Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer 'vaccine' eliminates tumors in miceInjecting minute amounts of two immune-stimulating agents directly into solid tumors in mice can eliminate all traces of cancer in the animals, including distant, untreated metastases, according to a new study.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astrophysicists release IllustrisTNG, the most advanced universe model of its kindNovel computational methods have helped create the most information-packed universe-scale simulation ever produced. The new tool provides fresh insights into how black holes influence the distribution of dark matter, how heavy elements are produced and distributed throughout the cosmos, and where magnetic fields originate.
15h
Ingeniøren
Tæt trængsel: Bilister i København kører én kilometer på syv minutterVejdirektoratet har opgjort rejsetiden for én kilometer i myldretiden på de mest trafikerede strækninger i Danmarks fem største byer. Og det går ikke stærkt. De danske bilister kan samtidig se frem til endnu tættere trafik frem mod 2030.
18h
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Much Ado About Nunes ThingToday in 5 Lines President Trump is reportedly expected to approve the release of a controversial memo, which alleges surveillance abuses by the FBI. CNN reports that alterations have been made to the document in response to concerns from the intelligence community, including FBI Director Christopher Wray. During his address at the GOP retreat in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia, Trump advise
9min
NYT > Science
What Cameras on Polar Bears Show Us: It’s Tough Out ThereA new study that tracked polar bears on sea ice off Alaska found that they’re fat-burning machines. That means when food is hard to find, they lose weight fast.
10min
Big Think
Why do quarterbacks say "Hut!"? Um, no one knows, but here are the best theoriesThe possible reasons quarterbacks use the word “hut” to start a play. Read More
10min
Popular Science
You probably won’t own a self-driving car, but you'll ride in them a lotTechnology Uber, Lyft, and others want self-driving cars in city centers—but only if they operate as a fleet. The autonomous car revolution is coming—and in the near future, you’re most likely to ride in one if it is part of a fleet of cars operated by a company.
12min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Polar bears finding it harder to catch enough seals to meet energy demandsA new study finds polar bears in the wild have higher metabolic rates than previously thought, and as climate change alters their environment a growing number of bears are unable to catch enough prey to meet their energy needs.
13min
BBC News - Science & Environment
Polar bears 'running out of food'Tracking collars on female polar bears measure the animals' struggle to find food on diminishing Arctic ice.
16min
Live Science
Polar Bears Starving As Arctic Ice VanishesA new study shows that polar bears require more food than previously thought.
19min
Popular Science
This year’s Super Bowl stadium is an avian death trapAnimals It kills more birds than any other building in Minneapolis. U.S. Bank Stadium, home of Super Bowl 52, kills the most birds out of any building in Minneapolis.
26min
BBC News - Science & Environment
Polar bears captured on collar camsHigh-tech tracking collars on polar bears reveal a growing Arctic struggle, say scientists.
40min
Dagens Medicin
Nordjylland sætter patienternes værdier forrest i behandling af diabetesManglende sygdomskontrol og psykosociale udfordringer kendetegner tilværelsen for mange personer med diabetes. I Region Nordjylland arbejdes der på højtryk med at udvikle en ny behandlingsstrategi, der skal sikre et systematisk fokus på fysiske og psykosociale behov, og dermed øge sundheden og livskvaliteten for den samlede patientgruppe.
40min
Live Science
In Photos: Hidden Maya CivilizationArchaeologists have found thousands of mysterious Maya structures using lidar. The structures indicate a sort of Maya urban sprawl.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google parent Alphabet reports $3 bn loss on tax provisionGoogle Alphabet RevenueGoogle parent company Alphabet on Thursday reported a quarterly loss of $3 billion as it set aside $11 billion for taxes on its overseas profits being brought back to the United States.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple, once again, has a bad case of the iPhone jittersApple is making more money than ever, but it doesn't seem to be enough. Not with conspiracy theories swirling around Apple's secret slowdown of older iPhones while a cloud of uncertainty looms over its high-priced iPhone X.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Airbnb rules out 2018 share offering, shakes up ranksAirbnb Laurence TosiHomesharing giant Airbnb said Thursday it won't launch a share offering in 2018 as it announced key changes in its leadership team.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How does limited education limit young people?A recent nationally-representative U.S. Department of Education study found that 28 percent of fall 2009 ninth-graders had not yet enrolled in a trade school or college by February 2016— roughly six-and-a-half years later.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research suggests toward end of Ice Age, human beings witnessed fires larger than dinosaur killersOn a ho-hum day some 12,800 years ago, the Earth had emerged from another ice age. Things were warming up, and the glaciers had retreated.
1h
Science : NPR
Your Team Made It To The Super Bowl. Now Maybe It's Time For Flu Shot.A new study finds that counties with teams in the Super Bowl experienced significantly higher influenza deaths for people 65 and older compared to counties that didn't have a team that participated.
1h
Dagens Medicin
Stort sukkerindtag skader blodgennemstrømningEt højt dagligt sukkerindtag i blot 14 dage kan forringe blodgennemstrømningen med 17 pct.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two-stage gas sensor reports on soil dynamicsA gene "genie" developed by Rice University scientists grants researchers valuable data about microbes through puffs of gas from the soil. The latest version is a robust two-stage microbial sensor that will help bioengineers, geobiologists and other researchers observe gene expression and the bioavailability of nutrients in laboratory facsimiles of environments like soil and sediments without dist
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Even small changes within an ecosystem can have detrimental effectsA mutualistic relationship between species in an ecosystem allows for the ecosystem to thrive, but the lack of this relationship could lead to the collapse of the entire system. New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York reveals that interactions between relatively small organisms are crucial to mutualistic relationships in an ecosystem dominated by much larger organisms
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers observe electrons zipping around in crystalsThe end of the silicon age has begun. As computer chips approach the physical limits of miniaturization and power-hungry processors drive up energy costs, scientists are looking to a new crop of exotic materials that could foster a new generation of computing devices that promise to push performance to new heights while skimping on energy consumption.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research unveils a developmental splicing program controlling neuronal maturationIn a new study, published Feb. 1 in Neuron, Zhang, Wichterle, and their team determined that loss of Rbfox genes results in an 'embryonic like' splicing program
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research suggests toward end of Ice Age, human beings witnessed fires larger than dinosaur killers12,800 years ago, thanks to fragments of a comet, humans saw an astonishing 10 percent of the Earth's land surface, or about 10 million square kilometers, consumed by fires.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How does limited education limit young people?A recent nationally-representative US Department of Education study found that 28 percent of fall 2009 ninth-graders had not yet enrolled in a trade school or college by February 2016 -- roughly six-and-a-half years later.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New research advances spintronics technologyEngineers have reported advances in so-called 'spintronic' devices that will help lead to a new technology for computing and data storage. They have developed methods to detect signals from spintronic components made of low-cost metals and silicon, which overcomes a major barrier to wide application of spintronics.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Family impact of congenital Zika syndrome likely to last a lifetimeThe impact of congenital Zika syndrome on families will be substantial and will last a lifetime, given its severity and uncertainty about long-term outcomes for infants.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UA researchers observe electrons zipping around in crystalsFor the first time, scientists have tracked electrons moving through exotic materials that may make up the next generation of computing hardware, revealing intriguing properties not found in conventional, silicon-based semiconductors.
1h
The Scientist RSS
Locally-Injected Immunotherapy Eradicates Tumors in MiceThe treatment also curbed the growth of nearby metastases that did not receive the drug.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A higher(er)-definition noseSensors that sniff out chemicals in the air to warn us about everything from fires to carbon monoxide to drunk drivers to explosive devices hidden in luggage have improved so much that they can even detect diseases on a person's breath. Researchers have made a discovery that could make our best 'chemical noses' even more sensitive.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Meet the 'odderon': Large Hadron Collider experiment shows potential evidence of quasiparticle sought for decadesA team of high-energy experimental particle physicists has uncovered possible evidence of a subatomic quasiparticle dubbed an 'odderon' that -- until now -- had only been theorized to exist.
1h
Live Science
Thousands of Mysterious Maya Structures Discovered in GuatemalaA new survey of the Maya lowlands reveals a sprawling ancient population.
1h
Latest Headlines | Science News
A blood test could predict the risk of Alzheimer’s diseaseA blood test can predict the presence of an Alzheimer’s-related protein in the brain.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Two-stage gas sensor reports on soil dynamicsA robust two-stage microbial sensor developed at Rice University will help researchers observe gene expression and the bioavailability of nutrients in environments like soil and sediments without disturbing them.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Children with disabilities in West Africa experience violence from the day they are bornDisabled children in West Africa experience significantly greater violence than their non-disabled peers and all experience violence from they day they are born, finds a study published in BMC Public Health by Janet Njelesani, assistant professor of occupational therapy at New York University Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows polar bear metabolic rates are higher than previously predictedA new study on polar bear metabolism, behavior, and foraging success sheds important light on their energy demands. The study, published in the journal Science, found that polar bears have metabolic rates greater than previously predicted and greater than other terrestrial mammals of similar size. The study reinforces the understanding that polar bears are reliant on a diet of fat-rich seals to su
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Even small changes within an ecosystem can have detrimental effectsA mutualistic relationship between species in an ecosystem allows for the ecosystem to thrive, but the lack of this relationship could lead to the collapse of the entire system. New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York reveals that interactions between relatively small organisms are crucial to mutualistic relationships in an ecosystem dominated by much larger organisms
1h
Science : NPR
Her Seizures Looked Like Epilepsy, But Her Brain Looked FineFor a surprising number of people who appear to have epilepsy, the real problem is psychogenic non-epileptic seizures, a little-known condition. (Image credit: Maria Fabrizio for NPR)
2h
Inside Science
The Moss That Removes Lead from Polluted WaterThe Moss That Removes Lead from Polluted Water Green plant could help clean up heavy metal contamination at industrial sites. Lead-Mine1.jpg Former lead mine in the U.K. Image credits: Silent Corners via Shutterstock Earth Thursday, February 1, 2018 - 15:30 Brian Owens, Contributor (Inside Science) -- A new solution for purifying drinking water polluted with lead could be growing under our feet.
2h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How we can use space technology to improve life on Earth | Danielle WoodDanielle Wood leads the Space Enabled research group at the MIT Media Lab, where she works to tear down the barriers that limit the benefits of space exploration to only the few, the rich or the elite. She identifies six technologies developed for space exploration that can contribute to sustainable development across the world -- from observation satellites that provide information to aid organiz
2h
Big Think
New A.I. police car brings us one step closer to RobocopThe capabilities on this thing are both impressive and worrisome. Read More
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Evidence: Chaplains crucial for advance care planning in medical practiceIn a study, 80 percent of participants completed an advance directive after meeting with a chaplain as part of a doctor's appointment.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simmons Cancer Center researchers part of historic CAR-T breakthroughA historic study involving researchers from UT Southwestern's Harold C. Simmons Comprehensive Cancer Center demonstrates the effectiveness of CAR-T therapy, which uses genetically modified immune cells to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children and young adults.
2h
Blog » Languages » English
Monthly Stats for Eyewire: January 2018Welcome to February: it’s stats day! Just like the month before, we completed 55 cells for January, but we also did something rather new, which was an official 2 cell marathon. The first cell took 12 hours 45 minutes, and the second cell took 6 hours 45 minutes— and that second time is a brand new record! We’re still stunned at HQ. And of course, we also just completed Sector 9. Check out these o
2h
Scientific American Content: Global
Strava Storm: Why Everyone Should Check Their Smart Gear Security Settings before Going for a JogA fitness-tracking app’s ability to reveal supposedly clandestine locations is a reality check for people lax about protecting their security and privacy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technique can capture images of ultrafast energy-time entangled photon pairsScientists have captured the first images of ultrafast photons that are energy-time entangled. The new technique will have direct applications for quantum cryptography and communication protocols, including the possibility for establishing highly secure communication channels over long distances.
2h
Latest Headlines | Science News
A peek into polar bears’ lives reveals revved-up metabolismsPolar bears have higher metabolisms than scientists thought. In a world with declining Arctic sea ice, that could spell trouble.
2h
Feed: All Latest
SpaceX Gears Up to Finally, Actually Launch the Falcon HeavyWhen it launches from Cape Canaveral, the Falcon Heavy will be the most powerful lift vehicle in the world.
2h
Live Science
Were Dinosaurs Having a Party Millions of Years Ago in NASA's Backyard?About 110 million years ago, two tank-like dinosaurs - a baby and an adult - left five-fingered handprints in the soft, earthy wetland of what is now NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, in Greenbelt, Maryland.
2h
Live Science
Tea Strainers & Nail Polish: The 5-Star Reviews Scientists Are Writing for Everyday ProductsYou may never look at tea strainers or dental floss in the same way again.
2h
The Atlantic
What Scientists Learned From Strapping a Camera to a Polar BearYou may have seen a recent viral video that showed a polar bear in the throes of suffering. The beast seems to be in the final hours of its life—its legs wobbling under its weight, its pupils widened in pain, its yellow fur hanging loosely off its bones—as it gnaws on trash, lays down, and shuts its eyes. Paul Nicklen, the conservationist who shot the video, said he hoped the haggard bear would r
2h
The Scientist RSS
February 2018 TS CrosswordTry your hand at a sciency brain teaser.
2h
The Scientist RSS
February 2018 TS Crossword Puzzle AnswersSee how well you did.
2h
Big Think
10 logical mistakes you make every day, and what to do insteadDo you ever act irrationally? You probably have. Let's take a look at how to fix that. Read More
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Changes in genes involved in DNA repair and packaging linked to risk of multiple myelomaResearchers have identified two gene regions that contribute to multiple myeloma, an inherited cancer that occurs in bone marrow, through a new method that makes use of human disease pedigrees.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
House dust mites evolved a new way to protect their genomeHouse dust mites are common pests with an unusual evolutionary history. They are tiny, free-living animals that evolved from a parasitic ancestor, which in turn evolved from free-living organisms millions of years ago.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Practical hair regeneration technologyResearchers have developed a method for the mass preparation of cellular aggregates, also known as 'hair follicle germs (HFGs)', that may lead to a new treatment for hair loss.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Oklahoma's earthquakes strongly linked to wastewater injection depthHuman-made earthquakes in Oklahoma are strongly linked to the depth at which wastewater from the oil and gas industry are injected into the ground, according to a new study.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drought deepens dramatically in Southern CaliforniaCalifornia is rapidly plunging back into drought, with severe conditions now existing in Santa Barbara, Ventura and Los Angeles counties—home to one-fourth of the state's population, a national drought monitor said Thursday.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Judge: US must reconsider Yellowstone bison protectionsA federal judge has ordered U.S. wildlife officials to reconsider a 2015 decision that blocked special protections for the iconic bison herds that roam Yellowstone National Park and are routinely subjected to hunting and slaughter.
2h
Science : NPR
Can Seagrass Save Shellfish From Climate Change?Warming oceans are hurting the shellfish industry. Scientists are hoping that seagrasses, like seaweed, can help soak up extra carbon in the water. (Image credit: Lauren Sommer/KQED)
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New international practice guidelines for tamoxifen treatment based on CYP2D6 genotypeAn international group of clinicians and scientists representing the Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium (CPIC) published the first-ever clinical practice guideline for using CYP2D6 genotype to guide tamoxifen therapy in Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Distant galaxy group contradicts common cosmological models, simulationsAstronomers have determined that Centaurus A, a massive elliptical galaxy 13 million light-years from Earth, is accompanied by a number of dwarf satellite galaxies orbiting the main body in a narrow disk. The researchers note that this is the first time such a galactic arrangement has been observed outside the Local Group, home to the Milky Way.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New water-splitting method could open path to hydrogen economyResearchers have found a way to more efficiently generate hydrogen from water - an important key to making clean energy more viable. Using inexpensive nickel and iron, the researchers developed a very simple, five-minute method to create large amounts of a high-quality catalyst required for the chemical reaction to split water.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Strange things happen when a crystal gets split in twoResearchers have carefully broken potassium tantalate crystals in specific directions, and imaged the resulting surfaces using a state of the art atomic force microscope. Their data was combined with computations and a series of remarkable phenomena were ultimately explained. The results are potentially useful for technologies such as hydrogen production.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Supermassive black holes can feast on one star per yearSupermassive black holes in some galaxies can eat stars at a rate of one per year in the period following a galactic merger, helping explain a longstanding astronomical mystery about eccentric stellar orbits.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neurons get the beat and keep it going in drumrollsWhat researchers believed to be chaotic electric potentials in neurons are turning out the be surprisingly orderly and rhythmic.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Induced labor after 39 weeks in healthy women may reduce the need for cesarean birthIn a study presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, researchers unveiled findings that suggest that induction of labor at 39 weeks of gestation among healthy, first-time mothers reduces the rate of cesarean birth as compared to expectant management among the same population.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Electro-mechano-optical NMR detectionResearchers develop an NMR system which converts radio-frequency signals into optical ones, promises higher sensitivity for MRIs.
2h
The Atlantic
Animals on the Playing FieldA collection of photos of some of the kangaroos, cats, capybaras, dogs, mantises, deer, squirrels, alligators, and many other animals who have taken it upon themselves to intrude upon us humans while we were in the middle of our many important sporting events.
2h
The Atlantic
In Science, There Should Be a Prize for Second PlaceIt is the moment that most scientists fear: You learn that your competitors have done similar experiments to those that have occupied the last years of your life, and have published the results before you. In the jargon of research, you have been scooped. In science, there are few prizes for second place. Your chances of publishing your own work are now limited, since most major scientific journa
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Egypt starts radar scans for secret rooms behind Tut's tombEgypt's Antiquities Ministry says archaeologists are starting radar scans of the tomb of famed pharaoh Tutankhamun in the southern city of Luxor.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genius or joker: Elon Musk flamethrowers spark controversyElon Musk The Boring CompanyAfter raising $1 million by hawking baseball caps, the visionary entrepreneur behind electric carmaker Tesla and private space firm SpaceX says he's set the market alight with his latest idea.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
House dust mites evolved a new way to protect their genomeHouse dust mites are common pests with an unusual evolutionary history. They are tiny, free-living animals that evolved from a parasitic ancestor, which in turn evolved from free-living organisms millions of years ago.
3h
Feed: All Latest
Facebook's Future Rests on Knowing You Even BetterFacebook Users PeopleThe social network has maxed out on ads, but is charging more for each ad. To continue doing so, it will need better targeting techniques.
3h
Live Science
Conspiracy Theorists Don't Trust Vaccines EitherWas Princess Diana's death an accident? People who feel strongly that it wasn't may be skeptical about vaccines, too.
3h
Big Think
Trump's State of the Union Address: How does it measure up to presidents past?How relatable was Trump’s speech? To evaluate this objectively, you could look at what reading level it was at. Read More
3h
NYT > Science
Gut Microbes Combine to Cause Colon Cancer, Study SuggestsTwo types of bacteria common in the gut may accelerate the growth of tumors, suggesting new possibilities for diagnosis and prevention.
3h
Popular Science
Should you feed your pet raw meat?Animals The real risks of a ‘traditional’ dog diet. A recent study has raised concerns about the health risks of these raw meat based diet products as possible sources of some bacterial and parasitic diseases.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Practical hair regeneration technologyResearchers have developed a method for the mass preparation of cellular aggregates, also known as 'hair follicle germs (HFGs),' that may lead to a new treatment for hair loss.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
House dust mites evolved a new way to protect their genomeHouse dust mites are common pests with an unusual evolutionary history. They are tiny, free-living animals that evolved from a parasitic ancestor, which in turn evolved from free-living organisms millions of years ago.
3h
The Atlantic
One of Antarctica's Most Celebrated Relics Isn't What It SeemsEvery year, in anticipation of the austral summer—in October, if you’re going by the northern calendar—a silver communion cup is escorted from Christchurch, New Zealand, to one of the southernmost permanent religious edifices on Earth: the Chapel of the Snows, a small church that serves the scientists, civilians, and military personnel who populate the United States’ primary Antarctic research ce
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News
New laser emits a more stable, energy-efficient light beamA new type of laser could emit more stable, energy-efficient light beams than its conventional counterparts.
3h
cognitive science
Consciousness and the World | by Riccardo Manzottisubmitted by /u/burtzev [link] [comments]
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook denies 'censoring' 19th-century vagina paintingFacebook Users PeopleA long-running dispute over claims of censorship by Facebook came to a head in a French court on Thursday, with the social network denying it had deleted a user's account because he posted a picture of a 19th-century painting of a woman's genitals.
3h
Viden
Rapport: Rådden gylle, kaffegrums og halm kan omsættes til 20.000 danske jobLige nu er verdens største biogasanlæg ved at blive bygget i Esbjerg.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Supermassive black holes can feast on one star per yearCU Boulder researchers have discovered a mechanism that explains the persistence of asymmetrical stellar clusters surrounding supermassive black holes in some galaxies and suggests that during post-galactic merger periods, orbiting stars could be flung into the black hole and destroyed at a rate of one per year.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research advances spintronics technologyEngineers at the University of California, Riverside, have reported advances in so-called "spintronic" devices that will help lead to a new technology for computing and data storage. They have developed methods to detect signals from spintronic components made of low-cost metals and silicon, which overcomes a major barrier to wide application of spintronics. Previously such devices depended on com
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Zeroing in on dopamineScientists have identified the molecular machinery responsible for secretion of the neurotransmitter dopamine, opening the door for strategies to precision target dopamine release to treat disorders such as Parkinson's and addiction.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Magnesium makes chromosomesResearchers report a new ion detector, MARIO. Using it, they show that changes in the intracellular concentration of free magnesium ions (Mg2+) is critical for the chromosome folding that must occur for cells to divide. The findings provide a new mechanism for chromosome organization.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pandemic risk: How large are the expected losses?Greater investment is needed to prepare against pandemics -- the worldwide spread of an infectious disease. A study shows the expected annual count of pandemic-related deaths is 700,000, and expected annual losses from pandemic risk is $500 billion. The paper applied a theoretical model to calculate the expected number of deaths and economic losses in rare pandemic scenarios.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel computational biology model accurately describes dynamics of gene expressionUsing a simple analytical framework for random events within a predictable system, computational biologists have found a new way to accurately model certain forms of gene expression, including the body's 24-hour internal clock. This new approach of applying a piecewise deterministic Markov process (PDMP) to gene expression could inform possible design principles for synthetic biologists.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fentanyl use linked to amnesiaA neuropsychologist's case report suggests a new reason fentanyl -- alone, or in combination with stimulants -- may put substance users at risk, whether they take it knowingly or not. It may cause amnesia.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Like Zika, West Nile virus causes fetal brain damage, death in miceTwo viruses closely related to Zika -- West Nile and Powassan -- can spread from an infected pregnant mouse to her fetuses, causing brain damage and fetal death, according to a new study. The findings suggest that Zika may not be unique in its ability to cause miscarriages and birth defects.
3h
cognitive science
Neurons Get the Beat and Keep It Going in Drumrolls -- MIT / Georgia Tech studysubmitted by /u/benbrum [link] [comments]
3h
Big Think
New ‘Cheaters Edition’ of Monopoly rewards players for dishonestyThe classic board game Monopoly has undergone countless special editions over the years, with themes ranging from “Star Wars” to World War II. All of these iterations were built on the assumption that players will be honest and follow the rules. But that’s over. This fall, Hasbro will ... Read More
3h
New Scientist - News
Polar bears waste lots of their energy and it could be a problemWe thought polar bears had neat tricks for conserving energy in lean periods, but it turns out they are not that thrifty, which could cause them trouble in the future
3h
New Scientist - News
At least three types of bacteria may help cause bowel cancerEvidence is growing that bacteria can cause bowel cancer. Now two common species have been found to cause DNA damage, and have been linked to tumours in mice
3h
New Scientist - News
Dancing galaxies may shake up our ideas of galaxy formationWe thought satellite galaxies were usually in random orbits around larger ones, but a handful in coordinated orbits may force us to rethink galaxy formation
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shedding light on arctic zooplankton in the darkWe know that tiny marine creatures in the Arctic respond to weak light from the Moon or the Northern Lights during the polar night. Now researchers have learned that artificial light from research vessels can also have a negative effect.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neurons get the beat and keep it going in drumrollsWhat researchers believed to be chaotic electric potentials in neurons are turning out the be surprisingly orderly and rhythmic.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scandinavians shaped by several waves of immigrationSo you think people in present-day Sweden and Norway are different from each other? It turns out that would have been closer to the truth some 9500 years ago.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Strange things happen when a crystal gets split in twoResearchers at the Vienna University of Technology have carefully broken potassium tantalate crystals in specific directions, and imaged the resulting surfaces using a state of the art atomic force microscope. Their data was combined with computations and a series of remarkable phenomena were ultimately explained. The results were published in the journal Science, and are potentially useful for te
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study challenges popular theory about dwarf galaxiesA new international study involving The Australian National University (ANU) has found a plane of dwarf galaxies orbiting around Centaurus A in a discovery that challenges a popular theory about how dwarf galaxies are spread around the Universe.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Small molecules set up security system to defend the genomeThousands of short RNA molecules with diverse genetic sequences serve as security guards to identify and silence attempts to invade the genome, such as DNA inserted by viruses or parasitic elements known as transposons.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Oklahoma's earthquakes strongly linked to wastewater injection depthMan-made earthquakes in Oklahoma, USA, are strongly linked to the depth at which wastewater from the oil and gas industry are injected into the ground, according to a new study led by the University of Bristol.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Distant galaxy group contradicts common cosmological models, simulationsAn international team of astronomers has determined that Centaurus A, a massive elliptical galaxy 13 million light-years from Earth, is accompanied by a number of dwarf satellite galaxies orbiting the main body in a narrow disk. In a paper published today in Science, the researchers note that this is the first time such a galactic arrangement has been observed outside the Local Group, home to the
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A bacterial duo linked to colon cancerScientists have identified a combination of bacteria that appears to increase the risk of colon cancer. Through a series of experiments in mice, they were able to pinpoint ways in which the two species of bacteria promote inflammation and break down the mucus layer of the colon.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wastewater injection depth important trigger for induced quakesA new study aiming to provide a better understanding of how injection wells in the US influence earthquake activity cites wastewater injection depth, not purely rate or volume, as a critical factor.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Surprise: Satellite galaxies of Centaurus A are on a coordinated danceThe satellite dwarf galaxies orbiting around the much larger galaxy Centaurus A are rotating in synchrony around their host, to researchers' surprise.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Increasing loss of spring sea ice taxes polar bear metabolismTracking polar bears during the spring -- their prime hunting season, when sea ice conditions should be ideal -- reveals that in recent years, many bears are expending notably more energy than they are consuming.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Astronomy: A rotating system of satellite galaxies raises questionsAstronomers have examined the distribution and movement of dwarf galaxies in the constellation Centaurus, but their observations do not fit with the standard model of cosmology that assumes the existence of dark matter. The international team of researchers led by the University of Basel reported their findings in the journal Science.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Polar bears finding it harder to catch enough seals to meet energy demandsA new study finds polar bears in the wild have higher metabolic rates than previously thought, and as climate change alters their environment a growing number of bears are unable to catch enough prey to meet their energy needs.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CUNY, Harvard scientists team with UBS Asset Management on sustainable investing frameworkScientists at The City University of New York (CUNY) and Harvard University, in partnership with UBS Asset Management, have developed a scientific framework to inform investment decisions that make positive contributions to sustainable environmental stewardship and human well-being.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Changes in genes involved in DNA repair and packaging linked to risk of multiple myelomaResearchers have identified two gene regions that contribute to multiple myeloma, an inherited cancer that occurs in bone marrow, through a new method that makes use of human disease pedigrees. Nicola Camp and Rosalie Waller of the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, and colleagues, report their findings Feb. 1, 2018, in PLOS Genetics.
3h
The Atlantic
The Many Failed Vindications of Donald J. TrumpThe politics of the Russia investigation increasingly resemble a high-stakes game of capture the flag, with two sides frantically searching for the single item that will hand them victory. For Trump’s opponents, that’s the smoking gun that will prove all their suspicions about him are true . For Trump and his defenders, the quest is for the silver bullet that will offer him full vindication. The
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Photoreversible molecular switch changes the physical property of thermoresponsive polymerResearchers have developed a novel strategy to control the shapes of polymeric materials by utilizing photoresponsive molecular switches, which may evolve tractable stimuli-responsive soft materials.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Splashdown: Supersonic cold metal bonding in 3-DA highly versatile deposition process already used to manufacture aircraft parts and other expensive, delicate surfaces is now 3-D modeled to show the effects of temperature for the first time. Cold Gas Dynamic Spray (CGDS) can bond supersonic micron-sized metal particles to a metal or polymer surface without damaging it. This 3D model of a single particle bonding to a surface starts unlocking a g
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The virtual brain: Patient data allow researchers to study brain function using detailedUsing patient measurement data, researchers have succeeded in further refining the brain modeling platform 'The Virtual Brain'. The software, which has been downloaded almost 11,000 times to date, has been used in projects and publications across the globe.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why basal cell tumors return when drug treatment stopsA new study pinpoints a mechanism that controls how basal cell cancers respond to treatment and offers new ideas for controlling this disease when it gets tricky.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quantum 'hack' to unleash computing powerThe building blocks of quantum computers -- qubits -- are highly unstable and prone to error. Building tolerance to such error is a major hurdle in scaling up practical quantum computers. Now physicists have found that modifying qubit surface codes can improve quantum error correction by up to 400 percent.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Self-assembled 'hairy' nanoparticles could give a double punch to cancer'Hairy' nanoparticles made with light-sensitive materials that assemble themselves could one day become 'nano-carriers' providing doctors a new way to simultaneously introduce both therapeutic drugs and cancer-fighting heat into tumors. That's one potential application for a new technology that combines water-repelling yet light-sensitive and water-absorbing materials into polymeric nano-reactors
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
For Americans, understanding money eases old age anxietyA new household economics study suggests that financially literate people are more capable of accumulating wealth and worrying less about life in old age.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Measuring molecular interactionsResearchers have used a new approach to discover previously unknown interactions between proteins and small metabolic molecules in bacterial cells. The technique can also be used to test the effect of medications.
3h
Science | The Guardian
Polar bears could become extinct faster than was feared, study saysThe animals facing an increasing struggle to find enough food to survive as climate change steadily transforms their environment Polar bears could be sliding towards extinction faster than previously feared, with the animals facing an increasing struggle to find enough food to survive as climate change steadily transforms their environment. New research has unearthed fresh insights into polar bea
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Scientific American Content: Global
Dancing Dwarf Galaxies Deepen Dark Matter MysteryA surprising alignment between small satellites of the galaxy Centaurus A challenges the standard model of cosmology -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Supermassive black holes can feast on one star per yearSupermassive black holes in some galaxies can eat stars at a rate of one per year in the period following a galactic merger, helping explain a longstanding astronomical mystery about eccentric stellar orbits.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New UC Riverside research advances spintronics technologyEngineers at the University of California, Riverside, have reported advances in so-called 'spintronic' devices that will help lead to a new technology for computing and data storage. They have developed methods to detect signals from spintronic components made of low-cost metals and silicon, which overcomes a major barrier to wide application of spintronics.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop sustainable investing frameworkScientists at The City University of New York (CUNY) and Harvard University, in partnership with UBS Asset Management, have developed a scientific framework to inform investment decisions that make positive contributions to sustainable environmental stewardship and human well-being. Among the beneficiaries are the U.N. Sustainable Development Goals that promote access to clean water, maintaining h
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Distant galaxy group contradicts common cosmological models, simulationsAn international team of astronomers has determined that Centaurus A, a massive elliptical galaxy 13 million light-years from Earth, is accompanied by a number of dwarf satellite galaxies orbiting the main body in a narrow disk. In a paper published today in Science, the researchers note that this is the first time such a galactic arrangement has been observed outside the Local Group, home to the
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Oklahoma's earthquakes strongly linked to wastewater injection depthMan-made earthquakes in Oklahoma, USA, are strongly linked to the depth at which wastewater from the oil and gas industry are injected into the ground, according to a new study led by the University of Bristol.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Small molecules set up security system to defend the genomeThousands of short RNA molecules with diverse genetic sequences serve as security guards to identify and silence attempts to invade the genome, such as DNA inserted by viruses or parasitic elements known as transposons.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Polar bears finding it harder to catch enough seals to meet energy demandsA new study finds polar bears in the wild have higher metabolic rates than previously thought, and as climate change alters their environment a growing number of bears are unable to catch enough prey to meet their energy needs.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Coastal cities: Hazard mitigation, recovery plansThe field of urban planning is gaining interest as cities around the world are facing increased exposure to weather-related risks and hazards ranging from sea level rise and flooding to temperature build-up and urban heat island effect.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breathing problems linked to drug that treats opioid addictionA drug used to treat opioid addiction could cause breathing problems in some obese patients, according to a new study.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Instagram users less likely to engage with political or controversial imagesInstagram Type FeatureA new study recently found that although Instagram users vary on their purposes for using the platform, the majority are drawn to Instagram for social news and entertainment and are less likely to engage with political or controversial images. The study also identifies several strategies for increasing engagement with audiences.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A biological approach to precision medicine targets endless number of diseasesA new study proposes a novel approach to manipulate genes using a self-assembling platform that delivers nucleic acids to distinct subsets of cells. The new modular platform offers a robust biological approach -- and may hold the key to the future of personalized medicine.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study of social contact patterns in Hong Kong will give insight into spread of epidemicThe first ever long-term study of patterns of social contact in Hong Kong will improve our knowledge of the growth of epidemics. Hong Kong was where SARS emerged in 2002-2003. The study looked at the number and type of social encounters made by 1,450 residents. This is affected by age but 'supermixers' are not necessarily more likely to contract or spread disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers discover a potential new therapeutic strategy for pancreatic cancerIn most pancreatic cancer patients, the diagnosis is made when the disease is already advanced, and there is no effective treatment at present. There have been no significant advances to combat it in recent decades and unfortunately, its occurrence is on the increase. Now, a group of researchers may have found a new form of attack.
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Science | The Guardian
Permission given to create Britain's first 'three-person babies'Two women with gene mutation that causes degenerative disorder will undergo therapy Doctors in Newcastle have been granted permission to create Britain’s first “three-person babies” for two women who are at risk of passing on devastating and incurable genetic diseases to their children. The green light from the fertility regulator means that doctors at the Newcastle Fertility Centre will now atte
4h
Popular Science
Should I get a flu shot? Is it too late to get a flu shot?Health You should get a flu shot. It's not too late to get a flu shot. You should get a flu shot. It’s not too late to get a flu shot. You can get the flu in every month of the year. It’s never too late to get a flu shot.
4h
Big Think
Facebook lost over 1 million daily users in North America for the first timeFacebook Users PeopleFacebook's Q4 earnings call was a mixed bag, with many indications that the company is now feeling the effects of social media fatigue among a significant portion of their userbase. Read More
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How the most common DNA mutation happensShape-shifters aren't just the stuff of fiction, they're real -- and they're inside our DNA. Researchers now describe how two mismatched bases in human DNA are able to change shape in order to avoid the body's natural defenses against genetic mutations.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Experimental therapy could boost stroke recoveryAn experimental therapy that targets the spinal cord may one day be key to spurring on enhanced recovery for stroke victims. By injecting a drug called chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) into the spinal cord of rats 28 days after they suffered a stroke, researchers found they were able to enhance recovery by inducing amplified rewiring of circuits connecting the brain to the spinal cord. When they also co
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists discover new field affecting metals solidificationThe discovery that this heretofore unknown 'bias field' is causing pattern formation alters the thinking that the formations had been caused only by the sound vibration or disturbances known in materials science as noise.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tracking microbial diversity through the terrestrial subsurfaceScientists have investigate samples collected at Utah's Crystal Geyser over one of its complex, five-day eruption cycles.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study of salts in water causing stirNew insight into science that seems, on its surface, exceedingly simple -- what happens when you add salt to water -- could ultimately lead to a better understanding of biochemical processes in cells and perhaps advance sources of clean energy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hunger overrides sense of fullness after weight lossThe levels of hormones that control hunger and fullness(satiety) both rise after weight loss, but individuals may only experience an increase in hunger, according to a new study.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Silk fibers could be high-tech 'natural metamaterials'New research has demonstrated how the nano-architecture of a silkworm's fiber causes 'Anderson localization of light,' a discovery that could lead to various innovations and a better understanding of light transport and heat transfer.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Severe and lingering symptoms occur in some after treatment for Lyme diseaseIn a study of 61 people treated for the bacteria that causes Lyme disease, researchers conclude that fatigue, pain, insomnia and depression do indeed persist over long periods of time for some people, despite largely normal physical exams and clinical laboratory testing.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Meet the 'odderon': Large Hadron Collider experiment shows potential evidence of quasiparticle sought for decadesIn a 17-mile circular tunnel underneath the border between France and Switzerland, an international collaboration of scientists runs experiments using the world's most advanced scientific instrument, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). By smashing together protons that travel close to light speed, particle physicists analyze these collisions and learn more about the fundamental makeup of all matter i
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Meet the 'odderon': Large Hadron Collider experiment shows potential evidence of quasiparticle sought for decadesA team of high-energy experimental particle physicists, including several from the University of Kansas, has uncovered possible evidence of a subatomic quasiparticle dubbed an 'odderon' that had only been theorized to exist.
4h
The Atlantic
Can Europe Step Up?BRUSSELS—It’s become an article of faith that the U.S. is withdrawing from the world, and a reflex to blame Donald Trump for it. It’s also largely fictitious. Some 34,000 U.S. troops are in the Gulf, at least 14,000 in Afghanistan, 70,000 or so in North East Asia, and roughly 62,000 in Europe. Many of those numbers are growing under his presidency, alongside the list of countries in which the U.S
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dutch urged to cut Groningen gas output by almost halfDutch mine safety officials on Thursday urged the government to almost halve production at Europe's biggest gas field, amid increasing anger from residents over damaging earthquakes in the Groningen region.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Orange alert over erupting Guatemala volcanoAuthorities in Guatemala issued an orange alert Thursday over an erupting volcano located a short distance from its capital.
4h
Big Think
San Francisco is wiping out convictions for marijuana, going back to 1975San Francisco takes a bold new step regarding marijuana laws and convictions. Read More
4h
New on MIT Technology Review
The planet could hit 1.5 °C of warming inside the next five years
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
Why Is Puerto Rico Dismantling Its Institute of Statistics?The organization has consistently improved the efficiency and quality of public services on the island—and in the face of crushing debt and hurricane devastation, it's more crucial than ever -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Ingeniøren
Besynderlighederne i Jupiters magnetfelt dukker gradvist opI ugens løb kunne Nasa-ekspert fortælle danske forskere nyt om Juno-missionen, mens en nobelprismodtager begejstrede danske kemikere med sine roterende nanomaskiner, og Innovationsfonden holdt prisfest.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover new field affecting metals solidificationA fundamental discovery that alters our current understanding of how metals solidify and form crystalline patterns may help lead to better control of casting and welding processes. It also explains how snowflakes and many mineral patterns form naturally.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Suomi NPP satellite tracking Tropical Cyclone CebileTropical Cyclone Cebile was still a powerful hurricane in the Southern Indian Ocean when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and captured a visible image of the storm.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Photoreversible molecular switch changes the physical property of thermoresponsive polymerResearchers have developed a novel strategy to control the shapes of polymeric materials by utilizing photoresponsive molecular switches, which may evolve tractable stimuli-responsive soft materials.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite tracking Tropical Cyclone CebileTropical Cyclone Cebile was still a powerful hurricane in the Southern Indian Ocean when NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed overhead and captured a visible image of the storm.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover new field affecting metals solidificationThe discovery that this heretofore unknown 'bias field' is causing pattern formation alters the thinking that the formations had been caused only by the sound vibration or disturbances known in materials science as noise.
4h
Inside Science
BRIEF: Grammar Becomes Simpler in Larger PopulationsBRIEF: Grammar Becomes Simpler in Larger Populations Researchers find that complex cultural practices tend to proliferate in more niche groups. topimage.jpg Composite image by Yuen Yiu. [Source image: Espen Sundve ] Image credits: CC BY-SA 2.0 Culture Thursday, February 1, 2018 - 12:30 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- If you've ever tried to learn the Finnish, Czech or Basque languages,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The disappearance of common speciesScientists were able to show that currently widespread insects are threatened with a serious decline in species diversity in the near future. The research team lists fragmentation of habitats and intensification of agriculture as reasons for the decline of these 'generalists.'
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Instagram users less likely to engage with political or controversial images, study findsInstagram Type FeatureAlthough an average of 4.2 billion "likes" occur on the popular media-sharing app Instagram every day, researchers still are trying to understand why certain types of content attract more engagement than others. News organizations in particular are trying to determine what strategies work best for cutting through social media clutter to get the news out to their audiences. A new study from the Uni
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
How Warp-Speed Evolution Is Transforming EcologyDarwin thought evolution was too slow to change the environment on observable timescales—ecologists are discovering that he was wrong -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More rice, please: 13 rice genomes reveal ways to keep up with ever-growing populationBillions of people around the world rely on rice as a mainstay of their diet. The grain provides about 20 percent of the calories consumed by humans worldwide. Rice production is critical for global food security, and demand will only grow as the world's population expands by an estimated 2-3 billion by 2050. To keep up, farmers will need new strains of rice that can be grown both efficiently and
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How China has world class football statues but no world class footballers—new researchDespite China's absence from this summer's World Cup Finals, the world's most populous nation is challenging for the number one spot in one aspect of football. A new study by the University of Sheffield has found that China has more statues depicting footballers (39) than any other nation apart from the UK, and also boasts the world's largest football statue.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A biological approach to precision medicine targets endless number of diseasesThe biological complexity of cancer and other diseases demands a more formidable arsenal of therapies than currently available. Most therapeutic approaches ignore the dynamic molecular network of genes, targeting instead only very few selected disease-related genes.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US car sales mixed in January; trucks stay strongAutomakers reported mixed US car sales in January, with strong demand for SUVs and pickup trucks continuing to provide a cushion in a declining overall auto market.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Changing landscape means some Arctic ponds may potentially be a significant source of carbon emissionsA new Canadian study has found that carbon released by some ponds in the High Arctic could potentially be a hidden source of greenhouse gas emissions.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Experimental therapy could boost stroke recoveryAn experimental therapy that targets the spinal cord may one day be key to spurring on enhanced recovery for stroke victims. By injecting a drug called chondroitinase ABC (ChABC) into the spinal cord of rats 28 days after they suffered a stroke, UAlberta researchers found they were able to enhance recovery by inducing amplified rewiring of circuits connecting the brain to the spinal cord. When the
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PSMA PET/CT visualizes prostate cancer recurrence early, impacts radiation therapyA nuclear medicine scan may locate prostate cancer recurrence after radical prostatectomy early after disease recurrence and could help guide salvage radiotherapy, according to new research from the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA). The study, which utilizes PET/CT with gallium-68 prostate-specific membrane antigen (68Ga-PSMA-11), is documented in the featured article in the February is
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New radiation detectors developed at Sandia used for New START inspectionsSandia National Laboratories designed, tested and delivered new radiation detection equipment for monitoring under the New START Treaty. Defense Threat Reduction Agency inspectors recently used this equipment for the first time in Russia for a New START inspection.
5h
Viden
Selvkørende biler: Google og General Motors er kørt i pole positionDe to firmaers selvkørende biler står for 96 procent af alle test-kilometer kørt i Californien det seneste år.
5h
Live Science
Finally Solved: The Science of Cracking Open a Cold One (With The Boys)Scientists have cracked a frothy mystery: the physics of fizz.
5h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Gravity doesn’t leak into large, hidden dimensionsGravitational waves from a recently observed neutron star merger offer no evidence of large, unknown dimensions.
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Popular Science
Looks like China just installed a railgun on a warship, beating the U.S. Navy to the punchEastern Arsenal Railguns are another way the PLAN hopes to get an edge in 21st-century naval warfare. China has made military history by installing a functional railgun onto a warship, beating the U.S. Navy in developing this new weapon.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Silk fibers could be high-tech 'natural metamaterials'New research has demonstrated how the nano-architecture of a silkworm's fiber causes 'Anderson localization of light,' a discovery that could lead to various innovations and a better understanding of light transport and heat transfer.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals how the most common DNA mutation happensShape-shifters aren't just the stuff of fiction, they're real -- and they're inside our DNA. In the Feb. 1 issue of the journal Nature, researchers describe how two mismatched bases in human DNA are able to change shape in order to avoid the body's natural defenses against genetic mutations.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breathing problems linked to drug that treats opioid addictionA drug used to treat opioid addiction could cause breathing problems in some obese patients, according to a new study from UT scientists.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More rice, please: 13 rice genomes reveal ways to keep up with ever-growing populationRice provides 20 percent of daily calories consumed globally. We will need more as population grows toward 9-10 billion by 2050. A vast new genetic resource based on comparison of 13 rice genomes and published this week will accelerate efforts to develop new rice varieties, guiding breeders to the genes plants use to resist pests, thrive in inhospitable environments, and produce abundant amounts o
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Instagram users less likely to engage with political or controversial images, MU findsA new study from the University of Missouri recently found that although Instagram users vary on their purposes for using the platform, the majority are drawn to Instagram for social news and entertainment and are less likely to engage with political or controversial images. The study also identifies several strategies for increasing engagement with audiences.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Poorer survival rates for adults with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in deprived areasAdults with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia living in deprived areas of England have poorer survival rates, a new study has found.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A higher(er)-definition noseSensors that sniff out chemicals in the air to warn us about everything from fires to carbon monoxide to drunk drivers to explosive devices hidden in luggage have improved so much that they can even detect diseases on a person's breath. Researchers from Drexel University and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have made a discovery that could make our best 'chemical noses' even
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How China has world class football statues but no world class footballers -- new researchDespite China's absence from this summer's World Cup Finals, the world's most populous nation is challenging for the number one spot in one aspect of football. A new study by the University of Sheffield has found that China has more statues depicting footballers (39) than any other nation apart from the UK, and also boasts the world's largest football statue.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New mouse model makes stem cells light up greenMultipotent stromal cells have long been a hot topic in medical research. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now found a way to specifically mark these stem cells. This makes it possible to analyze their distribution pattern and their function in living organisms. The study, which included researchers from Oxford University, Tsukuba University and the Karolinska Institute Stockholm, is now
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Zeroing in on dopamineHarvard Medical School scientists have identified the molecular machinery responsible for secretion of the neurotransmitter dopamine, opening the door for strategies to precision target dopamine release to treat disorders such as Parkinson's and addiction.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists reveal a molecule that may underpin neurological disordersScientists from Japan have identified a molecule that aids a crucial 'pruning' process in the brain that, if malfunctioning, could lead to disorders such as autism and dementia. These results provide new insights into the role of progranulin, a protein, in the developing brain, suggesting that progranulin signaling may one day become a potential therapeutic target for neuropsychiatric disorders.
5h
Big Think
Your brain activity can reveal who your friends areLike it or not, you are a lot like your friends. Read More
5h
New on MIT Technology Review
What the Coincheck hack means for the future of blockchain securityHalf a billion dollars’ worth of cryptocurrency was stolen—that’s gotten people’s attention.
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cognitive science
Clinical Psychologist Jordan Peterson talks about life on the Joe Rogan Experience, Fascinating and Motivating!submitted by /u/griceyyyyyyy [link] [comments]
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover the unexpected role of platelets in immune responsePlatelets play a much bigger role in our immune system than previously thought, according to Université Laval researchers. In addition to their role in coagulation and healing, platelets also act as the immune system's first responders when a virus, bacterium, or allergen enters the bloodstream. This discovery opens the door to new ways to treat patients with septic shock caused by viral or bacter
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A biological approach to precision medicine targets endless number of diseasesA new Tel Aviv University study proposes a novel approach to manipulate genes using a self-assembling platform that delivers nucleic acids to distinct subsets of cells. The new modular platform offers a robust biological approach -- and may hold the key to the future of personalized medicine.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why basal cell tumors return when drug treatment stopsA new study pinpoints a mechanism that controls how basal cell cancers respond to treatment and offers new ideas for controlling this disease when it gets tricky.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, February 2018ORNL research says quantum computers will use much less energy than current supercomputers, a potential cost benefit to equipment manufacturers and data centers. ORNL creates supertough renewable plastic with improved manufacturability.A new ORNL system will help builders and home designers select the best construction materials for long-term moisture durability.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Belief in conspiracy theories associated with vaccine skepticismPeople who believe Princess Diana was murdered or that John F. Kennedy's assassination was an elaborate plot are more likely to think that vaccines are unsafe, despite scientific evidence to the contrary, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Changing landscape means some Arctic ponds may potentially be a significant source of carbon emissionsA new Canadian study has found that carbon released by some ponds in the High Arctic could potentially be a hidden source of greenhouse gas emissions.
5h
The Atlantic
What Kids Are Really Learning About SlaveryA class of middle-schoolers in Charlotte, North Carolina, was asked to cite “four reasons why Africans made good slaves .” Nine third-grade teachers in suburban Atlanta assigned math word problems about slavery and beatings . A high school in the Los Angeles-area reenacted a slave ship —with students’ lying on the dark classroom floor, wrists taped, as staff play the role of slave ship captains.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
In India, Agroforestry Is a Win for Both Tigers and VillagersIntegrating trees into cropland makes agriculture more productive and preserves forests for the big cats and the ecosystems that depend on them -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News
Dark web users are easy to unmask through their bitcoin useThe Tor browser is meant to obscure your real movements online and keep your identity secret. But using bitcoin for dark web payments can blow your cover.
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New Scientist - News
It’s time to label all meat as stunned or unstunned at slaughterOne solution to concern over how animals are killed for our plates is labelling that makes this welfare distinction plain on all meat, says Danny Chambers
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Red wine proves good for the heart (again)Antioxidant compounds found in red wine are advancing the treatment of heart disease -- the leading cause of death for both men and women in the US Researchers have developed drug-eluting stents with red wine antioxidants.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Analysis of global duchenne muscular dystrophy patients registry underscoresDuchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a a rare and fatal genetically-inherited degenerative neuromuscular disease that affects one in 5,000 newborn boys.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Induced labor after 39 weeks in healthy women may reduce the need for cesarean birthIn a study presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, researchers unveiled findings that suggest that induction of labor at 39 weeks of gestation among healthy, first-time mothers reduces the rate of cesarean birth as compared to expectant management among the same population.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Half of Americans like universal basic income—and they want AI companies to pay for it
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cognitive science
Pleasure attainment or self-realization: the balance between two forms of well-beings are encoded in default mode networksubmitted by /u/saijanai [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Europe claims 100 million users for Galileo satnav systemThe Galileo satellite navigation system, Europe's rival to the United States' GPS, has nearly 100 million users after its first year of operation, the French space agency CNES said Thursday.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
Has Trump Killed More Regulations Than Any Other President?Energy and environmental agencies have been the administration's prime targets for regulatory removal -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Islands' of cell membrane componentsResearch has elucidated the fusion process of proteoliposomes with an artificial lipid bilayer and the mechanism behind this process. In addition, it was also discovered that the domains composed of all cell membrane components exist as 'islands' that were isolated from the artificial membrane. These findings will lead to further understanding of the functions of membrane proteins, which are an im
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reasoning behind campus sexual assault policies challenged by psychologistsA comprehensive analysis of policies related to sexual assaults -- known as mandatory reporting or compelled disclosure -- at 150 universities has raised questions about their effectiveness and their impacts on victims.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Same psychological mechanism explains violence among Muslim and Western extremistsWhy do some Westerners attack Muslim minorities and asylum seekers and why do some Muslims support and engage in terror against the West? New research suggests that the reasons for such extreme behaviour might be the same in both groups.
6h
Live Science
Double Trouble: These Diseases Could Raise Your Risk for CancerChronic diseases such as heart disease and diabetes are serious health concerns by themselves, but to make matters worse, they may also raise the risk of cancer.
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Viden
TÆT PÅ Danmarks første og eneste astronaut er sulten efter nye eventyr i rummetSTIL SPØRGSMÅL Hvad laver Andreas Mogensen i dag? Og kan han få endnu en tur i rummet?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Do career NFL players have a higher risk of death?Career players in the National Football League (NFL) had slightly higher rates of death that were not statistically different from those of replacement players who made only a few appearances during a short league strike in the 1980s.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Patients and doctors often disagree in evaluation of surgical scarringWhen it comes to the physical scars surgery leaves behind, a new study shows patients and doctors often don't assess their severity the same way. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found patients and physicians disagreed in their scar evaluations 28 percent of the time, with patients more likely to focus on the depth of the scar while physicians were
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Quanta Magazine
Quantum Algorithms Struggle Against Old Foe: Clever ComputersFor Cristian Calude , doubt began with a puzzle so simple, he said, that “even a child can understand it.” Here it is: Suppose you have a mysterious box that takes one of two possible inputs — you can press a red button or a blue button, say — and gives back one of two possible outputs — a red ball or a blue ball. If the box always returns the same color ball no matter what, it’s said to be const
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Machine tools receiving a check-upInfluences like temperature variation, drafts, and air humidity can heavily compromise precision. The Fraunhofer Institute for Machine Tools and Forming Technology IWU is exposing machines to various climate zones around the world without actually shipping them to Southeast Asia, Canada, or Brazil: A newly inaugurated climate chamber is able to test how ambient conditions affect the function of la
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russia to start offering spacewalks for touristsRussia is planning to send paying tourists on the International Space Station out on spacewalks for the first time, an official from the country's space industry said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Agroforestry systems may play vital role in mitigating climate changeAgroforestry could play an important role in mitigating climate change because it sequesters more atmospheric carbon in plant parts and soil than conventional farming, according to Penn State researchers.
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The Atlantic
How Muslim Women Use Fashion To Exert Political InfluenceI have been researching Muslim women’s fashion since 2004. My comparative investigation has taken me to three locations: Tehran, Iran; Yogyakarta, Indonesia; and Istanbul, Turkey. While there have been studies of Muslim women’s clothing in many individual countries, there are few cross-cultural and transnational comparisons. As I undertook such a comparison over the next dozen years, I found surp
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quantum chemistry solves mystery why there are these 20 amino acids in the genetic codeUsing quantum chemical methods, a team of researchers has solved one of the oldest puzzles of biochemistry. They uncovered why there are 20 amino acids that form the basis of all life today, even though the first 13 amino acids generated over time would have been sufficient to form a comprehensive repertoire of the required functional proteins.
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Feed: All Latest
February 2018 Best Tech Deals: Xbox, Dell, Essential Phone, and MoreFrom iPads to Xboxes, there are some great tech deals going on right now.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Less moisture in natural fibersNatural fibers have many advantages: they are renewable, biodegradable and robust. They are more energy-efficient to produce than glass or carbon fibers, are lighter and have better acoustics. Their disadvantage: they absorb water very easily. This impairs their mechanical properties. Fraunhofer researchers have collaborated with their partners to combine a special fiber treatment and a yarn techn
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Ingeniøren
Forsvaret træder ind i rumalderen med egen satellitFredag morgen får forsvarets opsendt sin første satellit, som skal overvåge fly og skibe mellem Arktis og Færøerne. Forhåbningen er, at den får følgeskab af flere andre, så man konstant kan overvåge området.
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Popular Science
Here are all the ways climate change will ruin your flightEnvironment Look forward to disruptions related to heat, wind, and water. Climate change is going to make air travel even more of a hassle.
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cognitive science
Resting-state functional connectivity of the default mode network associated with happiness [Eudaimonia]submitted by /u/saijanai [link] [comments]
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Science : NPR
Would College Students Retain More If Professors Dialed Back The Pace?Why do we forget so much of what we read? Anthropologist Barbara J. King suggests that the answer might point toward benefits of a slower pace of teaching in the college classroom. (Image credit: Adam Crowley/Getty Images/Blend Images RM)
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Viden
Andreas Mogensen sigter efter rejse til MånenOg den danske astronaut får måske chancen om få år, når NASA opsender de første bemandede missioner med fremtidens rumkapsel, Orion.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study of social contact patterns in Hong Kong will give insight into spread of epidemicThe first ever long-term study of patterns of social contact in Hong Kong will improve our knowledge of the growth of epidemics.Hong Kong was where SARS emerged in 2002-2003. The study looked at the number and type of social encounters made by 1,450 residents. This is affected by age but 'supermixers' are not necessarily more likely to contract or spread disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Macromolecular order in plastic kingdomA team of researchers has found out how the regularity of polypropylene molecules and thermal treatment affect the mechanical properties of the end product. New insights in the study make it possible to synthesize a material with predetermined properties, such as elasticity or hardness.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Parenting program brings 'joy' to Africa's poorest communitiesA major initiative to help teenagers, parents and caregivers in disadvantaged communities to form stronger relationships and improve teenagers' safety has been shown to succeed, according to trial results published today in BMJ Global Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Agroforestry systems may play vital role in mitigating climate changeAgroforestry could play an important role in mitigating climate change because it sequesters more atmospheric carbon in plant parts and soil than conventional farming, according to Penn State researchers.
6h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Black life at the intersection of birth and death | Mwende "FreeQuency" Katwiwa"It is the artist's job to unearth stories that people try to bury with shovels of complacency and time," says poet and freedom fighter Mwende "FreeQuency" Katwiwa. Performing her poem "The Joys of Motherhood," Katwiwa explores the experience of Black mothers in America and discusses the impact of the Movement for Black Lives -- because, she says, it's impossible to separate the two.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Low-latency image data compressionThe number of cameras in cars is increasing. However, through the flood of data the internal networks are being pushed to their limits. Special compression methods reduce the amount of video data, but exhibit a high degree of latency for coding. Fraunhofer researchers have adapted video compression in such a way that a latency is almost no longer perceivable. It is therefore of interest for use in
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Live Science
Missed the Blood Moon Lunar Eclipse? Here's When the Next One Is HappeningSkywatchers around the world were treated to a rare Super Blue Blood Moon today (Jan. 31). While this was the first time in 150 years that this type of eclipse happened in the U.S., the universe has a few more eclipses in store for us in the next year.
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The Atlantic
Employers Are Setting Workers Up for FailureMachines are learning how to perform routine tasks and some more complicated ones, and their progress is piquing employers’ interests. The retail and health industries in particular stand the most to gain from incorporating artificial intelligence into work. Both could see about a 50 percent revenue increase, according to a new Accenture report . And if all companies invest in artificial intellig
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New on MIT Technology Review
Trump allegedly wants to cut research funding for clean energy by 72 percent
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tajikistan says $4bn dam to open in NovemberTajikistan's $4-billion mega dam, intended to be the tallest in the world, could begin operations in time for a holiday honouring President Emomali Rakhmon in November, state media said on Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alibaba net profit soars 35% as Singles Day pays offChinese e-commerce giant Alibaba Thursday posted a 35 percent surge in net profit in the third quarter, fuelled by a record-breaking sales bonanza during its annual Singles Day shopping festival.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook denies censorship in closing of Paris user's pageFacebook Users PeopleLawyers for Facebook Inc. denied the company engaged in censorship when it shut down the account of a French user after he posted a photograph of a famous 19th century painting of a naked woman's genitals and lower torso.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First study of the only original fossils conserved of Peking ManScientists have been studying for the first time the original fossil remains conserved of "Peking Man." These six teeth belonging to Homo erectus were found in the mid-twentieth century at the Middle Pleistocene archaeological site of Zhoukoudian (Beijing).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Slow but steady: New study sheds light on the brain evolution of turtlesA new study shows that the brain of turtles has evolved slowly, but constantly over the last 210 million years, eventually reaching a variety in form and complexity, which rivals that of other animal groups.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rare ichthyosaur is only second known exampleA rare 200 million-year-old ichthyosaur specimen has been discovered in a private collection 22 years after it was originally found. The fossil is only the second example of Wahlisaurus massarae, a newly discovered species of ichthyosaur. This fossil was originally found in 1996 and has now been donated to a museum.
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The Economist: The world this week
KAL's cartoon
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The Economist: The world this week
Politics this week
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The Economist: The world this week
Business this week
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lightweight robots harvest cucumbersAutomation-intensive sectors such as the automotive industry are not the only ones to rely on robots. In more and more agricultural settings, automation systems are superseding strenuous manual labor. As part of the EU's CATCH project, the Fraunhofer Institute for Production Systems and Design Technology IPK is developing and testing a dual-arm robot for the automated harvesting of cucumbers. This
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemistry breakthroughs open new doors to drug developers and cancer researchersTwo independent chemistry breakthroughs have opened a plethora of doors that were previously locked to drug developers and cancer researchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Israeli firm takes venture world with crowdfunding approachWhen Israeli venture capitalist Jonathan Medved launched his OurCrowd funding platform five years ago, he billed it as a novel way to give individual investors a piece of the action on the country's vibrant start-up scene, traditionally the playground of well-heeled venture funds.
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Scientific American Content: Global
CDC Director's Investment in Tobacco, Drug Companies Baffles Ethics ExpertsThe purchases occurred after she took over the agency -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Turn on the tap: EU acts to improve water, reduce plasticThe European Union is revamping its water quality rules to address possible new health hazards and limit plastic waste by discouraging people from drinking bottled water.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research in olive varieties steps up the fight against anthracnoseHeavy rainfall in 1996 and 1997 provided the ideal conditions for the largest olive anthracnose epidemic recorded in recent decades, but at the same time prompted more intensive research into this pathogen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A step toward independence from fossil resourcesInstead of happening as a result of one big discovery, independence from fossil resources will most likely take place gradually. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials IFAM in Bremen have succeeded in taking another step in this direction. The scientists are now able to produce a paint primer on the basis of lignin, which, for example, can be ob
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Live Science
Why You (Probably) Shouldn't Worry About Earth's Magnetic Poles FlippingEarth's magnetic poles, whatever they're doing, are not going to spark chaos and kill us all — a scenario making the rounds online right now.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Solution to long-standing chemistry riddle has implications for drug developmentScientists have solved a decades-old challenge by working out how to craft functional residues onto a molecular cube. Cubane now has a plethora of additional applications in the fields of drug development, materials science and molecular engineering.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ultrafine aerosol particles intensify rainfall in Amazon regionStudy published in Science reveals that pollution particles from cities substantially affect storm cloud formation over tropical forest. The determinant role played by nanoparticles in the process of convection signals hints at the revision of widely accepted climactic models, whose concepts were developed in countries located in temperate areas of the globe.
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Ingeniøren
Vertikalmølle i Nordjylland kollapsetEn under tre år gammel vertikalmølle kollapsede søndag på en herregård ved Frederikshavn. Firmaet bag møllen eksisterer ikke længere.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Splashdown: Supersonic cold metal bonding in 3-DWhen a fragile surface requires a rock-hard, super-thin bonded metal coating, conventional manufacturing processes come up short. However, Cold Gas Dynamic Spray (CGDS) can do just that - with a big caveat. CGDS is enormously versatile, but is also very difficult to predict key aspects of the entire process. Now a temperature-based 3D model by Professor Tien-Chien Jen from the University of Johann
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum chemistry solves the mystery of the 20 amino acids in the genetic codeUsing quantum chemical methods, a team of researchers led by Dr. Matthias Granold and Professor Bernd Moosmann of the Institute of Pathobiochemistry at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz solved one of the oldest puzzles of biochemistry. They uncovered why there are 20 amino acids that form the basis of all life today, even though the first 13 amino acids generated over time would have been suffic
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Profound divisions in the U.K. revealed by Brexit studyA comprehensive report on Brexit and public opinion has revealed that the UK is a country deeply divided by class, place and age, and a values divide is emerging which could dramatically impact on politics in the years to come.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum 'hack' to unleash computing powerPhysicists at the University of Sydney have found a 'quantum hack' that should allow for enormous efficiency gains in quantum computing technologies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Computer models reveal best way to kill deadly bacteriaBacteria, transformed into dormant spores, can survive millions of years in extreme environments, threatening human life in the form of food poisoning and the biological weapon anthrax. But understanding how bacteria adapt to hostile environments has largely remained a mystery—until now.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technique can capture images of ultrafast energy-time entangled photon pairsScientists at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo have captured the first images of ultrafast photons that are energy-time entangled. The new technique will have direct applications for quantum cryptography and communication protocols, including the possibility for establishing highly secure communication channels over long distances.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
3D printing of living cellsUsing a new technique they call ‘in-air microfluidics’, scientists succeed in printing 3D structures with living cells. This special technique enable the fast and ‘in-flight’ production of micro building blocks that are viable and can be used for repairing damaged tissue, for example.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Food preservative enhances schizophrenia treatmentA randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial shows that sodium benzoate improves symptoms in clozapine-resistant schizophrenia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Warmer climate can give Europe dengue feverLarge parts of Europe can suffer from the dreaded dengue fever unless climate change is attenuated. The mosquito that can transmit the disease needs a certain temperature and humidity to spread.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Infrared lasers reveal unprecedented details in surface scattering of methaneWhen molecules interact with solid surfaces, a whole range of different dynamic processes can take place. These are of enormous interest in the context of catalytic reactions, e.g. the conversion of natural gas into hydrogen that can then be used to generate clean electricity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In the pipeline: A solution to a 130-year old problemAnyone who has ever turned on a tap knows something about fluid dynamics. Whether a fluid is flowing through household plumbing or industrial oil and gas pipelines, when it runs slowly its flow is smooth, but when it runs quickly its flow is more chaotic.
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Futurity.org
Most shoppers go to 6 grocery stores. You?Most shoppers—a whopping 83 percent—regularly visit between four and nine chain stores within a year to purchase groceries, a new study shows. Categories such as dessert toppings, motor oil, candles, and refrigerated foods from specific cultures are some of the products that lure customers to separate stores, according to the research. Of 1,321 households studied, only 12 stayed loyal to just one
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Dagens Medicin
Gebyrsagen for frivillige læger er rykket et skridt nærmere en løsningStyrelsen for Patientsikkerhed arbejder videre med fire spor, hvor der skal findes løsninger på problemstillingerne med det nye gebyr for frivillige læger.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The Virtual Brain -- patient data allow researchers to study brain function using detailedUsing patient measurement data, researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Berlin Institute of Health have succeeded in further refining the brain modeling platform 'The Virtual Brain.' The software, which has been downloaded almost 11,000 times to date, has been used in projects and publications across the globe. The latest findings have been published in eLife.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Electro-mechano-optical NMR detectionResearchers develop an NMR system which converts radio-frequency signals into optical ones, promises higher sensitivity for MRIs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Splashdown: Supersonic cold metal bonding in 3-DA highly versatile deposition process already used to manufacture aircraft parts and other expensive, delicate surfaces is now 3-D modeled to show the effects of temperature for the first time. Cold gas dynamic spray (CGDS) can bond supersonic micron-sized metal particles to a metal or polymer surface without damaging it. This 3-D model of a single particle bonding to a surface starts unlocking a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Severe and lingering symptoms occur in some after treatment for Lyme diseaseIn a study of 61 people treated for the bacteria that causes Lyme disease, Johns Hopkins researchers conclude that fatigue, pain, insomnia and depression do indeed persist over long periods of time for some people, despite largely normal physical exams and clinical laboratory testing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New use for telecommunications networks: Helping scientists peer into deep spaceFor the first time, researchers have demonstrated that a stable frequency reference can be reliably transmitted more than 300 kilometerFor the first time, researchers have demonstrated that a stable frequency reference can be reliably transmitted more than 300 kilometers over a standard fiber optic telecommunications network and used to synchronize two radio telescopes. s over a standard fiber opt
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ninety-six scientists co-author paper on rainforest mammalsThe Atlantic Forest, the second most biodiverse forest system in South America (after the Amazon), once covered roughly 463,000 square miles of habitat. Today, only 8-12 percent of this original habitat space remains. Ninety-six co-authors compiled trait information on 39,850 individuals from 279 different mammal species and 388 separate populations into a single, comprehensive study on Atlantic F
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bottled water sales fueled by desire for immortalityA fear of dying plays a role in people buying bottled water, even though they know it may not be good for them or the planet, a study from the University of Waterloo has found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How Facebook could really fix itselfFacebook Users PeopleFacebook has a world of problems. Beyond charges of Russian manipulation and promoting fake news, the company's signature social media platform is under fire for being addictive, causing anxiety and depression, and even instigating human rights abuses.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using mosquito nets for fishing potential threat to both humans and natureMosquito nets distributed to combat malaria are often used for fishing instead, impacting fish populations and human health in developing countries.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
MXene material could improve sensors that sniffSensors that sniff out chemicals in the air to warn us about everything from fires to carbon monoxide to drunk drivers to explosive devices hidden in luggage have improved so much that they can even detect diseases on a person's breath. Researchers from Drexel University and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology have made a discovery that could make our best "chemical noses" even
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quick HIV detection method could diagnose early diseaseA test capable of detecting HIV early using more efficient, robust methods has been developed by researchers at Imperial.
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The Atlantic
24 Frames Is a Fitting Elegy for Abbas KiarostamiThe late, great director Abbas Kiarostami was never afraid of lulling his audience into sleepy tranquility. “I absolutely don’t like the films in which the filmmakers take their viewers hostage and provoke them,” he famously said in an interview . “I prefer the films that put their audience to sleep in the theater … Some films have made me doze off in the theater, but the same films have made me
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The Scientist RSS
Growing AwarenessUniversity of California, Riverside, plant biologist Katie Dehesh explains the importance of agricultural research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Efficient use of resources in manufacture of metal componentsAdditive Manufacturing has established itself in many industrial sectors as a method for making plastic parts. The 3-D printing of metals is on the road to becoming a similar success story. In the newly opened 3-D-Printing Lab for Metals and Structural Materials at the Fraunhofer Institute for High-Speed Dynamics, Ernst-Mach-Institut, EMI, researchers have investigated how resource- efficient the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tracking activity on social networks now possible with new researchResearcher Fredrik Erlandsson at Blekinge Institute of Technology in Sweden has now developed methods that enable human interaction to be traced and to systematically retrieve information from social networks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The deepest-dwelling fish in the sea is small, pink and delicateThanks to movies and nature videos, many people know that bizarre creatures live in the ocean's deepest, darkest regions. They include viperfish with huge mouths and big teeth, and anglerfish, which have bioluminescent lures that make their own light in a dark world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How South Africa is keeping invasive famine weed at bayThe poisonous herb, Parthenium hysterophorus, is one of the world's most destructive invasive plants. It threatens biodiversity, national food security and human health. Native to parts of Central and South America (Gulf of Mexico) it has spread to more than 40 countries including Australia, India, Pakistan, Ethiopia, Swaziland and South Africa. In South Africa it's known as famine weed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Integrated metasurface converts colors of light over broadband inside a waveguideOne of the biggest challenges in developing integrated photonic circuits—which use light rather than electrons to transport information—is to control the momentum of light. Colors of light travel at different speeds through a material but in order for light to be converted between colors, it needs to have the same momentum or phase.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A study of the tooth sockets of famous skull leads to reconsideration of genderMore than 70 years ago two palaeontologists named Robert Broom and John Robinson discovered a skull at the Sterkfontein Caves near Johannesburg. They nicknamed the skull, which is believed to be about 2.5 million years old, "Mrs Ples".
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Dagens Medicin
Læger skal tage ansvar for kræftpatienters behandlingsforløbEn ny undersøgelse fra Kræftens Bekæmpelse viser, at 66 pct. af danske kræftpatienter oplever et klart lægeligt patientansvar. Men tallet kan ifølge Kræftens Bekæmpelse forbedres.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Friction found where there should be none: in superfluids near absolute zeroPhysicists have discovered unexpected friction while rotating superfluid helium. Understanding the friction’s provenance and implications is crucial for designing any devices that rely on superconducting quantum phenomena, such as quantum computers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neurological disease in mice and humans linked to an unlikely geneScreening for mutations influencing the migration of nerve cells in mice, scientists found a gene that plays a role in the transport of proteins within nerve cells. If less of the protein is present in the developing mouse, the scientists found that its brain showed severe defects. Investigating the situation in humans, they discovered that a mutation of the same gene underlies neural degeneration
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Friction found where there should be none—in superfluids near absolute zeroUnderstanding the causes and effects of the friction could pave the way for explorations into the composition of neutron stars and our universe. Here on Earth, the Aalto researchers' results will be invaluable for curtailing the production of heat and unwanted glitches in quantum computer components.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sharing is caring, but is privacy theft?Open Science (OS) is a movement toward increased sharing among scientists of their data, their materials, their computer code, their papers, and their peer reviews. The ultimate goal of this movement is to boost collaborative progress and bring greater transparency. Scientists might more rapidly build on results of others and help each other spot errors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snakes—why did it have to be giant snakes?Snakes are beautiful and bizarre animals. Limbless vertebrates, they have been around for more than 150 million years, and occupy almost every ecological role possible, including living under the sea!
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Infrared lasers reveal unprecedented details in surface scattering of methaneWhen molecules interact with solid surfaces, a whole range of dynamic processes can take place. These are of enormous interest in the context of catalytic reactions, e.g. the conversion of natural gas into hydrogen that can then be used to generate clean electricity.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In the pipeline: A solution to a 130-year old problemWhether a fluid is flowing through household plumbing or industrial oil and gas pipelines, when it runs slowly its flow is smooth, but when it runs quickly its flow is more chaotic.
7h
Viden
VIDEO Kontrolleret flystyrt: Sådan fungerer tyngdekraftenMan kan ikke simulere vægtløshed på jorden, men når et fly dykker kraftigt, giver det samme fornemmelse.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CNIO researchers discover a potential new therapeutic strategy for pancreatic cancerIn most pancreatic cancer patients, the diagnosis is made when the disease is already advanced, and there is no effective treatment at present. There have been no significant advances to combat it in recent decades and unfortunately, its occurrence is on the increase. Now, a group of researchers from the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) may have found a new form of attack.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research in olive varieties steps up the fight against anthracnoseA study by researchers at the University of Córdoba has identified the olive varieties most resistant to an epidemic which could ruin the year's harvest.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum chemistry solves mystery why there are these 20 amino acids in the genetic codeUsing quantum chemical methods, a team of researchers led by Dr. Matthias Granold and Professor Bernd Moosmann of the Institute of Pathobiochemistry at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz solved one of the oldest puzzles of biochemistry. They uncovered why there are 20 amino acids that form the basis of all life today, even though the first 13 amino acids generated over time would have been suffic
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Friction found where there should be none: In superfluids near absolute zeroPhysicists at Aalto University have discovered unexpected friction while rotating superfluid helium. Understanding the friction's provenance and implications is crucial for designing any devices that rely on superconducting quantum phenomena, such as quantum computers.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New, safe zinc oxide quantum dotsZinc oxide as a heavy metals-free substituent for commonly investigated cadium-based semiconductors is one of the most versatile systems with far-reaching perspectives. Physicochemical properties and biocompatibility of ZnO nanocrystals are strongly dependent on their interface, which is largely determined by synthetic procedures. Chemists from Warsaw have shown that ZnO nanoparticles produced by
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Ingeniøren
Eltogsaftale svækker DSB: »En betydelig risiko for togdriften,« mener kritikereNår togproducenten selv skal stå for reparation og vedligeholdelse af tog, betyder det, at DSB mister en masse ekspertise. Det er en bestræbelse på at tvinge DSB ud, mener Enhedslistens transportordfører.
7h
Feed: All Latest
Sidewalk Labs Launches Coord, a City-Planning PlatformThe Alphabet company is the latest to offer an "operating system" for the age of urban mobility.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ninety-six scientists co-author paper on rainforest mammalsImagine your hometown or city's entire population had to live on just one tenth of the land it used to—essentials like food and shelter would quickly go scarce, and it'd be just about impossible for the populace to sustain itself. This, in broad strokes, is what's happening to the flora and fauna of the Atlantic Forest, the second most biodiverse forest system in South America (after the Amazon).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How astronomers can leverage fiber nets and listen to deep spaceFor the first time, researchers have demonstrated that a stable frequency reference can be reliably transmitted more than 300 kilometers over a standard fiber optic telecommunications network and used to synchronize two radio telescopes. Stable frequency references, which are used to calibrate clocks and instruments that make ultraprecise measurements, are usually only accessible at facilities tha
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How black holes shape the cosmosAstrophysicists have gained new insights into the formation and evolution of galaxies. They calculated how black holes influence the distribution of dark matter, how heavy elements are produced and distributed throughout the cosmos, and where magnetic fields originate. This was possible by developing and programming a new simulation model for the universe, which created the most extensive simulati
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New magnet-based drug delivery system shows promise for cancer treatmentA team of researchers has developed a non-invasive method of delivering drugs directly to cancerous tissue using magnetic forces, a form of treatment that could significantly reduce the toxic side effects of chemotherapy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Magnesium makes chromosomesJapanese researchers report a new ion detector, MARIO. Using it, they show that changes in the intracellular concentration of free magnesium ions (Mg2+) is critical for the chromosome folding that must occur for cells to divide. The findings, which can be read in Current Biology, provide a new mechanism for chromosome organization.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Brave new world of robotic architecture dawningSure, there have already been 3-D printed houses. And you can pick up a Nest Thermostat with artificial intelligence at your local hardware store. But a new book co-written and co-edited by Mahesh Daas, dean of the University of Kansas School of Architecture & Design, argues that robotics can and soon will be even further integrated into the design processes at the heart of architecture.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study examines best leadership styles for entrepreneurial startupsLeadership determines a company's success and employee satisfaction. But which style of leadership is most effective for entrepreneurial startups?
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Popular Science
Your inbox can do a lot more than just organize your emailDIY There's more to email than email. Using your inbox to send and receive emails is all well and good. But you can also turn it into a toolbox for everything from social media to photo archiving.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New galaxy survey to measure the expanding universeANU will play a major role in the Taipan galaxy survey, which will for the first time measure the current expansion rate of the universe with one per cent precision.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ten-year study shows just how dry grapevines can get before they die due to droughtA ten-year study of grapevine hardiness in the face of drought has been conducted by a team led by researchers at the French National Institute for Agricultural Research. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, they report that the wine industry does not appear to be in imminent danger due to global warming, as some have suggested.
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Dana Foundation
Visit BrainFacts.orgIf you follow our blog, you’re no doubt familiar with the print and video resources we offer about the brain. In this blog, we wanted to take a moment to recognize the wonderful offerings you can find on the website of a key Brain Awareness Week partner, the Society for Neuroscience (SfN). On the newly relaunched BrainFacts.org , you can find a beginner’s guide to the brain and nervous system. Un
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New on MIT Technology Review
MIT wants to build an AI that’s as smart as a child
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The subcellular dynamics of RNA stabilizing molecule in response to inflammationA research group at Osaka University revealed the regulatory mechanism of subcellular localization of Arid5a in response to inflammation. It has been known that an inflammatory accelerator is localized in the nucleus, and an inflammatory brake is localized in the cytoplasm.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For Americans, understanding money eases old age anxietyA new household economics study from Hiroshima University suggests that financially literate people are more capable of accumulating wealth and worrying less about life in old age.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Food preservative enhances schizophrenia treatmentThe common food preservative sodium benzoate improves symptoms in clozapine-resistant schizophrenia patients, according to a new study published in Biological Psychiatry. The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial led by Hsien-Yuan Lane, M.D., Ph.D., of China Medical University, Taiwan, showed that adding on sodium benzoate to the antipsychotic clozapine improved symptoms in patients w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Infrared lasers reveal unprecedented details in surface scattering of methaneEPFL scientists have developed a novel method to study methane/surface scattering in unprecedented detail, elucidating important aspects of natural gas catalysis for clean energy. The study is published in Physical Review Letters.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Measuring molecular interactionsETH researchers have used a new approach to discover previously unknown interactions between proteins and small metabolic molecules in bacterial cells. The technique can also be used to test the effect of medications.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ten-year-old boy helps paleontologists discover ancient fish speciesPaleontologists from the University of Alberta have discovered a never-before-seen species of fish in Colombia, with help from a young and curious tourist.
8h
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Self-Driving Cars: The Complete GuideHow a chaotic skunkworks race in the desert launched what's poised to be a runaway global industry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Generalized Hardy's paradox shows an even stronger conflict between quantum and classical physicsIn 1993, physicist Lucien Hardy proposed an experiment showing that there is a small probability (around 6-9%) of observing a particle and its antiparticle interacting with each other without annihilating—something that is impossible in classical physics. The way to explain this result is to require quantum theory to be nonlocal: that is, to allow for the existence of long-range quantum correlatio
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iPhone: The Complete History—and What's NextApple iPhones RevenueIts influence goes far beyond other phones—the infrastructure that made the iPhone also enabled drones, smart-home gadgets, wearables, and self-driving cars.
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Climate Change: The Complete GuideThe world is getting warmer, the weather is getting worse. Here's everything you need to know about what humans can do to stop wrecking the planet.
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Star Wars: The Complete WIRED GuideHow the impossible, sprawling, everlasting universe came to be.
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Bitcoin: The Complete GuideThe cryptocurrency represents amazing technological advances. Bitcoin has a way to go before it's a a true replacement for, or even adjunct to, the global financial system.
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Hyperloop: The Complete HistoryElon Musk The Boring CompanyEverything you ever wanted to know about Elon Musk's fever-dream train-in-a-tube.
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Drones: The Complete GuideEverything you need to know about the tiny flyers that are going to fill the skies, transforming entire industries for the better—and worse.
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Blockchain: The Complete GuideIt's super secure and slightly hard to understand, but the idea of creating tamper-proof databases has captured the attention of everyone from anarchist techies to staid bankers.
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Emoji: The Complete HistoryMore than just cute pictures, these digital icons are a lingua franca for the digital age.
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Artificial Intelligence: The Complete GuideSupersmart algorithms won't take all the jobs, But they are learning faster than ever, doing everything from medical diagnostics to serving up ads.
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Why Alphabet’s Sidewalk Labs Really Wants to Transform TorontoWIRED’s new columnist Susan Crawford on the risks that accompany Alphabet subsidiary Sidewalk Labs’ bid to develop Toronto’s waterfront.
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Flu Vaccines Won’t Improve Without a Massive Incentive for Big PharmaWIRED’s new columnist Maryn McKenna on why this year’s flu season is so bad—and why we need to do more about it.
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Bitcoin, Blockchain, and the Trouble with ICOsWIRED’s new columnist Joi Ito on the many things that could go wrong with cryptocurrencies.
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The Era of Data Without Borders Is Under ThreatWIRED’s new columnist Antonio García Martínez on the battle between global cloud services and national borders.
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Futurity.org
Body clock problems come before other Alzheimer’s symptomsCircadian rhythm disruptions common to Alzheimer’s disease occur before memory loss and other symptoms in people whose memories are intact but whose brain scans show early, preclinical evidence of the condition, according to new research. “…these disruptions in circadian rhythms may serve as a biomarker for preclinical disease…” The findings, reported in JAMA Neurology , potentially could help do
8h
Viden
VIDEO På Mars koger dit blodSe hvad der vil ske med dit blod, hvis du smider rumdragten på Mars.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Self-assembled 'hairy' nanoparticles could give a double punch to cancer'Hairy' nanoparticles made with light-sensitive materials that assemble themselves could one day become 'nano-carriers' providing doctors a new way to simultaneously introduce both therapeutic drugs and cancer-fighting heat into tumors. That's one potential application for a new technology that combines water-repelling yet light-sensitive and water-absorbing materials into polymeric nano-reactors
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Magnesium makes chromosomesJapanese researchers report a new ion detector, MARIO. Using it, they show that changes in the intracellular concentration of free magnesium ions (Mg2+) is critical for the chromosome folding that must occur for cells to divide. The findings, which can be read in Current Biology, provide a new mechanism for chromosome organization.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Risk of suicide among hospitalized patients with depression decreases by half in FinlandThe risk of death by suicide among patients with depression who have undergone psychiatric inpatient treatment has significantly decreased since 1991, according a large Finnish study. The study shows for the first time that it is possible for the suicide mortality to decline markedly at the population level.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Islands' of cell membrane componentsResearch conducted by Toyohashi University of Technology in collaboration with Tohoku University elucidated the fusion process of proteoliposomes with an artificial lipid bilayer and the mechanism behind this process. In addition, it was also discovered that the domains composed of all cell membrane components exist as 'islands' that were isolated from the artificial membrane. These findings will
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum 'hack' to unleash computing powerThe building blocks of quantum computers -- qubits -- are highly unstable and prone to error. Building tolerance to such error is a major hurdle in scaling up practical quantum computers. Now University of Sydney physicists have found that modifying qubit surface codes can improve quantum error correction by up to 400 percent.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists reveal the evolutionary history of the angiosperm flora of ChinaThe research team led by Dr. CHEN Zhiduan from the Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), in collaboration with other researchers have investigated the spatial and temporal divergence patterns of 92 percent of the angiosperm flora in China.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In the pipeline: A solution to a 130-year-old problemA twist on a textbook physics experiment sheds light on a complex phenomenon in fluid dynamics.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pandemic risk: How large are the expected losses?Greater investment is needed to prepare against pandemics -- the worldwide spread of an infectious disease. A study published in the Bulletin of the World Health Organization shows the expected annual count of pandemic-related deaths is 700,000, and expected annual losses from pandemic risk is $500 billion. The paper applied a theoretical model to calculate the expected number of deaths and econom
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gene enhancers are important despite apparent redundancyScientists answered a long-standing question about the role of enhancers. And by better linking the genomic complement of an organism with its expressed characteristics, their work offers new insights that further the growing field of systems biology, which seeks to gain a predictive understanding of living systems.
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How Dockless Bikes From Mobike and Ofo Could Fix America’s CitiesWIRED’s new columnist Felix Salmon on broken cities, Chinese dockless bikes, and a new golden age of urbanism.
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Welcome to WIRED IdeasIntroducing a brand-new section dedicated to intellectual exploration, provocative writing, and a whole lot of mind grenades.
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Editors' Letter: The Next 25 Years of WIRED Start TodayWe're launching a paywall to ensure we can keep publishing great journalism well into the future.
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Mobility Companies Now Have 10 Commandments for Fixing CitiesA collection of 15 mobility tech companies, like Uber and Zipcar, have signed up to a plan to make cities nicer places to live, with fewer private cars.
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Streaming Hasn’t Changed TV Conversation, It’s Killed ItStreaming services and social media have capsized not just how we watch TV, but how we discuss it.
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The Shrinking Building in *Ant-Man and the Wasp* Would Cause Massive ProblemsDoes Ant-Man’s shrink ray let objects keep their mass as they get tiny?
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The Scientist RSS
Operation Monkey RescueMeet the people trying to save a research colony of rhesus macaques living on a small island off the coast of hurricane ravaged Puerto Rico.
8h
The Scientist RSS
Coral Sperm BankerMary Hagedorn is racing to save Earth's coral reefs by developing techniques for freezing the colonial animals' gametes.
8h
Futurity.org
Obesity-related health spending varies by stateHealth care spending on obesity-related illnesses in the United States rose by almost 30 percent between 2001 and 2015, researchers report. “We have, for the first time, estimated the percentage of health care spending that is devoted to obesity, using microdata for each state,” says coauthor John Cawley of Cornell University’s College of Human Ecology, who worked with Adam Biener of the Agency f
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Futurity.org
Tweaking mosquito genes may stop spread of dengueResearchers have discovered a link between genetic molecules in mosquitos and dengue fever. The researchers focused their efforts on a single species of mosquito, Aedes aegypti , a key player in the spread of such diseases in animals and humans around the world. The results could lead to breakthroughs in fighting destructive tropical diseases like dengue fever, Zika virus, and yellow fever, a new
8h
New on MIT Technology Review
People are spending less time on Facebook—and Zuck says that’s okay
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Dagens Medicin
Danske Patienter vil inddrages i ministerens tilsynsinitiativerSundhedsministeren fremlagde i går otte initiativer i forhold til justere tilsynet med læger. Danske Patienter vil være med i procesarbejdet.
8h
Ingeniøren
DSB var advaret: 13. september knækkede en aksel på ME 1532Allerede i september oplevede DSB problemer med ME-togenes aksler. Fordi lokomotivet ikke kunne køres på værksted, var DSB to måneder om at finde ud af, at der var tale om et udmattelsesbrud.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technique can capture images of ultrafast energy-time entangled photon pairsScientists at the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo have captured the first images of ultrafast photons that are energy-time entangled. The new technique will have direct applications for quantum cryptography and communication protocols, including the possibility for establishing highly secure communication channels over long distances.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Computer models reveal best way to kill deadly bacteriaIn a new study, USC Viterbi School of Engineering professors used computer-based models to identify mechanisms or 'strategies' used by bacterial spores to evade attack from extreme temperatures, chemicals and radiation. Using complex mathematical techniques to examine spores at the molecular level, the team also determined the optimal conditions for killing harmful bacteria.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A squid graveyard and a deep-sea buffetA recent paper describes an unusual discovery: dead squid littered across the deep sea bottom of the Gulf of California. It's a squid graveyard that might be a boon for deep-sea animals.
9h
Dagens Medicin
Hovedstaden stopper støtten til sammenslutning af kræftafdelingerDen fælles sammenslutning af kræftafdelinger (SKA) mellem Region Hovedstaden og Sjælland ophører, da Hovedstaden dropper støtten SKA. Sjælland viderefører funktionen.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bottled water sales fueled by desire for immortalityA fear of dying plays a role in people buying bottled water, even though they know it may not be good for them or the planet, a study from the University of Waterloo has found.The study suggests that most bottled-water advertising campaigns target a deep psychological vulnerability in humans, compelling them to buy and consume particular products. Bottled water ads specifically trigger our one-mos
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Internet of Things is now wearableThanks to a West Australian innovation, Australia is getting its first payment ring.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genetically modified produce—misunderstood wondersFrom disease and drought-resistant crops to nutrient-boosted fruits and veggies, genetically modified (GM) plants are a marvel of modern science.
9h
Dagens Medicin
Ny retningslinje anbefaler aggressiv behandling af hjernemetastaserSundhedsstyrelsen opdaterer retningslinjer på basis af ny viden, der tyder på, at aggressiv behandling kan øge levetid og livskvalitet. Evidensen er dog fortsat lav.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Are seismic surveys driving penguins from their feeding grounds?Whales, dolphins, squid and fish are among the many marine species that rely on underwater sounds for everything from foraging to communication. By listening to what's happening in the water around them they able to orientate themselves, locate prey, avoid predators or even select a mate.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study suggests hydroelectric dams causing greater impact on Amazon basin than thoughtA team of researchers from the U.S. and multiple countries in South America has found that hydroelectric dams built in the Amazon river basin, which were built to meet the growing electricity demands in the region, are making more of an impact on the natural geography than previously thought. In their paper published on the open access site Science Advances, the group describes using data from sat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smart cities need to be more human, so we're creating Sims-style virtual worldsHuge quantities of networked sensors have appeared in cities across the world in recent years. These include cameras and sensors that count the number of passers by, devices to sense air quality, traffic flow detectors, and even bee hive monitors. There are also large amounts of information about how people use cities on social media services such as Twitter and foursquare.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel computational biology model accurately describes dynamics of gene expressionUsing a simple analytical framework for random events within a predictable system, computational biologists have found a new way to accurately model certain forms of gene expression, including the body's 24-hour internal clock. This new approach of applying a piecewise deterministic Markov process (PDMP) to gene expression could inform possible design principles for synthetic biologists.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
Universities Should Encourage Scientists to Speak Out about Public IssuesWhen universities discourage scientists from speaking out, society suffers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Arctic lakes are releasing relatively young carbon, study discoversWhen Arctic permafrost soil thaws, greenhouse gases are released into the atmosphere, but most of the carbon currently escaping from lakes in northern Alaska is relatively young, according to a new study led by researchers at the University of California, Irvine.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How fungi make nutrients available to the worldLike most of us, trees don't want to be eaten alive.
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Ingeniøren
Kronik: Ny Limfjordstunnel skal ligge tæt ved den gamle
9h
Popular Science
Hookworms: the most common travel health risk no one warns Americans aboutHealth Even though the parasites were widespread in the U.S. not too long ago. No one wants worms in their feet. But unfortunately, hookworms don’t respect personal boundaries.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Strava storm: why everyone should check their smart gear security settings before going for a jogFitness tracking app Strava recently kicked off a privacy and security storm after it was revealed that its software had potentially exposed the location of secret military bases, courtesy of a data visualisation tool called a "heatmap".
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Diesel monkey tests: can harmful corporate research ever be justified?The recent allegations that researchers funded by the German car industry tested the effects of diesel fumes on humans and monkeys has raised serious questions about research ethics in the corporate world.
9h
The Atlantic
What Amazon Does to Poor CitiesSAN BERNARDINO, Calif.—This community was still reeling from the recession in 2012 when it got a piece of what seemed like good news. Amazon, the global internet retailer, was opening a massive 950,000-square-foot distribution center, one of its first in California, and hiring more than 1,000 people here.“This opportunity is a rare and wonderful thing,” San Bernardino Mayor Pat Morris told a loca
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The Atlantic
'Humorless Politicians Are the Most Dangerous'The Scottish-born television and film director Armando Iannucci is best known in the U.K. for the acclaimed BBC series The Thick of It , a farce set in the upper echelons of British government. Its success inspired his HBO series, Veep , which uses a similar approach—foulmouthed, cringe-inducing, relentlessly funny—to skewer Washington. For his new film, The Death of Stalin , Iannucci turns his a
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Science | The Guardian
Philosophy of science isn't pointless chin-stroking – it makes us better scientistsUnderstanding causal inference, one aspect of philosophy of science, is key to making our research reliable … the worst part of philosophy is the philosophy of science; the only people, as far as I can tell, that read work by philosophers of science are other philosophers of science.” This is the view of Arizona State University physicist Lawrence Krauss , author of the 2012 book A Universe from
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Mobile NanotweezersMagnetically-driven nanobots could be used to manipulate microscopic objects, including bacteria and fluorescent nanodiamonds.
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Futurity.org
Drugs before and after melanoma surgery improve survivalA new approach to treatment for certain melanoma patients may lead to better results after surgery, a new study suggests. “…58% of [patients] had a complete pathologic response. That means that when their tumor was removed it had no viable cancer cells in it…” The study compared two treatment approaches for high-risk melanoma patients with a BRAF gene mutation in their cancer: standard care, whic
9h
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OpenGov Report Shows What Congress Does With Your Phone CallsA new report from OpenGov reveals what happens to your phone calls, emails, and letters to Congress—and how they can break through the noise.
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It's Time For a Serious Talk About the Science of Tech "Addiction"If the food you eat changes your health, so does your technological diet. Here's what researchers of digital health need to learn from the study of nutrition.
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The Uber-Waymo Robocar Trial: Everything You Need to KnowAnd why you should pay attention to this tech showdown, no matter who you are.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists reveal double life of sunflower enzymeScientists have explained how a protein-cutting enzyme can join the ends of proteins together, creating protein circles; a finding with immediate applications in producing therapeutic drug treatments that is published in a study in the open access journal eLife.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Does Titan's hydrocarbon soup hold a recipe for life?NASA researchers have confirmed the existence in Titan's atmosphere of vinyl cyanide, which is an organic compound that could potentially provide the cellular membranes for microbial life to form in Titan's vast methane oceans. If true, it could prove to us that life can flourish without the ubiquitous H2O.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Measuring molecular interactionsETH Zurich researchers have used a new approach to discover previously unknown interactions between proteins and small metabolic molecules in bacterial cells. The technique can also be used to test the effect of medications.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electrochemistry flushes out antibiotic-resistant proteinsEPFL scientists, working in association with Valais Hospital in Sion and Fudan University in Shanghai, have developed a method for analyzing bacteria that – for the first time ever – lets doctors quickly see exactly which proteins are associated with antibiotic resistance.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoparticle study produces clearer understanding of kidney functionNew research findings from The University of Texas at Dallas unveil how kidneys filter ultra-small engineered particles, which may lead to new ways of developing targeted therapy for the detection and treatment of kidney diseases and cancers.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cell skeleton and the brush borderThe epithelial cells lining organs like the intestines and kidneys build a special surface called the "brush border," which consists of a dense array of finger-like protrusions.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Coral reefs in hot water as warming events slow recoveryAs the world's oceans heat up with climate change, coral reefs are increasingly under threat. Bleaching events—defense mechanisms against high temperatures that turn corals white—have become more frequent.
10h
Ingeniøren
Ørsteds første Renescience-anlæg forsinketØrsted første kommercielle udgave af affaldsbehandlingsanlægget Renescience i Northwitch i Storbritannien skulle have været i drift i 2017, men forventes først klar i først halvdel af 2018.
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Science | The Guardian
So killer whales can talk. Welcome to a brave new world of cross-species chat | Jules HowardWikie the orca is more mimic than raconteur, but the potential is awesome. Imagine dolphins tackling politicians on pollution A bridge in cultures has occurred. A cognitive chasm between intelligent creatures has been crossed. Of all the spectacular times for you to be alive, you happen to have been born in an age when killer whales started talking to the damn dirty apes who were willing to listen
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Science | The Guardian
Why is the flu so bad this year? - Science Weekly podcastHannah Devlin explores why 2018 is such a bumper year for seasonal flu and asks how scientists are trying to fight back Subscribe & Review on iTunes , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter Last week, Public Health England announced that this winter three times as many people have died from flu compared to the previous year. Australia saw a dou
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Self-assembled 'hairy' nanoparticles could give a double punch to cancer"Hairy" nanoparticles made with light-sensitive materials that assemble themselves could one day become "nano-carriers" providing doctors a new way to simultaneously introduce both therapeutic drugs and cancer-fighting heat into tumors. That's one potential application for a new technology that combines water-repelling yet light-sensitive and water-absorbing materials into polymeric nano-reactors
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop 'bionic leaf' for distributed agricultureAs the global population rises toward 10 billion, the planet is headed for a food shortage, with some estimates saying supply will have to double by 2050 to meet demand.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Got starch? There's bacteria in your gut for thatSoft foods like white bread and rice might seem like an easy thing for your body to digest, but a tiny organism in your gut is actually responsible for chowing down some types of starch and turning it into nutrients your body can use.
10h
Live Science
New 'Slasher' Wasp Comes Equipped with Its Own Body SawThis parasitic wasp inflicts horrors on its hosts.
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Live Science
Earthquake Watch: California Is Overdue for a 'Big One'California has a 93 percent chance of a magnitude-7 or greater earthquake occurring by 2045. Early warning systems, now in development, could limit casualties and damage.
10h
Live Science
Here's What You'd Look Like As Just a Nervous SystemThis medical cadaver sure had a lot of nerve.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
3-D printing of living cellsUsing a new technique they call "in-air microfluidics," University of Twente scientists succeed in printing 3-D structures with living cells. This special technique enable the fast and 'on-the-fly' production of micro building blocks that are viable and can be used for repairing damaged tissue, for example. The work is presented in Science Advances.
10h
The Guardian's Science Weekly
Why is the flu so bad this year? - Science Weekly podcastHannah Devlin explores why 2018 is such a bumper year for seasonal flu and asks how scientists are trying to fight back
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Science | The Guardian
Cultural taboos around food are powerful – could vegans change ours?As campaigns such as Veganuary become more popular could the way westerners categorise what’s edible start to shift? Yesterday marked the end of “Veganuary”, the campaign to encourage people to try a vegan lifestyle for a month. Year on year the trend has grown. Might those one-month vegans change the habits of the rest of us - by changing what an animal is? Vegans shun all animal-derived product
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Science | The Guardian
I was a video game sceptic, but now I'm a fanAfter spending most of her life bouncing off video games, Jessica Furseth finally discovers the joy and practical benefits of play ‘Luke, how do I get this power moon? Luke!” I’m playing Super Mario Odyssey while my partner, Luke, is trying to work. “You’ll figure it out,” he says patiently. Luke has been playing video games since he was a child, but this is my first ever game, and he’s thrilled
10h
The Atlantic
Could Self-Driving Trucks Be Good for Truckers?The outlook for trucking jobs has been grim of late. Self-driving trucks, several reports and basic logic have suggested, are going to wipe out truckers. Trucking is going to be the next great automation bloodbath. But a counter-narrative is emerging: No, skeptics in the industry, government, academia are saying, trucking jobs will not be endangered by autonomous driving, and in the brightest sce
10h
The Atlantic
Why NFL Ratings Are Plummeting: A Two-Part TheoryEvery year, the story of the Super Bowl is partly a story of its gargantuan audience. Of the 20 most-watched TV broadcasts in U.S. history , 19 are Super Bowls. (The other one is the series finale of M*A*S*H .) But this superlative legacy is in tension with an equal and opposite force: the steady collapse in NFL viewership. The size of the league’s average per-game audience has declined by about
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Winter Olympic Cyberattacks Have Already Started—And May Not Be OverTwo state-sponsored hacking operations are plaguing Pyeongchang, with murky motivations and no clear endgame.
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How Amazon Rebuilt Itself Around Artificial IntelligenceThe Alexa voice platform and other deep learning projects have made Amazon an AI leader.
10h
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Self-Driving Cars Have a Secret Weapon: Remote ControlAutonomous vehicles will drive themselves. Until the world around them gets weird and they freeze up. Then friendly, overlord humans will step in.
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Feed: All Latest
Addicted to your Smartphone? This Formula is WhyFacebook Users PeopleTen years ago, a Stanford lab created the formula to make technology addictive. Now, Silicon Valley is dealing with the consequences.
10h
Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsministeriet søger direktør til ny patientklagestyrelseJagten på en direktør til den nyoprettede Styrelsen for Patientklager og Erstatning er gået i gang. Ministeriet søger en person, som bl.a. kan bidrage til at skabe et lærende sundhedsvæsen.
10h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Cryonics: Your body preserved for future revival?Arizona-based company Alcor offers cryonic preservation in the hope of reviving you in the future.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What is CRISPR gene editing, and how does it work?You've probably read stories about new research using the gene editing technique CRISPR, also called CRISPR/Cas9. The scientific world is captivated by this revolutionary technology, since it is easier, cheaper and more efficient than previous strategies for modifying DNA.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gene enhancers important despite apparent redundancyEvery cell in the body has the same DNA and genes, so a cell's properties and functions are determined by which genes are turned on. That's why it is critical to understand enhancers, short sections of non-coding DNA that regulate the expression of specific genes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Precisely tailoring the dynamics of upconversion luminescenceA team of researchers led by Professors Hong Zhang (photonic nanochemistry) and Evert Jan Meijer (computational chemistry) of the University of Amsterdam's Van 't Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences has significantly improved the fundamental understanding of photon upconversion in nanoparticles. Through the collaborative approach of advanced spectroscopy and theoretical modelling they were able
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What time is it? The Arctic charr's inner clock meets the midnight sunBelow ice and snow, in pitch dark, Arctic charr's circadian clock still ticks with precision. The exception comes during the darkest and brightest weeks of the year, when daily activity rhythms break down.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Mount Sharp 'photobombs' Mars Curiosity roverA new self-portrait of NASA's Curiosity Mars rover shows the vehicle on Vera Rubin Ridge, which it has been investigating for the past several months. Directly behind the rover is the start of a clay-rich slope scientists are eager to begin exploring. In coming weeks, Curiosity will begin to climb this slope. In the image, north is on the left and west is on the right, with Gale Crater's rim on th
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
A Completely Preventable Public Health CrisisAn outbreak of diphtheria in a Rohingya refugee camp in Bangladesh makes it clear that these people were living in substandard conditions before they fled Myanmar -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Instead of Filling Cavities, Dentists May Soon Regenerate TeethResearchers recently discovered certain drugs, including one developed to treat Alzheimer’s, stimulate innate self-repair mechanisms -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fragmented habitats will lead to loss of insect species diversity in the near futureTogether with their colleagues from the Senckenberg Nature Research Society, scientists of the Technical University of Munich (TUM) were able to show that widespread insects are threatened with a serious decline in species diversity in the near future. The research team lists the fragmentation of habitats and the intensification of agriculture as reasons for the decline of these insect generalists
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Trust is good, quantum trickery is betterAn international team of scientists has proven, for the first time, the security of so-called device-independent quantum cryptography in a regime that is attainable with state-of-the-art quantum technology, thus paving the way to practical realization of such schemes in which users don't have to worry whether their devices can be trusted or not.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
ATLAS Experiment studies the dynamics of very high-momentum top quarksThe top quark, the heaviest known fundamental particle, plays a unique role in high-energy physics. Studies of its properties have opened new opportunities for furthering our knowledge of the Standard Model. In a new paper submitted to Physical Review D, the ATLAS collaboration at CERN presents a comprehensive measurement of high-momentum top-quark pair production at 13 TeV.
11h
Ingeniøren
Miljøminister vil vente: Måske penge til Grindsted-forurening næste årLokal- og folketingspolitikere kræver handling og større pengepose for at rydde op efter giftdepoterne i Grindsted, men Esben Lunde Larsen udskyder spørgsmålet til 2019.
11h
The Atlantic
Michael Wolff and the Smearing of Nikki Haley“She had become a particular focus of Trump’s attention, and he of hers. … The president had been spending a notable amount of private time with Haley on Air Force One, and was seen to be grooming her for a national political future.” That was the writer Michael Wolff, in his dubiously sourced but indubitably bestselling book Fire and Fury , commenting on the working relationship between the Unit
11h
The Atlantic
Infrastructure Week Is Always Next WeekPresident Trump devoted about 200 words of the more than 5,000 he uttered on Tuesday night to calling for a $1.5 trillion package “to permanently fix our infrastructure deficit.” But lawmakers itching to see the administration’s long-awaited plan for rebuilding the nation’s roads, bridges, railways, and waterways—and more importantly, how to pay for it—will have to wait. Again. Summoning his own
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
News about Tabby's star, the most mysterious star of 2017KIC 8462852, or "Tabby's Star," named after Tabetha Boyajian, the researcher at Louisiana State University (USA) who is leading its study, is a medium sized star, some 50 percent bigger than the sun, and 1,000 degrees hotter, at a distance of around 1000 light years. However, its brightness rises and falls sporadically, without explanation. Many theories have been proposed to explain the unusual l
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers find one of the first stars formed in the Milky WayResearchers at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) have identified a star that is a key to the formation of the first chemical elements in the galaxy. The results of this research are published today in The Astrophysical Journal.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Emission from the centre of a galaxy has a serpentine shapeAn international group of scientists led by members of the National Instituto of Astrophysics (Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino (INAF-OATo) has discovered a peculiar spiral-shaped blazar jet with many twists. The results of these observations are published today in Nature magazine.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Galaxies that feed on other galaxiesAn international team of astronomers led by Giuseppina Battaglia, researcher at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC), finds signs that the outer halo of the Milky Way contains stellar remains of massive dwarf galaxies that were devoured by our own.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study reveals human skin flakes lead to bad smell in air-conditioning systemsSkin squames (cells that peel off from the skin surface) are a source of food for the bacteria found in air-cooling units, which produce odours even in a dust-free air-conditioning system, a study by Hong Kong Baptist University scholars revealed. This research is the first to show that the accumulation and bacterial degradation of skin squames in air-cooling units is positively correlated to the
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bacteria produce gold by digesting toxic metalsHigh concentrations of heavy metals, like copper and gold, are toxic for most living creatures. This is not the case for the bacterium C. metallidurans, which has found a way to extract valuable trace elements from a compound of heavy metals without poisoning itself. One interesting side-effect: the formation of tiny gold nuggets. A team of researchers from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenber
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Improving the sensitivity for ionic solutes analysisResearchers from Kumamoto University in Japan have developed a new method to improve the sensitivity of analytical systems for ionic solutes, such as water from rivers and lakes, or even tap water. Clean water is important for community health, and impurity analysis can is conducted via sensitive equipment such as mass spectrometers. However, these devices can be prohibitively expensive for low-in
12h
Ingeniøren
Politikerne er klar: Danmark skal have 150 nye eltogTogproducenten skal ikke blot levere togene, men også stå for at vedligeholde dem, så det ikke ender med endnu en IC4-skandale.
12h
Dagens Medicin
Ny bog vil have læger til at tale mere om sex med deres patienterLæger skal være bedre til at tale med patienter om deres sexliv, for ofte har det en kæmpe betydning for patientens trivsel. Sådan lyder opfordringen fra psykolog Karina Kehlet Lins i den nye bog »Samtalen om sex«.
12h
Viden
Sådan rejser vi milliarder af kilometer ud i rummetRumfartøjer får bl.a. fart på ved at stjæle kræfter fra planeter. Og de finder vej ved hjælp af stjernerne.
12h
Dagens Medicin
Personlig medicin må ikke udsulte strukturel forebyggelseDen store opmærksomhed på personlig medicin må ikke fjerne fokus fra strukturel forebyggelse, der kan forebygge mere sygdom for færre penge.
12h
Ingeniøren
Krebse-overvågning: Brexit giver DTU ny opgaveI forvejen overvåger og rådgiver DTU EU-Kommissionen om fiskesygdomme. Nu udvides opgaven med krebsdyr. DTU håber, det medfører flere forskningsmidler og adgang til et nyt stort marked på verdensplan.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New focus on where heart disease and breast cancer treatment meetThe American Heart Association has released the first scientific statement about heart disease and breast cancer, calling for more research and collaboration between the fields of oncology and cardiology to treat and prevent both diseases.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Geese reduce metabolic rate to cope with winterNew research shows that geese cope with the harsh winter climate by reducing their heart rate and body temperature.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breast cancer treatments may increase the risk of heart diseaseSome breast cancer therapies can damage the heart and healthcare providers should carefully monitor breast cancer treatment effects on the heart. Breast cancer survivors, especially older women, are more likely to die from cardiovascular diseases such as heart failure rather than breast cancer.
12h
NYT > Science
The Next Big Volcano Could Briefly Cool Earth. NASA Wants to Be Ready.By studying the natural effects of a large volcanic eruption, scientists could learn about how we might deliberately cool the planet in the future.
12h
NYT > Science
Take a Number: The Smiling Axolotl Hides a Secret: A Giant GenomeThe Mexican salamander has largest genome ever sequenced, which may account for its unique regenerative abilities.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nokia widens losses in 2017Nokia said Thursday that its net loss widened in 2017, but that underlying profits improved, enabling the Finnish mobile phone maker to raise its forecasts for the coming years as operators prepare to roll out new lightning-fast 5G technology.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Profitable Daimler expects heavy spending on new techGerman automaker Daimler made lots of money last year. That's a good thing, because the company says it will need to spend heavily this year to keep up with the technological change expected to disrupt the car industry.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Structural insight into the molecular mechanism of PET degradationA KAIST metabolic engineering research team has found a molecular mechanism showing superior degradability of polyethylene terephthalate (PET). This is the first report to determine the 3-D crystal structure of Ideonella sakaiensis PETase and develop the new variant with enhanced PET degradation.
12h
Ingeniøren
Spionagefrygt: Teleselskaber i USA stopper salg af Huawei-mobilerAmerikanske myndigheder presser teleselskaberne for at droppe kinesiske mobil-leverandører.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Geese reduce metabolic rate to cope with winterNew research shows that geese cope with the harsh winter climate by reducing their heart rate and body temperature.
12h
Dagens Medicin
Marco Donia bliver ny formand for fagudvalg for modermærkekræft
13h
Viden
Se billederne: Rød supermåne kastede magisk skær over jordenI Danmark dækkede skyerne for den røde supermåne - rundt om i verden var man mere heldige.
13h
Ingeniøren
Her bygger BMW fremtidens elbilerBMW går efter at have en halv million elbiler på vejene i 2019. Kom med til Tyskland og se, hvordan de forbereder sig på fremtiden.
13h
Ingeniøren
Sådan forbereder BMW sig på elbil-revolutionenBMW går efter at have en halv million elbiler på vejene i 2019. Kom med til Tyskland og se, hvordan de forbereder sig på fremtiden.
13h
Ingeniøren
Disse virksomheder har flest ledige job lige nuPå månedens liste over de mest kandidatsøgende virksomheder er der nye navne at finde. Tjek listen og find ud af, om dit drømmefirma søger netop dig.
13h
Viden
International undersøgelse understreger, hvor farligt laserlys er for synet111 tilfælde af øjenskader fra laserpenne støtter danske øjenlægers advarsler.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SpaceX blasts off Luxembourg government satelliteSpaceX Elon MuskSpaceX on Wednesday blasted off a four-ton secure military communications satellite called GovSat-1, a partnership between the government of Luxembourg and the satellite operator SES.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
White House seeking to slash renewable energy research: reportThe Trump administration will ask Congress to cut funding for clean energy and energy efficiency programs by 72 percent in this year's budget, according to a report in the Washington Post, underscoring its preference for fossil fuels.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nepal losing out to China as Everest operators cross mountainPoor regulation and overcrowding are pushing Everest climbers away from Nepal to China, which is investing millions to boost a rival path to the top of the world.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microsoft reports loss due to tax chargeMicrosoft on Wednesday reported a hefty loss in the past quarter, as it set aside billions of dollars for taxes on profits it expects to bring back to the United States following passage of a major tax overhaul.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple challenged to show iPhone star shinesiPhone X Apple RevenueWith Apple set to report quarterly results Thursday investors and others are cautiously watching to see whether its newest iPhone will help fuel momentum for the world's most valuable company.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook booming even as time spent on it dropsFacebook Users PeopleFacebook on Wednesday reported a big jump in profits even though people are spending less time on the world's biggest social network.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russia launches 11 space satellites 'without glitch'Russia on Thursday successfully launched 11 satellites from its Vostochny cosmodrome, in the third rocket liftoff from the new spaceport, the space agency said.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lava spreads more than two miles from Philippine volcanoLava flowing out a Philippine volcano has spread up to 3.6 kilometers (2.2 miles) since it began intense eruptions more than two weeks ago.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UAE cyber firm DarkMatter slowly steps out of the shadowsDarkMatter, a growing cybersecurity company in the United Arab Emirates that's recruited Western intelligence analysts, is stepping out of the shadows amid concerns by activists about its power and potential targets.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
California gauges snowpack amid dry winterAmid record-setting heat in the state's south, California's water managers will measure the Sierra Nevada snowpack, which supplies water to millions.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rare ichthyosaur is only second known exampleA rare 200 million-year-old ichthyosaur specimen has been discovered in a private collection 22 years after it was originally found.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Slow but steady: New study sheds light on the brain evolution of turtlesA new study led by the University of Birmingham shows that the brain of turtles has evolved slowly, but constantly over the last 210 million years, eventually reaching a variety in form and complexity, which rivals that of other animal groups.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rare ichthyosaur is only second known exampleA rare 200 million-year-old ichthyosaur specimen has been discovered in a private collection 22 years after it was originally found.The fossil is only the second example of Wahlisaurus massarae, a new species of ichthyosaur discovered by The University of Manchester palaeontologist, Dean Lomax. This fossil was originally found in 1996 and has now been donated to a museum.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Findings may help scientists understand how much carbon dioxide can be released while still limiting global warmingAs more carbon dioxide enters the atmosphere, the global ocean soaks up much of the excess, storing roughly 30 percent of the carbon dioxide emissions coming from human activities.
15h
Science | The Guardian
Wonders of the Moon review – a timely celebration of all things lunarThis week’s extravaganza is a nice excuse for a documentary that takes in Apollo 12 astronauts, coral having sex and Pink Floyd The supermoon? Yes, I know this, and why it’s in the news. Now that it seems the president of the United States will be visiting us after all , in October, a supermoon will be our welcome. Protesters will line the street and, when the motorcade passes, they will bow, faci
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New method efficiently generates hydrogen from waterWashington State University researchers have found a way to more efficiently generate hydrogen from water—an important key to making clean energy more viable.
15h
Science | The Guardian
Natural painkiller nasal spray could replace addictive opioids, trial indicatesRisk of overdose could be far lower, say researchers, as fundraising for human clinical trials begins A nasal spray that delivers a natural painkiller to the brain could transform the lives of patients by replacing the dangerous and addictive prescription opioids that have wreaked havoc in the US and claimed the lives of thousands of people. Scientists at University College London found they coul
16h
Science | The Guardian
1,300-year-old Anglo-Saxon cross presented to Cambridge museumGarnet and gold cross discovered in 2011 on the body of a teenage girl buried lying in her own bed A beautiful gold and garnet cross, found on the breast of a teenage girl buried lying on her own bed about 1,300 years ago, has been presented to the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology in Cambridge . The girl’s grave was found in 2011 by University of Cambridge archaeologists only a few miles fr
16h
Ingeniøren
Styrelse politianmelder administrator efter misbrug af undervisnings-idStyrelsen for It og Læring vil nu bolstre sikkerhed med NemID.
16h
Viden
Eksperter til Zuckerberg: Træk børne-app tilbageFacebooks app Messenger Kids er med til at skade børns mentale helbred, mener forskere.
16h
The Scientist RSS
An Enduring PartnershipHumanity would be nothing without plants. It's high time we recognize their crucial role in sustaining life on Earth.
16h
The Scientist RSS
Caught on CameraSelected images of the Day from the-scientist.com
16h
The Scientist RSS
Researchers Cryopreserve Coral SpermA project aims to preserve samples of the climate change-vulnerable animals for future restoration.
16h
The Scientist RSS
Researchers Catalog Earths MicrobiomeThe new database includes data from 27,000 samples collected in sites ranging from Alaskan permafrost to the ocean floor.
16h
The Scientist RSS
Scientists Unite to Save Monkey Island After Hurricane MariaPuerto Rico's Cayo Santiago has hosted decades of research in cognition, primatology, immunization, and other areas.
16h
The Scientist RSS
Graduate Student Identifies Dozens of New Fly SpeciesOver the past seven years, Xiao-Long Lin has characterized nearly 70 new species of nonbiting midges and developed DNA barcodes to aid in future ecological surveys.
16h
The Scientist RSS
Detecting Protein ClumpsA synthetic genetic tool called yTRAP allows high-throughput detection of protein aggregates in cells.
16h
The Scientist RSS
Plant Cell Walls Can Control Growth in the DarkTo maintain an energy-saving growth strategy in the absence of light, seedlings need signals generated by pectin in their cell walls.
16h
The Scientist RSS
War Dance of the HoneybeeOne species has developed a novel waggle to warn about invading wasps.
16h
The Scientist RSS
A Newly Identified Photoenzyme Helps Algae Pump Out FuelThe finding could lead to a new way of producing 'green' alternatives to fossil fuels.
16h
The Scientist RSS
Planting Independence: A Profile of Katayoon DeheshAfter a harrowing escape from Iran, Dehesh never shied away from difficult choices to pursue a career in plant biology.
16h
The Scientist RSS
Anjali Iyer-Pascuzzi Investigates How Pathogens Invade Plant RootsThe Purdue University researcher is one of the first to examine the molecular processes that underlie infection by soil microbes.
16h
The Scientist RSS
Virtual Reality May Revolutionize Brain ScienceNew technology could open doors for researchers studying animals' most complex organ.
16h
The Scientist RSS
Mapping Brain ProteinsResearchers are using souped-up mass spectrometry to localize proteins within brain cells.
16h
The Scientist RSS
How to Make Scientists Into Better Peer ReviewersFrom efforts to increase the transparency of the review process to initiatives offering training, there are many attempts underway to make better reviewers out of researchers.
16h
The Scientist RSS
Agricultural Technology Can Save Humanity from Starvation (Again)We are on the cusp of yet another revolution in how we feed the populace.
16h
The Scientist RSS
A Brush with Inheritance, 1878Lampbrush chromosomes, first observed in the 19th century, still offer an unparalleled glimpse into how genetic information is organized in the cell.
16h
The Scientist RSS
Next-Generation Exoskeletons Help Patients MoveA robot's gentle nudge could add just the right amount of force to improve walking for patients with mobility-impairing ailments such as Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, and stroke.
16h
The Scientist RSS
Researchers Learn from Plant Viruses to Protect CropsPlants are locked in an ancient arms race with hostile viruses, but genome editing is giving crops the upper hand.
16h
The Scientist RSS
How Manipulating the Plant Microbiome Could Improve AgricultureIt has become increasingly evident that, like animals, plants are not autonomous organisms but rather are populated by a cornucopia of diverse microorganisms.
16h
The Scientist RSS
Plants' Microbial CommunitiesLike animals, plants host communities of microbes that influence a wide variety of their biological processes.
16h
The Scientist RSS
How Viruses Attack PlantsViruses are incapable of reproducing without the help of a host, whose cells copy their genetic material and fabricate the building blocks of new virus particles.
16h
The Scientist RSS
Infographic: A Prion AssayAn approach called yeast transcriptional reporting of aggregating proteins allows for high-throughput analysis and doesn't destroy cells.
16h
The Scientist RSS
Infographic: Skotomorphogenesis Versus PhotomorphogenesisPectin fragments may signal plant cells to maintain a type of growth suited to darkness.
16h
Science-Based Medicine
Kennedy, Fisher and Bigtree: a triple dose of anti-vaccine injected into upcoming chiropractic conferenceEven as the flu rages, chiropractors will be stoking their anti-vaccination ideology at a March conference with speeches from anti-vaxx Illuminati Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., Barbara Loe Fisher and Del Bigtree.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New method could open path to hydrogen economyWashington State University researchers have found a way to more efficiently generate hydrogen from water - an important key to making clean energy more viable.Using inexpensive nickel and iron, the researchers developed a very simple, five-minute method to create large amounts of a high-quality catalyst required for the chemical reaction to split water.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Boosting a key protein to help bones that won't healA powerful protein inside the body helps naturally repair bone injuries. Increasing it in some patients could jump-start the process, a new rodent study finds.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The disappearance of common speciesTogether with their colleagues from the Senckenberg Nature Research Society, scientists of Technical University of Munich (TUM) were able to show that currently widespread insects are threatened with a serious decline in species diversity in the near future. The research team lists fragmentation of habitats and intensification of agriculture as reasons for the decline of these 'generalists.'
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists identify weight loss ripple effectUniversity of Connecticut researchers have found that when one member of a couple commits to losing weight, the chances are good their partner will lose some weight too, even if they are not actively participating in a weight loss intervention.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Whites with mental illness far more likely to report insufficient money for care, delaysWhite adults with mental illness were significantly more likely than those of other ethnicities to report having insufficient money for mental health care or facing delays in care, a Mount Sinai study found. Whites were 50 percent more likely than blacks to experience delays in care, and 20 percent more likely than blacks to lack enough money for treatments such as doctor visits and prescription d
17h
The Scientist RSS
Ten-Minute SabbaticalTake a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.
17h
The Scientist RSS
Bees Under AttackJapanese honeybees (Apis cerana japonica) respond to an attack by a Vespa mandarinia wasp.
17h
Scientific American Content: Global
Ticks on Uptick Where Big Game DeclinesAreas of Kenya without large wildlife saw tick populations rise as much as 370 percent—meaning more danger to humans. Jason G. Goldman reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Coastal water absorbing more carbon dioxideOceanographers reveal that the water over the continental shelves is shouldering a larger than expected portion of atmospheric carbon dioxide. The findings may have important implications for scientists focused on understanding how much carbon dioxide can be released into the atmosphere while still keeping warming limited.
18h
Ingeniøren
To simple tricks til at undgå stressCivilingeniør og produktivitetsekspert i giver dig to tips til at mindske stress og øge dit overskud i hverdagen. Det kommer både din karriere og dit privatliv til gode.
18h
Live Science
Greenland: Earth's Biggest IslandGreenland is the biggest island on Earth, and it's covered by a thick ice sheet. Scientists are growing extremely concerned that global warming is melting the ice too quickly.
18h
Feed: All Latest
The Freedom of the Press Foundation Is Preserving the Archives of Gawker, the Toast, and LA WeeklyThe org will rely on Archive-It, a service from the non-profit Internet Archive.
19h
Feed: All Latest
'Jackpotting' ATM Hack Comes to the United StatesThe "jackpotting" ATM attack drained tens of millions of dollars worldwide before landing in the United States.
19h
Feed: All Latest
If Robert Mueller Is Fired, the Russia Probe Could ContinueThe special counsel is under attack, but if Robert Mueller gets fired, the investigation into Trump’s Russia ties and obstruction of justice could keep going.
19h
Feed: All Latest
Can an Airplane Take Off on a Moving Runway?Where do you get a giant plane-sized treadmill that goes 100 mph? Good question. I'm going to answer a different one.
19h
Feed: All Latest
WIRED's Top Stories in January: The Diversity War Inside GoogleGoogle Assistant SearchPlus: "Meltdown" madness, a 787 breaking a speed record, and the Logan Paul-prompted YouTube reckoning.
19h
Feed: All Latest
7 True Crime Docs You Should Stream Right NowHere are a few things you can watch when you're not watching 'The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story' on FX.
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Feed: All Latest
Now That Tech Runs the World, Let's Retire the Hacker IdealHere’s a remedy amid Big Tech's failures: honest valuations, business ethics, and the application of scientific method unmolested by greed.
19h
Feed: All Latest
The EPA Website Is 'Still Updating' Climate Change InfoInternal emails show Administrator Scott Pruitt personally ordered science to be scrubbed away.
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Feed: All Latest
How to Design Beacons for Humanity's AfterlifeA time capsule meant to teach aliens about humans could consist of math, DNA, a bot, or a brain—or something else entirely.
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Feed: All Latest
A Family’s Race to Cure a Daughter’s Genetic DiseasePersonalized medicine promised a cure for rare genetic disorders. Now patients and families themselves are trying to make up for its failures.
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Feed: All Latest
Replika, the Emotional Chatbot, Goes Open-SourceSoftware developer Eugenia Kuyda is releasing the code to her Replika chatbot, which can inject emotion into conversations.
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Feed: All Latest
Uber and Lyft Might Not Be Ruining the American CityNew research affirms the relationship between ridehialing services, transit ridership, and congestion
19h
The Atlantic
The (Annotated) State of the UnionThe Pre-game Before most State of the Union addresses , including those of the past decade-plus I’ve written about here , there’s a standard suite of pre-game questions. The two usual biggest ones are: Where will the speech stand, on the laundry-list scale? That is, will it be a speech at all, or essentially a big wish-list catalog? For budget purposes and later maneuvering over policy and promin
19h
New Scientist - News
Sound waves may be able to trigger earlier tsunami warningsWhen an earthquake sets off a tsunami, it releases speedy sound waves that could give us early warning. But they still can’t predict the size of the tsunami
19h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Genetic secret of English salmonResearchers have discovered that salmon from the chalk streams of southern England are genetically unique.
20h
Science | The Guardian
Super blue blood moon seen across the globe – videoMany parts of the globe managed to catch a glimpse of the moon as a giant crimson globe, thanks to a rare lunar trifecta that combines a total eclipse with a blue moon and super moon. From Jerusalem to Melbourne, here's how it looked across the world. Continue reading...
21h
The Atlantic
The Peril of Taking on the FBIFor more than two weeks, the Trump White House has engaged in an unprecedented assault on the president’s own Justice Department, and in particular on Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and the FBI. On Wednesday, the targets of that assault started firing back. The apparent catalyst is a memo, prepared at the behest of House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes, that is said to allege
22h
Big Think
How Schopenhauer’s thought can illuminate a midlife crisisWhen you're in a midlife crisis, success can seem like failure. Read More
22h
NYT > Science
E.P.A. Blocks Obama-Era Clean Water RulePresident Trump has called the Waters of the United States rule, set to enter force in the coming weeks, “one of the worst examples of federal regulation.”
22h
Live Science
Long-Lost Satellite Found by Amateur AstronomerAn amateur astronomer appears to have made contact with the Imager for Magnetopause-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) satellite, which lost contact with NASA in 2005.
22h
Live Science
Head and Heart: Migraines Linked to Heart Disease RiskPeople who experience migraines may be more likely to develop cardiovascular problems, a new study from Denmark finds.
22h
Futurity.org
Dating partners commit more domestic abuse than spousesFederal regulations designed to keep guns away from abusive partners, like the Violence Against Women Act, do not currently apply to dating relationships. But new research suggests they should. “They were more likely to push and shove, to grab, to punch.” According to the work of Susan B. Sorenson, professor of social policy in the University of Pennsylvania School of Social Policy & Practice, th
22h
Futurity.org
HPV may hide out in tonsil ‘crypts’Human papilloma virus (HPV), the culprit behind cervical cancer and some forms of head and neck cancer, may lurk in small pockets on the surface of tonsils in people not known to carry the virus, new research suggests. The finding could be pivotal for preventing oropharyngeal cancers that form on the tonsils and tongue. By mid-adulthood, most people have been exposed to HPV. The same strains that
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stand up -- it could help you lose weightYou might want to read this on your feet. A new study found that standing instead of sitting for six hours a day could prevent weight gain and help people to actually lose weight.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chlorinated lipids predict lung injury and death in sepsis patientsResearchers studied blood samples taken from patients diagnosed with sepsis and found that elevated chlorinated lipids predicted whether a patient would go on to suffer acute respiratory distress symptom (ARDS) and die within 30 days from a lung injury.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How can students with autism be supported through college?Thirty years ago it was rare for a student with ASD to enter college. But over the past decades, there has been much improvement in the detection and awareness of ASD in children. Now, with the provision of effective treatments, those with average or above average intellectual abilities are enrolling at universities.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Overabundance of massive stars in the Tarantula NebulaAstronomers have revealed an 'astonishing' overabundance of massive stars in a neighboring galaxy. The discovery, made in a gigantic star-forming region of the Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy, has 'far-reaching' consequences for our understanding of how stars transformed the pristine Universe into the one we live in today.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New universe simulation prompts breakthrough discoveries in astrophysicsNovel computational methods have helped create the most information-packed, universe-scale simulation ever produced. The new tool provides fresh insights into how black holes influence the distribution of dark matter, how heavy elements are produced and distributed throughout the cosmos, and where magnetic fields originate.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Early access to palliative care associated with better quality of lifePatients with advanced cancer have a significantly better quality of life in the weeks before they die if they receive early access to palliative care, according to research published today.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How black holes shape the cosmosAstrophysicists from Germany and the USA gained new insights into the formation and evolution of galaxies. They calculated how black holes influence the distribution of dark matter, how heavy elements are produced and distributed throughout the cosmos, and where magnetic fields originate. This was possible by developing and programming a new simulation model for the universe, which created the mos
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deaths from liver cancer nearly double since the 1990s, new figures revealOver the last two decades, deaths caused by liver cancer have increased by 80 percent, making it one of the fastest-growing causes of cancer deaths worldwide.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Slow but steady: New study sheds light on the brain evolution of turtlesA new study led by the University of Birmingham shows that the brain of turtles has evolved slowly, but constantly over the last 210 million years, eventually reaching a variety in form and complexity, which rivals that of other animal groups.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fitness in childhood linked to healthy lungs in adulthoodChildren who are fitter and whose fitness improves during childhood and adolescence have better lung function as young adults, according to a large study published in the European Respiratory Journal.
22h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Space shuttle Columbia crew, who never came backIt's 15 years since disaster struck as the Columbia returned to Earth following a research mission.
22h
Futurity.org
Watch: Temp grows and shrinks ‘4D-printed’ objectsA new “4D printing” method for a smart gel could lead to the development of “living” structures in human organs and tissues, soft robots, and targeted drug delivery. The 4D printing approach involves printing a 3D object with a hydrogel (water-containing gel) that changes shape over time when temperatures change, says Howon Lee, senior author of a new study and assistant professor in the departme
22h
Futurity.org
This disclosure could hurt your work relationshipsDisclosing a weakness might not be a good way to build rapport with coworkers, research suggests. Sharing personal information with friends and family is a standard way to build rapport and healthy relationships. But between coworkers, that’s not always true. In the journal Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes , researchers report that for higher status individuals, disclosing a w
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Research gives optical switches the 'contrast' of electronic transistorsEngineers have taken an important step toward the creation of a working optical transistor: precisely controlling the mixing of optical signals via tailored electric fields, and obtaining outputs with a near perfect contrast and extremely large on/off ratios.
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Futurity.org
Close look at ‘hardened’ arteries reveals a surpriseThe pathway in the body that leads to what laypeople call “hardening of the arteries” is not what medical experts previously assumed, report researchers who examined the mineralized arteries of genetically modified lab mice. Mineralized arteries, a complication often seen in patients with chronic kidney disease and diabetes, may affect heart functions, leading to death in some instances. Previous
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Futurity.org
Sanitation boosts health, not stunted growth for Bangladeshi kidsChildren born into housing compounds with improvements in drinking water quality, sanitation, and handwashing infrastructure were not measurably taller after two years compared to those born into compounds with more contamination, a new study suggests. Although children who received the interventions were significantly healthier overall, and despite mounting research over the last decade linking
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