Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tesla, Australia to turn 50,000 homes into power generatorsTesla South Australia PowerSome 50,000 homes in South Australia will receive solar panels and Tesla batteries, the state government announced Sunday, in a landmark plan to turn houses into a giant, interconnected power plant.

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Forskere finder ældgammel maya-by i Guatemalas jungleIfølge forskergruppe boede der omkring ti millioner mayaere i et stort område, der nu er blevet kortlagt.
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New on MIT Technology Review
100,000 happy momentsWhat makes people happy? A huge database is making it possible to discern the answer at last.
13min
Feed: All Latest
Bob Mueller’s Investigation is Larger—and Further Along—Than You ThinkWe speak about the “Mueller probe” as a single entity, but it’s important to understand that there are no fewer than five separate investigations under the broad umbrella of the special counsel’s office.
15min
Latest Headlines | Science News
The way dwarf galaxies move puts a new spin on galaxy formationDistant dwarf galaxies orbit a larger galaxy in a coordinated loop, rather than randomly as expected. The finding could challenge theories of dark matter.
18min
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: A Tiff With SchiffToday in 5 Lines President Trump accused Representative Adam Schiff, the ranking member on the House Intelligence Committee, of leaking confidential information. The committee is expected to vote Monday night to release the Democrats’ rebuttal to a controversial Republican memo alleging FBI surveillance abuses. Senators John McCain and Chris Coons formally introduced a new bipartisan immigration
27min
Popular Science
Watch live as SpaceX launches its highly anticipated Falcon Heavy rocketSpace Oh gosh, this is really happening. At 1:30 p.m. eastern time on February 6, tune in to watch the Falcon Heavy fire up its 27 engines.
40min
The Atlantic
The Stock Market Just Took a Historic Nosedive—Why?The Dow Jones Industrial Average plunged more than 1,000 points on Monday. This was the largest nominal decline in the history of the index, and the first time that the Dow has lost more than a thousand points in a single day of trading. This means the Dow suffered its first-ever four-digit point loss just hours after the Super Bowl witnessed its first-ever four-digit offensive output. I am not s
47min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SpaceX bucks launch tradition in 1st flight of new rocketSpaceX is bucking decades of launch tradition for the first test flight of its new megarocket.
57min
Live Science
Kentucky Man Gets 'Flesh-Eating' Bacteria After Cracking KnucklesA man in Kentucky developed a life-threatening infection with "flesh eating bacteria" — and nearly lost his hand — after simply cracking his knuckles.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Advances in fabricating nanocrystalline diamonds to study materials under extreme conditionsUsing a nanocrystalline diamond built by plasma vapor deposition, Yogesh Vohra, Ph.D., has already produced a pressure nearly two times greater than that found at the center of the Earth.
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Science | The Guardian
Very hot tea can raise risk of oesophageal cancer, suggests studyCombined with excess alcohol consumption, scaldingly hot tea raises relative risk fivefold, says Chinese researchers Very hot tea combined with heavy alcohol consumption can increase the risk of oesophageal cancer by five-fold, research suggests. The cancer, which starts in the oesophagus, was already known to be linked to drinking alcohol and smoking, but those risks are heightened by the additi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Opioid cessation may be more successful when depression is treatedOpioid cessation in non-cancer pain may be more successful when depression is treated to remission, a new study shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Texas A&M develops new type of powerful batteryMove over, lithium-ion; now, there's a better battery on the horizon. A multi-institution team of scientists led by Texas A&M University chemist Sarbajit Banerjee has discovered an exceptional metal-oxide magnesium battery cathode material, moving researchers one step closer to delivering batteries that promise higher density of energy storage on top of transformative advances in safety, cost and
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Live Science
Does Alcohol Really 'Clean' the Brain?Alcohol might help the brain, in low doses, in mice, at least.
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Live Science
Why You May Want to Avoid Drinking Piping-Hot TeaA word of caution to tea lovers: Let your cuppa cool a bit before taking a sip.
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Science : NPR
Why You Don't Hear Much About Sickle Cell AnymoreIt was cured … wasn't it?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fabricating nanocrystalline diamonds to study materials under extreme conditionsA nanocrystalline diamond built by plasma vapor deposition has already produced a pressure nearly two times greater than that found at the center of the Earth. A new study finds that the manufacturing process of these novel, nanocrystalline-diamond micro-anvils has proved to be 'remarkably consistent' and demonstrates 'a high level of reproducibility in fabrication.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Soil characteristics may be related to chronic wasting disease persistence, study findsDeer infected with chronic wasting disease are doomed to a slow and certain death, eventually wasting away as they lose the ability to eat and drink. There is no cure and no vaccine, and the number of infected deer continues to rise every year. But University of Illinois scientists recently published a new study that could help explain the movement of the disease across the landscape.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Altering Huntington's patients' skin cells into brain cells sheds light on diseaseScientists have transformed skin cells from patients with Huntington's disease into the type of brain cell affected by the disorder. The resulting mass of neurons serves as a new tool to study the degenerative and eventually fatal neurological condition, according to the researchers.
1h
Popular Science
DJI's Mavic Air drone is the best flying machine you can throw in your backpackGadgets It doesn't have the same range as pro models, but it's a lot of drone in a very small package. The DJI Mavic Air may be a middle child, but it's fast, compact, and comes with an excellent camera.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU Commission urges carmakers to 'behave more ethically'The European Union on Monday urged carmakers to "behave more ethically" and responsibly, following a scandal over diesel emissions, and revelations of diesel exhaust tests on monkeys and humans.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Zuckerberg acknowledges 'mistakes' as Facebook turns 14Facebook Mark ZuckerbergMark Zuckerberg offered fresh self-criticism Monday, acknowledging making numerous mistakes in building the world's biggest social network as Facebook marked its 14th birthday.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Soil characteristics may be related to chronic wasting disease persistence, study findsDeer infected with chronic wasting disease are doomed to a slow and certain death, eventually wasting away as they lose the ability to eat and drink. There is no cure and no vaccine, and the number of infected deer continues to rise every year. But University of Illinois scientists recently published a new study that could help explain the movement of the disease across the landscape.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers take important step toward gonorrhea vaccineResearchers are paving the way toward a new therapeutic approach for gonorrhea by shedding light on the mechanism behind important proteins on the Neisseria gonorrhoeae bacteria's outer membrane.
1h
The Atlantic
Trump Keeps Picking on the U.K. on TwitterNHS Donald TrumpAmerican presidents typically make at least a rhetorical show of not interfering in the internal affairs of most other countries—particularly allies. When Barack Obama weighed in on his preferred outcome in the U.K.’s Brexit referendum, for example, some took it as unseemly meddling. Donald Trump, though, has freely and repeatedly scolded the U.K. in public, first on counterterrorism, now on heal
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA finds wind shear tearing Tropical Cyclone Cebile apartNASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean and found that wind shear was adversely affecting Tropical Cyclone Cebile.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UF reports 2017 as average year for worldwide shark attacks, deathsWith 88 reported unprovoked shark attacks and five fatalities worldwide, 2017 was "just an average year," according to the University of Florida International Shark Attack File.
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
A biotech CEO explains why he injected himself with a DIY herpes treatment on Facebook LiveHe says he wants everyone to have access to affordable gene treatments.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Professor Ute Scholl discovers genetic cause of rare high blood pressure syndromeTwenty-five years ago, an unusual inherited form of high blood pressure was first described in an Australian family. Its genetic cause, however, had remained elusive. Using modern sequencing methods, an international research team led by BIH Johanna Quandt Professor Ute Scholl has succeeded in detecting mutations in a new disease gene (CLCN2) -- present in this family and seven others -- that are
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Uncovering the hidden roles management partners play in ACOsIn the first study of the role of management partners in ACOs, Dartmouth Institute researchers used data from the National Survey of Accountable Care Organizations to examine the prevalence of non-provider management partner involvement in ACOs, the services these partners provide, and the structure of ACOs that have such partners. They found 37% of ACOs had a management partner, and two-thirds of
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Following treatment guidelines more important than volume for assessing heart failure careLooking at how well hospitals adhere to treatment guidelines for heart failure is more important than comparing patient volumes at hospitals, new research shows.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers take important step toward gonorrhea vaccineResearchers are paving the way toward a new therapeutic approach for gonorrhea by shedding light on the mechanism behind important proteins on the Neisseria gonorrhoeae bacteria's outer membrane.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How brain's reward system lessened distress over 2016 election resultsSome people disturbed by the 2016 presidential election have suffered a loss of appetite, trouble sleeping and concentrating, and have become easily annoyed, while others equally disturbed by the election result have not suffered such symptoms of depression. A new study by UCLA psychologists explains the differences between these two groups.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research suggests your immune system can protect against MRSA infectionsAfter years of investigation, researchers at Johns Hopkins, the University of California, Davis, and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases have discovered how the immune system might protect a person from recurrent bacterial skin infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (staph).
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Despite potential for revenue gains, Medicare's annual wellness visit unevenly adoptedIn 2011, Medicare introduced the annual wellness visit -- a yearly check-up for Medicare beneficiaries at no cost to the patient -- but many practices have been slow to offer the visits. A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital examines why some practices have adopted these visits while others have not.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For world's poorest, vaccines prevent deaths, medical impoverishmentVaccines have enormous impact not just on health, but on keeping people out of poverty, according to a new study led by researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. They estimated that increased investments in 10 vaccines administered in low- and middle-income countries over a 15-year period could avert up to 36 million deaths and 24 million cases of medical impoverishment.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fish study finds genes that regulate social behaviorsGenes in an area of the brain that is relatively similar in fish, humans and all vertebrates appear to regulate how organisms coordinate and shift their behaviors, according to a new Cornell University study.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New insight into the molecular weapons of the plant microbiomeLike all organisms, plants are associated with bacterial communities in which helpful and harmful bacteria compete for dominance. Among the weaponry of these warring bacteria are molecular syringes that some bacteria can use to inject toxins into others. In a study published in the Feb. 2 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, researchers at McMaster University in Canada pinpointed the iden
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New ethics committee aims to help veterinarians navigate complex care situationsAdvances in veterinary technology provide pet owners with an ever-increasing array of treatment options for their pets. However, more options can lead to complex situations and difficult questions about care goals and quality of life that must be navigated by veterinary caregivers and pet owners. Clinicians and researchers from North Carolina State University and Duke University have developed a f
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mapping the first family tree for tropical forestsMore than 100 researchers have collaborated to classify the world's tropical forests according to their evolutionary history, a process that will help researchers predict the resilience or susceptibility of different forests to global environmental changes.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New information about the Flint water crisisThe Flint Area Community Health and Environment Partnership research team found that the majority of Legionnaires' disease cases that occurred during the 2014-15 outbreak in Genesee County, Mich., can be attributed to the change in of the City of Flint's drinking water supply to the Flint River. The researchers also found that the specific strain of Legionella isolated from Flint residences as par
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New alien species invasions still rising globallyUp to 16 percent of all species on Earth could qualify as potential alien species and if they invade new regions, impacts will be difficult to predict.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Farm sunshine, not cancer: Replacing tobacco fields with solar arraysResearchers contend that tobacco farmers could increase profits by converting their land to solar farms, which in turn provides renewable energy generation.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers blaze new ground in wireless energy generation for future electronic gadgetsResearchers from Clemson's Nanomaterials Institute (CNI) are one step closer to wirelessly powering the world using triboelectricity - a green energy source.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reducing the footprint of a greenhouse gas more potent than carbon dioxideUSC scientists have unlocked a new, more efficient pathway for converting methane - a potent gas contributing to climate change - directly into basic chemicals for manufacturing plastics, agrochemicals and pharmaceuticals.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Molecular weapons of the plant microbiomeResearchers have pinpointed the identity of a toxin used by a soil-dwelling bacterium that protects plants from disease.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
2017 was an average year for worldwide shark attacks, deathsWith 88 reported unprovoked shark attacks and five fatalities worldwide, 2017 was "just an average year," according to recent research.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fish study IDs genes that regulate social behaviorsGenes in an area of the brain that is relatively similar in fish, humans and all vertebrates appear to regulate how organisms coordinate and shift their behaviors, according to a new study.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Materials mystery key to next-generation electronic devices solvedScientists have provided evidence of a hole gas coexisting with two-dimensional electron gas. They designed an ultrathin material, known as a thin film structure, specifically for this research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The toxic relationship between ALS and frontotemporal dementiaALS and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are two neurodegenerative diseases with a toxic relationship, according to a new study. The study describes how a mutation in a gene, called C9ORF72, leads to toxicity in nerve cells -- causing 10 percent of all cases of ALS, and an additional 10 percent of FTD.
2h
The Atlantic
A Trip to a Museum for Convincing Americans About Climate ChangeSince January 25, after sunset, the shades on a window-walled gallery in Manhattan’s Greenwich Village have rolled up, and the sidewalk outside has been cast in a cool, blue glow. The color comes from a four-and-a-half-hour-long video of ice cores. Inside the gallery, scanned images of samples from the Greenland Ice Sheet are on a continuous loop, representing 110,000 years of accumulation. Watch
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In court clash, Waymo says Uber decided 'to cheat' to get aheadTwo tech giants racing for a lead in autonomous driving clashed Monday in court as former Google car unit Waymo's lawyer argued that Uber's boss deliberately chose "to cheat" to get a leg up on competitors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Risk assessment tool can now better predict pressure injuries in childrenPressure-related skin injuries, a nurse-sensitive quality indicator in hospitals, are associated with increased morbidity and higher costs of care. There's been much attention focused on hospital-acquired pressure injuries (HAPI) in the adult population. However, while preventable, immobility-related and medical device-related pressure injuries (MDPI) also occur in hospitalized infants and childre
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Building a future in science with construction-based toysChildhood play experiences strongly shape a person's spatial skills, according to a new study -- those skills can be critical to success in fields like science and engineering.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Traffic noise-induced harm to cardiovascular systemNoise may disrupt the body on the cellular level in a way that increases the risk of common heart disease risk factors, according to a new review that examined the underlying mechanisms that may lead to noise-induced heart disease. The review is in response to growing evidence connecting environmental noise, including from road traffic and aircrafts, to the development of heart disease, such as co
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Big improvements in HIV vaccine productionResearch on HIV has led to many promising ideas for vaccines to prevent infection by the AIDS virus, but very few candidate vaccines have been tested in clinical trials. One reason is the technical difficulty of manufacturing vaccines based on the envelope proteins of the virus, according to a vaccine expert who has now developed new methods for the production of HIV vaccines.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fish study IDs genes that regulate social behaviorsGenes in an area of the brain that is relatively similar in fish, humans and all vertebrates appear to regulate how organisms coordinate and shift their behaviors, according to a new Cornell study.
2h
Big Think
You thought quantum mechanics was weird: check out entangled timeWhat if entanglement also occurs across time ? Is there such a thing as temporal nonlocality? Read More
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Big Think
A new report shows democracy is in decline everywhere, including the United StatesHave you been feeling like democracy is in trouble lately? According to this report, you're right. Read More
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Big Think
Just how controversial is Dodge Ram's MLK Super Bowl ad?Dodge Ram has drawn the ire of social media after using audio clips of a Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. speech in a commercial that ran during Super Bowl LII. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UF reports 2017 as average year for worldwide shark attacks, deathsThroughout his more than 40-year career at the University of Florida, George Burgess gained an international reputation with the media and public as a reliable source and shark attack expert who always stressed the importance of shark conservation.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mapping the first family tree for tropical forestsMore than 100 researchers have collaborated to classify the world's tropical forests according to their evolutionary history, a process that will help researchers predict the resilience or susceptibility of different forests to global environmental changes.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technology for accelerated wound healing discoveredResearchers at Uppsala University and SLU have found a new way of accelerating wound healing. The technology and the mode of action method published in the highly ranked journal PNAS involves using lactic acid bacteria as vectors to produce and deliver a human chemokine on site in the wounds. The research group is the first in the world to have developed the concept for topical use and the technol
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What magnets have to do with pistachiosA study using thousands of pistachio trees shows that ecological systems can be governed by the Ising model, which is typically used to explain permanent magnets. It also helps explain synchrony in nature, such as why a field of fruit trees blossom at the same time.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research presents new information about the Flint water crisisThe Flint Area Community Health and Environment Partnership research team found that the majority of Legionnaires' disease cases that occurred during the 2014-15 outbreak in Genesee County, Mich., can be attributed to the change in of the City of Flint's drinking water supply to the Flint River. The researchers also found that the specific strain of Legionella isolated from Flint residences as par
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Aging immune system may explain age-related cancer risk increaseStudy published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences suggests aging immune system plays a larger role in cancer incidence than previously thought. Findings may explain higher likelihood of men developing cancer than women. This epidemiological research could have major implications for global fight against cancer if borne out by further studies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New alien species invasions still rising globallyUp to 16 percent of all species on Earth could qualify as potential alien species and if they invade new regions, impacts will be difficult to predict, according to new research involving UCL.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Adding crizotinib to radiation therapy may help preserve hearing in patients with NF2A Massachusetts General Hospital research team reports that the use of crizotinib to block a specific molecular pathway both enhanced the radiosensitivity of tumors in mouse models of NF2, allowing a reduction in radiation dosage, and inhibited the growth of cultured tumor cells from NF2 patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Long-term economic impact of cover cropsResearchers have examined data from the past 29 years to determine whether it is profitable to include cover crops in an erosion management strategy. They found that while cover crops can cut into profitability over the short term, there are a number of benefits over long-term adoption.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reducing the footprint of a greenhouse gas more potent than carbon dioxideScientists have unlocked a new, more efficient pathway for converting one of our most potent greenhouse gases directly into basic chemicals for manufacturing plastics, agrochemicals and pharmaceuticals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dim light may make us dumberSpending too much time in dimly lit rooms and offices may actually change the brain's structure and hurt one's ability to remember and learn, indicates groundbreaking research by neuroscientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New 'Tomato Expression Atlas' dives deep into the fruit's fleshResearchers have published a spatiotemporal map of gene expression across all tissues and developmental stages of the tomato fruit - the genetic information underlying how a fruit changes from inside to out as it ripens. Their data is available in the new Tomato Expression Atlas (TEA).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How viruses disarm the immune systemHow do viruses that cause chronic infections, such as HIV or hepatitis c virus, manage to outsmart their hosts' immune systems? The answer to that question has long eluded scientists, but new research has uncovered a molecular mechanism that may be a key piece of the puzzle. The discovery could provide new targets for treating a wide range of diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
PSMA PET/CT clearly differentiates prostate cancer from benign tissueUsing nuclear medicine, researchers have found a way to accurately differentiate cancerous tissue from healthy tissue in prostate cancer patients. The research demonstrates that the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) on 68Ga-PSMA PET/CT scans correlates with PSMA-expression in primary prostate cancer. By this means, researchers were able to generate an SUVmax cutoff for the differentiation
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Massive reserves of mercury hidden in permafrostResearchers have discovered permafrost in the northern hemisphere stores massive amounts of natural mercury, a finding with significant implications for human health and ecosystems worldwide.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wireless energy source generates electricity from simple motions such as waves, clapping handsResearchers have developed a wireless energy source that generates electricity from simple mechanical motion, such as the waves in the ocean, the tap of a foot or the clap of a hand.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Algorithm identifies vulnerable people during natural disastersA new algorithm will help first responders and home care providers better help the elderly during natural disasters.
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Inside Science
Future Self-Assembled Space TelescopeFuture Self-Assembled Space Telescope Scientists propose strategies to build a larger-than-ever space telescope by sending up the mirror piece by piece. cubesats.jpg Image from Feb. 11, 2014, of CubeSats deployed from International Space Station. The proposed GOAT telescope would assemble itself from thousands of robots launched into space in similarly sized packages. Image credits: NASA Space Mo
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The Atlantic
The Cloverfield Paradox Lands With a ThudThe Cloverfield Paradox was not intended to make its big debut on your television screen. First announced with the title God Particle , the sci-fi horror film directed by Julius Onah was all set for a theatrical release this year until it suddenly wasn’t. In January, rumors abounded that Netflix was interested in purchasing the rights to the film from Paramount, and that the studio (which also so
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Dana Foundation
New York City’s 2018 Regional Brain BeeGuest post by Brandon Barrera The battle of the best and brightest of brainiacs from New York City’s greater metropolitan area high schools came to its conclusion this Saturday at the 2018 Regional Brain Bee, held in the Great Hall at the City College of New York. Photo credit: Jacqueline Silberbush The annual neuroscience competition offers curious young minds the opportunity to flex their gray
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Science : NPR
Could A More Individualistic World Also Be A More Altruistic One?Equating individualism with selfishness may be a mistake: Some of the world's wealthiest and most individualistic countries are some of the most altruistic, says 13.7 guest commentator Abigail Marsh. (Image credit: Tom Merton/Getty Images/Hoxton)
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Science : NPR
Lethal Pneumonia Outbreak Caused By Low Chlorine In Flint WaterTwo new studies confirm that an outbreak of deadly Legionnaires' disease in Flint, Mich., was caused by the city's water crisis in 2014 and 2015. (Image credit: Science Source)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Baby, it's cold outside: Understanding conditions for star formationResearchers demonstrate how a gas escapes ice at an extremely cold temperature, providing insight about how stars form in interstellar clouds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Controlling fire ants with natural compoundsNew research has identified natural, plant-derived that repel fire ants. These compounds, including one found in cinnamon, work by activating a type of ion channel highly expressed in the antennae and leg of one of the world's most invasive insect species.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A good life for all within the planet's meansA new study has found that no country currently meets its citizens' basic needs at a globally sustainable level of resource use. The research is the first to quantify the sustainability of national resource use associated with meeting basic human needs for 151 countries.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
North American ice sheet decay decreased climate variability in the Southern HemisphereThe changing topography of ice sheets in the Northern Hemisphere during the last Ice Age forced changes in the climate of Antarctica, a previously undocumented inter-polar climate change mechanism.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate variability -- past and futureOn the basis of a unique global comparison of data from core samples extracted from the ocean floor and the polar ice sheets, researchers have now demonstrated that, though climate changes have indeed decreased around the globe from glacial to interglacial periods, the difference is by no means as pronounced as previously assumed. Until now, it was believed that glacial periods were characterized
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New approach could quickly identify best organic solar cell mixturesAn international team of researchers has discovered a new quantitative relation that allows for quick identification of promising material combinations for organic solar cells. The discovery could significantly reduce the 'trial and error' aspect of solar cell production by reducing the time spent on finding the most efficient mixtures.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Farm sunshine, not cancer: Replacing tobacco fields with solar arraysMichigan Tech researchers contend that tobacco farmers could increase profits by converting their land to solar farms, which in turn provides renewable energy generation.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New insight into the molecular weapons of the plant microbiomeIn a study published in the Feb. 2 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, researchers at McMaster University in Canada pinpointed the identity of a toxin used by a soil-dwelling bacterium that protects plants from disease.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What magnets have to do with pistachios—Synchrony in ecology puts ising model to the testDid you ever pass an orchard with branches bursting with flowers and wonder how the trees "know" when to blossom or bear fruit all at the same time? Or perhaps you've walked through the woods, crunching loads of acorns underfoot one year but almost none the next year.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New alien species invasions still rising globallyUp to 16% of all species on Earth could qualify as potential alien species and if they invade new regions, impacts will be difficult to predict, according to new research involving UCL.
3h
Science : NPR
Can Computers Learn Like Humans?Computers use artificial intelligence to do everything from drive cars to pick music we like. But what exactly is artificial intelligence? How does it work? What are its limits? (Image credit: Sam Rowe for NPR)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Powerful new dataset reveals patterns of global ozone pollutionAlthough ozone pollution is dropping across many parts of the United States, western Europe and Japan, many people living in those countries still experience more than a dozen days every year in which levels of the lung irritant exceed health-based standards.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New ethics committee aims to help veterinarians navigate complex care situationsClinicians and researchers from North Carolina State University and Duke University have developed a first-of-its-kind veterinary medical ethics committee to aid care providers in navigating complex care situations.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UA Cancer Center team targets tumor suppressor to treat 'triple-negative' breast cancerA team led by UA Cancer Center researchers Agnieszka Witkiewicz, MD, and Erik Knudsen, PhD, screened for drugs that could target triple-negative breast cancer tumors, producing several new therapeutic candidates for this difficult-to-treat cancer.
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Big Think
Is chocolate really healthy for you?The answer is a resounding yes—but not if it's loaded with sugar and milk products. Read More
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The Atlantic
#MeToo With Chinese CharacteristicsIn the spring of 2015, five feminist activists in China handed out stickers on the Beijing subway to call attention to sexual harassment. According to one of the activists, the police knocked on her door one night in March and whisked her to the station, where they questioned her for 24 hours straight. She was held in a detention center for 37 days. The others were also arrested, and another acti
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The Atlantic
'The Best Cab Ride of My Life'When Dave Grohl began impersonating Elvis Presley, he felt it made him “a sexier person than I had been just being Dave.” In the short documentary Cab Elvis , director Andrew Franks follows Grohl, a cab driver, across Seattle as he picks up passengers—some of whom describe the experience as the best taxi ride of their lives. “I was leaving some Seattle bars and just so happened to hop into Dave’s
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA finds wind shear tearing Tropical Cyclone Cebile apartNASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean and found that wind shear was adversely affecting Tropical Cyclone Cebile.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Health indicators for newborns of breast cancer survivors may vary by cancer typeIn a study published in the International Journal of Cancer, researchers from the UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center analyzed health indicators for children born to young breast cancer survivors in North Carolina.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Altering Huntington's patients' skin cells into brain cells sheds light on diseaseScientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have transformed skin cells from patients with Huntington's disease into the type of brain cell affected by the disorder. The resulting mass of neurons serves as a new tool to study the degenerative and eventually fatal neurological condition, according to the researchers.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Building a future in science with construction-based toysChildhood play experiences strongly shape a person's spatial skills, according to a new CIRES-led study--those skills can be critical to success in fields like science and engineering.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Trains, planes, automobiles and heart diseaseNoise may disrupt the body on the cellular level in a way that increases the risk of common heart disease risk factors, according to a review topic published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology that examined the underlying mechanisms that may lead to noise-induced heart disease. The review is in response to growing evidence connecting environmental noise, including from road
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An enzyme variant reduces cardiac hypertrophy and improves heart functionScientists at the Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cardiovasculares Carlos III (CNIC) have identified a variant of the enzyme calcineurin, called CnAβ1, whose action reduces cardiac hypertrophy and improves heart function.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Conservation stories from the front linesA new collection, 'Conservation Stories from the Front Lines,' publishing between Feb. 5-7 in the open access journal PLOS Biology, captures the long-neglected human side of science by entering the tragedy, comedy, and (mis)adventures that shape research into the scientific record as peer-reviewed scientific stories. The stories come from scientists working to manage and preserve biodiversity, and
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Atmospheres of exoplanets in TRAPPIST-1 habitable zone probedAstronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have conducted the first spectroscopic survey of the Earth-sized planets within the habitable zone around the nearby star TRAPPIST-1. Hubble reveals that at least three of the exoplanets (d, e, and f) do not seem to contain puffy, hydrogen-rich atmospheres similar to gaseous planets such as Neptune. The results, instead, favor more compact atmospheres l
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
TRAPPIST-1 planets probably rich in waterA new study has found that planets orbiting the star TRAPPIST-1 are made mostly of rock, and some could hold more water than Earth. The planets' densities suggest that some of them could have up to 5 percent of their mass in the form of water. The hotter planets closest to their parent star are likely to have dense steamy atmospheres and the more distant ones probably have icy surfaces.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Half of all dementias start with damaged 'gatekeeper cells'Research sheds new light on how a breakdown in the brain's vascular system predates the accumulation of toxic plaques and tangles in the brain that bring about Alzheimer's disease. The research suggests an earlier target for preventing dementia and Alzheimer's. Nearly 50 percent of all dementias, including Alzheimer's, begins with the breakdown of the smallest blood vessels in the brain and their
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Changing weather patterns throwing ecosystems out of whackSpecies' lifecycles are slowly growing out of alignment, which can affect the functioning of ecosystems, ultimately impacting human food supply and disease.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Conservation stories from the front linesThe ups and downs of the research process underlie every scientific publication, yet rarely make it into the final paper. A new collection, "Conservation Stories from the Front Lines," publishing between 5-7 February in the open access journal PLOS Biology, captures the long-neglected human side of science by entering the tragedy, comedy, and (mis)adventures that shape research into the scientific
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spatial skills higher among those who played with construction-based toys and video games in childhood: studyChildhood play experiences strongly shape a person's spatial skills, according to a new CIRES-led study—those skills can be critical to success in fields like science and engineering. Young adults who played with construction-based toys such as Legos, or with certain types of video games outperformed other peers in tests of spatial reasoning—like the skill needed to mentally rotate objects. And mo
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Blog » Languages » English
Activity Tracker Fix & Consensus AdjustmentHave you been looking forward to the Activity Tracker properly matching Review Mode? Have you ever felt robbed of points when tracing a poorly trailblazed cube? Did you ever imagine these issues could be connected? If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, read on! Here’s the short version of what we’re about to do: Accuracies in the Activity Tracker have sometimes been failing to match ac
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Scientific American Content: Global
Can Pregnancy Help Scientists Better Understand Cancer?Cancerous cells and placental ones appear to regulate the immune system in similar ways -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
Jimmy Fallon Tells Trump the Times Are a-Changin'A few hours after Prince’s flag flew on Justin Timberlake’s Super Bowl stage , another elusive Minnesota musician was paid tribute by another grinning Pepsi pitchman. The icon was Bob Dylan, the tribute payer was Jimmy Fallon, and the occasion was political—surprisingly so. For the post–Big Game Tonight Show , Fallon appeared in Dylan drag—curly wig, indoor sunglasses—at the Orpheum Theatre, a ve
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The Atlantic
As Pyeongchang Prepares for the Olympics, a Nearby Ski Resort Sits AbandonedWith less than a week left until the opening ceremonies for the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, host officials from Gangwon Province are expressing concern about the long-term maintenance and costs related to the 14 Olympic venues. In part, their concerns are based on a declining interest in skiing among South Koreans since 2012 , that has led to the closure of several other fac
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Big Think
The religious ad the NFL approved for Super Bowl—and the one it didn'tIf you blinked—or if you were in the wrong market—you might have missed a commercial for Scientology during the Super Bowl. You probably also missed the Twitter pushback. Read More
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New on MIT Technology Review
South Korea says North Korea won’t stop hacking its cryptocurrency exchanges
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Substances used in household goods affect the immune system of a coastal musselIn a study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, researchers from National University of Singapore have determined how perfluoalkyl substances (PFAS) affect the immune system of green mussels. Mussels, and other invertebrates, play an essential role in their ecosystem, and the ocean is the final sink for many pollutants like PFAS, so it is important to monitor regions that may have
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Online tool speeds up evolution educationThe biology teacher's pedagogical toolbox is evolving. Bright colors, replicating computer code and a digital petri dish bring evolution science to life for students.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Toddler formulas and milks -- not recommended by health experts -- mislead with health claimsMisleading labeling on formulas and milks marketed as 'toddler drinks' may confuse parents about their healthfulness or necessity, finds a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel genetic variants for ADHD linked to educational attainmentFive novel genetic variants associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been identified by exploiting genetic overlap between ADHD and educational attainment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Effects of climate change can complicate the politics of military basesUsing an abandoned U.S. military base in Greenland as a case study, new research explores how the impact of climate change on domestic and overseas military bases could cause a host of political and diplomatic problems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Controlling quantum interactions in a single materialBy demonstrating that multiple quantum interactions can coexist and be controlled in a single material, researchers open the door for ultrafast, low-power electronics and quantum computers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists target glioma cancer stem cells, which could improve patient survivalBrain tumors are responsible for 25 percent of cancer-related deaths in children and young adults. Despite initial response to treatment, most aggressive brain tumors eventually recur and are ultimately incurable. Multiple studies suggest that cancer stem cells within these tumors resist therapy and are responsible for tumor recurrences. Researchers have devised a strategy to treat these tumors by
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fiber optic sensors that dissolve in the body createdFor the first time, researchers have fabricated sensing elements known as fiber Bragg gratings inside optical fibers designed to dissolve completely inside the body.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diabetes doubles chance of developing cataractPeople with diabetes are twice as likely to develop cataract as the general population and the relative risk is highest in those aged between 45 and 54, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The discovery of a third form of flagella-mediated motility shown by symbiotic bacteriaMany species of swimming bacteria have a rotary structure called a "flagellum," consisting of more than twenty different kinds of proteins. By rotating their flagellar filaments and gaining propulsion, bacteria can swim freely in water. Flagella-mediated motility is essential for bacteria to move in search for better habitats and two forms have been known to date: (i) "run and tumbling" seen in pe
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Live Science
Drone Nearly Collides with Passenger Jet Near Las VegasDon't do this.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reducing the footprint of a greenhouse gas more potent than carbon dioxideUSC scientists have unlocked a new, more efficient pathway for converting one of our most potent greenhouse gases directly into basic chemicals for manufacturing plastics, agrochemicals and pharmaceuticals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
TRAPPIST-1: Findings show exoplanets made of rock and waterIn 2016, a team of researchers led by EU-funded astronomer Michael Gillon at the University of Liege, Belgium, discovered three temperate Earth-sized planets orbiting TRAPPIST-1, an ultra-cool dwarf star just 40 light years from Earth. A few months later, Gillon surprised the world with the discovery of a whole planetary system made of a total of seven planets around this star. A set of new studie
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clemson researchers blaze new ground in wireless energy generationResearchers at the Clemson Nanomaterials Institute have developed a wireless energy source that generates electricity from simple mechanical motion, such as the waves in the ocean, the tap of a foot or the clap of a hand.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Opioid cessation may be more successful when depression is treatedOpioid cessation in non-cancer pain may be more successful when depression is treated to remission, a Saint Louis University study shows.
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Byton and Aurora Are Building a Self-Driving Electric SUVThe Chinese automaker and the star-studded self-driving startup have joined forces.
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Popular Science
We might need to turn our poop into food to survive in spaceSpace Astronaut poop could help create a weird yet nutritious bacterial Vegemite. Don’t panic. No one is suggesting that astronauts on long-term space missions should actually snack on their own bodily waste.
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Viden
Insidere: Facebook f*cker med vores børns hjernerTidligere investorer og ansatte hos Google og Facebook angrer, at de har været med til at skabe noget, der skader børn. Nu har de startet en organisation, der skal modarbejde deres tidligere venner.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Tesla says it has a plan to improve conditions for its workers
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Feed: All Latest
A Nintendo Switch N00b Goes Hands-On With LaboNintendo's latest set of Switch peripherals bring the whimsy back into gaming.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Understanding pain exacerbation with Opioid useA new study published in JNeurosci advances understanding of how the potent opioid analgesic fentanyl can increase pain sensitivity in animals. These findings could inform the development of treatments for chronic pain that minimize the side effects of these powerful pain-relieving drugs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Controlling fire ants with natural compoundsNew research published in eNeuro has identified natural, plant-derived that repel fire ants. These compounds, including one found in cinnamon, work by activating a type of ion channel highly expressed in the antennae and leg of one of the world's most invasive insect species.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
An underestimated threat: Land-based pollution with microplasticsTiny plastic particles also present a threat to creatures on land and may have damaging effects similar or even more problematic than in our oceans. Researchers warn: the impact of microplastics in soils, sediments and the freshwaters could have a long-term negative effect on terrestrial ecosystems throughout the world.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vanadium dioxyde: A revolutionary material for tomorrow's electronicsVanadium dioxide's unique properties make it perfect for outperforming silicon and giving rise to a new generation of low-power electronic devices. Engineers have shown how this compound can be used to create programmable radiofrequency electronic functions for aerospace communication systems. Other applications -- such as in neuromorphic computing and artificial intelligence -- are also on the ca
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Regular physical activity is associated with better lung function among smokersLeisure-time vigorous physical activity is associated with better lung function among current smokers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ray-finned fishes: Natural born survivorsScientists have revealed that ray-finned fishes are perhaps one of Earth's most resilient groups of animals, having survived four mass extinction events that wiped out many other groups.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Small birds have more efficient wing strokes than batsSmall birds are more energy-efficient than bats when flying. Researchers previously believed this was due to air resistance created by the bats' ears. However, biologists have now discovered another reason.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Smart new method to manufacture organic solar cellsThe ability to use cheap materials and simple manufacturing methods are two huge advantages of printed organic solar cells. Scientists have now developed an even simpler method to manufacture solar cell modules.
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The Atlantic
What Went Wrong in the Fatal South Carolina Train Wreck?Train Amtrak SouthIt has been an awful two months for rail travel in America, and for Amtrak in particular. In late December, an Amtrak train derailed near Tacoma, Washington, killing three people. Last week, a train carrying Republican lawmakers struck a truck near Charlottesville, Virginia, killing the driver. Then, on Sunday, an Amtrak train struck a parked passenger train just south of Columbia, South Carolina
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The Atlantic
How WeWork Has Perfectly Captured the Millennial IdIn March 2017 , the New York City–based editors and writers of The Atlantic moved to a WeWork office in Brooklyn. I remember our first morning vividly: It was like entering the Millennial id. Craft beer and cucumber water poured from kitchen taps. Laptoppers in jeans and toques clacked along to MGMT in the wood-paneled common area. A WeWork “community manager” showed us to a glass-walled office s
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The Atlantic
The Horror of a World Without MicrobesA few years ago, while doing research for my book on the beneficial microbes that share our bodies, I went on an inadvisably frenetic weeklong reporting trip that spanned five cities and three time zones. On the final night, I wearily picked up the phone in my hotel room to order some food, and noticed a label on the receiver. It said: Antibacterial handset. It was a perfect reflection of the wor
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Former Google exec Eric Schmidt named MIT innovation fellowA longtime Google executive is taking on a new role at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Air pollution closes all schools in TehranAll schools in Tehran will remain closed on Tuesday because of dangerously high levels of air pollution blanketing the Iranian capital, authorities said.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Police shootings reflect structural racismThe deaths of Trayvon Martin, Tamir Rice, Sandra Bland, Michael Brown, and other unarmed black victims at the hands of police sparked a national conversation about racism and policing, from the Black Lives Matter movement to kneeling NFL players. Critics of these protests have attributed police shootings to "bad apples" within police departments, or argued more black victims die at the hands of po
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Premature babies make fewer friends -- but not for longPremature babies make fewer friends, feel less accepted by peers and spend less time socializing in early childhood -- but this improves when they get to school -- according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A majority of middle-aged people show a high level of mental well-beingA recent study has found a surprisingly high level of mental well-being among middle-aged individuals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Compounds derived from hops show promise for metabolic syndrome patientsA group of compounds derived from hops can likely improve cognitive and other functions in people with metabolic syndrome.
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NeuWrite West
Caution: Objects in the Bower May Be Smaller Than They AppearCreating illusions to fool others has been used as a form of entertainment for thousands of years. In movies and photography, an illusion called forced perspective takes advantage of a person’s tendency to make assumptions about the world they see to make objects seem bigger, smaller, closer or further. In the Lord of the Rings for instance, the hobbits were often made to look smaller not through
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
BU: Police shootings reflect structural racismThe deaths of Trayvon Martin, Tamir Rice, Sandra Bland, Michael Brown, and other unarmed black victims at the hands of police sparked a national conversation about racism and policing, from the Black Lives Matter movement to kneeling NFL players. But a new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers finds states with a greater degree of structural racism, particularl
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dissatisfaction in three dimensionsIn a paper published in the Clothing and Textiles Research Journal, Jessica Ridgway, an assistant professor of retail entrepreneurship in the Jim Moran School of Entrepreneurship, asserts that mood and body satisfaction can take major hits after viewing oneself represented as a 3-D avatar.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Physicists Harness Twisted Mathematics to Make Powerful LaserHigh-quality beams could be among the first practical applications of the booming field of topological physics -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher finds link between 3-D body scans, feelings of dejectionIf you've made a habit of sidestepping mirrors and shunning your reflection, new research from Florida State University suggests that you may want to keep a safe distance from 3-D body scanners as well.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Controlling fire ants with natural compoundsNew research published in eNeuro has identified natural, plant-derived that repel fire ants. These compounds, including one found in cinnamon, work by activating a type of ion channel highly expressed in the antennae and leg of one of the world's most invasive insect species.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SpaceX 'Starman' at wheel of sports car flying on new rocketSpaceX Falcon HeavyA SpaceX "Starman" is aboard the company's new rocket that's set to make its launch debut from Florida
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research examines long-term economic impact of cover cropsIt isn't often that researchers have the luxury to examine data from a long-term research project. While most research projects last from three to five years, scientists with the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture recently published a study that covered a 29-year period to find the benefits of cover crops on no-till cotton fields.
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Live Science
Flat Earth: What Fuels the Internet's Strangest Conspiracy Theory?Why do people reject more than 2,000 years of scientific understanding?
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Quanta Magazine
How Math (and Vaccines) Keep You Safe From the FluLet’s say you hear a juicy rumor that you just can’t keep to yourself. You hate rumormongers, so you compromise by telling only one person and then keeping your mouth shut. No big deal, right? After all, if the person you tell adopts the same policy and only tells one other person, the gossip won’t spread very far. If one new person hears the rumor each day, after 30 days it will have spread to o
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