EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In wine, there's health: Low levels of alcohol good for the brainWhile a couple of glasses of wine can help clear the mind after a busy day, new research shows that it may actually help clean the mind as well. The new study, which appears in the journal Scientific Reports, shows that low levels of alcohol consumption tamp down inflammation and helps the brain clear away toxins, including those associated with Alzheimer's disease.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astrophysicists discover planets in extragalactic galaxies using microlensingA University of Oklahoma astrophysics team has discovered for the first time a population of planets beyond the Milky Way galaxy. Using microlensing—an astronomical phenomenon and the only known method capable of discovering planets at truly great distances from the Earth among other detection techniques—OU researchers were able to detect objects in extragalactic galaxies that range from the mass
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Viden
Et lille forbrug af alkohol renser din hjerneAlkohol kan være godt for hjernen og med til at forebygge for eksempel demens, viser forskning.
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Science : NPR
Mars Rover Curiosity's Panoramic Photo Depicts Its Epic JourneyIt captured images that show some of the key regions NASA's robot has explored since 2012. (Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS)
10min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bacteria play critical role in driving colon cancersPatients with an inherited form of colon cancer harbor two bacterial species that collaborate to encourage development of the disease, and the same species have been found in people who develop a sporadic form of colon cancer, a study led by a Johns Hopkins Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy research team finds.
11min
New on MIT Technology Review
More efficient machine learning could upend the AI paradigmSmaller algorithms that don’t need mountains of data to train are coming.
19min
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: MemodramaToday in 5 Lines The House Intelligence Committee, which is chaired by Republican Representative Devin Nunes, released a controversial memo alleging surveillance abuses by the FBI. Read it in full here . In a statement, Democrats on the committee denounced the decision. The U.S. economy added 200,000 jobs in January while the unemployment rate held steady at 4.1 percent. And the Dow plunged by mo
22min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Natural telescope sets new magnification recordAn international team of astronomers has discovered one of the most extreme instances of magnification by gravitational lensing. Using the Hubble Space Telescope to survey a sample of huge clusters of galaxies, the team found a distant galaxy, eMACSJ1341-QG-1, that is magnified 30 times thanks to the distortion of space-time created by the massive galaxy cluster dubbed eMACSJ1341.9-2441.
27min
Science : NPR
'Game Changer': Maya Cities Unearthed In Guatemala Forest Using LasersThe technology provides them with an unprecedented view into how the ancient civilization worked and lived, revealing almost industrial agricultural infrastructure and new insights into warfare. (Image credit: PACUNAM/Marcello Canuto & Luke Auld-Thomas)
31min
New Scientist - News
Shrinking black holes avoid paradox by oozing hidden informationAs black holes evaporate, they release particles that may carry more information than we thought, so black holes may not break the laws of physics after all
36min
The Atlantic
The Dow Just Had Its Worst Week in Two YearsOn Friday, the stock market took a sharp tumble , with the Dow dropping more than 600 points, the biggest single-day decline since Brexit and the biggest weekly decline in two years. It wasn’t just the Dow. The declines were widespread, affecting stocks, bonds, and commodities. And the major indices , including the Standard & Poor’s, NASDAQ, and Dow Jones, dropped about 2 percent each. (The Dow’s
43min
Live Science
The King (Cobra) Is Dead (and So Is the Python)Judging by the interlocked combatants' bodies, no quarter was given in the final minutes of this deadly struggle.
53min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Measuring the temperature of two-dimensional materials at the atomic levelResearchers describe a new technique for precisely measuring the temperature and behavior of new two-dimensional materials that will allow engineers to design smaller and faster microprocessors.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Better support needed for thousands of informal dementia carersDirectly involving the thousands of family members and friends who serve as 'informal carers' for people with dementia in the evaluation of patients' symptoms and behavior could offer improved insights for healthcare professionals and help alleviate feelings of stress, guilt and isolation felt by many who fulfill these duties, a new study has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists present new long-term ecological researchMars developed in as little as two to four million years after the birth of the solar system, far more quickly than Earth, according to results of a new study published in this week's issue of the journal Nature.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penn Vet study uncovers therapeutic targets for aggressive triple-negative breast cancersNew findings from a study led by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have made inroads into a strategy to identify triple-negative breast cancers at risk for metastasis, and eventually target these cancers with drugs.
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The Devin Nunes Memo: Reading Between the LinesThe Devin Nunes memo that purports to show improper surveillance practices is out—and national security experts say it falls far short of the hype.
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Popular Science
Nintendo's Labo cardboard STEM toys are a recycling bin full of funTechnology These are some entertaining chunks of cardboard. Nintendo's STEM toy system is a great accessory for the Switch console.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gene network that regulates motor neuron formation during embryonic developmentResearchers have discovered the inner workings of a gene network that regulates the development of spinal motor neurons in the growing chicken and mouse embryo. The research also answers a long-standing question about why motor neurons, the nerve cells of the spinal cord that control muscle movement, form much faster than other types of neurons.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How I use Minecraft to help kids with autism | Stuart DuncanThe internet can be an ugly place, but you won't find bullies or trolls on Stuart Duncan's Minecraft server, AutCraft. Designed for children with autism and their families, AutCraft creates a safe online environment for play and self-expression for kids who sometimes behave a bit differently than their peers (and who might be singled out elsewhere). Learn more about one of the best places on the i
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Blog » Languages » English
Eyewire Release Report 2/2/2018Happy Friday! Here are all changes on Eyewire since the last report, even if there was a separate post about something big, so that you have a comprehensive picture of everything new from the last few weeks. We’ve set up some default-enabled add-on scripts to run in Eyewire for the enhancement of your tracing and reaping experience! Each of these scripts was created by an Eyewire player, and we a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Measuring the temperature of two-dimensional materials at the atomic levelResearchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago describe a new technique for precisely measuring the temperature and behavior of new two-dimensional materials that will allow engineers to design smaller and faster microprocessors.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA tracks major Tropical Cyclone Cebile in Southern Indian OceanTropical Cyclone Cebile held onto its status as a major hurricane in the Southern Indian Ocean when NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead.
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Big Think
Need more meaning in your life? A new study suggests more sex might do the trickCan't find meaning in your life? A new study has the next best thing. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Revealing the hidden path of perovskite formationScientists have systematically studied the path of the sequential deposition reaction used to build perovskite solar panels. The study offers much-needed, fundamental understanding of perovskite formation and its different stages.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Woodpeckers show signs of possible brain damage, but that might not be a bad thingWith each peck, woodpeckers absorb more than ten times the force it would take to give a human a concussion. But they seem fine. Researchers examined the brains of woodpeckers in museum collections and saw that the brains showed a build-up of a protein that's a sign of brain damage in humans. The woodpeckers might not have sustained brain damage themselves, though -- the researchers think that pro
2h
Live Science
'Human Uber' Lets You Hire Someone to Do Your Dirty Work (While Wearing Your Face)It's 'Human Uber'... hUber?
2h
The Atlantic
China's Surveillance State Should Scare EveryoneImagine a society in which you are rated by the government on your trustworthiness. Your “citizen score” follows you wherever you go. A high score allows you access to faster internet service or a fast-tracked visa to Europe. If you make political posts online without a permit, or question or contradict the government’s official narrative on current events, however, your score decreases. To calcu
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Big Think
Pepperoni, anyone? Pizza for breakfast beats old-fashioned sugar cereal.A slice of pizza might just be a better choice than breakfast cereal when you get up in the morning. Cheers! Read More
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Popular, common allergy medication may prevent neuromyelitis optica relapsesThe addition of cetirizine (the popular allergy medication sold under the brand name Zyrtec) to standard therapy is safe, well-tolerated, and may reduce relapses in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO), a rare and severe disease that causes inflammation and demyelination (damage to the myelin - the protective coating of nerve cells), primarily in the optic nerve (optic neuritis), spinal cord (
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Latest Headlines | Science News
‘Machines That Think’ predicts the future of artificial intelligenceIn a new book, an artificial intelligence expert explores AI’s past, present and future.
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The Atlantic
Photos of the Week: Super Blue Blood Moon, Starry Night, StratofortressA rare lunar eclipse, bloco parties in Rio, artwork as a memorial to deaths by overdose, Amazon’s new spheres in Seattle, snowy Shanghai, the Black Panther premiere, floating faces based on Chelsea Manning’s DNA data, the State of the Union, and much more.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gene playing major role in neurological condition foundResearchers are closer to solving the puzzle of a complex neurological condition called 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome. Individuals with this condition are missing a small piece of chromosome 15 that usually contains six genes, but which one of the genes is responsible for the clinical characteristics of patients has not been clear. Now researchers have identified in a mouse model OTUD7A as the ge
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Analyzing street drugs points to potential early warning system in opioid crisisIn just two years, the powerful opioid fentanyl went from nonexistent to detected in more than 1 in 7 stamp bags analyzed by the Allegheny County Office of the Medical Examiner. The findings suggest that real-time information about stamp bags can be used to supplement current public health surveillance measures and could serve as an early warning of new illegal drugs of high lethality available at
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Science : NPR
When The Flu Hits Campus, The Gesundheit Machine Will Be ReadyIt's a particularly harsh flu season. In the close quarters of dorm rooms and cafeterias and study groups, the flu will come to college campuses. And when it does, one scientist will be ready. (Image credit: Selena Simmons-Duffin/WAMU)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Natural telescope sets new magnification recordAn international team of astronomers, led by Harald Ebeling of the Institute for Astronomy at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, has discovered one of the most extreme instances of magnification by gravitational lensing. Using the Hubble Space Telescope to survey a sample of huge clusters of galaxies, the team found a distant galaxy, eMACSJ1341-QG-1, that is magnified 30 times thanks to the distor
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find grape-derived compounds may promote resilience against depressionNew study used DNA epigenetic mapping to analyze novel inflammatory mechanisms influencing brain circuitry associated with depression
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NYT > Science
Flu Patients Arrive in Droves, and a Hospital Rolls Out the ‘Surge Tent’The worst flu season in nearly a decade has filled emergency rooms and strained resources at medical centers. Hospitalization and infection rates are among the highest in two decades.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA mission launched; will revolutionize our understanding of space weatherNASA's first mission to provide unprecedented measurements of, and changes in, the temperature and composition of Earth's upper atmosphere launched at 5:20 p.m. EST Thursday, Jan. 25, from the Guiana Space Centre in Kourou, French Guiana.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genome wide association study of epigenetic aging rates in blood reveals a critical role for TERTResearchers analyzed blood samples from nearly 10,000 people to find that genetic markers in the gene responsible for keeping telomeres (tips of chromosomes) youthfully longer, did not translate into a younger biologic age as measured by changes in proteins coating the DNA.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cellular 'powerhouses' may explain health effects of stressHow does psychological stress translate into physical health effects? A key piece of the puzzle may be found in specialized cellular structures known as mitochondria, according to a pair of new articles.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Algorithm identifies vulnerable people during natural disastersA new algorithm developed at the University of Waterloo will help first responders and home care providers better help the elderly during natural disasters.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team develops new surface design inspired by snake skinAssistant Professor Seok Kim and graduate students Zining Yang and Jun Kyu Park have developed a design construct inspired in part by the surface of butterflies and snakes, where flexible skins are fully covered by rigid, discrete scales.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's newly rediscovered IMAGE mission provided key aurora researchOn Jan. 20, 2018, amateur astronomer Scott Tilley detected an unexpected signal coming from what he later postulated was NASA's long-lost IMAGE satellite, which had not been in contact since 2005. On Jan. 30, NASA—along with help from a community of IMAGE scientists and engineers—confirmed that the signal was indeed from the IMAGE spacecraft. Whatever the next steps for IMAGE may be, the mission's
3h
Big Think
‘Human Uber’ lets you pay a stranger to live your life for youA new technology hopes to provide customers with "human surrogates" who strap screens to their faces so they can interact with the world on customers' behalf. Read More
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA measured rainfall from Fehi's remnants in New ZealandThe remnants of Tropical Cyclone Fehi brought rain to New Zealand before it fizzled out. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's GPM core satellite provided a look at the rainfall from its vantage point in space.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New controls scale quantum chipsA fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is 'qubit interference.' In new research published in Science Advances magazine, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Building miniature optical antennas using DNA as a guideResearchers have reported a new highly parallel technique to fabricate precise metallic nanostructures with designed plasmonic properties by means of different self-assembled DNA origami shapes.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Language matters in end-of-life conversationsIn general, the term 'medical futility' applies when, based on data and professional experience, no further treatments, procedures or tests will provide benefit and may, in fact, be more burdensome and create undue suffering for the patient and the patient's family.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Once, twice, six times a grocery shopperIn the first test of detailed consumer-buying habits by categories at more than one chain store selling groceries, a team of business school researchers found that shoppers weren’t monogamist or bigamist but rather polygamist in their choice of outlets. In fact, it turns out that grocery categories such as dessert toppings, motor oil, candles and refrigerated ethnic foods were some of the leading
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Multidrug resistant malaria spread under the radar for years in CambodiaThe most comprehensive genetic study of malaria parasites in Southeast Asia has shown that resistance to antimalarial drugs was under-reported for years in Cambodia. Researchers have shown that the parasites developed multidrug resistance to first-line treatments extremely rapidly. They found that one main resistant strain had spread aggressively in the five years before clinical resistance was re
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Standard medical tests miss nearly two-thirds of heart attack diagnoses‘Unrecognised’ and ‘recognised’ heart attacks have the same long-term risk of death
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Low muscle strength identified as early risk factor for ALSLow muscle strength during the later teen years has been identified as a risk factor for much later onset of the neurological disease known as ALS, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A study also links low blood counts at a young age to ALS.
3h
Science : NPR
Buried In Trump's Nuclear Report: A Russian Doomsday WeaponThe administration's Nuclear Posture Review mentions a massive, nuclear-armed torpedo capable of incinerating cities. But is it real? (Image credit: USAF Lookout Moutain Laboratory)
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The Atlantic
The Case for Locking Up Your SmartphoneIf abstinence from alcohol originated in Protestant England, maybe abstinence from digital devices will come from Catholic France. The country has recently rolled out a new labor law called the “ right to disconnect ,” and following a campaign promise made by Prime Minister Emmanuel Macron, the French Ministry of Education plans to ban the use of smartphones in all of its public schools. Philippe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Algorithm identifies vulnerable people during natural disastersA new algorithm developed at the University of Waterloo will help first responders and home care providers better help the elderly during natural disasters.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An unbiased approach for sifting through big dataA new method could help researchers develop unbiased indicators for assessing complex systems such as population health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Revealing the hidden path of perovskite formationEPFL scientists systematically study the path of the sequential deposition reaction used to build perovskite solar panels. The study is published in Science Advances and offers much-needed, fundamental understanding of perovskite formation and its different stages.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Woodpeckers show signs of possible brain damage, but that might not be a bad thingWith each peck, woodpeckers absorb more than ten times the force it would take to give a human a concussion. But they seem fine. Researchers examined the brains of woodpeckers in museum collections and saw that the brains showed a build-up of a protein that's a sign of brain damage in humans. The woodpeckers might not have sustained brain damage themselves, though -- the researchers think that pro
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Building miniature optical antennas using DNA as a guideResearch groups from University of Jyväskylä and Aalto University together with researchers from California Institute of Technology and Aarhus University have reported a new highly parallel technique to fabricate precise metallic nanostructures with designed plasmonic properties by means of different self-assembled DNA origami shapes. The so-called DALI (DNA-assisted lithography) method has been p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Less moisture in natural fibersNatural fibers have many advantages: they are renewable, biodegradable and robust. They are more energy-efficient to produce than glass or carbon fibers, are lighter and have better acoustics. Their disadvantage: they absorb water very easily. This impairs their mechanical properties. Researchers have now combined a special fiber treatment and a yarn technology: as a result, natural fibers can ful
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lightweight robots harvest cucumbersAutomation-intensive sectors such as the automotive industry are not the only ones to rely on robots. In more and more agricultural settings, automation systems are superseding strenuous manual labor. Scientists are now developing and testing a dual-arm robot for the automated harvesting of cucumbers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Developmental splicing program controlling neuronal maturationScientists have determined that loss of Rbfox genes results in an 'embryonic like' splicing program.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
It’s been a no good, very bad week for cryptocurrenciesYouTube TV Apple
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Woodpeckers show signs of possible brain damage, but that might not be a bad thingWith woodpeckers, the answer's in the question—true to their name, they peck wood. And when they do, they peck hard—with each peck, the bird undergoes a force of 1,200 to 1,400 g's. By comparison, a measly force of 60-100 g's can give a human a concussion. The fact that a woodpecker can undergo fourteen times that without getting hurt has led helmet makers model their designs around these birds' s
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Building miniature optical antennas using DNA as a guideAn international research collaborative has reported a new, highly parallel technique to fabricate precise metallic nanostructures with designed plasmonic properties by means of self-assembled DNA origami shapes. The so-called DALI (DNA-assisted lithography) method has been published in the latest issue of Science Advances.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Revealing the hidden path of perovskite formationPerovskite solar cells are an alternative to conventional silicon solar cells, poised to enter the market with their high power-conversion efficiencies (above 22 percent, now) and lower capital expenditure and manufacturing costs.
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The Atlantic
The Surprise in the Nunes MemoPage Christopher SteeleA hotly anticipated memo from Representative Devin Nunes and Republican staff on the House Intelligence Committee offers a few new interesting pieces of information about the investigation into Russian interference in the election—though it leaves the most important questions unanswered. And in one crucial way, it seems to undermine the political case it was released to bolster. The most importan
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Astrophysicists discover planets in extragalactic galaxies using microlensingAstrophysicists have discovered for the first time a population of planets beyond the Milky Way galaxy. Using microlensing -- an astronomical phenomenon and the only known method capable of discovering planets at truly great distances from the Earth among other detection techniques -- researchers were able to detect objects in extragalactic galaxies that range from the mass of the Moon to the mass
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New algorithms to train robotsResearchers have developed new techniques for robots or computer programs to learn how to perform tasks by interacting with a human instructor.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Holding on to patriarchy-reinforcing beliefs comes at a priceSome men categorize women into two groups: either they are chaste, nurturing and good, or they are promiscuous, manipulative, and out to seduce them. This polarizing 'Madonna-Whore dichotomy' is grounded in a man's desire to reinforce male dominance, and not only relates to attitudes that restrict a woman's autonomy, but also impairs intimate relationships between men and women.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Solving the puzzle of multicellularityOne of the big evolutionary questions in life is how and why single cell organisms organized themselves to live in a group, thereby forming multicellular life forms. Scientists have answered at least part of this question, by decoding the genomic sequence of one of the simplest of all multicellular organisms -- the four-celled alga Tetrabaena socialis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technology: Edible QR code can be the medicine of the futureResearchers have developed a new method for the production of medicine. They print medical drugs in QR coded patterns onto an edible material. The production can be tailored to fit each patient and has the potential to protect against wrong medication and fake medicine according to the researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The benefits of social media for young people in careInstagram Type TextNew research reveals the benefits of using social media for young people in care. Until now, the automatic assumption has been that platforms such as Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp only pose a risk for this vulnerable group. But young people in care benefit from the psychological, emotional and social support gained via online networks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Relatively unknown gene linked to early emergence of blood diseasesResearchers have discovered the contribution of a specific gene in the proper development of blood cells that give rise to hematopoietic stem cells. The findings identify a potential target for the development of treatments for some types of leukemia, anemia and other blood disorders.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Language matters in end-of-life conversationsIn general, the term 'medical futility' applies when, based on data and professional experience, no further treatments, procedures or tests will provide benefit and may, in fact, be more burdensome and create undue suffering for the patient and the patient's family.
4h
The Scientist RSS
Bacteriophages Plentiful in Womens BladdersIn one of the first looks at the urinary virome, researchers find hundreds of viruses, most of which have never been sequenced before.
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The Scientist RSS
CDC to Drastically Cut Efforts to Prevent Global Disease OutbreaksThe agency's plan to scale back work in 39 foreign countries could hamper its ability to rapidly respond to future epidemics.
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Popular Science
Armpit transplants could make football locker rooms less stinkyHealth Cultivate some new friends. Imagine, if you will, the locker rooms of Super Bowl LII during and after the big game. They’re supercharged, chaotic, and probably extremely stinky.
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Live Science
'Tree Man': Unusual Bark-Like Growths Return After 24 SurgeriesA patient known as "tree man" underwent extensive surgeries to remove wood-like warts from his hands and feet; but now he says the unusual growths are starting to come back.
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The Atlantic
Republicans Release the Nunes Memo to the Fury of DemocratsThis article was updated on Friday, February 2 at 3:20 pm. The House Intelligence Committee released a controversial four-page memo on Friday written by its chair, Devin Nunes, outlining alleged surveillance abuses carried out by the Justice Department, marking the end of a weeks-long battle over the document between House Republicans, Democrats, and the Department of Justice. President Trump sen
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The Atlantic
The CDC Is About to Fall Off a Funding CliffLast October , I wrote that a large pot of money, dedicated to protecting the world from infectious diseases, was about to run dry. In December 2014, Congress appropriated $5.4 billion to fight the deal with the historic Ebola epidemic that was raging in West Africa. Most of that money went to quashing the epidemic directly, but around $1 billion was allocated to help developing countries improve
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genome wide association study of epigenetic aging rates in blood reveals a critical role for TERTResearchers from several institutions, including, UCLA, Boston University, Stanford University and the Institute for Aging Research at Hebrew SeniorLife, analyzed blood samples from nearly 10,000 people to find that genetic markers in the gene responsible for keeping telomeres (tips of chromosomes) youthfully longer, did not translate into a younger biologic age as measured by changes in proteins
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The Atlantic
Making Fun of How South Asians Talk: A HistoryLast week, The Washington Post reported that President Donald Trump had mimicked the accent of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Soon, several publications began to ask if the alleged incident could chill the leaders’ warm relationship. Disturbingly, this wouldn’t be Trump’s first brush with this very controversy—on the campaign trail in 2016, he entertained his base with an impression of an I
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Crash diets can cause transient deterioration in heart functionCrash diets can cause a transient deterioration in heart function, according to new research. Patients with heart disease should seek medical advice before adopting a very low calorie diet.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mini-primaquine does help stop people infecting mosquitoes with malariaA single dose of primaquine is thought to stop people with P. falciparum malaria infecting mosquitoes, which could help bring down malaria transmission. Recent data questions the practice.
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Live Science
Watch the Entire Total Lunar Eclipse in Just 1 MinuteDid you miss this week's total lunar eclipse? And are you extremely strapped for time? Fear not, because the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles has posted a 60-second time-lapse video of the celestial treat online.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High exposure to radiofrequency radiation linked to tumor activity in male ratsHigh exposure to radiofrequency radiation (RFR) in rodents resulted in tumors in tissues surrounding nerves in the hearts of male rats, but not female rats or any mice, according to draft studies from the National Toxicology Program (NTP). The exposure levels used in the studies were equal to and higher than the highest level permitted for local tissue exposure in cell phone emissions today. Cell
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA measured rainfall from Fehi's remnants in New ZealandThe remnants of Tropical Cyclone Fehi brought rain to New Zealand before it fizzled out. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's GPM core satellite provided a look at the rainfall from its vantage point in space.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Illinois researchers develop new surface design inspired by snake skinSeok Kim, assistant professor of mechanical science and engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and graduate students Zining Yang and Jun Kyu Park have developed a design construct inspired in part by the surface of butterflies and snakes, where flexible skins are fully covered by rigid, discrete scales.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cellular 'powerhouses' may explain health effects of stress - Psychosomatic Medicine Journal Outlines Role of MitochondriaHow does psychological stress translate into physical health effects? A key piece of the puzzle may be found in specialized cellular structures known as mitochondria, according to a pair of articles in the January issue of Psychosomatic Medicine: Journal of Biobehavioral Medicine, the official journal of the American Psychosomatic Society. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
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Live Science
An Ancient Virus May Be Responsible for Human ConsciousnessYou've got an ancient virus in your brain. In fact, you've got an ancient virus at the very root of your conscious thought.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cutting off tumor suppliesFor a tumour to grow, it must develop blood vessels that supply nutrients and oxygen. Preventing tumor vascularization is therefore an interesting anti-tumor therapy that has been explored over the last ten years. But how to be truly effective? By identifying two cytokines, key factors in the recruitment of blood cells essential to the formation of new blood vessels, and above all by deciphering h
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Viden
Radiokontakt til ny dansk satellitI eftermiddag fik GomSpace kontakt til den danske satellit, som blev sendt op i morges.
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The Atlantic
The Full Text of the Nunes MemoPage Christopher SteeleOn Friday, the House Intelligence Committee, which is chaired by Republican Representative Devin Nunes, released a four-page memo alleging surveillance abuses by the FBI. Earlier this week, Republicans on the committee voted to make the document public. The classified document has drawn criticism from Democratic lawmakers, who argue it is misleading, as well as from law enforcement officials. In
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The Atlantic
The State Department Just Lost Its Most Experienced LeaderTom Shannon is an increasingly rare kind of public servant in Washington—a career diplomat who served administrations of both parties, starting with the Reagan administration, and one of only two people currently at the State Department to have achieved the title of “career ambassador.” (There were five when Obama left office.) “I have had the honor of serving under six presidents and ten secreta
5h
New on MIT Technology Review
F1 drivers are getting biometric gloves that monitor the stress of racing
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's newly rediscovered IMAGE mission provided key aurora researchA long-lost NASA satellite, IMAGE, has recently been rediscovered. The mission's nearly six years in operation provided robust research about the space around Earth that continue to guide science to this day.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Army researchers develop new algorithms to train robotsResearchers at the US Army Research Laboratory and the University of Texas at Austin have developed new techniques for robots or computer programs to learn how to perform tasks by interacting with a human instructor. The findings of the study will be presented and published at the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence Conference in New Orleans, Louisiana, Feb. 2-7.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hatchet enzyme, enabler of sickness and of health, exposed by neutron beamsA pioneering glimpse at an enzyme inside elusive cell membranes illuminates a player in cell health but also in hepatitis C and in Alzheimer's. With neutron beams, researchers open a portal into the hidden world of intramembrane proteins, which a third of the human genome is required to create.
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New Scientist - News
Tropical plants are blooming as they gorge on our pollutionWe are pouring carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, heating the planet, but some plants are using the excess carbon dioxide to make more flowers
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New Scientist - News
Leaked photos suggest China may now have a hypersonic railgunA ship-mounted electromagnetic railgun, firing projectiles at more than Mach 6 over great distances, could let China dominate the seas
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New Scientist - News
Shark-free world? That’s a wish that would come back to bite usSharks may be hard to love for many people, including the US president, but these animals are essential to the health of our oceans, says Lesley Evans Ogden
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Science | The Guardian
Lab notes: So long and thanks for all the fish?Orcas talk! Well, one has, anyway: a study involving a killer whale called Wikie has revealed that orcas can imitate human speech . Researchers have shown that killer whales able to copy words such as “hello”, “one, two” and ‘bye bye’ as well as sounds from other orcas. A great leap for our species, however, is the news that doctors in Newcastle have selected the first patients to undergo treatme
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mark Zuckerberg: People are spending 50 million fewer hours on Facebook a dayMark Zuckerberg warned in January that radical changes he's making to return Facebook to its roots connecting friends and family would curtail how much time people spend there.
5h
Big Think
AI and brain interfaces may be about to change how we make musicComputer control in the form of AI and brain-computer interfaces is being introduced to the art of composing. Read More
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Big Think
Should we bring back an extinct species?In her book, Rise of the Necrofauna, Britt Wray reports on the ethics and science behind de-extinction. Read More
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Popular Science
Five rad and super random football products I found this weekGadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 35. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap. Below, gadgets that are awesome, rad, and random.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Engineer locates brain's seizure onset zone in record timeAn engineer can locate the brain's zone that creates seizures in record time -- one hour rather than the typical ten days. The new method potentially reduces complications, time and money.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ecuador: Deforestation destroys more dry forest than climate changeTropical forests worldwide are at risk. Two of the main threats are the deforestation for arable land and climate change. Scientists compared the losses due to deforestation with those that would result in extreme climate change scenarios in Ecuador. Although global warming is likely to change the distribution of species, deforestation will result in the loss of more dry forests than predicted by
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can your brain testify against you?A review of applications of neuroscience in law, or 'neurolaw,' brings into question the ethical implications that come with the possibility of a person unwillingly revealing their own guilt.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quantum algorithm could help AI think fasterOne of the ways that computers 'think' is by analyzing relationships within large sets of data. An international team has shown that quantum computers can do one such analysis faster than classical computers, for a wider array of data types than was previously expected.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cichlids: Paler in the face of the enemyMale cichlids that are constantly threatened by predators grow faster and postpone the full expression of conspicuous breeding coloration for longer. Thereby, the animals reduce their risk of becoming prey. However, at the peak of their sexual maturity the animals give up their retarded breeding coloration: Even under risky conditions, they then vie for their potential sexual partners with magnifi
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nano-switches in the cellA team with researchers has discovered a new mechanism for the regulation of protein synthesis.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cheetahs' inner ear is one-of-a-kind, vital to high-speed huntingThe world's fastest land animal, the cheetah, is a successful hunter not only because it is quick, but also because it can hold an incredibly still gaze while pursuing prey. For the first time, researchers have investigated the cheetah's extraordinary sensory abilities by analyzing the speedy animal's inner ear, an organ that is essential for maintaining body balance and adapting head posture duri
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New insights into how employees manage stressful situations at workResearchers have developed a new tool which could benefit organizations and their staff by assessing employees' beliefs about how they manage challenging and stressful situations at work. Results from two studies, involving a total of 2,892 Italian employees, provide evidence of the added value of a more comprehensive approach to the assessment of self-efficacy at work. They also suggest the new s
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
A Mini, Magnetic, All-Terrain RobotThis tiny soft robot can tackle impressive obstacles, using magnets to walk, roll, jump and swim. This flexibility could be vital for medical applications. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Should Twitter, Facebook get serious about real names?Fake social media accounts can retweet a presidential candidate, boost the perceived influence of a celebrity—or both—so is it finally time to require real names?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hatchet enzyme, enabler of sickness and of health, exposed by neutron beamsTucked away inside cell membranes, a molecular butcher does the bidding of healthy cells but also of disease agents. It has been operating out of clear view, but researchers just shined a mighty spotlight on it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Non-suicidal self-injury in adolescents: The prevalence in Germany is highIn the current issue of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International, Paul L. Plener and his coauthors from Ulm University Hospital present the latest evidence on non-suicidal self-injury in adolescents and also discuss guideline conform treatment (Dtsch Arztebl Int 2018; 115: 23-30).https://www.aerzteblatt.de/pdf.asp?id=195729
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Low muscle strength identified as early risk factor for ALSLow muscle strength during the later teen years has been identified as a risk factor for much later onset of the neurological disease known as ALS, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A study at Sahlgrenska Academy published in the Journal of Neurology also links low blood counts at a young age to ALS.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vodafone eyes European asset buy from Liberty GlobalBritish mobile phone giant Vodafone on Friday said it is in talks to buy European assets of US peer Liberty Global, dismissing reports the pair are planning a full merger.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Balance exercises may help people with multiple sclerosisA special program that involves balance and eye movement exercises may help people with multiple sclerosis (MS) with their balance problems and fatigue, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists discover 'chiral phonons' -- atomic rotations in a 2-D semiconductor crystalA research team has found the first evidence that a shaking motion in the structure of an atomically thin material possesses a naturally occurring circular rotation that could become the building block for a new form of information technology and molecular-scale machines.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Multiple ant-like transport of neuronal cargo by motor proteinsMicrotubules (roads made of proteins) extend throughout a cell for motor proteins (carriers) to deliver neuronal cargo packed with many kinds of materials required for life activity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
We view ourselves and those we care about through 'rose-tinted glasses', study saysNew research has shown that we see our own lives, and also those we care about, through 'rose-tinted glasses'.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
OU astrophysicists discover planets in extragalactic galaxies using microlensingA University of Oklahoma astrophysics team has discovered for the first time a population of planets beyond the Milky Way galaxy. Using microlensing--an astronomical phenomenon and the only known method capable of discovering planets at truly great distances from the Earth among other detection techniques--OU researchers were able to detect objects in extragalactic galaxies that range from the mas
6h
The Atlantic
A Week Around the World With The AtlanticWhat We’re Writing The problem of Afghanistan: A devastating terrorist attack in Kabul killed 95 people last week. This has highlighted the problems endemic to America’s longest war, which President Trump touched on in his State of the Union address. One of these problems is the fact that Afghanistan’s neighbor (and America’s sometimes-ally), Pakistan, has actively been undermining the U.S. milit
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Latest Headlines | Science News
New textile weathers temperature shiftReversible textile keeps skin at a comfortable temperature with thin layers of carbon and copper.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russian astronauts take spacewalk to upgrade station antenna (Update)Spacewalking Russian astronauts removed an old electronics box as part of an antenna upgrade at the International Space Station on Friday, then tossed it overboard as a piece of junk.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Brr! Six more weeks of winter for US, says furry forecasterBundle up America, the world's furriest weather forecaster says six more weeks of winter are in store.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Sedate a Plant, and It Seems to Lose Consciousness. Is It Conscious?Plants can be frozen in place with the same anesthetics used on you during surgery. It suggests they may be less different from animals than is often assumed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Poland and Baltic states need energy plan by June: EUA senior member of the European Commission on Friday called on Poland and the neighbouring Baltic states to come up with a joint plan by June on how to synchronise their energy grids with the rest of Europe.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Design call for 'solar sentinel' missionThe UK will play a leading role in developing a spacecraft to warn of solar storms.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Patients who achieve short-term weight loss before bariatric surgery have better outcomesPatients who lose some excess weight prior to weight loss surgery achieve greater weight loss after surgery, and also experience shorter hospital stays and shorter procedures, according to Journal of American College of Surgeons study findings.
6h
Ingeniøren
Gomspace bekræfter: Vi har signal fra det danske forsvars satellitSatellitten Ulloriaq, som skal hjælpe forsvaret med et overblik over Grønland og Færøerne, har givet lyd fra sig.
6h
Live Science
Here's Who Will Win the 2018 Super Bowl, According to a HippoFiona the hippo knows who will win Super Bowl 2018. This is science.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple overtakes Samsung in shrinking smartphone market: surveyApple overtook Samsung in the fourth quarter as the largest smartphone producer in a declining global market for handsets, research firm IDC said Friday.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Holding on to patriarchy-reinforcing beliefs comes at a priceSome men categorize women into two groups: either they are chaste, nurturing and good, or they are promiscuous, manipulative, and out to seduce them. This polarizing "Madonna-Whore dichotomy" is grounded in a man's desire to reinforce male dominance, and not only relates to attitudes that restrict a woman's autonomy, but also impairs intimate relationships between men and women. This is according
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cheetahs' inner ear is one-of-a-kind, vital to high-speed huntingThe world's fastest land animal, the cheetah, is a successful hunter not only because it is quick, but also because it can hold an incredibly still gaze while pursuing prey. For the first time, researchers have investigated the cheetah's extraordinary sensory abilities by analyzing the speedy animal's inner ear, an organ that is essential for maintaining body balance and adapting head posture duri
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team pieces together the mystery of how single cell life forms evolved into multicellular organismsOne of the big evolutionary questions in life is how and why single cell organisms organised themselves to live in a group, thereby forming multicellular life forms.
6h
New on MIT Technology Review
YouTube’s says it’s going to clean up its act, but don’t expect much
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
Polar Bears Require More Food to Survive Than ThoughtDue to climate change, they already may not be catching enough prey to meet their high energy demands -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Live Science
Ignore Tom Brady: 37 Glasses of Water a Day Is Too ManyPlease take Tom Brady's water advice with a grain of electrolytes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists call for global and local control and management of mercuryMercury is a complex, multifaceted contaminant which can take many different forms. It is poisonous to humans and wildlife and damaging to the environment. Currently, around two thirds of the mercury entering the environment comes from current or legacy human sources including mining, industrial activities, coal combustion and incinerators, with the remaining originating from natural sources. A sp
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Dying in agonyWhile the US suffers an overdose epidemic, most of the world misses out on painkillers.
6h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How I earned a law diploma while on death row | Peter OukoPeter Ouko spent 18 years in Kamiti Prison in Kenya, sometimes locked up in a cell with 13 other grown men for 23 and a half hours a day. In a moving talk, he tells the story of how he was freed -- and his current mission with the African Prisons Project: to set up the first law school behind bars and empower people in prison to drive positive change.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Mind controlControlling machines using thought can be used in medicine, gaming, transport and many other sectors.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Robo newsAs more media outlets use automated algorithms to write news stories, are journalists doomed?
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lobachevsky University scientists synthesize a new compound with anti-tumor propertiesA research team of the UNN Faculty of Chemistry led by Professor Alexei Fedorov has developed and synthesized a new multifunctional compound that possesses anti-tumor properties that are due to several independent effects. The active compound is a conjugate of a photoactive organic dye (photosensitizer), a derivative responsible for selective delivery of the medicine to tumor tissues and targeted
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists call for global and local control and management of mercuryMercury is a complex, multifaceted contaminant which can take many different forms. It is poisonous to humans and wildlife and damaging to the environment. A special issue addressing the most up-to-date science on the fate and effects of mercury has now been published in Springer's journal Ambio.
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Scientific American Content: Global
What China's Frightening Digital Strategy Portends for America's FutureThe government's new "social credit" system attempts to track citizen behavior and reward those who stay in line -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Mayan surpriseLatest technology reveals a network of more than 60,000 structures under Guatemala's jungle.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
New Zealand gannet 'no mates Nigel' dies alongside fake partnerThe lonely bird died beside a concrete bird replica he had courted - and nested with - for years.
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Viden
Ny teknologi: Spiselige QR-koder kan skræddersy medicin til patienterForskere på Københavns Universitet har udviklet en ny måde at producere medicin på.
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The Atlantic
Letter: The Crow That Hates FalafelCrows Are Doing the Best They Can In October, Elaine Godfrey laid out a defense of the much-maligned bird. Reading the ornithologist Kevin McGowan’s comment that crows are “just trying to make their way and do the best they can” reminds me of the crow who has only one foot and who visits my office, in Washington, D.C., every morning. I hear her cawing nearby—I know she’s a she , because she had a
7h
The Atlantic
Letter: Where Charter Schools Fall ShortThe Charter-School Revolutionary In the January/February issue, Elizabeth Green asked what the growing empire of Success Academy charter schools means for the future of public education. In her essay “The Charter-School Revolutionary,” Elizabeth Green indeed raises cautions about the charter-school movement, but ends up appearing starry-eyed overall about what she finally describes as “the most p
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The Atlantic
Letter: The Case for Tom BradyThe Case Against Tom Brady On Wednesday, Adrienne LaFrance wrote an article examining why the New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady is so intensely disliked. “Last time I checked, the cradle of liberty wasn’t in Foxborough, Massachusetts,” she wrote. “Ben Franklin may have believed the nation’s premier bird was the turkey, but he still picked Philadelphia over Boston for a reason. (The reaso
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The Atlantic
Letter: Leaving America Behind Amid the Turmoil of 1968Five Decades of White Backlash In January, Vann R. Newkirk II argued that the Trump presidency can be traced to the politics of white backlash in the wake of the civil-rights movement. “Trump’s only real concrete policies,” he wrote, “have been negations of King.” “ … built on King's bones.” What a fine phrase. The Atlantic ’s article about the white backlash in the U.S. helped me see a lot of th
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The Atlantic
We Want to Hear From YouDear Reader, I’m writing to let you know that we’re creating a place online for your ideas and feedback. Our new Letters section, like its counterpart in print, will feature the smartest, most compelling responses to our journalism. It will be a venue for respectful dialogue, criticism, meaningful observations, and challenging ideas. We want to hear from you, and we want to make it easy for anyon
7h
New on MIT Technology Review
The first women in the UK will undergo a radical ‘three-person’ IVF technique
7h
Live Science
Can You Get the Flu Twice in One Season?If you already caught the flu, are you in the clear for the rest of the season?
7h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Bones clue to 'lost' Viking army which made EnglandNew analysis suggests part of a nation-changing army of Vikings was buried in a town churchyard.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Are we stuck with plastic drinking straws?A leading maker of straws says greener alternatives are too costly and their development has stalled.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Fossil from south Wales named as new reptile speciesThe ancient animal would have shared its home with dinosaurs, say Bristol researchers.
7h
Live Science
Interlocked Spiral of Ancient Skeletons Unearthed in Mexico CityThe 10 bodies were buried in the unusual arrangement 2,400 years ago.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research highlights need for better support for thousands of informal dementia carersDirectly involving the thousands of family members and friends who serve as 'informal carers' for people with dementia in the evaluation of patients' symptoms and behaviour could offer improved insights for healthcare professionals and help alleviate feelings of stress, guilt and isolation felt by many who fulfil these duties, a new study has found.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cheetahs' inner ear is one-of-a-kind, vital to high-speed huntingThe world's fastest land animal, the cheetah, is a successful hunter not only because it is quick, but also because it can hold an incredibly still gaze while pursuing prey. For the first time, researchers have investigated the cheetah's extraordinary sensory abilities by analyzing the speedy animal's inner ear, an organ that is essential for maintaining body balance and adapting head posture duri
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Solving the puzzle of multicellularityWits PhD student, Jonathan Featherston, of the Evolution of Complexity Laboratory at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, has answered at least part of this question, by decoding the genomic sequence of one of the simplest of all multicellular organisms -- the four-celled alga Tetrabaena socialis.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify gene largely accounting for 15q13.3 microdeletion syndromeResearchers have identified in a mouse model OTUD7A as the gene within the deleted region that accounts for many characteristics of 15q13.3 microdeletion syndrome.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technology: Edible QR code can be the medicine of the futureResearchers at the University of Copenhagen have developed a new method for the production of medicine. They print medical drugs in QR coded patterns onto an edible material. The production can be tailored to fit each patient and has the potential to protect against wrong medication and fake medicine according to the researchers.
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Popular Science
We have no idea how dangerous football really isHealth Is there a scientific case for banning the sport? Despite the volume of studies on concussions, limitations on the type of studies done and the sort of data used make it difficult to draw sweeping conclusions.
7h
Big Think
The 2028 Summer Games could be a disaster for L.A., according to this group’s Twitter pageThere's grave concern over one particularly vulnerable group in the city. Read More
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Futurity.org
Flu genome could improve predictions for next pandemicResearchers have identified features of the influenza virus genome that affect how the virus multiplies. The findings could help improve surveillance to detect a potential pandemic flu, which could kill millions. Pandemic flu occurs when flu strains from different species—birds and humans, or humans and pigs—genetically mix to make a new virus that spreads faster and makes people sicker than eith
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can your brain testify against you?A review of applications of neuroscience in law, or 'neurolaw,' brings into question the ethical implications that come with the possibility of a person unwillingly revealing their own guilt.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum algorithm could help AI think fasterOne of the ways that computers 'think' is by analysing relationships within large sets of data. An international team has shown that quantum computers can do one such analysis faster than classical computers, for a wider array of data types than was previously expected.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mini-primaquine does help stop people infecting mosquitoes with malariaA single dose of primaquine is thought to stop people with P. falciparum malaria infecting mosquitoes, which could help bring down malaria transmission. In this Cochrane Review update co-ordinated through the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group, researchers added recent data to examine this question. Their findings are relevant to the global recommendation by the WHO that mini-primaquine be given t
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cichlids: Paler in the face of the enemyMale cichlids that are constantly threatened by predators grow faster and postpone the full expression of conspicuous breeding coloration for longer. This is shown by a study by biologists from the University of Bonn. Thereby, the animals reduce their risk of becoming prey. However, at the peak of their sexual maturity the animals give up their retarded breeding coloration: Even under risky condit
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nano-switches in the cellA team with researchers from Freiburg discovered a new mechanism for the regulation of protein synthesis.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cause of severe genetic disease identifiedMutations in the p63 protein lead to a number of disorders, but none is as severe as the AEC syndrome. Scientists at Goethe University Frankfurt in collaboration with a research group from the University of Naples Federico II have now discovered that this syndrome resembles diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's or ALS more closely than it does other p63-based syndromes. Their results were rece
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic factors that make babies susceptible to complications from Zika are identifiedStudy of twins exposed to Zika virus during pregnancy was conducted at the University of São Paulo's Human Genome & Stem Cell Research Centre in Brazil. Results are published in Nature Communications
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Analyzing street drugs points to potential early warning system in opioid crisisIn just two years, the powerful opioid fentanyl went from nonexistent to detected in more than 1 in 7 stamp bags analyzed by the Allegheny County Office of the Medical Examiner. The findings suggest that real-time information about stamp bags can be used to supplement current public health surveillance measures and could serve as an early warning of new illegal drugs of high lethality available at
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Holding on to patriarchy-reinforcing beliefs comes at a priceSome men categorize women into two groups: either they are chaste, nurturing and good, or they are promiscuous, manipulative, and out to seduce them. This polarizing 'Madonna-Whore dichotomy' is grounded in a man's desire to reinforce male dominance, and not only relates to attitudes that restrict a woman's autonomy, but also impairs intimate relationships between men and women.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ecuador: Deforestation destroys more dry forest than climate changeTropical forests worldwide are at risk. Two of the main threats are the deforestation for arable land and climate change. Scientists from Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Thünen-Institute compared the losses due to deforestation with those that would result in extreme climate change scenarios in Ecuador. Although global warming is likely to change the distribution of species, deforestation
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
We view ourselves and those we care about through 'rose-tinted glasses', study saysNew research from City, University of London, University of Oxford and Yale University has shown that we see our own lives, and also those we care about, through 'rose-tinted glasses'.
7h
Ingeniøren
Piller printet som QR-koder på spiseligt papir skal fremme personlig medicinHvis medicin printes som koder på spiseligt papir, kan man holde bedre styr på typer og dosering, lyder det fra forskere på Københavns Universitet.
7h
The Atlantic
Justin Timberlake's Manly Prance Through the WoodsAt some point in his Super Bowl halftime performance, Justin Timberlake really oughta bring out Janet Jackson. And not just as a mea culpa for her bearing the backlash to their collaborative nipple reveal in 2004, and not just as a way to troll the Parents Television Council. The truth is Timberlake may need fortification. He’s lost the killer ear that makes an arena-commanding pop star. Then aga
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Feed: All Latest
The Dirty Secret of California's Cannabis: It's DirtyAs cannabis use goes recreational in California, producers are facing a reckoning: They’ll either have to clean up their act, or get out of the legal market.
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Feed: All Latest
Self-Driving Cars Companies Are Using Remote Babysitters, And More Car News This WeekThe video game-style secrets to self-driving cars, Waymo and Uber face off, and more car news from this week.
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Feed: All Latest
Blake Griffin May No Longer Be a Clipper, But He's Still a Comic TalentIn an age when professional athletes are off-court performers as well, the NBA's Griffin soars above the rest of the league.
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Ingeniøren
Pengene strømmer ind til data-aktivist: De første privacy-syndere hives i retten 25. majNGO’en NOYB har foreløbig sikret sig en finansiering på 2,2 millioner kroner og gør nu klar til at hive virksomheder i retten for datasjusk.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dell considers VMware purchase, going public againDell Technologies is considering merging with business software provider VMware as part of several potential strategic options.
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Science : NPR
'Leaky Pipelines': Plug The Holes Or Change The System?There are many reasons women leave careers. It's not fair to assume they have not met the mark; some are making positive choices for more impactful, and varied, lives, says 13.7 guest Patricia Fara. (Image credit: AFP/Getty Images)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cutting off tumor suppliesPreventing tumour vascularization is therefore an interesting anti-tumour therapy that has been explored over the last ten years. But how to be truly effective? By identifying two cytokines, key factors in the recruitment of blood cells essential to the formation of new blood vessels, and above all by deciphering how these factors interact simultaneously with blood vessels, researchers at UNIGE ar
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fruit fly hunger games: Taste neurons in controlRight at the tip of the fruit fly's tongue sit two sets of taste neurons that have now been found to be crucial for the insect to develop a craving for protein.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kitchen hygiene in the spotlight: Do TV cooking shows influence our hygiene behavior?TV shows dealing with all aspects of cooking are popular. They not only convey knowledge and tasty recipes, they also have a high entertainment value. A research project at the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) shows, however, that kitchen hygiene often only plays a minor role on TV.
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The Atlantic
A Fantastic Woman Is a Powerful Portrait of Grief and PrejudiceThe life that Orlando (Francisco Reyes) has built with his girlfriend, Marina (Daniela Vega), which viewers glimpse in the opening 15 minutes of A Fantastic Woman, has a warm sense of stability. Orlando relaxes at a spa, then heads over to a bar where he watches Marina, a singer, perform. They celebrate her birthday at a Chinese restaurant, then head home to their apartment. Their relationship (h
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The Atlantic
America Finally Sees Meaningful Wage GrowthIn January, the U.S. economy added 200,000 jobs while the unemployment rate held steady at 4.1 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The number slightly beat analysts’ expectations: Economists surveyed by The Wall Street Journal anticipated around 177,000. But the biggest story of the month was the uptick in wages, which grew 2.9 percent from the previous year—marking the biggest
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
German car sales shrug off new diesel woesThe number of new car registrations in Germany leapt in January, industry data showed Friday, even as a new scandal related to diesel emissions shook the vital sector.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
BT shares tumble on sliding salesShares in British telecoms and television broadcasting company BT slumped Friday to a five-year low on news of shrinking quarterly revenue.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spain extradites suspect thought to be spam kingpin to USSpain says it has extradited to the United States a Russian citizen who is suspected of being one the world's most notorious spammers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lebanon displays stolen ancient artifacts returned from USLebanon has displayed three stolen ancient sculptures that were returned from the United States recently.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Tunis wetlandsThis Copernicus Sentinel-2 image features Tunisia's capital Tunis, in North Africa, and highlights some of the country's important wetlands.
8h
Ingeniøren
Efter Ingeniøren-artikel: Esben Lunde langer ud efter miljøorganisationer og har (hovedsageligt) retDet passer ikke, når Det Økologiske Råd og Danmarks Naturfredningsforening hævder, at fosfor i asken fra afbrænding af den tørre del af gyllen er utilgængelig for planter. Sådan lyder det fra miljøministeren, og eksperterne giver ham i hovedsagen ret, mens organisationerne står fast på, at gyllea...
8h
New on MIT Technology Review
Techlash? Big Tech feels no techlash
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
South Wales fossil identified as new species of ancient reptileFossils found in a quarry near Cardiff in South Wales have been identified by a student and her supervisors at the University of Bristol as a new small species of reptile that lived 205 million years ago.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First study of its kind shows how foetal strength changes over timeBioengineers at Imperial have measured how the force of babies' kicks in the womb change over the course of pregnancy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nano-switches in the cellMitochondria, best known for their role as cellular power plants, perform numerous vital tasks in the cell. During cell respiration, reactive oxygen species can be formed in mitochondria. If these are present in excess, their high reactivity leads to irreparable damage to important cellular components. This so-called oxidative stress is assumed to play a causal role in many diseases and in ageing
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The path to our evolutionDid climate change affect how we got here? A study from 2016 suggests that the climate and geographical locations of our ancestors held sway over how our bodies evolved and how they were built to withstand sharp weather turns. The study gives substantial evidence that many human characteristics—such as free-ranging diets, large brains, and running on two legs—emerged due to the spread of open gras
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Computer reads brain activity to find out the music each person is listening toIt may sound like sci-fi, but mind reading equipment are much closer to become a reality than most people can imagine. Researchers used a magnetic resonance machine to read participants' minds and find out what song they were listening to. The study contributes to improve the technique and pave the way to new research on reconstruction of auditory imagination, inner speech and to enhance brain-com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Radiocarbon dating reveals mass grave did date to the Viking ageArchaeologists have discovered that a mass grave uncovered in the 1980s dates to the Viking Age and may have been a burial site of the Viking Great Army war dead.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MSU-based scientists discovered a molecular timer based on stalling ribosomesA molecular biologist from Lomonosov Moscow State University together with foreign colleagues discovered a special mechanism of protein synthesis regulation that they called a 'molecular timer'. It controls the number of protein molecules produced by a cell and prevents the generation of extra molecules. When activated with drugs, such a timer may help efficiently combat cancerous tumors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists found and studied complex types of defects in the droplets of liquid crystalsA team of scientists from Kirensky Institute of Physics of the Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Science and Siberian Federal University (SFU) together with Russian and foreign colleagues studied the droplets of a cholesteric liquid crystal that contained a twisted defect loop. The results of the study were published in Scientific Reports journal.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Multiple ant-like transport of neuronal cargo by motor proteinsMicrotubules (roads made of proteins) extend throughout a cell for motor proteins (carriers) to deliver neuronal cargo packed with many kinds of materials required for life activity.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research uncovers gene network that regulates motor neuron formation during embryonic developmentUCLA researchers have discovered the inner workings of a gene network that regulates the development of spinal motor neurons in the growing chicken and mouse embryo. The research also answers a long-standing question about why motor neurons, the nerve cells of the spinal cord that control muscle movement, form much faster than other types of neurons.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Does college turn people into liberals?Does going to college make students into political liberals?
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Popular Science
The security gadgets and apps you need to keep your information safeDIY Protect your information. The internet is dark and full of hackers. Luckily, we found a variety of security gadgets and apps that can help keep your information safe.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Monitoring positive charges in solar materialsScientists have implemented a novel way of detecting positive charges (holes) and their trapping in solar materials.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
For the first time in humans, Zika syndrome susceptibility linked to genetic backgroundAbout 6 percent to 12 percent of the babies born from mothers infected with the Zika virus during pregnancy will have the CZS.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In wine, there's health: Low levels of alcohol good for the brainWhile a couple of glasses of wine can help clear the mind after a busy day, new research shows that it may actually help clean the mind as well. The new study shows that low levels of alcohol consumption tamp down inflammation and helps the brain clear away toxins, including those associated with Alzheimer's disease.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: Why traffic apps make congestion worseHas your smartphone traffic app ever led you into a traffic jam? Join the club.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In a threatening environment, male cichlids delay the development of their striking colorMale cichlids that are constantly threatened by predators grow faster and postpone the full expression of conspicuous breeding coloration for longer. This is shown by a study by biologists from the University of Bonn. Thereby, the animals reduce their risk of becoming prey. However, at the peak of their sexual maturity the animals give up their retarded breeding coloration: Even under risky condit
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New quantum repeater paves the way for long-distance big quantum data transmissionPhysicists have designed a new method for transmitting big quantum data across long distances that requires far fewer resources than previous methods, bringing the implementation of long-distance big quantum data transmission closer to reality. The results may lead to the development of future quantum networks, such as a global-scale quantum internet.
8h
Ingeniøren
Ole Birk Olesen vil ikke tale om voksende biltrafikBiltrafikken er vokset massivt siden årtusindeskiftet. Stigningen ventes at fortsætte med uformindsket styrke, godt hjulpet på vej af investeringer i motorveje og sænkede registreringsafgifter. Men transportministeren vil ikke interviewes om sagen.
8h
Science | The Guardian
Archaeologists may have found architects' camp for StonehengePosts with alignment matching stone circle are discovered on army land at nearby Larkhill A team of archaeologists believe they may have discovered a spot where some of the architects of Stonehenge gathered and camped. Continue reading...
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Highly localised and current DNA information on river animalsNew research proves that environmental DNA survives for less than two days in small fast-flowing rivers and so provides highly localised and current information on species composition. This is crucial new evidence as biologists turn increasingly to new DNA sampling techniques to assess aquatic ecosystem health.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover 'chiral phonons' -- atomic rotations in a 2-D semiconductor crystalA research team has found the first evidence that a shaking motion in the structure of an atomically thin material possesses a naturally occurring circular rotation that could become the building block for a new form of information technology and molecular-scale machines.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Longevity industry systematized for first timeVolume 1 of a new report published by the Biogerontology Research Foundation in coordination with several other longevity-focused entities outlines the emerging industry of human longevity in its entirety.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UH engineer locates brain's seizure onset zone in record timeA University of Houston engineer can locate the brain's zone that creates seizures in record time - one hour rather than the typical ten days. The new method potentially reduces complications, time and money.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
People honest about how they spend their money—but maybe not the dollar amountsIn 2008, early in the financial crisis that caused the U.S. housing market to collapse, the federal government distributed more than $100 billion to roughly 130 million eligible taxpayers through the Economic Stimulus Act. Individual tax filers received $600 and joint filers received $1,200, with an additional $300 for each child who qualified for the child credit.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sustainable shopping—take the 'litter' out of glitterScientists often get a bad rap as party poopers. As a case in point, my colleagues and I have provided data on the impacts of balloon releases on marine wildlife.
8h
Feed: All Latest
How NASA Tests Shapeshifting Plane WingsShape memory alloys could make plane wings that flap, to reduce drag, or increase stability in supersonic flight.
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Feed: All Latest
Why JP Morgan, Daimler Are Testing Quantum Computers That Aren't Useful YetQuantum computers hold great promise but aren't useful yet. Still, some companies are testing them for future applications in chemistry, banking and other fields.
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Feed: All Latest
'Altered Carbon' Review: This May Not Be the Cyberpunk Show You're Looking ForThe Netflix adaptation has its moments, but never manages to marry its plot with the bigger ideas lurking in its premise.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How serial killers capitalize on chaos, according to an expertIn 2017, the University of Wisconsin-Madison was ranked by the Princeton Review as the top party school in the United States, but it's also the focus of my recent true crime title, Mad City.
8h
Dagens Medicin
Rørbæk: Vi sætter styrelsen under skærpet offentligt tilsynNormalt sætter Styrelsen for Patientsikker læger under skærpet tilsyn, men i et debatindlæg vender Kristian Rørbæk Madsen rollerne om og lader styrelsen smage sin egen medicin.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Glacial geoengineering—the key to slowing sea level rise?The rapid collapse of some of the world's biggest glaciers due to climate change will have devastating consequences for our planet's coastlines due to sea level rise. Compounding this issue is the fact that many of these coastlines are heavily populated and developed. A recent proposal, first reported in The Atlantic, aims to avert potential catastrophe by turning to geoengineering through the con
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study of salts in water causing stirNew insight into science that seems, on its surface, exceedingly simple—what happens when you add salt to water—could ultimately lead to a better understanding of biochemical processes in cells and perhaps advance sources of clean energy.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cloud based quantum computing used to calculate nuclear binding energyA team of researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory has demonstrated that it is possible to use cloud-based quantum computers to conduct quantum simulations and calculations. The team has written a paper describing their efforts and results and uploaded it to the arXiv preprint server.
8h
Science | The Guardian
Astronaut Thomas Pesquet: ‘Earth is just a big spaceship with a crew. It needs looking after’A stint in space showed the ESA astronaut Earth’s fragility – and convinced him international cooperation is urgently needed As divisions between them widen on Earth, space must be where countries show they can work together for a common good, France’s best-known astronaut has said in a powerful plea for international cooperation beyond the final frontier. “From up there, the Earth seems so small
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Designers of mixed reality experiences shouldn't overlook the communal nature of video gamesAugmented reality, virtual reality and mixed reality headsets are gradually becoming more widespread. But the communal pleasure of video games is at risk when our friends disappear into solitary playing experiences that we can't see.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mimicking human driving in autonomous vehiclesResearchers from the University of Leeds are contributing to a 30-month autonomous vehicle project that will culminate in the most complex journey yet attempted across the UK without driver input.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dog paralysis condition linked to eating chicken necksFeeding dogs raw chicken meat, particularly chicken necks, has been linked to a rare but potentially fatal type of canine paralysis.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Laser technology reveals secrets of ancient Maya civilizationThe steamy jungles of northern Guatemala don't reveal secrets easily. For centuries, the overgrown landscape has protected most of the remains of the Maya who once tamed it—yielding slowly to modern scientists seeking to learn more about the ancient civilization known for its sophisticated hieroglyphic script, art, architecture and mathematics.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Creating an electron-hole liquid at room temperatureMaking a liquid out of electrons is complicated, but it opens the door to research in a wide variety of electronics. NC State physicists have created a phase diagram that can help researchers create this liquid at room temperature, making it much easier for everyone to study.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New source found for ultra-short bursts of lightAlthough critical for varied applications, such as cutting and welding, surgery and transmitting bits through optical fiber, lasers have some limitations – namely, they only produce light in limited wavelength ranges. Now, researchers from the Ginzton Lab at Stanford University have modified similar light sources, called optical parametric oscillators, to overcome this obstacle.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bears avoid trails with motorized recreational activity, study confirmsBears use trails with motorized recreation less often than those without it, new University of Alberta research shows.
9h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Hair FolliclesUnder certain conditions, skin organoids including hair follicles can be generated from mouse pluripotent stem cells, researchers report.
9h
The Scientist RSS
Experimental Drug Relieves Blast-Related PTSD in a Rat Model of Traumatic Brain InjuryThe compound, BCI-838, is already in human clinical trials as a possible treatment for depression.
9h
Popular Science
We consume a lot of food and beer on Super Bowl Sunday, but not a lot of electricityEntertainment At least, not more than usual. The Super Bowl seems excessive in every way. One might reasonably assume that we guzzle up electricity at equally whopping rates during the big event.
9h
The Atlantic
The Banana Trick and Other Acts of Self-Checkout ThieveryB eneath the bland veneer of supermarket automation lurks an ugly truth: There’s a lot of shoplifting going on in the self-scanning checkout lane. But don’t call it shoplifting. The guys in loss prevention prefer “external shrinkage.” Self-checkout theft has become so widespread that a whole lingo has sprung up to describe its tactics. Ringing up a T-bone ($13.99/lb) with a code for a cheap ($0.4
9h
Science : NPR
From Scraps To Snacks: Pulp Left Over From Juice Bars Is Reborn In New FoodsJuicing is all the rage – and produces lots of leftover fruit and vegetable bits. Once thrown out as compost, that fiber is now sneaking its way into snacks, breakfast foods and even burgers. (Image credit: Grace Hwang Lynch for NPR)
9h
Ingeniøren
Ny politisk aftale: Elvarme-afgift sænkes allerede fra 1.majFlere partier går nu med i en aftale om at lempe elvarmeafgiften fra 1 maj og etablerer puljer til blandt andet energilagring. Både godt og skidt, mener professor.
9h
Feed: All Latest
Techie Candidates Like Brian Forde and Brianna Wu Walk a Fine Line Running For CongressLots of people with tech backgrounds are making a run in 2018. How much they play that up, though, depends on the district.
9h
Feed: All Latest
The Limits of Artificial Intelligence and Deep LearningWIRED’s new columnist Jason Pontin on the limits of modern artificial intelligence.
9h
Feed: All Latest
Could a Vaccine Protect Football Players From Concussions?The NFL has to figure out how to deal with the effects of CTE in its players. Screening is one part of the answer—the other is prevention.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
On Super Bowl Sunday, Babies in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Will Be LonelyOne day without their parents isn’t such a big deal—but some infants rarely get family visits, and that is clearly detrimental to their health -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Science | The Guardian
'Ultra-processed' products now half of all UK family food purchasesExclusive : health experts warn increasing popularity of industrially-made food will lead to negative effects such as obesity and poor health Half of all the food bought by families in the UK is now “ultra-processed”, made in a factory with industrial ingredients and additives invented by food technologists and bearing little resemblance to the fruit, vegetables, meat or fish used to cook a fresh
10h
Dagens Medicin
Underskriftsindsamlingen mod STPS genåbnesDe 8 tiltag fra Ellen Trane Nørby omkring kontrol og læring kan umiddelbart virke fornuftige. Men vi vil se resultater, før vi tror på det. Derfor genåbnes underskriftindsamlingen, så vi over længere tid kan holde øje med linjen fra STPS.
10h
The Scientist RSS
Researchers Develop Potential Blood Test for Alzheimers DiseaseThe test uses levels of plasma amyloid-β to estimate the buildup of protein plaques in the brain.
10h
Live Science
6 More Weeks of Winter: Punxsutawney Phil Sees His Royal ShadowThe furry weather prognosticator has seen his shadow, forecasting six more weeks of winter.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover chiral phonons in a 2-D semiconductor crystalA research team from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has found the first evidence that a shaking motion in the structure of an atomically thin (2-D) material possesses a naturally occurring circular rotation.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Handling disasters differently critical for coastal citiesThe field of urban planning is gaining interest as cities around the world, including nearby Houston, are facing increased exposure to weather-related risks and hazards ranging from sea level rise and flooding to temperature build-up and urban heat island effect.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Radiocarbon dating reveals mass grave did date to the Viking ageA team of archaeologists, led by Cat Jarman from the University of Bristol's Department of Anthropology and Archaeology, has discovered that a mass grave uncovered in the 1980s dates to the Viking Age and may have been a burial site of the Viking Great Army war dead.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Natural telescope sets new magnification recordExtremely distant galaxies are usually too faint to be seen, even by the largest telescopes. But nature has a solution—gravitational lensing, predicted by Albert Einstein and observed many times by astronomers. Now, an international team of astronomers led by Harald Ebeling from the University of Hawaiʻi has discovered one of the most extreme instances of magnification by gravitational lensing.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers developing 2-D materials similar to grapheneChemists are working to synthesize the next generation of super materials for high-performance electronics, solar cells, photodetectors and quantum computers. While they have made progress with compound materials, they have not yet succeeded in developing unaltered or "freestanding" materials for such devices, according to a review published in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materi
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Applying topological physics to lasing creates more highly efficient and robust lasersIsraeli and US researchers have developed a new, highly efficient coherent and robust semiconductor laser system: the topological insulator laser.
10h
The Atlantic
Why Public Media Has a Sexual-Harassment ProblemIn a recent letter to listeners, Minnesota Public Radio’s president, John McTaggart, depicted damning allegations of sexual harassment against Garrison Keillor, the recently ousted host of the popular show A Prairie Home Companion . “If the full 12-page letter or even a detailed summary of the alleged incidents were to be made public, we believe that would clarify why MPR ended its business relat
10h
New Scientist - News
First UK three-parent babies could be born this yearTwo cases have been approved in the UK for using a three-parent baby technique to make healthy babies. The technique has already been used in China and Ukraine
10h
New Scientist - News
Brain genes hint at why Zika doesn’t always cause microcephalyOne in 10 babies exposed to the Zika virus during pregnancy develop abnormally small heads. A study of twins in Brazil suggests gene activity may decide which
10h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Små mængder alkohol er med til at rense hjernenEt begrænset alkoholindtag kan være med til at nedbringe betændelsestilstande i hjernen...
10h
Feed: All Latest
The 8 Ways Nintendo Can Double Down on Switch's SuccessThe Switch is already a huge hit. But how can Nintendo maintain its momentum?
10h
Feed: All Latest
Pastor D.J. Soto Is Putting His Faith in a Virtual Reality ChurchD.J. Soto believes Christianity can be renewed through worship in virtual reality. His VR mega-church is even attracting atheists.
10h
Feed: All Latest
How to Watch the Super Bowl, Kitten Bowl, or Puppy Bowl Online (2018)Our full guide to streaming the Super Bowl online (and the Puppy Bowl and Kitten Bowl).
10h
Feed: All Latest
The Squishy Ethics of Sex With RobotsEven if they roboticists solve the privacy and security problems of droid sex, society is going to have to answer a very hard question: Can you consent to sex with a robot? Can it consent to having sex with you?
10h
Feed: All Latest
Survey Finds Conservatives Feel Out of Place in Silicon ValleyOnline poll adds to concerns that political divisions are affecting tech workplaces.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Radiocarbon dating reveals mass grave did date to the Viking ageA team of archaeologists, led by Cat Jarman from the University of Bristol's Department of Anthropology and Archaeology, has discovered that a mass grave uncovered in the 1980s dates to the Viking Age and may have been a burial site of the Viking Great Army war dead.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
Birds Can Tell Us a Lot about Human LanguageThe brain areas that control vocal learning in birds are strikingly similar to language regions in the human brain -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Dagens Medicin
Ny it-løsning fra Sundhedsdatastyrelsen skal sikre borgernes anonymitetDet nye digitale system, Forskermaskinen, fra Sunhedsdatastyrelsen skal gøre det lettere for forskere at hente data og samtidig øge borgernes sikkerhed, når det kommer til personfølsomme data. Men hackere kan stadig ødelægge sikkerheden.
11h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Ny teknologi: Spiselig QR-kode kan være fremtidens medicinForskere på Københavns Universitet har udviklet en ny metode til at producere medicin. De...
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Olympic Big Air Snowboarders Use Physics to Their AdvantageThe PyeongChang Winter Games will debut big air snowboarding, where athletes who master the laws of physics will be most likely to medal and avoid injury -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Dagens Medicin
Lav produktivitetsvækst på sygehuseneSygehusene leverede samlet set en uhørt lav produktivitetsstigning fra 2015 til 2016, viser ny opgørelse. I Hovedstaden faldt produktiviteten.
11h
Ingeniøren
EU giver millioner til udvikling af hurtig-elfærgeDen norske klynge Maritime Clean Tech får 110 millioner norske kroner og fire år til at udvikle en elektrisk hurtigfærge.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
System identifies music selections via brain scanningIt may sound like science fiction, but mind-reading equipment is much closer to reality than most people realize. A new study carried out at D'Or Institute for Research and Education used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to read participants' minds and determine what song they were listening to. The study, published today in Scientific Reports, contributes to the improvement of the technique and p
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
To understand the sea, focus on the seabedA new review, led by Plymouth Marine Laboratory scientists, sets priorities for the benefit of future benthic research.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Practical hair regeneration technologyResearchers have developed a method for the mass preparation of cellular aggregates, also known as hair follicle germs (HFGs), that may lead to a new treatment for hair loss.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Strange things happen when a crystal is split in twoThe remarkable strength of ionic crystals is easily explained at the atomic scale: Positively and negatively charged atoms sit side by side in a repeating periodic arrangement. The strong electrostatic force in between keeps them together.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Photoreversible molecular switch changes the physical property of thermoresponsive polymerResearchers have developed a novel strategy to control the shapes of polymeric materials by utilizing photoresponsive molecular switches, which may evolve tractable stimuli-responsive soft materials.
11h
The Atlantic
Why Senators RebelImagine you’re a member of the U.S. Senate, constitutionally charged with vetting Donald Trump’s nominees to federal agencies and courts. (Don’t panic. It’s only pretend.) More specifically, imagine that you’re a Republican senator, under pressure from your base and your leadership to confirm as many nominees as possible as swiftly as possible. Maybe you love this president. Maybe you hate him. M
11h
The Atlantic
How Immigration Became So ControversialImmigration seems to be the most prominent wedge issue in America. Senate Republicans and Democrats shut down the federal government over the treatment of immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as children, also known as Dreamers. In his State of the Union address on Tuesday, President Donald Trump referred to U.S. immigration law as a “broken” system; one party clapped, the other scowled. This
11h
The Atlantic
The Constitutional Right to BoycottEsther Koontz is a public school educator in Wichita, Kansas. A couple years ago, she saw a presentation about Israel’s treatment of Palestinians. It struck her as unjust, and she wondered whether she should participate in the movement to boycott goods produced in Israel in hopes of pressuring it to change its policies. Then, last year, her church passed a resolution urging Mennonites like her to
11h
Viden
Forskere advarer mod virksomheders skræddersyede kosttilskudVi vejleder i junglen af kosttilbud, forsvarer virksomhederne. Men forskere er skeptiske: Det giver overforbrug og kan være meget usundt.
11h
Ingeniøren
Putin vil have sin egen private version af supersonisk bombeflyDen russiske præsident var til stede, da den opgraderede version af bombeflyet Topulev Tu-160 drog ud på sin jomfrurejse.
11h
Ingeniøren
Hør ugens podcast om strømslugende datacentreIngeniørens ugentlige podcast, Transformator, sætter denne gang fokus på de store strømslugende datacentre, der skyder op rundt omkring i landet. Det øgede danske energiforbrug vil kræve ekstra udbygning med sol og vind – men hvem skal betale? De private elkunder?
11h
Ingeniøren
Eksplosivt voksende biltrafik efterlader togene i støvetFolketinget vedtog i 2009, at over halvdelen af trafikvæksten i Danmark skal ske i den kollektive trafik. Siden er bare fire procent af den samlede trafikvækst sket i togtrafikken.
11h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Volcanic eruptions in Guatemala captured in time-lapse videoVolcan de Fuego sent ash over a mile into the sky.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plan to protect Indonesian peatlands with aerial mapping wins $1mA plan to use satellite imagery and aerial mapping to protect Indonesia's peatlands—a vast carbon sink and source of much of the country's greenhouse emissions—was awarded a $1 million prize on Friday.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Oil-like' blobs hit Japan beaches after tanker sinks"Oil-like" blobs are washing up on the beaches of several southern Japanese islands, officials said Friday, raising fears they could be from a tanker that sank in the area nearly three weeks ago.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China orders microblog operators to tighten censorshipRatcheting up control over Chinese microblogs, regulators ordered operators on Friday to set up a mechanism to remove false information after the most popular service was criticized for allowing prohibited material to spread.
11h
Big Think
Does your ego serve you, or do you serve it? What Buddhism and Freud say about self-slavery"Buddhist psychology and Western psychotherapy both hold out hope for a more flexible ego, one that does not pit the individual against everyone else in a futile attempt to gain total surety." Read More
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Record-breaking efficiency for secure quantum memory storageResearchers at Laboratoire Kastler Brossel (LKB) in Paris have broken through a key barrier in quantum memory performance. Their work has enabled the first secure storage and retrieval of quantum bits.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Macromolecular order in plastic kingdomA team of researchers at the Institute of Synthetic Polymer Materials of the Russian Academy of Sciences, MIPT and elsewhere has determined how the regularity of polypropylene molecules and thermal treatment affect the mechanical properties of the end product. Their new insights make it possible to synthesize a material with predetermined properties such as elasticity or hardness. The paper detail
12h
Dagens Medicin
Ny formand for National Videnskabsetisk Komité udpegetSundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby (V) har udpeget professor Mette Hartlev som ny formand for National Videnskabsetisk Komité.
12h
NYT > Science
Q&A: The Octopus: Stable GeniusThe cephalopod’s brain is the largest (proportionally) of any invertebrate. The creature’s advanced abilities, including memory and problem-solving, may be attributed to its large genome.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electro-mechano-optical NMR detectionAn international research project led by Kazuyuki Takeda of Kyoto University and Koji Usami of the University of Tokyo has developed a new method of light detection for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by up-converting NMR radio-frequency signals into optical signals.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Formation of cell membrane component domains in artificial lipid bilayerResearch conducted by Toyohashi University of Technology in collaboration with Tohoku University elucidated the fusion process of proteoliposomes with an artificial lipid bilayer and the mechanism behind this process. In addition, the researchers also discovered that the domains composed of all cell membrane components exist as "islands" isolated from the artificial membrane. These findings will l
12h
Ingeniøren
Politikere: Find ud af hvad PET har gemt på dig - det er din retEn række danske politikere opfordrer nu borgerne til at bruge deres ret til at vide, hvad PET gemmer i deres registre. Hvis styrelsen finder noget, der er gemt uberettiget, skal det slettes.
12h
Dagens Medicin
Ny formand for Hovedstadens Sundhedsudvalg klarChristoffer Buster Reinhardt fra Det Konservative Folkeparti er blevet valgt som ny formand for Region Hovedstadens Sundhedsudvalg efter et konstituerende møde.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Early career decisions could affect when you retirePolicies to extend working life should not exclusively focus on older people as the decision on when to retire is influenced by the course of a person's career, according to researchers investigating the factors affecting how long people work.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New, safe zinc oxide quantum dotsNowadays, zinc oxide nanoparticles are among the most commonly used nanomaterials. They seem to be safe for humans, but there are still no standards for their toxicity, and despite investigations, the toxicological impact of ZnO nanomaterials remains ambiguous. Researchers from the Polish Academy of Sciences (IPC PAS) in Warsaw and the Warsaw University of Technology (PW) have recently developed a
12h
Ingeniøren
Udbudsaftale: Højhastighedstog kan stadig komme til DanmarkRammeaftalen for udbuddet af eltog lægger op til, at der kan komme endnu et udbud med fokus på højhastighedstog i Danmark. Udsigterne er dog lange.
12h
Dagens Medicin
Steffen Heegaard er ny prodekan på sundhedsområdet på Københavns UniversitetProfessor og overlæge Steffen Heegaard er netop tiltrådt som prodekan for forskning på Københavns Universitets sundhedsfaglige fakultet.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
It sounds like music to my ... brain!It may sound like sci-fi, but mind reading equipment are much closer to become a reality than most people can imagine. Researchers used a magnetic resonance machine to read participants' minds and find out what song they were listening to. The study contributes to improve the technique and pave the way to new research on reconstruction of auditory imagination, inner speech and to enhance brain-com
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For the first time in humans, Zika syndrome susceptibility linked to genetic backgroundAbout 6 percent to 12 percent of the babies born from mothers infected with the Zika virus during pregnancy will have the CZS.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Monitoring positive charges in solar materialsEPFL, PSI and APS scientists have implemented a novel way of detecting positive charges (holes) and their trapping in solar materials.
12h
Ingeniøren
Genstart hos Microsoft gav kø i FaktaMedlemskort-tjeneste, som ikke ville starte af sig selv i Microsoft Azure, var onsdag årsag til et minuts ekstra ekspederingstid i COOP's butikker over hele landet.
12h
Dagens Medicin
Formindsket styrelse skal genvinde lægernes tillidStyrelsen for Patientsikkerhed bliver halveret og skal med øget fokus på læring og systemansvar skabe fornyet tillid hos lægerne.
12h
The Atlantic
The Rot at the Heart of Brazil's Anti-Corruption CrusadeI f it’s possible to identify the moment when Brazil’s anti-corruption purge derailed, it was probably an episode that Brazilians call “ o PowerPoint.” In September 2016, federal prosecutors held a press conference to lay out the indictment of former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva for corruption and money laundering. In the now-infamous presentation , one slide showed 14 illustrated circles
13h
Viden
Dansk satellit er sendt i kredsløb: Ulloriaq skal overvåge ArktisDer er meldinger om, at opsendelsen af det danske forsvars første satellit går efter planen.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Styrelse dropper brugen af intern karakterskalaStyrelsen for Patientsikkerhed erkender, at karakterskema anvendt i undervisningen af sagkyndige har kunnet misforstås, men afviser, at skemaet var udtryk for en skærpet ‘dumpegrænse’.
13h
The Atlantic
Radio Atlantic: Paul Manafort and How the Swamp Was Made“Conventional wisdom suggests that the temptations of Washington, D.C., corrupt all the idealists, naïfs, and ingenues who settle there," Franklin Foer writes in his cover story for the March issue of The Atlantic. "But what if that formulation gets the causation backwards? What if it took an outsider to debase the capital and create the so-called swamp?” Before Paul Manafort led the campaign to
13h
Dagens Medicin
Procentregning i Sundhedsministeriet – spin eller svær kunst?Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed skal styrke fokus på læring - men hvor meget skal der styrkes, når det kommet til stykket.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Japan's Honda revs up annual net-profit forecastHonda Motor on Friday nearly doubled its annual net-profit forecasts, citing strong growth in the sales of its cars and motorcycles, as well as US corporate tax cuts.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Record highs, record heists: where is cryptocurrency heading?A hacking theft that netted $530 million, a ban on Facebook advertising, regulation even in Russia and more wild price swings: despite another stomach-churning week for cryptocurrencies, analysts say they are here to stay.
13h
Dagens Medicin
Overlæge frifundet i Odense-sagenEn overlæge fra Odense Universitetshospital, der var tiltalt for grov forsømmelse eller skødesløshed i forbindelse med en patients død, er frifundet.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
With Kamprad gone, will Ikea lose its compass?Will Ikea lose its way after the death of its almighty founder Ingvar Kamprad? Observers reject the notion, or at least downplay the risks facing the orphaned group.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google parent hit by higher costs, names new chairmanGoogle parent company Alphabet on Thursday reported a quarterly loss to set aside funds to pay taxes on repatriated profits, and named a new chairman to replace outgoing Eric Schmidt.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experts discover hidden ancient Maya structures in GuatemalaExperts using an aerial high-tech laser scanner have discovered thousands of ancient Maya structures hidden under the thick jungle of northern Guatemala, officials said Thursday.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple delivers record profit, seeks to allay iPhone X fearsApple on Thursday said its earnings in the final three months of last year set new records, with sales of its flagship iPhone X topping its expectations.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Japan raids hacked crypto exchange, bitcoin plunges furtherJapanese authorities on Friday raided virtual currency exchange Coincheck, a week after the Tokyo-based firm lost $530 million in cryptocurrency to hackers.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sony profits soar more than tenfold, forecast revised upSony said Friday its nine-month profit had soared more than tenfold, and upgraded its annual profit forecast, demonstrating that its roaring comeback is continuing.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The raptors guarding Mexico City's airportFar from the crowds of passengers, lines and passport control, Madison spreads his wings on the side of a runway at Mexico City's international airport, the busiest in Latin America.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sony CEO Hirai to step downKazuo Hirai SonySony chief executive Kazuo Hirai, who led a major and successful overhaul at the Japanese electronics giant, will step down at the end of March, the firm said Friday.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Holograms and mermaids: Top trends at Nuremberg toy fairThe Nuremberg toy fair, the world's largest, opened its doors this week to an industry in the throes of reinvention as toymakers vie for the attention of children increasingly glued to smartphones and tablets.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Call me baby': Talking sex dolls fill a void in ChinaWith China facing a massive gender gap and a greying population, a company wants to hook up lonely men and retirees with a new kind of companion: "Smart" sex dolls that can talk, play music and turn on dishwashers.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon's quarterly profit tops $1 billion for first timeIt was a prime holiday season for Amazon: The online retailer's quarterly profit soared past $1 billion for the first time in its more than 20-year history as it sold more voice-activated gadgets, enlisted new Prime members and benefited from its recent purchase of Whole Foods.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
January was hottest month ever recorded in New ZealandJanuary was the hottest month ever recorded in New Zealand according to figures released Friday, and experts say climate change is one factor.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google's AI push comes with plenty of people problemsGoogle CEO Sundar Pichai recently declared that artificial intelligence fueled by powerful computers was more important to humanity than fire or electricity. And yet the search giant increasingly faces a variety of messy people problems as well.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New insights into how employees manage stressful situations at workResearchers have developed a new tool which could benefit organisations and their staff by assessing employees' beliefs about how they manage challenging and stressful situations at work.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The benefits of social media for young people in careYoung people in care benefit from the psychological, emotional and social support gained via social media networks - according to new research from the University of East Anglia's Centre for Research on the Child and Family (CRCF).
15h
NeuWrite San Diego
A Recipe for the BrainHow confident would you be in making a Victorian Tennis Cake, given a set of ingredients and the recipe? What about with a vague list of instructions instead of a detailed recipe? If you’ve ever watched The Great British Baking Show, this concept is familiar to you as the “technical challenge”. Britain’s best amateur bakers […]
15h
Viden
Seks timer i 120-kilo tung dragt: Sådan bliver Andreas Morgensen klar til næste rumturDen danske astronaut arbejder 40 timer om ugen på NASA's space center i Houston.
15h
Ingeniøren
Politikerne rykker på databrug: Øger kontrol og auto-afgørelser og mindsker samtykkeMere datadeling mellem myndigheder og mere automatisk kontrol af borgere er i støbeskeen – og kritikere finder allerede i dag praksis problematisk.
16h
Ingeniøren
Bedre brugerrejser skal give nemmere skilsmisse og borgerbetjeningBøvlede digitale sagsgange for borgerne skal lettes af brugerrejser med udgangspunkt i borgernes behov. Visionen er nemmere borgerportaler, men privacy-problematikken spøger i baggrunden.
16h
Ingeniøren
Leder: Vaccine-salg – den virkelige skandale er at ignorere eksperterne
16h
Science | The Guardian
We need to do more to close the gap in cancer outcomes | Sanchia ArandaMoney, cultural background and geographic location are crucial in determining survival rates This week Cancer Council released new data forecasting cancer survival trends into the future. The statistics, outlining an expected 72% increase in the number of Australians living with cancer or in remission by the year 2040, were startling – but even more concerning are the trends that show the gap bet
17h
New on MIT Technology Review
A search for insomnia genes involving 1.3 million people is the largest genetic study everThe quest to understand common diseases takes on unprecedented scope.
17h
Scientific American Content: Global
Holiday Cheer Leads to Birth-Rate SpikeDuring feel-good holiday periods like Christmas and Eid-al-Fitr, romance strikes—leading to a boom in births nine months later. Karen Hopkin reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science current issue
Our science, our society
18h
Science current issue
News at a glance
18h
Science current issue
India plans to land near moon's south pole
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Science current issue
Judge orders unmasking of anonymous peer reviewers
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Science current issue
NASA seeks to revive lost probe that traced solar storms
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Science current issue
Forever young? Naked mole rats may know the secret
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Science current issue
Accelerator boom hones China's engineering expertise
18h
Science current issue
Dams nudge Amazon's ecosystems off-kilter
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Science current issue
Human nature, observed
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Science current issue
Out of balance in the Arctic
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Science current issue
Enhancing responses to cancer immunotherapy
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Science current issue
Stealth reactions driving carbon fixation
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Science current issue
Lighting up superconducting stripes
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Science current issue
Galaxy motions cause trouble for cosmology
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Science current issue
Tracing single-cell histories
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Science current issue
Scientifically assess impacts of sustainable investments
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Science current issue
Picturing the future
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Science current issue
The fetishization of quantification
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Science current issue
Malaria in Venezuela requires response
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Science current issue
Integrated approach to malaria control
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Science current issue
Response: Integrated approach to malaria control
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Science current issue
Myoediting for Duchenne muscular dystrophy
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Science current issue
Dwarf galaxies move in unexpected ways
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Science current issue
Fearsome flaviviruses
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Science current issue
A phonon merry-go-round
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Science current issue
Remember the sugar when making proteins
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Science current issue
Structure of the human spliceosome
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Science current issue
A demanding lifestyle
18h
Science current issue
Biofilms provide refuge for cancerous bacteria
18h
Science current issue
Self-defense by avoiding self-targeting
18h
Science current issue
Integrating the biosphere into climate models
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Science current issue
Brain mutations, young and old
18h
Science current issue
Compensating a polar surface
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Science current issue
About-face for citrate synthase
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Science current issue
HLA genotype affects response
18h
Science current issue
The X chromosome link to lupus
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Science current issue
The cytoskeleton-EGFR connection
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Science current issue
A nonlinear peek into stripes
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Science current issue
Targeting the demise of male mitochondria
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Science current issue
High caloric intake induces inflammation
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Science current issue
Shear by the centimeter
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Science current issue
Using phylogeny to test evolution
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Science current issue
Many stars don't form in clusters
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Science current issue
Recycling antibiotic sensitivity
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Science current issue
Cutting up in the deep
18h
Science current issue
A whirling plane of satellite galaxies around Centaurus A challenges cold dark matter cosmologyThe Milky Way and Andromeda galaxies are each surrounded by a thin plane of satellite dwarf galaxies that may be corotating. Cosmological simulations predict that most satellite galaxy systems are close to isotropic with random motions, so those two well-studied systems are often interpreted as rare statistical outliers. We test this assumption using the kinematics of satellite galaxies around th
18h
Science current issue
Structure of a human catalytic step I spliceosomeSplicing by the spliceosome involves branching and exon ligation. The branching reaction leads to the formation of the catalytic step I spliceosome (C complex). Here we report the cryo–electron microscopy structure of the human C complex at an average resolution of 4.1 angstroms. Compared with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae C complex, the human complex contains 11 additional proteins. The step I sp
18h
Science current issue
Structure of the yeast oligosaccharyltransferase complex gives insight into eukaryotic N-glycosylationOligosaccharyltransferase (OST) is an essential membrane protein complex in the endoplasmic reticulum, where it transfers an oligosaccharide from a dolichol-pyrophosphate–activated donor to glycosylation sites of secretory proteins. Here we describe the atomic structure of yeast OST determined by cryo–electron microscopy, revealing a conserved subunit arrangement. The active site of the catalytic
18h
Science current issue
Different mutational rates and mechanisms in human cells at pregastrulation and neurogenesisSomatic mosaicism in the human brain may alter function of individual neurons. We analyzed genomes of single cells from the forebrains of three human fetuses (15 to 21 weeks postconception) using clonal cell populations. We detected 200 to 400 single-nucleotide variations (SNVs) per cell. SNV patterns resembled those found in cancer cell genomes, indicating a role of background mutagenesis in can
18h
Science current issue
Aging and neurodegeneration are associated with increased mutations in single human neuronsIt has long been hypothesized that aging and neurodegeneration are associated with somatic mutation in neurons; however, methodological hurdles have prevented testing this hypothesis directly. We used single-cell whole-genome sequencing to perform genome-wide somatic single-nucleotide variant (sSNV) identification on DNA from 161 single neurons from the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of 15 nor
18h
Science current issue
A primordial and reversible TCA cycle in a facultatively chemolithoautotrophic thermophileInorganic carbon fixation is essential to sustain life on Earth, and the reductive tricarboxylic acid (rTCA) cycle is one of the most ancient carbon fixation metabolisms. A combination of genomic, enzymatic, and metabolomic analyses of a deeply branching chemolithotrophic Thermosulfidibacter takaii ABI70S6 T revealed a previously unknown reversible TCA cycle whose direction was controlled by the
18h
Science current issue
Reversibility of citrate synthase allows autotrophic growth of a thermophilic bacteriumBiological inorganic carbon fixation proceeds through a number of fundamentally different autotrophic pathways that are defined by specific key enzymatic reactions. Detection of the enzymatic genes in (meta)genomes is widely used to estimate the contribution of individual organisms or communities to primary production. Here we show that the sulfur-reducing anaerobic deltaproteobacterium Desulfure
18h
Science current issue
High-energy, high-fat lifestyle challenges an Arctic apex predator, the polar bearRegional declines in polar bear ( Ursus maritimus ) populations have been attributed to changing sea ice conditions, but with limited information on the causative mechanisms. By simultaneously measuring field metabolic rates, daily activity patterns, body condition, and foraging success of polar bears moving on the spring sea ice, we found that high metabolic rates (1.6 times greater than previou
18h
Science current issue
Polarity compensation mechanisms on the perovskite surface KTaO3(001)The stacking of alternating charged planes in ionic crystals creates a diverging electrostatic energy—a "polar catastrophe"—that must be compensated at the surface. We used scanning probe microscopies and density functional theory to study compensation mechanisms at the perovskite potassium tantalate (KTaO 3 ) (001) surface as increasing degrees of freedom were enabled. The as-cleaved surface in
18h
Science current issue
Probing optically silent superfluid stripes in cupratesUnconventional superconductivity in the cuprates coexists with other types of electronic order. However, some of these orders are invisible to most experimental probes because of their symmetry. For example, the possible existence of superfluid stripes is not easily validated with linear optics, because the stripe alignment causes interlayer superconducting tunneling to vanish on average. Here we
18h
Science current issue
Observation of chiral phononsChirality reveals symmetry breaking of the fundamental interaction of elementary particles. In condensed matter, for example, the chirality of electrons governs many unconventional transport phenomena such as the quantum Hall effect. Here we show that phonons can exhibit intrinsic chirality in monolayer tungsten diselenide. The broken inversion symmetry of the lattice lifts the degeneracy of cloc
18h
Science current issue
Patient HLA class I genotype influences cancer response to checkpoint blockade immunotherapyCD8 + T cell–dependent killing of cancer cells requires efficient presentation of tumor antigens by human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-I) molecules. However, the extent to which patient-specific HLA-I genotype influences response to anti–programmed cell death protein 1 or anti–cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated protein 4 is currently unknown. We determined the HLA-I genotype of 1535 advanced can
18h
Science current issue
The piRNA targeting rules and the resistance to piRNA silencing in endogenous genesPiwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) silence transposons to safeguard genome integrity in animals. However, the functions of the many piRNAs that do not map to transposons remain unknown. Here, we show that piRNA targeting in Caenorhabditis elegans can tolerate a few mismatches but prefer perfect pairing at the seed region. The broad targeting capacity of piRNAs underlies the germline silencing of tran
18h
Science current issue
Patients with familial adenomatous polyposis harbor colonic biofilms containing tumorigenic bacteriaIndividuals with sporadic colorectal cancer (CRC) frequently harbor abnormalities in the composition of the gut microbiome; however, the microbiota associated with precancerous lesions in hereditary CRC remains largely unknown. We studied colonic mucosa of patients with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), who develop benign precursor lesions (polyps) early in life. We identified patchy bacteria
18h
Science current issue
New Products
18h
Science current issue
Sponsored Collection | Precision medicine and cancer immunology in China
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Science current issue
In praise of slow
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Science current issue
Climate, ecosystems, and planetary futures: The challenge to predict life in Earth system modelsMany global change stresses on terrestrial and marine ecosystems affect not only ecosystem services that are essential to humankind, but also the trajectory of future climate by altering energy and mass exchanges with the atmosphere. Earth system models, which simulate terrestrial and marine ecosystems and biogeochemical cycles, offer a common framework for ecological research related to climate
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Belief in conspiracy theories associated with vaccine skepticismPeople who believe Princess Diana was murdered or that John F. Kennedy's assassination was an elaborate plot are more likely to think that vaccines are unsafe, despite scientific evidence to the contrary, according to new research.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Red wine proves good for the heart (again)Antioxidant compounds found in red wine are advancing the treatment of heart disease -- the leading cause of death for both men and women in the US. Researchers have developed drug-eluting stents with red wine antioxidants.
18h
Ingeniøren
Brexit bremser store firmaer i digitaliseringFølgerne af Brexit er endnu ukendte, men spekulationerne fyger frit. De store usikkerheder får store danske firmaer til at hive i håndbremsen, når det gælder digitaliseringsprojekter. Men et voksende antal virksomheder satser på cloudløsninger.
18h
Ingeniøren
Biltrafikken vokser massivtFlere motorveje, sænket registreringsafgift og billig benzin har øget biltrafikken med næsten en femtedel siden årtusindeskiftet.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
3D printing: How creative minds inspire each otherThere is a lot of exchange going on in the 3D printing community: About half of the designs on the open platform Thingiverse are variations or combinations of existing ideas.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Agroforestry systems may play vital role in mitigating climate changeAgroforestry could play an important role in mitigating climate change because it sequesters more atmospheric carbon in plant parts and soil than conventional farming, according to researchers.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Two-stage gas sensor reports on soil dynamicsA robust two-stage microbial sensor will help researchers observe gene expression and the bioavailability of nutrients in environments like soil and sediments without disturbing them.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How does limited education limit young people?A recent nationally-representative US Department of Education study found that 28 percent of fall 2009 ninth-graders had not yet enrolled in a trade school or college by February 2016 -- roughly six-and-a-half years later.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New use for telecommunications networks: Helping scientists peer into deep spaceFor the first time, researchers have demonstrated that a stable frequency reference can be reliably transmitted more than 300 kilometers over a standard fiber optic telecommunications network and used to synchronize two radio telescopes.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gene enhancers are important despite apparent redundancyScientists answered a long-standing question about the role of enhancers. And by better linking the genomic complement of an organism with its expressed characteristics, their work offers new insights that further the growing field of systems biology, which seeks to gain a predictive understanding of living systems.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Family impact of congenital Zika syndrome likely to last a lifetimeThe impact of congenital Zika syndrome on families will be substantial and will last a lifetime, given its severity and uncertainty about long-term outcomes for infants.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New mouse model makes stem cells light up greenMultipotent stromal cells have long been a hot topic in medical research. Scientists have now found a way to specifically mark these stem cells. This makes it possible to analyze their distribution pattern and their function in living organisms.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Small molecules set up security system to defend the genomeThousands of short RNA molecules with diverse genetic sequences serve as security guards to identify and silence attempts to invade the genome, such as DNA inserted by viruses or parasitic elements known as transposons.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unexpected role of platelets in immune responsePlatelets play a much bigger role in our immune system than previously thought, according to researchers. In addition to their role in coagulation and healing, platelets also act as the immune system's first responders when a virus, bacterium, or allergen enters the bloodstream. This discovery opens the door to new ways to treat patients with septic shock caused by viral or bacterial infection and
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Changing landscape means some Arctic ponds may potentially be a significant source of carbon emissionsA new Canadian study has found that carbon released by some ponds in the High Arctic could potentially be a hidden source of greenhouse gas emissions.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Solution to long-standing chemistry riddle has implications for drug developmentScientists have solved a decades-old challenge by working out how to craft functional residues onto a molecular cube. Cubane now has a plethora of additional applications in the fields of drug development, materials science and molecular engineering.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bacteria play critical role in driving colon cancersPatients with an inherited form of colon cancer harbor two bacterial species that collaborate to encourage development of the disease, and the same species have been found in people who develop a sporadic form of colon cancer, a research team finds.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Even small changes within an ecosystem can have detrimental effectsA mutualistic relationship between species in an ecosystem allows for the ecosystem to thrive, but the lack of this relationship could lead to the collapse of the entire system. New research reveals that interactions between relatively small organisms are crucial to mutualistic relationships in an ecosystem dominated by much larger organisms, including trees and elephants.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers observe electrons zipping around in crystalsFor the first time, scientists have tracked electrons moving through exotic materials that may make up the next generation of computing hardware, revealing intriguing properties not found in conventional, silicon-based semiconductors.
19h
Science : NPR
California Appears Headed Back To DroughtLess than a year ago, California declared an end to a five-year drought, but a lack of winter precipitation is bringing new worries. (Image credit: Rich Pedroncelli/AP)
20h
Live Science
Lungs: Facts, Function and DiseasesLungs are an important part of the respiratory system. Adults take 15 to 20 breaths a minute, which comes to around 20,000 breaths a day.
20h
Science | The Guardian
Prostate cancer now kills more people than breast cancer, UK figures revealMale illness now third most common cause of cancer death behind lung and bowel Prostate cancer has become the third most common cause of cancer death in the UK, overtaking breast cancer, despite improvements in survival rates for both. The top cancer killer in the UK is lung cancer, which claimed 35,486 lives in 2015, followed by colorectal cancer, with a toll of 16,067 people. Continue reading..
21h
Science | The Guardian
Russia to offer tourists spacewalks for $100m – with discount for first takerSpace company Energia will offer ‘comfortable’ flights for up to six people onboard the NEM-2 module Russia is planning to send paying tourists on the International Space Station out on spacewalks for the first time, an official from the country’s space industry said Thursday. “We are discussing the possibility of sending tourists on spacewalks,” Vladimir Solntsev, the head of Russian space compa
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Short section of DNA predicts kidney transplant successThe first study of its kind to gather transplant data from across the UK and Ireland found patients have the best chance of long term survival where the donor and recipient have genetic matches in a section of DNA known as the HLA locus. This finding could help to personalise treatment and reduce costs to the NHS as patients need less treatment or spend less time in hospital.
21h
New Scientist - News
Pregnant women have to navigate a minefield of painkiller adviceI'm pregnant and sick of confusing advice about whether painkillers can harm developing fetuses - what should women like me do?
21h
Futurity.org
‘Vaccine’ kills cancer in miceInjecting small amounts of two immune-stimulating agents directly into solid tumors in mice eliminated all traces of cancer, including distant, untreated metastases, according to a new study. The approach works for many different types of cancers, including those that arise spontaneously, the study finds. The researchers believe the local application of very small amounts of the agents could serv
22h
Big Think
Anger is temporary madness: The stoics knew how to curb itPeople get angry for all sorts of reasons, from the trivial ones (someone cut me off on the highway) to the really serious ones (people keep dying in Syria and nobody is doing anything about it). But, mostly, anger arises for trivial reasons. That’s why the American Psychological Association has a ... Read More
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The benefits of social media for young people in careNew research reveals the benefits of using social media for young people in care. Until now, the automatic assumption has been that platforms such as Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp only pose a risk for this vulnerable group. But young people in care benefit from the psychological, emotional and social support gained via online networks.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New insights into how employees manage stressful situations at workResearchers have developed a new tool which could benefit organizations and their staff by assessing employees' beliefs about how they manage challenging and stressful situations at work. Results from two studies, involving a total of 2,892 Italian employees, provide evidence of the added value of a more comprehensive approach to the assessment of self-efficacy at work. They also suggest the new s
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ibuprofen in the first three months of pregnancy may harm future fertility of baby girlsPregnant women who take the pain killer ibuprofen in the first 24 weeks of their pregnancy may be reducing the store of eggs in the ovaries of their daughters. A study published in Human Reproduction has found the first evidence in human ovarian tissue that exposure to ibuprofen during the crucial first three months of foetal development results in a 'dramatic loss' of the germ cells that go into
22h
Futurity.org
We don’t tend to ‘like’ these photos on InstagramInstagram Type TextAlthough Instagram users have a variety of reasons for using the platform, the majority head to Instagram for social news and entertainment and are less likely to engage with political or controversial images, according to a new study. The study also identifies several strategies for increasing engagement with audiences. “Most users in our study preferred simple, clean images…” Although an averag
22h
Live Science
'Bug Bombs' Still Causing Injuries Despite Product WarningsDespite new warning labels on "bug bomb" products, Americans are still injuring themselves with these at-home pesticides.
22h
Science | The Guardian
Ibuprofen taken in early pregnancy could affect daughter's fertility – studyPainkiller taken by mother in first three months of pregnancy could potentially reduce child’s number of eggs, say researchers Ibuprofen taken by women in their first three months of pregnancy might reduce a daughter’s number of eggs, potentially affecting the child’s future fertility, according to research carried out on human cells in the lab. It is generally thought that women are born with a
22h
Science | The Guardian
Men and anxious people more likely to have been bitten by dogs, survey showsOfficial figures underestimate how common bites are, say researchers, with odds of men being bitten 81% higher than for women Anxious people and men are much more likely to be the victims of dog bites, according to new research which indicates bites are far more common than current official estimates suggest. The study, based on a survey of almost 700 people, found that nearly a quarter of people
22h
Futurity.org
Neglected kids do better with earlier foster family placementNeglected children placed with foster care families earlier in life are more likely to be as resilient and competent socially, academically, and physically as their peers who have never been institutionalized when they reach their teenage years, according to new research focused on children in Romania. “These kids are not doomed, and many of them end up with normal outcomes…” Researchers discover
22h
Big Think
Davos experts warn about future "rogue technology"Experts caution about the dangers of the current technological revolution at the annual gathering of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Read More
22h
Futurity.org
Stem cells made from skin grow into working muscleBiomedical engineers have grown the first working human skeletal muscle from induced pluripotent stem cells. The advance builds on work published in 2015 when researchers grew the first functioning human muscle tissue from cells obtained from muscle biopsies. The ability to start from cellular scratch using non-muscle tissue will allow scientists to grow far more muscle cells, provide an easier p
23h
Futurity.org
Yes, chronic Lyme disease is a real thingSome Lyme disease patients experience symptoms long after they are supposedly free of the disease and the bacterium that causes it, researchers have confirmed in a new study. “People have been comparing apples to oranges by grouping all of those with chronic Lyme disease together…” “Post-treatment Lyme disease syndrome is a real disorder that causes severe symptoms in the absence of clinically de
23h
Futurity.org
Polls suggest less environmentalism among U.S. ChristiansAmong self-identified US Christians, positive attitudes about the environment and environmental stewardship have not increased, according to new research. David Konisky of Indiana University’s School of Public and Environmental Affairs analyzed 20 years of survey results from Gallup public opinion polls. He found that not only is environmentalism not increasing, there are signs it is actually in
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Multidrug-resistant malaria spread under the radar for years in CambodiaThe most comprehensive genetic study of malaria parasites in Southeast Asia has shown that resistance to antimalarial drugs was under-reported for years in Cambodia. Wellcome Sanger Institute researchers showed the parasites developed multidrug resistance to first-line treatments extremely rapidly. Reported in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, the study revealed that one main resistant strain had sp
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Regular exercise halves complication rate after lung cancer surgeryExercising regularly before surgery for lung cancer halves the complication rate afterwards, finds a synthesis of the available published evidence in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anxious personality may be linked to heightened dog bite riskPersonality type may be linked to a heightened risk of being bitten by a dog, with people of a more anxious disposition more likely to be nipped, suggests research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.
23h
Science | The Guardian
Drug-resistant malaria will spread without urgent action, experts warnDismay at south-east Asian outbreaks of malaria resistant to artemisinin drugs, the most powerful drugs currently available Urgent action must be taken to stop the spread of drug-resistant malaria in south-east Asia and potentially beyond, according to scientists. The outbreak in Cambodia, then Thailand, Laos and most recently Vietnam , of malaria that is untreatable with the newest and best drug
23h
Live Science
Are Dogs More Likely To Bite You If You're Anxious?If you regularly feel anxious, you might be the perfect candidate for a dog bite.
23h
Popular Science
It turns out our galaxy isn’t as special as we thoughtSpace It's just plane confusing. Powerful, influential figures exert a irresistible pull, gathering an entourage around them.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Toward end of Ice Age, human beings witnessed fires larger than dinosaur killersAbout 12,800 years ago, thanks to fragments of a comet, humans saw an astonishing 10 percent of the Earth's land surface, or about 10 million square kilometers, consumed by fires.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Norway rats trade different commoditiesResearchers have shown for the first time in an experiment that also non-human animals exchange different kind of favors. Humans commonly trade different commodities, which is considered a core competence of our species. However, this capacity is not exclusively human as Norway rats exchange different commodities, too. They strictly follow the principle "tit for tat" -- even when paying with diffe
23h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: When Amazon Comes to TownWhat We’re Following Memo Dilemma: The saga surrounding a controversial memo from House Intelligence Committee Chairman Devin Nunes took another turn when the FBI issued an unusual public statement arguing strongly against the memo’s release. In addition, it was reported that when Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein asked President Trump for support during a clash with Nunes in December, the p
23h
Futurity.org
We’re more willing to try ‘gross’ foods with foreign namesPeople are more willing to eat foods that they find disgusting if those foods are presented in a foreign language, new research shows. The finding could help win acceptance for environmentally sustainable foods that many people are unwilling to try. “By using a foreign language you take away some of the emotionality attached to ‘insects…'” Americans and Europeans are generally averse to eating in
23h

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