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Viden

Forvirrede sædceller indbringer forsker årets Ph.d. CupAnders Rehfeld vinder 30.000 kroner for sin formidling af forskning i, hvordan kemikalier i kvindekroppen kan sende sædceller på afveje.
1d
Ingeniøren

NOx overstiger grænseværdier på 1.066 steder i hovedstadsområdetDen seneste måling viste ellers, at kun Københavns stærkt trafikerede H.C. Andersens Boulevard ligger over grænsen.
18h
GoDaddy

5 top plugins to turn a WordPress site into a mobile AppIt's no secret that the share of mobile traffic in overall online activity is soaring. According to...
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Here's What You're Getting Yourself IntoWhat We’re Following The President and Friends: The Senate confirmed former CIA Director Mike Pompeo as the new secretary of state hours after Ronny Jackson, the White House physician, withdrew himself from consideration to lead the Department of Veterans Affairs. In between, President Trump called in to Fox and Friends for a wide-ranging interview in which he discussed his relationship with the
3min
Big Think

Diversity and inclusion: Companies need both but there's a crucial differenceThough often used interchangeably, diversity and inclusion are two very different things. Most importantly, diversity without inclusion is mostly meaningless. Read More
9min
Live Science

Swiss Scientists Perform Massive Test of 80-Year-Old, 'Spooky' Quantum ParadoxThis new experiment is a huge example of the behavior Albert Einstein called "spooky action at a distance."
13min
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Facebook Launches a New Ad Campaign With an Old MessageFacebook ads will appear on TV, online, in movie theaters, and on public transit and billboards.
15min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genetic roadmap to building an entire organism from a single cellIn three landmark studies,researchers report how they have systematically profiled every cell in developing zebrafish and frog embryos to establish a roadmap revealing how one cell builds an entire organism. The findings represent a catalog of genetic 'recipes' for generating different cell types and provide an unprecedented resource for the study of developmental biology and disease.
17min
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Phone a Fox & FriendToday in 5 Lines In a freewheeling interview on Fox & Friends , President Trump appeared to confirm that his lawyer, Michael Cohen, represented him in a matter with adult-film star Stormy Daniels. He also defended White House physician Ronny Jackson and accused former FBI Director James Comey of committing crimes. Rear Admiral Ronny Jackson, Trump’s pick to lead the Department of Veterans Affairs
25min
The Atlantic

Scott Pruitt and the Trump White House's Serial ScandalsIn the hierarchy of Donald Trump-era scandals, from the brazen to the boorish, pay raises in a low-level agency shouldn’t crack the top quartile. But on Thursday, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt managed to spin his hiring practices into a cobweb beyond his control—leaving some reporters to question whether a low-stakes snafu could now be the “end of the line.” In his he
25min
Ingeniøren

DF sprang fra aftale - regeringen sikret flertal for kamp mod pesticid-forbudDet lykkedes i sidste sekund alligevel ikke oppositionen at samle flertal til at arbejde for at bakke op om EU-Kommissionens forslag til at stramme forbuddet mod de bi-dræbende neonikotinoider.
30min
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The iPad Apps Pilots Use in the CockpitNo Words With Friends for British Airways pilots, it's all about fuel calculations, safety notices, and maps.
34min
New on MIT Technology Review

These DNA testing companies are mainly trying to sell you other stuffBeware of tests offering to make “personalized” lifestyle recommendations.
37min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Prosthetic arms can provide controlled sensory feedback, study findsLosing an arm doesn't have to mean losing all sense of touch, thanks to prosthetic arms that stimulate nerves with mild electrical feedback. University of Illinois researchers have developed a control algorithm that regulates the current so a prosthetics user feels steady sensation, even when the electrodes begin to peel off or when sweat builds up.
58min
Latest Headlines | Science News

Archaeologists in Peru have unearthed the largest known child sacrificeThe largest known mass sacrifice of children occurred around 550 years ago in the Chimú empire in Peru.
58min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Novel ecosystems provide use for some native birdsEcosystems that have been altered by human activities can provide suitable habitat for native birds, according to scientists in the United States and Australia.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Weighing single molecules with lightScientists have developed a light-based measuring technique that could transform our ability to characterize biomolecules. Using a microscope that detects light scattering rather than fluorescence, the researchers have demonstrated that single molecules can be observed, and their mass measured, in solution.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Infinitely' recyclable polymer shows practical properties of plasticsThe world fell in love with plastics because they're cheap, convenient, lightweight and long- lasting. For these same reasons, plastics are now trashing the Earth. Chemists have just announced another major step toward waste-free, sustainable materials that could one day compete with conventional plastics.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why a robot can't yet outjump a fleaSmashing mantis shrimp. Snapping trap-jaw ants. Stinging jellyfish. Some of the fastest living things -- at least over short distances -- are also the smallest. A new mathematical model explores how the smallest and speediest things on Earth generate their powerful jumps, snaps, strikes and punches. The model could help explain why robots can't hold a candle to the fastest-moving insects and other
1h
New on MIT Technology Review

AI may be used to sift through Trump attorney Michael Cohen’s documents
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The Atlantic

Bill Cosby and the Slow Death of Celebrity ImpunityBill Cosby A. Constand“Let’s face it: She went up to his house with a bare midriff and incense and bath salts. What the heck?” That was one of the jurors in the 2017 trial of Bill Cosby, in which the actor and comedian defended himself against charges that, in 2004, he had drugged and then raped Andrea Constand, at the time a Temple University employee for whom he had served as a mentor. The jury in that trial, after
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study addresses the role of health in climate lawsuitsResearchers at the George Washington University (GW) are at the forefront of analyzing how climate lawsuits shape the nation's response to climate change. A new analysis investigates the role of health concerns in climate litigation since 1990 and finds that although health is cited in a minority of cases, it may have critical potential for protecting communities from the effects of climate change
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Be wary of cosmetic surgeons' online reviewsConsumers consider online reviews important for choosing physicians, but they should be wary of using those ratings to choose plastic surgeons. The reviews tend to be polarized, and some are written by people whom consulted with the doctor but never had surgery, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A study of Monterey Canyon's microbial denizens may offer insights on evolutionGeobiologist Victoria Orphan stands at the stern of the research vessel Western Flyer, watching her colleagues put the last touches on an unusual spread. Among the offerings: a large turkey leg, an alligator head and bowls of gelatinous agar that resemble consomme.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google honors Olympic runner Fanny Blankers-Koen, 'The Flying Housewife'Google is paying tribute to "The Flying Housewife."
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Inside Science

Brooklyn-Built Spacesuits Splash Down in a Connecticut PoolBrooklyn-Built Spacesuits Splash Down in a Connecticut Pool On an April weekend, engineers, designers and astronauts-in-training met to test suits for commercial, suborbital spaceflight. IMG_0365bCrop.jpg The mockup of the Orion capsule from the outside Image credits: Charles Q. Choi Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Space Thursday, April 26, 2018 - 15:45 Charles Q. Choi, Contributor (Inside Science)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bleaching of coral reefs reduced where daily temperature changes are largeCoral reef bleaching is stark evidence of the damage being inflicted by global climate change on marine ecosystems, but a research team led by scientists at the University of California, Irvine has found some cause for hope. While many corals are dying, others are showing resilience to increased sea surface temperatures, pointing to possible clues to the survival and recovery of these vitally impo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bleaching of coral reefs reduced where daily temperature changes are largeCoral reef bleaching is stark evidence of the damage being inflicted by global climate change on marine ecosystems, but a research team led by scientists at the University of California, Irvine has found some cause for hope. While many corals are dying, others are showing resilience to increased sea surface temperatures, pointing to possible clues to the survival and recovery of these vitally impo
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Viden

Norsk robotskib sejler med containere - uden nogen ved roretYara Birkeland er et automatiseret testskib. Den type eldrevne containerskibe uden egentlig besætning, kan gøre kystnær transport bedre og billigere, mener dansk professor.
1h
Big Think

These 2 feuding ‘Insta-fluencers’ are phony. No really—they’re not humanAn ongoing feud between two non-human Instagram "influencers" took a strange turn last week when one account claimed to reveal the company controlling the drama. Read More
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Whale shark logs longest-recorded trans-Pacific migrationLittle is known about the world's largest living fish, gentle giants reaching 12 meters (40 feet) in length. Researchers from the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute (STRI) and colleagues tracked a female whale shark from the eastern Pacific to the western Indo-Pacific for 20,142 kilometers (more than 12,000 miles), the longest whale shark migration route ever recorded.
2h
Big Think

Dominant religions in the U.S., county by countyA map shows the dominant religion in each of the United States’ counties. Evangelicals dominate the most areas geographically. Catholics are the majority faith in densely populated areas. Read More
2h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

What I've learned about parenting as a stay-at-home dad | Glen HenryGlen Henry got his superpowers through fatherhood. After leaving behind a job he hated and a manager he didn't get along with, he went to work for an equally demanding boss: his kids. He shares how he went from thinking he knew it all about being a stay-at-home parent to realizing he knew nothing at all -- and how he's now documenting what he's learned.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Head of Tesla Autopilot project leaves for IntelTesla Autopilot J. KellerThe head of Tesla's Autopilot project is leaving the carmarker, amid a US government probe into a fatal accident involving a vehicle using the semi-autonomous driving system.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Get a grip: What your hand strength says about your marriage prospects and mortalityResearchers found men with a stronger grip were more likely to be married than men with weaker grips. Grip strength was not a factor in the marital status of women. Grip strength is an established measure of health and has previously been linked to one's ability to cope independently and predicts the risk of cardiovascular diseases and mortality.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Whale shark logs longest-recorded trans-Pacific migrationA whale shark named Anne swam all the way across the Pacific from Coiba National Park in Panama to the Marianas Trench, setting a record as the longest-recorded migration.
2h
Latest Headlines | Science News

This plastic can be recycled over and over and over againA new kind of polymer is fully recyclable: It breaks down into the exact same molecules that it came from.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Retirement transition increases sitting during free timeAccording to a Finnish longitudinal cohort study, the amount of sitting during free time increases after transitioning to retirement. In general, sedentary behavior is known to be associated with several health issues.
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Popular Science

Human thigh bones apparently make excellent weapons in close combatScience Ancient daggers carved from femurs were pretty fierce. It turns out human bones, especially thigh bones, were prized by New Guinean warriors as materials which could be carved into exceptionally strong, fierce daggers.
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Inside Science

Can Green Infrastructure Save America's Capital from Overflowing Sewage?Earth Ambitious plan aims to keep waste out of rivers without massive new pipes. 04/25/2018 Gabriel Popkin, Contributor https://www.insidescience.org/news/can-green-infrastructure-save-americas-capital-overflowing-sewage
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

Police body cameras could be about to get an AI upgrade
2h
New on MIT Technology Review

Win more social-media followers with this trickBut the network researchers who discovered it warn it could be used to influence people in malicious ways.
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The Scientist RSS

Learning Enhances Synapses Between Memory Cells in MiceA new technique reveals certain neuronal connections grow larger and denser when memories are made.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Artificial optical materials could allow cheaper, flatter, more efficient detectors for night vision and other usesA new way of taking images in the mid-infrared part of the spectrum, developed by researchers at MIT and elsewhere, could enable a wide variety of applications, including thermal imaging, biomedical sensing, and free-space communication.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study yields first clues about internal structure of Galicia marginThe first study to spring from a Rice University-led 2013 international expedition to map the sea floor off the coast of Spain has revealed details about the evolution of the fault that separates the continental and oceanic plates.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Searching for a nursing home and don't know where to turn?A USC study concludes that consumers on the hunt for a nursing home should consider the ratings from Yelp and government sites such as Nursing Home Compare to get a more complete picture of a home's quality and care.
2h
Inside Science

Damaging Earthquake in South Korea Last Year May Have Been Caused by Geothermal FrackingDamaging Earthquake in South Korea Last Year May Have Been Caused by Geothermal Fracking The 5.4 magnitude earthquake suggests that even small volumes of water can trigger large events. 20171118_damaged_Hyundai_Grand_starex-1_cropped.jpg Earthquake damage following Nov. 15, 2017 Pohang earthquake. Image credits: via Wikimedia Commons Rights information: CC BY SA 4.0 Earth Thursday, April 26, 2018
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

US autism rate up 15 percent over 2 year periodA new report that finds the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) among 11 surveillance sites as one in 59 among children aged 8 years in 2014 (or 1.7 percent).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox observed in many-particle system for the first timePhysicistshave observed the quantum mechanical Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox in a system of several hundred interacting atoms for the first time. The phenomenon dates back to a famous thought experiment from 1935. It allows measurement results to be predicted precisely and could be used in new types of sensors and imaging methods for electromagnetic fields.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Who am I? How cells find their identityA research group has investigated more closely how a single embryonic cell develops into a heart, nerve or blood cell. For the first time, the researchers have been able to reconstruct the developmental trajectories of individual embryonic cells. Their results also suggest that cells can change their path during their maturation process.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global

Mars Probe Poised to Solve Red Planet's Methane MysteryResearchers hope European-Russian Trace Gas Orbiter will end a long-running debate over source of the gas on Mars -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Big Think

That know-it-all who drives you crazy is full of it, according to scienceIn this study, know-it-alls although aware of their biases, selected data that supported their beliefs anyway. Read More
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Improving mid-infrared imaging and sensingA new way of taking images in the mid-infrared part of the spectrum, developed by researchers at MIT and elsewhere, could enable a wide variety of applications, including thermal imaging, biomedical sensing, and free-space communications.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sub-sea rift spills secrets to seismic probeThe first study to spring from a Rice University-led expedition to map the subsurface off the coast of Spain has revealed details about the evolution of the fault that separates the continental and oceanic plates.
2h
Blog » Languages » English

Alice in Neuroland: Marathon Results!Thank goodness! No heads will roll for the Queen of Hearts today. This first 1044-cube cell finished in 15 hours 30 minutes, under the mark! And not only that, but you managed a second 1340-cube cell in 15 hours 6 minutes! The Queen is most impressed, and we hope you’ll join us at 4 PM on Friday for Alice to wake up from her dream, and for all of you to get some awards and promotions! Tune in nex
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Feed: All Latest

'Avengers: Infinity War': From Scope to Story, an Unreplicable SuccessThe culmination of 10 years and 18 movies is something that's virtually impossible to repeat.
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Popular Science

Future offshore drilling could wreak havoc on deep sea ecosystemsEnvironment Every step of the drilling process can cause harm to the delicate ocean environment Marine scientists say that opening up more areas to drilling means disruption for marine ecosystems and an even greater increased risk for oil spills.
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Live Science

The Origin Story of Rosetta Comet Is Weird, and Ends with a Rubber DuckyRosetta's weirdly shaped comet may have formed in a cosmic kiss inside a dirt cloud, thanks in part to Neptune's protective shadow.
3h
Big Think

7 conspiracy theories that are actually trueHere is when the government really did what the conspiracy theories claimed. Read More
3h
Live Science

What's Behind the Recent Rise in Autism in the US?The percentage of kids with autism in the United States continues to rise, according to a new report.
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The Atlantic

A Victim of U.S. Chemical Warfare Achieves His DreamDuring the Vietnam War, from 1961 to 1971, the U.S. military deployed an aggressive chemical warfare program codenamed Operation Ranch Hand . American troops in fighter jets sprayed highly toxic herbicides across more than 4.5 million acres of Vietnam in order to weaken the vegetative cover and food supply of North Vietnamese and Viet Cong armies. In this chemical cocktail was Agent Orange, which
3h
The Atlantic

'The Reinvention of America': Two Views from the PrairieThe new issue of The Atlantic has a long piece by me called “ The Reinvention of America .” It’s different from, but tied to, the publication in two weeks of a book by my wife, Deb, and me called Our Towns: A 100,000-Mile Journey into the Heart of America . The main contention of the Atlantic piece is that at a time of genuinely serious problems for the country, from economic polarization to the
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

The Growing Impact of AI on BusinessA survey by EY, conducted at the EmTech Digital conference on March 27, 2018, produced by MIT Technology Review Insights, yielded some interesting responses on how enterprises are incorporating AI into their overall strategies.
3h
The Scientist RSS

LabQuiz: Are You A Cancer Immunotherapy Mastermind?Chemotherapy? Nah. Radiation? Nope. Cancer immunotherapy's where it's at!
3h
Live Science

What the Folds of Your Brain Could Tell You About Schizophrenia RiskSchizophrenia may have a special fingerprint in the brain, even before its symptoms fully emerge.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox observed in many-particle system for the first timePhysicists from the University of Basel have observed the quantum mechanical Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox in a system of several hundred interacting atoms for the first time. The phenomenon dates back to a famous thought experiment from 1935. It allows measurement results to be predicted precisely and could be used in new types of sensors and imaging methods for electromagnetic fields. The find
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Who am I? How cells find their identityThe research group of Alex Schier, Director of the Biozentrum, University of Basel, has investigated more closely how a single embryonic cell develops into a heart, nerve or blood cell. For the first time, the researchers have been able to reconstruct the developmental trajectories of individual embryonic cells. Their results also suggest that cells can change their path during their maturation pr
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

From one, manyIn three landmark studies, Harvard researchers report how they have systematically profiled every cell in developing zebrafish and frog embryos to establish a roadmap revealing how one cell builds an entire organism. The findings represent a catalog of genetic 'recipes' for generating different cell types and provide an unprecedented resource for the study of developmental biology and disease.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In test with mice, Zika virus eliminates human brain tumor common in childrenBrazilian researchers at the Center for Human Genome and Stem Cell Studies at the University of São Paulo have put the virus to good use showing, for the first time in animals, the deleterious effect of the injection of a low concentration of the purified virus on human embryonic brain tumors induced in mice with low immunity.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cancer drug helps treat tuberculosis by restoring leaky blood vesselsResearchers at Duke University have discovered that an FDA-approved drug designed to treat cancer helps fight tuberculosis in mouse models. The drug is an MMP inhibitor designed to increase the structural integrity of blood vessels in tumors so that other drugs can reach inside them. It performs the same function in the granulomas associated with tuberculosis so that antibiotics can reach the bact
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CRISPR-based diagnostic SHERLOCK optimized for rapid use during viral outbreaksIn Science, Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard researchers report a new tool that engineers the CRISPR-based diagnostic SHERLOCK for rapid outbreak response. The platform can now be used to detect viruses directly in clinical samples such as blood or saliva, eliminating a processing step that previously required a lab and professionally trained personnel. The updates to SHERLOCK enable clinicians
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why a robot can't yet outjump a fleaSmashing mantis shrimp. Snapping trap-jaw ants. Stinging jellyfish. Some of the fastest living things -- at least over short distances -- are also the smallest. A new mathematical model explores how the smallest and speediest things on Earth generate their powerful jumps, snaps, strikes and punches. The model could help explain why robots can't hold a candle to the fastest-moving insects and other
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What's the best way to accelerate: Muscles or springs?A new study has pinpointed principles that are common in the mechanical systems that animals, plants, fungi and machines use to maximize kinetic energy delivery.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Studying ancestral remains needs to be done respectfully, ethicallyScientists should consult indigenous populations when studying ancestral remains, Jessica Bardill et al. emphasize in this Policy Forum.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A polymer that puts plastic on a better path toward recyclabilityResearchers have developed a family of synthetic polymers that can be repeatedly recycled, an important feat because current efforts to recycle plastic are so limited.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mw 5.4 Pohang earthquake tied to geothermal activity?The Mw 5.4 Pohang earthquake that occurred near a geothermal site in South Korea last year was likely triggered by fluid injection at the geothermal plant, two separate reports conclude.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Respect indigenous ancestors: Scholars urge community engagement before researchA new article in the journal Science provides guidance for those intending to study ancient human remains in the Americas. The paper, written by indigenous scholars and scientists and those who collaborate with Indigenous communities on studies of ancient DNA, offers a clear directive to others contemplating such research: first, do no harm.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Infinitely' recyclable polymer shows practical properties of plasticsThe world fell in love with plastics because they're cheap, convenient, lightweight and long- lasting. For these same reasons, plastics are now trashing the Earth. Colorado State University chemists have announced in the journal Science another major step toward waste-free, sustainable materials that could one day compete with conventional plastics.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Weighing single molecules with lightScientists at Oxford University have developed a light-based measuring technique that could transform our ability to characterize biomolecules.Using a microscope that detects light scattering rather than fluorescence, the researchers have demonstrated that single molecules can be observed, and their mass measured, in solution.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Repurposed medications enhance tuberculosis treatment in miceDrugs known as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors -- originally developed for other uses, such as cancer treatment -- enhance antibiotic treatment of tuberculosis in mice, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens by Yitian Xu of Cornell University and colleagues.
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The Atlantic

The Undoing of an Online Student-Loan 'Expert'It doesn’t take much to run a survey on the website Pollfish. An email address, a title for the survey, a couple of target-demographic details, and $400 dollars—which buys 400 responses—is all that’s needed. These are the types of surveys that produced the sometimes jarring findings published by the Student Loan Report, a website that was founded in 2016 as “a source for news on the student loan
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

DNR approves pulling Lake Michigan water for Foxconn plantThe Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has approved a request to pull millions of gallons of water daily from Lake Michigan to serve a new Foxconn Technology Group manufacturing plant, helping the Taiwanese electronics giant clear a major regulatory hurdle.
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Science current issue

Evidence for opportunity
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Science current issue

News at a glance
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Science current issue

Searching for a Stone Age Odysseus
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Science current issue

Data trove helps pin down the shape of the Milky Way
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Science current issue

Siberian sculpture is among the oldest monumental art
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Science current issue

Is genome-guided cancer treatment hyped?
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Science current issue

Robotic weather balloon launchers spread in Alaska
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Science current issue

Chronicling embryos, cell by cell, gene by gene
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Science current issue

Peace dividend
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Science current issue

Cleaning up the killing fields
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Science current issue

Regenerating tissues
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Science current issue

Split, but still attached
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Science current issue

Disrupting metabolism to treat autoimmunity
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Science current issue

Weighing one protein with light
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Science current issue

Plastics recycling with a difference
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Science current issue

Next-generation diagnostics with CRISPR
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Science current issue

Günter Blobel (1936-2018)
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Science current issue

Advancing the ethics of paleogenomics
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Science current issue

The automated battlefield
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Science current issue

Incentivizing responsible antibiotic use
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Science current issue

The Truth About Animals: Stoned Sloths, Lovelorn Hippos, and Other Tales from the Wild Side of Wildlife
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Science current issue

Bee conservation: Key role of managed bees
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Science current issue

Bee conservation: Inclusive solutions
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Science current issue

Response--"Bee conservation: Key role of managed bees" and "Bee conservation: Inclusive solutions"
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Science current issue

Africa cultivates innovation to boost global reach
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Science current issue

Cultural differences in Starbucks
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Science current issue

Splitting the entanglement
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Science current issue

Recycle, recycle, recycle
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Science current issue

Taking CRISPR technology further
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Science current issue

When beige is not boring
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Science current issue

Haunted by the past
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Science current issue

Memories are stored in synapses
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Science current issue

A recipe for regeneration
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Science current issue

Switching how to make flagella beat
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Science current issue

Hop, skip, jump, or massive leap
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Science current issue

Light and acid steer a radical addition
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Science current issue

Watching proteins' weight
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Science current issue

Immunometabolism as therapeutic target
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Science current issue

A fluid transition into the field
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Science current issue

Fueling T cell proliferation
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Science current issue

The brain as a work in progress
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Science current issue

Lessons learned from the JACS Challenge
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Science current issue

Staving off diabetes
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Science current issue

Gut bugs encourage hematopoietic recovery
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Science current issue

A cool model for biomedical research
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Science current issue

A brief flash from our closest neighbor
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Science current issue

A safe haven for the small
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Science current issue

A synthetic polymer system with repeatable chemical recyclabilityThe development of chemically recyclable polymers offers a solution to the end-of-use issue of polymeric materials and provides a closed-loop approach toward a circular materials economy. However, polymers that can be easily and selectively depolymerized back to monomers typically require low-temperature polymerization methods and also lack physical properties and mechanical strengths required fo
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Science current issue

Self-organization and progenitor targeting generate stable patterns in planarian regenerationDuring animal regeneration, cells must organize into discrete and functional systems. We show that self-organization, along with patterning cues, govern progenitor behavior in planarian regeneration. Surgical paradigms allowed the manipulation of planarian eye regeneration in predictable locations and numbers, generating alternative stable neuroanatomical states for wild-type animals with multipl
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Science current issue

Spatial entanglement patterns and Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering in Bose-Einstein condensatesMany-particle entanglement is a fundamental concept of quantum physics that still presents conceptual challenges. Although nonclassical states of atomic ensembles were used to enhance measurement precision in quantum metrology, the notion of entanglement in these systems was debated because the correlations among the indistinguishable atoms were witnessed by collective measurements only. Here, we
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Science current issue

Spatially distributed multipartite entanglement enables EPR steering of atomic cloudsA key resource for distributed quantum-enhanced protocols is entanglement between spatially separated modes. However, the robust generation and detection of entanglement between spatially separated regions of an ultracold atomic system remain a challenge. We used spin mixing in a tightly confined Bose-Einstein condensate to generate an entangled state of indistinguishable particles in a single sp
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Science current issue

Entanglement between two spatially separated atomic modesModern quantum technologies in the fields of quantum computing, quantum simulation, and quantum metrology require the creation and control of large ensembles of entangled particles. In ultracold ensembles of neutral atoms, nonclassical states have been generated with mutual entanglement among thousands of particles. The entanglement generation relies on the fundamental particle-exchange symmetry
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Science current issue

Catalytic enantioselective Minisci-type addition to heteroarenesBasic heteroarenes are a ubiquitous feature of pharmaceuticals and bioactive molecules, and Minisci-type additions of radical nucleophiles are a leading method for their elaboration. Despite many Minisci-type protocols that result in the formation of stereocenters, exerting control over the absolute stereochemistry at these centers remains an unmet challenge. We report a process for addition of p
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Science current issue

Quantitative mass imaging of single biological macromoleculesThe cellular processes underpinning life are orchestrated by proteins and their interactions. The associated structural and dynamic heterogeneity, despite being key to function, poses a fundamental challenge to existing analytical and structural methodologies. We used interferometric scattering microscopy to quantify the mass of single biomolecules in solution with 2% sequence mass accuracy, up t
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Science current issue

Legacy nitrogen may prevent achievement of water quality goals in the Gulf of MexicoIn August 2017, the Gulf of Mexico’s hypoxic zone was declared to be the largest ever measured. It has been estimated that a 60% decrease in watershed nitrogen (N) loading may be necessary to adequately reduce eutrophication in the Gulf. However, to date there has been no rigorous assessment of the effect of N legacies on achieving water quality goals. In this study, we show that even if agricult
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Science current issue

Interregional synaptic maps among engram cells underlie memory formationMemory resides in engram cells distributed across the brain. However, the site-specific substrate within these engram cells remains theoretical, even though it is generally accepted that synaptic plasticity encodes memories. We developed the dual-eGRASP (green fluorescent protein reconstitution across synaptic partners) technique to examine synapses between engram cells to identify the specific n
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Science current issue

CRISPR-Cas12a target binding unleashes indiscriminate single-stranded DNase activityCRISPR-Cas12a (Cpf1) proteins are RNA-guided enzymes that bind and cut DNA as components of bacterial adaptive immune systems. Like CRISPR-Cas9, Cas12a has been harnessed for genome editing on the basis of its ability to generate targeted, double-stranded DNA breaks. Here we show that RNA-guided DNA binding unleashes indiscriminate single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) cleavage activity by Cas12a that comp
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Science current issue

Multiplexed and portable nucleic acid detection platform with Cas13, Cas12a, and Csm6Rapid detection of nucleic acids is integral for clinical diagnostics and biotechnological applications. We recently developed a platform termed SHERLOCK (specific high-sensitivity enzymatic reporter unlocking) that combines isothermal preamplification with Cas13 to detect single molecules of RNA or DNA. Through characterization of CRISPR enzymology and application development, we report here fou
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Science current issue

Field-deployable viral diagnostics using CRISPR-Cas13Mitigating global infectious disease requires diagnostic tools that are sensitive, specific, and rapidly field deployable. In this study, we demonstrate that the Cas13-based SHERLOCK (specific high-sensitivity enzymatic reporter unlocking) platform can detect Zika virus (ZIKV) and dengue virus (DENV) in patient samples at concentrations as low as 1 copy per microliter. We developed HUDSON (heatin
3h
Science current issue

Dimethyl fumarate targets GAPDH and aerobic glycolysis to modulate immunityActivated immune cells undergo a metabolic switch to aerobic glycolysis akin to the Warburg effect, thereby presenting a potential therapeutic target in autoimmune disease. Dimethyl fumarate (DMF), a derivative of the Krebs cycle intermediate fumarate, is an immunomodulatory drug used to treat multiple sclerosis and psoriasis. Although its therapeutic mechanism remains uncertain, DMF covalently m
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Science current issue

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Science current issue

Sponsored Collection | Hangzhou Normal University: Serving China through world-class research and education
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Science current issue

The principles of cascading power limits in small, fast biological and engineered systemsMechanical power limitations emerge from the physical trade-off between force and velocity. Many biological systems incorporate power-enhancing mechanisms enabling extraordinary accelerations at small sizes. We establish how power enhancement emerges through the dynamic coupling of motors, springs, and latches and reveal how each displays its own force-velocity behavior. We mathematically demonst
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Science current issue

Asymmetric distribution and spatial switching of dynein activity generates ciliary motilityMotile cilia and flagella are essential, highly conserved organelles, and their motility is driven by the coordinated activities of multiple dynein isoforms. The prevailing "switch-point" hypothesis posits that dyneins are asymmetrically activated to drive flagellar bending. To test this model, we applied cryo–electron tomography to visualize activity states of individual dyneins relative to thei
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: A New Spider Family Tree Tries to Untangle the Evolution of WebsScientists have fiercely debated the origins of the orb-style web. A new study challenges the idea that all spiders who make this web had a common ancestor.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Largest-ever study of thyroid cancer genetics finds new mutations, suggests immunotherapyData from 583 patient samples of advanced differentiated thyroid cancer and 196 anaplastic thyroid cancers, show new genetic alterations, and 'high mutation burden' that is an FDA-approved marker for treatment with immunotherapy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Studies find more patients admitted to hospitals with cardiac conditions in winter monthsTwo new studies examined seasonal variations in cardiac-related hospitalizations specifically for aortic dissection and ST-Elevation Myocardial Infarctions (STEMI). The results of both studies revealed winter as the most common time for hospital admissions and used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database (NIS) for analysis.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Split atom clouds get entangled in quantum testsScientists create quantum links between clouds consisting of thousands of atoms.
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Feed: All Latest

Pinterest Wants to Diversify Your Search ResultsA new search tool on Pinterest aims to surface more content showing people of all skin tones when you search for beauty tips and products.
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Feed: All Latest

Nature’s Mechanical Secrets Could Help Build Faster RobotsSome small animals can produce bullet-like accelerations—could robots do it, too?
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Quanta Magazine

Cell by Cell, Scientists Map the Genetic Steps as Eggs Become AnimalsA fertilized egg divides first into two cells, then four, then eight and so on. Meanwhile, those cells progress from undifferentiated blobs in a cluster to more diverse identities associated with heart, brain, muscle, blood, bone and other tissues. Though the overall process is familiar, scientists have not understood it in much detail. But three papers appearing today in Science are changing tha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists reveal the genetic roadmap to building an entire organism from a single cellWhether a worm, a human or a blue whale, all multicellular life begins as a single-celled egg.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK lawmakers call on Zuckerberg to appear before themThe U.K. parliament's media committee demanded Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg appear before the panel after lawmakers said the senior executive who testified Thursday failed to fully answer their questions about the data protection scandal that has engulfed the company.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Respect Indigenous ancestors: Scholars urge community engagement before researchA new article in the journal Science provides guidance for those intending to study ancient human remains in the Americas. The paper, written by Indigenous scholars and scientists and those who collaborate with Indigenous communities on studies of ancient DNA, offers a clear directive to others contemplating such research: First, do no harm.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Weighing single molecules with lightScientists at Oxford University have developed a light-based measuring technique that could transform our ability to characterise biomolecules.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Infinitely' recyclable polymer shows practical properties of plasticsThe world fell in love with plastics because they're cheap, convenient, lightweight and long- lasting. For these same reasons, plastics are now trashing the Earth.
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Scientific American Content: Global

There's Good News and Less Good News about Worldwide ImmunizationMass immunization has greatly reduced the incidence of many illnesses, but there's much left to do -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ExoMars returns first images from new orbitThe ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter has returned the first images of the Red Planet from its new orbit.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's electric carmakers bloom at Beijing auto showAuto executives from across the globe are plugging their plans for an electric car future in China at the Beijing auto show, but they will find their Chinese counterparts are already motoring ahead.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rugosity and concentricity: In urban planning, look to edges, not just the coreCatherine Brinkley is a professor of human and community development and human ecology at UC Davis. So it's interesting that in a recent published paper, she advocates that cities should work more like coral reefs—supporting a diversity of niches and uses for sustained vigor and resilience. In ecology and medical sciences, the term for a physical form with such topographic complexity is rugosity.
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Big Think

Who was Socrates? Philosophy’s greatest mystery explainedSocrates is often cited as one of the greatest philosophers of all time. The trouble is, we don't have his word for it. Read More
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Live Science

Watch Scientists Blast a Fake Asteroid into a Fake EarthWhy build an asteroid cannon? 1) Because it could help explain the history of early Earth, and 2) because it's awesome.
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Science | The Guardian

Gustav Born obituaryProminent pharmacologist whose pioneering work on how the body stops bleeding improved the detection of thrombosis In 1945, Gustav Born, a young and recently qualified doctor serving with the Royal Army Medical Corps, was among the first allied staff to witness the medical aftermath of the atomic bomb blast in Hiroshima. Among the horrific injuries he encountered, one struck him particularly forci
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Science | The Guardian

NHS preparing to offer ‘game-changing’ cancer treatmentHealth service chief calls for affordable access to CAR-T, which modifies immune system to destroy cancer cells The NHS is preparing to fast-track a “game-changing” cancer treatment into hospitals, its chief executive has said, calling for the manufacturers to help by setting an affordable price. Simon Stevens said CAR-T therapy, which has been licensed in the US but not yet in the UK, could be a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A simple method etches patterns at the atomic scaleA precise, chemical-free method for etching nanoscale features on silicon wafers has been developed by a team from Penn State and Southwest Jiaotong University and Tsinghua University in China.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stellar thief is the surviving companion to a supernovaSeventeen years ago, astronomers witnessed a supernova go off 40 million light-years away in the galaxy called NGC 7424, located in the southern constellation Grus, the Crane. Now, in the fading afterglow of that explosion, NASA's Hubble has captured the first image of a surviving companion to a supernova. This picture is the most compelling evidence that some supernovas originate in double-star s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rugosity and concentricity: In urban planning, look to edges, not just the corePlanners should view high rugosity (highly non-concentric) urban areas as symptomatic of vigor in urban and agricultural markets. Greater planning efforts are required to coordinated the co-joined health of both agricultural and urban land-uses. Empirical analysis is supported by land-use policies from 30 case study counties.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Infection of the heart valves and healthcare costs on rise due to impact of IV drugA new study finds the number of patients hospitalized with endocarditis has increased dramatically over the last decade in a pattern that mirrors the increase in mixed drug use.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study shows therapy for psoriasis can reduce heart plaqueLate-breaking clinical science shows common therapy options for psoriasis (PSO) can help reduce coronary plaque. The authors found that not only do the treatments reduce the volume of the plaque, but also the plaque becomes less inflammatory over time harboring fewer characteristics prone to rupture and cause a heart attack.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

US autism rate edges up in new CDC reportResearchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health contributed to a new US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that finds the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) among 11 surveillance sites as one in 59 among children aged 8 years in 2014 (or 1.7 percent).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study of bat natural immunity to Marburg virus may shed light on human diseaseScientists examining the genome of Egyptian fruit bats, a natural reservoir for the deadly Marburg virus, have identified several immune-related genes that suggest bats deal with viral infections in a substantially different way than primates. Their research, published online today in the journal Cell, demonstrates that bats may be able to host viruses that are pathogenic in humans by tolerating--
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First-of-its-kind study associates obesity with poorer stroke outcomes in non-white patientsResearch led by LSU Health New Orleans faculty has found that obesity contributed to poorer outcomes in non-white patients who had hemorrhagic strokes. It is one of the few studies examining outcomes of patients with obesity following intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) and is the first such study conducted within the stroke belt of the US with a racially diverse population.
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The Atlantic

Visiting Chernobyl 32 Years After the DisasterToday marks the anniversary of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster. On April 26, 1986, technicians conducting a test inadvertently caused the fourth reactor to explode. Several hundred staff members and firefighters then tackled a blaze that burned for 10 days and sent a plume of radiation around the world in the worst-ever civil nuclear disaster. More than 50 reactor and emergency workers were killed
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How landscapes and landforms 'remember' or 'forget' their initial formationsCrescent dunes and meandering rivers can "forget" their initial shapes as they are carved and reshaped by wind and water while other landforms keep a memory of their past shape, suggests a new laboratory analysis by a team of mathematicians.
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Viden

Apple-ur med indbygget mobilnet kommer til DanmarkSnart kan du ringe og streame musik helt uden at have din telefon med dig. Men kun et teleselskab understøtter Apples ur med indbygget netforbindelse.
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Popular Science

Here's why you've been getting so many privacy policy and terms of service updates latelyTechnology Thanks the General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) for the recent assault on your inbox. All those updated privacy policy notices in your inbox are coming from a new European internet privacy law.
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The Atlantic

Avengers: Infinity War Is an Extraordinary Juggling ActAvengers Infinity WarNote: Although this review avoids spoilers, it inevitably contains hints of what transpires in the film. Those who wish to avoid any such knowledge should see the movie first. Ah, how times passes. It seems like only a couple of Marvel movies ago that the original Avengers—Cap, Iron Man, Thor, Black Widow, Hulk, Hawkeye—were duking it out with Tony Stark’s high-end, ill-advised kitchenware Ultron
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stellar thief is the surviving companion to a supernovaHubble found the most compelling evidence that some supernovas originate in double-star systems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New results from preserve clinical trial include data on patients who underwent PCINew results from the large-scale, international randomized PRESERVE clinical trial are being presented as late-breaking clinical science at the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) 2018 Scientific Sessions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bacteria in the small intestine indispensable for fat absorptionA researcher at Midwestern University led a new study showing that Western diets, high in fat and simple sugar, promote the growth of bacteria in the small intestine that increase fat digestion and absorption. The goals of the study were to determine if microbes were required for digestion and absorption of fats, to begin to learn which microbes were involved, and to assess the role of diet-induce
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Molecule may help tame virulent bacteria and prevent infectionUniversity of Washington researchers show that an immune-system generated molecule called nitric oxide inhibits Staphylococcus aureus' transformation from a relatively benign, quiescent colonizing state to its virulent form.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study shows life-saving outcomes using 3-D printing models for heart valve diseaseA new study examines the effectiveness of 3-D printing technology and computer modeling to predict paravalvular leak (PVL) in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New clinical trial shows second generation drug-eluting stents are safe and effectiveResults of the PERSPECTIVE trial were presented today as late-breaking clinical science at the SCAI 2018 Scientific Sessions, and reports on one-year outcomes of patients undergoing CTO PCI treated with Zotarolimus-Eluting Stents (ZES).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Expanded registry data shows continued positive results for the mitraclip deviceThe post-approval study evaluating the safety and efficacy of MitraClip in a real-world, commercial setting was presented today as late-breaking clinical science at the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) 2018 Scientific Sessions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study shows length of hospital stay impacts outcomes after TAVR procedureA new study finds patients who stay in the hospital for more than 72 hours when undergoing trans-femoral TAVR procedure may be associated with negative short and long-term outcomes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

US autism rates rise 15 percent; New Jersey rates remain highestA new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which uses research by Rutgers University, shows a significant increase in the estimated percentage of 8-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in the United States.
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New Scientist - News

Horses remember if you smiled or frowned when they last saw youHorses can remember the expressions on people’s faces and use them to make judgements about whether people are nice or unpleasant
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

CRISPR/Cas9 silences gene associated with high cholesterol levels through epigenetic regulationBiomedical engineers at Duke University have used a CRISPR/Cas9 genetic engineering technique to turn off a gene that regulates cholesterol levels in adult mice, leading to reduced blood cholesterol levels and gene repression lasting for six months after a single treatment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reefs that experience frequent temperature changes most likely to resist coral bleachingAs scientists and conservationists race to work out the best way to conserve the world's coral reefs, a new study reveals why some reefs appear to be more resistant to coral bleaching during ocean warming events and calls for higher-resolution data to be collected.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Army researcher uses math to uncover new chemistryIn the future, materials scientists will use advanced software to specify the properties they desire and a program will deliver a choice of optimized chemical compounds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Treating cardiovascular disorders—and more—with the flips of a switchYou've heard of "nature versus nurture," and philosophers argue about which is more important. But how does this work on the cellular level?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study could spawn better ways to combat crop-killing fungusAbout 21 million years ago, a fungus that causes a devastating disease in rice first became harmful to the food that nourishes roughly half the world's population, according to an international study led by Rutgers University-New Brunswick scientists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Transplant-damaging virus comes into focusResearchers from the University of Leeds have revealed the structure of a virus which affects kidney and bone marrow transplant patients in near-atomic levels of detail for the first time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Proof of water wires motivated by a biological water channelAquaporins are proteins that serve as water channels to regulate the flow of water across biological cell membranes. They also remove excess salt and impurities in the body, and it is this aspect that has led to much interest in recent years in how to mimic the biochemical processes of aquaporins potentially for water desalination systems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Publication details IDRI's promising leprosy vaccine candidateA publication in Nature Partner Journals (npj) Vaccines indicates that post-exposure prophylaxis with LepVax, IDRI's leprosy vaccine candidate, not only appears safe but, unlike BCG (a tuberculosis vaccine that provides some protection against leprosy), alleviates and delays the neurologic disruptions caused by Mycobacterium leprae infection in nine-banded armadillos.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Upgrading the immune system to fight cancerNew research has opened the door to reducing serious side effects of CAR-T therapy while enhancing its effectiveness.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Community efforts to prevent teen problems have lasting benefitsA study by the University of Washington finds that a community-based approach to substance-abuse prevention, which can include after-school activities, can affect young people into adulthood.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Shoebox-Size Lab Can Diagnose Infectious Diseases from a Drop of BloodThe device can already detect antibodies for measles and rubella -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

What a Dog Geneticist Wants You to Know about Dog GeneticsWhat dog lovers get right, and wrong, about dog genetics -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

These Things Don't Cause Cancer, But People Think They DoWhich of the following raises the risk for cancer: alcohol, genetically modified foods or stress?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds horses remember facial expressions of people they've seen beforeA study by the Universities of Sussex and Portsmouth reveals that horses can read and then remember people's emotional expressions, enabling them to use this information to identify people who could pose a potential threat.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A simple method etches patterns at the atomic scaleA precise, chemical-free method for etching nanoscale features on silicon wafers has been developed by a team from Penn State and Southwest Jiaotong University and Tsinghua University in China.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

PARP-1 may be key to effectiveness of PARP inhibitors, and now researchers can image itPenn Medicine researchers have used CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technology to isolate a key genetic feature that could cause resistance to PARP inhibitors in patients with ovarian cancer -- and they've also proven they have a way to see that feature using PET imaging.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

RNA editing study shows potential for more effective precision cancer treatmentIf there is one thing all cancers have in common, it is they have nothing in common. A multi-center study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has shed light on why proteins, the seedlings that serve as the incubator for many cancers, can vary from cancer to cancer and even patient to patient, a discovery that adds to a growing base of knowledge important for developing more ef
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Move over Tupac! Life-size holograms set to revolutionize videoconferencingTeleHuman 2 -- the world's first truly holographic videoconferencing system -- is being unveiled. TeleHuman2 allows people in different locations to appear before one another in life-size 3-D -- as if they were in the same room.
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New on MIT Technology Review

China is installing a bewildering, and potentially troublesome, amount of solar capacity
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Zika virus eliminates advanced human tumor in central nervous system of rodentsA group of Brazilian researchers confirmed for the 1st time in vivo the efficiency of Zika virus in infecting CNS tumor cells -- tests even showed that the resulting viral particles were less harmful than the ones created from infection of healthy cells. The team's plans include applying for patent on pharmaceutical kit and moving on to clinical trial phase in near future.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers simulate conditions inside 'super-Earths'By aiming intense X-ray beams at iron samples, scientists have discovered what may lie at the core of 'super-Earths,' rocky planets triple the mass of Earth orbiting far-distant stars.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How landscapes and landforms 'remember' or 'forget' their initial formationsCrescent dunes and meandering rivers can 'forget' their initial shapes as they are carved and reshaped by wind and water while other landforms keep a memory of their past shape, suggests a new laboratory analysis by a team of mathematicians.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Navigating with the sixth senseDesert ants use the Earth's magnetic field for orientation, a new study has found which was conducted by scientists of the University of Würzburg. This provides ants the cue to find their way back to the nest.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Transplant-damaging virus comes into focusResearchers from the University of Leeds have revealed the structure of a virus which affects kidney and bone marrow transplant patients in near-atomic levels of detail for the first time.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds horses remember facial expressions of people they've seen beforeHorses can read and then remember people's emotional expressions, enabling them to use this information to identify people who could pose a potential threat.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

BU study: Egyptian fruit bat genome yields clues to protectionThe study examined the genome of Rousettus aegyptiacus, the Egyptian fruit bat, and found larger-than-expected families of genes related to the mammalian immune system. Specifically, researchers found large families of interferon and natural killer genes that differed dramatically from their counterparts in other mammals. The finding, published online and featured in the May 2018 print edition of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blood cancer precursor found in 9/11 firefightersA study in today's issue of JAMA Oncology reports that New York City firefighters exposed to the 9/11 World Trade Center disaster site face an increased risk for developing myeloma precursor disease, which can lead to the blood cancer multiple myeloma. The study was conducted by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Montefiore Health System, the Fire Department of the City of New Yor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Metastatic cancer gorges on fructose in the liverBiomedical engineers at Duke University have demonstrated that metastatic cancer cells can reprogram their metabolism to thrive in new organs. Cells originating from colorectal cancer change their dietary habits to capitalize on the high levels of fructose often found in the liver. The finding offers both general and specific insights into new ways of fighting metastatic cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

100-million-year-old liverwort mimicry in insectsResearchers from China and USA reported a new lacewing species (green lacewing larvae) based on two larvae from the Cretaceous Burmese amber (approximately 100 million years old). These larvae are anatomically modified to mimic coeval liverworts. This discovery represents the first record of liverwort mimicry by fossil insects and brings to light an evolutionary novelty, both in terms of morpholog
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Key differences in young, older people's immune cells attributed to environmentDiscoveries by Stanford University School of Medicine investigators may help explain why older people's immune systems often don't work so well, why different people's immune systems age at different rates, and why the environment matters more than heredity in generating these age-related differences.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dinosaurs' tooth wear sheds light on their predatory livesPredatory, bird-like theropod dinosaurs from the Upper Cretaceous of Spain and Canada all relied on a puncture-and-pull bite strategy to kill and consume their prey. But close examination of patterns of wear and modeling of their teeth reported in Current Biology on April 26 also suggest that these dinosaurs weren't necessarily in direct competition for their next meal. Some of them apparently pre
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The complicated biology of garlicResearchers generally agree that garlic, used for thousands of years to treat human disease, can reduce the risk of developing certain kinds of cancers, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes. Nevertheless, in a review published April 26 in the journal Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, researchers in the UK argue that explaining how garlic affects human health--and getting consistent result
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Want to build a dragon? Science is here for youFire-breathing dragons can’t live anywhere outside of a book or TV. But nature provides some guidance as to how they might get their flames. If they existed, anyway.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Robot-deployed balloons are taking over for humans at remote weather stations
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New Scientist - News

Gross alert: you can get a urinary tract infection from your dogJust like us, dogs carry many kinds of bacteria – and sometimes, this can spread from a pooch to their owner’s urinary tract, causing painful infections
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Scientific American Content: Global

Landmark Air Pollution Studies Could Be Excluded by Proposed EPA RuleResearch linking pollution to public health was instrumental in setting air quality standards -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

Beware the long face: horses remember your moodHorses are wary of people who were angry-looking if they meet them again, and more positive to people who they last saw smiling The following news is straight from the horse’s mouth: our equine companions can remember human facial expressions, and an angry grimace will leave a horse more wary of that individual, scientists claim. The research follows previous work by the team from University of S
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Feed: All Latest

A New Startup Wants to Use Crispr to Diagnose DiseaseGenetics pioneer Jennifer Doudna has launched the first commercial Crispr platform for detecting disease-causing DNA.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mediterranean diet boosts beneficial bacteria, study findsHere's another reason to eat a Mediterranean-type diet: it's good for your gut. Scientists have found that eating a plant-based diet enhanced the good bacteria living in the gut by up to 7 percent as compared to only 0.5 percent from eating a more meat-centric, Western diet.
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The Economist: The world this week

KAL’s cartoon
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The Economist: The world this week

Business this week
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The Economist: The world this week

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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reefs that experience frequent temperature changes most likely to resist coral bleachingReefs subjected to high sea temperature fluctuations on daily or tidal timescales leading up to ocean warming event are better able to resist coral bleaching, such that a 1 degree C increase in daily temperature range reduces the odds of more severe bleaching by a factor of 33.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

I'm (not) afraid to sayThe #imnotafraidtosay flashmob on Facebook and other online actions against sexual violence have helped victims to speak out about the problem and get psychological support from the web. At the same time, full frankness is hardly possible in such projects. It is directly related to anonymity. According to HSE researchers, the most painful experiences are still muted in groups where the discussants
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

VA delivers higher quality care than other health providers, study findsExamining a wide array of commonly used measures of health care quality, researchers have found that the VA health care system performs similar to or better than non-VA systems on most measures of inpatient and outpatient care quality. However, there is high variation in quality across individual VA facilities, suggesting that the VA needs targeted quality improvement efforts to ensure that vetera
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

CRISPR/Cas9 silences gene associated with high cholesterolBiomedical engineers at Duke University have used a CRISPR/Cas9 genetic engineering technique to turn off a gene that regulates cholesterol levels in adult mice, leading to reduced blood cholesterol levels and gene repression lasting for six months after a single treatment. This marks the first time researchers have delivered CRISPR/Cas9 repressors for targeted therapeutic gene silencing in adult
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Neonicotinoids may alter estrogen production in humansNeonicotinoids are currently the most widely used pesticides in the world and frequently make headlines because of their harmful effects on honeybees and other insect pollinators. Now, a study published in the prestigious journal Environmental Health Perspectives, indicates they may also have an impact on human health by disrupting our hormonal systems. This study by INRS professor Thomas Sanderso
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers assassinate disease-causing bacteria with virus cocktailResearchers from the University of Copenhagen have succeeded in targeting and killing E. coli without causing harm to the surrounding community of commensal bacteria in a simulated small intestinal microbiome using a cocktail of viruses (bacteriophages). The study proved that this approach is as effective as using broad-spectrum antibiotics. The experiment underlines the potential of using bacteri
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Treating cardiovascular disorders -- and more -- with the flips of a switchYou've heard of 'nature versus nurture,' and philosophers argue about which is more important. But how does this work on the cellular level?
5h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Magic of the Microscopic WorldBiologist and teacher Carrie Norin uses photography to reveal the unseen beauty around us -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chaperones just prepare proteins for folding on their ownCellular proteins are produced as long chains of amino acids that must fold precisely into their final shape. The key players in this folding process are the so-called molecular chaperones, protein helpers that make sure this process is successful. Researchers from Utrecht University, in close collaboration with colleagues from Heidelberg University, have at last uncovered how the two most importa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Egyptian fruit bat genome yields clues about bats' ability to harbor and transmit deadly pathogens without getting sickBoston University researchers, Thomas Kepler, professor of microbiology; Stephanie Pavlovich, an MD/PhD student; and Elke Mühlberger, director, Biomolecule Production Core, National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories (NEIDL); in collaboration with the United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Vi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dinosaurs' tooth wear sheds light on their predatory livesPredatory, bird-like theropod dinosaurs from the Upper Cretaceous (100.5-66 million years ago) of Spain and Canada all relied on a puncture-and-pull bite strategy to kill and consume their prey. But close examination of patterns of wear and modeling of their serrated, blade-like teeth reported in Current Biology on April 26 also suggest that these dinosaurs weren't necessarily in direct competitio
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

100-million-year-old liverwort mimicry in insectsCamouflage and mimicry are pervasive throughout the biological world as part of the usual interactions between predators and their prey, allowing both to avoid detection. Among insects, the icons of mimicry include familiar stick and leaf insects, leaf-like moths and katydids.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Army researcher uses math to uncover new chemistryIn the future, materials scientists will use advanced software to specify the properties they desire and a program will deliver a choice of optimized chemical compounds.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Proof of water wires motivated by a biological water channelAquaporins are proteins that serve as water channels to regulate the flow of water across biological cell membranes. They also remove excess salt and impurities in the body, and it is this aspect that has led to much interest in recent years in how to mimic the biochemical processes of aquaporins potentially for water desalination systems.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Speeding up material discoveryResearchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed an algorithm that can discover and optimize thermoelectic materials for energy conversion in a matter of months, relying on solving quantum mechanical equations, without any experimental input.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study could spawn better ways to combat crop-killing fungusAbout 21 million years ago, a fungus that causes a devastating disease in rice first became harmful to the food that nourishes roughly half the world's population, according to an international study led by Rutgers University-New Brunswick scientists. The findings may help lead to different ways to fight or prevent crop and plant diseases, such as new fungicides and more effective quarantines.
6h
The Atlantic

The Difference Between a Killer and a TerroristTwo mass murders took place within 48 hours this week. Both attackers were adherents of extremist ideologies. Both terrorized people. But one of these two attacks was clearly terrorism, and one was apparently not. What’s the difference? Early Sunday morning, Travis Reinking walked into a Tennessee Waffle House wearing nothing but a jacket and started shooting, killing four and wounding several mo
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Viden

Danske Emma Kathrine gik viralt og var magtesløsNår et billede går viralt på internettet, kan det være umuligt at standse det igen. Det oplevede danske Emma Kathrine på egen krop.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Biomarkers and efficacy of vaccine responses among patients treated with new MS drugIn March 2017, the US Food and Drug Administration approved ocrelizumab as the first treatment for both relapsing (RMS) and progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), a genetic disease that afflicts approximately 400,000 Americans with an estimated 10,000 new cases every year. This week at the 2018 American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Annual Meeting in Los Angeles, Penn Medicine neurologist Amit
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Probiotics useful in the fight against infection preventionProbiotics may be a relatively safe, simple, and low-cost solution for preventing Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in hospital settings, according to two studies published today in Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. Both studies show that treating patients who received antibiotics with multi-strain probiotics, cut dow
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

MSU-based scientists explained the survivability of virusesAn employee of Belozersky Research Institute of Physico-Chemical Biology (RI PCB), MSU together with a Russian colleague analyzed the ways of increasing the survivability of RNA-containing viruses as well as the mechanisms that help them get rid of adverse mutations. The study was published in Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews journal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New metric defines areas of highest prostate cancer burdenTo improve the impact of outreach efforts, researchers develop a better way to identify areas with high risk patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mid-life chronic inflammation may be linked to frailty laterA study of nearly 6,000 Americans followed for 24 years from middle to late adulthood found that having chronic inflammation in middle age may be linked to an increased risk of frailty and overall poorer health decades later.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unprecedented study identifies 44 genetic risk factors for major depressionA global research project has mapped out the genetic basis of major depression, identifying 44 genetic variants which are risk factors for depression, 30 of which are newly discovered. The study, by the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium and co-led in the UK by King's College London, is the largest study to-date of genetic risk factors for major depression.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers identify 44 genomic variants associated with depressionA new meta-analysis of more than 135,000 people with major depression and more than 344,000 controls has identified 44 genomic variants, or loci, that have a statistically significant association with depression.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hearing aids linked to fewer hospital and ER visits by older adultsThey cost thousands of dollars, and insurance almost never covers them. But hearing aids may hold the potential to cut older adults' visits to the hospital or emergency room, according to a new study. That could mean lower costs in the long run, though more research is needed to see if this is true. The study arrives at a time when discussion about adding Medicare coverage for hearing aids is risi
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hearing aid use associated with lower likelihood of hospitalization, emergency department visitOlder adults with hearing loss who used hearing aids were less likely to be hospitalized or have an emergency department visit and they had lower total Medicare costs, although their out-of-pocket health care expenses were higher.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Did eating dark chocolate improve vision?A small study found slight improvement in vision after eating dark chocolate.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Two studies, editorial report on cancer risk for firefighters at World Trade Center disasterTwo studies and a related editorial report on cancer risk for firefighters with the Fire Department of the City of New York (FDNY) exposed to the wreckage of the World Trade Center during rescue and recovery work following the attacks on Sept. 11, 2001.
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Futurity.org

New clues to genetics of depression are ‘game-changing’Researchers have identified 44 genomic variants, or loci, with a statistically significant association with depression. The meta-analysis involves research with more than 135,000 people with major depression and more than 344,000 controls. Of these 44 loci, 30 are new discoveries while previous studies had identified 14 of them. In addition, the new study in Nature Genetics identifies 153 signifi
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Popular Science

Researchers think 9/11 gave first responders cancer—but proving it will be nearly impossibleHealth New York City's fire department has assembled one of the largest firefighter research populations in the world. Two new studies, published in the journal JAMA Oncology , analyze cancer risks among firefighters who responded to the World Trade Center attack.
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Science | The Guardian

'Gene map for depression' sparks hopes of new generation of treatmentsA 200-strong team of researchers from across the globe have mapped the genetic variants that increase the risk of depression Scientists have raised hopes for more effective treatments for depression, a condition that affects over 300 million people globally, after mapping out the genetic foundations of the mental disorder in unprecedented detail. In the world’s largest investigation into the impa
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New on MIT Technology Review

AI is a poet, and knows it
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Transparent eel-like soft robot can swim silently underwaterAn innovative, eel-like robot developed by engineers and marine biologists can swim silently in salt water without an electric motor. Instead, the robot uses artificial muscles filled with water to propel itself. The foot-long robot, which is connected to an electronics board that remains on the surface, is also virtually transparent.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New breath and urine tests detect early breast cancer more accuratelyA new method for early and accurate breast cancer screening has been developed using commercially available technology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Children of youngest and oldest mothers at increased risk of developmental vulnerabilitiesChildren born to teenage mothers have the highest risk of developmental vulnerabilities at age 5, largely due to social and economic disadvantage, a new study of almost 100,000 school children has found. The risk declines steadily with every additional year of a mother's age up to 30 years, then increases slightly after 35 years and older -- to a level similar to the risk for children born to moth
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

No future for egoists -- that's what their brain says!Some people are worried about the consequences of climate change, while others consider them too remote to have an impact on their well-being. Researchers examined how these differences are reflected in our brains. With the help of neuro-imaging, the scientists found that people deemed 'egotistical' do not use the area of the brain that enables us to look into and imagine the distant future. In 'a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

E. coli -- are we measuring the wrong thing?Work to improve sepsis detection suggests that hospitals may be measuring the wrong metrics for success. A sepsis awareness and management program has demonstrated overall success in terms of improved sepsis detection, but has led to an increase in the number of E. coli blood stream infection cases presented.
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New on MIT Technology Review

This startup hopes to keep barf bags out of self-driving carsBy filtering out road vibrations, ClearMotion can prevent carsickness in autonomous vehicles.
6h
The Atlantic

What Happens When Your Bomb-Defusing Robot Becomes a WeaponMicah Xavier Johnson spent the last day of his life in a standoff, holed up in a Dallas community-college building. By that point, he had already shot 16 people. Negotiators were called in, but it was 2:30 in the morning and the police chief was tired. He’d lost two officers. Nine others were injured. Three of them would later die. In the early hours of July 7, 2016, the chief asked his SWAT team
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A biochemical process in plants is imitated to curb the reproduction of colon cancer tumor cellsUniversity of Cordoba research team has developed a tool to erase molecular tags that silence genes involved in tumor growth.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Meningococcal meningitis: Stomach pain should be seen as a warning signPatients with meningococcal infection generally develop symptoms including a high temperature, vomiting and a stiff neck... but they might also just have a bad stomach ache. This can be so severe that they are sometimes wrongly operated for appendicitis. Teams from the Institut Pasteur decided to investigate the question. And the results speak for themselves: 10 percent of patients infected by the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Loss of brain synchrony may explain working memory limits, says studyA new study from City, University of London and MIT may have revealed the reasons behind our memory limitations. The researchers found that trying to retain too much information in our working memory leads to a communication breakdown between parts of the brain responsible for maintaining it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Who is using guns for suicide?The average profile of an American using a gun for suicide is a married, white male over the age of 50 who is experiencing deteriorating health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Smartphone app keeps an 'eye' on daily tuberculosis therapyJohns Hopkins researchers report success with asmart phone video-based app that substitutes for a daily in-person visit by a health care worker required for tuberculosis treatment known as directly observed therapy, or DOT. The preliminary study showed that the app may be less costly and may improve privacy concerns raised by patients compared to in-person visits.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Curiosity is key to early childhood success in math and readingCurious children are better able to grasp basic math and reading. This is according to a group of researchers from the University of Michigan, led by Prachi Shah. The study in the journal Pediatric Research, which is published by Springer Nature, is the first to investigate a possible link between curiosity and early academic success among young children.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Going home to Chernobyl ghost town 32 years onNatalia Shevchuk gazes at the peeling walls inside her old flat and tears run down her cheeks: 32 years after the Chernobyl disaster she is finally revisiting her childhood home in the ghost town of Pripyat.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Melting Arctic sends a message—climate change is here in a big wayScientists have known for a long time that as climate change started to heat up the Earth, its effects would be most pronounced in the Arctic. This has many reasons, but climate feedbacks are key. As the Arctic warms, snow and ice melt, and the surface absorbs more of the sun's energy instead of reflecting it back into space. This makes it even warmer, which causes more melting, and so on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Snapchat upgrades 'Spectacles' after first-generation flopSnapchat on Thursday began selling a new version of its eyewear with built-in cameras after the first version failed to catch on with users of the youth-oriented social network.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Turning deep-learning AI loose on software developmentComputer scientists have created a deep-learning, software-coding application that can help human programmers by writing chunks of code in response to keywords.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook says to extend political ad changes to UKFacebook on Thursday said that it would be extending a raft of measures to allow its users to identify the source of political adverts that appear in their feed to Britain next year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Evidence for persistent forest reliance by indigenous peoples in historical Sri LankaWorking closely with Wanniyalaeto (Vedda) elders in Sri Lanka during the repatriation of skeletal remains, a team of researchers have demonstrated that while some Indigenous hunter-gatherers in Sri Lanka made use of agricultural resources and trade connections with farmers and colonial power structures, others continued to subsist primarily on tropical forest resources as late as the 19th century.
7h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How work kept me going during my cancer treatment | Sarah DonnellyWhen lawyer Sarah Donnelly was diagnosed with breast cancer, she turned to her friends and family for support -- but she also found meaning, focus and stability in her work. In a personal talk about why and how she stayed on the job, she shares her insights on how workplaces can accommodate people going through major illnesses -- because the benefits go both ways.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Tailoring blood cells in the laboratoryFor some blood transfusion patients, it is particularly difficult to find a compatible blood donor. Growing matching blood cells in the laboratory has long been an overarching goal of scientists for these patients. Research from Ashley Toye and colleagues at the University of Bristol, UK, and NHS Blood and Transplant has brought this vision one step closer to reality. The research is published tod
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Quality cancer care: Not just a matter of anti-cancer medicinesESMO, the leading professional organisation for medical oncology, shares concerns expressed in a scientific paper and reflected in the international media about the rising costs of cancer medicines.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Double trouble for a coral reefUpolu, one of the nine islands of Samoa, in the Pacific Ocean. This isolated coral reef promised to be a site of rich biodiversity for the scientists on the Tara Pacific expedition, principally from the CNRS, the CEA and KAUST. But, it proved to be in a far more degraded state than previously thought: coral cover is below 10 percent in over 80 percent of the 124 sites considered.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research finds new mechanism that can cause the spread of deadly infectionScientists at the University of Birmingham have discovered a unique mechanism that drives the spread of a deadly infection.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Evidence for persistent forest reliance by indigenous peoples in historical Sri LankaWorking closely with Wanniyalaeto (Vedda) elders in Sri Lanka during the repatriation of skeletal remains, a team of researchers have demonstrated that while some indigenous hunter-gatherers in Sri Lanka made use of agricultural resources and trade connections with farmers and colonial power structures, others continued to subsist primarily on tropical forest resources as late as the 19th century.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

There is more than just saving money when it comes to fake goodsWhile some may think a 'knock-off' product is morally wrong, new research from UBC's Okanagan campus demonstrates that for some cultures 'unethical' consumption is a virtue.
7h
The Atlantic

How Slack Got Ahead in DiversityLast week, Slack, the company whose popular, plaid-themed messaging app has simplified office communications and introduced custom fox emoji into our daily routines, quietly released its 2017 diversity report. Diversity reports, which list statistics like the percentage of women in management and underrepresented minorities in technical jobs, have become something of an annual rite of passage amo
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Futurity.org

Bag device could save babies with external intestinesA new system could help treat babies born with gastroschisis, a condition where the abdominal wall is not fully closed and some of the intestines are outside the body at birth. Standard treatment in Western hospitals is a sterile silicone bag that holds the intestines in place and allows gravity to slowly pull them back into the abdominal cavity—a process that can take five to 10 days. But the cu
7h
Live Science

Hey, Congress: Scientists Are Coming for Your SeatsFrom a nuclear commander to a Harvard-educated refugee, STEM-trained candidates are shaking up politics.
7h
Ingeniøren

Reaktioner: Regeringens energiudspil er for uambitiøstUdbygningen med vedvarende energi er ikke tilstrækkelig, og der mangler kraftigt fokus på energibesparelser, lyder kritikken af regeringens energiudspil.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When politics affects demography: How Erdogan has brought 10 percent more children to TurkeyPolitics, and in particular the Islamist AKP party, played a decisive role in the reversal of demographic decline in Turkey since the early 2000s, through the provision of local welfare policies directed to families. The effects of the Turkish policies are surprisingly similar to Swedish welfare, but in a completely different setting. The study rules out alternative explanations based on an increa
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sylentis presents new results on its ophthalmological compounds at ARVO 2018Sylentis, the pharmaceutical company belonging to PharmaMar Group, will present new results on three ophthalmological compounds for the treatment of dry eye syndrome, macular degeneration associated to age, administered topically, and also for the treatment of eye allergies. The mentioned presentations will take place under the framework of the annual meeting of the Association for Research in Vis
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Review finds more effective drugs to stop bleeding after childbirthNew evidence from a Cochrane review suggests that alternative drugs may be more effective than the standard drug currently used to stop women bleeding after childbirth.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists identify a potential treatment for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasiaThe work of researchers Francesc Viñals, Mariona Graupera and Antoni Riera-Mestre has led to a new potential treatment for hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) or Rendu-Osler syndrome, a rare disease that affects blood vessels and had no described treatment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Identifying the use of tinder fungi among neolithic communities at la DragaInhabitants of the Neolithic community at la Draga already used fungi to light or transport fires 7,300 years ago. The discovery represents one of the oldest examples of technological use of fungi documented until now and is the result of several archaeological interventions at the site, which have also yielded an exceptional collection of these organisms, unique in all of prehistoric Europe.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fluoride varnish in the primary dentition can prevent cariesRegular use of fluoride varnish can prevent caries in primary teeth. Advantages or disadvantages regarding further patient-relevant outcomes remain unclear due to a lack of data.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Obesity inhibits key cancer defense mechanismObesity could enhance cancer development while aspirin might prevent it -- a new insight into potential targets for cancer prevention.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NUS geography researchers determine benefits of Singapore's mangrovesA three-year study conducted by researchers from the National University of Singapore has identified that apart from cultural benefits, mangroves act as nursery habitat for fish and as coastal defence, as well as storing carbon that could help offset some of our climate change emissions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Kids exposed to general anesthestic have poorer development, literacy and numeracy scoresExposure to general anesthestic up to age four raises the risk of poor child development and reduced literacy and numeracy as measured by school tests, new research led by the University of Sydney reveals.
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New Scientist - News

Robot port in China to unload shipping containers without humansDriverless vehicles will make the global shipping network cheaper and more efficient – and cost jobs
7h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Elusive Calculus of Insect AltruismA new theory may change the debate over evolution and self-interest among ants, bees and other social bugs -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
New Scientist - News

Don’t rely on draconian controls to keep your kids safer onlineConcerns about use of social media by children and teens are multiplying. But is heavy-handed intervention the solution, wonders Paul Marks
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Punching holes in graphene to boost hydrogen productionResearchers may have brought the renewable energy future one step closer. A new electrode can accomplish the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in acidic conditions, making the technology both cheaper and more effective. The process is helped by a smart form of graphene.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Double trouble for a coral reefUpolu, one of the nine islands of Samoa, in the Pacific Ocean. Well-known among fans of diving, this isolated coral reef promised to be a site of rich biodiversity for the scientists on the Tara Pacific expedition, principally from the CNRS, the CEA1 and the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) in Saudi Arabia. Although some signs of bleaching had been observed on their route
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rabies trick could help treat Parkinson's DiseaseThe rabies virus wreaks havoc on the brain, triggering psychosis and death. To get where it needs to go, the virus must first trick the nervous system and cross the blood brain barrier -- a process that makes it of interest in drug design. Now, scientists report a way to exploit the rabies virus machinery to deliver a Parkinson's disease medication directly to the brain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Back in black for singletons trying to find loveBlack beats red as the color of choice when it comes to finding new love, according to new research based on the hit TV series 'First Dates,' which shows that single people wear more of the darker hue when meeting a potential partner for the first time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bacteria boost antifungal drug resistance in severe childhood tooth decaySome young children experience severe tooth decay that resist normal therapies. New research shows how plaque's protective matrix can shield fungal cells from the drugs intended to kill them.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Easier way to predict how chemical compounds will interactNew research has revealed that simple, commercially available computer programmes could be used to design next generation drug-delivery systems by predicting more easily how different chemical compounds interact.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why we need erasable MRI scansGas-filled protein structures could one day be used as 'erasable' contrast agents for MRI scans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Millennial men value altruism and self-care above traditional male qualitiesContrary to popular stereotypes, young men today are likely to be selfless, socially engaged and health-conscious, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New tools in the fight against diabetic blindnessEstimates are that 600 million people will have some sort of diabetic retinopathy by 2040. Previously, no good animal models existed that scientists could use to study the disease, its diagnosis or potential treatments. Now, scientists have employed a mouse model exhibiting diabetic retinopathy symptoms that could lead to future translational research studies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nuclear radiation detecting device could lead to new homeland security toolA research team has developed an exceptional next-generation material for nuclear radiation detection that could provide a significantly less expensive alternative to detectors now in commercial use. Specifically, the high-performance material is used in a device that can detect gamma rays, weak signals given off by nuclear materials, and can easily identify individual radioactive isotopes. Potent
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Popular Science

How to finally organize your contact listDIY Tips and tricks for the Apple, Google, and Microsoft contact apps. Your contacts are in a hopeless jumble. Organize them with these tips and tricks for the Apple, Google, and Microsoft contacts apps.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New methods for genetics analyses and diagnosis of inflammatory bowel diseaseInflammatory bowel disease is a common chronic disease of the gut. Approximately one out of 250 Europeans suffer from this disease today.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Accepted or rejected? Uncovering how fate of B cell is determinedOsaka University-centered researchers identify the plasma cell-prone B cells in the light zone of germinal centers. Higher expression of the proteins ICAM-1 and SLAM in those cells facilitates more stable contacts with Tfh cells, suggesting that strength of Tfh-GC B cell interaction critically regulates formation of plasma cell precursors. The findings serve as important information for the develo
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NUS engineers develop novel method for resolving spin texture of topological surface states using transport measurementsA research breakthrough from the National University of Singapore has revealed a close relation between the spin texture of topological surface states and a new kind of magneto-resistance. The team's finding could help in addressing the issue of spin current source selection often faced in the development of spintronic devices.
7h
The Atlantic

Donald From D.C. Calls in to Fox and FriendsUpdated on April 26 at 10:21 a.m. President Trump isn’t great at avoiding trouble. On Thursday alone, his nominee to lead the Department of Veterans Affairs, Ronny Jackson, withdrew amid allegations of misconduct; Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt is set to be grilled about allegations of misconduct on Capitol Hill; and his longtime fixer Michael Cohen was set to appear a
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The Atlantic

The Perks of a Play-in-the-Mud Educational PhilosophyMost American kids don’t spend large chunks of their day catching salamanders and poking sticks into piles of fox poop. In a nation moving toward greater standardization of its public-education system , programs centered around getting kids outside to explore aren’t normal. But that’s precisely what students do at the Nature Preschool at Irvine Nature Center in Owings Mills, Maryland. There, ever
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

E. coli rewired to control growth as experts let them make proteins for medicineExperts have equipped biotech workhorse bacteria with feedback control mechanism to balance growth with making protein products.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Camouflage protects animals – even if they are spottedPythons, moths and frogs exhibit a certain type of camouflage that hides their identity from other animals even after they have been spotted, new research has found.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Statistical designs accelerate the optimization of layered 2-D crystalsResearchers have demonstrated that statistical optimization techniques provide substantial efficiency increases when engineering layered van der Waals heterostructures. The research team used the Sb2Te3 growth problem to demonstrate the power of fractional factorial design in materials science to uncover the statistically significant parameters that influence the quality of Sb2Te3 crystals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Looking past peer influence: Genetic contributions to increases in teen substance use?Parents spend a lot of time worrying about the influence of peers on teen substance use. A new study examines if there is a genetic component that drives teens' desire for risk taking and novelty. A key finding revealed genetic influences that are unique to the growth in substance use. With each passing year, genetic differences between individuals become more and more important in explaining why
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Implantable islet cells come with their own oxygen supplyResearchers have designed and tested an implantable device for treatment of Type 1 diabetes. The device furnishes islet cells with their own supply of oxygen, carried in a chamber that can be replenished every 24 hours.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Consuming protein supplements with meals may work better for weight controlA new systematic review of available evidence indicates that consuming protein supplements with meals may be more effective at promoting weight control than consuming supplements between meals in adults following a resistance training regimen.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Skewed sex ratios causes single bird fathers to bring up the youngWhen the balance of the sexes is skewed towards one gender, parents are more likely to split up, leaving the father to care for the offspring, says a new study in bird populations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bento browser makes it easier to search on mobile devicesSearches involving multiple websites can quickly get confusing, particularly when performed on a mobile device with a small screen. A new web browser now brings order to complex searches in a way not possible with conventional tabbed browsing. The Bento browser stores each search session as a project workspace that keeps track of the most interesting or relevant parts of visited web pages.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Drinking baking soda could be an inexpensive, safe way to combat autoimmune diseaseA daily dose of baking soda may help reduce the destructive inflammation of autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, scientists say. They have some of the first evidence of how the cheap, over-the-counter antacid can encourage our spleen to promote instead an anti-inflammatory environment that could be therapeutic in the face of inflammatory disease scientists report.
8h
Big Think

The science is in: You need to take more napsIn his latest book, 'When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing', Daniel Pink makes a convincing case for more naps. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Algorithm take months, not years, to find material for improved energy conversionIn even the most fuel-efficient cars, about 60 percent of the total energy of gasoline is lost through heat in the exhaust pipe and radiator. To combat this, researchers are developing new thermoelectic materials that can convert heat into electricity. These semiconducting materials could recirculate electricity back into the vehicle and improve fuel efficiency by up to 5 percent.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Finding trace material in waste materialsLast year Empa's inorganic analytics lab was granted the status of "Reference Laboratory" within the scope of the ProSUM project, funded by the EU. Fine-grained samples of shredder waste from scrapped cars, e-waste or mine dumps from all over Europe end up here. Empa chemists find out what is in them, what is worth extracting and what could be dangerous for staff at recycling plants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The convoluted history of the double-helixIt's been 65 years since the paper "Molecular structure of nucleic acids," by James Watson and Francis Crick, was published in Nature. Or, more prosaically, the paper that first describes the structure of DNA as we know it today.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study sheds light on recently evolved traits among Japanese descendantsEvolution allows advantageous traits to become predominant. Evolutionary adaptions that occur on comparatively short time scales are less well-understood. Researchers centered at Osaka University used whole-genome sequencing to identify the evolutionary adaptations that occurred within Japanese populations over the last 3,000 years. In contrast to European ancestry studies, adaptive changes relate
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study sheds light on bacterial propeller assemblyThe bacterial flagellum is a motor whose assembly occurs in an ordered, stepwise fashion. However, the molecular details of this ordered assembly are poorly understood. Japanese researchers centered at Osaka University used high-speed atomic force microscopy and biochemical assays to identify structural changes to a protein ring that acts as a gatekeeper for flagellum assembly. The study provides
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cell membrane inspires new ultrathin electronic filmJapanese researchers have developed a new method to build large areas of semiconductive material that is just two molecules thick and a total of 4.4 nanometers tall. The films function as thin film transistors, and have potential future applications in flexible electronics or chemical detectors. These thin film transistors are the first example of semiconductive single molecular bilayers created w
8h
The Atlantic

Who Is to Blame for Kanye West's MAGA Hat?It may seem to some as though Kanye West’s recent Donald Trump rally on Twitter is comeuppance for fans and critics who gassed him up as a genius over the years. This is the wrong take. Almost from the start, the Kanye West conversation, among all but the most slavering fanboys, has been critical of West the man even as it has praised West the musician. The people who have hated him have been lou
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Culprit in reducing effectiveness of insulin identifiedScientists have discovered that Stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1) secreted from adipocytes reduced the effectiveness of insulin in adipocytes and decreased insulin-induced glucose uptake.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Oxidative stress makes difference between metabolically abnormal and healthy obesitiesScientists have clarified that deletion of adipose oxidative stress (Fat ROS) decreased lipid accumulation in the liver, clinically improving insulin resistance and inducing metabolically healthy obesity. In fact, Fat ROS suppressed lipid accumulation and increased ectopic lipid accumulation in the liver, worsening insulin resistance.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microbial communities have a seasonal shake-upSeasonal changes in turbulence and nutrient availability are shown to shape microbial communities in the Red Sea. "A lot of the marine ecosystem is ultimately based on how microbes live and what they're doing," explains research scientist John Pearman, who undertook the study. "Knowing how microbes respond is important to understand how the ecosystem is going to function."
8h
Big Think

There is no such thing as Italian foodYou can get a pizza even in Pyongyang. But is it Italian? Read More
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Viden

Forsker: Nu kan vi teste bedre for høreproblemerFremover kan de 800.000 danskere med høreproblemer testes med bedre værktøjer, viser dansk forskning fra én af fem finalister ved Ph.d. Cup 2018.
8h
Ingeniøren

Politisk flertal vil have regeringen til at stramme brugen af pesticiderOppositionen og DF vil have stoppet dispensationer til landmænd, der bruger bidræbende neonikotinoider.
8h
Futurity.org

Russian Arctic ice melt is picking up speedThe rate of ice mass loss in the Russian Arctic has nearly doubled over the last decade when compared to records from the previous 60 years, a new study shows. Scientists focused on Franz Josef Land, a glaciated Russian archipelago in the Kara and Barents seas—among the northernmost and most remote parcels of land on Earth, using very high-resolution optical satellite images to examine the island
8h
The Atlantic

‘Chinaperson’ and the Sanitization of a Racial SlurIn a radio interview earlier this week, Don Blankenship, a Republican candidate for U.S. Senate in West Virginia, accused Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of having foreign-policy conflicts of interest, based on McConnell’s marriage to Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao. But Blankenship’s comments attracted attention not just for what he had to say—intimating that McConnell’s wife and her
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Europe's current approach to food, agriculture, and the environment is not sustainableThe European Academies' Science Advisory Council along with the InterAcademy Partnership are calling for European policy-makers to urgently re-think their approach to food and agriculture. Calling for a 'food systems approach,' the national science academies say that the current siloed policy approach to food, agriculture, climate change, and health -- both at the EU and Member State levels -- is
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study suggests older surgeons produce lower mortality rates in emergency proceduresResearchers found surgeries performed by older surgeons -- age 50 and up -- have lower patient mortality rates than those performed by younger surgeons, and that patient mortality rates do not differ significantly based on whether the surgeon is male or female.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

There is more than just saving money when it comes to fake goodsWhile some may think a 'knock-off' product is morally wrong, new research from UBC's Okanagan campus demonstrates that for some cultures 'unethical' consumption is a virtue. Faculty of Management assistant professor Eric Li, along with researchers from the Hong Kong Polytechnic University and the Hong Kong Design Institute, interviewed young Chinese consumers about their purchased counterfeit prod
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Noninvasive spinal stimulation method enables paralyzed people to regain use of handsA UCLA-led team of scientists reports that six people with severe spinal cord injuries -- three of them completely paralyzed -- have regained use of their hands and fingers for the first time in years after undergoing a nonsurgical, noninvasive spinal stimulation procedure the researchers developed.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel ecosystems provide use for some native birdsEcosystems that have been altered by human activities can provide suitable habitat for native birds, according to scientists in the United States and Australia.
8h
New Scientist - News

The world’s biggest hacking market has just been bustedA website that provided hacking services for a monthly fee and had hundreds of thousands of subscribers was closed in international bust
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Space agencies aim to deliver rocks from Mars to EarthNasa and Esa sign a letter of intent that could lead to the first "round trip" to the Red Planet.
8h
Dagens Medicin

Lægeforeningens næstformand vil sætte fokus på psykiatrienAmbitionerne er tårnhøje hos den 58-årige speciallæge i psykiatri, der er blevet valgt til næstformand for Lægeforeningen. Hendes mål er at sidestille den ellers nedprioriterede psykiatri med somatikken.
8h
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Ominous Views of Japan's New Concrete SeawallsCan these 41-foot-high walls protect the country from another tsunami?
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

American Airlines 1Q profits hit by higher fuel costsAmerican Airlines reported a drop in first-quarter profits Thursday in part due to higher fuel costs, but said consumer demand for air travel remained robust.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists set eyes on Neanderthal 'brain'Scientists have for the first time set eyes on a three-dimensional Neanderthal brain in the form of a virtual model made to fit the empty, fossilised skulls of long-dead individuals, a study said Thursday.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Analyzing insect performance—Researchers looking at the role neonicotinoid insecticides play in arthropod performancePollinators and other beneficial insects play an important role in the agricultural world, especially in terms of economic value for growers. A study conducted by Cornell University showed that crops pollinated by those beneficial insects contributed $29 billion to farm income in 2010.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global

Human Brain Gain: Computer Models Hint at Why We Bested NeandertalsDifferences in the structure of the brain’s cerebellum may help explain our superior cognitive abilities -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Futurity.org

Cannon blasts mimic asteroids delivering waterExperiments with a high-powered projectile cannon show how impacts by water-rich asteroids can deliver surprising amounts of water to planetary bodies, report researchers. The research could shed light on how water got to the early Earth and help account for some trace water detections on the Moon and elsewhere. “The origin and transportation of water and volatiles is one of the big questions in
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

It's time we demanded the protection of our personal dataWe are beginning to see the extent to which our online personal information can be compromised and used in ways we never intended and never authorized.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

GM earnings hit by South Korea chargeGeneral Motors reported a big drop in first-quarter profits Thursday due to costs connected with shuttering a plant in South Korea, but car sales rose in the US and China.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cell membrane inspires new ultrathin electronic filmJapanese researchers have developed a new method to build large areas of semiconductive material that is just two molecules thick and a total of 4.4 nanometers tall. The films function as thin film transistors, and have potential future applications in flexible electronics or chemical detectors. These thin film transistors are the first example of semiconductive single molecular bilayers created w
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Zinc is able to modulate Escherichia coli bacteria's virulence, study findszinc can modulate the virulence of Escherichia coli bacteria, a pathogen that causes urinary infections in humans, according to a new study published in the journal Scientific Reports by biologist Carlos Balsalobre, from the University of Barcelona (UB). The new study reveals for the first time that zinc can regulate the expression of bacterial virulence factors, in particular, alfa-hemolysin, an
8h
The Atlantic

'I Don't Know How Professors Teach Without Fighter-Pilot Experience'Missy Cummings’s father was in the Navy, but he urged her to go into the Air Force because he thought it was a better environment for women. Still, she entered the Navy, becoming one of the service’s first female fighter pilots. While her mother, a teacher, wasn’t against the idea, she was glad when Cummings finished serving and became a professor and the director of the Humans and Autonomy Lab a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antibody 'cocktail' can prevent Zika infection but is not effective for treatment of fetusesA 'cocktail' of monoclonal antibodies that can prevent Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in primates was not effective for treatment of fetuses, according to a new collaborative study led by a University of Miami Miller School of Medicine research team. The team of researchers is now working on engineering the antibodies to redirect the therapies to the fetus.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UCLA research may explain some causes of infertility and miscarriageA new study in the journal Nature Cell Biology has uncovered information about a key stage that human embryonic cells must pass through just before an embryo implants. The research, led by UCLA biologist Amander Clark, could help explain certain causes of infertility and spontaneous miscarriage.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Analyzing insect performanceA team of researchers from the University of Missouri looked at the role neonicotinoid insecticides play in arthropod abundance, behavior, condition, reproductive success and survival. They found the insecticides negatively affected a broad array of arthropods.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Critically endangered Javan Rhino dies in IndonesiaA Javan rhino has died in Indonesia, the environment ministry said Thursday, bringing the critically endangered mammals closer to extinction with just 60 believed to be still living in the wild.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fido funeral: In Japan, a send-off for robot dogsThe robot dogs lined up in their dozens Thursday in Japan were no tech fair display. They were the dearly departed being honoured with their own traditional "funeral."
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fiat Chrysler drives profits higherFiat Chrysler (FCA) said Thursday that its net profit jumped 59 percent in the first quarter of the year, but unfavourable exchange rate changes ate away at an increase in sales of vehicles.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU tells tech giants to tackle fake news by end-yearThe EU warned US tech giants Thursday to crack down on the spread of "fake news" by the end of the year or face regulation in the wake of a scandal involving the illegal harvesting of Facebook users' data.
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Dagens Medicin

To nye analyser sætter fokus på styring af sundhedsvæsenetTo analyser, der skal danne grundlaget for udviklingen af fremtidens styring af sundhedsvæsenet, er blevet offentliggjort.
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Dagens Medicin

Forsker vil forebygge livstilssygdomme hos psykisk sygeSyddansk ph.d.-projekt vil undersøge retspsykiatriske patienters sundhedsvaner
9h
The Atlantic

Sympathy for the CharlieIn sitcoms, there’s a thing that will sometimes happen when a new character is introduced to the show: The newbie, often but not always a fleeting love interest of one of the main characters, will arrive on the scene … and then promptly be dismissed as narratively expendable. Tasha on Insecure , Emily on Friends , the Mother (her name is pretty much irrelevant) on How I Met Your Mother : They are
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study sheds light on bacterial propeller assemblyMany bacteria are equipped with a flagellum, a helical propeller that allows bacteria to travel. The flagellum is assembled in a highly organized manner involving the stepwise addition of each of its internal parts. However, there are many open questions as to how this orderly construction is achieved. In a study published in Science Advances, a Japanese research team centered at Osaka University
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Futurity.org

Diabetic mice to let scientists study vision lossA new mouse model that exhibits symptoms of diabetic retinopathy, a disease that often causes blindness, could lead to future translational research, say researchers. Diabetic retinopathy affects adults who have had diabetes mellitus for 10 years or more. Estimates are that 600 million people will have some sort of the disease by 2040. Until now, no good animal models existed that scientists coul
9h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: RainbotubulesBy combining two microscopy techniques, researchers produce images of structures less than 10 nanometers wide.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study sheds light on recently evolved traits among Japanese descendantsEvolution enables beneficial traits to dominate a population. Given enough time, groups exposed to different environments will eventually evolve unique adaptive traits. Knowing how environmental pressures shape human evolution can lead to a better understanding of why certain populations or ethnic groups today are predisposed to certain characteristics. In a new study published in Nature Communica
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer spacecraft to re-enter over tropicsFragments of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) spacecraft, a NASA mission to observe the time variation of astronomical X-ray sources, are expected to fall to Earth on or about May 1. The mission was terminated and the spacecraft decommissioned on Jan. 12, 2012.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fungal highways on cheese rinds influence food safety, ripenessBacteria traveling along "fungal highways" on cheese rinds can spread more quickly and ruin quality or cause foodborne illnesses, but cheesemakers could manipulate the same highways to help cheese mature faster and taste better, according to new research from Tufts University.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Recreating supernova reaction yields new insights for fusion energyWe study exploding stars in our quest to make reliable fusion energy a reality, but chances are we've been thinking about supernovae wrong.
9h
Popular Science

If you grow a brain in a lab, will it have a mind of its own?Science As our ability to create organs expands, ethical questions come into play. There are lots of reasons one might want to grow brains. For starters, they would allow us to study human neurological issues in detail, which is otherwise quite…
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Dagens Medicin

Flere læger udskriver medicinsk cannabisYderligere 100 forskellige læger har fra marts til april måned ordineret medicinsk cannabis til patienter. Det er ifølge sundhedsministeren »en vigtig udvikling«.
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Dagens Medicin

Diabetesforeningen nedjusterer antallet af danskere med diabetes – igenFor fjerde gang det seneste år har Diabetesforeningen foretaget en kraftig nedjustering af sine tal for udbredelsen af diabetes. »Vi er kun interesseret i, at tallene er korrekte,« siger formand.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Disguising access patterns to protect sensitive data in the cloudA team of computer scientists is working to defend against the next potential cyber risk – cloud storage. Wensheng Zhang, an associate professor of computer science at Iowa State University, says cloud users can encrypt sensitive data and information, but how they access the data may make it vulnerable.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study examines how early embryonic development can go awryA new study in the journal Nature Cell Biology has uncovered information about a key stage that human embryonic cells must pass through just before an embryo implants. The research, led by UCLA biologist Amander Clark, could help explain certain causes of infertility and spontaneous miscarriage.
9h
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Snapchat Spectacles (2018): Hands On, Price, Release DateThe social network Snap, Inc has refreshed its Spectacles wearable camera. They're improved—and more expensive.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A user-friendly, step-by-step guide to conducting comparative product evaluationsAccording to the World Bank, over 1.1 billion people have lifted themselves from extreme poverty since 1990. But even as the global outlook on extreme poverty improves, billions of people continue to struggle to access basic human needs, like water, food, shelter, health care and energy. In response to these challenges, innovators around the world have developed a preponderance of cost-effective,
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Underwater grasses in Chesapeake Bay continue record growthAn annual survey led by researchers at William & Mary's Virginia Institute of Marine Science mapped an estimated 104,843 acres of underwater grasses in Chesapeake Bay in 2017, the highest amount ever recorded and the third consecutive year of record-breaking abundance.
9h
Ingeniøren

Her er stævningen, der skal sætte stopper for dansk telelogningDonationer til kampen mod ulovlig telelogning er stukket af, fortæller foreningens initiativtager.
10h
Ingeniøren

It-sikkerhedsfolk hacker sig til hovednøgle til tusindvis af hotelværelserKodestumper opsnappet fra gamle chipkort kan bruges til at bygge en masterkey til udbredt hotellåsesystem, viser sikkerhedsforskere.
10h
Futurity.org

These dentures deliver drugs to battle infectionResearchers have created 3D-printed dentures that can deliver drugs to prevent the kinds of infections that affect so many people who use artificial teeth. Nearly two-thirds of the US denture-wearing population suffer frequent fungal infections that cause inflammation, redness, and swelling in the mouth. To better treat these infections, called denture-related stomatitis, researchers turned to 3D
10h
Dagens Medicin

Derfor har Holbæk for mange patienter og for få sygeplejerskerAntallet af medicinske patienter voksede Holbæk Sygehus over hovedet, da regionen minimerede de geriatriske afdelinger på Sjællands Universitetshospital. Det indikerer en analyse.
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Dagens Medicin

Overlæge: »Der er helt klart stadig alt, alt for mange patienter her på medicinsk afdeling«Personalet på den medicinske afdeling på Holbæk Sygehus løber alt for stærkt. Med kroniske overbelægninger, for få sygeplejersker, et presset budget og et nyt EPJ-system har personalet svært ved at følge med. Men arbejdspresset har styrket sammenholdet. Vi besøgte afdelingen.
10h
Dagens Medicin

Vicedirektør: Der er lys for enden af tunnelenKnut Borch-Johnsen, der er vicedirektør på Holbæk Sygehus, oplever, at han har en konstruktiv dialog om problemerne med den nye koncerndirektør, Leif Panduro Jensen.
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Dagens Medicin

Koncerndirektør: Vi arbejder på sagenLeif Panduro Jensen, der er ny koncerndirektør i Region Sjælland, erkender at medicinsk afdeling på Holbæk Sygehus fortsat modtager for mange patienter i forhold til kapaciteten. I samarbejde med hospitalsledelsen arbejder han på nye initiativer.
10h
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BMW's Self-Driving Cars Get Lidars From Israel's InnovizThe German automaker struck a deal to purchase lidar laser sensors from the solid state startup.
10h
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If Scott Pruitt Leaves, Will EPA Science Change Course?Advocates say attacks on science and deregulation would continue under the agency's number two.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: Sentinel-3B liftoffThe second Copernicus Sentinel-3 satellite, Sentinel-3B, lifted off on a Rockot from the Plesetsk Cosmodrome in northern Russia at 17:57 GMT (19:57 CEST) on 25 April 2018. Sentinel-3B joins its twin, Sentinel-3A, in orbit. The pairing of identical satellites provides the best coverage and data delivery for Europe's Copernicus programme – the largest environmental monitoring programme in the world.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to hunt a giant sloth—according to ancient human footprintsRearing on its hind legs, the giant ground sloth would have been a formidable prey for anyone, let alone humans without modern weapons. Tightly muscled, angry and swinging its fore legs tipped with wolverine-like claws, it would have been able to defend itself effectively. Our ancestors used misdirection to gain the upper hand in close-quarter combat with this deadly creature.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Behavioral differences between Northern v. Southern Chinese linked to wheat v. rice farming, study showsA new study from the University of Chicago Booth School of Business analyzing behavior patterns of people across China shows that the traditional interdependent rice-farming culture of southern China has resulted in today's residents—even city dwellers far removed from farming—being more interdependent and less controlling over their environment compared to their countrymen who hail from the more
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New method for interpreting cryo-EM maps makes it easier to determine protein structuresA new algorithm makes interpreting the results of cryo-electron microscopy maps easier and more accurate, helping researchers to determine protein structures and potentially create drugs that block their functions.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stellar dust survey paves way for exoplanet missionsVeils of dust wrapped around distant stars could make it difficult for scientists to find potentially habitable planets in those star systems. The Hunt for Observable Signatures of Terrestrial Systems, or HOSTS, survey was tasked with learning more about the effect of dust on the search for new worlds. The goal is to help guide the design of future planet-hunting missions. In a new paper published
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cognitive science

Hearing sounds from nature can help people recover from psychological stress, compared to hearing sounds from an urban environment.submitted by /u/randomusefulbits [link] [comments]
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The Atlantic

The 'Fireflies' of the Early CosmosClose to the beginning of time, not long after the Big Bang, cosmic construction was booming. Giant clumps of gas collapsed under their own weight and formed the first stars. Eventually, galaxies emerged, tugged into glittering arrangements by gravity. Some of them clustered together. This process took many millions of years to unfold, but thanks to some very powerful telescopes, we now have a me
10h
The Atlantic

Why The Virgin Suicides Is Still So Resonant TodayIt’s somewhat rare that a filmmaker’s first movie is their best, especially when they go on to have an illustrious career. But that might just be the case for Sofia Coppola: The Virgin Suicides , released this week in a new Criterion Collection edition , was such a confident debut in 2000 that it immediately announced her as a generational talent, a status she cemented with her Oscar-winning foll
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists explore how slow release fertilizer behaves in soilTesting soil samples at the Canadian Light Source has helped a University of Saskatchewan soil scientist understand how tripolyphosphate (TPP), a slow release form of phosphorus fertilizer, works in the soil as a plant nutrient for much longer periods than previously thought.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World's smallest optical implantable biodeviceJapanese researchers have described a new implantable device no bigger than the width of a coin that can be used to control brain patterns. The device, reported in AIP Advances, converts infrared light into blue light to control neural activity, and is the smallest and lightest wireless optical biodevice yet reported.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Novel technique achieves 32-fold increase in nanometric bactericide's activityIn recent decades, research groups in the field of materials science have invested time and resources to answer the following question: Is it possible to develop new techniques to produce silver particles on a nanometric scale (i.e., one billionth of a meter), thus enhancing the optical, catalytic and bactericidal properties of silver? A group of Brazilian investigators reports new developments.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists find seeds of domestic plants in the burial sites of ancient nomadsAn international team of scientists, including a professor of the Faculty of Soil Science, MSU, has studied burial sites dated back to the Bronze Age at the border between Kalmykia and Stavropol Territory and found traces of domestic barley on the walls of vessels. Local residents did not practice agriculture at that time, so the barley was likely received from people of farming cultures in exchan
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

Winning the War on TuberculosisNew drugs, treatment regimens new public health initiatives are making a difference, but we need to do more -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

Alexa, How Do We Take Our Relationship to the Next Level?If voice interfaces are to replace keyboards and touch screens, they are going to have to get a lot smarter -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Students' social relationships in the last year of secondary educationThe Personal and Community Relationships Laboratory (Laboratorio de Redes Personales y Comunidades) at the University of Seville has published a project that shows the structural properties of high-school students personal networks and predicts the probability of those students maintaining (or not) relationships with their high-school friends when they start their university studies. That is to sa
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Geologists assist in solving the mystery of a gold treasureThe Carambolo Treasure is an assemblage of gold items of the first millennium BCE, whose origin has for about 50 years been the epicentre of a heated debate. New chemical and isotopic analyses, carried out by the UPV/EHU's Geochronology and Isotopic Geochemistry Service—Ibercron and commissioned by the University of Huelva and the Archaeological Museum of Seville, suggest that the source of the go
11h
Feed: All Latest

No Job for Humans: The Robot Assault on FukushimaThe 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan triggered a devastating catastrophe in one of the country’s largest nuclear power plants. The cleanup will take decades, and it’s no job for humans.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How does urban-induced warming in Beijing interact with air temperature in summer?Beijing has undergone several important urbanization development stages since late 1978. Linked with urbanization, the so-called "urban heat island effect" is a key problem caused by urban land expansion. Such changes in air temperature in Beijing inevitably have an impact on the daily lives of its inhabitants, and is therefore of considerable interest to scientists and the wider public alike.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Influence of aquatic plants on long chain n-alkanes in lake sedimentsThe hydrogen isotopic composition (δD) of leaf wax long-chain n-alkanes from lacustrine sediments has been widely applied to reconstruct terrestrial paleoclimatic and paleohydrological changes. However, few studies have addressed whether the aquatic-derived n-alkanes can affect the δD values of lake sedimentary long-chain n-alkanes, which are usually regarded as a recorder of the terrestrial hydro
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Statistical designs accelerate the optimization of layered 2-D crystalsIt has been estimated that there are more than 10100 possible materials that can be synthesised, grown and optimised. Materials design can be a slow and laborious process, and investigating the full parameter space is a formidable challenge. Machine learning and other advanced statistical techniques will almost certainly accelerate materials development, but many materials scientists are unaware t
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK corporate giants sign pact to cut plastic wasteMore than 40 British companies including major retailers and soft drinks companies on Thursday pledged to eliminate unneccessary plastic packaging as part of an anti-pollution push.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ukraine says Chernobyl remains an 'open wound' 32 years onUkraine on Thursday marked 32 years since Chernobyl, the world's worst nuclear disaster, saying it would "remain an open wound in the hearts of millions."
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Messi scores in EU court battle to trademark nameBarcelona footballer Lionel Messi won a legal battle Thursday to register his name as a trademark to sell sports goods after an EU court ruled that he is too famous to be confused with other businesses.
11h
The Atlantic

The Democratic Push for a 'Public Option on Steroids'After beating back the repeated Republican efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act, Democrats, for the first time in years, are taking the offense on health care. While the flashiest proposal—for an entirely government-run system—remains a distant aspiration, Democrats are again looking for new ways to expand Washington’s role in shaping the health-care system. Their ideas include new plans to
12h
The Atlantic

Can Puerto Rico Recover From Maria Before the Next Storm Hits?Puerto Rico still doesn’t know how many people died from Hurricane Maria. The official death toll of people drowned in floods, killed by landslides, caught in collapsed houses, or who perished from environmental or health problems in the immediate aftermath of the storm seven months ago sits at 64. By just about all accounts, that is an undercount by at least an order of magnitude. A New York Tim
12h
The Atlantic

The High Cost of Free Labor on Capitol HillCongress failed to grapple with many, many important issues in this year’s legislative battles. But when lawmakers at last rammed through the $1.3-trillion budget-busting omnibus last month, they did manage to tuck in a little extra something for themselves. Specifically, the agreement included a 9 percent bump in funding for senators’ office expenses (staff, travel, mail, office equipment, etc.)
12h
Ingeniøren

Forskere frygter ‘brain drain’: Foreslår Cern-inspireret AI-centerEuropæisk forskning i kunstig intelligens taber omgangshøjde i forhold til USA og Kina, advarer forskere i et åbent brev. Europa bør etablere et fælleseuropæisk center for kunstig intelligens, så kontinentets dygtigste forskere ikke smutter til Silicon Valley, mener de.
12h
New Scientist - News

Superlight aerogel made by mimicking a baby dragonfly’s wingsDragonflies solidify their jelly-like wings with sodium bicarbonate they make in their gut. Aerogels used for heat shields have been made using the same method
12h
Dagens Medicin

Patienter med kræft i bugspytkirtlen vælger længere ventetiderNye tal fra Region Hovedstaden viser, at ni patienter med kræft i bugspytkirtlen, i marts valgte at vente længere tid på at få en tid hos deres primære sygehus i stedet for at tage imod et tilbud fra et andet sygehus.
12h
NYT > Science

‘Desperation Oncology’: When Patients Are Dying, Some Cancer Doctors Turn to ImmunotherapyThe drugs don’t work against every cancer — but on rare occasions, they work miracles.
12h
Ingeniøren

Her er regeringens energiudspilAfgiftslempelse på både el og elvarme og omkring 15 mia. kr til udbygning af vedvarende energi. Her er regeringens energiudspil, som netop er blevet præsenteret ved et pressemøde i Statsministeriet.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Noninvasive brain tumor biopsy on the horizonTaking a biopsy of a brain tumor is a complicated and invasive surgical process, but a team of researchers at Washington University in St. Louis is developing a way that allows them to detect tumor biomarkers through a simple blood test.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery of new material is key step toward more powerful computingResearchers have created a new material that represents a key step toward the next generation of supercomputers.
12h
Dagens Medicin

Ny næstformand for Lægeforeningen: Der er masser at tage fat påLægeforeningens nye næstformand vil arbejde på at genvinde tilliden til styrelsen efter Svendborg-sagen, styrke psykiatrien og bidrage til det nære sundhedsvæsen.
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Dagens Medicin

Svenske læger er bedre end danske til at sikre aktiv opfølgning på kræftsymptomerPraktiserende læger i Sverige er bedre deres danske kollegaer til at gennemføre en mere opfølgning på patienter, som de tidligere har sendt hjem efter undersøgelse af potentielle kræftsymptomer. Det viser nyt dansk studie.
12h
Science : NPR

EPA Chief Pruitt Faces Tough Questions On Capitol HillEPA chief Scott Pruitt said the recent scrutiny he has received over ethical issues is an effort to undermine the president's agenda. (Image credit: Alex Brandon/AP)
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discovery of new material is key step toward more powerful computingA new material created by Oregon State University researchers is a key step toward the next generation of supercomputers.
12h
Viden

Facebook forbyder Whatsapp for de helt ungeHvis du er under 16 år gammel, skal du til at finde dig en anden chat-platform.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unusual magnetic structure may support next-generation technologyMagnetic materials that form helical structures—coiled shapes comparable to a spiral staircase or the double helix strands of a DNA molecule—occasionally exhibit exotic behavior that could improve information processing in hard drives and other digital devices.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nokia struggles with losses after 'challenging' quarterFinnish telecoms equipment maker Nokia on Thursday posted its fifth straight quarter in the red, though its losses narrowed in a "challenging" first quarter as sales slowed in North America.
13h
The Scientist RSS

Women Are Underrepresented at Conferences: StudyAn analysis of abstracts from American Geophysical Union meetings reveals that female scientists get fewer speaking opportunities than men.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Volkswagen sees 'good start' to 2018 despite slip in profitsGerman car giant Volkswagen on Thursday reported a small drop in profits but nonetheless said strong sales got the year off to "a good start", as new CEO Herbert Diess pushes on with a post-dieselgate revamp of the behemoth.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ford gets record fine in Australia for 'unconscionable' conductFord Cars North AmericaCar giant Ford is set to pay out Aus$10 million (US$7.6 million) for its "unconscionable" handling of gearbox complaints in Australia after a court on Thursday slugged the auto manufacturer with a record penalty.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nintendo annual profits soar 36 percent to $1.27bn on Switch salesNintendo Switch SalesNintendo on Thursday said its annual net profit soared 36.1 percent, thanks to the immense popularity of its Switch console, and announced it was appointing a new president.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Telefonica sales hit by end of roaming chargesSpanish telecoms giant Telefonica saw its sales plunge in the first quarter due to the end of roaming charges in Europe, but still posted a 7.4 percent rise in net profit.
13h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Sædcelleforsker vinder Ph.d.-cupAnders Rehfeld fra Det Sundhedsvidenskabelige Fakultet og Rigshospitalet har vundet formidlingskonkurrencen...
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Air France unions announce four days of strikes in MayThree Air France pilots unions have announced new strikes for May 3, 4, 7 and 8 in the latest move in a long-running pay dispute with the French flag carrier.
13h
Ingeniøren

Kunstig intelligens er genvej til militære musklerSelvstyrende krigsmaskiner vil udligne styrkeforholdet mellem de forskellige nationer og destabilisere den militære magtbalance, vurderer AI-forskere.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

After Cape Town, Ivory Coast city feels the thirstEarlier this year, Cape Town grabbed the world's headlines as it careened towards a water armageddon.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ford deepens cost cuts even as earnings riseFord Cars North AmericaFord will deepen planned cost cuts and phase out several small models in North America even as it reported better-than-expected quarterly earnings, the company announced Wednesday.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

GM to add 700 US jobs to plant building SUVsGeneral Motors said Wednesday it plans to add 700 jobs in September to boost production of its popular sport-utility vehicles and models for export to Australia and New Zealand.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Maryland reaches $33.5 million settlement with VolkswagenMaryland officials announced Wednesday that they had reached a multimillion-dollar settlement with Volkswagen AG and two of its affiliates for using devices in cars that violated the state's environmental laws.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Philippines closes Boracay to tourists under high securityThe Philippines shuttered its most famous holiday island Boracay to tourists on Thursday for a six-month clean-up, which the government has imposed with a muscular show of its security forces.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Women listed as inventors in third of global patent filings: UNThe UN on Thursday hailed a significant increase in women listed as inventors in global patent filings over the past decade, but warned a pronounced gender gap remained.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's Huawei under US probe for Iran sanctions violations: reportThe US Justice Department has opened an investigation into suspected violations of Iran sanctions by China's Huawei Technologies, the Wall Street Journal reported Wednesday.
14h
Ingeniøren

18 milliarder kroner i cleantech venter på at blive samlet opDer er vækst og penge i cleantech – men ingen til at samle dem op. Flere udenlandske specialister skal hentes til Danmark, mener IDA.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hyundai Motor first quarter net profit slumps 48%South Korea's largest automaker Hyundai Motor saw its first-quarter net profits plunge 48 percent as strikes and a strong won weighed on its bottom line, it said Thursday.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Medicinrådet anbefaler lægemiddel til kræft i blære og urinvejeNy anbefaling kan årligt få betydning for ca. 300 danske patienter med kræft i blære og urinveje.
14h
Dagens Medicin

Ny anbefaling fra Medicinrådet kan give besparelser på behandling af brystkræftMedicinrådet anbefaler lægemidlet Kisqali som alternativ til Ibrance til behandling af kvinder med brystkræft. Det kan give en besparelse på 10 mio. kr. om året, vurderer Amgros.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The disappearing jobs of yesterdayAhead of May Day, AFP reporters, video and photo teams spoke to men and women around the globe whose jobs are becoming increasingly rare, particularly as technology transforms societies.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lufthansa cuts Q1 losses as it digests Air BerlinGerman airline giant Lufthansa said Thursday it had pared back losses in the first quarter, but confirmed it expects a slightly leaner result over the full year than in 2017.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shell says profit jumps on high energy pricesEnergy major Royal Dutch Shell said Thursday that profits leapt by about two thirds in the first quarter of 2018, energised by resurgent crude oil and gas prices.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Samsung's profit exceeds expectations thanks to memory chipsSamsung Electronics Co. reported better-than-expected financial results Thursday as robust demand from global data centers for its mainstay memory chips earned it another record-high quarterly profit.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A Yellowstone guide to life on MarsA University of Cincinnati geology student is helping NASA determine whether life existed on other planets.
15h
BBC News - Science & Environment

'Guns, germs and trees' determine gorilla's fateThe largest ever survey of western lowland gorillas shows most are living in unprotected areas.
15h
Viden

Forskere: Børn har udholdenhed som professionelle atleterNy forskning viser, hvorfor børn kan løbe rundt hele dagen uden at blive trætte.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World's oldest insect inspires a new generation of aerogelsA team of international scientists have created a new form of highly-efficient, low-cost insulation based on the wings of a dragonfly.
15h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Companies sign up to pledge to cut plastic pollutionMore than 40 firms including Coca-Cola have promised to reduce harmful packaging.
15h
Science-Based Medicine

“Dr. Amy” Yasko’s Autism Protocol: Unproven, Complicated and Expensive"Dr. Amy" Yasko isn't a real doctor and her autism protocol is unproven, complicated, and expensive. Her claims of success are contradicted by autism, nutrition, and genetics experts.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New imaging system makes back surgery safer, faster and less expensiveDartmouth College researchers develop a new way to make back surgery safer, faster and more cost effective. Professors from Thayer School of Engineering and Geisel School of Medicine develop and test a 3-dimensional, real-time optical tracking system, like a 'Google Maps' for the body.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hidden costs of skin cancer caused by workplace sun exposure revealedSkin cancer cases attributable to work-related sun exposure could be costing millions of dollars, and must be better addressed by policymakers.
17h
Ingeniøren

Stemme-syntese: Er kunstige stemmer det nye sikkerhedsproblem?Du skal ikke tro på alt hvad du hører: Kunstig intelligens bliver bedre og bedre til at imitere menneskelige stemmer, og det er dårligt nyt for dem af os, der gerne vil vide hvem vi snakker med.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

One in every six deaths in young adults is opioid-relatedOne out of every six deaths among young adults in Ontario is related to opioids, suggests a new study.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

After a volcano erupts, bird colonies recoverWhere do seabirds go when their nesting colony is buried by a volcano? In 2008, the eruption of the Kasatochi volcano in the Aleutian archipelago provided a rare opportunity to track how the island's crested and least auklet populations responded when their nesting colony was abruptly destroyed. As a new study shows, the birds were surprisingly adaptable, establishing a new colony on freshly creat
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Precision optical components created with inkjet printingResearchers have developed an inkjet printing technique that can be used to print optical components such as waveguides, an approach that could advance a variety of devices such as optical sensors used for health monitoring and lab-on-a-chip devices.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain folding provides researchers with an accurate marker to predict psychosisBy using images of the brain to look at how the grey matter is folded on itself, researchers can predict which high-risk patients will develop psychosis with more than 80 per cent accuracy.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Belief in fake causes of cancer is rifeMistaken belief in mythical causes of cancer is rife according to new research.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Napping can help tired teens' performance in schoolResearchers have found a positive relationship between midday-napping and nighttime sleep. They believe it might be key to boosting neurocognitive function in early adolescents. The team examined adolescents in Jintan, China, measuring midday napping, nighttime sleep duration and sleep quality, and performance on multiple neurocognitive tasks. Habitual nappers (who napped more often) tended to hav
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A Yellowstone guide to life on MarsA geology student is helping NASA determine whether life existed on other planets. He is helping find a marker for ancient bacterial life on Mars. The research could help scientists put to rest one of our most fundamental mysteries.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stress hormones spike as the temperature risesA new study in medical students finds that summer, not winter, is the season when people are most likely to have higher levels of circulating stress hormones. These non-intuitive findings contradict traditional concepts of the taxing physical toll of winter and the relaxed ease of summer.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

World's oldest insect inspires a new generation of aerogelsExperts have created a new form of highly-efficient, low-cost, sustainable insulation based on the wings of a dragonfly.
19h
Science | The Guardian

Most lung and bowel cancers being diagnosed too late, data showsCancer Australia data prompts calls for governments to help develop early detection tests Most Australians with lung and bowel cancers are being diagnosed too late, data released by Cancer Australia shows, prompting renewed calls for governments to make developing early detection tests a priority. Just 18% of lung cancer cases recorded in 2011 were caught early, at either stage 1 or stage 2, the
19h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Seventh EU Sentinel goes into orbitEurope's latest Earth observation satellite will focus on the behaviour and health of oceans.
21h
cognitive science

Direct detection of a single photon by humanssubmitted by /u/QuantumVariables [link] [comments]
21h
Feed: All Latest

Why Facebook's Troubles Haven't Dented Its ProfitsFacebook's growth accelerated, despite concerns about the Cambridge Analytica scandal, the #deletefacebook movement, and potential advertiser defections.
21h
Feed: All Latest

BMW's New Electric iX3 SUV Looks Shockingly NormalAfter the ultra-funky i3 and i8, the German automaker is bringing its batteries into the mainstream.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New approach to treating patients with stage IV Wilms tumorA new study shows significantly improved survival rates for patients with stage IV Wilms tumors with lung metastases.
21h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Milky Way, Revealed as Never BeforeAs a major new catalogue of our galaxy's stars from the Gaia space mission reverberates through the scientific community, astronomers are rushing to make revolutionary discoveries -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h
The Atlantic

A Fly on the Wall in the West WingYou’ve probably seen the photos: a 5-year-old boy patting the president’s head, the tense scene in the Situation Room during the mission against Osama bin Laden, the look on the president’s face as he receives awful news. The Obama presidency was largely captured, and came to be visually defined, under the close watch and photographic craftsmanship of Pete Souza. Souza spent eight years photograp
21h
Futurity.org

New A.I. application can write its own codeComputer scientists have created a deep-learning, software-coding application that can help human programmers navigate the growing multitude of often-undocumented application programming interfaces, or APIs. Designing applications that can program computers is a long-sought grail of the branch of computer science called artificial intelligence (AI). The new application, called Bayou, came out of
22h
BBC News - Science & Environment

The robot helping to deliver water in rural IndiaThe customised robot is part of a study looking at how technology can help those in rural areas.
22h
Futurity.org

What would it take for peace in Syria?This month the United States launched a massive military precision strike in Syria, a country that has experienced brutal violence by President Bashar al-Assad’s regime. The US was responding to a chemical weapons attack on civilians in Douma, Syria a week earlier that the US and others have blamed on the Assad government. Syria has been in a political quagmire since a democratic uprising in 2011
22h
Futurity.org

Uber drivers basically have computers for managersAspects of Uber’s ride-sharing computer platform mimic the role of a manager for the company’s drivers, say researchers. However, the drivers have little ability to voice grievances, pitch ideas to work better with customers, or influence policy changes as they might with a human manager, says Benjamin Hanrahan, assistant professor of information sciences and technology at Penn State. “There has
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Labeling alcoholic drinks as lower in strength could encourage people to drink moreWines and beers labelled as lower in alcohol strength may increase the total amount of alcoholic drink consumed, according to a study published in the journal Health Psychology. The study was carried out by the Behaviour and Health Research Unit at the University of Cambridge in collaboration with the Centre for Addictive Behaviours Research at London South Bank University.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Belief in fake causes of cancer is rifeMistaken belief in mythical causes of cancer is rife according to new research jointly funded by Cancer Research UK and published today in the European Journal of Cancer.
22h
The Atlantic

The 'Dragon Energy' of Kanye West and Donald TrumpThe scandals are like sediment in the delta of Kanye West. Each new controversy— each paparazzi fight , each “ BILL COSBY INNOCENT ,” each repackaging of ratty apocalypse couture as expensive fashion, each “multiracial women only” casting call —instead of burying him, only builds up higher and higher until it somehow becomes the very thing that grounds him. It’s worth wondering if, some untold nu
22h
Futurity.org

Why we trust our privacy to some apps but not othersAs concerns about privacy increase for people using mobile apps, new research suggests that trust and engagement may hinge on perceptions about how the app uses personal data and whether it seeks user input before delivering services. Researchers add, however, that reactions may also depend on how familiar users are with technology. In a study of a prototype app for recommending eco-friendly stor
22h
Science | The Guardian

Flesh-eating ulcer: Coalition will spend $1.5m to try to control disease's spreadBuruli ulcer funding will be matched by Victorian government and two local councils More than $1m will be spent tackling a mysterious flesh-eating bug and reducing its spread in Australia. The federal government on Thursday announced it is investing $1.5m into researching the Buruli ulcer, which has spread throughout Victoria and far north Queensland. Continue reading...
22h
Live Science

Oklahoma Suffers Its 2,724th Earthquake Since 2010And oil and gas extraction are to blame.
22h
Futurity.org

How vision keeps us steady while we’re walkingUsing new technologies to track how vision guides foot placement, researchers are one step closer to knowing what’s going on in the brain when we walk. The findings could lead to better treatments for mobility impairments—such as strokes, aging, and Parkinson’s—and the development of technologies like prosthetics and robots. Walking on natural terrain takes precise coordination between vision and
22h
Feed: All Latest

The Lab Making Robots Walk Through Fire and Ride SegwaysBenefits of robots: 1. They never get tired. 2. They can lift very heavy things. 3. They can walk through (controlled) conflagrations at the University of Michigan.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Common class of drugs linked to dementia even when taken 20 years before diagnosisThe largest and most detailed study of the long-term impact of anticholinergic drugs, a class of drugs commonly prescribed in the United States and United Kingdom as antidepressants and incontinence medications, has found that their use is associated with increased risk of dementia, even when taken 20 years before diagnosis of cognitive impairment.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Should doctors recommend e-cigarettes to help smokers quit?The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence offers guidance for doctors to advise people who are trying to quit smoking -- that e-cigarettes are helpful tools when trying to quit. However, emerging evidence suggests that e-cigarettes as actually used, actually depress, not assist cigarette smoking cessation for most users, and are a gateway to youth smoking. So, should they be recommende
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Certain drugs for muscle conditions may be linked to increased risk of dementiaUse of certain anticholinergic drugs -- that help to control involuntary muscle movements for conditions such as Parkinson's disease -- is associated with an increased risk of dementia, finds a UK study published by The BMJ today.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Emergency treatment by older surgeons linked to slightly lower death ratesPatients undergoing emergency surgery who are treated by older surgeons (aged 60 or over) have slightly lower death rates in the first few weeks after their operation than patients treated by younger surgeons (aged less than 40) within the same hospital, finds US study published by The BMJ today.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antidepressants and bladder medicines linked to dementia in landmark studyLong-term use of some anticholinergic medications are associated with an increased risk of dementia -- according to a new study led by the University of East Anglia (UK).
23h
Science | The Guardian

Some antidepressants linked to dementia riskScientists say doctors should consider weaning patients with depression, Parkinsons or bladder problems off anticholinergic drugs Some antidepressants and bladder medicines could be linked to dementia, according to a team of scientists who are calling for doctors to think about “de-prescribing” them where possible. Tricyclic antidepressants such as amitriptyline, which are also prescribed for pai
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Russian Arctic glacier loss doubles as temps warmIce mass loss in the Russian Arctic has nearly doubled over the last decade.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When do problems with memory and decision-making affect older adults' ability to drive?Recently, a team of researchers designed a study to learn more about cognitive health and older drivers' crash risks. The study focused on links between levels of cognitive function and crash risk among older drivers without dementia over a 14-year study period. They also assessed the link between changes in cognitive function over time and later risks of crashes.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Drug-filled, 3-D printed dentures could fight off infectionsResearchers have developed 3-D printed dentures filled with antifungal medication to better treat oral fungal infections.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Emerging memory devices used to develop electronic circuits for cybersecurity applicationsWhile we embrace the way the Internet of Things already is making our lives more streamlined and convenient, the cybersecurity risk posed by millions of wirelessly connected gadgets, devices and appliances remains a huge concern. Even single, targeted attacks can result in major damage; when cybercriminals control and manipulate several nodes in a network, the potential for destruction increases.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Engineers get a grip on slippery surfactantsA group's innovative surfactant theory removes limitations of a 100-year-old model for interfacial behavior in enhanced oil recovery.
23h
Science : NPR

DNA Analysis Of Ancient Excrement Reveals The Diets Of Centuries PastResearchers are exhuming ancient dung from toilets of yore to reconstruct snapshots of food and lifestyle in bygone centuries. The parasites that show up in privies reveal a lot about what people ate. (Image credit: The Pierpont Morgan Library)
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Targeting telomerase as therapeutic strategy for melanomaTargeting telomerase was effective at killing NRAS-mutant melanoma cells, and the impact was further enhanced when the strategy was paired with an inhibitor of mitochondrial function, according to study results by the Wistar Institute published in Oncogene.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain structure linked to symptoms of restless legs syndromePeople with restless legs syndrome may have changes in a portion of the brain that processes sensory information, according to a new study.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Balancing nuclear and renewable energyResearchers explore the benefits of adjusting the output of nuclear power plants according to the changing supply of renewable energy such as wind and solar power.
23h
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Right and Wrong in Art and ScienceWhat We’re Following Too Much Transparency? A new rule proposed by Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt would require the agency to publish all the scientific data that informs its clean-air and clean-water rules. Because of privacy laws surrounding medical data, many long-running studies on the health effects of pollution wouldn’t meet the proposed standards for regulators’
23h
Popular Science

Scientists literally brought out the big gun to study the origins of waterSpace High impact research. Water is everywhere on our planet. If it's not crashing against the shore, it's pounding on the roof, or dripping from the faucet, or pooling unfortunately right in that…
23h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Mesmerising footage shows lava lake overflow in HawaiiLava has risen above the crater floor in Hawaii's Kilauea volcano for the first time since 2016.
1d
NYT > Science

A Lifesaving Pump for Cancer Patients Is Being Phased OutA small, implantable device made by a Johnson & Johnson subsidiary has been discontinued, with no replacement in sight.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Projectile cannon experiments show how asteroids can deliver waterNew research shows that a surprising amount of water survives simulated asteroid impacts, a finding that may help explain how asteroids deposit water throughout the solar system.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New link between sleep arousals and body temperature may also be connected to SIDSWhat is the origin of these arousals? Scientists have discovered that brief arousals are probably triggered by the intrinsic electrical noise from wake-promoting neurons (WPN) in the brain. Their research reveals a previously unrecognized neurophysiological mechanism that links sleep arousals with temperature regulation, and may also provide an important new link between temperature and Sudden Inf
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

World's smallest optical implantable biodeviceResearchers have built a new optical device no bigger than the edge of a coin. The device includes a photovoltaic cell that is powered by infrared light and emits blue light. Using infrared light allows the device to be implanted several centimeters deep into the body, while the emission of blue light can be used for optogenetic control of brain patterns.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Massive study across western equatorial Africa finds more gorillas and chimpanzees than expectedA massive decade-long study of Western Equatorial Africa's gorillas and chimpanzees has uncovered both good news and bad about our nearest relatives. The good news: there are one third more western lowland gorillas and one tenth more central chimpanzees than previously thought. The bad news: the vast majority of these great apes (80 percent) exist outside of protected areas, and gorilla population
1d
Popular Science

What Amazon’s in-car delivery service means for your vehicle's futureTechnology Your trunk just became your mailbox. The service is part of a system called Amazon Key.
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Live Science

Incredible Fossilized Footprints Suggest That Early Humans Stalked Giant SlothsA bigfoot-like giant ground sloth had unwelcome company about 11,000 years ago. No matter which way the creature went, ancient humans followed it, stepping in its elongated, kidney-shaped paw prints as they seemingly tracked the furry beast.
1d
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Yeezus Take the WheelToday in 5 Lines President Trump thanked Kanye West on Twitter after the rapper posted a series of tweets praising the president. In an address to a joint session of Congress, French President Emmanuel Macron urged the U.S. to engage more in global affairs, and stressed the growing threat of climate change. After a decades-long search, authorities arrested a suspect in the Golden State Killer cas
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Ingeniøren

Machine learning sikrer hæveautomater med penge i mavenJPMorgan Chase har optimeret kontant-transporter til hæveautomater ved at analysere cash-flowet i hver eneste hæveautomat.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ultrahigh-pressure laser experiments shed light on super-Earth coresUsing high-powered laser beams, researchers have simulated conditions inside a planet three times as large as Earth. The pressures achieved in this study, up to 1,314 gigapascals (GPa), allowed researchers to gather the highest-pressure X-ray diffraction data ever recorded and generate new, more robust models for the interior structure of large, rocky exoplanets.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Weather associated with sentiments expressed on social mediaSentiments expressed on Facebook and Twitter may be associated with certain weather patterns.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A Yellowstone guide to life on MarsA University of Cincinnati geology student is helping NASA determine whether life existed on other planets. Doctoral candidate Andrew Gangidine is working with UC geology professor Andrew Czaja to develop a marker for ancient bacterial life on Mars. The research could help scientists put to rest one of our most fundamental mysteries. "We're trying to answer the question: How rare is life in the un
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New testing provides better information for parents of children with form of epilepsyNew ways of sequencing the human genome mean geneticists and genetic counselors have much more to say to parents who wonder if future children might carry the disease,
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Risks to babies of mothers with HIV from three antiretroviral regimens appear to be lowThe risk for preterm birth and early infant death is similar for three antiretroviral drug regimens taken by pregnant women with HIV according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
1d
The Atlantic

Macron Embraces Trump, Rejects TrumpismPARIS—There was the moment French President Emmanuel Macron greeted President Trump with a kiss on both cheeks, French-style, prompting a Fox News commentator to explain that in France, that kind of thing is normal, even for men. There was the moment Trump pretended to brush dandruff off Macron’s shoulder during an Oval Office photo shoot. There was the unforgettable, amused, “I-can’t-believe-thi
1d
New on MIT Technology Review

In a medical first, drugs have reversed an inherited disorder in the wombDoctors in Germany successfully treated twins in utero using a biotech drug, pointing to a new way to eliminate disease.
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NYT > Science

Global Health: Infant Deaths Fall Sharply in Africa With Routine AntibioticsProviding one dose every six months saved one in four babies, researchers reported. Now the W.H.O. will consider recommending routine use.
1d
NYT > Science

Trilobites: A Massacre Frozen in Time: Skeletons in Sweden Reveal Ancient AttackAn archaeological dig of a fifth-century village offers a glimpse of the violent chaos across Europe as the Roman Empire fell.
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NYT > Science

Dr. Samuel Epstein, 91, Cassandra of Cancer Prevention, DiesHe blamed greedy manufacturers, lax regulators, misguided researchers and complicit charitable groups for what he saw as a coming cancer epidemic.
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The Scientist RSS

Columbia University Graduate Students Go on StrikeAdministration officials contend that research and teaching assistants are students, not workers, and want to take the matter to federal court.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient skeleton of child found in ruins of Pompeii's bathWork at ancient thermal baths in Pompeii's ruins has revealed the skeleton of a crouching child who perished in Mount Vesuvius' eruption in A.D. 79.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

European Space Agency satellite rides to orbit from RussiaA Russian rocket has carried into orbit a satellite that is part of the European Space Agency's earth observation program.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Profits up at Facebook, no impact from privacy scandal (Update)Facebook on Wednesday reported a sharp jump in profits in the past quarter, with gains in its user base and strong ad growth as the social network appeared to see no impact from a controversy over privacy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trump meets with Apple CEO at White House to talk tradePresident Donald Trump has met with Apple CEO Tim Cook at the White House to discuss trade as he engages in negotiations around the globe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

YouTube overhauls kids' app after complaints about contentYouTube is overhauling its kid-focused video app to give parents the option of letting humans, not computer algorithms, select what shows their children can watch.
1d
BBC News - Science & Environment

Macron to US Congress: 'There is no Planet B'The French president received more than one standing ovation in his remarks to Congress on climate change.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How Comcast is trying to change the cable gameIf you can't beat them, join them. Comcast is trying to refigure the traditional cable bundle, adding services like Netflix to its subscription packages and offering internet-only TV streaming.
1d
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Many low-lying atoll islands could be uninhabitable by mid-21st centurySea-level rise and wave-driven flooding will negatively impact freshwater resources on many low-lying atoll islands in such a way that many could be uninhabitable in just a few decades.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New natural gas catalyst would boost clean transportationThanks to advances in drilling technology, there is enough natural gas in the U.S. to last well into next century and beyond. This has renewed the idea of using inexpensive, domestically produced natural gas as a transportation fuel.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Recent Russian Arctic glacier loss doubles from the previous 60 yearsGeophysicists examining glacier changes in the Russian Arctic have found that the rate of ice mass loss has nearly doubled over the last decade when compared to records from the previous 60 years, according to Cornell-led research published April 24 in Remote Sensing of Environment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Startup advances carbon-zero fuels through UConn partnershipWhen Rob McGinnis needed a well equipped lab for his startup company, his graduate school friend, Jeff McCutcheon, associate professor of chemical and biomedical engineering, suggested he apply for UConn's Technology Incubation Program (TIP) at the Storrs campus.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Balancing nuclear and renewable energyNuclear power plants typically run either at full capacity or not at all. Yet the plants have the technical ability to adjust to the changing demand for power and thus better accommodate sources of renewable energy such as wind or solar power.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Massive study across western equatorial Africa finds more gorillas and chimpanzees than expectedA massive decade-long study of Western Equatorial Africa's gorillas and chimpanzees has uncovered both good news and bad about our nearest relatives. The good news: there are one third more western lowland gorillas and one tenth more central chimpanzees than previously thought.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Napping can help tired teens' performance in schoolA University of Delaware researcher led a team that found a positive relationship between midday-napping and nighttime sleep. They believe it might be key to boosting neurocognitive function in early adolescents. The team examined adolescents in Jintan, China, measuring midday napping, nighttime sleep duration and sleep quality, and performance on multiple neurocognitive tasks. Habitual nappers (w
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers study how early humans thrived through volcanic winterUTA researcher Naomi Cleghorn has participated in a Nature paper that describes how humans thrived in South Africa through the Toba volcanic eruption about 74,000 years ago, which created a decades-long volcanic winter.
1d
Science : NPR

EPA Chief Scott Pruitt Prepares For Questions On Ethics AllegationsEnvironmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt appears on Capitol Hill Thursday for the first time since a string of ethics allegations. But what has he done at the agency and what are the questions he may face about his conduct there?
1d
The Atlantic

A Sunny Seattle DayI’ve been traveling for several days recently, and was unable to compose a proper photo story for today, so I hope you’ll indulge me if I just share a few pictures I took in and around Seattle, Washington, yesterday. The weather was fantastic, and I had the luxury of a whole day to do nothing other than explore the city I once called home, and see how much (and how little) has changed in the doze
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Will warm-water events in the Gulf of California reduce seabird populations?Oceanic warm-water events in the Gulf of California have increased in frequency during the last three decades, passing from a historic mean of one or two warm anomalies per decade to five events in the 2007-2016 period. This can lead to massive failures in seabird nesting, as anomalously warm waters accumulate in the ocean's surface, preventing the upwelling of colder, nutrient-rich waters from th
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Science : NPR

Tiny Lab-Grown 'Brains' Raise Big Ethical QuestionsScientists are growing increasingly large and sophisticated clusters of human brain cells. Ethicists are now wondering what to do if these minibrains start thinking. (Image credit: Courtesy of Pasca lab/Stanford University)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Synaptic communication controls neuronal migrationDevelopment of the mammalian neocortex requires the precise migration of billions of neurons. Synapses are structures that allow neurons to communicate with each other. Scientists have now identified a novel role of synapses in neuronal migration during neocortical development. They show that transient synapses are formed between subplate neurons, which function as guidance cells, and newborn neur
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIH study: No chronic wasting disease transmissibility in macaquesChronic wasting disease (CWD) did not cross the species barrier to infect cynomolgus macaque monkeys during a lengthy investigation by National Institutes of Health scientists exploring risks to humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Engineers get a grip on slippery surfactantsA Rice University group's innovative surfactant theory removes limitations of a 100-year-old model for interfacial behavior in enhanced oil recovery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain structure linked to symptoms of restless legs syndromePeople with restless legs syndrome may have changes in a portion of the brain that processes sensory information, according to a study published in the April 25, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
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The Atlantic

The Supreme Court Appears Poised to Bless Trump’s Travel Ban“What if the military advisers tell the president that, in their judgment, the president ought to order a strike, an air strike against Syria,” Chief Justice John Roberts asked Neal Katyal from the bench on Wednesday, “does that mean he can’t because you would regard that as discrimination against a majority-Muslim country?” Katyal, a former acting solicitor general and one of the most formidable
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The Atlantic

The Evidence Is Not With Joy ReidA strange story about MSNBC host Joy Reid has been unfolding for a week. It began when a Twitter user with about 1,000 followers, @Jamie_Maz, dug up what appeared to be homophobic posts on Reid’s defunct blog, the Reid Report. They were similar in nature to posts that Reid apologized for as “ insensitive ” back in December, after @Jamie_Maz brought those to light. The new round of posts contain a
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Footprints prove humans hunted giant sloths during the Ice AgeFootprints of humans and giant sloths show a dramatic chase sequence from more than 10,000 years ago.
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Feed: All Latest

Facebook's Targeted Ads Are More Complex Than It Lets OnFacebook's vice president of ads described a simple picture of how advertising works on the platform. The reality is far more complicated.
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The Scientist RSS

Worms Magnetic Sense QuestionedUnsuccessful attempts to reproduce the results of a 2015 study reporting that C. elegans orient themselves by Earth's magnetic field spark debate among researchers.
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Big Think

How the god you worship influences the ghosts you seePeople across eras, religions, and cultures have always been curious about a spiritual world that exists behind the curtain of death. Read More
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Inside Science

Can Green Infrastructure Save America's Capital from Overflowing Sewage?Can Green Infrastructure Save America's Capital from Overflowing Sewage? Ambitious plan aims to keep waste out of rivers without massive new pipes. stormwater-top-image.jpg Anacostia Riverwalk Trail in Southeast Washington, D.C. Image credits: Eric Vance, EPA photographer Earth Wednesday, April 25, 2018 - 11:45 Gabriel Popkin, Contributor (Inside Science) – On the afternoon of March 28, under a c
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Popular Science

Good job: Arctic sea ice is full of our junk plasticEnvironment Scientists now have a better idea of just how much microplastic reaches the Arctic. It's a lot. A new study from researchers at the Alfred Wegener Institute in Germany found that microplastic—tiny chunks only a few micrometers long that are easily ingested by…
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New Scientist - News

Blood cell and bacteria stuck together to deliver cancer drugsA red blood cell stuck to a swimming E. coli bacterium can be steered using magnetism and induced to release drugs on demand – perhaps avoiding side effects
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Feed: All Latest

Google Tasks: Hands On With Google's New To-Do List AppThe newest Google app is a simple and easy to-do list named Tasks.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

The latest star map from the Gaia spacecraft plots 1.7 billion starsThe Gaia spacecraft’s latest data release brings the number of stars with precisely measured motions up from 2 million to more than 1.3 billion.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Defending Hospitals against Life-Threatening Cyber AttacksDespite widespread concern about lack of cybersecurity funding, two surprising factors more directly determine whether a hospital is well protected -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think

How China's ‘social credit score’ will punish and reward citizensBy 2020, China plans to assign each of its 1.4 billion citizens a “social credit score” that could determine what certain people are allowed to do. Read More
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Science : NPR

Every Day, Tons Of Viruses Are Swept Into The Sky And Fall Back Down To EarthFor the first time, scientists measured the quantity of viruses that are swept into the Earth's atmosphere and then fall back down. The study explains why similar viruses are spread across the globe. (Image credit: Chris Jackson/Getty Images)
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New on MIT Technology Review

Please, Alexa? Amazon’s new parental controls will encourage politenessAlexa Amazon Echo Kids
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Long-sought structure of telomerase paves way for new drugs for aging, cancerTelomerase, because of its role in cancer and aging, has long been a target of drug companies who want to block it to stop the uncontrolled cell growth characteristic of cancer, or boost it to create a fountain of youth. The structure of the enzyme complex has been a mystery, however, until now. Scientists have finally obtained a detailed picture of the architecture of the RNA-protein complex, a b
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Redefining the origin of the cellular powerhouseResearchers proposes a new evolutionary origin for mitochondria -- also known as the 'powerhouses of the cell.' Mitochondria are energy-converting organelles that have played key roles in the emergence of complex cellular life on Earth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Switch controls light on a nanoscale for faster information processingResearchers have helped design a compact switch that enables light to be more reliably confined to small computer chip components for faster information processing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study shows a new approach to treating patients with stage IV Wilms tumorA new study showing significantly improved survival rates for patients with stage IV Wilms tumors with lung metastases was recently published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UTA researcher participates in Nature paper on early human survivalUTA researcher Naomi Cleghorn has participated in a Nature paper that describes how humans thrived in South Africa through the Toba volcanic eruption about 74,000 years ago, which created a decades-long volcanic winter.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hair products for black women contain mix of hazardous ingredientsA new report shows that black women are potentially exposed to dozens of hazardous chemicals through the hair products they use. This is the first study to measure concentrations of endocrine disrupting chemicals in a variety of hair products marketed at black women. The findings could help researchers understand why black women have higher exposures to hazardous chemicals than other groups and ho
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

World's smallest optical implantable biodeviceResearchers in Japan have built a new optical device no bigger than the edge of a coin. The device includes a photovoltaic cell that is powered by infrared light and emits blue light. Using infrared light allows the device to be implanted several centimeters deep into the body, while the emission of blue light can be used for optogenetic control of brain patterns.
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Feed: All Latest

Some Startups Use Fake Data to Train AIStartups building artificial intelligence software don't have millions of images like Google, Apple, or Facebook; so they fabricate images to train the algorithms.
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Big Think

The crucial difference between diversity and inclusionThough often used interchangeably, “diversity” and “inclusion” are two very different things. Most importantly, diversity without inclusion is mostly meaningless. Read More
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Popular Science

Here’s what to expect when you try out the new GmailTechnology Don't let the phrase "Gmail redesign" make you panic The new Gmail redesign offers some handy features and a new look.
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The Atlantic

The Age of 'Shotgun Cohabitation'When young couples of the ’60s and ’70s thought about the future, their path forward was often clear: get married, move in, have babies. Two of the steps of that sequence swapped places decades ago—for the first time, in the mid-’90s, over half of all couples lived together before marriage. Now, researchers are finding that the order is again undergoing change: More and more Americans are first s
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