Live Science

Human Bone Reveals How Much Radiation Hiroshima Bomb Released — And It's StaggeringThe jawbone of a Hiroshima casualty — belonging to a person who was less than a mile from the bomb's hypocenter — is helping researchers determine how much radiation was absorbed by the bones of the victims.
10h

Wired

Does Your Doctor Need a Voice Assistant?By helping them spend more time listening to patients and less time typing into electronic health records, voice assistants aim to keep physicians from getting burned out.
10h

Wired

Are Google and Facebook Undermining Europe's Privacy Rules?Regulators, publishers, and privacy watchdogs say moves by the tech giants may leave European internet users no better off.
10h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Twin spacecraft to weigh in on Earth's changing waterA pair of new spacecraft that will observe our planet's ever-changing water cycle, ice sheets and crust is in final preparations for a California launch no earlier than Saturday, May 19. The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission, a partnership between NASA and the German Research Centre for Geosciences (GFZ), will take over where the first GRACE mission left off when
10h

Latest Headlines | Science News

How a backyard pendulum saw sliced into a Bronze Age mysteryA saw no one has seen may have built Bronze Age Greek palaces.
10h

The Atlantic

The Secret Star of John Mulaney's Kid Gorgeous“I love to play venues where if the guy who built the venue could see me on stage, he would be a little bit bummed about it,” says John Mulaney as he walks into the hallowed spotlight of Radio City Music Hall for his new Netflix special Kid Gorgeous , out Tuesday. That’s how Mulaney has always slyly presented himself—as a bit of a bland disappointment, like a Saltine cracker topped with American
10h

Scientific American Content: Global

Something Wonderful: New Horizons's Encounter with PlutoA new book tells the tale of how a remarkable space probe transformed a distant, fuzzy blob, whose planethood some have questioned, into a full-fledged world -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A scholar's take on Starbucks, anti-bias training and the Berkeley experimentWhen Starbucks announced plans to conduct anti-bias training at its 8,000 outlets following the unprovoked arrests of two African-American customers in Philadelphia, UC Berkeley psychologist Rodolfo Mendoza-Denton was at once impressed and skeptical.
10h

Live Science

Can Your Diet Delay Menopause?Eating certain foods may be linked to a delayed or hastened onset of menopause, a new study from England finds.
10h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New sources prove a Frenchman was one of the translators of the King James BibleThe King James Bible, first published in 1611, has been found to have been translated by a Frenchman – according to three sources newly discovered by a University of Birmingham researcher.
11h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers bring new thinking to dolphin tourism activityNew research led by University of Otago scientists indicates there is increasing evidence that whale and dolphin watching activities can have detrimental effects on the populations they target.
11h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Most microplastic harm done at lowest levels of food web, according to analysisPurdue University scientists led a comprehensive analysis of research concerning the effects of microplastics on aquatic life, with the results showing widely different impacts among different types of animals. Strong negative effects were particularly apparent for small animals, such as larval fish and zooplankton, a source of food for many species, suggesting serious potential consequences that
11h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Small earthquakes caused by migrating gasses in the undergroundThe metropolitan area of Istanbul with around 15 million inhabitants is considered to be particularly earthquake-prone. In order to be able to assess the risk correctly, researchers must decipher the processes underground. Now, a team including Marco Bohnhoff from the GFZ German Research Center for Geosciences has made new progress. Below the Marmara Sea, they detected earthquakes that were not di
11h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A reimagined future for sustainable nanomaterialsEngineered nanomaterials hold great promise for medicine, electronics, water treatment, and other fields. But when the materials are designed without critical information about environmental impacts at the start of the process, their long-term effects could undermine those advances. A Yale-led team of researchers hopes to change that.
11h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to make solar hydrogen year roundResearchers have built a new dynamic model showing how hydrogen produced with concentrated solar thermal energy can be made more continuously through a novel seasonal control strategy with ceria (CeO2) particles buffering the effect of variation in solar radiation.
11h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Imminent forest collapse threatens Melbourne's water supplyA landmark study from ANU has found that a vital forest in Victoria faces imminent collapse, which poses a major threat to Melbourne's water supply.
11h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Phased array feed imaging system broadens vision for radio astronomyTo accelerate the pace of discovery and exploration of the cosmos, a multi-institution team of astronomers and engineers has developed a new and improved version of an unconventional radio-astronomy imaging system known as a phased array feed (PAF). This remarkable instrument can survey vast swaths of the sky and generate multiple views of astronomical objects with unparalleled efficiency.
11h

Scientific American Content: Global

Sound Awake: "Noisy" Neurons May Repeatedly Disrupt Your SleepStudy proposes novel sleep theory, but whether it can explain infant death syndrome remains less clear -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

30-year river study finds overlooked extinction crisisOne of the longest river studies in the world has discovered that an important part of the planet's extinction crisis may have gone unnoticed
11h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stage-diving with biomolecules improves optical microscopyPhysicists from Dresden and Würzburg have developed a novel method for optical microscopy, obtaining high-resolution images using biological motors and single quantum dots.
11h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers study long-term effects of discarded munitions in the oceansMore than 70 years after the end of World War II, countless pieces of ammunition are still lying in all oceans. Once the casings are damaged, the explosives can release toxic substances into the seawater. A new review study, published by scientists from the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel and the Schleswig-Holstein Ministry of the Environment, points to considerable knowledge gaps
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Labeling and detecting RNA modificationsWhat happens in a cell when genetic information is translated into proteins? In order to study this process, researchers study one particular biomolecule inside the cell: messenger ribonucleic acid, mRNA for short. This biomolecule plays a major role in all cellular processes—and it is also the focus of joint research being carried out by two groups at the Cells-in-Motion Cluster of Excellence at
11h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers investigate obesity and diabetes in catsWhat makes obese cats prone to diabetes? That's one question researchers at the University of Calgary Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (UCVM) and the University of Saskatchewan Western College of Veterinary Medicine want to answer as they work to learn more about feline diabetes.
11h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Copepod mortality rates have been linked to jellyfish abundance and warmer, windier conditionsZooplankton may be tiny, but their importance to the health of the planet is not – they are microscopic life that makes a huge contribution to the fine balance of ocean ecosystems. Copepods make up a significant proportion of zooplankton biomass – tiny invertebrates that are the key prey resource for many marine animals, from other zooplankton and fish larvae to sharks and whales, and are a crucia
11h

Ingeniøren

Ekspert: Styrelse burde ikke godkende radioaktivt affaldSundhedsstyrelsen burde ikke have godkendt virksomhedernes Norm-lagre uden at have styr på miljøpåvirkningen fra lagrene. Norm-affaldet har fået for lidt fokus, lyder det fra ekspert.
11h

Ingeniøren

Derfor er det bedst med hjelm på kontoretIllustration: Eskil Thuesen (privatfoto) Det var tilbage i efteråret 1994, jeg fik min første byggepladshjelm. Som nyslået civilingeniør startede jeg på anlægget af Storebæltsforbindelsen, med opgaver i en skønsom blanding af ledelsesbetjening, myndighedshåndtering og arbejdsmiljø. Et fantastisk...
11h

Ingeniøren

Digital platform kortlægger rør og ledninger i jordenStyrelsen for Dataforsyning og Effektivisering er på jagt efter en ny digital platform der viser hvor rør og ledninger ligger nedgravet i jorden. Platformen har en anslået værdi af 63 millioner kroner og er netop sendt i udbud
11h

Wired

Popularity Isn't Enough to Save Shared Electric ScootersOne company has seen a 61 percent day-over-day increase in ridership, but more serious problems could make it hard to stay in business.
11h

Wired

The Authors of Wikipedia's Most-Cited Source Had No IdeaHow a climate study by three Australians came to dominate the online encyclopedia.
11h

Wired

A Dying Scientist's Rogue Vaccine TrialRunning out of time to prove he'd found a miracle cure, Bill Halford teamed up with a Hollywood executive and recruited a band of desperate patients.
11h

Wired

Facebook F8 2018 LiveblogFollow along with WIRED's staff as Mark Zuckerberg takes the stage after a scandal-filled year.
11h

Dagens Medicin

Hjertelæge bliver ny direktør i HjerteforeningenHjertelæge Anne Kaltoft skifter jobbet som ledende overlæge i Aarhus og formandsposten i Hjerteforeningen ud med stillingen som direktør i samme forening.
11h

The Atlantic

Hillary Clinton's High Profile Is Hurting the DemocratsHillary Clinton was back in the news last week thanks to a Sunday speech at the PEN America World Voices Festival , which sounded custom-designed to give Donald Trump a nosebleed. Pulling no punches, Clinton slapped Trump for his assault on such public goods as the arts, self-expression, knowledge, dissent, and basic reality. “We are living through an all-out war on truth, facts, and reason,” she
11h

The Atlantic

An Exodus From Congress Tests the Lure of LobbyingThere’s a particular moment Representative Tom Rooney can see in his mind, when his fifth and final term in the House comes to an end and he leaves Washington, D.C., for the last time as a member of Congress. He’ll drive south toward Georgia, crossing over into Florida north of Jacksonville. He’ll pass that familiar sign, the blue one that says “Welcome to the Sunshine State,” when he reaches the
11h

Ingeniøren

Også Iran blokerer nu for TelegramIrans styre har netop beordret samtlige teleudbydere at blokere for Telegram. Det sker i kølvandet på omfattende, russiske forsøg på det samme.
11h

Ingeniøren

Ny superbil med brændselsceller fra AalborgSuperhurtig kinesisk/tysk brændselscellebil. I tanken er der methanol.
11h

Ingeniøren

Hvis du vil skifte karriere, må du gøde jordenMedarbejdere, der gerne vil være projektleder, bør tage første skridt ved at opføre sig som én, lyder rådet fra afdelingsleder i Niras.
12h

Ingeniøren

Onsdag hyler sirenerne: Samme lyd - ny beskedBeredskabsstyrelsen gør klar til den årlige test af sirenerne. Men i år er budskabet forenklet.
12h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Marmosets as the canary in the coal mine for ZikaNew research shows small, New World monkeys called marmosets may be an important animal model for emerging viruses with the potential for harmful effects on fetuses. Establishing animal models for emerging diseases, like Zika, is necessary for the development of vaccines, therapies and diagnostics.
12h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain's window for language learning open until adulthoodIt has long been known that children learn language more easily than adults, but determining exactly when that ability declines has been something of a mystery. Researchers from Boston College, MIT and Harvard report in the journal Cognition that prime language learning years extend approximately a decade longer than previously thought -- until 17.4 years of age. The new findings hold implications
12h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Physicists find properties of magnetic soliton of interest for brain-inspired computingA team of physicists has uncovered properties of a category of magnetic waves relevant to the development of neuromorphic computing--an artificial intelligence system that seeks to mimic human-brain function.
12h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

EEG signals accurately predict autism as early as 3 months of ageAutism is challenging to diagnose, especially early in life. A new study in the journal Scientific Reports shows that inexpensive EEGs, which measure brain electrical activity, accurately predict or rule out autism spectrum disorder in infants, even in some as young as three months.
12h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Small earthquakes caused by migrating gases in the undergroundThe metropolitan area of Istanbul with around 15 million inhabitants is considered to be particularly earthquake-prone. In order to be able to assess the risk correctly, researchers must decipher the processes underground. Below the Marmara Sea, an international research team detected earthquakes that were not directly caused by tectonic stresses but by rising natural gas.
12h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cognitive scientists define critical period for learning languageAn MIT study suggests children remain skilled at learning language much longer than expected -- up to the age of 17 or 18. However, scientists also found it nearly impossible for people to achieve proficiency similar to that of a native speaker unless they start learning a language by the age of 10.
12h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stanford scientist develops protein mimic to help injured lungs breatheA Stanford University researcher has bioengineered an effective protein mimic that restored breathing capacity to the injured lungs of rats, according to a new study.
12h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists find properties of magnetic soliton of interest for brain-inspired computingA team of physicists has uncovered properties of a category of magnetic waves relevant to the development of neuromorphic computing—an artificial intelligence system that seeks to mimic human-brain function.
12h

cognitive science

Calcium-based MRI sensor enables more sensitive brain imagingsubmitted by /u/james_otter [link] [comments]
12h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Wood you like a drink? Japan team invents 'wood alcohol'Discerning drinkers may soon be able to branch out after Japanese researchers said Tuesday they have invented a way of producing an alcoholic drink made from wood.
13h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

BP says first-quarter profit soar 70%British energy major BP said Tuesday that first-quarter net profits soared 70 percent on the back of rising crude oil prices, increasing output and improving reliability across its operations.
13h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New insights into the origins of mutations in cancerUsing worm experiments, scientists were able to study the processes generating cancer-causing DNA mutations in detail. The findings help identify the causes of human cancer. Such insights could be an important first step in identifying possible directions for new cancer treatments.
13h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Virtual championship, real ambition as NBA launches eSport leagueA virtual championship with real ambitions gets under way on Tuesday as the National Basketball Association tips off its bid to gain a foothold in the burgeoning arena of eSports with the launch of its NBA 2K League.
14h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New lab study reveals how breast cancer drug can accelerate cancer cell growthThe breast cancer drug lapatinib which is designed to shrink tumors can sometimes cause them to grow in the lab, according to a new study. By understanding the molecular basis of this phenomenon, scientists hope that their findings will lead to safer treatment decision-making and drug design in the future.
14h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

No sign of MH370 found in new scan of Indian Ocean floor (Update)A new scan of the Indian Ocean floor for Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 has searched nearly 80,000 square kilometers (31,000 square miles) since January without finding any sign of the wreckage. But the company looking for the plane, which has been missing for more than four years, said it is still determined to find it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

WhatsApp CEO Jan Koum to leave Facebook amid privacy flapJan Koum WhatsApp FacebookWhatsApp CEO Jan Koum is breaking ties with his company's parent, Facebook, amid a privacy scandal that has dogged the social network for weeks.
14h

Science | The Guardian

Why the ‘introverts v extroverts’ battle helps neither sideThe internet is full of content championing introverts, but extroverts are getting a bad rep by extension. In this ‘us versus them’ mentality, nobody wins When Carl Jung first introduced the concepts of introversion and extroversion as human personality traits back in the 1920s, he probably never thought that nearly 100 years later his theory would form the basis of a very quiet – but nonetheless
14h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mongolians sip 'oxygen cocktails' to cope with smogFed up with the smog in Mongolia's capital, residents have resorted to sipping "lung" tea and "oxygen cocktails" in a desperate bid to protect themselves from pollution, despite health officials saying there is no evidence they work.
14h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Valleytronics discovery could extend limits of Moore's LawResearch appearing today in Nature Communications finds useful new information-handling potential in samples of tin(II) sulfide (SnS), a candidate "valleytronics" transistor material that might one day enable chipmakers to pack more computing power onto microchips.
14h

Dagens Medicin

Syddanske læger får samme epj som MidtjyllandRegion Syddanmark har valgt Systematic som leverandør af nyt journalsystem, som skal tages i brug fra 2020.
14h

Science-Based Medicine

Should I Get the New Shingles Vaccine?There are two vaccines to prevent shingles and post-herpetic neuralgia in patients age 50 and up. If you are wondering whether to get vaccinated and which vaccine to choose, here are the facts to help you make an informed decision.
14h

Ingeniøren

Version2-undersøgelse: Hver 4. danske virksomhed har været ramt af ransomwareDanske organisationer døjer stadig med ransomware-angeb, men også CEO fraud er problematisk.
16h

Live Science

Adenoids: Facts, Function & TreatmentThe adenoids are one type of tonsils. They are found only in children, and shrink over time until they disappear by adulthood.
16h

Live Science

Tonsils: Facts, Function & TreatmentTonsils are small organs in the back of the throat. Once thought to be useless, they are actually important to the immune system.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Bullets and BallotsResearching the rare, but all-too-common, disease of gun violence in America will take a concerted political effort.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Ten-Minute SabbaticalTake a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.
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The Scientist RSS

Caught on CameraSelected rare-disease Images of the Day from the-scientist.com
17h

The Scientist RSS

Pinpointing the Origin of Marbled Crayfish ClonesResearch suggests that the invasive, all-female Procambarus virginalis originated in a German aquarium back in the 1990s.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Understanding What Makes a Successful Crowdfunding CampaignResearchers at the Rare Genomics Institute look at how families finance the cost of diagnostic exome sequencing.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Researchers Turn to Implantable Robots to Regenerate TissueThe devices, which could one day treat children with esophageal atresia and short bowel, were recently tested in pigs.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Colorblindness Study Reveals Unexpected Way to Make Blood VesselsResearchers stumbled across the connection while searching for ways to reduce vision problems in people with achromatopsia.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Mitochondrial Isolation SystemA transgenic approach allows researchers to collect the organelles from specific cells in nematodes with unprecedented efficiency.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Certain Glial Cells Appear to Help Prevent Muscle FatigueThe flow of calcium and potassium ions keeps muscles contracting in the diaphragms of neonatal mice, but if a key protein receptor is missing, fatigue sets in more quickly.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Copper ConnectionsResearchers initially set out to investigate the relationship between copper homeostasis and the rare Menkes disease, but they also found links to Parkinson's.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Big Data in 3 DimensionsViewing oncogenic mutations in 3-D showed that they cluster together on folded proteins.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Rare Disease Geneticist: A Profile of Uta FranckeThe Stanford University human geneticist identified the genes and genomic abnormalities underlying numerous rare diseases, including Rett syndrome, and advanced the field of molecular diagnostics.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Valerie Arboleda Uses Big Data to Unravel the Biology of a Rare DiseaseThe UCLA geneticist examines how defects in a histone protein lead to symptoms throughout the body.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Computer Programs Sift Through Spikes in Nerve Cells ActivitySoftware that can separate signals from noise brings neuroscientists a step closer to understanding neurons' patterns of communication.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Scientists Are Opting For Remote Postdoc PositionsTechnology and family constraints are making the 'ghostdoc' more popular, but the setup is not without costs, researchers say.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Rare to the RescueRarity is a strength, not a weakness, when lessons learned from rare disease patients buoy research and development to find cures for more common diseases.
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The Scientist RSS

Among the Amish, c. 1960sVictor McKusick's pioneering investigations provided insight into hereditary disorders.
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The Scientist RSS

May 2018 TS CrosswordTry your hand at a sciency brain teaser.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Eliza's StoryWatch the viral video that helped the family of a child with Sanfilippo syndrome raise more than $2 million.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Fighting Canavan DiseaseMeet the family seeking to fund research into a rare disease that afflicts their two boys.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Ali's JourneyAli Guthy, the daughter of cosmetics entrepreneur Victoria Jackson, discusses NMO, the rare autoimmune disease she suffers from.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Exome Sequencing Helps Crack Rare Disease DiagnosisClinical analyses of patients' gene sequences are helping to provide answers where none were available before.
17h

The Scientist RSS

How Orphan Drugs Became a Highly Profitable IndustryGovernment incentives, advances in technology, and an army of patient advocates have spun a successful market-but abuses of the system and exorbitant prices could cause a backlash.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Families of Children with Rare Diseases Fuel Gene Therapy ResearchCrowdfunding can power investigations into diseases that would otherwise receive little attention.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Infographic: Piecing the Cholesterol PuzzleHow a rare disease led to an understanding of the basics of cholesterol regulation.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Infographic: Isolating mitochondria from specific cell typesAdding a fusion gene to certain mitochondria in C. elegans enables researchers to collect and analyze them.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Infographic: Getting Synapses Ready to FireA new study reveals more about the role of specialized Schwann cells at junctions between neurons and muscle cells.
17h

The Scientist RSS

A Devastating Diagnosis, a Viral Video, and a Clinical TrialWhen the O'Neills learned that their daughter had Sanfilippo syndrome, a devastating rare disease, they created a GoFundMe campaign that raised $2 million in less than a year.
17h

The Scientist RSS

The Philadelphia Family Helping to Drive Research on MLDThough Calliope Joy's disease is too far progressed to be treatable, her parents have helped other children with metachromatic leukodystrophy get access to an experimental therapy.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Slow March Toward a Canavan CureTwo decades after a successful crowdfunding campaign, some clinical trial patients have seen improvements-but there's still no approved treatment for the disease.
17h

The Scientist RSS

Infographic: Rare Disease by the NumbersHow rare conditions and research spending on them compare with more common diseases.
17h

The Scientist RSS

May 2018 TS Crossword Puzzle AnswersSee how well you did.
17h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breakthrough for SF State kinesiologists studying metabolic proteinResearchers in San Francisco State University's Muscle Physiology Laboratory discover a new method for analyzing an important metabolic protein in muscles.
17h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel cancer vaccine strategy blocks death of tumor-specific cytotoxic T cellsA novel cancer vaccine strategy blocks death of tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells.
17h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Valleytronics discovery could extend limits of Moore's LawResearch appearing today in Nature Communications finds useful new information-handling potential in samples of tin(II) sulfide (SnS), a candidate 'valleytronics' transistor material that might one day enable chipmakers to pack more computing power onto microchips.
17h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Survey: Medical marijuana could reduce opioid use in older adultsA study shows up to 65 percent of older adults who use medical marijuana significantly reduced their chronic pain and dependence on opioid painkillers. Results to be presented at American Geriatric Society meeting, May 3.
17h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

American pikas tolerate climate change better than expectedThe American pika, a relative of rabbits, occupies rocky environments in the mountains of western Northern America. It has been widely thought that pikas could not survive extremes of temperature and thus were at risk of running out of space at the tops of mountains as temperatures rise due to climate change. But is there more to the story?
17h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Acute and chronic changes in myelin following mild traumatic brain injuryPreliminary research using mcDESPOT magnetic resonance imaging shows changes in the myelin content of white matter in the brain following mild traumatic brain injury. Myelin changes are apparent at the time of injury and three months afterward.
17h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lightning carries potential danger to people with deep brain stimulatorsPatients receiving deep brain stimulation are warned that their neurostimulators may dysfunction when confronted by electromagnetic fields generated by particular electrical devices found at work, home, and in the hospital. A new and potentially dangerous source of dysfunction has been identified: nearby lightening.
17h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Poll finds 4 in 5 Americans favor increase in mental health support for childrenA new poll finds that 87 percent of Americans agree that there needs to be more mental health support available to kids which is why Nationwide Children's Hospital is now working to increase access to mental health services.
17h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fracking the immune systemResearchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center are the first to report links between early life exposure to chemicals in ground water near fracking sites and immune system imbalances in mice. Their findings suggest that exposure to these chemicals during development may adversely affect the immune system's ability to fight diseases like multiple sclerosis later in life.
17h

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

American pikas tolerate climate change better than expectedThe American pika (Ochotona princeps), a relative of rabbits, occupies rocky environments in the mountains of western Northern America. It has been widely thought that pikas could not survive extremes of temperature and thus were at risk of running out of space at the tops of mountains as temperatures rise due to climate change. But is there more to the story?
17h

Scientific American Content: Global

Healthful Eating Requires Supermarket SmartsAdvice from an N.Y.U. food policy symposium: eating healthfully means you can't ever let down your guard when shopping. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
18h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Very few pages devoted to climate change in introductory science textbooksIn new research researchers examined more than the 15,000 combined pages from current editions of 16 of the leading physics, biology and chemistry undergraduate textbooks published between 2013 and 2015. They found that less than 4 percent of pages were devoted toward discussing climate change, global warming, related environmental issues or renewable energy applications.
18h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Proximity to books and adult support enhance children's learning opportunitiesAn innovative book distribution program that provides free children's books in low-income neighborhoods, combined with supportive adults who encourage reading, can boost children's literacy and learning opportunities, finds a new study.
18h

Ingeniøren

Tungen lige i munden: Danske ingeniører renser spejlet på verdens største teleskopDe har noget nær umulige arbejdsbetingelser på en bjergtop i Chile. Og der er ikke plads til fejl.
18h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brains of young people with severe behavioral problems are 'wired differently'Psychologists and neuroscientists point to subtle differences in brain connectivity impacting young people with conduct disorder.
18h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Freshwater ecosystems filter pollutants before they reach oceansBy adding excess nutrients to crops, some are very likely to end up in rivers, lakes and streams. But not all of the carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus that enter waterways end up downstream. Freshwater ecosystems filter some of the excess pollutants out of the water before it reaches the ocean, according to a new study.
18h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Diagnostic imaging computers outperform human counterpartsThe 'deep learning' computers in a diagnostic imaging lab routinely defeat their human counterparts in diagnosing heart failure, detecting various cancers and predicting their strength. But nonetheless researchers dismiss any notion that such machines might someday replace pathologists and radiologists.
18h

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Going beyond 'human error'A human factors study using Bayes' theorem and content analysis reveals underlying teamwork, organizational, and technological influences on severe US Naval aviation mishaps.
18h

BBC News - Science & Environment

Meet YouTube's plastic-free vloggersKim and Amanda are dedicated to educating women about plastic-free reusable period products.
19h

New Scientist - News

Women who eat more pasta tend to get menopause earlierEating more white pasta and rice has been linked to reaching menopause a year or so earlier than average, while eating oily fish is linked to later menopause
20h

Science : NPR

New Director Of Air And Space Museum Is The First Woman To Hold The JobEllen Stofan says she hopes to inspire the next generation with more stories about the women and people of color who have been involved in the aviation and space business since the beginning. (Image credit: Amanda Edwards/Getty Images for Discovery)
21h

BBC News - Science & Environment

Rising levels of 'frustration' at UN climate stalemateOld divisions between rich and poor are again threatening to limit progress in UN climate negotiations.
21h

BBC News - Science & Environment

Genetic secrets of the rose revealedTake time to smell the roses, the saying goes, as a study shows they may smell even sweeter in future.
21h

Futurity.org

Inflexible jobs also make non-parents miserableWork-life balance is not an issue exclusive to women, particularly mothers, new research shows. Men and people without children can suffer when they feel that their workplace culture is not family-friendly, as well. When employees think their careers will suffer if they take time away from work for family or personal reasons, they have lower work satisfaction and experience more work-life spillov
22h

Live Science

Mysterious Eye Cancer Cases Pop Up in 2 States, and Doctors Can't Explain ItDozens of people in Alabama and North Carolina have developed a rare eye cancer, and doctors don't know what's behind the apparent spike.
22h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Discovery of immune cells able to defend against mutating viruses could transform vaccine developmenScientists have found immune cells can fight different strains of the same virus -- a discovery which could help transform vaccine development.
22h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brains of young people with severe behavioral problems are 'wired differently'Latest research from an international team of psychologists and neuroscientists points to subtle differences in brain connectivity impacting young people with Conduct Disorder.
22h

Futurity.org

New flu shot is just for horses—but it’ll help us, tooResearchers have developed a new live equine influenza vaccine that is safe and more protective than existing vaccines, which haven’t gotten an update in more than 25 years. A new vaccine is necessary not only to keep horses healthy, but also to protect people, says Luis Martinez-Sobrido, associate professor of microbiology and immunology at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Animals are
22h

Futurity.org

Hearing aids may cut hospital visits for older adultsHearing aids hold the potential to cut older adults’ visits to the hospital or emergency room, a new study suggests. That could mean lower costs in the long run, though more research will be necessary to see if this is true. The study arrives at a time when discussion about adding Medicare coverage for hearing aids is rising. Hearing aids cost thousands of dollars and insurance almost never cover
22h

New Scientist - News

A mix-up means US air pollution is way worse than thoughtLevels of nitrogen oxides in the air are still falling across the US, but satellite measurements show the reduction has slowed down unexpectedly since 2011
22h

Futurity.org

New method could make probing epileptic brains easierA new technique may simplify the placement of electrodes in the brains of patients with epilepsy. The method, called BrainGuide, is a software-based automation tool for use by neurosurgeons that plots the correct placement of probes in the brains of patients with non-treatable forms of epilepsy. The gathered information could then be used to design future procedures in which doctors could remove,
23h

Futurity.org

How the E.U.’s new online privacy laws will affect youThe effects of the European Union’s sweeping new data privacy laws, set for implementation in May, won’t be limited to Europe, argues Albert Gidari, director of privacy at the Center for Internet & Society at Stanford Law School. “…you should be seeing new privacy policies, terms of use, and consent mechanisms right now as you log in to your services…” Known as the General Data Protection Regulat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The effects of diet on the start of the menopauseIn the first UK study examining the relationship between diet and the start of the menopause researchers have found certain food groups could affect the age at which the menopause begins.
23h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Moderate to severe mid-life anxiety may be linked to later life dementiaModerate to severe mid-life anxiety may be linked to dementia in later life, suggests an analysis of the available published evidence in the online journal BMJ Open.
23h

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Living close to a livestock farm linked to lowered allergy risk among adultsLiving close to a livestock farm may help curb the risk of common allergies among adults who aren't farmers or agricultural workers, suggests research published online in Occupational & Environmental Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diet rich in fish and legumes may help to delay natural menopauseA diet rich in fish and legumes may help to delay the natural menopause, while high dietary intake of refined carbs, such as pasta and rice, may instead help to hasten it, suggests the first UK study of its kind, published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
23h

Wired

This Silicon Valley Lawmaker Has a Plan to Regulate TechUS Representative Ro Khanna wants tougher scrutiny on tech mergers and an "Internet Bill of Rights" for users.
23h

NYT > Science

Mars InSight: NASA’s Journey Into the Red Planet’s Deepest MysteriesThe newest mission to Mars is to launch on Saturday morning. It will search for marsquakes and try to produce a map of the planet’s insides.
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Popular Science

NASA's next mission will give us InSight into Mars' interiorSpace InSight is blasting off this week. Of all the wonders in our solar system, there’s no place beyond our own planet that’s been studied more intensely than Mars. But all of this activity still isn’t…
23h

Scientific American Content: Global

Humans Evolved but Are Still SpecialBrown University biologist and author Ken Miller talks about his new book The Human Instinct: How We Evolved to Have Reason, Consciousness and Free Will. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review

One way to get self-driving cars on the road faster: let insurers control themData gathered by autonomous cars and shared with insurance companies could be used to keep the vehicles from taking undue risks.
23h

The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: The Simmering QuestionWhat We’re Following Deal or No Deal: Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu claimed that Iran was cheating on the international agreement to limit its nuclear activities, yet the PowerPoint presentation he delivered at a news conference on Monday contained no smoking-gun evidence for that accusation. Krishnadev Calamur unpacks what Netanyahu did and didn’t say. President Trump has threatened
23h

The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Four-Star ReviewToday in 5 Lines NBC News reports that comments from White House Chief of Staff John Kelly have “ eroded morale in the West Wing in recent months ,” leading some officials to believe he’ll leave by July. In response, Kelly called the report “total BS.” Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Israel obtained documents proving that Iran had lied about not pursuing nuclear weapons when it sig
23h

Live Science

Toxic Caterpillars Will Invade London This Spring, Authorities WarnArmed with highly toxic hairs, invasive caterpillars may soon be marching across London, threatening humans and oak trees alike.
23h

Science : NPR

Won't You Be My Neighbor?: Kids' TV, Then And NowMeet the woman in charge of PBS Kids.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

State-of-the-art HIV drug could curb HIV transmission, improve survival in IndiaAn HIV treatment regimen already widely used in North America and Europe would likely increase the life expectancy of people living with HIV in India by nearly three years and reduce the number of new HIV infections by 23 percent with minimal impact on the country's HIV/AIDS budget.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Better care of sickest patients can save hospitals money, says largest study of its kindPalliative care -- which better aligns medical treatments with patients' goals and wishes, aggressively treats distressing symptoms, and improves care coordination, --is associated with shorter hospital stays and lower costs, and shows its greatest effect among the sickest patients, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ample warning of supervolcano eruptions likely, experts sayConcern over the potential imminent eruptions of Earth's supervolcanoes, like Taupo in New Zealand or Yellowstone in the United States, may be quelled by the results of a new study suggesting that geological signs pointing to a catastrophic eruption would be clear far in advance.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Personal care products contribute to a pollution 'rush hour'When people are out and about, they leave plumes of chemicals behind them -- from both car tailpipes and the products they put on their skin and hair. In fact, emissions of siloxane, a common ingredient in shampoos, lotions, and deodorants, are comparable in magnitude to the emissions of major components of vehicle exhaust, such as benzene, from rush-hour traffic.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Old data, new tricks: Fresh results from NASA's Galileo spacecraft 20 years onNewly analyzed data from the Galileo spacecraft's flybys of one of Jupiter's moons two decades ago is yielding fresh insights: the magnetic field around the moon Ganymede makes it unlike any other in the solar system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Comprehensive estimate of 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spillResearchers announce that optical remote sensing observations may provide close estimates of relative oil thickness/volume for large oil slicks in the ocean captured by satellites.
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Popular Science

The most common misconceptions, debunkedScience Let me Google that for you. We mined the Internet for those persistent truisms that just aren't true, then figured out just how many of you are Googling each of them. Come get your facts straight.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

High wildfire severity risk seen in young plantation forestsWildfires show no respect for property lines, but a new analysis of the 2013 Douglas Complex fire in southwestern Oregon concludes that young plantation forests managed by industrial owners experienced higher severity fire than did nearby public forests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Therapeutic RNA corrects splicing defect that causes familial dysautonomiaResearchers have published a proof of concept for a therapeutic RNA drug to correct the error in RNA splicing that causes familial dysautonomia (FD), a rare inherited neurodegenerative disorder.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How to assess new solar technologiesResearchers find that combining two types of solar cells into one, called tandem photovoltaic cells, can provide more efficient home solar installations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lonely and non-empathetic people more likely to make unethical shopping decisionsLonely consumers are capable of behaving morally, but aren't motivated to, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Horses get the flu, tooFlu vaccines for horses haven't been updated in more than 25 years, but researchers have developed a new live equine influenza vaccine that's safe and more protective than existing vaccines. Proactively preventing the spread of flu in animals is important, as animals are the most likely source of future human pandemics. Animals can be infected with multiple influenza viruses and have the potential
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using mathematical modeling and evolutionary principles important in treatment decisionsResearchers are using mathematical modeling based on evolutionary principals to show that adaptive drug treatments based on tumor responses to prior treatment are more effective than maximum-tolerated dose approaches for certain tumor situations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Water-repellent surfaces can efficiently boil water, keep electronics coolSurfaces that repel water can support efficient boiling if all air and vapor is removed from a system first, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researcher discovers mechanisms and epigenetic markers with implications for diseases ranging from cancers to infertilityA researcher uncovered new mechanisms that dictate the development of germline stem cells. Mechanisms were found to be associated with genes responsible for cancers and viral infections among other major diseases. Markers used to identify male germ cells were discovered, exploring how environmental factors or epigenetics affect these cells and providing significant insight into treatments for male
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New models could uncover important answers for Alzheimer's researchersAlzheimer's disease currently affects more than 5.5 million Americans and is one of the costliest diseases to treat, according to the Alzheimer's Association. Characterized by a buildup of plaque in the brain, few animal models exist that researchers could use to study this devastating disorder. Now a team of researchers has developed a rat model that can be used to study the buildup of amyloid pl
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Live Science

No, a Woman Wasn't 'Eaten Alive' By Scabies. Here's What Likely Happened.An elderly woman died after reportedly being "eaten alive" by scabies. But can these mites really kill a person?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Computers equal radiologists in assessing breast density and associated breast cancer riskAutomated breast-density evaluation was just as accurate in predicting women's risk of breast cancer, found and not found by mammography, as subjective evaluation done by radiologists, in a study led by researchers at UC San Francisco and Mayo Clinic.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon to add another 3,000 jobs in CanadaAmazon Prime BooksOnline retailer Amazon, with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau on hand, announced Monday it will add 3,000 jobs in Vancouver, about 150 miles (240 kilometers) north of its Seattle headquarters.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK, US launch biggest-ever study of Antarctic glacierBritain and the United States on Monday launched a research programme billed "the most detailed and extensive examinations of a massive Antarctic glacier ever undertaken" to gauge how quickly it could collapse.
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Wired

Facebook F8 2018: How to Watch LiveDid your invitation get lost in the mail? That's OK. You can watch the whole thing online.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists hope bug experiment fattens Colorado River fishAny great fishing hole depends on the health and well-being of its bugs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Proximity to fracking sites affects public support of them, study findsPeople who live closer to fracking sites are more familiar with and more supportive of hydraulic fracturing, while those who live in proximity to areas of higher oil and gas well density are more familiar with but not necessarily more supportive of the practice, a new study from Oregon State University has found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Proximity to books and adult support enhance children's learning opportunitiesAn innovative book distribution program that provides free children's books in low-income neighborhoods, combined with supportive adults who encourage reading, can boost children's literacy and learning opportunities, finds a new study by NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Freshwater ecosystems filter pollutants before they reach oceansWhether through carbon dioxide emissions or nutrient pollution from fertilizers used in agriculture, human activities have a profound impact on ecosystems—often throwing them out of balance. By adding excess nutrients to crops, some are very likely to end up in rivers, lakes and streams. But not all of the carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus that enter waterways end up downstream. Freshwater ecosystem
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

La Nina-like ocean cooling patterns intensify northwestern Pacific tropical cyclonesThe intensity and frequency of strong tropical cyclones, as well as cyclone landfalls, has increased in recent decades in the northwestern Pacific Ocean, raising speculation about the root cause of this surge in destructive Category 4 and 5 storms. Atmospheric researchers at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa (UH Mānoa) International Pacific Research Center (IPRC) have recently published a study in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Malaria-carrying parasites spread more when they can jump into multiple birdsIf you're a parasite and want to spread out a little in Amazonia, then you better be cool with riding around in a variety of different birds, a new study found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA finds wind shear affecting Tropical Cyclone FlamboyanWhen NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Flamboyan in the Southern Indian Ocean it analyzed the storm in visible and infrared light.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New details of molecular machinery that builds plant cell wall componentsPlants are among the most effective energy convertors on Earth. They capture solar energy and convert it to carbon-based compounds that are used for energy and also to build up essential plant components, including the cell walls that surround every single plant cell. In a new biochemical genetics study at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory, scientists reveal new
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The Scientist RSS

Prominent Cell Biologist Fired After Data Manipulation InvestigationThe University of Tokyo confirmed last August that Yoshinori Watanabe tampered with research-related images, and dismissed him in late April.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study identifies new target for treatment of pulmonary hypertensionInhibiting FoxM1 gene reverses disease process in animal models of pulmonary hypertension.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Proximity to fracking sites affects public support of them, study findsPeople who live closer to fracking sites are more familiar with and more supportive of hydraulic fracturing, while those who live in proximity to areas of higher oil and gas well density are more familiar with but not necessarily more supportive of the practice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

La Niña-like ocean cooling patterns intensify northwestern Pacific tropical cyclonesAtmospheric researchers at the University of Hawaii at Mānoa (UH Mānoa) International Pacific Research Center have recently published a study in Scientific Reports that demonstrates a strong connection between sea surface temperature patterns associated with the Global Warming Hiatus and changes in cyclone activity over the northwest Pacific Ocean, particularly increasing intensities in coastal re
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Daily photography improves wellbeingTaking a photo each day and posting it online has complex benefits say researchers who say it supports improved wellbeing. A study recorded what photos people took, what text they added and how they interacted with others on the photo-a-day site for two months.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new formula for creating chemical reactions -- with carbsA wide range of drugs and biochemical probes rely on natural or synthetic compounds that aid a reaction by adding carbohydrates. It's a process called glycosylation. But it is traditionally a highly specific process that makes synthesis of such compounds, for testing or large-scale production, difficult. A team of scientists has developed a new approach to glycosylation that is remarkably simple a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An AI for deciphering what animals do all dayResearchers show how an algorithm for filtering spam can learn to pick out, from hours of video footage, the full behavioral repertoire of tiny, pond-dwelling Hydra. By comparing Hydra's behaviors to the firing of its neurons, the researchers hope to eventually understand how its nervous system, and that of more complex animals, works.
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Big Think

How this European nobleman personally killed 300,000 animals and caused a world warThis emperor-to-be was one of the worst trophy hunters ever and a strange guy all around. Read More
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Big Think

The 10 smartest NFL Players to ever be draftedThe NFL is known predominantly for its players’ display of athletic prowess. But you’d be surprised to know that many of these same players are incredibly smart. Here are some of the smartest NFL players ever to have graced the league. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

BU: Smoking, alcohol consumption increase lifetime risk of atrial fibrillationA new study co-authored by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers found that among individuals aged 55 years or older, the overall lifetime risk of atrial fibrillation (AF) was 37 percent and was influenced by the burden of risk factors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research brief: Freshwater ecosystems filter pollutants before they reach oceansBy adding excess nutrients to crops, some are very likely to end up in rivers, lakes and streams. But not all of the carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus that enter waterways end up downstream. Freshwater ecosystems filter some of the excess pollutants out of the water before it reaches the ocean, according to a new study.
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Science : NPR

Why The U.S. And Britain Are Teaming Up To Study A Massive Glacier In AntarcticaA major scientific research project announced Monday will focus on the Thwaites Glacier in Antarctica, which has ice two miles thick. But as the ocean gets warmer, some models predict the glacier could make the global sea level rise by two or three feet over the next hundred years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Understanding deadly citrus diseaseResearchers have made an important step in understanding the molecular mechanism of huanglongbing (HLB), a destructive disease that is a serious threat to the citrus industry worldwide.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Workplace flexibility bias not just a mother's problemWork-life balance is not an issue exclusive to women, particularly mothers -- even men and those without children can suffer when they feel that their workplace culture is not family friendly, according to a new study.
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The Atlantic

What Netanyahu Did and Didn't Say About Iran's Nuclear ProgramIran Benjamin NetanyahuIsraeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu gave a speech Monday that he billed as showing “something that the world has never seen.” He vowed to provide evidence of Iran’s duplicity over its nuclear program, and especially its obligations to the nuclear agreement Tehran signed in 2015 with the world’s powers. But much of the speech concerned details of Iran’s covert nuclear program from the years
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pill for breast cancer diagnosis may outperform mammogramsAs many as one in three women treated for breast cancer undergo unnecessary procedures, but a new method for diagnosing it could do a better job distinguishing between benign and aggressive tumors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA finds wind shear affecting Tropical Cyclone FlamboyanFlamboyan, the 21st tropical cyclone of the Southern Indian Ocean season, formed over the weekend of April 28 and 29. Wind shear is expected to weaken Flamboyan over the next several days.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Farming fish saves landTo satisfy the protein demands of an anticipated nearly 10 billion people by 2050, the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and researchers around the world estimate current animal production will need to grow by an average of 52 percent. Meeting this need without pushing the environment to the brink will be critical.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New details of molecular machinery that builds plant cell wall componentsIn a new biochemical genetics study at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory, scientists reveal new details of the molecular machinery that helps channel carbon into a key cell-wall component.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Google cofounder Sergey Brin warns the AI boom isn’t all good
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Malaria-carrying parasites spread more when they can jump into multiple birds -- studyA study out of the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University found that blood parasites that cause malaria spread more widely if they can use many different kinds of birds as hosts. But even those 'generalist' parasites are limited.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Proximity to books and adult support enhance children's learning opportunitiesAn innovative book distribution program that provides free children's books in low-income neighborhoods, combined with supportive adults who encourage reading, can boost children's literacy and learning opportunities, finds a new study by New York University's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.
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Popular Science

A healthy reef is alive with music, but the chorus fades as the coral dies.Environment It's bad news for fish when their homes go quiet. When reefs get damaged, animals die and the orchestra stops playing. That silence makes it harder for young fish that have grown up in the open ocean to find a way back…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds very few pages devoted to climate change in introductory science textbooksAs an ASU graduate student, Rachel Yoho wanted to push the boundaries of renewable energy research. What she didn't fully anticipate is that it would also lead her to questioning how climate change is taught in today's universities.
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Big Think

Which side of the A.I. debate are you on: Musk or Zuckerberg?Two tech titans can't agree on the one thing that could come to define our times: A.I. What do they have to say on the matter? Read More
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Big Think

UK royal baby: Will England see a King Louis Arthur Charles?Prince William and Kate Middleton have welcomed their third child to the royal family. Find out where the new royal baby falls in the line of succession to the throne. Read More
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Live Science

Why Earth's Magnetic Field Might Not Flip After AllThe magnetic field is likely to recover without major disruption, new research finds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds very few pages devoted to climate change in introductory science textbooksIn new research published in the journal Environmental Communication, Rachel Yoho and co-author Bruce Rittmann examined more than the 15,000 combined pages from current editions of 16 of the leading physics, biology and chemistry undergraduate textbooks published between 2013 and 2015. They found that less than 4 percent of pages were devoted toward discussing climate change, global warming, relat
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Big Think

NASA just scrapped its only lunar rover, but still plans to launch these 12 missionsNASA just cancelled its only lunar rover in development, despite President Donald Trump's orders to expand lunar expeditions. Read More
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Science : NPR

Russia Launches Floating Nuclear Power Plant; It's Headed To The ArcticIt's the first nuclear power plant of its kind, Russian officials say. Called the Akademik Lomonoso, it was towed out of St. Petersburg. (Image credit: Rosatom)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Panasonic fined $280 mn by US in bribery schemePanasonic will pay $280 million in fines to settle charges over bribes to an employee at government-owned airline to win business for its aircraft electronics unit, US authorities announced Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Archaeologists find ancient mass child sacrifice in PeruArchaeologists in northern Peru say they have found evidence of what could be the world's largest single case of child sacrifice.
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NYT > Science

C.D.C. Director’s $375,000 Salary Will Be CutHis pay raised eyebrows because it was much higher than his predecessors’. It was granted under a special provision to attract top scientists.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Billions of dollars are at stake, so the fight over who owns CRISPR is back in court
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Live Science

Google Doodle Honors 'Prince of Mathematicians,' Johann Carl Friedrich GaussGerman mathematician Johann Carl Friedrich Gauss used math to find the lost dwarf planet Ceres, and a Google Doodle commemorates what would have been his 241st birthday.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stanford researchers have developed a water-based battery to store solar and wind energyStanford scientists have developed a manganese-hydrogen battery that could fill a missing piece in the nation's energy puzzle by storing wind and solar energy for when it is needed, lessening the need to burn carbon-emitting fossil fuels.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Deteriorating Great Barrier Reef hushed: Young fish no longer hear their way homeDegraded coral reefs are far quieter than five years ago, and no longer sound like a suitable habitat to young fish searching for a place to live and breed, according to research published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Earth's magnetic field is not about to reverseA study of the most recent near-reversals of the Earth's magnetic field by an international team of researchers, including the University of Liverpool, has found it is unlikely that such an event will take place anytime soon.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

City upbringing, without pets, boosts vulnerability to mental illnessChildren raised in a rural environment, surrounded by animals and bacteria-laden dust, grow up to have more stress-resilient immune systems and might be at lower risk of mental illness than pet-free city dwellers, according to new research by University of Colorado Boulder and University of Ulm researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Farming fish saves landA team from UCSB conducts the first land-use analysis of future food systems focusing on aquatic farming.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Identifying the mechanism in obesity's link to colon cancerIn a recent new finding, doctoral candidates Wiecang Wang and Jianan Zhang, with their advisor Guodong Zhang in the department of food science at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, report that they have identified a new molecular mechanism to explain the link between obesity and increased risk of colon inflammation, which is a major risk factor in colorectal cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The South Atlantic Anomaly is probably not an evidence of a reversing Earth's magnetic fieldBased on a reconstruction of the Earth's magnetic field of the past, scientists from the Helmholtz Centre Potsdam -- GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences and the universities of Iceland, Liverpool, and Nantes now show that the anomaly is probably not a precursor of a switching of the poles.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

US gains in air quality are slowing downA detailed analysis of satellite observations shows that US progress in reducing levels of two key air pollutants has slowed significantly in recent years. The new study in PNAS indicates that it may be more difficult than previously realized for the nation to achieve its goal of decreased ozone pollution.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Physics of a glacial 'slushy' reveal granular forces on a massive scaleThe Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) published the findings, describing the dynamics of the clog of icebergs -- known as an ice mélange -- in front of Greenland's Jakobshavn Glacier. The fast-moving glacier is considered a bellwether for the effects of climate change.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

DNA adds twist to ancient story of a Native American groupThe American Journal of Human Genetics published the findings, which draw from the first population-level nuclear DNA analysis of a Native American group from ancient to modern times.
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New Scientist - News

3000 missing children identified with face recognition in IndiaThousands of children go missing in India every year. Facial recognition software is now helping reunite some of them with their families
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New Scientist - News

To save the insect world we must go way beyond neonicotinoid banEurope's bold ban on bee-harming insecticides is a positive step, but much more is needed if we are to avoid ecological disaster, says Dave Goulson
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Wired

Could Artificial Intelligence Predict the Next 'Avengers: Infinity War'?A handful of companies are already using machine learning to try to anticipate the next blockbuster.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Climate change study finds New Hampshire's warmer weather will bring warmer streamsAir temperature increases from climate change will make New Hampshire's streams warmer, according to Dartmouth-led research published in Freshwater Biology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climate change study finds New Hampshire's warmer weather will bring warmer streamsAir temperature increases from climate change will make New Hampshire's streams warmer, according to Dartmouth-led research published in 'Freshwater Biology.' The study examined the extent to which stream waters are warming, which has implications for freshwater ecosystems across the nation given that many species depend on cold water to survive.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Farming fish saves land: studyTo satisfy the protein demands of an anticipated nearly 10 billion people by 2050, the United Nations' Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and researchers around the world estimate current animal production will need to grow by an average of 52 percent. Meeting this need without pushing the environment to the brink will be critical.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physics of a glacial 'slushy' reveal granular forces on a massive scaleThe laws for how granular materials flow apply even at the giant, geophysical scale of icebergs piling up in the ocean at the outlet of a glacier, scientists have shown.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Deteriorating Great Barrier Reef hushed: Young fish no longer hear their way homeDegraded coral reefs are far quieter than five years ago, and no longer sound like a suitable habitat to young fish searching for a place to live and breed, according to research published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Earth's magnetic field is not about to reverse, study findsA study of the most recent near-reversals of the Earth's magnetic field by an international team of researchers, including the University of Liverpool, has found it is unlikely that such an event will take place anytime soon.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US gains in air quality are slowing downAfter decades of progress in cleaning up air quality, U.S. improvements for two key air pollutants have slowed significantly in recent years, new research concludes. The unexpected finding indicates that it may be more difficult than previously realized for the nation to achieve its goal of decreased ozone pollution, scientists said.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The ancient genomes of the Tsimshian indigenous people left tell-tale markers on the trail of their pastThe ancient genomes of the Tsimshian indigenous people left tell-tale markers on the trail of their past, revealing that at least 6,000 years ago their population size was on a slow but steady decline.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Going beyond 'human error'Failures in highly technological environments, such as military aircraft, can be investigated using known tools like HFACS, the U.S. Department of Defense's Human Factors Analysis and Classification System. However, because of some limitations, HFACS does not always highlight the deeper causal factors that contribute to such failures. In what might be the first application of the Bayes' theorem pr
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Big Think

Designing the compassionate city to overcome built-in biases and help us live betterHow good urban design can help us become better people. Read More
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New on MIT Technology Review

Computer scientists have found the longest straight line you could sail without hitting landWhile they were at it, they found the longest straight path you could drive without hitting water.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Laser frequency combs may be the future of Wi-FiWi-Fi and cellular data traffic are increasing exponentially but, unless the capacity of wireless links can be increased, all that traffic is bound to lead to unacceptable bottlenecks.
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Popular Science

We’re finally understanding why exercise is great for your heartHealth Another reason you should make yourself a frequent gym visitor We’ve all been told that exercise is good for us. It reduces stress, keeps our muscles and bones healthy, and makes our hearts stronger. But the exact cardiovascular…
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Last year’s solar eclipse set off a wave in the upper atmosphereThe August 2017 solar eclipse launched a wave in the upper atmosphere that was detected from Brazil after the eclipse ended.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Going beyond 'human error'A human factors study using Bayes' theorem and content analysis reveals underlying teamwork, organizational, and technological influences on severe US Naval aviation mishaps.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Laser frequency combs may be the future of Wi-FiResearchers have uncovered a new phenomenon of quantum cascade laser frequency combs, which would allow these devices to act as integrated transmitters or receivers that can efficiently encode information.
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Live Science

Stolen Sumerian Tablets Come from the Lost City of IrisagrigHundreds of 4,000-year-old tablets that were looted in Iraq and bought by the U.S. company Hobby Lobby seem to hail from a mysterious Sumerian city whose whereabouts are unknown.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

South Florida mangroves are on a death march, marking a new era for EarthMangroves running for their lives may have just hit the end of the road.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cyborg-lit: Book about transhumanism wins Wellcome prizeA book that explores the quest to defeat death with technology has won Britain's medically themed Wellcome Book Prize.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Govt argues that AT&T-Time Warner deal would hurt consumers (Update)The U.S. government pleaded its case Monday for blocking AT&T from absorbing Time Warner, saying the combination would hurt consumers.
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Live Science

NASA Will Solve a Massive Physics Mystery This SummerWhat size is a pulsar?
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The Atlantic

The Opportunity Costs of Covering Joy ReidRoughly two weeks ago, a Twitter user with fewer than 1,700 followers began publishing screen grabs of anti-gay posts from a defunct blog once written by Joy Reid, who hosts a weekend morning show on a cable-news network. Like the vast majority of Americans, I’d never watched the show AM Joy on MSNBC— I do not typically enjoy cable-news channels, or for that matter, the morning. But despite havin
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The Atlantic

Netanyahu's Bizarre PowerPoint Presentation on IranIsraeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Monday that Israel had uncovered documents showing that Iranian officials had lied when they said the country had never pursued nuclear weapons, adding that the Islamic Republic had a detailed plan to develop nuclear weapons—and had hidden the relevant documents away in an archive in Tehran. “I’m here to tell you one thing: Iran lied. Big time,” Neta
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: An EyefulThe physiological changes that can occur in the retinas of patients with cerebral malaria may provide a useful approach to diagnosis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

3-D printing is transforming care for congenital heart disease3-D printing is an emerging technology that is impacting the way cardiologists treat patients with congenital heart disease (CHD), according to a review paper published today in JACC: Basic to Translational Science.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

African-Americans hospitalized for heart failure less likely to see cardiologistAfrican-American patients were less likely than Caucasian patients to be treated primarily by a cardiologist when admitted to the intensive care unit for heart failure, according to a study published today in JACC: Heart Failure. Previous studies have shown that in-hospital survival is higher when patients of any race receive primary care from a cardiologist, compared to other specialties.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Not enough women included in some heart disease clinical trialsWomen are underrepresented in clinical trials for heart failure, coronary artery disease and acute coronary syndrome but proportionately or overrepresented in trials for hypertension, atrial fibrillation and pulmonary arterial hypertension, when compared to incidence or prevalence of women within each disease population, according to a study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mandatory public reporting of coronary artery bypass grafting associated with better patient outcomesMandatory public reporting of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) results in Massachusetts was associated with better patient outcomes compared to national findings, according to a recent study. Results of the 13-year Massachusetts experience were presented in a plenary session of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery's 98th Annual Meeting.
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Science | The Guardian

Exploration of transhumanism movement wins Wellcome book prizeMark O’Connell’s To Be a Machine, about humanity’s attempts to conquer death through technology, wins £30,000 prize Irish debut author Mark O’Connell has won the Wellcome book prize for his exploration of transhumanism, a movement that seeks to use technology to solve “the modest problem of death”, as O’Connell puts it. Continue reading...
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New on MIT Technology Review

With brain-scanning hats, China signals it has no interest in workers’ privacy
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Labeling and detecting RNA modificationsResearchers have developed a new method enabling them to locate important modifications to messenger RNA. This is the result of an interdisciplinary collaboration between biochemists and molecular biologists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Man vs. machine?The 'deep learning' computers in Anant Madabhushi's diagnostic imaging lab at Case Western Reserve University routinely defeat their human counterparts in diagnosing heart failure, detecting various cancers and predicting their strength. But Madabhushi dismisses any notion that such machines might someday replace pathologists and radiologists. To the contrary, he argues that there is desperate nee
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers move toward understanding deadly citrus diseaseResearchers at the University of California, Riverside have made an important step in understanding the molecular mechanism of huanglongbing (HLB), a destructive disease that is a serious threat to the citrus industry worldwide.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new formula for creating chemical reactions—with carbsIn the world of chemistry, good things can happen if you just add sugar.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An AI for deciphering what animals do all dayMuch of what biologists have learned about animal behavior over the years has come from careful observation and painstaking notes. There could soon be an easier way.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ultrafast compression offers new way to get macromolecules into cellsBy treating living cells like tiny absorbent sponges, researchers have developed a potentially new way to introduce molecules and therapeutic genes into human cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Effects of munitions in the seas only partially knownMore than 70 years after the end of World War II, countless pieces of ammunition from this time are still lying in all oceans. Once the casings are damaged, the explosives can release toxic substances into the seawater. A new review study points to considerable knowledge gaps regarding the spread and effects of these chemicals on marine ecosystems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Potential for more precise diagnosis and treatment of TBIPatients who've suffered from traumatic brain injuries have changes in tiny blood vessels in their brains that researchers believe are linked to a range of cognitive symptoms. The findings may help doctors pinpoint specific types of TBIs and tailor personalized therapies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A first for quantum physics: Electron orbitals manipulated in diamondsWhile defects in a diamond are mostly undesirable, certain defects are a quantum physicist's best friend, having the potential to store bits of information that could one day be used in a quantum computing system. Applied physicists have demonstrated a technique for engineering some of the key optical properties of those defects, providing a new tool for exploring quantum mechanics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ancient quids reveal clues about genetic ancestry of early Great Basin inhabitantsNew research showcases modern research methods that have revealed clues about the genetic ancestry of Native Americans who inhabited the Desert Southwest almost 1,000 years ago.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

If pigs could fly: How can forests regenerate without birds?Research on ungulates in the limestone forests of northern Guam has yielded surprising results.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Chronic dizziness can result from, or trigger, psychiatric disordersDizziness can fall into a number of broad categories, including vertigo (spinning sensation), presyncope (near-fainting), and disequilibrium (imbalance). When a patient's description of symptoms appears consistent with one of these categories, physicians are better equipped to make an accurate diagnosis. Patients who have a difficult time describing their symptoms, or seem to experience several di
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Popular Science

Last week in tech: See the world through rose-colored SpectaclesTechnology Snapchat’s latest face-wear, Amazon delivers to your car, and the latest episode of the podcast. Download the latest episode of our podcast and catch up on tech news.
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Live Science

Can Animals Predict Earthquakes?Can cats, dogs or other animals predict earthquakes?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers move toward understanding deadly citrus diseaseResearchers at the University of California, Riverside have made an important step in understanding the molecular mechanism of huanglongbing (HLB), a destructive disease that is a serious threat to the citrus industry worldwide.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ultrafast compression offers new way to get macromolecules into cellsBy treating living cells like tiny absorbent sponges, researchers have developed a potentially new way to introduce molecules and therapeutic genes into human cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An AI for deciphering what animals do all dayResearchers show how an algorithm for filtering spam can learn to pick out, from hours of video footage, the full behavioral repertoire of tiny, pond-dwelling Hydra. By comparing Hydra's behaviors to the firing of its neurons, the researchers hope to eventually understand how its nervous system, and that of more complex animals, works.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New resistance mechanism in the often multidrug resistant pathogen Acinetobacter baumanniiA team of Australian and Portuguese investigators has discovered yet another resistance mechanism in the pathogen, Acinetobacter baumannii, in this case, one that blocks the critical antibiotic-of-last-resort, colistin. A. baumannii is a highly troublesome pathogen globally, infecting primarily patients in intensive care units with ventilator-associated pneumonia, blood stream infections, and urin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Antiepileptic drug induces birth defects in frogsA common drug for treating epileptic seizures may lead to birth defects if used during pregnancy by interfering with glutamate signaling in earliest stages of nervous system development, finds a study in frogs published in JNeurosci. The research could inform the development of new epilepsy medications that are safer for pregnant women.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Saving aging nerves from 'big eater' immune cellsImmune cells may contribute to weakness and mobility issues in the elderly by driving nerve degeneration, according to a study of aging mice and biopsies of human nerves published in JNeurosci. In mice, blocking a receptor necessary for the survival of these cells improved the structure of nerves and increased muscle strength.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Back up: How worms travel in reverseA study of genetically diverse worms finds that the length of their backward movement is under the control of a small protein called a neuropeptide that fluctuates in response to food availability. The research, published in JNeurosci, demonstrates genetic and environmental influences on an animal's exploration of its environment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Axon guidance gene influences reward systemIndividuals with a mutation in a gene involved in nervous system development have reduced connectivity between regions of the brain's reward system, finds a study of a four-generation Canadian family published in JNeurosci.
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Inside Science

April's Stunning Space PicturesApril's Stunning Space Pictures Enjoy a rainbow of pictures this month, featuring Hubble's 28th anniversary image and the richest image of the Milky Way Galaxy yet. 5_heic1808a_crop.jpg For Hubble's 28th anniversary, the telescope snapped the Lagoon Nebula in all its glory. Image credits: NASA, ESA, and STScI Space Monday, April 30, 2018 - 09:45 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside Science)
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The Atlantic

Women in Prison Take Home Economics, While Men Take CarpentryThe Government Accountability Office did not mince words in the top line of a 1980 report to Congress on inequitable treatment of women in prison: “Women in correctional institutions are not provided comparable services, educational programs, or facilities as men prisoners.” Incarcerated women had been filing lawsuits—and they had been winning. Their conditions, they argued, violated their consti
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The Atlantic

Theresa May's Incredible Vanishing GovernmentIt’s looking to be another terrible, horrible, no good, very bad week for Theresa May. The British prime minister has lost another cabinet member after Home Secretary Amber Rudd, under pressure over a mounting immigration scandal, tendered her resignation late Sunday night. It’s the fifth resignation to rock May’s 10-month-old cabinet and, far from putting an end to the government’s latest politi
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Viden

Tillykke, din hjerne er verdensmester i at ignorere fornuftDu ved godt, at du burde tænke på klimaet, spare på pengene og holde til højre på motorvejen. Men mennesker er mestre i at opføre sig irrationelt, og det er der flere psykologiske årsager til.
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Wired

Spellbinding Photos of the World's Most Boring NeighborhoodsMove over, America: France also has its fair share of suburban ennui.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Key Parker Solar Probe sensor bests sun simulator—last launch hurdleYou don't get to swim in the sun's atmosphere unless you can prove you belong there. And the Parker Solar Probe's Faraday cup, a key sensor aboard the $1.5 billion NASA mission launching this summer, earned its stripes last week by enduring testing in a homemade contraption designed to simulate the sun.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new formula for creating chemical reactions -- with carbsA wide range of drugs and biochemical probes rely on natural or synthetic compounds that aid a reaction by adding carbohydrates. It's a process called glycosylation. But it is traditionally a highly specific process that makes synthesis of such compounds, for testing or large-scale production, difficult. A team of Yale University scientists has developed a new approach to glycosylation that is rem
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Science : NPR

So A Rice Grower And A Wheat Grower Walk Into A Coffee ShopA new study suggests that modern-day Chinese might behave differently in coffee shops — depending on whether their ancestors grew rice or wheat. (Image credit: Getty Images)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Neuropeptide controls roundworms' backward movementA study of genetically diverse worms finds that the length of their backward movement is under the control of a small protein called a neuropeptide that fluctuates in response to food availability. The research, published in JNeurosci, demonstrates genetic and environmental influences on an animal's exploration of its environment.
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Wired

Too High, Drunk, or Sleepy to Drive? One Day Your Phone Could KnowEventually, phone-based sobriety tests could tell you if you're too drunk, stoned, or sleepy to drive.
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Scientific American Content: Global

What Sensors Are in a Smartphone?Smartphone sensors locate your phone in time and space. Working together, several sensors can paint a fairly complete picture of your daily activity, with implications for your privacy. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Dramatic action needed on climate change: UNThe world must redouble efforts to halt global warming before it is too late, the UN's climate chief said Monday as nearly 200 nations kicked off talks in Bonn.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New EU-wide tests to tackle 'food apartheid'Brussels is rolling out new tests to target inferior versions of the same food products in different member states, EU Consumer Affairs Commissioner Vera Jourova said Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hundreds protest against release of bears in FranceHundreds of demonstrators including shepherds and farmers marched on Monday in south-west France in protest against the reintroduction of two bears into the countryside.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber reaches deal in Czech Republic on licencing, taxThe Czech government said Monday it had reached a deal with ride-hailing service Uber that will see its drivers licensed like taxi drivers and data provided for tax purposes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

High wildfire severity risk seen in young plantation forestsWildfires show no respect for property lines, but a new analysis of the 2013 Douglas Complex fire in southwestern Oregon concludes that young plantation forests managed by industrial owners experienced higher severity fire than did nearby public forests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Water-repellent surfaces can efficiently boil water, keep electronics coolSurfaces that repel water can support efficient boiling if all air and vapor is removed from a system first, according to research featured on the cover of the most recent issue of Physical Review Letters.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sprint, T-Mobile shares fall on fears deal will be blockedT-Mobile Sprint MergerShares of Sprint and T-Mobile tumbled Monday on worries their proposed telecom mega merger would be blocked by antitrust regulators.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Daily emissions from personal care products comparable to car emissions: studyWhen people are out and about, they leave plumes of chemicals behind them—from both car tailpipes and the products they put on their skin and hair. In fact, emissions of siloxane, a common ingredient in shampoos, lotions, and deodorants, are comparable in magnitude to the emissions of major components of vehicle exhaust, such as benzene, from rush-hour traffic in Boulder, Colorado, according to a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Iran orders internet providers to block TelegramIranian authorities have ordered internet service providers to block access to Telegram, a popular messaging app used by an estimated 40 million Iranians, state TV reported Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study suggests ample warning of supervolcano eruptionsConcern over the potential imminent eruptions of Earth's supervolcanoes, like Taupo in New Zealand or Yellowstone in the United States, may be quelled by the results of a new study suggesting that geological signs pointing to a catastrophic eruption would be clear far in advance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SPIE Journal of Applied Remote Sensing article reports comprehensive estimate of oil spillIn an article published in SPIE's Journal of Applied Remote Sensing, researchers announce that optical remote sensing observations may provide close estimates of relative oil thickness/volume for large oil slicks in the ocean captured by satellites.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New live vaccine protects against equine influenza: Keeping animals healthy also protects peopleFlu vaccines for horses haven't been updated in more than 25 years, but University of Rochester researchers have developed a new live equine influenza vaccine that is safe and more protective than existing vaccines.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Old data, new tricks: Fresh results from NASA's Galileo spacecraft 20 years onFar across the solar system, from where Earth appears merely as a pale blue dot, NASA's Galileo spacecraft spent eight years orbiting Jupiter. During that time, the hearty spacecraft—slightly larger than a full-grown giraffe—sent back spates of discoveries on the gas giant's moons, including the observation of a magnetic environment around Ganymede that was distinct from Jupiter's own magnetic fie
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Wired

Apple Flash Sale (2018): Apple Watch, Mac, iPad, BeatsIf you're hunting for a MacBook, iMac, iPad, Apple Watch, or Beats earbuds, you may want to give Best Buy a gander.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New models could uncover important answers for Alzheimer's researchersAlzheimer's disease currently affects more than 5.5 million Americans and is one of the costliest diseases to treat, according to the Alzheimer's Association. Characterized by a buildup of plaque in the brain, few animal models exist that researchers could use to study this devastating disorder. Now, a team of researchers from the University of Missouri, publishing in PLOS ONE, developed a rat mod
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Daily photography improves wellbeingTaking a photo each day and posting it online has complex benefits say researchers who say it supports improved wellbeing. A study recorded what photos people took, what text they added and how they interacted with others on the photo-a-day site for two months.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UMD researcher discovers mechanisms and epigenetic markers with implications for diseases ranging from cancers to infertilityA UMD researcher uncovered new mechanisms that dictate the development of germline stem cells. Mechanisms were found to be associated with genes responsible for cancers and viral infections among other major diseases. Markers used to identify male germ cells were discovered, exploring how environmental factors or epigenetics affect these cells and providing significant insight into treatments for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Youth tackle football participation linked to earlier onset of cognitive and emotional symptomsStarting to play tackle football before age 12 could lead to earlier onset of cognitive and emotional symptoms among athletes who were diagnosed with CTE and other brain diseases postmortem, according to a new study.
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Science : NPR

Australia Investing $377 Million To Protect Great Barrier ReefStorms, warmer waters and coral-eating starfish have harmed the iconic coral reef system off Australia's coast. Now the Australian government has announced a plan to boost funding for the reef. (Image credit: William West/AFP/Getty Images)
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Big Think

Should artificial intelligence be regulated? Here's what Elon Musk and Mark Zuckerberg thinkTwo tech titans can't agree on the one thing that could come to define our times: AI. What do they have to say on the matter? Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers lay out how to control biology with light—without geneticsOver the past five years, University of Chicago chemist Bozhi Tian has been figuring out how to control biology with light.
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New Scientist - News

A fossil may rewrite the story of how plants first lived on landA plant fossil that lay unnoticed for a century is unexpectedly large for something so old, and it could upend our ideas about the evolution of land plants
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New Scientist - News

How some resistant bacteria can even eat antibiotics as foodHundreds of resistant bacteria are able to actively feed on antibiotics. Now we know how - and we may be able to use it to remove antibiotics from our water
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The Scientist RSS

How Bacteria Eat PenicillinScientists work out the specific genes and biochemical steps required for digesting the very drugs designed to kill microbes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers unlock thorny secrets of rose DNAA new, detailed breakdown of the modern rose genome should help growers improve traits such as pest and drought resistance, and boost the vase life of cut stems, researchers said Monday.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Water-repellent surfaces can efficiently boil water, keep electronics coolSurfaces that repel water can support efficient boiling if all air and vapor is removed from a system first, according to research featured on the cover of the most recent issue of Physical Review Letters.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Old data, new tricks: Fresh results from NASA's Galileo spacecraft 20 years onNewly analyzed data from the Galileo spacecraft's flybys of one of Jupiter's moons two decades ago is yielding fresh insights: the magnetic field around the moon Ganymede makes it unlike any other in the solar system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using mathematical modeling and evolutionary principles important in treatment decisionsResearchers at Moffitt Cancer Center are using mathematical modeling based on evolutionary principals to show that adaptive drug treatments based on tumor responses to prior treatment are more effective than maximum-tolerated dose approaches for certain tumor situations. Their new study discussing this approach was published in online ahead of print in Cancer Research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Horses get the flu, tooFlu vaccines for horses haven't been updated in more than 25 years, but researchers have developed a new live equine influenza vaccine that's safe and more protective than existing vaccines. Proactively preventing the spread of flu in animals is important, as animals are the most likely source of future human pandemics. Animals can be infected with multiple influenza viruses and have the potential
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lonely and non-empathetic people more likely to make unethical shopping decisionsLonely consumers are capable of behaving morally, but aren't motivated to, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: How to assess new solar technologiesResearchers at MIT find that combining two types of solar cells into one, called tandem photovoltaic cells, can provide more efficient home solar installations.
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