people for admitting their errors is bad for everyone -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Archaeologists on ancient horse find in Nile River ValleyAn ancient horse burial at Tombos along the Nile River Valley shows that a member of the horse family thousands of years ago was more important to the culture than previously thought, which provides a window into human-animal relationships more than 3,000 years ago.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

Scent of Death: Honeybees Use Odors to Clean Out Deceased BroodsUnderstanding this mechanism could help scientists breed healthier colonies -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Live Science

This Planet Is So Dark, Scientists Have to Guess What It Looks LikeThe gassy world is "darker than charcoal" and may swallow up to 99 percent of the light its local star sheds upon it.
8h
Live Science

Rare Stone Head of Emperor Marcus Aurelius Discovered in Egyptian TempleEgyptian archaeologists have unearthed a rare find at the temple in Kom Ombo.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discovery of the neural circuit for fear conditioning of fishAnimals are often noted sensing signs of danger and reacting. A simple form of this phenomenon is called fear conditioning, which is a type of learning commonly seen in every animal. By manipulating the activity of specific neurons of the zebrafish brain, scientists at the National Institute of Genetics (NIG) in Japan have elucidated a neuronal population essential for fear conditioning in zebrafi
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New robot for skull base surgery alleviates surgeon's workloadDrilling out a hole in the skull base requires great precision and often takes many hours, a demanding procedure for a surgeon. Researchers from Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) have developed a surgical robot to take over this task. With sub-millimeter precision, the robot can automatically and safely mill a cavity of the desired shape and dimensions. Jordan Bos received his PhD on 16 Ap
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Controlled nuclear transition for vastly more accurate clocksA Russian scientist from Skobelitsyn Research Institute of Nuclear Physics, MSU theoretically substantiated that the speed of transition of thorium-229 from ground to excited state may be managed depending on external conditions. The frequency of the transitions may be increased or decreased by dozens of times. This effect will contribute to extremely precise clocks exceeding even the best atomic
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flavins keep a handy helper in their pocketIn human cells, vitamins often serve as the precursors of cofactors—non-proteins that are an essential part of enzymes. Among them are the flavins, derived from vitamin B2.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dispute about terahertz photoresponse in graphene results in a drawPhysicists at MIPT and their British and Russian colleagues revealed the mechanisms leading to photocurrent in graphene under terahertz radiation. The paper published in Applied Physics Letters ends a long-lasting debate about the origins of direct current in graphene illuminated by high-frequency radiation, and also sets the stage for the development of high-sensitivity terahertz detectors. Such
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hospital staff experience 'sea change' in addressing substance use disorderDespite high need, most hospitals lack systems to engage people with substance use disorder, initiate life-saving treatment or connect people to care after hospitalization. This causes tremendous distress among health care providers and patients alike. A new study to be published April 25 in the Journal of Hospital Medicine describes a 'sea change' in attitudes after implementation of a hospital-b
8h
Science | The Guardian

Top US medical schools failing to reflect minorities, social justice group saysWhite Coats for Black Lives calls on elite schools to improve race bias shortcomings and help eliminate disparities in US healthcare Ten of the top US medical schools including Harvard and Yale do not have faculty and staff that reflect the country’s black, Native American and Latino population, according to a report by the social justice group White Coats for Black Lives (WC4BL). The medical stu
8h
The Atlantic

A Republican Victory in Arizona Sets Off Alarms in the GOPArizona Debbie LeskoDemocrats failed to flip Arizona’s 8th congressional district from red to blue in Tuesday’s special election, but their candidate did well enough to reinforce their narrative that the “blue wave” could help them take the House in November. “There are no moral victories in this business,” said Andy Barr, a local Democratic strategist, “but I’m pretty damn happy.” State Senator Debbie Lesko defeate
8h
The Atlantic

The True Cost of Cheap Health InsuranceAny day now, the Trump administration is expected to release new regulations to make short-term health-insurance plans last a lot longer. In a fact sheet about the forthcoming changes , the administration said it wants to extend access to the plans—which now expire after three months, and offer too few services to qualify for the Affordable Care Act’s tax credits—in order to “provide additional,
8h
The Atlantic

Why Congress Remains Hostile to WomenPoor Orrin Hatch. The guy makes one crack about swarms of infants overrunning the Senate, and suddenly he’s the laughingstock of Twitter. “But what if there are 10 babies on the floor of the Senate?” the Utah Republican mused last week, as senators dealt with a resolution allowing lawmakers to bring their offspring, aged one year or younger, onto the floor. The resolution was being pushed by Mail
8h
Dagens Medicin

Rathcke: Vi føler os svigtet, men fortsætter med samme dagsordenForbundene fra LO brød musketer-eden sent i nat, da de indgik aftale om en ny overenskomst med Danske Regioner. Formand for Yngre Læger Camilla Rathcke forsikrer, at Akademikerne og FTF ikke vil sige ja til samme aftale.
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Dagens Medicin

Private udbudsklinikker nægtet adgang til udstilling på LægedageDe private udbudsklinikker er ikke velkomne til Lægedage i efteråret. Sådan lyder meldingen fra PLO, og det vækker forargelse hos direktørerne for udbudsklinikkerne.
8h
Feed: All Latest

Can This System of Unlocking Phones Crack the Crypto War?Ray Ozzie thinks his Clear method for unlocking encrypted devices can attain the impossible: It satisfies both law enforcement and privacy purists.
8h
Feed: All Latest

What Happens When Science Just Disappears?When one of the first online science journals went under, its papers all disappeared. Enter: Portico, the Wayback Machine for scholarly publications.
8h
Ingeniøren

Ørsted investerer i 20 MW batterilager til det britiske elnetSelskabet vil opføre og drive et batterilagringsanlæg på 20 MW i nærheden af Liverpool, Storbritannien, hvor det skal hjælpe med at holde nettet stabilt.
9h
Dagens Medicin

Uklare regler om fravalg af genoplivningsforsøgPatienters ønsker om fravalg af genoplivning forsvinder ofte i uklare retningslinjer på tværs af sektorer. Vejledning fra Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed er ikke gennemtænkt og er skrevet i et kompliceret juridisk sprog, der har betydet, at den oftere bliver misforstået end den bliver forstået.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Skewed sex ratios causes single fathers to bring up the youngWhen the balance of the sexes is skewed towards one gender, parents are more likely to split up, leaving the father to care for the offspring, says a study from an international team of scientists studying bird populations.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Implantable islet cells come with their own oxygen supplyResearchers at MIT and a company, Beta-O2 Technologies, have designed and tested an implantable device for treatment of Type 1 diabetes. The device furnishes islet cells with their own supply of oxygen, carried in a chamber that can be replenished every 24 hours.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Exercise could make the heart youngerAfter a heart attack, patients must create new heart muscle cells to heal. Harvard study shows that mice make more new heart muscle cells when they exercise compared to when they do not. This was true for both healthy mice and those that had experienced a heart attack. Findings demonstrate that one reason exercise is beneficial to health is that it increases the heart's capacity to regenerate.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain cell's Achilles' heel may prompt hydrocephalusViruses may spark hydrocephalus by exploiting a surprising weakness of cells that circulate fluid in the brain, called ependymal cells, report Duke University scientists. The researchers discovered that ependymal cells from mice require a continuous production of a transcription factor called Foxj1 to maintain their shape and function. Viruses known to infect the brain have found a way to shut dow
9h
Ingeniøren

Cambridge University afviste Analytica-projektet: Langt under den etiske standardCambridge er blevet sagt næsten lige så tit som Facebook i den omdiskuterede Cambridge Analytica-skandale, men det er måske ikke fair. Universitetet afviste nemlig projektet, da det faldt langt under universitetets etiske standarder.
9h
New Scientist - News

How an Amazonian people convey their entire language by drumbeatThe Bora people can encode complex messages into drumbeats that mimic human speech, and even include a “ringtone” to announce the start of a message
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Brain cell's Achilles' heel may prompt hydrocephalusViruses may spark hydrocephalus by exploiting a suprising weakness of cells that circulate fluid in the brain, says a new study by Duke University scientists.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Skewed sex ratios causes single fathers to bring up the youngWhen the balance of the sexes is skewed towards one gender, parents are more likely to split up, leaving the father to care for the offspring, says a study from an international team of scientists studying bird populations.
9h
Science : NPR

Pruitt Proposes EPA Science RestrictionsThe EPA says it wants to only use research in which all data are publicly available. Scientists say this would hurt policy making on everything from air pollution to toxic waste and pesticides.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Linde confident for Praxair merger after strong Q1German industrial gases group Linde confirmed its objectives for 2018 Wednesday after a strong first quarter, as it eyes a jumbo tie-up with US rival Praxair in the second half.
9h
The Atlantic

The Iran Regime-Change Crew Is BackAmong the most strident critics of the nuclear deal with Iran are those who believe it furthers the survival of its leadership. By throwing Iran’s rulers an economic lifeline, they believe, the deal is an abject failure. America ’s goal, they say, should never have been “denuclearization,” but regime change. These days, those regime-change evangelists, having shrugged off the lessons of the Iraq
10h
Ingeniøren

IDA: Sådan skal Danmark vokse som grøn eksportnationIDA opstiller nu 29 anbefalinger, som skal gøre Danmark til en endnu større eksportør af grønne løsninger. Næste skridt bliver at overbevise politikerne.
10h
Dagens Medicin

OK18: Musketereden er brudtLO-forbundene har lavet en aftale på det regionale område, mens FTF og Akademikerne har sagt nej til samme aftale. Tilslut jer aftalen eller gå i konflikt, lyder det fra regionernes forhandlingsleder.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Japan drug giant Takeda tumbles as Shire recommends $64 bn offerShares in Tokyo-listed Takeda tumbled Wednesday after it raised its offer for Irish pharmaceutical company Shire to £46 billion ($64 billion), which would represent the largest ever foreign takeover by a Japanese firm.
11h
Ingeniøren

Nu kom teknologipagten – er det så tid til et teknologimanifest?Akademiet for de Tekniske Videnskaber foreslår et manifest, der skal fungere som en kontrakt mellem politikere, erhvervslivet samt uddannelses- og forskningsinstitutioner, og som skal have fokus på syv indsatsområder med henblik på at gøre Danmark til en førende region for Science & Engineering.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Privacy fears weigh on Facebook with earnings aheadFacebook reports quarterly results Wednesday as it grapples with a data privacy scandal that strikes at how the huge social network makes money from what it knows about people.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

House Democrats talk to Cambridge Analytica whistleblowerHouse Democrats, frustrated by what they see as GOP inaction and with an eye on midterm elections, on Tuesday held the first of what they hope to be several interviews with witnesses who have not been interrogated in the Republican-led Russia investigations.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The melodious mouse that sings for sexA small, brown mouse found in the forests of Central America bucks the rodent trend of conversing in high-pitched squeaks often inaudible to the human ear.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In southern Iraq, drought tightens its gripAbu Ali carefully crank-starts a generator to pump water from a well out into his parched field in southern Iraq.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Inuka, first polar bear born in the tropics, is put downInuka, the first polar bear born in the tropics, was put down Wednesday after a rapid decline in health, with Singapore Zoo mourning the loss of one of its best-loved animals.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In New Guinea, human thigh bone daggers were hot property: studyNew Guinea warriors harvested thigh bones from their dead fathers to fashion into ornamental but deadly daggers used to kill and maim enemies, sometimes to eat them.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Museum realizes collection's rare elephant bird egg is realA Buffalo museum has made a rare discovery within its own collection: a fully intact egg from the extinct elephant bird that until now, was thought to be fake.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mediterranean fears bitter future for citrus cropsCould we soon be forced to do without a glass of orange juice or a slice of grapefruit at breakfast? The answer is unfortunately yes.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Beijing Auto show highlights e-cars designed for ChinaVolkswagen and Nissan have unveiled electric cars designed for China at a Beijing auto show that highlights the growing importance of Chinese buyers for a technology seen as a key part of the global industry's future.
11h
Feed: All Latest

Gmail Will Get Long-Overdue Management and Security UpgradesGmail Google FeaturesGoogle is adding new features to Gmail, including a snooze button, and soon, the ability for messages to self-destruct.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Corn with straw mulch builds yield, soil carbonHow do you boost soil water content and soil health without irrigating? Best cover it with a layer of straw, a new study concludes.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How do marine mammals avoid the bends? Study offers new hypothesis, highlights role that sonar plays in strandingsDeep-diving whales and other marine mammals can get the bends—the same painful and potentially life-threatening decompression sickness that strikes scuba divers who surface too quickly. A new study offers a hypothesis of how marine mammals generally avoid getting the bends and how they can succumb under stressful conditions.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cheaper and easier way found to make plastic semiconductorsCheap, flexible and sustainable plastic semiconductors will soon be a reality thanks to a breakthrough by chemists at the University of Waterloo.
12h
Viden

Racisme var en praktisk forklaring i renæssancenDa europæerne rejste ud i verden og mødte andre slags mennesker, opstod idéen om, at der er forskellige racer. I dag ved vi, at overbevisningen kun fastholdes mod bedre vidende.
12h
Dagens Medicin

Ny PLO-repræsentant i Lægeforeningens bestyrelsePraktiserende læge Anna Mette Nathan tager over efter Michael Dupont i Lægeforeningens bestyrelse
12h
Dagens Medicin

Falck Lægehuse overtager patienter fra to lægeklinikkerFalck Lægehuse har vundet udbuddet for to lægers patienter i Vordingborg, når de begge inden længe går på pension.
12h
Science | The Guardian

Hey millennials, don’t fall for Shell’s pop star PR | Graham ReadfearnRoyal Dutch Shell wants to cut its own climate emissions in half by 2050 - a target wiped out by burning one month’s worth of their fossil fuels If you’re a millennial, the global oil and gas company Shell will have been most pleased if you’d seen one their #makethefuture music videos. Twice now Shell have lined up superstars including Jennifer Hudson, Pixie Lott and Yemi Alade to sing about sola
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Positive Phase 2 results of NovaDigm TX's NDV-3A vaccine published in Clinical Infectious DiseasesNovaDigm Therapeutics, a company developing innovative immuno-therapeutics and preventative vaccines for fungal and bacterial infections, today announced the publication of data from a Phase 2a study of its NDV-3A vaccine program in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. The data demonstrate that a single dose of NDV-3A with alum adjuvant was safe, well-tolerated, immunogenic and efficacious, l
13h
Ingeniøren

Ny Ubuntu på trapperne: Ny Gnome, opdateret Linux-kerne m.m.Den langtids-supporterede Ubuntu 18.04 er planlagt til at udkomme i denne uge.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cheaper and easier way found to make plastic semiconductorsCheap, flexible and sustainable plastic semiconductors will soon be a reality thanks to a breakthrough by chemists at the University of Waterloo.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bento browser makes it easier to search on mobile devicesSearches involving multiple websites can quickly get confusing, particularly when performed on a mobile device with a small screen. A new web browser developed at Carnegie Mellon University now brings order to complex searches in a way not possible with conventional tabbed browsing. The Bento browser stores each search session as a project workspace that keeps track of the most interesting or rele
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New uses for existing antiviral drugsBroad-spectrum antiviral drugs work against a range of viral diseases, but developing them can be costly and time consuming. Testing existing anti-viral drugs for their ability to combat multiple viral infections can help.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Corn with straw mulch builds yield, soil carbonHow do you boost soil water content and soil health without irrigating? Best cover it with a layer of straw, a new study concludes.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Telemedicine aided people hit by hurricanes Harvey and IrmaTelemedicine has been used during disasters for many years, but providing such care directly to consumers only has become viable because of the widespread growth of smartphones and the creation of services that allow consumers to directly access thousands of US physicians. A new study of the aftermath of hurricanes Harvey and Irma finds that direct-to-consumer telemedicine is a viable way to deliv
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Consuming protein supplements with meals may work better for weight controlA new systematic review of available evidence appearing in Nutrition Reviews indicates that consuming protein supplements with meals may be more effective at promoting weight control than consuming supplements between meals in adults following a resistance training regimen.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How do marine mammals avoid the bends?Deep-diving whales and other marine mammals can get the bends -- the same painful and potentially life-threatening decompression sickness that strikes scuba divers who surface too quickly. A new study offers a hypothesis of how marine mammals generally avoid getting the bends and how they can succumb under stressful conditions.
14h
New on MIT Technology Review

Five industries that blockchains could—maybe—revolutionizeAnd we emphasize “maybe.”
14h
New on MIT Technology Review

How secure is blockchain really?It turns out “secure” is a funny word to pin down.
14h
New on MIT Technology Review

The top 12 cryptocurrencies and what they are—and aren’t—good forEvery one is unique, but they have one thing in common: investors think they’re worth billions.
14h
New on MIT Technology Review

A technology in turmoilA letter from the editor.
14h
New on MIT Technology Review

The blockchain believersWhat makes blockchain devotees so passionate about the technology? We sent reporters and photographers to two blockchain conferences to find out.
14h
New on MIT Technology Review

Unchained: A story of love, loss, and blockchainA science fiction story for MIT Technology Review ’s blockchain issue.
14h
Live Science

Facts About ChlorineProperties, sources and uses of the element chlorine.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Doctors may soon be able to see a brain tumor burned away in real timeA team of researchers are now making it easier, faster and safer for doctors to use an emerging procedure -- one that involves burning away tumors in more patients, including those with brain tumors.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Organoids reveal how a deadly brain cancer growsScientists developed a new model for glioblastoma using gene-edited organoids.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Planet's smallest microbes examined at nation's largest aquariumBiologists have advanced a new scientific frontier -- study of the aquarium microbiome -- to better understand the millions of marine microorganisms living in the water and what role they play in keeping the ecosystem healthy.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blinded by the light: Climate change, the sun, and Lake SuperiorLakes tend to emit carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere, making them important players in the planet's natural regulation of its climate. However, the direction of the flow of CO2 between lakes and the atmosphere can be influenced by humans or by natural factors such as rainfall or air temperature.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Engineers create social media infrastructure for emergency managementResearchers have developed an online platform that enables first responders to monitor emergency situations using tweets and Instagram posts.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New app could make cannabis use saferResearchers have developed a prototype app called 'Am I Stoned' that could help cannabis users understand how the drug is affecting them through a series of phone-based tasks.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Feelings of ethical superiority can lead to workplace ostracism, social underminingA new study suggests that feelings of ethical superiority can cause a chain reaction that is detrimental to you, your coworkers and your organization.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Billions of gallons of water saved by thinning forestsThere are too many trees in Sierra Nevada forests, say scientists. That may come as a surprise to those who see dense, verdant forests as signs of a healthy environment. After all, green is good, right? Not necessarily. When it comes to the number of trees in California forests, bigger isn't always better.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How can animals sense danger?Why animals avoid dangers by sensing some 'signs' possibly related to the danger? A simple form of this phenomenon is called 'fear conditioning,' which is a type of learning commonly seen in every animal on the earth. By manipulating activity of specific neurons of the zebrafish brain, scientists at the National Institute of Genetics in Japan have elucidated a neuronal population essential for fea
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Experimental arthritis drug prevents stem cell transplant complicationAn investigational drug in clinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis prevents a common, life-threatening side effect of stem cell transplants, new research shows. Studying mice, the researchers found the drug prevented what's known as graft-versus-host disease, a debilitating, sometimes lethal condition that develops when transplanted stem cells attack the body's own organs or tissues.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More than 1 in 20 US children and teens have anxiety or depressionAbout 2.6 million American children and adolescents had diagnosed anxiety and/or depression in 2011-12, reports an analysis of nationwide data.
16h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Fancy a French farm for free?This Brittany farm could be available to someone who will preserve its traditional methods.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hospitals often missing dementia despite prior diagnosisHospitals in the UK are increasingly likely to recognize that a patient has dementia after they've been admitted for a different reason, finds a new UCL-led study, but it is still only recognized in under two-thirds of people.
17h
NYT > Science

With George H.W. Bush Hospitalized, the World Wonders: Is It a Broken Heart?Failing health after sudden grief — especially the loss of a spouse — has been reported by medical researchers. But it seems to be statistically quite rare, experts said.
18h
Futurity.org

Listen: Expert sorts Medicaid expansion myth from factIn 2008, when Oregon decided to expand its Medicaid program through a random lottery, Katherine Baicker struck research gold. It presented the economic health care researcher with a unique opportunity to study the true costs and benefits of health care expansion through a system that provided a randomized trial. The project helped refute a number of myths surrounding health care expansion when it
19h
Futurity.org

There’s a weird link between coffee and cryptocurrencyThe physics involved with stirring a liquid operate the same way as the mathematical functions that secure digital information, research shows. In the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , applied physics doctoral student William Gilpin of Stanford University describes how swirling liquids, such as coffee, follow the same principles as transactions with cryptocurrencies such as bitcoi
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Malaria study reveals gene variants linked to risk of diseaseMany people of African heritage are protected against malaria by inheriting a particular version of a gene, a large-scale study has shown.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Potential for sun damage should be carefully balanced with need for vitamin D in children, say scientistsScientists at King's College London are encouraging parents and carers to ensure even more rigorous protection of children against the harmful effects of the sun. The comments follow a study which has suggested that children may experience much more significant DNA damage from small amounts of sun exposure than adults.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rhythm crucial in drummed speechAn international team of researchers, including Frank Seifart and Sven Grawunder of the former Department of Linguistics at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and Julien Meyer from the Université Grenoble Alpes carried out research into the drummed speech system of the Bora people of the Northwest Amazon. They found the Boras not only reproduce the melody of words and sentences
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Engaging in physical activity decreases people's chance of developing depressionAn international team of researchers have found physical activity can protect against the emergence of depression, regardless of age and geographical region.
19h
Futurity.org

Lots of teachers are super stressed outHigh levels of job-related stress affect 93 percent of teachers, new research suggests, a greater percentage than previously thought. Classrooms with highly stressed teachers tend to have the poorest student outcomes, including lower grades and frequent behavior problems. “It’s no secret that teaching is a stressful profession,” says Keith Herman, professor in the University of Missouri’s College
19h
Futurity.org

Most women say they feel less stress with ageIn a new study, researchers found that women reported less perceived stress, a measure of confidence, control, and ability to cope with life’s stressors, over a 15-year period during midlife. The study also found that menopausal status wasn’t a factor, which challenges the notion that menopause is associated with higher stress and depression. “Our perception of stress decreased even through the m
19h
New Scientist - News

Stoner app lets cannabis users keep track of how high they areA series of smartphone tests that score memory and reaction are intended to make cannabis use safer and lead to a better understanding of the drug
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazonian Bora people mimic the rhythm of their language for communication over large distances using drumsAn international team of researchers, including Frank Seifart and Sven Grawunder of the former Department of Linguistics at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and Julien Meyer from the Université Grenoble Alpes carried out research into the drummed language system of the Bora people of the Northwest Amazon. They found the Boras not only reproduce the melody of words and sentenc
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain activity linked to stress changes chemical codesScientists have identified light-induced electrical activity as the brain mechanism controlling chemical code switching in relation to stress. While investigating neurotransmitter switching in rats, the researchers found that specific brain neurons were responsible, with possible implications for chemical imbalances in the brain underlying mental illness.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Overdose risk factors in youth with substance use disordersA team of investigators has identified factors that may increase the risk of drug overdose in adolescents and young adults.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Killer whale genetics raise inbreeding questionsA new genetic analysis of Southern Resident killer whales found that two male whales fathered more than half of the calves born since 1990 that scientists have samples from, a sign of inbreeding in the small killer whale population that frequents Washington's Salish Sea and Puget Sound.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Electrode shape improves neurostimulation for small targetsA cross-like shape helps the electrodes of implantable neurostimulation devices to deliver more charge to specific areas of the nervous system, possibly prolonging device life span, says research.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Early childhood interventions show mixed results on child developmentEarly childhood interventions may have some efficacy in boosting measures of child health and development in low income countries, but more work is needed to sort out how to implement these interventions, according to a new set of studies.
19h
Live Science

Why New Guinea Warriors Prized Human Bone DaggersWhich of these bone-made daggers — the human or the cassowary — is stronger?
19h
Futurity.org

Wireless pacemaker would jolt hearts with tiny chipsA new design for a wireless pacemaker would place a network of chips the size of rice grains in various places inside the heart. The chips would communicate with a base station located under a patient’s skin and charge via radio frequency. When the base station sensed a problem with the heart’s rhythm, it would automatically trigger the embedded chips to release a jolt of energy timed to re-estab
19h
The Atlantic

What You Can't Say on FacebookAfter years of pleas from activists and users, Facebook publicly released a version of its Community Guidelines on Tuesday—thousands of words that attempt to describe what you can’t say on the service. Or, more precisely, the document spells out what Facebook will take down, if it is alerted by users. The text lays out Facebook’s first principles—“safety,” “voice,” and “equity”—and demonstrates h
20h
Futurity.org

New method can predict chemotherapy success with DopplerLess than half the patients diagnosed with cancer respond favorably to chemotherapy. Now, a new method for testing how patients will respond to various drugs could pave the way for more personalized treatment. Using Doppler light scattering, like a weather radar, researchers can determine how a patient will respond to chemotherapy even before they begin treatment. “It’s like watching the weather
20h
NYT > Science

Scott Pruitt’s Political Patron Now Questions the E.P.A. Chief’s EthicsSenator James Inhofe, who has long championed Mr. Pruitt, now says he’d like to see an investigation into the ethical allegations against his protégé.
20h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Can Ronny Jackson Be Confirmed?What We’re Following Toronto’s Aftermath: At least 10 people were killed and 14 others wounded on Monday when a van drove into a crowd on Yonge Street, a busy thoroughfare in Toronto. While investigators suspect the driver was part of a misogynistic online movement known as “incel” (short for “involuntarily celibate”), he used a method that’s often associated with the Islamic State, illustrating
20h
Popular Science

Scientists just discovered a strange new DNA shape lurking in human cellsScience But what does it do? The discovery of DNA as a double helix is a hallowed story of scientific triumph. But decades later, we’re still learning that DNA is a more furiously complicated piece…
20h
Latest Headlines | Science News

The first penis-scrotum transplant is the latest to go beyond lifesavingAdvances that give patients new faces, hands and more aim to improve quality of life
20h
Science : NPR

Pruitt Proposes New Rule Defining What Science Can Be Used By EPAThe EPA administrator wants to restrict the science used by the agency in its decision-making. Scientists are concerned it eliminates all good science in the process. (Image credit: Jason Andrew/Getty Images)
20h
Live Science

This Is What It Sounds Like at the Bottom of the OceanThe deep ocean is eerily dark, but not silent. Take a listen.
20h
Popular Science

Crowdfunding helps women succeed in tech because venture capital won'tTechnology On Kickstarter and Indiegogo, women outperform men. Women entrepreneurs received only 2 percent of venture capitalist money in 2017. But they outperform men on crowdfunding platforms like Indiegogo and Kickstarter.
21h
Big Think

Mark Zuckerberg sets an example for entrepreneurs, but is it a good one?Mark Zuckerberg has infamously downplayed Facebook's responsibilities as a business in the content creation space. Instead, he defends it as a technology platform. Read More
21h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Ronny on the SpotToday in 5 Lines President Trump defended his pick for veterans affairs secretary, Ronny Jackson, but hinted that Jackson might withdraw from consideration after a Senate panel postponed his confirmation hearing amid allegations of misconduct. Alek Minassian, the man accused of plowing a van into pedestrians in Toronto on Monday, was charged with 10 counts of first-degree murder and 13 counts of
21h
Feed: All Latest

NYC Is Redesigning Its Slow, Old, and Unpopular Bus SystemIt's also introducing double-decker buses and all-door boarding.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Incompatible' donor stem cells cure adult sickle cell patientsDoctors at the University of Illinois Hospital have cured seven adult patients of sickle cell disease, an inherited blood disorder primarily affecting the black community, using stem cells from donors previously thought to be incompatible, thanks to a new transplant treatment protocol.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Feelings of ethical superiority can lead to workplace ostracism, social undermining: studyDo you consider yourself more ethical than your coworker?
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cambridge Analytica says it is 'no Bond villain'Cambridge Analytica claimed Tuesday it was "no Bond villain" as it vehemently denied exploiting Facebook users' data for the election campaign of US President Donald Trump.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Feelings of ethical superiority can lead to workplace ostracism, social undermining: StudyA new Baylor study published in the Journal of Business Ethics suggests that feelings of ethical superiority can cause a chain reaction that is detrimental to you, your coworkers and your organization.
22h
The Scientist RSS

Exercise Warms the Brain, Causing Mice to Eat LessDirectly activating a heat sensor also sensitive to capsaicin in chili peppers in the hypothalamus had the same effect as exercise.
22h
The Scientist RSS

Military Veteran Receives Most Complex Penis Transplant YetAfter losing his genitals in a roadside bomb explosion, the soldier endured a 14-hour surgery to have a donated penis, scrotum, and partial abdominal wall attached.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EPA chief signs proposal limiting science used in decisionsEnvironmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt has signed a proposed rule that would restrict the types of scientific studies regulators can use to determine the impact of pesticide and pollution exposure on human health.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

3-D printed food could change how we eatResearchers consider how 3-D printing technology could be used for food production.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Airborne dust threatens human health in SouthwestResearchers have found that in the coming decades, increased dust emissions from severe and prolonged droughts in the American Southwest could result in significant increases in hospital admissions and premature deaths.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Uncovering the secret law of the evolution of galaxy clustersUsing observational data from the Hubble Space Telescope and the Subaru Telescope, the size and mass of galaxy clusters have precisely been measured. The research team analyzed those data and found a simple law that regulates the growth of the clusters. They also showed that the clusters are still young and growing. The newfound law will serve as a tool to clarify the evolutionary history of clust
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Depressed, inactive and out of work -- study reveals lives of lonely young adultsNew research shows that lonely young adults are more likely to experience mental health problems and more likely to be out of work than their peers. The study gives a detailed snapshot of the lives of lonely 18-year-olds and shows how loneliness goes hand-in-hand with a wide range of problems in health and wellbeing.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genetic transcription 'pause' is focus of NASA grantDNA is a blueprint for cells to make proteins that allow those cells to function properly. To create the proteins, enzymes copy genetic codes from DNA strands and then transfer the instructions onto RNA in a process called transcription.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Blinded by the light: Climate change, the sun, and Lake SuperiorLakes tend to emit carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere, making them important players in the planet's natural regulation of its climate. However, the direction of the flow of CO2 between lakes and the atmosphere can be influenced by humans or by natural factors such as rainfall or air temperature.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Planet's smallest microbes examined at nation's largest aquariumMore than 2 million people flock to Georgia Aquarium annually to see Ocean Voyager Built by Home Depot, the largest salt water habitat in the United States and home to whale sharks, the world's largest fish. But for microbiologists at Georgia Tech, the most significant attraction within this 6.3-million-gallon environment of aquatic life is the community of species invisible to the naked eye livin
22h
New on MIT Technology Review

Robots are going to redefine Japan’s skylines
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Doctors may soon be able to see a brain tumor burned away in real timeSome 80,000 Americans will be diagnosed with a brain tumor this year according to the American Brain Tumor Association. Many of them will need major surgery and chemotherapy. Sixteen thousand of them will lose the battle. But a team of USC Viterbi School of Engineering researchers are now making it easier, faster and safer for doctors to use an emerging procedure - one that involves burning away t
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Experimental arthritis drug prevents stem cell transplant complicationAn investigational drug in clinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis prevents a common, life-threatening side effect of stem cell transplants, new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis shows. Studying mice, the researchers found the drug prevented what's known as graft-versus-host disease, a debilitating, sometimes lethal condition that develops when transplanted stem
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More than 1 in 20 US children and teens have anxiety or depressionAbout 2.6 million American children and adolescents had diagnosed anxiety and/or depression in 2011-12, reports an analysis of nationwide data in the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, the official journal of the Society for Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Commonly prescribed heartburn drug linked to pneumonia in older adultsResearchers at the University of Exeter have found a statistical link between pneumonia in older people and a group of medicines commonly used to neutralize stomach acid in people with heartburn or stomach ulcers. Although proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are still a valuable group of medicines, research is indicating that PPIs are not as completely safe for older people as previously thought.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

3-D printed food could change how we eatImagine a home appliance that, at the push of a button, turns powdered ingredients into food that meets the individual nutrition requirements of each household member. Although it may seem like something from science fiction, new research aimed at using 3-D printing to create customized food could one day make this a reality.
22h
cognitive science

Please view my meme so my group can get extra credit in our Cog Sci- Social Computing class!submitted by /u/plsehelpusgoodgrades [link] [comments]
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cognitive behavioral therapy can improve emotion regulation in children with autismNew research shows cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can help children with autism manage not only anxiety but other emotional challenges, such as sadness and anger. The study shows CBT can lead to significant improvements in children's emotional regulation. It also shows -- for the first time -- that CBT can improve more than just anxiety. This is the first transdiagnostic CBT trial for children
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Newspaper op-eds change mindsResearchers have found that op-ed pieces have large and long-lasting effects on people's views among both the general public and policy experts. The study also found that Democrats and Republicans altered their views in the direction of the op-ed piece in roughly equal measure.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What can a tasty milkshake teach us about the genetics of heart disease?Analysis of high-resolution genomic data in a large study population reveals novel low-frequency polymorphisms that drive response to dietary lipids and medication.
22h
Big Think

Understanding other religions is fundamental to citizenshipReligious literacy can help us to 'disagree better.' Read More
22h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Visions of Africa's future, from African filmmakers | Dayo OgunyemiBy expanding boundaries, exploring possibilities and conveying truth, films have helped change Africa's reality (even before "Black Panther"). Dayo Ogunyemi invites us to imagine Africa's future through the lens of inspiring filmmakers from across the continent, showing us how they can inspire Africa to make a hundred-year leap.
22h
Inside Science

Future Gadgets Could Custom-Print Food to Your Taste and Nutritional NeedsFuture Gadgets Could Custom-Print Food to Your Taste and Nutritional Needs Will the kitchen of the future include a 3-D printer? Open-Meals-3D-sushi.jpg Image credits: Open Meals Culture Tuesday, April 24, 2018 - 15:45 Tracy Staedter, Contributor (Inside Science) -- The cutting-edge kitchens of today boast appliances like internet-connected refrigerators, sous vide cookers and hydroponic terrariu
22h
The Atlantic

Trump Throws Ronny Jackson Under the BusHours after news of allegations of misconduct emerged against Rear Admiral Ronny Jackson, the White House physician and President Trump’s pick to be the next secretary of veterans affairs, the president had a bizarre commentary to offer. “I told Admiral Jackson just a little while ago, what do you need this for? This is a vicious group of people. … What do you need it for?” Trump said Tuesday, du
23h
New Scientist - News

Gamma rays from the sun are acting weird and nobody knows whyA survey of the sun’s radiation turned up two surprises: a dip in low-energy gamma rays, and far more high-energy gamma rays than predicted. And nobody knows why
23h
Live Science

Barely Buzzed or Super Stoned? An App Could One Day Reveal How High You AreAre you high? An app could help you find out.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hospital patients are eager to play a role in tracking health data, researchers findNew research shows that patients in the hospital are eager to collaborate with clinicians to track their health data. Traditionally, clinicians have been the only ones who collect, track and reflect on that data.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Engineers create social media infrastructure for emergency managementPurdue researchers have developed an online platform that enables first responders to monitor emergency situations using tweets and Instagram posts.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blinded by the light: Climate change, the sun, and Lake SuperiorLakes tend to emit carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere, making them important players in the planet's natural regulation of its climate. However, the direction of the flow of CO2 between lakes and the atmosphere can be influenced by humans or by natural factors such as rainfall or air temperature.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mammary stem cells challenge costly bovine diseaseBovine mastitis is typically treated with antibiotics, but with the potential threat of antimicrobial resistance and the disease's long-term harm to the animal's teat, researchers at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine are laying the foundation for alternative therapies derived from stem cells.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Frontier of science: Planet's smallest microbes examined at nation's largest aquariumGeorgia Aquarium and Georgia Tech collaborated to advance a new scientific frontier -- study of the aquarium microbiome -- to better understand the millions of marine microorganisms living in the water and what role they play in keeping the ecosystem healthy.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bariatric surgery successes lead to type 2 diabetes treatmentBariatric surgery has long yielded almost immediate health benefits for patients with type 2 diabetes, and new findings from Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine may be the key to developing drug alternatives to surgery.
23h
NYT > Science

Nonfiction: How Does Empathy Work? A Writer Explores the Science and Its ApplicationsIn “I Feel You,” Cris Beam examines how we come to feel one another’s pain.
23h
Popular Science

While you're staring at your new phone, scientists are finding ways to recycle your old oneNexus Media News Used cellphones are a huge source of electronic waste. How often do you swap out your old smartphone for a new one? Today, phone companies make it easy with deals to trade in your old phone for the newest version. But those…
23h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Private web browsing doesn’t mean no one is watchingMany people misunderstand what private web browsing actually is. Web browsers’ explanations don’t help.
23h
The Atlantic

ISIS Tactics Have Spread to Other Violent ActorsYesterday’s headline writers took the afternoon off, it seems, and engaged the newsroom’s cliché machine: A van “plowed” into crowds on Toronto’s Yonge Street, killing at least 10 and wounding several. That many readers no longer blanch at this agricultural metaphor—indeed they expect it—is a mark of how far the technique of mass vehicular homicide has spread. The alleged driver does not appear t
23h
The Atlantic

How Cities Defend Against Vehicular AttacksYonge Street is Toronto’s most well-known thoroughfare. With some of the city’s busiest intersections , it serves hundreds of thousands of pedestrians and vehicles each day. And like most major streets in big cities, it lacks barriers to divide them from one another. The vehicular attack Monday on a two-kilometer stretch of Yonge Street, which killed 10 people and injured at least 15 others, expo
23h
Live Science

This Light Therapy Could Zap Away Chronic Pain One DayJust flicking on a light might one day provide pain relief to some patients with chronic pain, early research in animals suggests.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Future wearable device could tell how we power human movementFor athletes and weekend warriors alike, returning from a tendon injury too soon often ensures a trip right back to physical therapy. However, a new technology could one day help tell whether your tendons are ready for action.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Milky Way's supermassive black hole may have 'unseen' siblingsAstronomers predict that galaxies with a mass similar to the Milky Way should host several supermassive black holes.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New model could help build communities of climate change-defying treesResearchers in Australia have developed a model to help build plant communities that are more resilient to climate change.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Heart disease may only be a matter of time for those with healthy obesityPeople who are 30 pounds or more overweight may want to slim down a bit even if they don't have high blood pressure or any other heart disease risk, according to scientists.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stem cells from adults function just as well as those from embryosA review of research on induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) finds that donor age does not appear to influence their functionality. This validates iPSCs as a viable alternative to embryonic stem cells in regenerative medicine, and highlights the enormous potential of iPSCs derived from elderly patients to treat their age-related diseases.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Organoids reveal how a deadly brain cancer growsSalk scientists developed a new model for glioblastoma using gene-edited organoids.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Burning tumors awayA team of USC Viterbi School of Engineering researchers are now making it easier, faster and safer for doctors to use an emerging procedure -- one that involves burning away tumors in more patients, including those with brain tumors.
23h

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