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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox observed in many-particle system for the first timePhysicists from the University of Basel have observed the quantum mechanical Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox in a system of several hundred interacting atoms for the first time. The phenomenon dates back to a famous thought experiment from 1935. It allows measurement results to be predicted precisely and could be used in new types of sensors and imaging methods for electromagnetic fields. The find
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Science : NPR

EU To 'Completely Ban' Outdoor Use Of Pesticides Blamed For Devastating BeesCiting concerns for food production, the environment and biodiversity, the European Union moves to protect bees from a popular insecticide. (Image credit: Jamal Saidi/Reuters)
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BBC News - Science & Environment

EU member states support near-total neonicotinoids banMember states vote in favour of an almost complete ban on the use of chemicals linked to harming bees.
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The House Intelligence Committee's Russia Report Doesn't Exonerate Donald TrumpRepublicans concluded that Trump's campaign didn't collude with Russia, but the president is far from off the hook.
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Google Cofounder Sergey Brin Warns of AI's Dark SideGoogle cofounder calls advances in artificial intelligence "the most significant development in computing in my lifetime,” but warns of ethical concerns.
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How Red-Pill Culture Jumped the Fence and Got to Kanye WestPopularized by misogynists, fueled by white supremacists, and now espoused by the most popular rapper in the world.
13min
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: A New UrgencyWhat We’re Following Peace on the Peninsula? At a summit on the south side of the border dividing their two countries, North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and South Korean President Moon Jae-in made a historic pledge not only to officially end the Korean War by the end of this year, but also to remove all nuclear weapons from the Korean peninsula. Here are the diplomatic challenges they’ll need to ov
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Popular Science

What can you learn from Chris Hadfield's class on how to be an astronaut?Space He thinks spaceflight will soon be routine. So many people long to be astronauts when they grow up, but only a few people ever actually make it to space. The ones that do are emissaries for the rest of us, their…
30min
The Atlantic

RedState and the Dwindling Space for Anti-Trump ConservativesRedState was a rare thing these days in the conservative media: a platform for an array of different opinions about President Trump. That now seems to be a thing of the past, as media on the right has split into two camps: the full-on Trump boosterism of Breitbart or Fox News’s opinion programs, or anti-Trump critique as exemplified by National Review . On Friday, several contract writers were le
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Gadget Lab Podcast: Snap Spectacles and Our Faceputer FutureThis week on the Gadget Lab podcast, we hear about Lauren and Arielle's adventures with Snap's new Spectacles.
31min
The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Sprechen Sie Trump?Today in 5 Lines During a joint press conference with German Chancellor Angela Merkel, President Trump criticized the trade relationship between the United States and Germany and other European nations. The Republican-led House Intelligence Committee released a redacted version of their report on the Russia investigation that finds no collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia. In a historic
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NYT > Science

E.P.A. Readies Plan to Weaken Rules That Require Cars to Be CleanerThe agency has drafted regulations on planet-warming emissions from vehicles that would dramatically weaken Obama-era standards.
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Blog » Languages » English

Alice in Neuroland: AwardsWe went on a strange journey with Alice this week, Eyewirers, but at last we seem to have returned to something resembling the normal world. And what rewards we have brought with us! Here is the summary of competition awards, but you can also view the full results (including @susi swag details) here . To quote the Dodo Bird: “ Everybody has won, and all must have prizes,” and us folks at HQ hope
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How landscapes and landforms 'remember' or 'forget' their initial formationsCrescent dunes and meandering rivers can 'forget' their initial shapes as they are carved and reshaped by wind and water while other landforms keep a memory of their past shape, suggests a new laboratory analysis.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Investigators searched a million people’s DNA to find Golden State serial killerGolden State KillerOperator of genealogy website claims “no knowledge” of police exploit on vast data set.
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Popular Science

China has big plans for a modern bomberEastern Arsenal The H-20 is China's future stealth bomber. The H-20 is China's future stealth bomber with a strategic reach. Plans for other bombers, though, are less clear.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

A DIY take on the early universe may reveal cosmic secretsA conglomerate of ultracold atoms reproduces some of the physics of the early universe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How hackers could cause chaos on America's roads and railwaysWhen hackers struck the Colorado Department of Transportation in a ransomware attack in February and again eight days later, they disrupted the agency's operations for weeks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A potential new weapon in the addiction battle: FDA-approved diabetes and obesity drugsResearch from the University of Pennsylvania reveals that FDA-approved drugs to treat diabetes and obesity may reduce cocaine relapse and help people who are addicted break the habit. Such medications work by targeting receptors for glucagon-like peptide 1, a hormone in the brain.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Maduro says Venezuela to get $1 bn injection from 'bitcoin' saleVenezuela's government, which is facing a worsening liquidity crisis, is to release $1 billion into the economy obtained through the sale of the petro, its new cryptocurrency, said President Nicolas Maduro.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Energy conversion: Speeding up material discoveryResearchers have developed an algorithm that can discover and optimize thermoelectic materials for energy conversion in a matter of months, relying on solving quantum mechanical equations, without any experimental input.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neonicotinoids may alter estrogen production in humansNeonicotinoids are currently the most widely used pesticides in the world and frequently make headlines because of their harmful effects on honeybees and other insect pollinators. Now, a study indicates they may also have an impact on human health by disrupting our hormonal systems. This study indicates that more work must be done on the potential endocrine-disrupting effects of neonicotinoids.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

CRISPR/Cas9 silences gene associated with high cholesterolBiomedical engineers have used a CRISPR/Cas9 genetic engineering technique to turn off a gene that regulates cholesterol levels in adult mice, leading to reduced blood cholesterol levels and gene repression lasting for six months after a single treatment. This marks the first time researchers have delivered CRISPR/Cas9 repressors for targeted therapeutic gene silencing in adult animal models.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plymouth startup creates One Spot app to streamline work of property managersBefore a client buys a commercial building, Tim Jackson's team of maintenance technicians has to walk the property to check for any potential issues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Startup targets salmonella with techIf Arjun Ganesan had been accepted to Stanford University, Connecticut would have missed out on a technology company that has grown to 23 workers so far, with ambitious plans.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Bill Gates Announces Universal Flu Vaccine EffortToday in Boston, Gates announced a $12 million initiative to foster the development of a vaccine effective against all flu strains. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reddit to open Chicago office as part of advertising pushReddit is opening an office in Chicago, the tech company's first outside the coasts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Here's what you can't post on Facebook (no nude buttocks or cannibalism)Facebook for the first time published its secret rules and guidelines for deciding what its 2.2 billion users can post on the social network.
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NYT > Science

New C.D.C. Director’s $375,000 Salary Under ScrutinySenate Democrats and watchdog agencies question the use of a statute to authorize paying Dr. Robert R. Redfield nearly twice as much as his predecessor.
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Live Science

Photos: Amazing Insects of the North American DesertsFrom the seven-spotted ladybug to clown beetles, the deserts are full of amazing insects with their own quirky features and lifestyles.
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Why the New Snap Spectacles MatterWant to see the future? Try squinting through Spectacles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How DNA led to the elusive 'Golden State Killer'Golden State KillerDetectives in California used DNA left at crime scenes, combined with genetic information from a relative who joined an online genealogy service, to catch an alleged rapist and murderer who eluded authorities for four decades.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists project a drier Amazon and wetter Indonesia in the futureClimate models predict that an increase in greenhouse gases will dry out the Amazon rainforest in the future while causing wetter conditions in the woodlands of Africa and Indonesia. Researchers at the University of California, Irvine and other institutions have identified an unexpected but major factor in this worldwide precipitation shift: the direct response of the forests themselves to higher
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Live Science

Bee-Harming Pesticides Face Complete Ban in EuropeThe EU is planning to ban all outdoor use of a pesticide group that is harmful to bees.
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Live Science

This Biologist Cracked a Problem That's Stumped Mathematicians for 68 YearsAn amateur mathematician just partially solved the Hadwiger-Nelson problem, which has vexed mathematicians since 1950.
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Popular Science

The EPA is jeopardizing scientific research and privacy in the name of ‘transparency’Environment It sounds like something you'd want, but it makes public health research almost impossible. On their face, transparency and reproducibility are hard to argue against—they are fundamental principles of the scientific method—but in practice, calls for greater…
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using math to uncover new chemistryIn the future, materials scientists will use advanced software to specify the properties they desire and a program will deliver a choice of optimized chemical compounds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Zika virus eliminates advanced human tumor in central nervous system of rodentsA group of Brazilian researchers confirmed for the 1st time in vivo the efficiency of Zika virus in infecting CNS tumor cells -- tests even showed that the resulting viral particles were less harmful than the ones created from infection of healthy cells. The team's plans include applying for patent on pharmaceutical kit and moving on to clinical trial phase in near future.
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The Atlantic

The GOP's Path to Economic PopulismCome the 2020 Democratic National Convention, it is entirely possible that the party’s presidential nominee will be committed to “Medicare for all,” at least two tuition-free years at a public college or university, a $15 minimum wage, a sharp increase in Social Security benefits, a dramatic expansion of wage subsidies, and a federal jobs guarantee. Bernie Sanders, who came very close to securing
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Science : NPR

This Is Your Brain On Ads: How Media Companies Hijack Your AttentionHow many ads have you encountered today? On this week's radio show, we discuss the insidiousness of advertising in American media. (Image credit: Phillip Waterman/Getty Images/Cultura RF)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists project a drier Amazon and wetter Indonesia in the futureClimate models predict that an increase in greenhouse gases will dry out the Amazon rainforest in the future while causing wetter conditions in the woodlands of Africa and Indonesia. Researchers at the University of California, Irvine, and other institutions have identified an unexpected but major factor in this worldwide precipitation shift: the direct response of the forests themselves to higher
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Size matters when fighting cancer, groundbreaking UTHealth study findsDoctors could be a step closer to finding the most effective way to treat cancer with a double whammy of a virus combined with boosting the natural immune system, according to a pioneering study by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) and The Ohio State University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Hearing screening for public safety professionals -- new method for 'fitness for duty' assessmentsHearing is an important part of fitness-for-duty assessments of police officers and other public safety professionals -- but standard hearing tests don't give a true picture of whether these professionals can hear and communicate in the specific 'noise environments' where they must work.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene transfer alters the neurodegenerative course of GM2 gangliosidosisThis review outlines current knowledge pertaining the pathobiology as well as potential innovative treatments for the GM2 gangliosidoses.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Parents may help prep kids for healthier, less violent relationshipsWarm, nurturing parents may pass along strategies for building and maintaining positive relationships to their kids, setting them up for healthier, less-violent romantic relationships as young adults, according to researchers. In a study, adolescents who reported a positive family climate and their parents using more effective parenting strategies tended to go on to have better relationship proble
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wickless heat pipes: New dynamics exposed in a near-weightless environmentHeat pipes are devices to keep critical equipment from overheating. They transfer heat from one point to another through an evaporation-condensation process and are used in everything from cell phones and laptops to air conditioners and spacecraft.
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The Scientist RSS

Trailblazing Endocrinologist Neena Schwartz DiesThe reproductive biologist uncovered hormones important for fertility cycles.
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The Scientist RSS

Genealogy Website Helped Crack Golden State Killer CaseDNA from a relative of the suspect submitted to the site GEDmatch gave investigators just enough information to identify him, but the process raises privacy concerns.
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The Scientist RSS

EU States Vote to Ban NeonicotinoidsThe pesticides, which studies show are harmful to bees, will be prohibited in open fields by the end of 2018.
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The Scientist RSS

Advanced Analytical: DNA Sequencing Quality ControlsQuality in, quality out. That's the basic mantra of DNA sequencing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A simple method etches patterns at the atomic scaleA precise, chemical-free method for etching nanoscale features on silicon wafers has now been developed.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review

Say goodbye to Alexa and hello to gadgets listening to the voice inside your headArnav Kapur’s AlterEgo lets him communicate, switch TV channels, and more by talking silently to himself.
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The Atlantic

Photos of the Week: Diplomacy, Mud Madness, a Brand-New PrinceA cliffside convenience store in China, a Peruvian sunset, a nesting stork in Belarus, Fashion Week in Brazil, flower fields in California, three lost bear cubs in Bulgaria, fire dancing in the Philippines, Lego art in Paris, a historic handshake in the Korean Demilitarized Zone, and much more.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genealogy site didn't know it was used to seek serial killerGolden State KillerA genealogy website that investigators used to find the former police officer they believe was one of California's most terrifying serial killers had no idea its services were being used to pursue a suspect who eluded law enforcement for four decades.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Student Loan processor tells 16,500 borrowers of data breachA student loan services company has notified 16,500 borrowers that files containing personal data were released to a business that wasn't authorized to receive them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'JEDI' calls on Europe to find innovation forceAn association of firms and research centres in France and Germany said Friday they intend to spur technological innovation by emulating the US agency used to fund development of defence technologies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber back on the road in ViennaUber said Friday it had resumed operations in Vienna, two days after a court ruling took the ride-hailing service off the road following a complaint from a local taxi firm.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Theater subscription service MoviePass tightens plansMoviePass, a startup that lets customers watch a movie a day at theaters for just $10 a month, is limiting new customers to just four movies a month.
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Viden

Vincent Hendricks: En kunst at være tro mod videnskabenFem unge forskere konkurrerer om at formidle deres forskning bedst muligt til Ph.d. Cup 2018. Og det er altså ikke let, at forklare tre års forskning på tre minutter.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A shape to rememberKyoto University scientists are one step closer to designing porous materials that can change and retain their shapes -- a function known as shape-memory effect.
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Big Think

Einstein’s quantum spooky action has just been re-created on a "large" scaleScientists have replicated Albert Einstein's spooky action at a distance on a massive scale—well, for the quantum world, anyway. Read More
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Big Think

Why more highly educated people are less into conspiracy theoriesTwo studies, summing up almost 5,000 participants, point to an interesting link between education and conspiracy theories. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New technology for measuring brain blood flow with lightBiomedical engineers at the University of California, Davis, have developed a new technique for measuring blood flow in the human brain, which could be used in patients with stroke or traumatic brain injury, for example. The new technique, based on conventional digital camera technology, could be significantly cheaper and more robust than prior methods.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

TACC builds seamless software for scientific innovationBig, impactful science requires a whole technological ecosystem to progress. This includes cutting-edge computing systems, high-capacity storage, high-speed networks, power, cooling... the list goes on and on.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Catching mantle plumes by their magma tailsHawaii's volcanos stand as silent sentinels. They guard the secret of how they formed, thousands of miles away from where the edges of tectonic plates clash and generate magma for most volcanos. A 2017 Nature study by Jones et al. found the best clues yet of the origin of Hawaii's volcanos through simulation of a shift in the Pacific plate three million years ago. What remains elusive is conclusiv
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The Creepy Genetics Behind the Golden State Killer CaseIn the end, it wasn’t stakeouts or fingerprints or cell phone records that got him. It was a genealogy website.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals how bacteria communicate in groups to avoid antibioticsIn a new study published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry (JBC), researchers from the University of Notre Dame and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have found that the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a pathogen that causes pneumonia, sepsis and other infections, communicates distress signals within a group of bacteria in response to certain antibiotics. This communication was
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The Atlantic

Trump's Triumph, Trump's FollyAll politics, even geopolitics, is domestic. ( Sorry, Tip .) Friday’s historic meeting between North Korea leader Kim Jong-Un and South Korean President Moon Jae-In represents an important milestone on the Korean Peninsula, but it is also an important moment for President Trump, for whom North Korean proliferation has been a major foreign-policy challenge. Discerning what the latest news means fo
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The Atlantic

An Israel 'Conspiracy Theory' That Proved True—but Also More ComplicatedGaza Israel PalestinianTo report on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is to invite criticism and controversy. In what is arguably the most well-covered story in the world (perhaps before the rise of Trump), any mistake is amplified, with both sides often accusing media outlets and journalists of bias. Yet The New York Times recently took this journalistic truth to another level with a severely unforced error. In a wholl
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Science | The Guardian

Meat is crucial to balanced diet, Michael Gove tells farmersEnvironment secretary’s vision for UK agriculture post-Brexit sees farmers playing a vital role in improving public health Meat is a crucial part of a balanced diet, the environment secretary has said, as he told farmers about his “health and harmony” vision for food. Michael Gove’s new vision for British agriculture post-Brexit envisages farmers playing a critical role in improving public health
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Ethics debate as pig brains kept alive without a bodyScientists raise ethical concerns as the brain cells of decapitated pigs are kept alive for 36 hours.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Drones are about to start mapping the Great Wall of China in incredible detail
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Big Think

North and South Korea pledge to end war, denuclearize peninsulaThe leaders of North and South Korea vowed to bring peace to the region, setting an optimistic tone ahead of President Donald Trump's upcoming meeting with Kim Jong Un. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New development in contact lenses for red-green color blindness using simple dyeResearchers have developed a contact lens that may help people with color blindness simply by using a low cost dye.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

City fish evolve different body forms than country fishA new study examining the effects of urbanization on the evolution of fish body shape produced both expected and surprising results: One fish species became more sleek in response to urbanization, while another species became deeper bodied in urban areas.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How success breeds success in the sciencesA small number of scientists stand at the top of their fields, commanding the lion's share of research funding, awards, citations, and prestigious academic appointments. New research shows it's not necessarily because they are better and smarter than their peers, but rather, the result of the 'Matthew effect.'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mid-life chronic inflammation may be linked to frailty laterA study of nearly 6,000 Americans followed for 24 years from middle to late adulthood found that having chronic inflammation in middle age may be linked to an increased risk of frailty and overall poorer health decades later.
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Popular Science

Can my dog get me sick?Ask Us Anything It’s possible, but it’s not the most likely culprit. Unfortunately for us, the line of disease transmission does not end with germy children and coughing colleagues. Dogs, cows, mosquitos, ticks, mice, sushi, your…
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Contemporary update to PROGRESS-CTO International Registry shows successful outcomesA significant update to the PROGRESS-CTO International Registry was presented today as late-breaking clinical science at SCAI Scientific Sessions 2018.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Culprit vessel-only strategy has lower mortality rates compared to routine MVIA contemporary, real-world analysis shows lower mortality rates when culprit-only intervention is used for patients with multivessel disease (MVD) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI) with cardiogenic shock (CS).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First ever risk tool predicts readmission rates for patients after undergoing TAVRA new study looked at the effectiveness of novel risk tool to predict 30-day readmission rates in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) presented today at SCAI 2018 Scientific Sessions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First results announced for the AVIATOR 2 international multicenter registryResults of the AVIATOR 2 international registry are being presented as late-breaking clinical science at the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) 2018 Scientific Sessions.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Hidden Data in Your FingerprintsA fingerprint could give a molecular signature revealing aspects of a person’s lifestyle and environment, such as their job, eating habits or medical problems -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Catching mantle plumes by their magma tailsSimulations show how mantle plumes decelerate seismic waves and how plumes appear in seismic tomographic images of Earth's mantle. Mantle plume simulations could help guide future experiments and save cost of large-scale ocean-bottom seismometer deployments to image deep Earth. XSEDE Extended Collaborative Support Services, Campus Champions, Stampede1 supported mantle plume simulations. Novel use
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Growing 'dead zone' confirmed by underwater robots in the Gulf of OmanNew research reveals a growing 'dead zone' in the Gulf of Oman. Little data has been collected in the area for almost 50 years because of piracy and geopolitical tensions. The area devoid of oxygen was confirmed by underwater robots. Reasearchers found an area larger than Scotland with almost no oxygen left. The environmental disaster is worse than expected with dire consequences for fish and mari
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Capturing of the rare Yanbaru whiskered batThe critically endangered Yanbaru whiskered bat, Myotis yanbarensis, has been caught for the first time on Okinawa Island since its discovery 22 years ago.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mercury's thin, dense crustA planetary scientist has used careful mathematical calculations to determine the density of Mercury's crust, which is thinner than anyone thought.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antibody 'cocktail' can prevent Zika infection but is not effective for treatment of fetusesA 'cocktail' of monoclonal antibodies that can prevent Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in primates was not effective for treatment of fetuses, according to a new collaborative study. The team of researchers is now working on engineering the antibodies to redirect the therapies to the fetus.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New metric defines areas of highest prostate cancer burdenResearchers have developed a better way to identify areas with high risk patients in order to catch prostate cancer at earlier stages, when it's more easily treated.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Double trouble for a coral reefUpolu, one of the nine islands of Samoa, in the Pacific Ocean. This isolated coral reef promised to be a site of rich biodiversity for the scientists on the Tara Pacific expedition. But, it proved to be in a far more degraded state than previously thought: coral cover is below 10 percent in over 80 percent of the 124 sites considered.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tailoring blood cells in the laboratoryResearchers are a step closer to growing blood cells customized to the special needs of transfusion patients with rare blood groups.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Loss of brain synchrony may explain working memory limits, says studyA new study may have revealed the reasons behind our memory limitations. The researchers found that trying to retain too much information in our working memory leads to a communication breakdown between parts of the brain responsible for maintaining it.
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New Scientist - News

Serial killer suspect identified using DNA family tree websiteGolden State KillerA serial killer active in California decades ago may finally have been identified using genetic sequences the suspect’s distant relatives gave to a website
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

TACC builds seamless software for scientific innovationScientific software resources are an integral part of the nation's cyberinfrastructure. The Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) is among the national leaders in developing software for scientific computing. Researchers from TACC will present emerging tools at the NSF SI2 Principle Investigators Workshop from April 30-May 2 in Washington, D.C.
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Inside Science

The Science Behind Where Police Should Place Their Body CamerasThe Science Behind Where Police Should Place Their Body Cameras As law enforcement increasingly uses body-worn cameras, researchers are studying the roles of camera design and perspective. BodyCamera.jpg Image credits: Skyward Kick Productions /Shutterstock Technology Friday, April 27, 2018 - 12:00 Katharine Gammon, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Joel Suss , an Australian psychologist, had just
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Older surgeons produce lower mortality rates in emergency proceduresResearchers found surgeries performed by older surgeons -- age 50 and up -- have lower patient mortality rates than those performed by younger surgeons, and that patient mortality rates do not differ significantly based on whether the surgeon is male or female.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The complicated biology of garlicResearchers generally agree that garlic, used for thousands of years to treat human disease, can reduce the risk of developing certain kinds of cancers, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes. Nevertheless, researchers in the UK argue that explaining how garlic affects human health -- and getting consistent results during clinical trials -- is more complex, because of the vast array of compou
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dinosaurs' tooth wear sheds light on their predatory livesPredatory, bird-like theropod dinosaurs from the Upper Cretaceous of Spain and Canada all relied on a puncture-and-pull bite strategy to kill and consume their prey. But close examination of patterns of wear and modeling of their teeth also suggest that these dinosaurs weren't necessarily in direct competition for their next meal. Some of them apparently preyed on larger, struggling prey, while ot
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Meningococcal meningitis: Stomach pain should be seen as a warning signPatients with meningococcal infection generally develop symptoms including a high temperature, vomiting and a stiff neck. But they might also just have a bad stomach ache. This can be so severe that they are sometimes wrongly operated for appendicitis. Researchers decided to investigate the question. And the results speak for themselves: 10% of patients infected by the meningococcal strain that is
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: This Fungus Borrowed From Ancient Bacteria to Defy GravityScientists say a fungus developed its well-known sensing abilities following an ancient genetic transfer between its ancestor and bacteria it encountered.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cell membrane inspires new ultrathin electronic filmResearchers have developed a new method to build large areas of semiconductive material that is just two molecules thick and a total of 4.4 nanometers tall. The films function as thin film transistors, and have potential future applications in flexible electronics or chemical detectors. These thin film transistors are the first example of semiconductive single molecular bilayers created with liqui
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Kids exposed to general anaesthestic have poorer development, literacy and numeracy scoresExposure to general anaesthestic up to age four raises the risk of poor child development and reduced literacy and numeracy as measured by school tests, new research reveals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Recently evolved traits among Japanese descendantsEvolution allows advantageous traits to become predominant. Evolutionary adaptions that occur on comparatively short time scales are less well-understood. Researchers used whole-genome sequencing to identify the evolutionary adaptations that occurred within Japanese populations over the last 3,000 years. In contrast to European ancestry studies, adaptive changes related to alcohol, glucose, and li
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists calculate radiation dose in bone from victim of Hiroshima bombingIn an article published in PLOS ONE, Brazilian researchers describe the first retrospective dosimetric study by electron spin resonance spectroscopy using human tissue from nuclear attack victims.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New technology for measuring brain blood flow with lightBiomedical engineers at UC Davis have developed a new technique for measuring blood flow in the human brain, which could be used in patients with stroke or traumatic brain injury, for example. The new technique, based on conventional digital camera technology, could be significantly cheaper and more robust than prior methods.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UAB-led study shows drug effectiveness in reducing glucocorticoid-induced bone lossAbout one in every 100 people in the world takes glucocorticoids long term to treat immune-mediated diseases. However, glucocorticoids, such as prednisone, have a side effect -- they induce glucocorticoid-induced bone loss, causing an estimated yearly bone fracture rate of 5 percent. An alternative treatment option to the standard treatment now appears promising, according to an international stud
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Music activates regions of the brain spared by Alzheimer's diseaseResearchers at the University of Utah Health are looking to the salience network of the brain to develop music-based treatments to help alleviate anxiety in patients with dementia. Their research will appear in the April online issue of Journal of Prevention of Alzheimer's Disease.
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Science | The Guardian

Helen Sharman, first Briton in space, backs manned mission to Mars‘You need a vision of going somewhere, doing something that is hard, going further than humans have ever been before’ Plans to send humans back to the moon lack “vision”, according to the first Briton in space, who says that the true challenge is now to send our species to Mars. Former astronaut Helen Sharman, who undertook an eight-day mission to the Mir space station in 1991, was speaking to th
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NYT > Science

Matter: Hints of Human Evolution in Chimpanzees That Endure a Savanna’s HeatThe apes of Senegal’s Fongoli savanna may offer hints to how our own ancestors moved out of the woodlands, shed their fur and started walking upright.
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The Atlantic

The Best Ways to Fix College Admissions Are Probably IllegalYear after year, the admissions process at selective colleges seems to make high-schoolers and their parents only more anxious. The numbers are wild: Harvard admitted just 4.6 percent of its nearly 43,000 applicants for the class that begins this fall. Stanford accepted only 4.29 percent , and Princeton 5.5 percent . Although selective schools—those that accept fewer than half of applicants—enrol
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

86 million workdays lost to migraine in the UK every yearMigraine costs the UK economy £8.8 billion per year in lost productivity, a new report by the Work Foundation reveals.The equivalent of 86 million workdays are lost to migraine each year and close to £1 billion is spent on healthcare costs associated with the condition. It affects more than 23 per cent of adults with almost 200,000 attacks happening in the UK every day -- making migraine the most
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Futurity.org

Bubbles and a blood test could detect brain tumorsResearchers have developed a proof-of-concept technique that allows them to detect brain tumor biomarkers with a simple blood test, rather than a complicated, invasive surgical process. Hong Chen, a biomedical engineer, and Eric C. Leuthardt, a neurosurgeon, led a team of engineers, physicians, and researchers who developed the technique, which allows biomarkers from a brain tumor to pass through
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Curiosity is key to early childhood success in math and readingCurious children are better able to grasp basic math and reading, according to a new study investigating a possible link between curiosity and early academic success among young children.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bacterial propeller assemblyThe bacterial flagellum is a motor whose assembly occurs in an ordered, stepwise fashion. However, the molecular details of this ordered assembly are poorly understood. Researchers used high-speed atomic force microscopy and biochemical assays to identify structural changes to a protein ring that acts as a gatekeeper for flagellum assembly. The study provides a working model for how the ordered as
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Engineers develop novel method for resolving spin texture of topological surface states using transport measurementsNew research has revealed a close relation between the spin texture of topological surface states and a new kind of magneto-resistance. The team's finding could help in addressing the issue of spin current source selection often faced in the development of spintronic devices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Accepted or rejected? Uncovering how fate of B cell is determinedResearchers identify the plasma cell-prone B cells in the light zone of germinal centers. Higher expression of the proteins ICAM-1 and SLAM in those cells facilitates more stable contacts with Tfh cells, suggesting that strength of Tfh-GC B cell interaction critically regulates formation of plasma cell precursors. The findings serve as important information for the development of effective vaccine
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Obesity inhibits key cancer defense mechanismObesity could enhance cancer development while aspirin might prevent it -- a new insight into potential targets for cancer prevention.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Effective drugs to stop bleeding after childbirthNew evidence suggests that alternative drugs may be more effective than the standard drug currently used to stop women bleeding after childbirth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fluoride varnish in the primary dentition can prevent cariesRegular use of fluoride varnish can prevent caries in primary teeth. Advantages or disadvantages regarding further patient-relevant outcomes remain unclear due to a lack of data.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Identifying the use of tinder fungi among neolithic communities at la DragaInhabitants of the Neolithic community at la Draga already used fungi to light or transport fires 7,300 years ago. The discovery represents one of the oldest examples of technological use of fungi documented until now and is the result of several archaeological interventions at the site, which have also yielded an exceptional collection of these organisms, unique in all of prehistoric Europe.
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New Scientist - News

The European Union has decided to ban bee-killing pesticidesEuropean Union member states have voted to ban the outdoor use of neonicotinoid pesticides, which have been linked to declines in pollinating insects
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Sentinel tracks ships' dirty emissions from orbitThe EU's new satellite pollution-tracker will be a powerful tool to monitor vessels' emissions.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The digital transformation of news media and the rise of online disinformationA new report by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre contains an overview of the relevant economic research literature on the digital transformation of news markets and related impact on the quality of news.
7h
The Atlantic

What Bill Gates Fears MostBill Gates fancies himself an optimist. Global health, he feels, is on an upward trajectory. Childhood deaths are plummeting. Polio is on the verge of eradication. But if there’s one issue that punctures his positivity, it’s the possibility that the world will face a serious pandemic—and the near certainty that we aren’t prepared for it. “This is a rare case of me being the bearer of bad news,” h
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Joy Reid Blames Hackers, Just Like Everyone ElseJoy Reid may have very well been the target of a malicious breach. Or she's just the latest person to blame hackers for her past mistakes.
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Scientific American Content: Global

As Hawaii Aims for 100% Renewable Energy, Other States Watching CloselyHow to incorporate solar and wind while keeping the electricity grid stable is a key question -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

More than 9 in 10 elementary school teachers feel highly stressedOne of the most important factors in ensuring student success is quality instruction by teachers. However, quality instruction can be a difficult goal if teachers do not have the resources to improve their skills and if rising levels of teacher stress go unchecked. Now, researchers have found that high levels of job-related stress affect 93 percent of teachers, a greater percentage than previously
7h
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On 'Dirty Computer' Janelle Monáe Breaks Out of Her Android PersonaIf her new album says anything, it’s that all she ever needed to be was herself.
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Futurity.org

CRISPR successfully lowers cholesterol in miceBiomedical engineers have used a CRISPR/Cas9 genetic engineering technique to turn off a gene that regulates cholesterol levels in adult mice, leading to reduced blood cholesterol levels and gene repression lasting for six months after a single treatment. This marks the first time researchers have delivered CRISPR/Cas9 repressors for targeted therapeutic gene silencing in adult animal models. The
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Popular Science

What we can learn from the new detailed map of 1.3 billion starsSpace The Gaia satellite charts stars like never before. The truth is, scientists don’t know the exact positions or velocities of the vast majority of the stars in the Milky Way. But now a new tranche of data from the European…
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The Atlantic

Disobedience Is a Drab Story of Forbidden LoveThe hometown that Ronit Krushka (Rachel Weisz) returns to after her father’s death is a cold and gray one, a drab corner of North London that she fled in her youth. It isn’t the neighborhood itself that drove Ronit away, but the Orthodox Jewish community she was raised in—which is at odds with her bisexuality and her relaxed attitude toward personal relationships. Restraint is what defines the so
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Pumping water underground for power may have triggered South Korean quakeA 2017 South Korean earthquake may have been caused by human activities, two new studies suggest.
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Science : NPR

NASA Mars Mission Faces Setback After Heat Shield Cracks Under PressureThe heat shield, made of material that's as light as balsa wood but can withstand temperatures of nearly 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit, broke during testing earlier this month. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)
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Quanta Magazine

Solution: ‘The DNA Computer Program’Do genes behave like lines of computer code? Our April puzzle discussed ways in which genes hold true to this analogy: They have control structures commonplace in computer programs, such as “if-then” logic, “do loops,” timing routines and cascading “subroutine calls.” We also listed some ways that DNA programs differ from ordinary computer programs: Genes program three-dimensional structures from
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals how bacteria communicate in groups to avoid antibioticsresearchers from the University of Notre Dame and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have found that a bacterium that causes pneumonia, sepsis and other infections, communicates distress signals within a group of bacteria in response to certain antibiotics.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers map the potential spread of yellow fever virus to cities around the worldThe deadly yellow fever virus has the potential to spread into cities around the world where it previously hasn't been seen, according to a new study led by St. Michael's Hospital.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook gives parents control on when kids can use appFacebook is adding a "sleep" mode to its Messenger Kids service to let parents limit when their kids can use it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Seven striking facts about the money tech companies are makingEveryone knows the tech industry is rich, but it can be challenging to get your head around just how much money it's minting.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Distracted by technology? Microsoft tries to helpTechnology companies whose devices and constantly scrolling online services have driven us to distraction are beginning to acknowledge that their products can be a waste of time. Some of them now say they're trying to help.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Black-oriented films can be highly profitable when marketed to all audiences, study findsDespite the persistent notion in Hollywood that films starring people of color aren't marketable to a broad audience, the success of Black Panther—a Marvel movie starring a Black superhero and with an almost entirely Black cast—provides a clear counterexample, having grossed $1.3 billion worldwide.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Role neonicotinoid insecticides play in arthropod performanceA team of researchers looked at the role neonicotinoid insecticides play in arthropod abundance, behavior, condition, reproductive success and survival. They found the insecticides negatively affected a broad array of arthropods.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How I turn negative online comments into positive offline conversations | Dylan MarronDigital creator Dylan Marron has racked up millions of views for projects like "Every Single Word" and "Sitting in Bathrooms With Trans People" -- but he's found that the flip side of success online is internet hate. Over time, he's developed an unexpected coping mechanism: calling the people who leave him insensitive comments and asking a simple question: "Why did you write that?" In a thoughtful
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Artificial intelligence helps soldiers learn many times faster in combatNew technology allows U.S. Soldiers to learn 13 times faster than conventional methods and Army researchers said this may help save lives.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

City fish evolve different body forms than country fishA North Carolina State University study examining the effects of urbanization on the evolution of fish body shape produced both expected and surprising results: One fish species became more sleek in response to urbanization, while another species became deeper bodied in urban areas.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Black-oriented films can be highly profitable when marketed to all audiences, study findsHollywood tends to market black-oriented media, and media oriented around other people of color, to only audiences of color. However, a study of 1,900 adolescents shows that black and white teens both consider Black-oriented content as being 'for them,' but white adolescents are less likely to know black-oriented content exists. Researchers say this means black-oriented media can be highly profita
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Glioma subtypes determine how the dangerous tumors spread, evade anti-angiogenic treatmentA multi-institutional research team led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital and the University of California San Francisco has identified a new mechanism by which the dangerous brain tumors called gliomas develop resistance to anti-angiogenic treatment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Online reviews of plastic surgeons -- study looks at differences between happy and unhappy patientsGood cosmetic results are an important factor -- but not the only factor -- differentiating positive versus negative reviews for plastic surgeons on Google, Yelp, and other online review sites, according to a special topic paper in the May issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).
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Scientific American Content: Global

Autism Prevalence Jumps 16 Percent, CDC SaysRising awareness of the condition’s characteristics may contribute to an increase in reporting -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research team demonstrates terahertz semiconductor laser with record-high output powerThe ability to harness light into an intense beam of monochromatic radiation in a laser has revolutionized the way we live and work for more than fifty years. Among its many applications are ultrafast and high-capacity data communications, manufacturing, surgery, barcode scanners, printers, self-driving technology and spectacular laser light displays. Lasers also find a home in atomic and molecula
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Radiation technique could offer less harmful alternative to X-raysA new source of intense terahertz (THz) radiation, which could offer a less harmful alternative to X-rays and has strong potential for use in industry, is being developed by scientists at the University of Strathclyde and Capital Normal University in Beijing.
8h
The Atlantic

The Deceptively Simple Promise of Korean PeaceOn Friday, after becoming the first North Korean leader to step into South Korea, Kim Jong Un joined with South Korean President Moon Jae In in making an extraordinary announcement : The two leaders vowed to pursue the shared objective of a “nuclear-free Korean peninsula” and, by the end of this year, to finally proclaim an end to the Korean War. The declaration established ambitious, if notably
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The Atlantic

How a Genealogy Website Led to the Alleged Golden State KillerGolden State KillerUpdated on April 27 12:45 p.m. ET. When the East Area Rapist broke into the home of his first victim in 1976, human DNA had not yet been sequenced. When he reemerged as the Original Night Stalker and began a spree of murders in 1979, the World Wide Web still did not exist. For decades, the Golden State Killer—as he is now best known—got away with it all. Then DNA and the internet appear to have c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why cereal crops are betterCereal crops are much more drought-tolerant than other plants. Researchers from Würzburg have now found out why that is so. Their insight could help breed crops that are more resistant to drought.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How intestinal cells renew themselvesThe intestine must be able to renew itself to recover from environmental insults like bacterial infections. This renewal is made possible by a small number of intestinal stem cells which divide and produce daughter cells throughout their lives. The daughter cells differentiate into highly specialised gut cell types. Researchers at Heidelberg University have studied these processes in the fruit fly
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The internet is designed for corporations, not peopleFacebook People PrivacyUrban spaces are often designed to be subtly hostile to certain uses. Think about, for example, the seat partitions on bus terminal benches that make it harder for the homeless to sleep there or the decorative leaves on railings in front of office buildings and on university campuses that serve to make skateboarding dangerous.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The hidden data in your fingerprintsFingerprints have provided key evidence in countless cases of serious crime. But there are still some situations in which it can be difficult or impossible to recover fingerprints and this can cause a headache for forensic investigators. In seeking a solution to this problem, researchers like myself have started to realise that a fingerprint can be used for a lot more than just its unique ridge pa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How drones could improve crop damage estimatesFarmers and insurance companies may soon get more accurate estimates of weather-related crop damage thanks to a University of Alberta researcher working with existing drone technology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Caribbean collaboration offers hope for a vanishing island iguanaWhen someone says Caribbean, I am sure most people think idyllic beaches, sunshine and relaxation. When I hear the word, I think remarkable wildlife and lush habitats teeming with a delightful array of animals and plants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study shines light on alternative medical imaging techniquesWith a thin probe and a burst of microwaves, doctors can eradicate cancer cells without opening up a patient for surgery.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study: Beltway to divert diesel trucks in Sao Paulo improved public healthA study by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) and the University of Sao Paulo revealed that a beltway constructed to divert heavy-duty diesel vehicles traffic in the Brazilian city of Sao Paulo has reduced public health damage associated with exposure to diesel. The positive health outcomes of the intervention could guide the formulation of similar transport polices in oth
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New report looks at how other countries manage their landAcademics from the University of Aberdeen were part of a team that recently produced a report for the Scottish Land Commission looking at how other countries manage land ownership.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Finding galaxies with active nucleiThe nuclei of most galaxies host supermassive black holes with millions or even billions of solar-masses of material. Material in the vicinity of such black holes can accrete onto a torus of dust and gas around the black hole, and when that happens the nuclei radiate powerfully across the full spectrum. These active galactic nuclei (AGN) are among the most dramatic and interesting phenomena in ext
8h
New on MIT Technology Review

"…It’s much easier to build an AI system that can detect a nipple than it is to determine what is linguistically hate speech."
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hidden costs of skin cancer caused by workplace sun exposure revealedSkin cancer cases attributable to work-related sun exposure could be costing millions of dollars, and must be better addressed by policymakers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Discovery of new material is key step toward more powerful computingResearchers have created a new material that represents a key step toward the next generation of supercomputers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Noninvasive brain tumor biopsy on the horizonTaking a biopsy of a brain tumor is a complicated and invasive surgical process, but a team of researchers is developing a way that allows them to detect tumor biomarkers through a simple blood test.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A powerful laser breakthroughLehigh University research team and Sandia National Laboratories develop a simple, effective technique to enhance the power output of single-mode lasers that are 'surface-emitting' (as opposed to those using an 'edge-emitting' configuration). Of the two types, the surface-emitting configuration for semiconductor lasers offers distinctive advantages in how the lasers could be miniaturized, packaged
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Platelet-rich plasma for cosmetic facial procedures -- promising results, but evidence has limitationsMost studies evaluating platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection for facial rejuvenation and other cosmetic procedures have reported positive results, according to a critical review in the May issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why cereal is betterCereal is much more drought-tolerant than other plants. Researchers from Würzburg have now found out why that is so. Their insight could help breed crops that are more resistant to drought.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Protein responsible for leukemia's aggressiveness identifiedResearchers have identified a protein critical for the aggressiveness of T-cell leukemia, a subtype of leukemia that afflicts children and adults.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Growing 'dead zone' confirmed by underwater robots in the Gulf of OmanNew research reveals a growing 'dead zone' in the Gulf of Oman. Little data has been collected in the area for almost 50 years because of piracy and geopolitical tensions.The area devoid of oxygen was confirmed by underwater robots. Reasearchers found an area larger than Scotland with almost no oxygen left. The environmental disaster is worse than expected with dire consequences for fish and marin
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New on MIT Technology Review

The Golden State Killer was found via DNA genealogy—and he won’t be the lastGolden State Killer
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Science | The Guardian

The curious case of the dodo – Science Weekly podcastThis week: Nicola Davis investigates the death by fowl play of one of the world’s most famous dodo specimens. So what do we know about the dodo as a species? And what questions does this murder case raise? Subscribe and review on Acast , Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom and Mixcloud . Join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter The dodo has long been extinct. Renderings of what the birds s
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The Physics of Terrifying Technological Battlebot TacticsHere's the fundamental physics behind every class of robots in the showdown.
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Popular Science

10 solar-powered products to keep your devices juicedGadgets Stay in charge wherever the sun shines. Power your life with these 10 solar-powered products that'll keep your phone charged, music blasting, and room lit.
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cognitive science

People with larger brains tend to score higher in intelligencesubmitted by /u/Smaxbrinson [link] [comments]
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The Atlantic

The Cost of Accusing Bill CosbyBill Cosby A. ConstandIn 2005, Bill Cosby was interviewed by the National Enquirer about accusations—in part—that he’d drugged and sexually assaulted a woman in 1970. He didn’t deny anything . But he raised the prospect of how damaging such allegations could be for the people closest to him. “Who really wants to put his or her family in a position of information coming out publicly that will cause great emotional stre
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research lends insight into the spread of invasive speciesSome invasive species depend on one another to spread, according to new research from Michigan State University scientists.
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The Guardian's Science Weekly

The curious case of the dodo – Science Weekly podcastThis week: Nicola Davis investigates the death by fowl play of one of the world’s most famous dodo specimens. So what do we know about the dodo as a species? And what questions does this murder case raise?
8h
Futurity.org

Scientists discover crystal structure in super-Earth coresScientists have discovered what may exist at the core of “super-Earths,” rocky planets at least triple the mass of Earth that orbit far-distant stars. A team of scientists was able to simulate, if only for the briefest of moments, the deep interiors of these exoplanets, offering revealing insight into what had been limited to extrapolations and theoretical calculations. “All other physical and ch
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Live Science

Some Scientists Predict These Islands Are Doomed, But That's Not the Whole StorySome scientists paint a brighter future for coral atolls.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

City fish evolve different body forms than country fishA North Carolina State University study examining the effects of urbanization on the evolution of fish body shape produced both expected and surprising results: One fish species became more sleek in response to urbanization, while another species became deeper bodied in urban areas.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Partial mechanical unfolding may regulate protein functionA study carried out as a collaborative approach between University of Tampere, Finland, and Imperial College London has shown that mechanically regulated proteins talin and α-catenin have stable intermediates during mechanical unfolding. The stable unfolding intermediates are formed by three α-helices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Capturing of the rare Yanbaru whiskered batThe critically endangered Yanbaru whiskered bat, Myotis yanbarensis, has been caught for the first time on Okinawa Island since its discovery 22 years ago.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Artificial intelligence helps soldiers learn many times faster in combatNew technology allows US soldiers to learn 13 times faster than conventional methods and Army researchers said this may help save lives.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists verify a way of how to improve resolution of most powerful microscopesA Russian-British research team experimentally verified previously simulated anomalous amplitude apodization for non-spherical particles, that has multiple applications in areas where sub-wavelength focusing is required. These are medicine, non-destructive testing, flaw detection, on chip processing and data transfer systems, etc.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New way of producing intense radiation could offer less harmful alternative to X-raysA new source of intense terahertz (THz) radiation, which could offer a less harmful alternative to X-rays and has strong potential for use in industry, is being developed by scientists at the University of Strathclyde and Capital Normal University in Beijing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research gives new ray of hope for solar fuelThe quest to develop the 'Holy Grail' of affordable, viable and environmentally-friendly fuels using sunlight has taken an exciting new twist.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bristol researchers use gene editing to improve red blood cell transfusion compatibilitySynthetic biologists at the University of Bristol have succeeded in generating laboratory-made red blood cells with rare blood group types that could one day be used to help patients who cannot be matched with donor blood.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Growing 'dead zone' confirmed by underwater robots in the Gulf of OmanGrowing 'dead zone' confirmed by underwater robots in the Gulf of Oman
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Belle II measures first particle collisionsIn the new SuperKEKB accelerator in Japan the first collisions of matter and anti-matter particles have been detected. Scientists from LMU and the Universe Cluster are involved in the experiments.
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The Scientist RSS

Studies Show How Cells Differentiate at Lifes BeginningA trio of papers provide new insight into embryo development.
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New Scientist - News

UK smart missile will decide where to look for its next targetGiving the Brimstone weapon system greater autonomy could reduce the number of civilian casualties but critics worry about lack of human control
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New Scientist - News

Huge haul of ‘depression genes’ shows it’s a complex conditionAn analysis of more than 135,000 people with depression has pinpointed 44 genetic variants that are linked to the condition, 30 of which have never been identified before
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Popular Science

Defend your house against ants—with scienceDIY No thanks, ants. No thants. It’s spring now, which means warmer days, budding flowers—and the first onslaught of ants. Here are a few ways to prevent them from taking over your home.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

It's funny to name species after celebrities, but there's a serious side tooMicroleo attenboroughi. Scaptia beyonceae. Crikey steveirwini. These are the scientific names of just a few of the nearly 25,000 species of plants, animals, fungi and micro-organisms discovered and named in Australia in the past decade.
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Futurity.org

Is your sleep on weekends messing up the week?Most Americans go to sleep later on Friday, Saturday, and Sunday nights than during the week, a new analysis confirms. The study of data from physical activity monitors suggests that younger people, especially, are more naturally prone to go to bed and wake up later. That adds evidence to support recent pushes for later middle and high school start times, the researchers say. “This means that a l
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Designing the compassionate city to overcome built-in biases and help us live betterWhen we design, build, manage, occupy or even just pass through a place, we change it. Whether we are conscious of it or not, these changes can embellish, adorn, colour, tint or taint that place in the eyes of the people who share it. These perceptions influence how appealing those people will find particular behaviours.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How success breeds success in the sciencesA small number of scientists stand at the top of their fields, commanding the lion's share of research funding, awards, citations, and prestigious academic appointments. But are they better and smarter than their peers? Or is this a classic example of success breeding success—a phenomenon known as the "Matthew effect"?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Helmholtz researchers get to grips with a herpesvirusHuman herpesvirus 6 infects most people all over the world. It is usually well controlled by the body, but it can cause diseases in immunocompromised individuals. As reported in PLOS Pathogens, scientists at Helmholtz Zentrum München, member in the German Center for Infection Research, have now identified virus structures that can be attacked by killer T cells -- a possible approach for new therap
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Introduced species overlooked in biodiversity reportingThe reports on biodiversity are based on indicators that only take indigenous -- i.e. 'original' -- species into account for each region. Yet today modern environments are made up of indigenous and introduced species. The introductions are either deliberate or accidental. Although these introduced species play important roles, they are ignored by specialists, a fact that partly distorts the intern
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bright future for solar cell technologyNew all-inorganic perovskite solar cells tackle three key challenges in solar cell technology: efficiency, stability, and cost.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Solanine in potatoes: Green and strongly germinating potato tubers should be sorted outFollowing a case of poisoning caused by a potato dish, the German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment is reminding people about the correct handling of potatoes. Glycoalkaloids, of which solanine is an important derivative, are natural ingredients of the potato, but the ingestion of higher amounts of glycoalkaloids can lead to poisoning in humans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New catalyst turns ammonia into an innovative clean fuelAmmonia (NH3) has attracted attention in recent years as a carbon-free fuel that does not emit carbon dioxide. For use as a fuel, it should have a lower combustion temperature and produce only nitrogen (N2) and water. Now, Japanese researchers have succeeded in developing a new catalyst that burns NH3 at a low temperature and produces N2. The results are expected to contribute to climate change co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New estimates of Mercury's thin, dense crustMichael Sori, a planetary scientist at the University of Arizona, used careful mathematical calculations to determine the density of Mercury's crust, which is thinner than anyone thought.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Targeting telomerase as therapeutic strategy for melanomaTargeting telomerase was effective at killing NRAS-mutant melanoma cells, and the impact was further enhanced when the strategy was paired with an inhibitor of mitochondrial function, according to new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Antidepressants and bladder medicines linked to dementia in landmark studyLong-term use of some anticholinergic medications are associated with an increased risk of dementia -- according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Will warm-water events in the Gulf of California reduce seabird populations?Oceanic warm-water events in the Gulf of California have increased in frequency during the last three decades, passing from a historic mean of one or two warm anomalies per decade to five events in the 2007-2016 period. This can lead to massive failures in seabird nesting, as anomalously warm waters accumulate in the ocean's surface, preventing the upwelling of colder, nutrient-rich waters from th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The Matryoshka effect: Underwater phenomenonA team of engineers and fluid dynamicists uncovered the physics behind a unique underwater phenomenon that's been likened to the Matryoshka doll -- the traditional Russian doll within a doll.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Even huge scandals can’t dent Big Tech’s big bucks
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cybersecurity teams that don't interact much perform bestArmy scientists recently found that the best, high-performing cybersecurity teams have relatively few interactions with their team-members and team captain. While this result may seem counterintuitive, it is actually consistent with major theoretical perspectives on professional team development.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study reveals secrets of evolution at molecular levelA study led by ANU has retraced the evolutionary history of a modern enzyme with a technique called ancestral protein reconstruction—a discovery that will help new enzymes to be engineered for use in medicine and industry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Up to one-third of family owned forests likely to change hands in five yearsAbout 1.7 million acres of forest land in Idaho is family-owned, representing about 36,000 landowners and 56 percent of all privately-owned forest land in the state. As much as 560,000 acres, or 33 percent of family owned forests in Idaho, are likely to have new owners within five years, according to a new survey released today.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First-of-its-kind look at the inner workings of biological protein complexesProteins play a crucial role in the human body. These complex molecules help maintain the structure and function of organs and tissue, regulating cellular activity at the most fundamental level.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New estimates of Mercury's thin, dense crustMercury is small, fast and close to the sun, making the rocky world challenging to visit. Only one probe has ever orbited the planet and collected enough data to tell scientists about the chemistry and landscape of Mercury's surface. Learning about what is beneath the surface, however, requires careful estimation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New mapping techniques allow researchers to better gauge effect of glacier flow on infrastructure, environmentUsing advanced mapping techniques, scientists are trying to predict when and where fast-flowing glaciers in Western Canada could change the surrounding ecology—and put nearby infrastructure and fisheries at risk.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World's oldest spider discovered in Australian outbackAustralian researchers have discovered what is thought to be the world's oldest recorded spider, unlocking key information about the mysterious eight-legged creature.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Beyond the oceans—microplastics pollute rivers and lakes, tooWhen you think of microplastic pollution, plastic debris less than five millimetres in size, you likely envision the ocean —probably because ocean gyres gained notoriety for being a microplastic soup.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Recovering a narrative of place—stories in the time of climate changeFive years ago, I was invited to participate in a global project on climate change. The aim was to engage 15-year-old students with the challenges posed by climate change and the increase of extreme weather events. The students would be asked to respond to the challenge through creativity, initially through an introduction to the science underpinning climate change. In the following 18 months, I v
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Multiple sclerosis drug could reduce painful side effects of common cancer treatmentResearchers from the Saint Louis University School of Medicine have discovered why many multiple myeloma patients experience severe pain when treated with the anticancer drug bortezomib. The study, which will be published April 27 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that a drug already approved to treat multiple sclerosis could mitigate this effect, allowing myeloma patients to succe
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Want to remember your dreams? Try taking vitamin B6New research from the University of Adelaide has found that taking vitamin B6 could help people to recall their dreams.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How success breeds success in the sciencesA small number of scientists stand at the top of their fields, commanding the lion's share of research funding, awards, citations, and prestigious academic appointments. New research shows it's not necessarily because they are better and smarter than their peers, but rather, the result of the 'Matthew effect.'
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Seniors stick to fitness routines when they work out togetherOlder adults are more likely to stick with a group exercise program if they can do it with people their own age, a new University of British Columbia study has found. Working out with peers of the same gender doesn't seem to make a difference, which suggests that age-targeting but not gender-targeting should be considered when developing exercise programming.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Beltway to divert diesel trucks in Sao Paulo improved public healthA new study revealed that a beltway constructed to divert heavy-duty diesel vehicles traffic in the Brazilian city of Sao Paulo has reduced public health damage associated with exposure to diesel. The positive health outcomes of the intervention could guide the formulation of similar transport polices in other cities, where humans and diesel vehicles reside and transit in close proximity.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Forty-four genomic variants linked to major depressionA new meta-analysis of more than 135,000 people with major depression and more than 344,000 controls has identified 44 genomic variants, or loci, that have a statistically significant association with depression.
9h
The Atlantic

The Danger of a Distorted View of the RightWhat attributes define intellectuals on the right and left in the strange era of Donald Trump? That’s the question Paul Krugman raised in a column attempting to explain ideological imbalance among commentators at elite U.S. media organizations. While his account betrayed dubious assumptions about civil society and the value of opinion journalism, it sparked illuminating responses. Tyler Cowen, on
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making cities cooler is a no brainer – so why are we doing so little about it?You walk through a park in a city on a warm day, then cross out to a narrow street lined with tall buildings. Suddenly, it feels much hotter. Many people will have experienced this, and climate scientists have a name for it: the urban heat island effect.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stretchable smart sensor a promising alternative to painful blood testsResearchers have created a flexible, wireless sensor worn on the skin which monitors the pH of the wearer's sweat in real time. Developed in the course of the EU-funded project CONTEST, the device is a stepping stone towards eliminating invasive blood tests when monitoring chemical levels in the body.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers find Earth-like planets capable of hosting waterNew studies show that the seven planets orbiting the dwarf star TRAPPIST-1 are made mostly of rock, and some could hold more water than Earth.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Introduced species overlooked in biodiversity reportingNature is intimately connected with human well-being of current and future generations – which is why an array of reports track the state of biodiversity and predict the impact of our way of life on its evolution. These reports are based on several indicators that only take indigenous – i.e. "original" – species into account for each region. Yet today modern environments are made up of indigenous
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How automation will make oil rigs saferOffshore oil rigs can be extremely dangerous places to work. Over the last few decades, several offshore explosions have led to environmental disasters and the death of workers. Regulations have so far failed to stop fatal accidents from occurring. But with developments in technology, particularly the rise of automation, we're hoping that future accidents can be reduced.
9h
Feed: All Latest

Maybach's Electric SUV, Tesla's Autopilot Shakeup, and More Car NewsPlus: why self-driving car developers should be aiming lower.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bright future for solar cell technologyNew all-inorganic perovskite solar cells tackle three key challenges in solar cell technology: efficiency, stability, and cost.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

AI can help in crime prevention, but we still need a human in chargeImagine you live in a smart city that knows your face and follows your every move – the places you go, the people you see, and all of the things you do along the way.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global

Can You Explain Climate to an 11-Year-Old?Seven scientists did it well enough to become finalists in an international competition -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cybersecurity teams that don't interact much perform bestArmy scientists recently found that the best, high-performing cybersecurity teams have relatively few interactions with their team-members and team captain.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cave ecologist sheds light on subterranean speciesAs a cave ecologist, Dr. Matthew Niemiller is a frequent visitor to the dark, damp caves of the Southeastern U.S., where he chases millipedes, beetles, and other diminutive creatures through tight spaces. Hours spent breathing cool, heavy air and wading through chilly underground water are necessary for him to gather enough material for further analysis. After he removes his helmet and muddy boots
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wooden Shigir idol found to be over twice as old as Egyptian pyramidsA team of researchers in Germany has found evidence suggesting that the famous wooden Shirgir Idol is actually 11,500 years old. The team has documented their efforts and findings in a paper published on the Cambridge University Press site Antiquity.
10h
The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Glowing TickThis lone star tick's bite can cause an allergy to red meat.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

X-ray scientists create tiny, super-thin sheets of flowing water that shimmer like soap bubblesWater is an essential ingredient for life as we know it, making up more than half of the adult human body and up to 90 percent of some other living things. But scientists trying to examine tiny biological samples with certain wavelengths of light haven't been able to observe them in their natural, watery environments because the water absorbs too much of the light.
10h
Science-Based Medicine

I Used To Be a Holistic NutritionistUp until a year ago, I was a practicing holistic nutritionist. As someone who has left that world behind, I have a moral obligation to do what is right – and what is right is to denounce my former beliefs in an industry rife with deception.
10h
Science | The Guardian

Anteater in prize-winning wildlife photo is stuffed, say judgesNatural History Museum takes down picture, but Marcio Cabral is adamant he did not fake it The dramatic photograph of an anteater approaching a glowing termite mound in the dead of night was originally considered a worthy winner of a Wildlife Photographer of the Year award. The prize has now been withdrawn after judges noticed a problem: the anteater pictured is almost certainly a stuffed animal
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New NASA study may improve future river-observing satellitesRiver floods are one of the most common and devastating of Earth's natural disasters. In the past decade, deluges from rivers have killed thousands of people every year around the world and caused losses on the order of tens of billions of U.S. dollars annually. Climate change, which is projected to increase precipitation in certain areas of the planet, might make river floods in these places more
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher to send cotton into space to improve its growth on EarthJeans are thirsty. The fibers making up their denim come from water-guzzling cotton plants, and plant scientists are on the hunt for ways to make this vital fiber more sustainable.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scalable, cost-effective intervention helps parents improve student attendance, new study findsInforming parents about not just when but how often their children miss school reduces absenteeism by 10 percent or more at every level from kindergarten all the way through 12th grade, according to a study published this week in the journal Nature Human Behavior.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How much does infrastructure boost an economy?Before 1870, India barely had railroads. It didn't have many canals either, and only a small percentage of the population lived along the three main rivers. So when goods needed to be transported, people used steer, which could pull freight about 20 miles per day.
10h
The Atlantic

Pleading the Fifth Doesn't Mean Michael Cohen Is GuiltyDuring a campaign rally in Iowa in 2016 , Donald Trump criticized former Hillary Clinton staffers who had invoked their Fifth Amendment rights against self-incrimination in the case involving her private email system. By pleading the Fifth, Trump suggested, they were admitting their guilt. “The mob takes the Fifth,” Trump told the crowd. “If you’re innocent, why are you taking the Fifth Amendment
10h
Big Think

Religion isn't going anywhere, but the demographics are shifting dramaticallyStudies show which religions are growing fast and which ones may be dying out. Read More
10h
Dana Foundation

The Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives Celebrates its 25th AnniversaryPresident George Bush designated the 1990s as the “ Decade of the Brain ” to “enhance public awareness of the benefits to be derived from brain research.” Yet, in the early 90s, even with this presidential proclamation, there was not much information about the brain available to the general public. Outreach was still uncommon and neuroscience funding had even decreased. In response, thirty of the
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Separate studies offer evidence of geothermal plant causing Pohang earthquakeTwo teams working independently have found evidence implicating a geothermal plant in South Korea as a cause of a major earthquake in the city of Pohang last year. One of the teams, made up of researchers from several universities in Korea, used data from onsite seismic monitors to reach their conclusions. The other team was made up of researchers from across Europe and used satellite data to make
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists teach neural network to identify a writer's genderA team of researchers from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI, the National Research Center Kurchatov Institute and the Voronezh State University has developed a new learning algorithm that allows a neural network to identify a writer's gender by the written text on a computer with up to 80 percent accuracy.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

"Rapid Autopsy" Programs Seek Clues to Cancer within Hours of DeathMore than a dozen medical centers hope to study donated tumor tissue before it degrades -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Evolving Asteroid Starships projectA group of students and researchers at Delft University of Technology are designing a starship capable of keeping generations of crew alive as they cross the gulf between stars – and they've turned to ESA for the starship's life support.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ESA and NASA to investigate bringing Martian soil to EarthESA and NASA signed a statement of intent today to explore concepts for missions to bring samples of martian soil to Earth.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New development in contact lenses for red-green color blindness using simple dyeResearchers at the University of Birmingham have developed a contact lens that may help people with colour blindness simply by using a low cost dye, according to research published today (26 April 2018) in the journal Advanced Healthcare Materials.
10h
Popular Science

Our bravest ancestors may have hunted giant slothsAnimals Or maybe they were just having fun? You might think a ground sloth would be easy to kill. What’s it gonna do, walk away from you at half a mile per hour? If you, like me, made this joke when reading the…
10h
Feed: All Latest

Chemists Orchestrate the Molecular Union of Two Single AtomsIt’s a molecular Parent Trap: Stick two atoms in a vacuum chamber, and steer them together with lasers.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global

The Health and Safety of America's Workers Is at RiskWe’ve made great progress, but the Trump administration is intent on rolling back protections and favoring industry interests over the public interest -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)

"RainMakers" | Qudus Onikeku and The QTribeQudus Onikeku and The QTribe summon a downpour with a poetic, powerful dance performance. Set to a composition of singing, drums and strings, the dancers radiate energy -- moving in circles, in shapes and in unison as they consume the TED stage.
10h
New Scientist - News

Cute but dim quolls have been taught to stop eating toxic toadsNorthern quolls are an endangered species thanks to an epidemic of poisonous cane toads in Australia, but now some of them have been trained to steer clear
10h
Feed: All Latest

What is Crispr Gene Editing? The Complete WIRED GuideHow scientists can repurpose a bacterial immune system to alter DNA, making everything from cheap insulin to extra starchy corn.
11h
Feed: All Latest

Fukushima’s Other Big Problem: A Million Tons of Radioactive WaterMore than 1 million tons of radiation-laced water is already being kept on-site in an ever-expanding forest of hundreds of hulking steel tanks.
11h
Feed: All Latest

The Startup That Will Vet You for Your Next JobMore companies like Uber and Instacart are using Checkr, which promises streamlined background checks through automation and integration with hiring apps.
11h
Feed: All Latest

The Crazy, Complex Engineering of Honda's New Clarity HybridThe latest Honda hybrid uses two motors, an engine, and a bevy of buttons, paddles, and pedals—and can leave drivers feeling like symphony conductors.
11h
Latest Headlines | Science News

Website privacy policies don’t say much about how they share your dataPrivacy policies don’t reveal the half of how websites share user data.
11h
Viden

Op af stolen: Halvdelen af danskerne sidder mere end 8 timer om dagenSidder du for meget, kan du få diabetes eller hjertekarsygdomme. Det er værst, hvis du ikke dyrker motion, mener eksperter.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cas3: a biological fishing rod and a shredder rolled into oneCRISPR-Cas9 has made gene editing a lot easier, and will eventually contribute to elimination of hereditary diseases from our DNA. But despite the fact that researchers use CRISPR-Cas9 and similar bacterial immune systems as molecular tools, they still don't know how they work. For instance, an unanswered question about Cas3 is how it cuts DNA. Does it pull a DNA strand toward itself, or does it g
11h
Scientific American Content: Global

We Could Learn Something from Italy about Dealing with Opioid AbuseEvery resident and legal immigrant in Italy has full access to a benefits package that includes addiction treatment, regardless of age, income, gender or state -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Science | The Guardian

Scientists 'keep pigs' brains alive without a body for up to 36 hours'The brains, which are not conscious, are kept alive through the circulation of an oxygen-rich fluid through the organs Researchers in the US say they have managed to keep the brains of decapitated pigs alive outside of the body for up to 36 hours by circulating an oxygen-rich fluid through the organs. While the scientists, led by Yale University neuroscientist Nenad Sestan, say the brains are not
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Surprising findings reveal desert ants orient to the geomagnetic fieldDesert ants (Cataglyphis) spend the first weeks of their lives exclusively in the nest. For around four weeks, they nurse the queen and the brood, dig tunnels, build chambers or tidy up. At some point, they leave the nest to start their outdoor career, working as foragers until death.
12h
Scientific American Content: Global

A Nation Divided: Arid/Humid Climate Boundary in U.S. Creeps EastwardThe stark climatic border in the U.S. separating the sultry east from the dry west is rapidly shifting—a change that could have a significant future impact -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists explain the survivability of virusesAn employee of Belozersky Research Institute of Physico-Chemical Biology (RI PCB), MSU, together with a Russian colleague, analyzed ways of increasing the survivability of RNA-containing viruses as well as the mechanisms that help them get rid of adverse mutations. The study was published in Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews journal.
12h
NYT > Science

No, Your Dog Can’t Get Autism From a VaccineBritish officials were spurred to rebut claims about the possible side effects of vaccines because the “anti-vaxxer” movement blamed for measles outbreaks in the U.S. and Europe has turned to pets.
12h
Ingeniøren

Ny ringgade skal forbinde Aarhus’ landevejeEn 300 meter lang bro står nu klar til at føre den nye ringgade over Aarhus’ baneterræn. Ringgaden skal føre den gennemkørende trafik uden om midtbyens snævre gader.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NUS-led study: Beltway to divert diesel trucks in Sao Paulo improved public healthA study by researchers from the National University of Singapore and the University of Sao Paulo revealed that a beltway constructed to divert heavy-duty diesel vehicles traffic in the Brazilian city of Sao Paulo has reduced public health damage associated with exposure to diesel. The positive health outcomes of the intervention could guide the formulation of similar transport polices in other cit
12h
Live Science

Why One Woman Broke Out in Hives When Her Co-Workers Cranked Up the ACIs it possible to be allergic to the cold?
12h
The Atlantic

Free Shipping Isn't Hurting AmazonThere’s a lot that has to happen from the time you click “Place Your Order” on Amazon.com to the time that item arrives on your doorstep a day or two later. There are Amazon workers who have to grab the item from the bin where it’s kept, workers who pack it in a box, and people who drive the trucks (or fly the airplanes) that bring that box from the warehouse to a sortation center to the carrier
12h
The Atlantic

Experts Are for Facts, Amateurs Are for AnalysisDuring testimony before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt described a new proposed rule that would require the agency to publish the data behind all studies used to guide clean-air and clean-water regulations. “It seems to me it’s common sense that as we do rule making at the agency, we base it upon a record, scientific conclusi
12h
Big Think

Christopher Hitchens's 4 greatest one-liners, according to Martin AmisOver the years Christopher has spontaneously delivered many dozens of unforgettable lines. Here are four of them. Read More
12h
Live Science

Deadly Fungus Cells Talk Amongst Themselves to Infect You BetterThe fungal cells use a surprising method to communicate with each other, which may make them more virulent.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Identifying the use of tinder fungi among neolithic communities at la DragaInhabitants of the Neolithic community at La Draga (Banyoles, Girona) used fungi to light or transport fires 7,300 years ago. The discovery represents one of the oldest examples of the technological use of fungi documented to date, and is the result of several archaeological interventions at the site, which also yielded an exceptional collection of fungi, unique in all of prehistoric Europe.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When politics affects demography—how Erdogan has brought 10% more children to TurkeyIn the early 2000s, Turkey was a country in full demographic transition. Fertility rates had dropped to replacement level and were heading toward the lower levels of Southern Europe and Iran. Unexpectedly, Turkey has been able to stop, and in some areas even reverse, this trend in subsequent years, also recording an increase in marriage rates. A newly published paper asserts that politics, and in
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mouse study identifies new target for human accelerated aging syndromeScientists from the University of Cambridge have identified a potential therapeutic target in the devastating genetic disease Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), which is characterized by premature aging.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In multiple myeloma, different types of blood biopsies match up well with bone marrow testsScientists from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard have shown that two ways to measure multiple myeloma DNA in blood samples provide highly detailed sets of genetic information that agree well not just with each other but with results from bone marrow tests.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU to ban bee-killing pesticidesEU countries voted on Friday for a near-total ban on insecticides blamed for killing off bee populations, in what campaigners called a "beacon of hope" for the winged insects.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Geography researchers determine benefits of Singapore's mangrovesA three-year study conducted by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has identified and quantified the benefits of mangrove forests to people in Singapore. These researchers concluded that apart from cultural benefits, mangroves act as nursery habitat for fish and as coastal defence, as well as storing carbon that could help offset some of our climate change emissions.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Engineers develop novel method for resolving spin texture of topological surface states using transport measurementsThe magnetoresistance effect is the tendency of a material to change the value of its electrical resistance in an externally-applied magnetic field. It has been widely applied in sensors and hard disk heads. So far, no link has been established between the existing magnetoresistance and spin texture of spin-polarised materials. Researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have recen
13h
The Atlantic

Exit Macron, Enter MerkelAngela Merkel is in Washington on Friday. But she will not get the reception of her French counterpart Emmanuel Macron, whose U.S. visit this week was capped with a glitzy state dinner and a rousing congressional address. There will be no fanfare for the German chancellor. She is in the U.S. capital for a working visit, which lacks the pomp of a formal state visit. Nor, based on the awkward inter
13h
Science : NPR

Family Caregivers Finally Get A Break — And Some CoachingAcross the U.S., community groups, hospitals and government agencies are stepping up to support the estimated 42 million stressed and strained family caregivers, who are often untrained and unpaid. (Image credit: Lynne Shallcross/KHN)
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment

Wildlife photo competition disqualifies 'stuffed anteater' imageWildlife Photographer of the Year excludes a winning image for featuring a taxidermy specimen.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon raising price of annual prime membership to $119Amazon is raising the price of its annual Prime membership fee to $119 a year, up 20 percent from $99.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Honda net profit surges 70% on US tax cuts, brisk salesHonda Motor on Friday said its annual net profit grew more than 70 percent thanks to strong growth in sales of its cars and motorcycles, as well as US corporate tax cuts.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sony profits soar nearly seven-fold to $4.5 bnSony on Friday reported profits worth $4.5 billion, extending a roaring recovery supported by better sales almost across the board, including with box office blockbusters like its Jumanji reboot.
14h
Viden

Ny teknik kan låse alle hoteldøre op på et minutFinske sikkerhedseksperter har opdaget, at man let kan kopiere et helt hotels nøglekoder ned på ét kort.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microsoft gets earnings boost from 'cloud'Microsoft said Thursday profits rose sharply in the past quarter, lifted by gains in its core cloud computing operations for business.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Labor unions face hard road in Silicon ValleyWell paid and in high demand, it would appear that engineers in Silicon Valley have scant reason to join forces in labor unions.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Baidu net profit jumps after video unit spin-offChina search engine giant Baidu on Friday reported net profit nearly tripled in the first quarter after spinning off its video unit as part of a corporate reorientation toward artificial intelligence (AI).
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Airbus profits fall 30 percent, hit by delivery delaysAirbus saw its profits plunge by 30 percent in the first quarter of 2018 due to delays in delivery of its A320neo engines but still plans to supply 800 aircraft this year, the company said Friday.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Interview with a robot: AI revolution hits human resourcesYou have a telephone interview for your dream job, and you're feeling nervous. You make yourself a cup of tea as you wait for the phone to ring, and you count to three before picking up.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Can fish school cars in how to drive together?In the not so distant future autonomous vehicles may rule the road. Could the ability of fish to swim together provide insights for engineers to make automated driving safer?
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon delivers hefty profits, led by web servicesAmazon Jeff Bezos AWSInternet colossus Amazon on Thursday reported that its quarterly profit more than doubled on soaring revenue from online commerce and cloud services.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Use of DNA in serial killer probe sparks privacy concernsGolden State KillerInvestigators who used a genealogical website to find the ex-policeman they believe is a shadowy serial killer and rapist who terrified California decades ago call the technique ground-breaking.
16h
Ingeniøren

ANALYSE: Regeringen halvvejs i mål med sit nye energiudspilRegeringens længe ventede energiudspil indeholder kun konkrete initiativer, der bringer den halvvejs til målet om 50 pct. ve i 2030 - og så mangler der et udspil omkring blandt andet transporten, der først kommer efter sommerferien.
16h
Science | The Guardian

English Heritage’s visitor centre 'will harm' Clifford’s Tower in YorkExclusive: Campaigners’ legal challenge could restrict development at heritage sites Archaeologists fear English Heritage’s plans to build a visitor centre in the mound of the 13th-century Clifford’s Tower in York will cause “substantial harm” to one of England’s most significant monuments. Legal action is being pursued in a test case that could have a major impact on the power of developers to b
17h
The Atlantic

Radio Atlantic: Is the Presidency Broken?“We are a president-obsessed nation, so much so that we undermine the very idea of our constitutional democracy,” writes John Dickerson in his May cover story in The Atlantic . “No one man—or woman—can possibly represent the varied, competing interests of 327 million citizens.” Have we heaped so much upon the president that the job has become impossible? Is Trump testing the office in valuable wa
18h
The Scientist RSS

Doctors Successfully Treat Rare Genetic Disorder in UteroThe disorder, called X-linked hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia, leaves patients unable to produce sweat, which can be life-threatening.
20h
Live Science

Who Were the Barbarians?To the ancient Greeks, a barbarian was someone who didn't speak Greek. Over time, the word has taken on new meanings.
20h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Sukkerstoffer styrer cellers optag af dårligt kolesterolSukkerstoffer har en afgørende betydning for, hvordan celler kan optage og fjerne det dårlige...
20h
Live Science

How the Golden State Killer's DNA Nabbed HimDNA testing kits such as 23andMe can tell you all about your family's ancestry… but they can also potentially catch a serial killer.
20h
Live Science

Facts About SiliconProperties, sources and uses of the element silicon.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Evidence for persistent forest reliance by indigenous peoples in historical Sri LankaWorking closely with Wanniyalaeto (Vedda) elders in Sri Lanka during the repatriation of skeletal remains, a team of researchers have demonstrated that while some indigenous hunter-gatherers in Sri Lanka made use of agricultural resources and trade connections with farmers and colonial power structures, others continued to subsist primarily on tropical forest resources as late as the 19th century.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New imaging system makes back surgery safer, faster and less expensiveResearchers develop a new way to make back surgery safer, faster and more cost effective. Scientists have developed and tested a 3-dimensional, real-time optical tracking system, like a 'Google Maps' for the body.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Labeling alcoholic drinks as lower in strength could encourage people to drink moreWines and beers labelled as lower in alcohol strength may increase the total amount of alcoholic drink consumed, according to a new study.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

No chronic wasting disease transmissibility in macaquesChronic wasting disease (CWD) did not cross the species barrier to infect cynomolgus macaque monkeys during a lengthy investigation exploring risks to humans.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Drinking kefir may prompt brain-gut communication to lower blood pressureDrinking kefir may have a positive effect on blood pressure by promoting communication between the gut and brain. Kefir is a fermented probiotic milk beverage known to help maintain the balance of beneficial bacteria in the digestive system.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Imaging may allow safe tPA treatment of patients with unwitnessed strokesA study may lead to a significant expansion in the number of stroke patients who can safely be treated with intravenous tPA, the 'clot busting' drug that has greatly reduced stroke-related disability and deaths in eligible patients.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Students' social relationships in the last year of secondary educationEstablishing friendships in the university context helps students to gain independence and to manage their lives in their new environment with more self-confidence. For this reason, those who were more rooted in the village or town that they came from were more likely to experience difficulties adapting to university life. Although they keep some of the original support figures in their lives, it
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Endangered petrels and trawl fishing clash in Tasman seaToday's shifting environmental conditions are creating an uncertain future for many top predators in marine ecosystems, but to protect the key habitat of a species, you first have to know where that habitat is and what threats might be affecting it. A new study looks at where New Zealand's endangered Westland Petrel forages during its breeding season and shows that its range overlaps more with tra
22h
New Scientist - News

Could a tax on chocolate make us healthy? Let’s not be too hastyDoctors are calling for an expansion of sugar taxes to include sweets and cakes, but we don’t yet know whether higher prices will lead to improved health
22h
NYT > Science

Trump’s Doctor Accused of Handing Out Ambien. D.E.A. Calls the Practice Illegal.If Dr. Ronny Jackson gave sleeping pills to reporters and staff on long flights abroad, he broke the law, a D.E.A. spokesman said. “You could be prosecuted.”
22h
NYT > Science

Do Serial Killers Just Stop? Yes, SometimesGolden State KillerJoseph James DeAngelo’s arrest occurred more than 30 years after the Golden State Killer’s spree ended. Experts cite cases involving murderers whose crimes ceased long before they were caught.
22h
Futurity.org

Prison linked to obesity among black menBlack men who have been incarcerated and have a close relative in jail or prison are three times more likely to be obese than are other black men, research shows. Researchers used data from the 2001-2003 National Survey of American Life, which includes a nationally representative sample of 1,140 black men, to examine the rate of incarceration among these men and their family members and adjusted
23h
NeuWrite San Diego

Lymph, glymph, sleep, & sicknessConsider the word “lymph.” What comes to mind? To me, “lymph” sounds like a viscous liquid that might ooze out of the orifices of some terrifying wounded creature. Or perhaps your mind jumps to the term “lymph nodes”, conjuring images of little knobs in your neck bulging with infection, sometimes growing so large that […]
23h
Futurity.org

Diagnose crop disease with a smartphoneNew technology could allow anyone with a smartphone to diagnose crop disease the same way trained plant breeders and scientists do. The findings show how artificial intelligence can identify a range of common stresses in soybeans and improve efficiency for plant breeders and farmers. Researchers started by collecting a large dataset of around 25,000 images of soybean stresses taken in Iowa, says
23h
Futurity.org

Bats carry deadly viruses but don’t get sick. How?The newly-sequenced genome of an Egyptian fruit bat from a cave in Uganda offers clues as to how bats harbor and transmit deadly viruses—but don’t get sick themselves. Researchers were investigating a 2008 case of a 44-year-old woman from Colorado who returned home from a 2-week safari in Uganda and developed a severe headache, chills, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Then came a rash, abdominal p
23h
Futurity.org

This ancient Nubian horse got a surprising burialResearchers excavating a tomb in what was Upper Nubia unearthed the skeleton of a horse so well-preserved it still had hair on its legs. A burial shroud had covered it, and it was found with a piece of iron that appeared to be a cheek piece from a bridle. The finding was “a complete surprise,” says Stuart Tyson Smith, professor of archaeology in the University of California, Santa Barbara anthrop
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Futurity.org

Cancer cells adapt to gorge on sugar in the liverMetastatic cancer cells can reprogram their metabolism to thrive in new organs, research shows. Specifically, the finding shows that cells originating from colorectal cancer change their dietary habits to capitalize on the high levels of fructose often found in the liver. The work, published in Cell Metabolism today, offers both general and specific insights into new ways of fighting metastatic c
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The Atlantic

North and South Korea's Push for PeaceUpdated at 9:42 a.m. ET The leaders of North and South Korea pledged Friday to remove all nuclear weapons from their peninsula and vowed to work toward an official end to the Korean War. The meeting between Kim Jong Un and South Korean President Moon Jae In contained many firsts: Kim became the first North Korean leader to ever step inside the South. And in an apparently unscripted moment, the No
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New Scientist - News

Entangled clouds of atoms are quantum record-breakersTwo distinct clouds of ultracold atoms have been entangled for the first time, which could help us figure out where quantum effects begin and end
23h

New Scientist - News

Humans may be to blame for a big earthquake in South KoreaAn earthquake that struck South Korea in 2017 was caused by a geothermal energy project that injected water underground – and risk assessments missed it
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research helps frail older people in hospitalsResearchers led by the University of Leicester have devised a 'risk score' which will be used to help frail older people have better support in hospital.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Three-minute version of brain stimulation therapy effective for hard-to-treat depressionIn the largest study of its kind, a three-minute version of a brain stimulation treatment was shown to be just as effective as the standard 37-minute version for hard-to-treat depression. These results were published in a new Canadian study in The Lancet co-led by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) and the University Health Network's Krembil Research Institute, in collaboration with
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Too liberal use of oxygen increases risk of death in acutely ill adult patientsExtensive data analyses show that supplemental oxygen, when given liberally to acutely ill adults, increases the risk of death without improving other health outcomes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Taxing sweet snacks may bring greater health benefits than taxing sugar-sweetened drinksA 10 percent tax on sweet snacks could lead to a similar reduction in consumer demand as taxing sugar-sweetened drinks.
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Live Science

This 3,000-Year-Old Horse Got a Human-Style BurialA horse entombed 3,000 years ago received a burial fit for nobility.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Prosthetic arms can provide controlled sensory feedbackLosing an arm doesn't have to mean losing all sense of touch, thanks to prosthetic arms that stimulate nerves with mild electrical feedback. Researchers have developed a control algorithm that regulates the current so a prosthetics user feels steady sensation, even when the electrodes begin to peel off or when sweat builds up.
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The Scientist RSS

Marine Biologist Susan Williams DiesThe UC Davis researcher was an advocate of ocean conservation and science communication.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sub-sea rift spills secrets to seismic probeThe first study to spring to map the subsurface off the coast of Spain has revealed details about the evolution of the fault that separates the continental and oceanic plates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Improving mid-infrared imaging and sensingA new way of taking images in the mid-infrared part of the spectrum, developed by researchers could enable a wide variety of applications, including thermal imaging, biomedical sensing, and free-space communications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Whale shark logs longest-recorded trans-Pacific migrationA whale shark named Anne swam all the way across the Pacific from Coiba National Park in Panama to the Marianas Trench, setting a record as the longest-recorded migration.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bleaching of coral reefs reduced where daily temperature changes are largeCoral reef bleaching is stark evidence of the damage being inflicted by global climate change on marine ecosystems, but a research team has found some cause for hope. While many corals are dying, others are showing resilience to increased sea surface temperatures, pointing to possible clues to the survival and recovery of these vitally important aquatic habitats.
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Popular Science

Feel like the seasons are all out of whack? You can help scientists prove it.Nexus Media News Weekend warriors are tracking the early emergence of spring. Climate change is causing spring to arrive earlier and earlier, posing a challenge for plants and animals —as well as the scientists who study them. So now they're…
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The Atlantic

How Cosby's 'Pound Cake' Speech Helped Lead to His DownfallBill Cosby A. ConstandOn Thursday, “America’s Dad” was convicted of sexual assault. Cosby’s image as a wholesome sitcom dad and moral exemplar had been irreparably tarnished in the past few years by dozens of women who had come forward with stories of drug-induced sexual assault—some new, some raised a decade ago. But the conviction will define his legacy forever, even if he never spends a day in prison. He went from
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Feed: All Latest

Meet Badass, the Grassroots Activists Hitting Revenge Porn Where It LivesFrom posting "boner killers" to helping law enforcement, victims of nonconsensual pornography are fighting back.
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Science | The Guardian

Last chance to study and name Australia’s vanishing species, scientists warn MPsAustralian Academy of Science launches 10-year plan to document hundreds of thousands of unknown species With an estimated 70% of Australian organisms still undocumented and funding for species discovery declining, the national science academy will head to parliament on Friday to argue that a rapid reversal is needed to avoid extinctions and reveal unimagined health and biosecurity solutions. The
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