EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Therapeutic RNA corrects splicing defect that causes familial dysautonomiaResearchers at CSHL have published a proof of concept for a therapeutic RNA drug to correct the error in RNA splicing that causes familial dysautonomia (FD), a rare inherited neurodegenerative disorder.
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Scientific American Content: Global

California to Extend Low-Carbon Fuel Standard Through 2030Plan seeks to encourage carbon sequestration development and expand options for credits -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vapers and non-smokers have the same flourishing gut floraThe first study of its kind has found that people who vape have the same mix of gut bacteria as non-smokers, whilst smokers have significant changes to their microbiome.
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Futurity.org

To better enjoy your job, complain more?Complaining about work helps build relationships among team members and boost workers’ moods, particularly if there’s some humor in it, new research suggests. New research in Organization Studies , looks at how a team of nurses, doctors, social workers, and case workers used humor and complaining in their daily care-planning meetings. Griping at work is still somewhat taboo, but Vanessa Pouthier
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Futurity.org

Mercury’s crust may be thinner than scientists thoughtData from the Messenger mission to Mercury, which ended in 2015, led scientists to believe the planet’s crust is roughly 22 miles thick. A new estimate suggests it’s much thinner than that. Using the most recent mathematical formulas, Michael Sori, an associate staff scientist at the Lunar and Planetary Laboratory at the University of Arizona, estimates that the Mercurial crust is just 16 miles t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vultures reveal critical Old World flywaysIdentifying bottlenecks -- i.e. places where birds concentrate on migration -- helps bird conservationists know what areas to focus on and get the most bang for their buck, since a large percentage of a species' population can pass through these small areas.
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Live Science

'Cork' Glacier Holding Back Sea Level Rise May PopHow doomed are we?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High wildfire severity risk seen in young plantation forestsWildfires show no respect for property lines, but a new analysis of the 2013 Douglas Complex fire in southwestern Oregon concludes that young plantation forests managed by industrial owners experienced higher severity fire than did nearby public forests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study suggests ample warning of supervolcano eruptionsConcern over the potential imminent eruptions of Earth's supervolcanoes, like Taupo in New Zealand or Yellowstone in the United States, may be quelled by the results of a new study suggesting that geological signs pointing to a catastrophic eruption would be clear far in advance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Personal care products contribute to a pollution 'rush hour'When people are out and about, they leave plumes of chemicals behind them -- from both car tailpipes and the products they put on their skin and hair. In fact, emissions of siloxane, a common ingredient in shampoos, lotions, and deodorants, are comparable in magnitude to the emissions of major components of vehicle exhaust, such as benzene, from rush-hour traffic.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

T cell biomarker predicts which CLL patients will respond to CAR T cell therapyPenn Medicine researchers may have found the reason why some patients with advanced chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) don't respond to chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy, and the answer is tied to how primed patients' immune systems are before the therapy is administered.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Better care of sickest patients can save hospitals money, says largest study of its kindPalliative care -- which better aligns medical treatments with patients' goals and wishes, aggressively treats distressing symptoms, and improves care coordination, --is associated with shorter hospital stays and lower costs, and shows its greatest effect among the sickest patients, according to a study published Monday, April 30, in JAMA Internal Medicine. The meta-analysis was conducted in colla
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stagediving with biomolecules improves optical microscopyPhysicists from Dresden and Würzburg have developed a novel method for optical microscopy. Using biological motors and single quantum dots, they acquire ultra-high-resolution images.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research casts doubt on theories of star formationThe birth of stars from dense clouds of gas and dust may be happening in a completely unexpected way in our own galaxy and beyond.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

World-first synthesis of globalization effects on people and planetAustralian researchers have compiled a world-first conclusive synthesis of the environmental and social impacts of globalization -- using sophisticated computation to provide a bird's eye view of the displacement of wealth-driven consumption into offshore production -- highlighting effects such as child labor. The research reveals the extent developed countries are outsourcing burdensome productio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UChicago researchers lay out how to control biology with light -- without geneticsOver the past five years, University of Chicago chemist Bozhi Tian has been figuring out how to control biology with light. In a paper published April 30 in Nature Biomedical Engineering, Tian's team laid out a system of design principles for working with silicon to control biology at three levels -- from individual organelles inside cells to tissues to entire limbs. The group has demonstrated eac
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Calcium-based MRI sensor enables more sensitive brain imagingMIT neuroscientists have developed an MRI sensor that lets them monitor neuron activity deep within the brain by tracking calcium ions. This type of sensing could allow researchers to link specific brain functions to their pattern of neuron activity, and to determine how distant brain regions communicate with each other during particular tasks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Butterfly wings inspire light-manipulating surface for medical implantsNanostructures inspired by transparent butterfly wings help eye implants function better and safely avoid biofouling.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Editing brain activity with holographyThe goal of brain implants is to read neuron activity and respond by activating neurons to, for example, move prosthetics or simulate lost perceptions. UC Berkeley researchers developed a device to do that, projecting a holographic image into the top layer of the brain to activate dozens of neurons hundreds of times a second to simulate real patterns of activity. Equipped with new, fast on/off opt
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Targeting chemotherapy with genetic testing benefits women with aggressive breast cancerWomen with an aggressive form of breast cancer who have faults in their BRCA genes do much better on chemotherapy drug carboplatin than standard treatment, a major clinical trial reports. Researchers found that women with advanced 'triple-negative' breast cancer who had inherited a BRCA mutation were twice as likely to benefit from carboplatin as docetaxel, which is currently standard of care for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Bacteria's appetite may be key to cleaning up antibiotic contaminationSome bacteria can not only withstand antibiotics, but turn them into food. Until now, scientists have understood little about how bacteria manage to consume antibiotics safely, but new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis illuminates key steps in the process. The findings, published April 30 in Nature Chemical Biology, could lead to new ways to eliminate antibiotics
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists create nanomaterials that reconfigure in response to biochemical signalsA newly published paper in Nature Chemistry details how a research team lead by scientists at the Advanced Science Research Center's Nanoscience Initiative are developing self-assembling electronic nanomaterials that can respond to biochemical signals for potential therapeutic use.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Double-bridged peptides bind any disease targetEPFL scientists have developed a new type of 'double-bridged peptide' that can be tailored to bind tightly to disease targets of interest. The peptides' highly efficient binding, combined with their small size and high stability make them ideal for drug therapies. The work is published in Nature Chemistry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Arctic survivalistsThey form the basis of the Arctic food web -- and are extremely tough: even when the water becomes more acidic and the available light or temperatures change, various phytoplankton assemblages in the Arctic demonstrate undiminished productivity and biodiversity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Coverage gains after ACA for Asian-Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific IslandersHealth insurance coverage gains were associated with all major racial groups following the Affordable Care Act and coverage disparities between whites and Asian-Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders were essentially eliminated, according to a research letter based on national survey data.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Do women with epilepsy have similar likelihood of pregnancy?Women with epilepsy without a history of infertility or related disorders who wanted to become pregnant were about as likely as their peers without epilepsy to become pregnant. In an observational study of 89 women with epilepsy and 108 without, 60.7 percent of the women with epilepsy achieved pregnancy compared with 60.2 percent of women without epilepsy. They also had similar pregnancy outcomes
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Psychiatric diagnoses and medication use in children insured by MedicaidYoung children insured by Medicaid with a psychiatric diagnosis had early and prolonged exposure to psychotropic medications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Geometry is key to T-cell triggeringA new study reveals the geometric underpinnings of T-cell triggering through the precise engineering of T-cell receptor geometry in all three dimensions. The researchers used nanofabrication to create a biomimetic surface that simulates the key features of the APC, presenting T-cell receptor ligands in different geometric arrangements, with different inter-ligand spacings arranged in clusters of v
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ACA increased health insurance coverage, narrowed disparities for Asian-Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific IslandersFollowing the passage of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in 2010, the rate of Asian-Americans, Native Hawaiians, and Pacific Islanders (AANHPIs) without health insurance dropped to 9 percent -- a rate essentially equal to that of whites (8.8 percent), according to a new study by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fertility rates no different for women with epilepsy'Myth-busting' study among women with no history of infertility finds that those with epilepsy are just as likely to become pregnant as those without.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medicare kidney failure patients enter hospice too late to reap full benefitsLate referrals to hospice drive up end-of-life costs and limit benefits for patients on dialysis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Exceptional' research points way toward quantum discoveriesRice University scientists use nanotube films and polarized light to strongly couple light and matter progressively and on demand at room temperature. Their technique could help scientists who study data storage and the manipulation of light at quantum levels.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genomic analysis unravels complexities of the most common form of lymphoma and enables personalized treatmentGenomic analysis by scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard offers a better framework for understanding large B cell lymphoma's many forms, which will help to predict individual patient outcomes and guide personalized treatment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The laws of star formation challengedAn international team led by researchers at CNRS, Université Grenoble Alpes and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) has challenged currently held ideas about star formation. Published in Nature Astronomy, the findings could challenge the widespread assumption that the mass distribution of a population of star-forming cores is identical to that of the stars they spawn
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Reef fish inherit tolerance to warming oceansThanks to mom and dad, baby reef fish may have what it takes to adjust to hotter oceans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Citizen scientists discover a new water beetle and name it after Leonardo DiCaprioCitizen scientists decided to name a new water beetle, which they discovered in the pristine Maliau Basin, Malaysian Borneo, after Hollywood actor and environmentalist Leonardo DiCaprio. The tribute also marks the 20th anniversary of the celebrity's Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation that supports various projects dedicated to the preservation of biodiversity and magnificent unspoiled habitats just like
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Adds Lauren N. Williams and Taylor Lorenz to Growing MastheadWashington, D.C. (April 30, 2018)— The Atlantic is growing its New York bureau with two new editorial hires: Lauren N. Williams joins as a senior editor on the Culture desk and Taylor Lorenz is joining the Technology team as a staff writer. The Atlantic’s editor in chief Jeffrey Goldberg and TheAtlantic.com editor Adrienne LaFrance announced the news today. Williams will start in June, after comp
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New Scientist - News

North Korea’s nuclear-free pledge comes with a massive catchKim Jong Un North KoreaLast week saw a historic meeting between the leaders of North and South Korea, but the promise of a nuclear-free Korean Peninsula may not be so easy
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New on MIT Technology Review

How a gaming chip could someday save your lifeNvidia has made a fortune selling chips for games and AI. Now it wants to reboot hospitals.
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NYT > Science

Basics: A Population That Pollutes Itself Into Extinction (and It’s Not Us)Gorging on glucose, bacteria in a petri dish died in their own acidic waste, a sign of the perpetual struggle in nature between cooperation and selfishness.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: How a Rose Blooms: Its Genome Reveals the Traits for Scent and ColorFrench researchers are completing a full map of the rose, pinpointing genes to edit for continuous blooming and its other signature features.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Rotation of the Large Magellanic CloudLast week the much-awaited second slew of data from ESA's Gaia mission was released, providing information on a phenomenal 1.7 billion stars – the richest star catalogue to date.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

FAST's first discovery of a millisecond pulsarChina's 500-meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) discovered a radio millisecond pulsar (MSP) coincident with the unassociated gamma-ray source 3FGL J0318.1+0252 in the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) point-source list. This is another milestone of FAST.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Supreme Court to hear Google class action settlement caseThe Supreme Court has agreed to review the settlement of a class action lawsuit involving Google, where the settlement agreement largely directed money to organizations rather than search engine users.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lake Victoria biodiversity being 'decimated': conservationistsThree quarters of freshwater species endemic to East Africa's Lake Victoria basin face the threat of extinction, conservationists said Monday, warning the biodiversity there was being "decimated".
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Walmart to sell UK unit as it seeks growth in online salesWalmart has agreed to sell its British unit, Asda, to local rival Sainsbury's in a 7.3 billion pound ($10.1 billion) deal as the U.S. giant focuses on online sales in countries with higher growth and less intense competition.
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Viden

Eske Willerslev: Ikke alle forbinder et meningsfuldt liv med at få børnSelvom det strider imod vores genetiske formål, vælger mange at få børn i en sen alder, mens andre helt dropper efterkommere.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

Is the world getting better or worse? A look at the numbers | Steven PinkerWas 2017 really the "worst year ever," as some would have us believe? In his analysis of recent data on homicide, war, poverty, pollution and more, psychologist Steven Pinker finds that we're doing better now in every one of them when compared with 30 years ago. But progress isn't inevitable, and it doesn't mean everything gets better for everyone all the time, Pinker says. Instead, progress is pr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Few patients maximize opioid-sparing medications after orthopaedic surgeryA new study adds to growing evidence that patients underuse nonopioid pain relievers to supplement opioid pain management after spine and joint surgery.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Topological insulator 'flips' for superconductivityA groundbreaking sample preparation technique has enabled researchers to perform the most controlled and sensitive study to date of a topological insulator (TI) closely coupled to a superconductor (SC).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brown widow male spiders prefer sex with older females likely to eat them afterwardsMale brown widow spiders seek to mate with older, less-fertile females who are 50 percent more likely to eat them after sex.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Protein responsible for leukemia's aggressiveness identifiedResearchers have identified a protein critical for the aggressiveness of T-cell leukemia, a subtype of leukemia that afflicts children and adults.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

German nationalist wins injunction against FacebookA leading German nationalist politician has won a court injunction forcing Facebook to ensure a user's slur against her can't be seen in Germany.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Moon holds key to improving satellite views of EarthMany Earth observation satellites make use of an added ingredient to ensure reliable, good quality environmental data: the moon.
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Science | The Guardian

New beetle species named after Leonardo DiCaprioWater beetle species found in Malaysia was named after the Titanic star for his environmental activism A new species of water beetle found clinging to a sandstone rock in a fast-flowing stream that leads to a waterfall in Malaysian Borneo has been named after the actor Leonardo DiCaprio. The tiny black insect, which has a partially retractable head and slightly protruding eyes, was named after th
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Popular Science

This butterfly's transparent wings could one day save people's visionHealth See it with butterfly wings. The same trick that makes a South American butterfly’s wings transparent could improve eye implants for people with glaucoma…
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Quanta Magazine

Troubled Times for Alternatives to Einstein’s Theory of GravityMiguel Zumalacárregui knows what it feels like when theories die. In September 2017, he was at the Institute for Theoretical Physics in Saclay, near Paris, to speak at a meeting about dark energy and modified gravity. The official news had not yet broken about an epochal astronomical measurement — the detection, by gravitational wave detectors as well as many other telescopes, of a collision betw
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Marathon Petroleum $23.3 bn buy forms US refining giantMarathon Petroleum announced Monday that it will acquire Andeavor for $23.3 billion to form the largest oil refining company in the United States by capacity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Workplace flexibility bias not just a mother's problemWork-life balance is not an issue exclusive to women, particularly mothers—even men and those without children can suffer when they feel that their workplace culture is not family friendly, according to a new study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World-first synthesis of globalization effects on people and planetAustralian researchers have compiled a world-first conclusive synthesis of the environmental and social impacts of globalisation - using sophisticated computation to provide a bird's eye view of the displacement of wealth-driven consumption into offshore production - highlighting effects such as increased child labour and environmental degradation at the area of production that may not be seen eas
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ISIL activity is not funded by oil, study suggestsOil was never as important to ISIL terrorists as many thought, despite media reports of an oil-related income of as much as US $28 million a week, according to a new study in Energy Research & Social Science. This knowledge supports efforts to weaken terrorist organizations like ISIL, by first understanding how they are funded and how financially stable they are.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

New genetic details may help roses come up smelling like, well, rosesA detailed genetic look at China roses and an old European species shows that there’s a built-in trade-off between color and scent.
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The Atlantic

Artificial Intelligence Is Cracking Open the Vatican's Secret ArchivesThe Vatican Secret Archives is one of the grandest historical collections in the world. It’s also one of the most useless. The grandeur is obvious. Located within the Vatican’s walls, next door to the Apostolic Library and just north of the Sistine Chapel, the VSA houses 53 linear miles of shelving dating back more than 12 centuries. It includes gems like the papal bull that excommunicated Martin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

State-of-the-art HIV drug could curb HIV transmission, improve survival in IndiaAn HIV treatment regimen already widely used in North America and Europe would likely increase the life expectancy of people living with HIV in India by nearly three years and reduce the number of new HIV infections by 23 percent with minimal impact on the country's HIV/AIDS budget.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pill for breast cancer diagnosis may outperform mammogramsAs many as one in three women treated for breast cancer undergo unnecessary procedures, but a new method for diagnosing it could do a better job distinguishing between benign and aggressive tumors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Workplace flexibility bias not just a mother's problemWork-life balance is not an issue exclusive to women, particularly mothers -- even men and those without children can suffer when they feel that their workplace culture is not family friendly, according to a new study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why Armenia's transition to democracy failedAs the world awaits the next steps after Armenia's recent pro-democracy revolution—which toppled its authoritarian leader Serzh Sarksyan leading to an upcoming parliamentary election May 1st—it seems an opportune time to ask: why did Armenia fail in its transition to democracy after achieving independence from the Soviet Union in the early 1990s?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bacteria's appetite may be key to cleaning up antibiotic contaminationAntibiotics can be lifesaving for people suffering from serious bacterial infections such as pneumonia and meningitis. The drugs are lethal to bacteria—but some bacteria fight back by developing resistance to antibiotics, and a few not only resist the onslaught, but turn the lethal drugs into food.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Double-bridged peptides bind any disease targetPeptides are short chains of amino acids that can bind to proteins and change their function. They show high binding affinity, low toxicity, and are easy to synthesize, all of which makes peptides ideal for use in drug development, and many naturally occurring peptides such as insulin, oxytocin, somatostatin and the antibiotics vancomycin or polymyxin B, are widely used.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Arctic phytoplankton assemblages in coastal waters remain productive, despite variable environmental conditionsEven when Arctic water becomes more acidic and the available light or temperatures change, phytoplankton assemblages in the ocean demonstrate undiminished productivity and biodiversity. They form the basis of the Arctic food web—and are extremely tough. This was the main finding presented in a study by researchers at the Alfred Wegener Institute, released jointly with their Canadian colleagues in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The laws of star formation challengedAn international team led by researchers at CNRS, Université Grenoble Alpes and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) has challenged currently held ideas about star formation. Published in Nature Astronomy, the findings could challenge the widespread assumption that the mass distribution of a population of star-forming cores is identical to that of the stars they spawn
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Citizen scientists discover a new water beetle and name it after Leonardo DiCaprioNew animal species are sometimes named after celebrities because of their trademark looks. That's how we got the blonde-haired Donald Trump moth and the big-armed Arnold Schwarzenegger fly, to name a few. However, some well-known people are enshrined in animal names not for their looks, but rather for what they do for the environment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Reef fish inherit tolerance to warming oceansIn a rapidly changing climate, the decline of animal populations is a very real concern. Today, an international team of researchers report new evidence of reef fish adjusting to global warming conditions at the genetic level.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Calcium-based MRI sensor enables more sensitive brain imagingMIT neuroscientists have developed a new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sensor that allows them to monitor neural activity deep within the brain by tracking calcium ions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Butterfly wings inspire light-manipulating surface for medical implantsInspired by tiny nanostructures on transparent butterfly wings, engineers at Caltech have developed a synthetic analogue for eye implants that makes them more effective and longer-lasting. A paper about the research was published in Nature Nanotechnology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists create nanomaterials that reconfigure in response to biochemical signalsBiological cells have the complex and miraculous ability to reconfigure and change the way they communicate with each other over time, allowing them to nimbly direct critical functions in the human body—from thinking to walking to fighting disease. A major challenge in materials science is developing nanomaterials that can replicate aspects of these cellular functions and integrate with living sys
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Geometry is key to T-cell triggeringT cells protect the body from foreign substances (known as antigens) and are an essential component of the body's immune system. New immunotherapies that use a patient's own T cells to treat disease have already proven strikingly effective in treating some cancers, and cancer researchers around the world are racing to improve these treatments and apply them more broadly.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists make tunable light-matter couplings in nanotube filmsRice University scientists are known for exceptional research, but a new paper led by physicist Junichiro Kono makes that point most literally.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Voters make choices based on looks—but this doesn't help them pick the best politiciansVoters are wrong to think they can pick the best politician based on their looks, according to new research which shows this leads to less effective people being elected.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A first for quantum physics: Electron orbitals manipulated in diamondsWhile defects in a diamond are mostly undesirable, certain defects are a quantum physicist's best friend, having the potential to store bits of information that could one day be used in a quantum computing system.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Sprint and T-Mobile are all about 5G—or so they say
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Future of Science StorytellingScience is messy, full of plot twists and competing interpretations—and the way we talk about it should reflect that truth -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Topology meets superconductivity through innovative reverse-order sample preparationA groundbreaking sample preparation technique has enabled researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Tokyo to perform the most controlled and sensitive study to date of a topological insulator (TI) closely coupled to a superconductor (SC). The scientists observed the superconducting proximity effect—induced superconductivity in the TI due to its proximity t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research improves prospects for imperiled Devils Hole Pupfish in captivityIn a first-of-its kind study of comparing the microbiology of Devils Hole with that of a constructed scale replica at the Ash Meadows Fish Conservation Facility (AMFCF), a team of scientists from the Desert Research Institute (DRI) in Las Vegas discovered key differences in nutrient levels and species composition that may be impacting the ability of the highly endangered Devils Hole Pupfish (Cypri
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How can forests regenerate without birds?Human activity continues to shape environmental systems around the world creating novel ecosystems that are increasingly prevalent in what some scientists call the Anthropocene (the age of humans). The island of Guam is well known as a textbook case for the devastating effects of invasive species on island ecosystems with the extirpation of most of the forest dwelling birds due to brown tree snake
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Brown widow male spiders prefer sex with older females likely to eat them afterwardsMale brown widow spiders seek to mate with older, less-fertile females who are 50 percent more likely to eat them after sex, according to Israeli researchers in a study published in the journal Animal Behaviour.
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Futurity.org

Two new materials advance aluminum batteriesResearchers have identified two new materials that could bring about key advances in the development of aluminum batteries. The first, reported in Advanced Science , is a corrosion-resistant material for the conductive parts of the battery; the second, reported in Advanced Materials , is a novel material for the battery’s positive pole that adapt to suit a wide range of technical requirements. An
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Big Think

Who is God? Americans are as divided as imaginable on a definitionA new Pew Research study shows how widely varied belief in what God, or a higher power, actually is. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ancient quids reveal clues about genetic ancestry of early Great Basin inhabitantsIf you want to know about your ancestors today, you can send a little saliva to a company where - for a fee - they will analyze your DNA and tell you where you come from. For scientists trying to find out about ancient peoples, however, the challenge is more complex.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Vultures reveal critical Old World flywaysIt's not easy to catch an Egyptian vulture.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists pinpoint energy flowing through vibrations in superconducting crystalsManipulating the flow of energy through superconductors could radically transform technology, perhaps leading to applications such as ultra-fast, highly efficient quantum computers. But these subtle dynamics—including heat dispersion—play out with absurd speed across dizzying subatomic structures.
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Ingeniøren

Nu kan EU kræve at biler med diesel-fusk købes tilbageHidtil har det EU-land, som har typegodkendt en bil, været den eneste instans, der kunne kræve, at biler skulle tilbagekaldes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why this summer might be a test for the Texas electric gridSummer is fast approaching here in Texas, and even if it is a mild one, it will be hot. Once again we'll walk from our air-conditioned houses to our air-conditioned cars to our air-conditioned parking garages to our air-conditioned places of work.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trapping trip finds disease-free Tasmanian devils in remote SouthwestScientists from the Save the Tasmanian Devil Program (STDP), the University of Sydney and Toledo Zoo spent eight days exploring the south west wilderness on a quest to find and trap devils in an area that nobody had trapped before.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers get on consumers' wavelength with InSb technologyThe technology for controlling light absorption at selected wavelengths in nanostructures has garnered much attention in recent years; however, dynamically tuning absorption wavelengths without also changing the geometry of their structure has been somewhat elusive. A recently published paper in Scientific Reports by Dr. Don Gregory, distinguished professor in the Department of Physics and Astrono
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Magnetic nanoparticles leap from lab bench to breast cancer clinical trialsSandia National Laboratories materials chemist Dale Huber has been working on the challenge of making iron-based nanoparticles the exact same size for 15 years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ISIL activity is not funded by oil, study suggestsOil was never as important to ISIL terrorists as many thought, despite media reports of an oil-related income of as much as US $28 million a week, according to a new study in Energy Research & Social Science. This knowledge supports efforts to weaken terrorist organizations like ISIL, by first understanding how they are funded and how financially stable they are.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Keep calm and carry on: VTCRI scientists make first serotonin measurements in humansScientists at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute have begun to unravel how serotonin acts, based on data collected in a first-of-its-kind experiment that utilized electrochemical probes implanted into the brain of awake human beings.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Systematic treatment of periodontal disease: Advantage of further therapeutic approachesAn indication or hint of greater benefit was now shown for six instead of two therapeutic measures. This applies particularly to the attachment level.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Effects of night-time light on internal body clockNew research has illuminated the effects of night-time light exposure on internal body clock processes. This is important for helping those who have poor quality sleep, such as shift workers, and could help improve treatments for depression.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New materials for sustainable, low-cost batteriesA new conductor material and a new electrode material could pave the way for inexpensive batteries and therefore the large-scale storage of renewable energies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New strategies needed to help healthcare providers gain knowledge to counsel patients on dietHealthcare providers are willing to counsel heart disease patients on diet but need more educational support.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Higher aerobic fitness levels are associated with better word production skills in healthy older adultsResearchers found that older adults' aerobic fitness levels are directly related to the incidence of age-related language failures such as 'tip-of-the-tongue' states.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Following five healthy lifestyle habits may increase life expectancy by decade or moreMaintaining five healthy habits -- eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, keeping a healthy body weight, not drinking too much alcohol, and not smoking -- during adulthood may add more than a decade to life expectancy, according to a new study.
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cognitive science

A new deep learning algorithm is able to identify the gender of a writer based on written text with 80% accuracy.submitted by /u/Lightfiend [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Neonicotinoid ban—how meta-analysis helped show pesticides do harm beesThe EU has announced a near-total ban on three insecticides that we now know are harmful to bees and other pollinators. And yet for years, scientists weren't sure whether these neonicotinoid insecticides had any significant effect on bees, thanks to numerous studies that appeared to contradict each other.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Thermophile respiratory complex's structure determined by cryoEMEnergy is the basis of life, and all organisms depend on mechanisms of energy transformation for growth and reproduction. Living beings get their energy through cellular respiration. In eukaryotes, like us humans, this is done in the presence of oxygen in an organelle called the mitochondria through four protein complexes, which constitute the respiratory chain. Bacteria have more diverse protein
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Black employees in the service industry pay an emotional tax at workThe arrests of two black men who were waiting for a friend at a Starbucks in Philadelphia have raised questions about how race determines how customers are treated.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Project puts rail communication networks on right trackEU researchers have developed and analysed scenarios of what future rail communication networks might look like. Their methodology will now be freely available to rail and telecom operators to make their own evaluations.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Digital rail network mapping achieves efficienciesEU-funded researchers have been able to gather accurate geographical data through the use of drones, remote sensing and 360-degree cameras to deliver digital 3-D models of railway lines. This will assist rail and infrastructure companies in assessing tracks throughout their lifecycle.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Drone-based thermal imaging and analytics for energy efficiencySay the word drone, and you're likely to conjure up images of the latest military technology, the newest e-commerce delivery device, or something you snap a GoPro camera onto for aerial shots of the Grand Canyon.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study explores link between curiosity and school achievementThe more curious the child, the more likely he or she may be to perform better in school -- regardless of economic background -- suggests a study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Effects of munitions in the seas only partially knownMore than 70 years after the end of World War II, countless pieces of ammunition from this time are still lying in all oceans. Once the casings are damaged, the explosives can release toxic substances into the seawater. A new review study, published by scientists from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and the Schleswig-Holstein Ministry of the Environment points to considerable k
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Penn Medicine-led study reveals potential for more precise diagnosis and treatment of TBIPatients who've suffered from traumatic brain injuries have changes in tiny blood vessels in their brains that researchers believe are linked to a range of cognitive symptoms, according to new findings presented at the 2018 AAN Annual Meeting. The findings may help doctors pinpoint specific types of TBIs and tailor personalized therapies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Voters make choices based on looks -- but this doesn't help them pick the best politiciansNew research, thought to be the the first of its kind, measures the impact of appearance and personality on voting and political performance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers say chronic dizziness can result from, or trigger, psychiatric disordersDizziness can fall into a number of broad categories, including vertigo (spinning sensation), presyncope (near-fainting), and disequilibrium (imbalance). When a patient's description of symptoms appears consistent with one of these categories, physicians are better equipped to make an accurate diagnosis. Patients who have a difficult time describing their symptoms, or seem to experience several di
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using an SN1 reaction to make quaternary stereocentersA team of researchers at Harvard University in the U.S. has developed a way to us an SN1 reaction to make quaternary carbon stereocenters. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes overcoming the tendency of SN1 reactions to destroy stereochemistry to make the carbon-centered material. Tobias Morack and Ryan Gilmour from the University of Münster in Germany, offer a News &
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Ingeniøren

AI-udvikling kan gøre Google til et militært målNår Google skriver kode til kunstig intelligens anvendt i krigsmaskiner, bliver IT-giganten er legitimt mål i tilfælde af krig.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A scalable deep learning approach for massive graphsA graph structure is extremely useful for predicting properties of its constituents. The most successful way of performing this prediction is to map each entity to a vector through the use of deep neural networks. One may infer the similarity of two entities based on the vector closeness. A challenge for deep learning, however, is that one needs to gather information between an entity and its expa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Going to Mars and never coming backIf all goes to plan, humans will be settling Mars by 2032. And there's a good chance someone on the crew will be from Australia.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What your body odour says about youSmells emanating from you can reveal anything from your health status to your personality or political taste.
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Popular Science

And now, a ship that can mine 39,000 tons of ore from a mile under waterEastern Arsenal There are giant robots involved. The Deep Sea Nautilus is the world's first dedicated underwater mining platform that can operate underwater robots.
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Dagens Medicin

Udsatte kvinder bliver oftere væk fra screening af livmoderhalskræftNy forskning viser, at udsatte kvinder sjældnere bliver screenet for livmoderhalskræft. Forskere mener, at der er brug for mere fokuserede tiltag for at øge deltagelse.
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The Atlantic

What If Robert F. Kennedy Had Become President?The most surprising thing about Bobby Kennedy for President , a new four-part documentary that debuted Friday on Netflix, is how every frame of archival footage of Robert Kennedy seems to feature a hundred people trying to touch him. As he tours different neighborhoods in New York, a sea of hands reaches out to make contact. During one drive through a campaign stop, a newscast reports, “he was to
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The Atlantic

Michelle Wolf Does Unto the White House as It Has Done Unto Others“Women attacking conservative women for their looks and their jobs It’s shameful. #WHCA.” Those angry words were tweeted by White House Communications Director Mercedes Schlapp at 11:15 p.m. on the night of the White House Correspondents’ Association’s annual dinner. It was wise to begin her tweet with the caution that the shame was attached to women attacking conservative women. In any other cas
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How Australian museums regulate the display of human remainsProtesters are urging a boycott of Real Bodies: The Exhibition, which recently opened in Sydney, due to the possibility that the plastinated human bodies and organs on display were taken without consent from executed Chinese political prisoners.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Labeling and detecting RNA modificationsResearchers at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence have developed a new method enabling them to locate important modifications to messenger RNA. This is the result of an interdisciplinary collaboration between biochemists and molecular biologists. It has been published in Angewandte Chemie (International Edition).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research supports calls for food industry to reduce food product portion sizesNew research, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, highlights the benefits of the food industry changing food product portion sizes in order to make healthier eating more normal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UNICEF 'muted' on tobacco control for childrenThe tobacco industry manipulated the renowned children's rights agency UNICEF for more than a dozen years, from 2003 until at least 2016, during which time UNICEF's focus on children's rights to a tobacco-free life was reduced, according to previously secret documents uncovered by UC San Francisco.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are damselflies in distress?Damselflies are evolving rapidly as they expand their range in response to a warming climate, according to new research led by Macquarie University researchers in Sydney. The study, published in Molecular Ecology today, investigated the genetics of an insect's capacity to adapt and survive in a changing world by looking at the blue-tailed damselfly (Ischnura elegans) in Sweden.
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Big Think

Can a five-day fast rebuild your immune system?Fasting is trending, yet it's also been prescribed for thousands of years. Does the science on the Fasting Mimicking Diet (FMD) hold up? Read More
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Futurity.org

Did #metoo lead to Bill Cosby’s conviction?Last week, a jury in the Montgomery County, Pennsylvania trial of Bill Cosby found the actor and comedian guilty of drugging and sexually assaulting a woman 14 years ago. “…allegations that were once viewed with more skepticism are now viewed with more credibility.” The case, a retrial of one last year, was perhaps the first high-profile one in the #metoo era. And, with an estimated fifty women o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study identifies ways smaller hospitals can effectively reduce antibiotic overuseResearchers completed a study identifying how community hospitals with fewer than 200 beds can develop antibiotic stewardship programs that work to prevent the growth of superbugs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Topological insulator 'flips' for superconductivityA groundbreaking sample preparation technique has enabled researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the University of Tokyo to perform the most controlled and sensitive study to date of a topological insulator (TI) closely coupled to a superconductor (SC).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brown widow male spiders prefer sex with older females likely to eat them afterwards'Males don't seem to be behaving in their own self-interest and suffer a twofold cost -- fewer offspring and no opportunity to mate with another female,' the researchers say. 'One possible explanation is that older females are manipulating the males by using strong signals to attract them, a hypothesis that remains to be tested.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Few patients maximize opioid-sparing medications after orthopaedic surgery, study findsA new study led by Johns Hopkins researchers adds to growing evidence that patients underuse nonopioid pain relievers to supplement opioid pain management after spine and joint surgery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

If pigs could flyResearch on ungulates in the limestone forests of northern Guam has yielded surprising results.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research improves prospects for imperiled Devils Hole Pupfish in captivityIn a first-of-its-kind study of comparing the microbiology of Devils Hole with that of a constructed scale replica at the Ash Meadows Fish Conservation Facility (AMFCF), a team of scientists from the Desert Research Institute (DRI) in Las Vegas discovered key differences in nutrient levels and species composition that may be impacting the ability of the highly endangered Devils Hole Pupfish (Cypri
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A first for quantum physics: Electron orbitals manipulated in diamondsWhile defects in a diamond are mostly undesirable, certain defects are a quantum physicist's best friend, having the potential to store bits of information that could one day be used in a quantum computing system. Applied physicists at Cornell University have demonstrated a technique for engineering some of the key optical properties of those defects, providing a new tool for exploring quantum mec
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ancient quids reveal clues about genetic ancestry of early Great Basin inhabitantsNew research from a Nevada-led team showcases modern research methods that have revealed clues about the genetic ancestry of Native Americans who inhabited the Desert Southwest almost 1,000 years ago.
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Scientific American Content: Global

All You Need to Know for Round 2 of the CRISPR Patent FightOral arguments take place in Washington, D.C. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dealing with the reproducibility crisis: what can ECRs do about it?Unless you've been living under a rock (no judgment, by the way), I'm sure you've heard about the reproducibility crisis in scientific research. In 2016, two posts on this blog covered what the main causes of irreproducibility are and what can be done, and how we can reform scientific publishing to value integrity. To briefly recap, a study published in PLOS Biology noted that half of preclinical
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Enhanced human body response to implantsUPM researchers have developed a new surface treatment to reduce metallic biomaterial implant rejection. This will extend the prosthesis life and thus increase the quality of life for patients.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Nanoparticles developed to improve magnetic resonance scan imagesResearchers at the Chemical Technology Institute (ITQ) of the Unviersitat Politècnica de València and collaborating institutions have developed nanoparticles that improve the contrast in magnetic resonance scan images. Measuring 90 nanometres, their clinical use could facilitate the diagnosis of hepatic, pulmonary and cardiovascular pathologies, as well as many types of tumours. Their work has bee
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Math puzzle goes viralA University of Huddersfield lecturer has puzzled the world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

600 seismographs listen in on the Alps600 sensors placed on and around the Alps constitute the largest academic seismographic network in the world. The AlpArray project will enable better understanding of the birth of the Alps as well as homogeneous seismic hazard maps of the Alpine regions. Comprising 36 institutions from 11 countries, the project is coordinated by scientists at ETH Zurich and the University of Lausanne and is suppor
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Dagens Medicin

Bornholms Hospital ansætter ny vicedirektørAnnemarie Hellebek er blevet ansat som vicedirektør på Bornholms Hospital fra 1. maj.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Positron luminescence outshines that of electronsIn old cathode ray TVs, a picture is generated when an electron beam excites a phosphor screen, causing the phosphor to radiate light. Now in a new study, researchers have found that a beam of positrons (positively charged anti-electrons) incident on a phosphor screen produces significantly more luminescence than an electron beam does.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why Armenia's transition to democracy failedIn a paper published online in Nationalities Papers earlier this month in, Arman Grigoryan, assistant professor of international relations at Lehigh University, argues that the main driver of Armenia's failed transition after independence was its war with Azerbaijan and the continued state of belligerence after the ceasefire was signed in 1994.
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Futurity.org

Robots still can’t outdo nature’s tiny speedstersRobots still can’t compete with the fastest-jumping insects and other small-but-powerful creatures. New research helps explain why nature still beats robots, and describes how machines might take the lead. Take the smashing mantis shrimp, a small crustacean not much bigger than a thumb. Its hammer-like mouthparts can repeatedly deliver 69-mile-per-hour wallops more than 100 times faster than the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Snake in the clouds—astronomers discover a new dwarf galaxy in the Magellanic BridgeAn international group of astronomers reports the detection of a new dwarf galaxy in the so-called Magellanic Bridge – a stream of gas linking the two Magellanic Clouds. The newly found galaxy, designated Hydrus 1, is described in a paper published April 17 on the arXiv pre-print server.
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Wired

An Anti-Aging Pundit Solves a Decades-Old Math ProblemBy making the first progress on the “chromatic number of the plane” problem in over 60 years, biologist Aubrey de Grey has achieved mathematical immortality.
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Wired

How a Soviet A-Bomb Test Launched US Climate ScienceThe untold story of a failed Russian geoengineering scheme, panic in the Pentagon, and a Nixon-era effort to study global cooling.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Warming future means more fire, fewer trees in western biodiversity hotspotIncreasing fires and summer droughts caused by global warming are drastically changing a globally unique bio-region of northern California and southwestern Oregon, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Obesity may hasten disability in patients with rheumatoid arthritisUnintentional weight loss also linked with worsening disability, perhaps related to frailty.
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Dagens Medicin

Nordjysk hospitalsfusion træder i kraftProcesplanen er godkendt, og fra i morgen, 1. maj, træder sammenlægningen af hospitalet i Thisted med Aalborg Universitetshospital i kraft.
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Big Think

This map turns the San Francisco Bay Area into the Middle EastThought experiment: What if you graft Israel's borders onto the San Francisco Bay Area? Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genes might play unrecognized role in aging, interventionWhile aging is familiar to all of us, exactly how it occurs on a molecular basis has been an area of intense study and interest. We take it for granted that different species age at different rates, yet we do not have a good understanding of why and how. Most mammals have similar numbers of genes, many of which show conserved function, yet there are several orders of magnitude differences in lifes
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Ingeniøren

Flydende atomkraftværk på vej mod DanmarkVerdens første flydende atomkraftværk sejler i næste uge gennem dansk farvand på sin tur fra Skt. Petersborg til Murmansk.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Creating Pandora on EarthIf you saw the movie Avatar on the big screen, you were more than likely awed by the 3-D spectacle of the planet Pandora.
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Dana Foundation

And All That Jazz: A Q&A with Michael Shadlen, M.D., Ph.D.Guest post by Kayt Sukel Famed artist Barbara Januszkiewicz once said, “Jazz is the art of thinking out loud.” Is it any wonder then that jazz has made its way into a variety of neuroscience laboratories to help researchers investigate the neural underpinnings of creativity, communication, and timing? In honor of International Jazz Day , a day designated by the United Nations Educational, Scienti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vultures reveal critical Old World flywaysIdentifying bottlenecks -- i.e. places where birds concentrate on migration -- helps bird conservationists know what areas to focus on and get the most bang for their buck, since a large percentage of a species' population can pass through these small areas.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Vapers and non-smokers have the same flourishing gut floraThe first study of its kind has found that people who vape have the same mix of gut bacteria as non-smokers, whilst smokers have significant changes to their microbiome.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lipid accumulation in the brain may be an early sign of Parkinson's diseaseResearchers have found that elevated levels of certain types of lipids (fat molecules) in the brain may be an early sign of Parkinson's disease (PD). This finding could have significant implications for identifying patients who may be at risk for developing PD and for the early treatment of the disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

86 million workdays lost to migraine in the UK every yearMigraine costs the UK economy £8.8 billion per year in lost productivity, a new report reveals. The equivalent of 86 million workdays are lost to migraine each year and close to £1 billion is spent on healthcare costs associated with the condition. It affects more than 23 per cent of adults with almost 200,000 attacks happening in the UK every day -- making migraine the most common neurological re
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Popular Science

Pregnant people get a lot of grief for the unhealthy habits we all shareHealth Health concerns while carrying a baby shouldn’t be much different from the rest of your life. Women spend a lot of their lives being told what to do—and not do—with their bodies. This is perhaps the most true during pregnancy. Everyone has an opinion. Everyone…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hubble sights galaxy stuck in the middleThis pretty, cloud-like object may not look much like a galaxy—it lacks the well-defined arms of a spiral galaxy, or the reddish bulge of an elliptical—but it is in fact something known as a lenticular galaxy. Lenticular galaxies sit somewhere between the spiral and elliptical types; they are disk-shaped, like spirals, but they no longer form large numbers of new stars and thus contain only aging
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Ingeniøren

Rumturisterne kan snart gå til gatenEn vellykket testflyvning af Blue Origins New Shepard-rumfartøj øger forventningerne til, at 2018 bliver året for rumturismen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Interest-based learning engages older Australians in the digital worldOlder Australians become better engaged with the digital world when learning social media skills and drawing on their own interests than when learning just the fundamentals of going online.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Treating young people like criminals actually makes violent crime worseThe rise in violent incidents on the streets of London has prompted a wave of discussion about what causes crime among young people. The closure of children's services, cuts to police budgets, social media and drill music have all been blamed.
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Futurity.org

Don’t trust Yelp reviews for plastic surgeonsOnline consumer reviews of plastic surgeons tend to be polarized, and some come from people who consulted with the doctor but never had surgery, a new study suggests. The study examined online ratings of doctors who performed cosmetic breast augmentation in six major US cities. In reviews by patients who had cosmetic breast augmentation, patients’ treatment by the surgeon’s staff was nearly as im
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Modeled clouds in the tropics get a reality checkDue to a scarcity of useful observations to guide model development, Earth system models often miss the mark in predicting tropical clouds and their effects on incoming and outgoing energy in the atmosphere. For most of the past two decades, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility, collected data at three sur
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Are damselflies in distress?Damselflies are evolving rapidly as they expand their range in response to a warming climate, according to new research led by Macquarie University researchers in Sydney.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mini-vessel device probes blood interactions in malaria, sickle cell diseaseIn diseases such as malaria and sickle cell disease, red blood cells break down, with harmful effects on the rest of the body – particularly the lining of small blood vessels.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pushing casual sport to the margins threatens cities' social cohesionPark soccer, social cricket and street basketball bring the public spaces of our cities to life. For many of the most marginalised communities, access to public space for sport is crucial for developing and maintaining a sense of belonging. But as populations grow and competition for playing fields, courts and parks becomes fiercer, many communities are losing access to their sporting spaces.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Big little lies of mobile datingFor some online daters, the constant contact of mobile technology has made it hard to play it cool. As a result, lying about availability is a common deception mobile app daters tell their potential partners, according to a new paper by two Stanford researchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research demonstrates new approach to study properties of nanodropletsResearchers have found new methods to measure the internal pressure and surface tension of nano-sized drops of liquid like those involved in cloud formation and airborne pollutants to study how they behave in different environments.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Two-way traffic for cell migrationCells often move in groups. They sometimes adopt a strategy that leads them to move in antiparallel directions, as explained by the work of the Biology-inspired Physics at MesoScales team led by Pascal Silberzan at Institut Curie, Paris.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New materials for sustainable, low-cost batteriesA new conductor material and a new electrode material could pave the way for inexpensive batteries and therefore the large-scale storage of renewable energy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First successful ablation of a cardiac arrhythmia in a horseThe Equine Cardioteam, led by Prof Gunther van Loon, has treated a Norwegian showjumper stallion with a cardiac arrhythmia by ablation. The horse had been successfully treated by electroshock therapy several times but showed recurrence each time.
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Live Science

The 'Attoclock' Shows How Fast Electrons Move in a Millionth of a Billionth of a SecondAn ultraprecise new "attoclock" helps physicists make molecular movies of ultrafast chemical reactions.
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Live Science

These 'Spooky' Entangled Atoms Just Brought Quantum Computing One Step CloserPhysicists have pushed quantum computing one step closer to becoming a reality.
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New Scientist - News

Paint a touchpad on your wall to control lights with a swipeCovering surfaces with a thin layer of conductive material lets you turn on lights and fast-forward films by touching the wall
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New Scientist - News

Our understanding of the universe’s expansion is really wrongLast week, the Gaia spacecraft released the best 3D map of our galaxy, which revealed scars in the Milky Way and deepened confusion about how fast the cosmos is expanding
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Ingeniøren

Danmark blev nedstemt, men kan alligevel fortsætte med pesticiderMiljøstyrelsen har ikke tænkt sig at ændre på, hvordan den behandler ansøgninger om dispensation til at benytte de pesticider, som er mistænkt for at skade bier. Dermed kan EU-stramning af forbud ende uden konsekvenser herhjemme.
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Wired

Pandora Learns the Cost of Ads, and of SubscriptionsA 21-month study finds that as users are fed more ads, they listen less; some subscribe, but not enough to compensate for lost ad revenue.
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Wired

Mercedes-Benz's Plan for Surviving the Auto RevolutionThe company that invented the automobile is getting ready for a world where batteries, sharing, and robots rule.
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Wired

Facebook F8 2018: What to Expect from Facebook's Big ShowF8 Facebook ConferenceThis year, it won't be all fun and games for Mark Zuckerberg.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

See (and hear) the stunning diversity of bowhead whales’ songsBowhead whales display a huge range in their underwater melodies, but the drivers behind this diversity remain murky.
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Live Science

Don't Believe the 'Hype': This New Book Separates Health Fact from FictionDr. Nina Shapiro tackles medical misconceptions in her new book, "Hype."
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Live Science

Sacrificed Kids Had Their Hearts Ripped Out 550 Years AgoIn one of history's largest human sacrifices, about 140 children and 200 llamas were killed at a site in Peru. Archaeologists aren't sure why.
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The Atlantic

The Problem With Calling Trump a 'Reality-TV President'On New Year’s Eve, in a much-maligned assessment of Donald Trump’s first year in office, The New York Times declared that the president had brought a “reality-show accessibility” to the office. Trump was a maverick who—whatever you thought of him—bucked the status quo, the writer Peter Baker argued. The ensuing backlash to the story centered on the Times’ unwillingness to make a value judgment on
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Private Sector Must Pitch In More to Protect Marine MammalsGovernment agencies have done a lot, but tighter budgets and increasing environmental stressors are making things tougher -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

Franske Total gjorde opmærksom på manglende miljøundersøgelser af lavradioaktive lagreOtte Norm-lagre med lavradioaktivt affald skal nu miljøvurderes, efter franske Total gjorde Esbjerg Kommune opmærksom på problemet. Borgmester mener ikke, at kommunerne bør have ansvaret.
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Ingeniøren

Bro-kollaps: Hævder at entreprenøren begyndte at støbe uden at tjekke dokumentationenNu skal retten tage stilling til, hvor forsikringsansvaret ligger efter norsk broulykke i 2013.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Island Lizards Shift to Evolutionary Fast-Track after Invasive Goats and Rats Are EradicatedIn just one year lizards on remote Redonda Island may be changing -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News

Acid lakes may be a false alarm but we can’t afford complacencyFreshwater acidification might turn out to be a trivial problem but we don’t know how much danger aquatic life is in unless we can track down more data
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Ingeniøren

Techtopia #50: Sensorer i iPhone afslører, om du er skævPodcast: Sensorer indopereret i hjernen kan forebygge epilepsianfald helt automatisk, idet sensoren læser og lærer vores hjernebølger og helt automatisk kan give et lille stød, der stopper et anfald.
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Science | The Guardian

Boaty McBoatface leads £20m mission to melting Antarctic glacierBritish and US scientists are to examine the risk of the Thwaites glacier collapsing, which is already responsible for a 4% sea-level rise The precarious state of a vast, remote Antarctic glacier will provide an inaugural mission for the British vessel once dubbed Boaty McBoatface, as scientists from the UK and US set up a new £20m research operation. Continue reading...
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Thwaites Glacier: Biggest ever Antarctic field campaignBritish and American scientists will assess the stability of one of Antarctica's biggest ice streams.
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Ingeniøren

Anders Foghs Twitterprofil hacket: Vi vidste, der var et kup på vej i TyrkietPolitikere og borgere verden over studsede nok lige en ekstra gang over, hvad Natos tidligere generalsekretær pippede om på Twitter i nat.
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Ingeniøren

It-fejl på datingside aktiverer gamle profilerGamle brugere på datingsiden Match.com er begyndt at få notifikationer om, at der er nye matches - selvom de ikke har brugt siden i årevis. En fejl har genoplivet de gamle profiler.
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Dagens Medicin

Overblik: Sådan ser den nye overenskomst udI weekenden blev staten, regionerne og kommunerne enige om en ny overenskomst med alle de faglige organisationer. Få overblik over, hvad den nye overenskomst betyder for dig.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists calculate radiation dose in bone remains from Hiroshima bombing victimThe bombing of the Japanese cities Hiroshima and Nagasaki by the United States in 1945 was the first and only use of nuclear weapons against civilian targets. Researchers conducted a series of studies in its aftermath to measure the impact of the fallout, in terms of both the radiation dose to which the victims were exposed and the effects of this exposure on DNA and health in general.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New carbon-dioxide-adsorbing crystals for biomedical materials that rely on shape-memory effectKyoto University scientists are one step closer to designing porous materials that can change and retain their shapes—a function known as shape-memory effect.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New catalyst turns ammonia into an innovative clean fuelTaking measures against climate change and converting into societies that use significant amounts of renewable energy for power are two of the most important issues common to developed countries today. One promising technology in those efforts uses hydrogen (H2) as a renewable energy source. Although it is a primary candidate for clean secondary energy, large amounts of H2 must be converted into l
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Partial mechanical unfolding may regulate protein functionA study carried out as a collaborative approach between University of Tampere, Finland, and Imperial College London has shown that mechanically regulated proteins talin and α-catenin have stable intermediates during mechanical unfolding. The stable unfolding intermediates are formed by three α-helices.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists verify a way of how to improve resolution of most powerful microscopesResearchers from Tomsk Polytechnic University (Russia) and Bangor University (UK) have experimentally verified anomalous amplitude apodization for non-spherical particles for the first time. This phenomenon makes it possible to boost the magnifying power of microscopes and to record molecules and viruses more effectively. The study results were reported in Journal of Infrared, Millimeter, and Tera
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Capturing of the rare Yanbaru whiskered batThe critically endangered Yanbaru whiskered bat Myotis yanbarensis, discovered 22 years ago, has been caught for the first time on Okinawa Island. Kyoto University doctoral student Jason Preble succeeded in the capture on the night of 20 February during a survey in the Yanbaru Forest in the north of Okinawa's main island.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Warming future means more fire, fewer trees in western biodiversity hotspotIncreasing fires and summer droughts caused by global warming are drastically changing a globally unique bio-region of northern California and southwestern Oregon, according to new research funded by the National Science Foundation and published today in the journal Scientific Reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Following five healthy lifestyle habits may increase life expectancy by decade or moreMaintaining five healthy habits -- eating a healthy diet, exercising regularly, keeping a healthy body weight, not drinking too much alcohol, and not smoking -- during adulthood may add more than a decade to life expectancy, according to a new study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Higher aerobic fitness levels are associated with better word production skills in healthy older adultsResearchers found that older adults' aerobic fitness levels are directly related to the incidence of age-related language failures such as 'tip-of-the-tongue' states.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New strategies needed to help healthcare providers gain knowledge to counsel patients on dietHealthcare providers are willing to counsel heart disease patients on diet but need more educational support.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Five healthy habits may add more than a decade to lifeA new study suggests that living a healthy lifestyle during adulthood may extend longevity by 14 years for women and 12 years for men. Following five healthy habits found American women and men in this study were 82 percent less likely to die from cardiovascular disease and 65 percent less likely to die from cancer. The findings quantified how prevention is key to improving longevity and decreasin
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Science | The Guardian

The five habits that can add more than a decade to your lifeMajor study calculates effect on lifespan of habits including healthy eating and not smoking People who stick to five healthy habits in adulthood can add more than a decade to their lives, according to a major study into the impact behaviour has on lifespan. Related: Loneliness isn't inevitable – a guide to making new friends as an adult Continue reading...
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Science : NPR

Report To Army Finds Blast From Some Weapons May Put Shooter's Brain At RiskService members who fire certain weapons can get concussion-like symptoms from the blasts, an Army-commissioned report finds. It urges taking measures to cut the risk of lasting brain damage. (Image credit: Sgt. Aaron Patterson/3rd Marine Division/DVIDS)
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Science : NPR

Probiotics For Babies And Kids? New Research Explores Good BacteriaSales of probiotics are soaring. While some studies on this beneficial bacteria show it can treat specific health issues in children, scientists are exploring how it may help gut health more broadly. (Image credit: Paige Vickers for NPR)
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The Atlantic

Kim Jong Un Is Manipulating the WorldKim Jong Un North KoreanLittle was known of Kim Jong Un when he assumed North Korea’s leadership in December 2011. Reporting on his ascent following the death of his father, Kim Jong Il, The New York Times noted : “Mr. Kim is young—believed to be in his 20s—and untested, making him more vulnerable to challenges.” In the intervening seven years, Kim all but closed himself off to the outside world, cemented his hold on po
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The Atlantic

Remembering Photojournalist Shah MaraiShah Marai, chief photographer for Agence France-Presse in Kabul, was killed today in Afghanistan, one of at least 25 victims of twin suicide bombings in downtown Kabul. The second bombing targeted journalists who had come to cover the initial attack, killing nine of them, including Marai. He began covering events in Afghanistan for AFP in 1998, first as a stringer, later a staff photographer, wo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study: Warming future means more fire, fewer trees in western biodiversity hotspotIncreasing fires and summer droughts caused by global warming are drastically changing a globally unique bio-region of northern California and southwestern Oregon, according to new research funded by the National Science Foundation and published today in the journal Scientific Reports.
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Ingeniøren

Ny rapport om massiv forurening i København: Skærp miljøzonerKøbenhavnske miljøzoner har stort set ingen effekt. Derfor er det nødvendigt at opdatere miljøkravene, mens vi venter på overgangen til elbiler.
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Science | The Guardian

It’s official: the Brexiter v remainer battle will never, ever end | Andrew BrownDig in for the long haul, folks. Research on Brexit voting habits shows an intrinsic conservatism against liberalism The Cambridge Analytica scandals have made it obvious that some people’s votes can be predicted and manipulated by knowing their emotional triggers. But new research suggests that the way people think, in apparently unemotional ways, is also a reliable predictor of political attitu
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

2 år efter Taksøe: Danmark glider ned af den diplomatiske ranglisteDanmark er et lille land, men har tidligere kunnet bryste sig af en diplomatisk indflydelse, der var...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sets sights on May 5 launch of InSight Mars missionNASA's next mission to Mars, Interior Exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy and Heat Transport (InSight), is scheduled to launch Saturday, May 5, on a first-ever mission to study the heart of Mars.
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Science-Based Medicine

Autism prevalence increases to 1 in 59, and antivaxers lose it…yet againAutism Awareness Month isn't as full of news stories about autism with false balance between science and antivaccine pseudoscience advocates as it was in years past. Every few years, though, when new autism prevalence figures are released, we can count on antivaxers losing it. 2018 is just such a year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK supermarket giants Sainsbury's, Asda clinch £13 bn merger deal (Update)Britain's second and third biggest supermarket chains Sainsbury's and Walmart-owned Asda have agreed to merge, the pair said Monday, creating a £13-billion ($18-billion, 15-billion-euro) retail king that would leapfrog Tesco.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

French hotel giant AccorHotels buys Switzerland's MovenpickFrench hotel group AccorHotels announced Monday it has signed a deal to buy Switzerland's Movenpick Hotels and Resorts for 560 million Swiss francs (467 million euros, $567 million).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

After the gold rush: Mining boom in Cameroon leaves 'open tombs'For a time, the land around the village of Longa Mali in eastern Cameroon was one of the most prized in Africa, and powerful machines gnawed greedily into its soil to extract precious gold.
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Viden

Homoseksuelle blev brændt på båletHomofober taler mod bedre vidende i dag. Men det er faktisk ikke så længe siden, at homoseksualitet blev betragtet som en sygdom i Danmark.
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Ingeniøren

IDA: OK-aftale vil gøre det nemmere at rekruttere til det offentligeIDAs chefforhandler glæder sig over den betalte frokostpause, lønstigning på 8,1 procent over tre år og fjernelsen af privatlønsværnet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sprint, T-Mobile have to sell $26.5B deal to antitrust copsTo gain approval for their $26.5 billion merger agreement, T-Mobile and Sprint aim to convince antitrust regulators that there is plenty of competition for wireless service beyond Verizon and AT&T.
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Science | The Guardian

Partial rather than full knee replacements better for many – reportLess invasive procedure, often for osteoarthritis, used in only 9% of cases, researchers find Many more people facing surgery for knee problems would be better off with a partial rather than total knee replacement, which should allow them to recover faster, say experts. Partial replacements are also cheaper, say researchers from Oxford University. The NHS, however, needs to get the support of sur
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study explores link between curiosity and school achievementResearchers know that certain factors give children a leg up when it comes to school performance. Family income, access to early childhood programs and home environment rank high on the list.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New materials for sustainable, low-cost batteriesA new conductor material and a new electrode material could pave the way for inexpensive batteries and therefore the large-scale storage of renewable energies.
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The Neurocritic

The Fractionation of Auditory Semantic Knowledge: Agnosia for Bird CallsHow is semantic knowledge represented and stored in the brain? A classic way of addressing this question is via single-case studies of patients with brain lesions that lead to a unique pattern of deficits. Agnosia is the inability to recognize some class (or classes) of entities such as objects or persons. Agnosia in the visual modality is most widely studied, but agnosias in the auditory and olf
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Wired

'Westworld' Recap, Season 2 Episode 2: The Facade Is CrumblingThe second episode of season two of 'Westworld' finally shows the places beyond the parks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study explores link between curiosity and school achievementThe more curious the child, the more likely he or she may be to perform better in school -- regardless of economic background -- suggests a new University of Michigan study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Obesity may hasten disability in patients with rheumatoid arthritisUnintentional weight loss also linked with worsening disability, perhaps related to frailty.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Seniors more likely to visit emergency department after home care visit from nursePatients who received home care visits from nurses were more likely to visit the emergency department during the evening on the same day, particularly for non-urgent issues, according to new research in CMAJ.
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Ingeniøren

Version2-undersøgelse: Mange tester backuppen højst én gang hver månedEn stor del af de adspurgte i Version2's it-sikkerhedsundersøgelse indikerer, at de tester deres backup en gang om måneden eller sjældnere.
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Ingeniøren

Undervisningsministeriet: Vi kan ikke love at slette cpr-numre fra trivselsmålingerFor mange anmodninger om anonymisering i tidligere trivselsmålinger kan betyde, at situationen genovervejes. Det siger loven.
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The Scientist RSS

BioLegend: TotalSeq Reagents and CITE-seq WorkflowCITE-seq for single-cell analysis
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Scientific American Content: Global

Pain: The Search for ReliefBurning. Shooting. Stabbing. Sometimes the cause is unknown. Sometimes it begins as the result of an injury. Whatever form it takes, chronic pain often resists treatment. In this eBook, we examine... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

Efter Mærsk-skandalen: Virksomheders lavradioaktive affald opbevares i strid med miljøreglerHverken kommuner, stat eller virksomheder har foretaget de lovpligtige VVM-vurderinger af otte danske lagre med lavradioaktivt affald fra blandt andet olie- og gasboringer.
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The Atlantic

Westworld: What's in 'The Valley Beyond'?Every week for the second season of Westworld , three Atlantic staffers will discuss new episodes of HBO’s cerebral sci-fi drama. Spencer Kornhaber: “Up until this point, the stakes in this place haven’t been real,” the Man in Black says to his dim sidekick, and his observation applies to Westworld as much as to Westworld. For the most part, intellectual curiosity rather than emotional investment
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The rhythms of the night?New research published in The Journal of Physiology has illuminated the effects of night-time light exposure on internal body clock processes. This is important for helping those who have poor quality sleep, such as shift workers, and could help improve treatments for depression.
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Futurity.org

Rate of U.S. kids with autism has gone up a bitA new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that while rates of autism in children in the United States continue to rise, some signs suggest things may be leveling off. The new statistical findings, from the Autism and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network, reflect data from more than 10,886 children. The results are available in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortalit
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Futurity.org

Cancer drug may treat leaky blood vessels in tuberculosisAn FDA-approved drug originally designed to treat cancer may be an unlikely potential ally in the global fight against tuberculosis, a new study suggests. Animals naturally produce matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) to break down connective tissue for a wide array of biological processes such as wound repair, growth, and tissue development. Many diseases, however, can hijack these enzymes for their
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Futurity.org

Exploding stars shed light on fusion energyScientists study exploding stars as part of a quest to make reliable fusion energy a reality, but new research suggests that they may have been thinking about supernovae wrong. New research shows that heat plays a significant role in the way materials mix during fusion reactions—a factor that has, to this point, been left out of the discussion. The finding should help focus future studies of how
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Futurity.org

Drug in the pipeline helps stem cell transplants tooAn investigational drug in clinical trials for rheumatoid arthritis also prevents a common, life-threatening side effect of stem cell transplants, new research shows. Studying mice, the researchers found the drug prevented what’s known as graft-versus-host disease, a debilitating, sometimes lethal condition that develops when transplanted stem cells attack the body’s own organs or tissues. About
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The Atlantic

A Butterfly Effect at the North Korean Border“Is this ridiculous, what I’m trying to do?” says South Korean violinist Hyungjoon Won in the short documentary 9at38 . Catherine Lee’s film, premiering on The Atlantic today, follows Won as he attempts to stage a peace concert at the 38 th Parallel Demilitarized Zone to commemorate the 70 th anniversary of Korea’s independence. “I’ve made an official pitch to the South and North Korean governmen
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Big Think

Study: Memories of music cannot be lost to Alzheimer's and dementiaThe part of your brain responsible for ASMR catalogs music, and appears to be a stronghold against Alzheimer's and dementia. Read More
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Science | The Guardian

Starwatch: Mars and Saturn on view with the moonEarly risers can see a fine grouping in the southern sky, and southern observers should also see shooting stars Throughout the early hours of 5 May, a nice grouping of solar system objects will be visible in the southern sky. Continue reading...
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Wired

The Sprint/T-Mobile Merger Is Huge—but a Lot of Questions RemainT-Mobile Sprint MergerThe massive deal still has to be approved by regulators, and that may not be as easy as it sounds.
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Big Think

UK royal baby: Will England see a King Louis Arthur Charles?Prince William and Kate Middleton have welcomed their third child to the royal family. Find out where the new royal baby falls in the line of succession to the throne. Read More
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Science : NPR

'A Silent Extinction': Finding Peace And Saving Giraffes On A Lake In KenyaNearly 40 percent of giraffes were wiped out in one generation. Now, Kenyan conservation efforts are helping to bring them back. (Image credit: Education Images/UIG via Getty Images)
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The Atlantic

The Slow, Awkward Death of the White House Correspondents' DinnerThe first White House Correspondents’ Dinner was held in 1921, at the Arlington Hotel in Washington, D.C., a couple blocks north of the presidential residence. The event’s purpose was practical: to inaugurate the new officers of the group that had been formed to advocate for the interests of the journalists who kept the public informed about the doings of the American presidency. The dinner invol
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Scientific American Content: Global

Culture Shapes Kids' Views of NatureIn a study of children interacting with toy animals Native American kids and non-Native kids imagined the animals very differently. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Power cut temporarily shuts Amsterdam's airportA power cut overnight forced the temporary closure of Amsterdam's Schipol airport, one of Europe's busiest, officials said as they tried to get operations moving again Sunday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Port operator DP World now firmly in hyperloop businessThe Dubai-based port operator DP World put its name Sunday on the hyperloop technology it has already spent millions of dollars to develop as work continues to make it operational across the grand plans of its designers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Telecom Italia CEO to step down if hedge fund breaks up board: reportThe head of Telecom Italia has said he will resign if a US hedge fund wins a power struggle this week with French telecom giant Vivendi, its largest shareholder, according to reports in Britain.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

China's JD.com looks to Silicon Valley center for innovationSelf-driving delivery vehicles that are polite to pedestrians? Faster and more precise robotic arms? JD.com, the largest challenger to Alibaba's e-commerce empire in China, is investing in technology to speed up warehouse operations and delivery to shoppers who want service quickly.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

T-Mobile, Sprint to merge: CEOsT-Mobile Sprint MergerUS wireless operators Sprint and T-Mobile will form a new company and push development of a super-fast 5G network, the heads of both firms said Sunday.
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The Atlantic

Trump May Already Be Violating the Iran DealAs anyone who reads the news knows, Donald Trump will decide by May 12 whether to “ withdraw from ” or “ pull out of ” or “ abandon ” or “ scrap ” or “ jettison ” (the synonyms keep coming) the nuclear deal with Iran. Why May 12? Because last October , Trump declared that Iran isn’t complying with the agreement. Under a law passed by Congress, that “decertification” means Trump can reimpose the s
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Big Think

Machine-learning system processes sounds like humans doUsing a machine-learning system known as a deep neural network, MIT researchers have created the first model that can identify a musical genre just like a human would. Read More
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Big Think

Warp speed: How the outer edges of the universe travel faster than the speed of lightThe answer can give us an indication of where our universe is headed and how it might end. Read More
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Big Think

Are religious people more moral?Why do people distrust atheists? And are they right to do so? Read More
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Big Think

7 myths you learned in biology class that you probably still believeYou’ll be surprised how many commonly known science “facts” are actually total misconceptions. Read More
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NYT > Science

Q. & A.: Tell Us 5 Things About Your Book: A Dangerous Journey Into the Heart of TornadoesBrantley Hargrove’s “The Man Who Caught the Storm” recounts the life of Tim Samaras, a tornado chaser who designed probes that revolutionized science before he was killed doing what he loved in 2013.
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Scientific American Content: Global

This Island EarthOne planet, modified by life, racing into the future. Our species should gear up -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

Letter: Patricia Lindop obituaryAnthony Tucker’s obituary for Patricia Lindop mentioned that she helped found the Society for Education in the Applications of Science. Thanks to Lord (Brian) Flowers and Patricia, I was a grateful beneficiary of a grant from the society in 1976, to study for a PhD on the Technologies of Political Control at Lancaster University. It wasn’t a smooth journey. In April 1977, Special Branch raided th
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Wired

Space Photos of the Week: ESA's Gaia Tallies Up Our Milky WayThe European Space Agency's craft has already has catalogued more than 1 billion stars.
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NYT > Science

Australia Pledges Millions of Dollars in Bid to Rescue Great Barrier ReefThe government will set aside 500 million Australian dollars to help the global treasure after years of damage from warming waters caused by climate change.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

New genetic sleuthing tools helped track down the Golden State Killer suspectDNA sleuths may have adapted new techniques for identifying John and Jane Does to track down a serial killer suspect.
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The Atlantic

Is Germany Capable of Protecting Its Jews?For understandable reasons, Europeans are much more comfortable condemning the familiar anti-Semitism of the far right than the sort expressed by migrants entering Europe as the victims of war and economic deprivation. Nowhere is this issue more fraught than in Germany. To a degree unmatched by any other nation, Germany has confronted its horrific past with commendable honesty. After World War II
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Latest Headlines | Science News

New genetic sleuthing tools helped track down the Golden State Killer suspectDNA sleuths may have adapted new techniques for identifying John and Jane Does to track down a serial killer suspect.
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Wired

Peace Talks Between North and South Korea Top This Week's Internet NewsIn other big internet news, President Trump went on 'Fox and Friends' and Kanye West is back on Twitter.
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Ingeniøren

Her er hurtigladeren, der kan sælge elbilens strøm tilbage til nettetMed en ny oplader til elbiler kan bilejeren ifølge leverandøren få gratis strøm til sin bil ved at købe billigt og sælge dyrt.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The shape, not size, of our ancestors' brains may have helped them outlast NeanderthalsFor more than 200,000 years, Neanderthals successfully occupied the cold, dark forests and shores of Europe.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Dinosaurs Didn't Die from Cretaceous CrampsA strange paper offers an odd idea for why nonavian dinosaurs died out. It doesn't hold up to scrutiny -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

Game-Changing Study Finds Dozens of Genes Tied to DepressionThe finding may explain why antidepressant therapies work well for some people but are utterly ineffective for others.
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NYT > Science

Injecting Drugs Can Ruin a Heart. How Many Second Chances Should a User Get?A life-threatening heart infection afflicts a growing number of people who inject opioids or meth. Costly surgery can fix it, but the addiction often goes unaddressed.
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The Atlantic

Let the Sunshine In Is a Very French Romantic Comedy2018 in film has already seen its fair share of spine-tingling horror: Think of the blind alien beasts of A Quiet Place or the psychedelic, sinister “Shimmer” of Annihilation . But nothing in this delightfully varied year of cinema has terrified me quite as much as the French dating scene, at least as presented in Claire Denis’s wonderful—sometimes joyous, and other times wrenching—comedy Let the
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The Atlantic

Letters: Should Code-Switching Be Taught in Schools?The Code-Switcher Updated on April 30, 2018 In The Atlantic ’s April issue , William Brennan wrote about Julie Washington, a speech pathologist who believes that helping kids switch seamlessly between dialects is a key to their success. I read “The Code-Switcher” in the April issue of The Atlantic with horror. What was described as African-American English was in fact poor grammar. As an African
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Music activates regions of the brain spared by Alzheimer's diseaseResearchers are looking to the salience network of the brain to develop music-based treatments to help alleviate anxiety in patients with dementia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Get off the golf cart if you have knee osteoarthritisIt may seem intuitive that golfers with knee osteoarthritis should stay off their feet and ride in a golf cart. But new research has found, for the first time, that walking the course provides significantly higher health benefits and is not associated with increased pain, cartilage breakdown or inflammation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A potential new weapon in the addiction battle: FDA-approved diabetes and obesity drugsResearch reveals that FDA-approved drugs to treat diabetes and obesity may reduce cocaine relapse and help people who are addicted break the habit. Such medications work by targeting receptors for glucagon-like peptide 1, a hormone in the brain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The digital transformation of news media and the rise of online disinformationA new report contains an overview of the relevant economic research literature on the digital transformation of news markets and related impact on the quality of news.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

‘The Curious Life of Krill’ is an ode to an underappreciated crustaceanA new book makes the case that Antarctic krill and the dangers they face deserve your attention.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Universe's First Moments Mimicked with Ultracool AtomsPhysicists see the hallmarks of cosmic expansion in a ring of cold atoms -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Size matters when fighting cancerDoctors could be a step closer to finding the most effective way to treat cancer with a double whammy of a virus combined with boosting the natural immune system, according to a pioneering study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists project a drier Amazon and wetter Indonesia in the futureClimate models predict that an increase in greenhouse gases will dry out the Amazon rainforest in the future while causing wetter conditions in the woodlands of Africa and Indonesia. Researchers have identified an unexpected but major factor in this worldwide precipitation shift: the direct response of the forests themselves to higher levels of carbon dioxide.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New carbon-dioxide-adsorbing crystals could form the basis of future biomedical materials that rely on the shape-memory effectScientists are one step closer to designing porous materials that can change and retain their shapes -- a function known as shape-memory effect.
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Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Kan man bygge antenner til frekvenser i nanometer-området?En læser spekulerer på, om man mon kan bygge dipol-antenner til brug i nanometerområdet – altså synligt lys. Det svarer DTU-professor på.
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Wired

It's Time to Adopt Global Principles to Protect Consumers' DataOpinion: Customers should be in charge of the information companies have about them, and companies need to be liable if they misuse it.
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Wired

AI Can Help Cybersecurity—If It Can Fight Through the HypeThere are a ton of claims around AI and cybersecurity that don't quite add up. Here's what's really going on.
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The Atlantic

Diplomacy Without DiplomatsPresident Donald Trump evidently doesn’t need the State Department to conduct foreign policy. When Mike Pompeo went to North Korea over Easter, no one from the State Department accompanied him. Pompeo, still the CIA director at the time, hadn’t been confirmed by the Senate as secretary of state, and his trip had to be quietly declared “not diplomacy.” Meanwhile, Trump has no ambassador in South K
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers find that lipid accumulation in the brain may be an early sign of Parkinson's diseaseA collaborative team of researchers at McLean Hospital and Oxford University has found that elevated levels of certain types of lipids (fat molecules) in the brain may be an early sign of Parkinson's disease (PD). This finding could have significant implications for identifying patients who may be at risk for developing PD and for the early treatment of the disease.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Solar plant built at site of Chernobyl nuclear disasterHow solar power is giving the site of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster a new beginning.
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Science | The Guardian

Extra time: how smart exercise keeps you younger for longerCreaking knees, stiff back, dodgy shoulders… Age is no friend to the human body. So how are veteran athletes like Roger Federer and Jo Pavey still at the top of their game? And what can you do to keep up? Slow down, that used to be the mantra for middle age. The dread half-century reached, fiftysomethings were expected to take up less challenging physical activities – if they were physical at all
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Australia pledges half a billion to restore Great Barrier ReefAustralia pledged half a billion dollars to restore and protect the Great Barrier Reef Sunday in what it said would be a game-changer for the embattled natural wonder, but conservationists were not convinced.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK supermarket giant Sainsbury says in merger talks with AsdaBritain's supermarket chain Sainsbury said Saturday it was in talks to merge with rival Asda, in a deal that would create a retail giant with around 30 percent share of the British market.
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Viden

Microsoft-forskere: Vi manipulerer tid og rumSindrigt system kombinerer virtual reality med den virkelige verden
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Ingeniøren

Sensor med ekstremt store pixels kan tage billeder i tæt mørkeJapanske Canon har udviklet en foto-sensor, som kan tage billeder i en bælgmørk kasse. Sensoren har de største pixels nogensinde.
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Science | The Guardian

Simone Lia: ode to the moonContinue reading...
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Science | The Guardian

Self-destructive species: from exploding ants to postnatal octopusesAnimals that sacrifice their lives, for their homes or offspring – or just because they’re in the wrong place at the wrong time Earlier this month, a group of scientists described a newly discovered ant species, Colobopsis explodens , in the journal ZooKeys . As the name suggests, the worker ants of the species, which is found in south-east Asia, are known to explode when attacked, releasing stick
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Science | The Guardian

This revolution in our understanding of depression will be life-transforming | Edward BullmoreThe discovery of genes that are linked to the crippling condition throws up exciting new possibilities for its successful treatment Depression runs in families, we know. But it is only very recently, and after considerable controversy and frustration, that we are beginning to know how and why. The major scientific discoveries reported last week by the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium in Nature Gene
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Ingeniøren

Teknologipagt viser agt – men følger magten med?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Drug effectiveness in reducing glucocorticoid-induced bone lossAbout one in every 100 people in the world takes glucocorticoids long term to treat immune-mediated diseases. However, glucocorticoids, such as prednisone, have a side effect -- they induce glucocorticoid-induced bone loss, causing an estimated yearly bone fracture rate of 5 percent. An alternative treatment option to the standard treatment now appears promising, according to an international stud
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Catching mantle plumes by their magma tailsSimulations show how mantle plumes decelerate seismic waves and how plumes appear in seismic tomographic images of Earth's mantle. Mantle plume simulations could help guide future experiments and save cost of large-scale ocean-bottom seismometer deployments to image deep Earth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists calculate radiation dose in bone from victim of Hiroshima bombingResearchers describe the first retrospective dosimetric study by electron spin resonance spectroscopy using human tissue from nuclear attack victims.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New technology for measuring brain blood flow with lightBiomedical engineers have developed a new technique for measuring blood flow in the human brain, which could be used in patients with stroke or traumatic brain injury, for example. The new technique, based on conventional digital camera technology, could be significantly cheaper and more robust than prior methods.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why cereal crops are so drought-tolerantCereal is much more drought-tolerant than other plants. Researchers have now found out why that is so. Their insight could help breed crops that are more resistant to drought.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Parents may help prep kids for healthier, less violent relationshipsWarm, nurturing parents may pass along strategies for building and maintaining positive relationships to their kids, setting them up for healthier, less-violent romantic relationships as young adults, according to researchers. In a study, adolescents who reported a positive family climate and their parents using more effective parenting strategies tended to go on to have better relationship proble
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A powerful laser breakthroughA research team has developed a simple, effective technique to enhance the power output of single-mode lasers that are 'surface-emitting' (as opposed to those using an 'edge-emitting' configuration). Of the two types, the surface-emitting configuration for semiconductor lasers offers distinctive advantages in how the lasers could be miniaturized, packaged and tested for commercial production.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers map the potential spread of yellow fever virus to cities around the worldThe deadly yellow fever virus has the potential to spread into cities around the world where it previously hasn't been seen, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

how bacteria communicate in groups to avoid antibioticsResearchers have found that a bacterium that causes pneumonia, sepsis and other infections, communicates distress signals within a group of bacteria in response to certain antibiotics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Artificial intelligence helps soldiers learn many times faster in combatNew technology allows US soldiers to learn 13 times faster than conventional methods and researchers said this may help save lives.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Seniors stick to fitness routines when they work out togetherOlder adults are more likely to stick with a group exercise program if they can do it with people their own age, a new study has found. Working out with peers of the same gender doesn't seem to make a difference, which suggests that age-targeting but not gender-targeting should be considered when developing exercise programming.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Vitamin B6 helps people recall their dreamsNew research has found that taking vitamin B6 could help people to recall their dreams.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New catalyst turns ammonia into an innovative clean fuelAmmonia (NH3) has attracted attention in recent years as a carbon-free fuel that does not emit carbon dioxide. For use as a fuel, it should have a lower combustion temperature and produce only nitrogen (N2) and water. Now, researchers have succeeded in developing a new catalyst that burns NH3 at a low temperature and produces N2. The results are expected to contribute to climate change countermeas
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Bright future for solar cell technologyNew all-inorganic perovskite solar cells tackle three key challenges in solar cell technology: efficiency, stability, and cost.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Introduced species overlooked in biodiversity reportingThe reports on biodiversity are based on indicators that only take indigenous -- i.e. 'original' -- species into account for each region. Yet today modern environments are made up of indigenous and introduced species. The introductions are either deliberate or accidental. Although these introduced species play important roles, they are ignored by specialists, a fact that partly distorts the intern
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Big Think

London crawling: Deadly caterpillars invade LondonIf you go down to the woods today you'll be sure of a big surprise... (possible) death by caterpillar! Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Herpesvirus: Identifying virus structures that can be attacked by killer T cellsHuman herpesvirus 6 infects most people all over the world. It is usually well controlled by the body, but it can cause diseases in immunocompromised individuals. Scientists have now identified virus structures that can be attacked by killer T cells -- a possible approach for new therapies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New ray of hope for solar fuelThe quest to develop the 'Holy Grail' of affordable, viable and environmentally-friendly fuels using sunlight has taken an exciting new twist.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New way of producing intense radiation could offer less harmful alternative to x-raysA new source of intense terahertz (THz) radiation, which could offer a less harmful alternative to x-rays and has strong potential for use in industry.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Taxing sweet snacks may bring greater health benefits than taxing sugar-sweetened drinksA 10 percent tax on sweet snacks could lead to a similar reduction in consumer demand as taxing sugar-sweetened drinks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mouse study identifies new target for human accelerated aging syndromeScientists have identified a potential therapeutic target in the devastating genetic disease Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), which is characterized by premature aging.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The role of health in climate lawsuitsResearchers are at the forefront of analyzing how climate lawsuits shape the nation's response to climate change. A new analysis investigates the role of health concerns in climate litigation since 1990 and finds that although health is cited in a minority of cases, it may have critical potential for protecting communities from the effects of climate change and coal fired power plants.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Be wary of cosmetic surgeons' online reviewsConsumers consider online reviews important for choosing physicians, but they should be wary of using those ratings to choose plastic surgeons. The reviews tend to be polarized, and some are written by people whom consulted with the doctor but never had surgery, reports a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Get a grip: What your hand strength says about your marriage prospects and mortalityResearchers found men with a stronger grip were more likely to be married than men with weaker grips. Grip strength was not a factor in the marital status of women. Grip strength is an established measure of health and has previously been linked to one's ability to cope independently and predicts the risk of cardiovascular diseases and mortality.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blood cancer precursor found in 9/11 firefightersA new study reports that New York City firefighters exposed to the 9/11 World Trade Center disaster site face an increased risk for developing myeloma precursor disease (MGUS), which can lead to the blood cancer multiple myeloma.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Molecule may help tame virulent bacteria and prevent infectionResearchers show that an immune-system generated molecule called nitric oxide inhibits Staphylococcus aureus' transformation from a relatively benign, quiescent colonizing state to its virulent form.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rugosity and concentricity: In urban planning, look to edges, not just the corePlanners should view high rugosity (highly non-concentric) urban areas as symptomatic of vigor in urban and agricultural markets. Greater planning efforts are required to coordinated the co-joined health of both agricultural and urban land-uses. Empirical analysis is supported by land-use policies from 30 case study counties.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stellar thief is the surviving companion to a supernovaHubble found the most compelling evidence that some supernovas originate in double-star systems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Surveillance of livestock could detect rift valley fever disease before human transmissionOccurrence of Rift Valley Fever (RVF) has often been linked with El Niño rainfall. To curb future outbreaks of RVF, scientists have carried out enhanced syndromic surveillance of 22 high-risk RVF Kenyan counties to collect data on RVF-associated syndromes and risk factors in livestock from November 2015 through February 2016. Their research could provide the first step toward establishing a nation
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New computational model enables personalized simulation of exercise's metabolic effectsA new mathematical model incorporates personalized details to simulate the metabolic effects of exercise. The model can be adapted to different individual characteristics, such as age and weight, as well as different types and intensities of exercise.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Molecular culprit behind virus-mediated chronic inflammation and cancers identifiedWithin cells infected by Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV), the human protein CADM1 interacts with viral proteins to promote chronic inflammation, which plays a major role in the development of cancers caused by KSHV.
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NYT > Science

Toxic Caterpillars Invading Parts of London, Officials WarnOfficials are on the lookout for caterpillars of the oak processionary moth, larval creatures whose hairs can cause illness and even death in humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Metastatic cancer gorges on fructose in the liverBiomedical engineers have demonstrated that metastatic cancer cells can reprogram their metabolism to thrive in new organs. Cells originating from colorectal cancer change their dietary habits to capitalize on the high levels of fructose often found in the liver. The finding offers both general and specific insights into new ways of fighting metastatic cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Respect Indigenous ancestors: Scholars urge community engagement before researchA new article provides guidance for those intending to study ancient human remains in the Americas. The paper, written by Indigenous scholars and scientists and those who collaborate with Indigenous communities on studies of ancient DNA, offers a clear directive to others contemplating such research: First, do no harm.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

CRISPR-based diagnostic SHERLOCK optimized for rapid use during viral outbreaksResearchers report a new tool that engineers the CRISPR-based diagnostic SHERLOCK for rapid outbreak response. The platform can now be used to detect viruses directly in clinical samples such as blood or saliva, eliminating a processing step that previously required a lab and professionally trained personnel. The updates to SHERLOCK enable clinicians to quickly and cheaply diagnose patient samples
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cancer drug helps treat tuberculosis by restoring leaky blood vesselsResearchers have discovered that an FDA-approved drug designed to treat cancer helps fight tuberculosis in mouse models. The drug is an MMP inhibitor designed to increase the structural integrity of blood vessels in tumors so that other drugs can reach inside them. It performs the same function in the granulomas associated with tuberculosis so that antibiotics can reach the bacteria sheltering wit
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

RNA editing study shows potential for more effective precision cancer treatmentIf there is one thing all cancers have in common, it is they have nothing in common. A new study has shed light on why proteins, the seedlings that serve as the incubator for many cancers, can vary from cancer to cancer and even patient to patient, a discovery that adds to a growing base of knowledge important for developing more effective precision therapies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Key differences in young, older people's immune cells attributed to environmentNew research may help explain why older people's immune systems often don't work so well, why different people's immune systems age at different rates, and why the environment matters more than heredity in generating these age-related differences.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Hearing aids linked to fewer hospital and ER visits by older adultsThey cost thousands of dollars, and insurance almost never covers them. But hearing aids may hold the potential to cut older adults' visits to the hospital or emergency room, according to a new study. That could mean lower costs in the long run, though more research is needed to see if this is true. The study arrives at a time when discussion about adding Medicare coverage for hearing aids is risi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Egyptian fruit bat genome yields clues to protectionThe study examined the genome of Rousettus aegyptiacus, the Egyptian fruit bat, and found larger-than-expected families of genes related to the mammalian immune system. Specifically, researchers found large families of interferon and natural killer genes that differed dramatically from their counterparts in other mammals. The finding may eventually lead to a deeper understanding of virus transmiss
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Horses remember facial expressions of people they've seen beforeHorses can read and then remember people's emotional expressions, enabling them to use this information to identify people who could pose a potential threat.
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cognitive science

Theory of Quantum Cognition by Matthew Fisher (x-post /r/nuero)submitted by /u/whyohwhymyohmy [link] [comments]
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New mechanism that causes the spread of deadly infectionScientists have discovered a unique mechanism that drives the spread of a deadly infection.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Transplant-damaging virus comes into focusResearchers have revealed the structure of a virus which affects kidney and bone marrow transplant patients in near-atomic levels of detail for the first time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Probiotics useful in the fight against Clostridium difficile infectionProbiotics may be a relatively safe, simple, and low-cost solution for preventing Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) in hospital settings. Both studies show that treating patients who received antibiotics with multi-strain probiotics, cut down on CDI incidence rates over time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Navigating with the sixth sense: Desert ants sense Earth's magnetic fieldDesert ants use the Earth's magnetic field for orientation. This provides ants the cue to find their way back to the nest.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers assassinate disease-causing bacteria with virus cocktailResearchers have succeeded in targeting and killing E. coli without causing harm to the surrounding community of commensal bacteria in a simulated small intestinal microbiome using a cocktail of viruses (bacteriophages). The study proved that this approach is as effective as using broad-spectrum antibiotics. The experiment underlines the potential of using bacteriophages for target-specific manipu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biomarkers and efficacy of vaccine responses among patients treated with new MS drugIn March 2017, the US Food and Drug Administration approved ocrelizumab as the first treatment for both relapsing (RMS) and progressive forms of multiple sclerosis (MS), a genetic disease that afflicts approximately 400,000 Americans with an estimated 10,000 new cases every year. Neurologists have now looked more deeply into the impact of ocrelizumab in these patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Spawing better ways to combat crop-killing fungusAbout 21 million years ago, a fungus that causes a devastating disease in rice first became harmful to the food that nourishes roughly half the world's population, according to an international study. The findings may help lead to different ways to fight or prevent crop and plant diseases, such as new fungicides and more effective quarantines.
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