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The Atlantic
Boycott the Republican PartyA few days after the Democratic electoral sweep this past November in Virginia, New Jersey, and elsewhere, The Washington Post asked a random Virginia man to explain his vote. The man, a marketing executive named Toren Beasley, replied that his calculus was simply to refuse to calculate. “It could have been Dr. Seuss or the Berenstain Bears on the ballot and I would have voted for them if they we
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Remarkable spider with a tail found preserved in amber after 100 million yearsAn extraordinary new species of arachnid, resembling a spider with a tail, has been discovered in amber from Myanmar (formerly Burma), of mid-Cretaceous age, around 100 million years ago.
1h
Futurity.org
A little alcohol may keep brains ‘clean’Low levels of alcohol consumption may reduce inflammation and help the brain clear away toxins, including those associated with Alzheimer’s disease, new research suggests. “Prolonged intake of excessive amounts of ethanol is known to have adverse effects on the central nervous system,” says Maiken Nedergaard, co-director of the Center for Translational Neuromedicine at the University of Rochester
17h
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Waymo and GM Lead the Self-Driving Car Race, New Data ShowsThe numbers we have are a little jumbly, but they're the best we've got—and they do tell an interesting story.
5min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Old drug may have new tricks for fighting cancerResults show that the drug ibrutinib acts as a potent kinase inhibitor for ERBB4, limits growth in human cancer cells in the laboratory, and reduces tumor size in mice. The sensitivity of ERBB4 to ibrutinib is similar to that of BTK, the original target of the drug.
9min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Treatment of nitrogen-polluted sediment using marine anammox bacteriaWorking on a way to alleviate eutrophication in coastal waters, scientists have found a combination of bacteria with the potential to lighten the impact of excess nitrogen found in many coastal water systems.
9min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ribosomes found to induce somatic cell pluripotencyIn 2012, a Japanese research group discovered that human skin cells acquire pluripotency when introduced to lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus). Now, the same group of researchers have found that the cause of somatic cell conversion into pluripotent stem cells is the ribosome, a protein synthesizing cellular organelle.
9min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New genome-editing method 'cuts back' on unwanted genetic mutationsGene therapy can potentially correct genetic disorders by directly editing defective genes. CRISPR-Cas9 is a popular gene-editing technology whose clinical utility is limited by its tendency to produce unintended genetic errors. Researchers centered at Osaka University developed a modified CRISPR-Cas9 system that uses single-stranded nicking, rather than DNA cleavage, to generate highly precise ch
9min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UTIA research examines long-term economic impact of cover cropsA team of researchers from the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture examined data from the past 29 years to determine whether it is profitable to include cover crops in an erosion management strategy. They found that while cover crops can cut into profitability over the short term, there are a number of benefits over long-term adoption.
12min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Continental teams with NVIDIA on self-driving car systemSoftware maker NVIDIA (Nah-VID-E-uh) and German auto parts supplier Continental are teaming to build a self-driving vehicle system that will hit the market in 2021.
16min
The Atlantic
Could an Adjective Solve a 27-Year International Dispute?A 27-year-old dispute could be resolved with an adjective and a simple name-change of an airport. Or at least that’s what Greek and Macedonian leaders appear to be saying. Nearly three decades of contention over the seemingly simple word “Macedonia”—and who gets to claim it—may be nearing an end, due largely to leadership changes on each side. Matthew Nimetz, the United Nations envoy who has been
20min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists find massive reserves of mercury hidden in permafrostResearchers have discovered permafrost in the northern hemisphere stores massive amounts of natural mercury, a finding with significant implications for human health and ecosystems worldwide.
22min
The Atlantic
Calling the Trump Era by Its Proper NameDonald Trump’s first official State of the Union address —which seems as if it happened back in the 19th century, but in reality is five days in the past—highlighted something that was implicit in his campaign and increasingly significant through his time in office: Trump virtually never praises or speaks about, and gives no evidence of respecting or even comprehending, the strengths of the Unite
31min
The Atlantic
The Great Crude Oil Fireball TestIf all goes well, a massive fireball of hydrocarbons will ignite in the New Mexico desert some time in the next year. It will be part of a multiyear Department of Energy research project to understand whether the chemical composition of unconventional crude oils changes the risk they pose to the nation’s highways, pipelines, and railroads. If all doesn’t go well, a similar massive fireball could
31min
Live Science
Could a 19th-Century 'Alienist' Understand the Criminal Mind?In the earliest years of psychology, what did medical experts really know about criminal behavior and thinking?
32min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Loved one's death could spur aggressive measures against breast cancerA woman's memories of a loved one's experience with cancer could play a significant role in how she approaches breast cancer prevention in her own life, a new study has found.
33min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Baby, it's cold outside: understanding conditions for star formationResearchers demonstrate how a gas escapes ice at an extremely cold temperature, providing insight about how stars form in interstellar clouds.
33min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cellular models of fetal intestinal tissue may help combat deadly neonatal diseaseCellular models of fetal and adult intestinal tissues generated by investigators from MassGeneral Hospital for Children have identified differences in the immune response to natural intestinal bacteria at different developmental ages.
33min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find massive reserves of mercury hidden in permafrostResearchers have discovered permafrost in the northern hemisphere stores massive amounts of natural mercury, a finding with significant implications for human health and ecosystems worldwide.
33min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PSMA PET/CT clearly differentiates prostate cancer from benign tissueUsing nuclear medicine, German researchers have found a way to accurately differentiate cancerous tissue from healthy tissue in prostate cancer patients. The research is highlighted in the February issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine and demonstrates that the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) on 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT scans correlates with PSMA-expression in primary prostate cancer. By thi
33min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New 'Tomato Expression Atlas' dives deep into the fruit's fleshResearchers at BTI, Cornell and USDA published a spatiotemporal map of gene expression across all tissues and developmental stages of the tomato fruit - the genetic information underlying how a fruit changes from inside to out as it ripens. Their data is available in the new Tomato Expression Atlas (TEA).
33min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How viruses disarm the immune systemHow do viruses that cause chronic infections, such as HIV or hepatitis c virus, manage to outsmart their hosts' immune systems? The answer to that question has long eluded scientists, but new research from McGill University has uncovered a molecular mechanism that may be a key piece of the puzzle. The discovery could provide new targets for treating a wide range of diseases.
33min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Powerful new dataset reveals patterns of global ozone pollutionAlthough ozone pollution is dropping across many parts of the United States, western Europe and Japan, many people living in those countries still experience more than a dozen days every year in which levels of the lung irritant exceed health-based standards.
33min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research on global surface ozone levels shows populations most affected by air pollutionResearch led by the Universities of Leicester and Edinburgh and 12 other research institutions into surface ozone levels that are important for human health.
33min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What makes a good egg?In approximately 15 percent of cases where couples are unable to conceive, the underlying cause of infertility is not known. Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and in the Division of Biological Sciences at UC San Diego have identified a protein in mice that must be present in eggs for them to complete normal development. Without the protein, called ZFP36L2 or L2 f
33min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New controls scale quantum chipsA fundamental barrier to scaling quantum computing machines is "qubit interference." In new research published in Science Advances, engineers and physicists from Rigetti Computing describe a breakthrough that can expand the size of practical quantum processors by reducing interference.
34min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Israel bourse bullish on blockchain, cagey on cryptoThe Tel Aviv Stock Exchange (TASE) is bullish about the potential for blockchain technology but sees involvement in cryptocurrency trading as far away, its chief executive said on Monday.
34min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cape Town calls for hygiene blitz amid water crisisOfficials in Cape Town appealed on Monday for residents to be vigilant against health risks caused by efforts to save or reuse water as the South African city's drought worsens.
34min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alibaba buys stake in Wanda Film for $750 millionTroubled Chinese conglomerate Wanda announced Monday that e-commerce giant Alibaba has agreed to buy a stake in its cinema division for around $750 million, the latest sell-off by the heavily-indebted group.
34min
Live Science
If You Get the Flu, When Should You Go to the ER?Emergency rooms around the U.S. are crowded with flu patients. But if you do catch the flu, how do you know if you need to go to the ER?
36min
Scientific American Content: Global
Trump Wants Offshore Drilling, but States Are Choosing Wind EnergyStates bordering the outer continental shelf are looking for carbon-free electricity as the Trump administration rolls back rules requiring it -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
37min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New 'Tomato Expression Atlas' dives deep into the fruit's fleshFrom fried green tomatoes to pizza pie, the world savors the tomato across many stages of ripeness, each with its unique qualities. How a fruit ripens has long been an important question for breeders, and the subject of an extensive and fruitful collaboration involving researchers at Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI), Cornell University and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA).
40min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Changing weather patterns throwing ecosystems out of whackDay and night will soon align, marking the start of spring. But the timing of nature's calendar is starting to fall out of sync.
40min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Effects of climate change can complicate the politics of military bases, study findsGreenland's vast ice sheet has long been home to Project Iceworm, an abandoned Cold War-era U.S. Army initiative designed to deploy ballistic missiles with nuclear warheads against the Soviet Union. When the project was shuttered in 1967, military planners expected that any materials left on site would be safely frozen in ice and snow in perpetuity.
46min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Controlling quantum interactions in a single materialThe search and manipulation of novel properties emerging from the quantum nature of matter could lead to next-generation electronics and quantum computers. But finding or designing materials that can host such quantum interactions is a difficult task.
46min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers create fiber optic sensors that dissolve in the bodyFor the first time, researchers have fabricated sensing elements known as fiber Bragg gratings inside optical fibers designed to dissolve completely inside the body. The bioresorbable fiber Bragg gratings could be used for in-body monitoring of bone fracture healing and for safer exploration of sensitive organs such as the brain.
46min
Feed: All Latest
Pixel Visual Core Now Adds HDR+ To Instagram, WhatsApp, and Snapchat ImagesPixel Visual CoreAfter months of lurking unused in Google's flagship Pixel 2 smartphone, the company's first homegrown, consumer-focused processor springs to life.
46min
The Scientist RSS
ProteinSimple: icIEF Analysis of Protein Mixtures with MauriceMeet Maurice.
50min
The Scientist RSS
ProteinSimple: Seeing Beyond Light Obscuration with Micro-Flow ImagingMeet MFI.
50min
Science : NPR
SpaceX Set To Launch World's Most Powerful RocketSpaceX Falcon HeavyThe company is getting ready for the first flight of its massive Falcon Heavy. It will be the most powerful rocket in use — if it doesn't blow up. (Image credit: SpaceX)
51min
Scientific American Content: Global
SpaceX Falcon Heavy Rocket Will Attempt a Triple LandingIf successful, the rocket’s first test flight will include three boosters flying back to Earth -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
51min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new path into bipolar disorder comes to lightA new article reveals a novel potential drug target for bipolar disorder and offers new insights into the underlying biology of this lifelong and devastating mental illness.
51min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Islands in yeast membrane revealed by extreme microscopyMicrobiologists have visualized tiny islands in the cell membrane of baker's yeast. These membrane compartments appear to store transport proteins before use. The scientists observed that these proteins move extremely slowly in the plasma membrane of the yeast and discovered how they travel through the membrane to reach the islands. They made these observations with state-of-the-art super-resoluti
51min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Meditation has limited role in making you a better person, says studyNew research has suggested meditation's role in making individuals better people is limited.
51min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mixed-use developments may actually reduce housing affordability, social diversityMaking the buildings in neighbourhoods more diverse through mixed residential and commercial developments also makes it too expensive for many people to live in.
51min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Therapeutic targets for aggressive triple-negative breast cancersNew findings have made inroads into a strategy to identify triple-negative breast cancers at risk for metastasis, and eventually target these cancers with drugs.
51min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Powerful new dataset reveals patterns of global ozone pollutionAlthough ozone pollution is dropping across many parts of the United States, western Europe and Japan, many people living in those countries still experience more than a dozen days every year in which levels of the lung irritant exceed health-based standards.
52min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SpaceX poised to launch 'world's most powerful rocket'SpaceX Falcon HeavySpaceX is poised for the first test launch Tuesday of its Falcon Heavy, which aims to become the world's most powerful rocket, capable of ferrying people to the Moon or Mars some day.
52min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Moffitt researchers identify new target to reduce risk of GVHDMoffitt Cancer Center researchers are trying to identify new drug targets to reduce the risk of GVHD. Their new study, published last week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows a drug that targets the protein JAK2 may reduce the risk of GVHD.
55min
Live Science
Flat-Earth Rocketeer Fails to Launch (Again)The flat-Earth rocketeer remains planet-bound.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hubble delivers first insight into atmospheres of potentially habitable TRAPPIST-1 planetsAn international team of astronomers has used the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to look for atmospheres around four Earth-sized planets orbiting within or near TRAPPIST-1's habitable zone. The new results further support the terrestrial and potentially habitable nature of three of the studied planets. The results are published in Nature Astronomy.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dim light may make us dumberSpending too much time in dimly lit rooms and offices may actually change the brain's structure and hurt one's ability to remember and learn, indicates groundbreaking research by Michigan State University neuroscientists.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists report big improvements in HIV vaccine productionResearch on HIV has led to many promising ideas for vaccines to prevent infection by the AIDS virus, but very few candidate vaccines have been tested in clinical trials. One reason is the technical difficulty of manufacturing vaccines based on the envelope proteins of the virus, according to vaccine expert Phil Berman, who has now developed new methods for the production of HIV vaccines.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Long-term usage of inhaled corticosteroids may increase risk of bone fractures in patients with COPDA study published in the February journal CHEST® suggests long-term inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in patients with COPD may increase risk of bone fractures in both men and women. Previous studies have suggested that ICS negatively impacts bone mineral density in a dose-dependent fashion, particularly affecting postmenopausal women, but it has been unclear whether these effects translate to bone fr
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Detecting and treating dnDSA early preserves allograft functionMonitoring and treating de novo donor-specific antibodies before they could cause graft damage helped to decrease dnDSA in a majority of pediatric kidney transplant recipients at Children National Health System and prevented graft failure in the first few years.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
TRAPPIST-1 planets probably rich in waterA new study has found that planets orbiting the star TRAPPIST-1 are made mostly of rock, and some could hold more water than Earth. The planets' densities suggest that some of them could have up to 5 percent of their mass in the form of water. The hotter planets closest to their parent star are likely to have dense steamy atmospheres and the more distant ones probably have icy surfaces.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Autism might be better detected using new two-minute questionnaireResearchers at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School have developed a two-minute questionnaire for parents that could help pediatricians and other primary care providers detect autism in toddlers, at a time when intervention might be crucial. The Psychological Development Questionnaire (PDQ-1) had an 88 percent likelihood of correctly identifying which of the youngster that screened positive because o
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers create fiber optic sensors that dissolve in the bodyFor the first time, researchers have fabricated sensing elements known as fiber Bragg gratings inside optical fibers designed to dissolve completely inside the body.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Do companies need corporate universities?Researchers at the Higher School of Economics, International Laboratory of Intangible-driven Economy, have examined the role of corporate universities in developing human capital and improving performance. Their findings were published in the Journal of Intellectual Capital at https://doi.org/10.1108/JIC-01-2017-0011.
1h
Live Science
Astronomers Detect a Swarm of Tiny Objects Orbiting an Alien SunThese dusty comets, speeding through distance space, are the smallest objects ever detected in another star system.
1h
NYT > Science
In Australia, Arsonists May Have WingsAboriginal Australians have long believed that some predatory birds deliberately spread wildfires. A few ornithologists have set out to find proof.
1h
NYT > Science
Basics: Many Animals Can Count, Some Better Than YouNumerosity is deeply embedded in species that need to track quantity, such as hungry spiders and schooling fish. But the ability seems to have faded in humans.
1h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Newly Discovered Form of Water Ice Is ‘Really Strange’Long theorized to be found in the mantles of Uranus and Neptune, the confirmation of the existence of superionic ice could lead to the development of new materials.
1h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Ancient Spider-like Creature With Tail Found Trapped in AmberThe Cretaceous-era arachnid had the front end of a spider and a scorpionlike tail appendage, but more specimens are required to find its place on the evolutionary tree.
1h
cognitive science
Some more on dog cognition from that special issue of Current Directions in Psychological Science. This time on object permanence.submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists target glioma cancer stem cells, which could improve patient survivalBrain tumors are responsible for 25 percent of cancer-related deaths in children and young adults. Despite initial response to treatment, most aggressive brain tumors eventually recur and are ultimately incurable. Multiple studies suggest that cancer stem cells within these tumors resist therapy and are responsible for tumor recurrences. Researchers at Dartmouth's Norris Cotton Cancer Center have
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Controlling quantum interactions in a single materialBy demonstrating that multiple quantum interactions can coexist and be controlled in a single material, researchers open the door for ultrafast, low-power electronics and quantum computers.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Effects of climate change can complicate the politics of military bases, study findsUsing an abandoned U.S. military base in Greenland as a case study, new Brown research explores how the impact of climate change on domestic and overseas military bases could cause a host of political and diplomatic problems.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel genetic variants for ADHD linked to educational attainmentA study published in the February 2018 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP) reports that five novel genetic variants associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been identified by exploiting genetic overlap between ADHD and educational attainment.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Weight loss surgery improves microvascular complications in obese diabetic patientsIn a BJS (British Journal of Surgery) analysis of published studies in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, researchers found that weight loss surgery helps prevent the development of microvascular complications--which affect small blood vessels--better than medical treatment. The analysis was conducted by investigators from the Surgical Department of the University of Heidelberg in cooperation wi
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Toddler formulas and milks -- not recommended by health experts -- mislead with health claimsMisleading labeling on formulas and milks marketed as 'toddler drinks' may confuse parents about their healthfulness or necessity, finds a new study by researchers at the NYU College of Global Public Health and the Rudd Center for Food Policy & Obesity at the University of Connecticut.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Changing weather patterns throwing ecosystems out of whackSpecies' lifecycles are slowly growing out of alignment, which can affect the functioning of ecosystems, ultimately impacting human food supply and disease.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New approach could quickly identify best organic solar cell mixturesAn international team of researchers has discovered a new quantitative relation that allows for quick identification of promising material combinations for organic solar cells. The discovery could significantly reduce the 'trial and error' aspect of solar cell production by reducing the time spent on finding the most efficient mixtures.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An enhanced recovery program reduced total hospital costs and improved patient outcomesA standardized protocol for managing patients immediately before, during, and after colorectal operations not only improved clinical outcomes, it also significantly reduced overall hospital costs.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Half of all dementias start with damaged 'gatekeeper cells'USC research sheds new light on how a breakdown in the brain's vascular system predates the accumulation of toxic plaques and tangles in the brain that bring about Alzheimer's disease. The research suggests an earlier target for preventing dementia and Alzheimer's. Nearly 50 percent of all dementias, including Alzheimer's, begins with the breakdown of the smallest blood vessels in the brain and th
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Patients with kidney disease with heart defibrillators at greater risk of hospitalizationIn a study of nearly 6,000 community-based patients with chronic kidney disease and heart failure, the use of implantable cardioverter defibrillators was associated with a significantly increased risk of subsequent hospitalization.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ridesharing may not reduce number of missed medical appointments, Penn study findsThe high number of low-income patients missing medical appointments because of unreliable transportation has led to partnerships between health care systems and ridesharing companies, such as Uber and Lyft, in an effort to ease travel and boost attendance. However, a new study from Penn Medicine researchers published in JAMA Internal Medicine found that offering a free Lyft ride to Medicaid patien
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate variability -- past and futureOn the basis of a unique global comparison of data from core samples extracted from the ocean floor and the polar ice sheets, AWI researchers have now demonstrated that, though climate changes have indeed decreased around the globe from glacial to interglacial periods, the difference is by no means as pronounced as previously assumed (Nature advanced online publication). Until now, it was believed
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A clonal crayfish from nature as a model for tumorsA genome study has proven that all specimen of Marmorkrebs, or marbled crayfish, originate from a single female. About 30 years ago, the original clone evolved in an aquarium. Ever since, the female animals have been able to spread successfully and massively without any help from males, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) report in a current publication. The clonal genome evol
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Zika brain damage may go undetected in pregnancyZika virus may cause significant damage to the fetal brain even when the baby's head size is normal, according to a primate study. The damage can be difficult to detect even with sophisticated brain scans. It may also occur from infections during childhood and adolescence. Hard hit are brain regions that generate new brain cells. Fetal brain structures that may be injured include those where neura
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Remarkable spider with a tail found preserved in amber after 100 million yearsAn extraordinary new species of arachnid, resembling a spider with a tail, has been discovered in amber from Myanmar of mid-Cretaceous age, around 100 million years ago.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers solve a materials mystery key to next-generation electronic devicesWriting today in the journal Nature Materials, Chang-Beom Eom and his collaborators provided evidence of a hole gas coexisting with two-dimensional electron gas. They designed an ultrathin material, known as a thin film structure, specifically for this research.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The toxic relationship between ALS and frontotemporal dementiaALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are two neurodegenerative diseases with a toxic relationship, according to a new USC Stem Cell study published in Nature Medicine. The study describes how a mutation in a gene, called C9ORF72, leads to toxicity in nerve cells--causing 10 percent of all cases of ALS, and an additional 10 percent of FTD.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A good life for all within the planet's meansA study led by the University of Leeds has found that no country currently meets its citizens' basic needs at a globally sustainable level of resource use. The research is the first to quantify the sustainability of national resource use associated with meeting basic human needs for 151 countries.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
North American ice sheet decay decreased climate variability in the Southern HemisphereThe changing topography of ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere during the last Ice Age forced changes in the climate of Antarctica, a previously undocumented inter-polar climate change mechanism.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research reveals more about TRAPPIST-1 planets, and the possibility of lifeA series of four studies have shed new light on the properties of the TRAPPIST-1 planetary system, currently our most optimal hope for evidence of biological life beyond the solar system.
1h
New Scientist - News
It may be impossible to live comfortably without trashing EarthA study of 151 nations shows that the ones that do the most damage to the planet also give their citizens the best lives. Does this mean modern life is unworkable?
1h
Science | The Guardian
Why communication from a ‘locked-in’ child is a miracle we must questionIf Jonathan Bryan can communicate we should celebrate, but hard evidence is needed before we change how severely disabled children are cared for There has been much coverage lately – including in the Times , the Mirror , the Daily Mail , and tonight’s CBBC documentary special – of the story of 11-year-old Jonathan Bryan and his remarkable ability to write poetry, keep a regular blog, and communic
1h
The Atlantic
SpaceX's Falcon Heavy Is Ready For Its Historic FlightElon Musk SpaceXCAPE CANAVERAL—Around midnight on Sunday, after the evening’s heavy rain dwindled to a drizzle and then finally stopped, a giant rocket emerged from a warehouse into the thick, humid air, ready for a historic journey. Its first stop, not far from the warehouse, was launchpad 39A, the site of rocket launches that, decades earlier, had hurled American astronauts toward the moon. From there, the roc
1h
The Atlantic
A Pet Crayfish Can Clone Itself, and It's Spreading Around the WorldNo one knows exactly when the clones first appeared, but humans only became aware of them in the early 2000s. It was a German aquarium owner who first brought it to scientists’ attention. In 1995, he had acquired a bag of “Texas crayfish” from an American pet trader, only to find his tank inexplicably filling up with the creatures. They were all, it turns out, clones. Sometime, somewhere, the bio
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An archaeological adventure visiting Mexico's pyramid citiesIt was an archaeological adventure: a 12-day family trip to Mayan and Aztec pyramid cities, from Mexico City to the Yucatan jungle.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Online tool speeds up evolution educationStudents often learn best when they can apply what they're learning. In the world of science, that means engaging in the practice of science. But this can be a challenge for teachers when dealing with subjects that are hard to observe—like biological evolution. The solution? Digital evolution—computer software in which populations of digital organisms evolve.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Substances used in household goods affect the immune system of a coastal musselPerfluoalkyl substances (PFAS) is shorthand for a group of fluorinated compounds that have been used extensively in household products such as non-stick cookware, stain-resistant carpeting and upholstery. They can also be found in things from clothing to adhesives, and even in some cosmetics. PFAS use is being phased out because they have been shown to target the immune system in humans and rodent
1h
Futurity.org
Killer cells target leukemia broadcasting ‘come and get me’Researchers used CRISPR gene-editing to equip certain immune cells with a homing beacon to target leukemia. Leukemia is a deadly cancer in which rogue white blood cells roam the bloodstream, slowly killing the body that gave them life. But it has an Achilles’ heel. Many leukemia cells are betrayed by a molecule on their exterior surfaces known as CD19. “We’re trying to design smarter cells.” When
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Science | The Guardian
Very creepy crawlies: 'proto-spiders' with long tails discovered in amberFossil hunters find preserved remains of 100-million-year-old arachnids with tails longer than their bodies In what can safely be assumed to be horrifying news for arachnophobes around the world, scientists have discovered the beautifully-preserved remains of prehistoric “proto-spiders” that sported tails longer than their bodies. Continue reading...
1h
Science | The Guardian
Xanax misuse: doctors warn of 'emerging crisis' as UK sales riseUK makes up 22% of global sales of the highly addictive anti-anxiety drug on the dark web ‘My personality changed’: Johnny, 16, on Xanax addiction The UK is the second-largest market for untraceable online sales of Xanax in the world, research has found, prompting warnings from doctors, MPs and youth workers of an “emerging crisis”. Data revealed to the Guardian shows that the UK accounts for 22%
1h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How to fix a broken heart | Guy WinchAt some point in our lives, almost every one of us will have our heart broken. Imagine how different things would be if we paid more attention to this unique emotional pain. Psychologist Guy Winch reveals how recovering from heartbreak starts with a determination to fight our instincts to idealize and search for answers that aren't there -- and offers a toolkit on how to, eventually, move on. Our
1h
BBC News - Science & Environment
'Extraordinary' fossil sheds light on origins of spidersA fossil preserved in amber for 100 million years is shaking up ideas about the evolution of spiders.
1h
Feed: All Latest
The Physics of One of the Craziest Big Air Snowboard Tricks EverWith elite athletes competing in the Olympic debut of Big Air in Pyeongchang, South Korea, expect to see more attempts of the quad cork 1800.
1h
Viden
Forskere opdager flydende vand på fjerne planeterI et solsystem, der er cirka 40 lysår væk, har forskere opdaget vand på jordlignende planeter.
1h
Popular Science
Find out where your town’s air pollution actually comes fromEnvironment It goes any way the wind blows. Transboundary air pollution is the subject of a new lawsuit. What is it and who's responsible?
1h
Popular Science
Last week in tech: All the important stories, no Super Bowl commercialsTechnology It was a great week for Nintendo fans, but not so great for Bitcoin holders. Mario Kart for Mobile is coming this year.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Online tool speeds up evolution educationThe biology teacher's pedagogical toolbox is evolving. Bright colors, replicating computer code and a digital petri dish bring evolution science to life for students.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Substances used in household goods affect the immune system of a coastal musselIn a study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, researchers from National University of Singapore have determined how perfluoalkyl substances (PFAS) affect the immune system of green mussels. Mussels, and other invertebrates, play an essential role in their ecosystem, and the ocean is the final sink for many pollutants like PFAS, so it is important to monitor regions that may have
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Premature babies make fewer friends -- but not for longPremature babies make fewer friends, feel less accepted by peers and spend less time socialising in early childhood -- but this improves when they get to school -- according to new research by an international research collaboration, including the University of Warwick, UK.
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Ingeniøren
Danske ingeniører har fundet unikt antistof mod allergierOpdagelsen af et antistof, der kan stoppe allergiske reaktioner, inden de udvikler sig til nys og kløe, har har stort potentiale for udviklingen af allergimedicin.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New approach could quickly identify best organic solar cell mixturesAn international team of researchers has discovered a new quantitative relation that allows for quick identification of promising material combinations for organic solar cells. The discovery could significantly reduce the "trial and error" aspect of solar cell production by reducing the time spent on finding the most efficient mixtures. The research appears in Nature Materials.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research reveals more about TRAPPIST-1 planets, and the possibility of lifeA series of four studies have shed new light on the properties of the TRAPPIST-1 planetary system, currently our most optimal hope for evidence of biological life beyond the Solar system.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers solve a materials mystery key to next-generation electronic devicesLennon and McCartney. Abbott and Costello. Peanut butter and jelly.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
North American ice sheet decay decreased climate variability in the Southern HemisphereNew research led by the University of Colorado Boulder shows that the changing topography of ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere during the last Ice Age forced changes in the climate of Antarctica, a previously undocumented inter-polar climate change mechanism.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A good life for all within the planet's meansA study led by the University of Leeds has found that no country currently meets its citizens' basic needs at a globally sustainable level of resource use.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers compare global temperature variability in glacial and interglacial periodsOn the basis of a unique global comparison of data from core samples extracted from the ocean floor and the polar ice sheets, AWI researchers have now demonstrated that, though climate change has decreased around the globe from glacial to interglacial periods, the difference is by no means as pronounced as previously assumed. Until now, it was believed that glacial periods were characterised by ex
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A clonal crayfish from nature as a model for tumorsA genome study has proven that all specimen of Marmorkrebs, or marbled crayfish, originate from a single female. About 30 years ago, the original clone evolved in an aquarium. Ever since, the female animals have been able to spread successfully without any help from males, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) report in a current publication. The clonal genome evolution of the c
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The Atlantic
A Long-Lost NASA Spacecraft Rises From the DeadRick Burley couldn’t believe what he was reading. The email on his computer screen, forwarded by his former colleague Jim Burch, was from someone named Scott Tilley. Tilley, an amateur astronomer in British Columbia, recently had been searching the skies for a signal from the Zuma satellite, a top-secret government mission that many believe failed after Zuma was launched into orbit last month. Hi
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Laser experiment hints at weird in-between iceScientists spot signs of an unusual phase of water called superionic ice.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Some of TRAPPIST-1’s planets could have life-friendly atmospheresThe seven planets orbiting TRAPPIST-1 are probably rocky and some may have life-friendly atmospheres, two new papers suggest.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When did flowers originate?Flowering plants likely originated between 149 and 256 million years ago according to new research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mixed-use developments may actually reduce housing affordability, social diversityMaking the buildings in neighbourhoods more diverse through mixed residential and commercial developments also makes it too expensive for many people to live in, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A revolutionary material for aerospace and neuromorphic computingFirst came the switch. Then the transistor. Now another innovation stands to revolutionize the way we control the flow of electrons through a circuit: vanadium dioxide (VO2). A key characteristic of this compound is that it behaves as an insulator at room temperature but as a conductor at temperatures above 68°C. This behavior - also known as metal-insulator transition - is being studied in an amb
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The resilience of ray-finned fishesScientists from the University of Bristol have revealed that ray-finned fishes are perhaps one of Earth's most resilient groups of animals, having survived four mass extinction events that wiped out many other groups.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Land-based pollution with microplastics an underestimated threatTiny plastic particles present a threat to creatures on land, and may have damaging effects similar or even more problematic than in our oceans. Researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and their Berlin colleagues warn that the impact of microplastics in soils, sediments and freshwater sources could have a long-term negative effect on terrestrial ecos
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Small birds have more efficient wing strokes than batsSmall birds are more energy-efficient than bats when flying. Researchers previously believed this was due to air resistance created by the bats' ears. However, biologists at Lund University in Sweden have now discovered another reason.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What medieval artists teach us about animal sexThe prevailing view is that animals mainly have sex to reproduce. Until recently, therefore, scientists assumed that animals were relentlessly heterosexual. This is the message conveyed by countless zoos, wildlife documentaries, books and films. Think March of the Penguins or 2014's controversial Noah. Such representations perpetuate the belief that animals are best seen through the lens of human
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Collective disentanglement of entangled polymersLMU researchers have disproven the conventional theory used to explain the dynamics of polymer solutions. They show that for biopolymers collective effects facilitate chain mobility, which is reminiscent of the behavior of glass-like materials.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The three surprises of 'OumuamuaOne of the defining moments in planetary astronomy in 2017 is that this is the year we discovered the first astronomical object to enter the Solar System from interstellar space. Now known as `Oumuamua (Hawaiian for "scout"), the object was discovered by the Pan-STARRS survey team in Hawaii on October 19th. Over the next three weeks it was in turn classified as a comet, a long-period asteroid and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers call on science fiction to understand extremist psychologyDeakin University researchers have used science fiction to understand terrorist propaganda techniques in an innovative study.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Oxidation behavior of crude oil and SARA fractionsDuring the last several months, the Lab has managed to conduct tests of oxidation of SARA fractions (saturates, aromatics, resins, and asphaltenes). Differential scanning calorimetry, adiabatic calorimetry, and thermogravimetric analysis coupled with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy have been among the used methods.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An underestimated threat: Land-based pollution with microplasticsTiny plastic particles also present a threat to creatures on land and may have damaging effects similar or even more problematic than in our oceans. Researchers from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and their Berlin colleagues warn: the impact of microplastics in soils, sediments and the freshwaters could have a long-term negative effect on terrestrial ecosyst
2h
The Atlantic
Fear and Loathing in the BundestagBERLIN—On first glance, the legislators occupying the 92 royal blue chairs lining the far-right side of the plenary floor in Germany’s parliament appeared no different from their 617 colleagues. Dressed in sharp suits and ties, they flipped through briefing papers on their desks, gave prepared speeches at the appropriate times, and asked polite questions of their colleagues. But then it came time
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Could this creature hold the future of regenerative medicine?Thanks to a team of Australian scientists, we're a step closer to harnessing the power of stem cells for regenerative medicine.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The benefits of job automation are not likely to be shared equallyWhile companies might reap significant gains in productivity from automating certain jobs, this won't necessarily lead to pay rises for everyone. The evidence suggests businesses might pass on the gains to some workers, but not to all.
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Futurity.org
2-minute questionnaire may detect autismA new two-minute questionnaire for parents could help pediatricians detect autism in toddlers earlier, at a time when intervention might be crucial, a new study indicates. Lead investigator Walter Zahorodny, associate professor of pediatrics at Rutgers University, says the Psychological Development Questionnaire (PDQ-1), had an 88 percent likelihood of correctly identifying which of the children
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
Uber and Waymo are finally taking their driverless lawsuit to trial
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Big strides in the push for affordable, effective antivenomsFor city dwellers, especially those in the developed world, the idea of being bitten by a venomous snake seems outlandish. But it is a daily and very real risk for millions around the world – and that includes many people living in African countries.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Magnetic trick triples the power of SLAC's X-ray laserScientists at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have discovered a way to triple the amount of power generated by the world's most powerful X-ray laser. The new technique, developed at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), will enable researchers to observe the atomic structure of molecules and ultrafast chemical processes that were previously undetectable at the
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Elon Musk is launching a Tesla into space – here's how SpaceX will do itSpaceX Falcon HeavyElon Musk's SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket is scheduled for launch on February 6, and the entire space industry is watching with anticipation.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Putting the P in photosynthesis of tropical forestsHow forests in Panama and elsewhere grow, decline, and recover affects carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere and human welfare. Scientists are investigating whether computational models of these forests could be improved by considering the amount of phosphorus found in the trees. Phosphorus is a key nutrient that is especially important in tropical forests. The team analyzed upper canopy leaves
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New genome-editing method 'cuts back' on unwanted genetic mutationsGene therapy is an emerging strategy to treat diseases caused by genetic abnormalities. One form of gene therapy involves the direct repair of a defective gene, using genome-editing technology such as CRISPR-Cas9. Despite its therapeutic potential, genome editing can also introduce unwanted and potentially harmful genetic errors that limit its clinical feasibility. In a study published in Genome R
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Innovative diode design uses ultrafast quantum tunneling to harvest infrared energy from the environmentMost sunlight striking the Earth is absorbed by its surfaces, oceans and atmosphere. As a result of this warming, infrared radiation is emitted constantly all around us-estimated to be millions of Gigawatts per second. A KAUST team has now developed a device that can tap into this energy, as well as waste heat from industrial processes, by transforming quadrillionth-of-a-second wave signals into u
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New method to manufacture organic solar cellsThe ability to use cheap materials and simple manufacturing methods are two huge advantages of printed organic solar cells. Olle Inganäs, professor at Linköping University, is head of a research group that has now developed an even simpler method to manufacture solar cell modules. The results have been published in the scientific journal npj Flexible Electronics.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bacterial superheroes may save the day for cropsThe bacterium SA187 has been isolated from the root nodules of an indigenous desert plant that grows in Saudi Arabia. The KAUST team found it has many genes that promote plant growth in stressful environments.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global
Senators Traded in Tobacco Stocks While Sitting on Health CommitteeLawmakers, unlike executive branch employees, are allowed to engage in such activity -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Science of Diet & ExerciseFor decades, experts reduced weight loss to simple math: burn more calories than you consume, without too much regard for what you consumed. Another old maxim presupposes that people who are more... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
The Real Lessons From Bill Clinton's Welfare ReformWelfare reform is back. President Trump signaled its return to the forefront of national policy debates in his State of the Union address on Tuesday, when he announced a plan to “lift our citizens from welfare to work.” He shouldn’t have trouble finding support for it: With a collective of pro-reform officials leading key agencies, and with longtime entitlement crusader Paul Ryan as speaker of th
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diabetes doubles chance of developing cataractPeople with diabetes are twice as likely to develop cataract as the general population and the relative risk is highest in those aged between 45 and 54, according to a new study published in the journal Eye.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Inadequate follow-up for many cardiac arrest patientsA major international study shows that if cardiac arrest patients are treated like heart attack patients only, this will potentially have negative consequences on their rehabilitation and return to working life. These patients often lack follow-up of the injuries they may have suffered to the brain in connection with their cardiac arrest, the researchers found.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tests on airway tissue reveal glo vapour has minimal impact compared to smokeScientists at British American Tobacco used state-of-the-art genomic testing to assess human air-way tissue exposed to glo vapour. Gene profiling revealed just two changes in genes in tissue exposed to glo vapour. This compares to thousands of changes in genes in tissue exposed to cigarette smoke. These results add to evidence suggesting that glo could be reduced risk compared to cigarettes.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exposure to chemical found in plastics 'hard to avoid' in everyday life86 per cent of teenagers have traces of Bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical compound used to make plastics, in their body, an Engaged Research public engagement project in collaboration with the University of Exeter has found.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Small birds have more efficient wing strokes than batsSmall birds are more energy-efficient than bats when flying. Researchers previously believed this was due to air resistance created by the bats' ears. However, biologists at Lund University in Sweden have now discovered another reason.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Workbench for virus designETH researchers have developed a technology platform that allows them to systematically modify and customise bacteriophages. This technology is a step towards making phage therapies a powerful tool for combating dangerous pathogens.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hubble's majestic spiral in PegasusThis NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image shows a spiral galaxy known as NGC 7331. First spotted by the prolific galaxy hunter William Herschel in 1784, NGC 7331 is located about 45 million light-years away in the constellation of Pegasus (the Winged Horse). Facing us partially edge-on, the galaxy showcases its beautiful arms, which swirl like a whirlpool around its bright central region.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shark tourism a 'hook' for conservationCage diving with an apex predator such as a white shark is a high adrenaline experience, but it can also change participants' views on shark conservation once they're back on dry land.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers characterize membrane behaviorAn article authored by a team of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) scientists has characterized how different cell membranes behave.
2h
Live Science
Can You Get 2 Colds at Once?When you come down with a cold, the last thing you probably need is, well, another cold.
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Feed: All Latest
NASA’s Proposed Moon Mission Offers Little Value at Astronomical CostOpinion: NASA is looking at sending people back into space. But taxpayer dollars are better spent on unmanned missions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Compound could transform energy storage for large gridsIn order to power entire communities with clean energy, such as solar and wind power, a reliable backup storage system is needed to provide energy when the sun isn't shining and the wind doesn't blow.
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Dagens Medicin
Gidseltagning fører til skærpet sikkerhed på psykiatrisk centerRegion Hovedstadens største psykiatriske center opgraderer sikkerheden, efter at to nattevagter på et åbent afsnit blev holdt som gidsler af en patient og en bekendt.
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Dagens Medicin
Praktiserende læger skrider til handling mod lange ventetider i psykiatrienGrundet mangel på rettidig behandling er praktiserende læger landet over begyndt selv at udskrive antidepressiver til patienter med ondt i livet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Healthy chickens for a healthy economyIn Georgia, poultry farming isn't just an industry.
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The Atlantic
An Unforgettable Super Bowl Win for the EaglesPhiladelphia Eagles Tom Brady New England PatriotsIn the closing minutes of Sunday night’s Super Bowl between the Philadelphia Eagles and New England Patriots, the NBC commentator Al Michaels took a moment to praise the evening’s all-around play, before the ending elevated one participant at the expense of the other. “You know what’s so great about this game,” Michaels said, “is that the game has been terrific from start to finish.” Michaels’s p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Multinational companies continue to produce unregulated antibiotics in IndiaMillions of unapproved antibiotics are being sold in India, according to a new study.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
This seizure-spotting smartwatch has won FDA approval
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research calls for rethink on approach to treating NTDs in urban areasNew research published today in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, suggests the effectiveness of large-scale distribution of medication (known as Mass Drug Administration or MDA) to treat lymphatic filariasis (LF) in urban areas needs to be re-examined.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Regular physical activity is associated with better lung function among smokersThe results of this ISGlobal study strengthen the epidemiological evidence supporting a link between physical activity and respiratory health
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ray-finned fishes: Natural born survivorsScientists from the University of Bristol have revealed that ray-finned fishes are perhaps one of Earth's most resilient groups of animals, having survived four mass extinction events that wiped out many other groups.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study sheds light on the the dark side of Hong Kong's most lucrative seafood tradeHong Kong is the global hub for the more than USD 1 billion Live Reef Food Fish Trade (LRFFT), much of it unreported and unregulated with serious consequences for vulnerable species, food security and livelihoods in Southeast Asia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Type 2 diabetes: The costs of treating complicationsScientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München have examined health insurance data of more than 300,000 people with diabetes in Germany. Their report, published in the medical journal 'Diabetes Care', breaks down the costs involved in treating various complications of the disease. The Helmholtz authors are members of the German Center for Diabetes Research (DZD).
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists explain the impacts of aerosol radiative forcingAerosol optical properties and direct radiative effects on surface irradiance were examined using seven years (2006-2012) of Cimel sunphotometer data collected at Panyu--the main atmospheric composition monitoring station in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region of China. Optical properties and radiative impacts of the absorbing particles can be used to improve the accuracy of inversion algorithms fo
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Round-the-clock power from smart bowtiesInnovative diode design uses ultrafast quantum tunneling to harvest infrared energy from the environment.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smart new method to manufacture organic solar cellsThe ability to use cheap materials and simple manufacturing methods are two huge advantages of printed organic solar cells. Olle Inganäs, professor at Linköping University, is head of a research group that has now developed an even simpler method to manufacture solar cell modules. The results have been published in the scientific journal npj Flexible Electronics.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Freely shared satellite data improves weather forecastingOn Nov. 18, 2017, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA launched the Joint Polar Satellite System, the first in an advanced series of polar-orbiting weather satellites.
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Science | The Guardian
Could ketamine help treat alcohol dependence?Current treatments for alcohol dependence often fail. So researchers are investigating more unusual interventions January 2018 has come to an end and with it the month that people increasingly use to abstain from alcohol. It is still unknown whether Dry January has a lasting effect on drinking behaviours , and people with an alcohol dependency problem should always seek support from their GP befo
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Dagens Medicin
Belastet sygehus får 11 mio. kr. til forbedringerArbejdspresset på Holbæk Sygehus har været stærkt kritiseret den seneste tid. Nu får sygehuset knap 11 mio. kr. til at afhjælpe det ekstra pres, der har været på sygehuset.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vanadium dioxyde: A revolutionary material for tomorrow's electronicsVanadium dioxide's unique properties make it perfect for outperforming silicon and giving rise to a new generation of low-power electronic devices. Under the Phase Change Switch project, which is being funded by the EU's Horizon 2020 research program and coordinated by EPFL researchers, engineers have shown how this compound can be used to create programmable radiofrequency electronic functions fo
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A majority of middle-aged people show a high level of mental well-beingA recent study at the University of Jyväskylä has found a surprisingly high level of mental well-being among middle-aged individuals. The study examined multiple dimensions of mental well-being, including satisfaction with life and psychological and social well-being.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The discovery of a third form of flagella-mediated motility shown by symbiotic bacteriaResearch Key Points- The Burkholderia symbiont of bean bugs swims by wrapping its rotary structure, called a flagellar filament, around its cell body.- This flagellar filament-wrapping motility is an advantage for moving around in sticky environments and on uneven extracellular matrix surfaces.- This unique form of motility is not only interesting in terms of fundamental research but also may cont
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Super-adsorbent MOF to control humidityA metal-organic framework that can take up twice its weight in water and then release it when humidity falls.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New genome-editing method 'cuts back' on unwanted genetic mutationsGene therapy can potentially correct genetic disorders by directly editing defective genes. CRISPR-Cas9 is a popular gene-editing technology whose clinical utility is limited by its tendency to produce unintended genetic errors. Researchers centered at Osaka University developed a modified CRISPR-Cas9 system that uses single-stranded nicking, rather than DNA cleavage, to generate highly precise ch
3h
Feed: All Latest
First 'Solo: A Star Wars Story' Trailer Proves 'Solo: A Star Wars Story' ExistsSolo Star WarsThe long-awaited and long-troubled Han Solo standalone movie finally has a full trailer. Watch it here.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
Big Tech insiders have a plan to repair damage being done by tech
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers demonstrate graphene as a source of high-speed light pulsesOne of the key requirements of future optical communications technologies is a nanoscale light source capable of emitting ultrafast light pulses. In a new study, researchers have shown that graphene may be an ideal candidate for such a light source, by demonstrating graphene-based devices that emit light pulses with a bandwidth of up to 10 GHz and pulse durations of less than 100 picoseconds (or 1
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Imagining the possibility of life in a universe without the weak forceA team of researchers at the University of Michigan has conducted a thought experiment regarding the nature of a universe that could support life without the weak force. In their paper uploaded to the ArXiv preprint server, the researchers suggest life could be possible in such an alternative universe, but it would definitely be different from what we observe in ours.
3h
Ingeniøren
SF: Afsæt en milliard til historiens værste jordforureningerSF vil finde en milliard på finansloven nu og her til oprensning af især Grindsted-forurening. Men regeringen vil vente til 2019.
3h
Feed: All Latest
How Germany Became the World's Safest Social Media StateWIRED’s new columnist Virginia Heffernan on how she escaped trolls by “moving” her Twitter to Germany.
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Dagens Medicin
Statsministeren og regionsformand modtager Kræftens Bekæmpelses hædersprisStatsminister Lars Løkke Rasmussen (V) og formand for Danske Regioner Bent Hansen (S) modtog i går Kræftens Bekæmpelses hæderspris 2018. De fik prisen for ekstraordinært politisk lederskab i forbindelse med indførelsen af kræftpakkerne.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mixed-use developments may actually reduce housing affordability, social diversityMaking the buildings in neighbourhoods more diverse through mixed residential and commercial developments also makes it too expensive for many people to live in.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ribosomes found to induce somatic cell pluripotencyIn 2012, a Japanese research group discovered that human skin cells acquire pluripotency when introduced to lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus). Now, the same group of researchers have found that the cause of somatic cell conversion into pluripotent stem cells is the ribosome, a protein synthesizing cellular organelle.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Personal Genome Project Canada study results show promise for health care in CanadaFirst results from the Personal Genome Project Canada, which sequenced the entire personal genomes of 56 healthy participants, suggest whole genome sequencing can benefit health care in Canada, according to results published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
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Futurity.org
West Nile linked to birth defects in fetal miceTwo viruses closely related to Zika—West Nile and Powassan—can spread from an infected pregnant mouse to her fetuses, causing brain damage and fetal death, a new study suggests. The findings suggest that Zika may not be unique in its ability to cause miscarriages and birth defects. “We only studied mice and human tissues, so we can’t say for sure what happens when pregnant women are infected with
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Dagens Medicin
Forsker i sundhedsfremme bliver professor1. februar tiltrådte seniorforsker ved Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Peter Bentsen, en stilling som adjungeret professor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research will help beef industry increase sustainabilityResearchers at the University of Arkansas are conducting a lifecycle analysis of the beef industry—an in-depth look at all the factors that go into producing beef products—in order to identify ways the industry can increase sustainability and to assess how much the industry has improved over the past decade.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Book chronicles the birth of statistical arguments in public debateOdds are, you've tried to win arguments by citing statistics. Who has been the greater player, LeBron James or Michael Jordan? Which health care policy is right? Where are the best schools? Which city has the worst morning traffic? If you can find the numbers, then maybe—maybe—you can resolve these matters.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stellar winds behaving unexpectedlyESA's XMM-Newton has spotted surprising changes in the powerful streams of gas from two massive stars, suggesting that colliding stellar winds don't behave as expected.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The size of a cereal box—ESA's first satellite of 2018ESA's first mission of the year was launched today: GomX-4B is the Agency's most advanced technology-tester yet, featuring a hyperspectral camera and tiny thrusters to manoeuvre thousands of kilometres from its near-twin to try out their radio link.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: The Columbus moduleCareering around Earth every 90 minutes, 400 km above our heads, is the International Space Station – humanity's orbital outpost.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Are Smartphones Really Destroying the Lives of Teenagers?Recent headlines would have us believe that device-hooked teens are mentally and socially doomed. The reality isn't so simple -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Parental enrollment in Medicaid yields increase in preventive health care for childrenEnrolling in Medicaid may have health benefits not only for low-income parents but also for their children, according to a Johns Hopkins analysis of over 50,000 parent-child pairs
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Treatment of nitrogen-polluted sediment using marine anammox bacteriaWorking on a way to alleviate eutrophication in coastal waters, a research collaboration between Kumamoto University in Japan and the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) in the US have found a combination of bacteria with the potential to lighten the impact of excess nitrogen found in many coastal water systems.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Compounds derived from hops show promise for metabolic syndrome patientsA group of compounds derived from hops can likely improve cognitive and other functions in people with metabolic syndrome.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two new inflated 'hot Jupiters' discovered by astronomersAstronomers have detected "hot Jupiter" exoplanets transiting two distant stars. The newly found alien worlds, designated EPIC 229426032 b and EPIC 246067459 b, appear to be larger than it should be according to theoretical models. The finding is reported January 24 in a paper published on arXiv.org.
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The Atlantic
Justin Timberlake's Anti-Spectacular Super BowlPrince Justin TimberlakeJustin Timberlake is among the very few performers to ever do multiple Super Bowls, and in a way, now so is Prince. But for a sense of how Prince, if alive today, would have approached the task of following up his 2007 performance—a strong pick for the best halftime in history—you can read this 2016 account from his production manager Patrick Whalen. It features the terrifying anecdote of Whalen
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The Scientist RSS
Biohacker Injects DIY Herpes Vaccine on Facebook LiveThe stunt, performed at a biohacking conference, was purportedly part of a two-subject trial of the genetically modified vaccine.
3h
The Scientist RSS
Brain Activity Reveals Which Songs People Are Listening ToResearchers create a program that can use fMRI data to identify which musical pieces are in participants' heads.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Cell DivisionA combination of imaging techniques allows researchers to observe subcellular processes within organisms.
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The Scientist RSS
PubMed Commons to Stop Accepting CommentsThe venue for post-publication peer review was not getting enough participation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Porsche to double investment in electric carsGerman high-end sports car maker Porsche said Monday it would double investments in electrifying its entire range by 2022, as parent company Volkswagen reacts to environmental scandals and new challenges from abroad.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Broadcom raises Qualcomm bid to more than $121 billionQualcomm Broadcom ShareBroadcom boosted its bid for Qualcomm to more than $121 billion in cash and stock Monday in what would be the largest tech deal in history.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What does your poo microbiome do?Even if you've been enjoying the solitary confinement of life under a rock, you'll probably still have heard the phrase 'gut microbiome'. You might even be aware that we all have one.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
We Need a Universal Flu Vaccine before the Next Pandemic StrikesA century after the deadly pandemic of 1918, we're still not safe -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Popular Science
These beautiful, terrifying maps show how hot we'll get in 2090Environment It’s easy to be apathetic about rising global temperatures, but difficult when you imagine your own future backyard. It can be hard to get too worked up over climate change, even if we know intellectually that it’s a huge problem.
4h
Ingeniøren
Manglende sikkerhedssystem spøger igen i amerikansk togulykkeAmerikanske togselskaber bliver igen kritiseret for manglende sikkerhed, efter at et passagertog i weekenden kolliderede med et godstog i delstaten South Carolina.
4h
Feed: All Latest
Uber Is Losing to Grab in Southeast AsiaThe Uber of Singapore has figured out how to make ride-sharing work in the developing world: rethink everything.
4h
Feed: All Latest
Can VR Survive in a Cutthroat Attention Economy?Virtual reality has struggled to take hold in the world of Too Much Content, but here’s how (and where) it can thrive.
4h
Feed: All Latest
Want Awesome Robots? You'll Have to Best These ChallengesNumber one: Robots can't be idiots. Number two: They probably shouldn't fall into fountains, either.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rats help each other out just as humans doRats demonstrate cooperative behaviour similar to human beings, researchers at the University of St Andrews have discovered.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Panasonic upgrades earnings targets on cheap yenJapanese electronics giant Panasonic on Monday upgraded its annual earnings targets thanks to a weak yen and robust demand for its automotive products.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Islands in yeast membrane revealed by extreme microscopyUniversity of Groningen microbiologists have visualized tiny islands in the cell membrane of baker's yeast. These membrane compartments appear to store transport proteins before use. The scientists observed that these proteins move extremely slowly in the plasma membrane of the yeast and discovered how they travel through the membrane to reach the islands. They made these observations with state-o
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Monitoring solar activityLiving near a star is risky business, and positioning a spacecraft near the sun is a very good way to observe rapidly changing solar activity and deliver early warning of possibly harmful space weather. ESA is now looking at doing just that.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UK bank bans bitcoin purchases via credit cardLloyds Banking Group on Monday joined major US banks in banning purchases of bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies via credit card amid debt and security concerns.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alleged UK hacker wins appeal against US extraditionLauri Love USAn alleged computer hacker from Britain won his appeal Monday against extradition to the United States.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon hammers out tax deal with FranceUS online retailer Amazon said Monday that it had settled a major tax claim in France and would start declaring all its earnings in the country locally, as European officials prepare to tighten the fiscal screws on digital economy giants.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Brain Stimulation Is All the Rage--but It May Not Stimulate the BrainResearch indicates that techniques fail to trigger the type of brain activity thought to produce therapeutic benefits -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Live Science
Mystery Behind Mass Grave of Viking Warriors Finally SolvedThe Vikings' dining choices - that is, chowing down on fish - caused scientists to make a radiocarbon- dating blunder.
5h
Feed: All Latest
Olympics Could Require Athletes' Genetic Code to Test For DopingThe falling cost of genome sequencing means the World Anti-Doping Agency could build a genetic baseline for every athlete.
5h
Feed: All Latest
Startup Unicorns Are Rare. This Study Suggests They Should Be Even RarerNot all shares are created equal, and preferences for some shareholders can leave employees with nothing after a company is sold.
5h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Wikipedia has become a science reference source even though scientists don’t cite itWikipedia is everyone’s go-to source. Even scientists. A new study shows how science on Wikipedia may end up forwarding science itself.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Is This the Year the Florida Grasshopper Sparrow Goes Extinct?Things don’t look good for these critically endangered birds, but a captive-breeding program could help save them -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Why Do Birds Get Divorced?For blue tits, timing can be a factor in whether they remain together or part ways -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Live Science
Virtual Volterra: Ancient Amphitheaters and Temples Recorded in 3DAncient archaeological sites in the mountaintop town of Volterra in Italy's Tuscany region are being digitally documented in three-dimensions with 21st-century technology and software.
6h
Live Science
Virtual Volterra Gallery: Photos of Ancient Tuscany TownAn international team is recording archaeological sites in the ancient mountaintop city of Volterra, in central Italy and transforming the information into a 3D virtual rendering of the site.
6h
Ingeniøren
Nyt værktøj gør hacking endnu nemmereMange er kritiske over for lanceringen af Autosploit, det sandsynligvis kun er til nytte for ‘script kiddies’.
6h
Ingeniøren
Tidligere ansatte går sammen: Vil beskytte børn fra Facebook og GoogleEn række personer, der tidligere har været ansat i både Facebook, Google og Apple går nu sammen for at gøre børn opmærksomme på, hvad deres færden online kan betyde.
6h
New Scientist - News
We must stand up to bad politics, not hide in an ivory towerScience journalism is about more than pure science. When powerful people of any political leaning go against the evidence, New Scientist cannot turn a blind eye
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fruit fly hunger games—taste neurons in controlA team of neuroscientists from the Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown (CCU), in Lisbon, Portugal, has discovered that specific taste neurons located in the fruit fly's proboscis confer a craving for protein. The results, published in the journal eLife, could represent a step toward preventing the transmission of certain insect-borne human diseases.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ecuador: Deforestation destroys more dry forest than climate changeTropical forests all over the world are at risk from climate change and deforestation for arable land. Scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Thünen-Institute compared losses due to deforestation with those that would result in extreme climate change scenarios in Ecuador. Although global warming is likely to change the distribution of species, deforestation will result in
6h
Ingeniøren
Techtopia #38: Kunstig intelligens hjælper 112Podcast: Kan en kunstig intelligens høre om, der er tale om et hjerteanfald, når en borger ringer til 112? Svaret er ja.
6h
Ingeniøren
Ups! Russiske kosmonauter fik vendt en antenne forkertUnder en mere end otte timer lang rumvandring fik to kosmonauter vendt en antenne forkert. Til gengæld har de nu rekorden for længste russiske rumvandring.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Multiple ant-like transport of neuronal cargo by motor proteinsMicrotubules are roads made of proteins that extend throughout a cell for motor proteins (carriers) to deliver neuronal cargo packed with many kinds of materials required for cellular activity. The delivery is active along neuronal axons, which function like highways in human societies. Deficits in the supply chain cause neuronal diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's or Huntington's disease.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sea anemone sting cells could inspire new drug-delivery systemsA multi-stage genetic process for the formation of sting cells in sea anemones could inspire a new way of delivering drugs into the human body.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum algorithm could help AI think fasterOne of the ways that computers think is by analysing relationships within large sets of data. An international team has shown that quantum computers can do one such analysis faster than classical computers for a wider array of data types than was previously expected.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists found and studied complex types of defects in the droplets of liquid crystalsA team of scientists from Kirensky Institute of Physics of the Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Science and Siberian Federal University (SFU) together with Russian and foreign colleagues studied droplets of a cholesteric liquid crystal that contained a twisted defect loop. The results of the study were published in Scientific Reports.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover a molecular timer based on stalling ribosomesA molecular biologist from Lomonosov Moscow State University and international colleagues discovered a special mechanism of protein synthesis regulation that they called a "molecular timer." It controls the number of protein molecules produced by a cell and prevents the generation of extra molecules. When activated with drugs, such a timer may help efficiently combat cancerous tumors. The study wa
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Meditation has limited role in making you a better person, says studyNew research has suggested meditation's role in making individuals better people is limited.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Islands in yeast membrane revealed by extreme microscopyUniversity of Groningen microbiologists have visualized tiny islands in the cell membrane of baker's yeast. These membrane compartments appear to store transport proteins before use. The scientists observed that these proteins move extremely slowly in the plasma membrane of the yeast and discovered how they travel through the membrane to reach the islands. They made these observations with state-o
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new path into bipolar disorder comes to lightA new article authored by an international group of researchers reveals a novel potential drug target for bipolar disorder and offers new insights into the underlying biology of this lifelong and devastating mental illness.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Severe pre-eclampsia often leads to undetected high blood pressure after pregnancyHypertension commonly occurs in the year following pregnancy among women who had severe pre-eclampsia during pregnancy. The lingering hypertension may go unnoticed because it often doesn't present as classic high readings in the doctor's office. Offering post-pregnancy ambulatory blood pressure monitoring to all women who have severe pre-eclampsia may help detect those whose blood pressures might
7h
Ingeniøren
VIDEO: DSB finder revnerne i togets aksler med en magnetPå værkstedet i Aarhus bruger de magnet til at finde revner i de gamle ME-lokomotivers trækaksler. Derefter bliver de mindre beskadigede aksler fikset med metallisering.
7h
Science : NPR
Eating Leafy Greens Each Day Tied to Sharper Memory, Slower DeclineScientists are keen to figure out how diet influences aging, including brain health. A 5-year study of healthy seniors found those who ate a serving or two of daily greens had less cognitive decline. (Image credit: Meredith Miotke for NPR)
7h
Ingeniøren
Tesla bygger 250 MW virtuelt kraftværk i AustralienVed hjælp af solceller og batterier i 50.000 boliger vil Tesla nu bygge verdens største virtuelle solcellekraftværk. Batterierne er derfor gratis for boligejerne.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China looks to stamp out cryptocurrency tradingChina plans to stamp out all remaining cryptocurrency trading in the country by blocking access to overseas-based websites and removing related applications from app stores.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Third time lucky for another Samsung leaderLee Jae-yong Samsung South KoreanSamsung heir Lee Jae-Yong on Monday became the third generation of his family to benefit from merciful legal treatment, when most of his bribery convictions were set aside and his jail sentence was replaced with a suspended term.
8h
Science | The Guardian
'Dangerous gaming': is the WHO right to class excessive video game play as a health disorder?Industry figures question research that ‘pathologises’ compulsive gaming, while scientist involved defends move to address addiction The World Health Organization (WHO) has included “gaming disorder” in its draft for the next edition of its diagnostic manual, the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11), which is due for final release this year. The disorder is characterised by behaviour
8h
The Neurocritic
Head Impact and Hyperphosphoralated Tau in TeensWe all agree that repeated blows to the head are bad for the brain. What we don't yet know is: who will show lasting cognitive and behavioral impairments who will show only transient sequelae (and for how long) who will manifest long-term neurodegeneration ...and by which specific cellular mechanism(s) Adding to the confusion is the unclear terminology used to describe impact-related head injurie
8h
Science-Based Medicine
Death by Gardasil? Not so fast there…There is a type of "vaccine injury" story promoted by the antivaccine movement that is particularly pernicious, a narrative I call "death by Gardasil." The stories, which use tenuous connections between vaccination against HPV to prevent cervical cancer and the unexpected death of a teen or young adult, are always tragic, and you can't help but feel incredible empathy for the parents. However, non
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
IATA chief warns about rising cost of airport expansionThe "skyrocketing" costs of expanding airport infrastructure must be controlled to keep flight tickets affordable, the boss of airline industry group IATA warned Monday.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ice instruments ring out coolest music in NorwayInside a giant igloo in a snowy Norwegian village, the sound of a horn rings out, warming the mood of a freezing audience, huddled together in -24 Celsius.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chicago museum's T. rex Sue to be moved for new displayA Tyrannosaurus rex fossil that's been on prominent display at Chicago's Field Museum is being moved to make room for a cast of the biggest dinosaur ever discovered.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nissan to invest $9.5 billion in China to drive salesJapanese automaker Nissan Motor and its Chinese joint venture partner announced on Monday a $9.5 billion investment plan in China to increase annual sales by one million vehicles and boost electric car production.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When did flowers originate?Flowering plants likely originated between 149 and 256 million years ago according to new UCL-led research.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Late-year change in income tax rate leads to billions in unexpected profits and lossesAs politicians tout the merits of U.S. tax reform on personal returns and corporate investment, many companies are scrambling to deal with the law's immediate impact on the value of their deferred tax assets and liabilities and their bottom lines in the fourth quarter.
9h
Ingeniøren
Ugens job: COWI, Teknologisk institut og Widex har flere ledige jobsPå dagens liste finder du job for ingeniører og naturvidenskabelige kandidater i flere forskellige firmaer. Blandt andet som specialist, projektleder, konsulent og mere endnu.
9h
Viden
Engelsk forskning: Gamle Lego-klodser er sundhedsfarligeGammelt legetøj i store mængder er af britiske forskere blevet undersøgt for sundhedsskadelige stoffer.
10h
Ingeniøren
Sådan slipper du af med uønskede standard-apps på din Android-telefonDet er ikke så svært at afinstallere apps der ikke bruges, og som ellers ikke uden videre lader sig fjerne.
11h
Ingeniøren
Alvorlig sikkerhedsbrist fundet i sexlegetøjSexlegetøj fra fabrikanten Amor Gummiwaren GmbH har ifølge en rapport fra et sikkerhedsfirma været meget sårbart for cyberangreb. Det har været muligt at indsamle personlige kundedata samt kontrollere produkterne uden brugerens tilladelse.
11h
Science | The Guardian
Whale and shark species at increasing risk from microplastic pollution – studyLarge filter feeders, such as baleen whales and basking sharks, could be particularly at risk from ingesting the tiny plastic particles, say scientists Whales, some sharks and other marine species such as rays are increasingly at risk from microplastics in the oceans, a new study suggests. Continue reading...
11h
Science | The Guardian
Stonehenge tunnel could destroy 'unique library' of early historyPlans for A303 could spell loss of Blick Mead site, where humans may have lived since the Ice Age The construction of a tunnel past Stonehenge could spell the loss of a unique site that can trace the presence of people back to the last Ice Age, experts have said. Perfectly preserved hoofprints of wild cattle known as aurochs have recently been found at excavations a mile and a half from the Wilts
11h
Science | The Guardian
Look at me: why attention-seeking is the defining need of our timesThe urge to belong is universal. So would a better understanding of it help tackle loneliness – and explain why stalkers, spree killers and jihadists turn their pain on others? There is a famous Jewish mother joke. You’ve heard it before. Question: How many Jewish mothers does it take to change a lightbulb? Answer: “Ah no, I’ll just sit in the dark. Don’t worry about me.” It’s funny, at least the
11h
NeuWrite West
Complementary Learning Systems within the Hippocampus: Reconciling Episodic Memory with Statistical LearningAs humans, we have a natural ability to remember the specifics of individual experiences (e.g. where I parked my car today) and rapidly learn rules across those experiences (e.g. where in the parking lot spaces tend to be open). The Complementary Learning Systems (CLS) [1] theory offers a computational framework for how we are able to accomplish, both seemingly disparate tasks, by positing that t
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Studies reveal looming shortage of rheumatologistsTwo new articles provide insights on the outlook of rheumatology in the United States, noting that the need for rheumatologists will greatly exceed the projected growth over the next 15 years. This is due to an increasing aging patient population, a wave of impending rheumatologists retiring, and changing practice trends for new rheumatologists. Experts note that even a doubling of the number of f
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drugs sold in India pose a global threat to antibiotic resistance controlMillions of unapproved antibiotics are being sold in India each year, according to a new study published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Late-year change in income tax rate leads to billions in unexpected profits and lossesIn a paper being published Feb. 5 in Tax Notes, professors from Indiana University and the University of Virginia report that Tax Cuts and Jobs Act this could result in unexpected drops in earnings for two thirds of companies in the Standard & Poor's 500, with a median drop of $100 million.
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Plastic pollution: Scientists' plea on threat to ocean giantsScientists call for monitoring of plastic pollution risks to whales, sharks and rays that strain water to feed.
12h
Ingeniøren
Faktatjek: Kan vi køre hurtigere på motorveje uden at risikere flere ulykker?Regeringen hævder, at man kan hæve den tilladte hastighed til 120 og 130 km/t på flere motorveje uden at øge risikoen for ulykker. Men påstanden er kun underbygget af fornemmelser – ikke undersøgelser.
13h
Ingeniøren
Ekspertpanel: 5 tip til den perfekte indledningSom jobsøger skal du kunne skrive en god ansøgning. Jobfinder leverer gode råd til at skrive en indledning, der fanger firmaers interesse.
13h
Feed: All Latest
Best 2018 Super Bowl Ads, From Dinklage's Doritos to Sprint's 'Westworld' MomentOnce again, brands turned football's biggest game into a night of hugely expensive one-upmanship. No complaints here.
14h
cognitive science
The Pulfrich Effect - Strong 3D Effect on a 2D Video!! (optical illusion)submitted by /u/greeenpro [link] [comments]
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When did flowers originate?Flowering plants likely originated between 149 and 256 million years ago according to new UCL-led research.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Multinational companies continue to produce unregulated antibiotics in IndiaMillions of unapproved antibiotics are being sold in India, according to a new study by researchers at Queen Mary University of London and Newcastle University.
17h
Futurity.org
How bacteria in your gut chow down on starchResearchers know a little more about how bacteria in your gut breaks down some types of starch and turns them into nutrients your body can use. The findings, which appear in Biophysical Journal , will ultimately help doctors when they prescribe antibiotics and in the development of probiotics. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron , or Bt is one type of gut bacteria that breaks down dietary carbohydrates
17h
Futurity.org
Dust mites defend their genome in a unique wayAs a consequence of their tumultuous evolutionary history, the house dust mite developed a novel way to protect its genome from internal disruptions, a new genetic study suggests. House dust mites are ubiquitous inhabitants of human dwellings, thriving in the mattresses, sofas, and carpets of even the cleanest homes. They are the primary cause of indoor allergies in humans, affecting up to 1.2 bi
17h
Futurity.org
Obesity may make ignoring ‘food cues’ even harderA new study with rats may help explain why some people can resist the rustle of a chip bag or the smell of pizza and others can’t. The study included rats that had been specially bred for a tendency to become obese, and rats from a line with normal weight tendencies. The obesity-prone rats were fed diets that didn’t allow them to become obese. But even so, they showed much stronger food-seeking b
18h
Futurity.org
Targeted intervention benefits Hispanics with mental illnessA culturally-adapted intervention shows potential for improving health outcomes for Hispanics with serious mental illness, a new study shows. “‘Bridges to Better Health and Wellness’ is a promising intervention that can help to address some of the health care disparities faced by Hispanics with serious mental illness, a population that is often overlooked in the literature and in the system of ca
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Old drug may have new tricks for fighting cancerResults show that the drug ibrutinib acts as a potent kinase inhibitor for ERBB4, limits growth in human cancer cells in the laboratory, and reduces tumor size in mice. The sensitivity of ERBB4 to ibrutinib is similar to that of BTK, the original target of the drug.
18h
Big Think
A single “Like” on Facebook can reveal a crucial aspect of your personalityThe internet and social media have made persuasive appeals more powerful than ever before. Read More
19h
Big Think
Texas has its first legal medical marijuana transactionThe first medicinal marijuana patient in Texas uses it to treat severe epilepsy. And although 10 companies are allowed to grow marijuana within Texas state borders, the substance itself is still illegal. Read More
19h
Science : NPR
Trump Administration Reverses Policy On Protecting Migrating BirdsThe Trump administration has reversed a key policy for protecting migrating birds. Officials say a century old federal law is outdated, and poses a burden for utilities and energy companies.
19h
Science : NPR
The Forgotten Renewable: Geothermal Energy Production Heats UpExperts say the American West is full of geothermal reservoirs whose energy could power millions of homes. But extracting that energy isn't easy. (Image credit: Benjamin Purper/KVCR)
19h
Science | The Guardian
Starwatch: distant encounter between the red planet and a red giantMars and Antares will be close together in our skies this week, but are separated in space by hundreds of light years All week, the planet Mars will be close to the bright star Antares in the constellation Scorpius. Both will appear to the naked eye as red dots of approximately the same brightness in the pre-dawn sky. Mars gets its colour from the dust on its surface that reflects sunlight. Antar
20h
The Atlantic
A Note on ‘Notes’This past week The Atlantic announced a sensible new policy for engaging readers in our ongoing conversations. The news is explained here , and it amounts to a shift away from an open Comments section, and to a managed online Letters section. To me this is welcome news, in that it finally brings my own personal practices into compliance with Official Magazine Policy. Over the decades of online wr
20h
Scientific American Content: Global
Paleo Profile: The Mansoura LizardA dinosaur from Egypt helps make sense of global patterns among long-necked herbivores -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High pollution shuts schools in TehranPrimary schools will be closed on Monday in Tehran as thick fog caused by pollution smothers the Iranian capital and most of the surrounding province, local authorities said.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU says 'electroshock' tax plan for internet giants set for MarchThe European Commission will present by the end of March its plan for overhauling tax rules for internet giants, aimed at making them pay up in the countries where they earn their profits, a top official said Sunday.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Q&A: Ride-hailing service Lyft's product chief Tali RapaportLyft Line Benefits UberEven though it's been in business for just over five years, the Lyft ride-hailing service is still evolving as it moves toward a time when personal car ownership falls and self-driving robotaxis start carrying passengers.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SpaceX's hot new monster rocket ready for first test flightSpaceX Falcon HeavySpaceX's hot new monster rocket makes its launch debut this week, blasting off from the same pad that hoisted men to the moon a half-century ago.
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A raucous Google-Uber fight is finally heading to trialA Google-bred pioneer in self-driving cars and Uber's beleaguered ride-hailing service are colliding in a courtroom showdown revolving around allegations of deceit, betrayal, espionage and a high-tech heist that tore apart one-time allies.
22h
NYT > Science
The Life and Death of Nigel, the World’s Loneliest SeabirdThe gannet won hearts with his devotion to a concrete decoy on an uninhabited New Zealand island. His story shines a light on efforts to repopulate the island.
22h
Scientific American Content: Global
Exoplanetary Science, Build 2.0The time is ripe for getting really serious about other worlds, and other life -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
Science | The Guardian
Murray-Darling basin plan fails environment and wastes money – expertsScientists and economists condemn squandering of $4bn on projects that have failed to improve the river’s health A group of prominent scientists and economists have issued a stark warning to the nation’s politicians: the Murray-Darling basin plan is failing to achieve environmental goals and is a “gross waste” of money. The group of seven economists and five scientists with deep expertise in the
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Scientific American Content: Global
How to Get Mistaken for a GeologistGeologists are cool! Here's how you can play one on the internet. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NYT > Science
Trump to Withdraw Nomination of Climate Skeptic as Top Environmental AdviserThe White House is dropping Kathleen Hartnett White from consideration to lead the Council on Environmental Quality.
1d
Big Think
A "new Bermuda Triangle" that leads the world in sea disasters foundA sea region has become the top place for maritime accidents, accounting for almost half the shipping disasters in the world. Read More
1d
The Atlantic
Superb Owl Sunday IIA special Sunday event, a photographic essay celebrating a few of these magnificent raptors. Not Eagles (nor Patriots), these superb owls hail from Europe, Asia, North and South America, captured in photos over the past few years. If you have some time today before the big game (or are skipping the event entirely) I invite you to have a look.
1d
Live Science
If Football Is Deadly, Why Do We Still Watch?The evidence that football leads to brain injury is mounting, but there are two big reasons why it's not likely to change anytime soon.
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Ingeniøren
Efterlysning: Hvem har en jetmotor til en Me262?Ugens flyteknikhistoriske
1d
Feed: All Latest
President Trump's State of the Union Speech Tops This Week's Internet NewsSocial media dissected a lot of the facts of President Trump's speech to Congress. But it was a spelling error that brought the LOLs.
1d
Feed: All Latest
The Weighted Gravity Blanket Won't Cure All Your Sleep WoesAs sleep gadgets become more and more bizarre, the 25-pound Gravity Blanket offers an intuitive approach: Lie down, pull up the covers, and close your eyes.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Texas Got 18 Percent of Its Energy from Wind and Solar Last YearFor years critics have claimed grid costs and stability will spiral out of control before we hit 20 percent renewable energy. Texas is proving them wrong -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Evolution of Attraction, the Magnetic Force That Created the World and Other New Science BooksBook recommendations from the editors of Scientific American -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d
The Atlantic
Letter: Discussions of American Citizenship and Belonging Must Include Native PopulationsRadio Atlantic : Who Gets to Be American? In a recent episode of Radio Atlantic , three second-generation immigrants—Priscilla Alvarez, Matt Thompson, and Alex Wagner—discussed America’s history with immigration and its immigration politics today. I just listened to your “Who Gets to Be American” show, and I loved it. I would be curious to see you engage in the same conversation in the context of
1d
The Atlantic
The Comic-Strip Heroine I'll Never ForgetT he excitement in the Long Island theater where I first saw Pulp Fiction was unlike anything I’d previously experienced at the movies: Everything people were saying about Quentin Tarantino, the boy-genius director, was true. But the picture stirred me most profoundly—alerting me that there was an intelligence behind it that was in some small way in sync with my own—when I caught sight of the boo
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Big Think
Video games can have a meaningful social impact, proves Davos expertA game designer creates games that can change attitudes and behaviors. Read More
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Science : NPR
In The U.S. Virgin Islands, Health Care Remains In A Critical StateIn September, two Category 5 hurricanes devastated the region. Now, its hospitals can no longer provide major surgery, cancer treatment or specialized care, forcing daily staff cuts and revenue loss. (Image credit: Greg Allen/NPR)
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Ingeniøren
Professor efterlyser vilkår for private solceller i nyt forligDagens vilkår for privates solcelleanlæg er hverken langtidsholdbare eller nemme at forstå, og det bør politikerne tage hånd om, mener medlem af Klimarådet.
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Feed: All Latest
The Gig Economy's Tipping PointNo good can come of turning a basic transaction into a “pay what you want” situation. Especially when employees—ahem, contractors—earn less than a living wage.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
‘Death: A Graveside Companion’ offers an outlet for your morbid curiosityA coffee-table book explores how humans have tried to understand death through the ages.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Can You Get the Flu Twice in One Season?Getting sick with a single strain does not necessarily protect you from others -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1d
The Atlantic
Altered Carbon Is a Moody, Violent SpectacleIf there really are no new ideas, as Mark Twain once theorized, and the best we can hope for is a kind of kaleidoscope effect made out of the same old shapes, then Altered Carbon at least renders the resulting impressions in violent, trippy technicolor. Adapted from the 2002 novel of the same name by Richard K. Morgan, the new Netflix series is replete with ideas and images from sci-fi works past
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Feed: All Latest
The Era of Quantum Computing Is Here. Outlook: CloudyQuantum computers should soon be able to beat classical computers at certain basic tasks. But before they’re truly powerful, researchers have to overcome a number of fundamental roadblocks.
1d
The Atlantic
The 'Slave Power' Behind Florida's Felon DisenfranchisementIn November 1865—barely six months after Appomattox, and three weeks before the official ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment—the New York Tribune ’s front page bore a provocative headline: “South Carolina Re-establishing Slavery.” The story laid out the new system being put into place in most of the former Confederacy—“Black Codes,” criminal laws targeting black citizens, coupling a long lis
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A 3-D approach to stop cancer in its tracksEvery day, roughly 100 billion new cells are created inside the human body. These cells join trillions of older cells to form the tissues and organs we rely on to stay alive. Sometimes when a cell is created, a mutation occurs within its DNA, transforming the cell into something defective and potentially dangerous to the body's internal environment. Usually, a cell will recognize its own defects a
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Ingeniøren
Matematikere kommer vikingehistorikere til hjælpNetværksanalyse af en gammel tekst om et berømt slag i 1014 giver ny indsigt om afslutningen af vikingernes herredømme i Irland.
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Viden
Snart er din computer en del af dine brillerGoogle var for tidligt ude med Google Glass. Men næste bølge af briller, der lægger et digitalt lag oven på virkeligheden, er så småt på vej.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tesla, Australia to turn 50,000 homes into power generatorsTesla South Australia PowerSome 50,000 homes in South Australia will receive solar panels and Tesla batteries, the state government announced Sunday, in a landmark plan to turn houses into a giant, interconnected power plant.
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NYT > Science
Fentanyl Adds Deadly Kick to Opioid Woes in BritainBritain has one of the highest rates of drug-related deaths in Europe, and among the places hit hardest is the former fishing port of Hull.
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Ingeniøren
Et af Europas største isværker lå på FinsensvejIngeniøren gav i 1915 en grundig beskrivelse af Krystalisværkets opbygning og produktion, inden Ingeniørforeningens forestående rundvisning på stedet.
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Viden
Forskere finder ældgammel maya-by i Guatemalas jungleIfølge forskergruppe boede der omkring ti millioner mayaere i et stort område, der nu er blevet kortlagt.
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Science : NPR
White House To Withdraw Controversial Nominee For Top Environmental PostThe White House will pull nominee Kathleen Hartnett White to lead the Council on Environmental Quality. White has drawn criticism for her comments on climate change.
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Science | The Guardian
What style of argument do you follow? Personality quizIf your partner is upset, do you listen to them or try to cheer them up? Rebecca McGuire-Snieckus on strengthening relationships Choose which of the following statements applies to you: a) or b) 1 Arguments are a) Damaging to relationships b) Inevitable Continue reading...
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Science | The Guardian
So men are dying because they don’t have women’s brains? Show me the evidenceMortality rates for prostate cancer are rising, but not because of any neurological determinism It is the crossover moment. For the first time, more men are dying of prostate cancer than women are from breast cancer. Any GP surgery will offer a blood test to check a man’s prostate-specific antigen (PSA) indicating cancer. All men have to do is ask. The trouble is that, as we all know, men are fro
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Big Think
This bacteria literally poops goldThe bacteria C. metallidurans is able to take trace amounts of gold and copper and turn it into teeny tiny gold nuggets a few nanometers in size. Read More
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Scientific American Content: Global
In a World of Shifting Sand, Algae Turn to Dark FermentationFor light-loving marine microbes, living in sand means having a good Plan B -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian
The DNA database that is key to beating our rarest diseasesThe future now holds hope for children like Sam Ward, and doctors say many other people are set to benefit Jillian Hastings Ward gave birth to her second child, Sam, almost four years ago. For the first few months of his life, the boy appeared to be in good health. “Then we realised that he was not making proper visual contact, and discovered he was blind,” Hastings Ward recalls. Subsequent diagno
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