EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Evolutionary biology: Sponges can economize on oxygen useSponges lack a signaling pathway that responds to low intracellular oxygen levels in more complex animals. Do they use a different mechanism for this purpose or did their earliest ancestors evolve at a time when less oxygen was available?
12h
Ingeniøren
Øget risiko for svine-MRSA jo tættere du bor på en svinefarmFor første gang viser en undersøgelse en klar sammenhæng mellem stafylokok-smittede folks bopæl og svinefarme. Forskerne tror, at årsagen er dyrekontakt og ikke miljøsmitte.
16h
Viden
Vibe, sanglærke og landsvale har trange kår: Tre millioner fugle forsvundet i det åbne landDOF efterlyser ny EU-landbrugspolitik, der støtter naturen. Dansk landbrug er enig.
10h

LATEST

Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shines new light on how Salmonella 'die' at low temperaturesThe most economical way to kill bacteria that cause common food-borne illnesses—mostly caused by Salmonella enterica—is heat, but, the mechanisms that kill Salmonella at lower temperatures were not fully understood until now, according to a team of researchers.
4min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US policymakers ponder tougher rules for cryptocurrenciesUS regulators on Tuesday joined a growing chorus of officials saying they made need new powers to regulate cryptocurrencies which pose risks the investing public does not recognize.
4min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Olympic video and VR: Guide to watching without a TVEvery Olympic event will be streamed live. But to watch online, you'll still need to be a paying cable or satellite subscriber.
4min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Former Uber CEO set to testify in high-tech heist caseFormer Uber CEO Travis Kalanick is poised to testify Tuesday in a high-stakes trial focused on charges that his company stole self-driving car technology from Waymo, a Google spinoff.
4min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple mulls refunds for battery replacement on old iPhonesApple is mulling refunds to customers who paid full price for battery replacements on older iPhones.
4min
Big Think
Searching for meaning in your life? This Japanese concept can help you find itA very useful Venn diagram illustrates this concept perfectly. Read More
5min
Big Think
10 astronomical events in 2018 and how to see themNeed more astronomical phenomena in your life? We've got you covered. Read More
5min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Child aids paleontologists in discovery of new ancient fish speciesThe fossil, called Candelarhynchus padillai, is approximately 90 million years old, and has no modern relatives, explained Oksana Vernygora, PhD student in the Department of Biological Sciences and lead author on the study.
6min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shines new light on how Salmonella 'die' at low temperaturesThe most economical way to kill bacteria that cause common food-borne illnesses -- mostly caused by Salmonella enterica -- is heat, but, the mechanisms that kill Salmonella at lower temperatures were not fully understood until now, according to a team of researchers.
6min
Live Science
Why Do Rockets Explode?SpaceX is expected to launch its Falcon Heavy rocket into low-Earth orbit, but what are the chances that something could go wrong?
7min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Love actually: Computer model may decode Facebook emoticonsWhile the trusty 'like' button is still the most popular way to signal approval for Facebook posts, a computer model may help users and businesses navigate the increasingly complicated way people are expressing how they feel on social media.
7min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Virus-cracking' molecules advance fight against hepatitis BResearchers have found that certain molecules -- currently under clinical trial -- are able to 'crack' the protective shell of the hepatitis B virus, suggesting it may be possible to attack the virus after its already taken hold in the body. There is currently no cure for the virus, which can cause liver failure and cancer.
7min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
No volcanic winter in East Africa from ancient Toba eruptionThe Toba supereruption on the island of Sumatra about 74,000 years ago did not cause a six-year-long 'volcanic winter' in East Africa and thereby cause the human population in the region to plummet, according to new research based on an analysis of ancient plant remains from lake cores. The new findings disagree with the Toba catastrophe hypothesis, which says the eruption and its aftermath caused
7min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New compound may stop bacteria from causing sicknessA new study has described a signaling pathway that affects communication -- a process called quorum sensing -- between Streptococcus bacteria cells.
7min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Emerald ash borer: How cities and towns can prepare for invasionIn Pennsylvania, where emerald ash borer has been present since 2007, municipalities have found successful ash-management plans under guidance of the state's Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, and they offer a model for other regions to follow. A new guide outlines a set of four options for communities to choose from as they plan for the impact of the emerald ash borer.
7min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Liver cancer: New system matches genetic anomalies with precision medicine treatmentsComputer scientists have developed a new system to rapidly determine which cancer drugs are likely to work best given genetic markers for a patent -- the first publicly available system of its kind. This will allow doctors to better access data linking genetic factors and treatment results spread among hundreds of academic journals.
7min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Production of solar fuels inches closer with new discoveryResearchers have discovered how a catalyst splits water using solar power, opening the door to economically viable solar-fuel production.
7min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Children affected by prenatal drinking more numerous than previously estimatedResearchers found a significant number of children across four regions in the United States were determined to have fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). The new findings may represent more accurate prevalence estimates of FASD among the general population than prior research.
7min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Insecure workers less likely to have access to family friendly arrangementsNew research shows that workers who fear they may lose their jobs are less likely to have access to family-friendly flexible working arrangements.
7min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New compound may stop bacteria from causing sicknessA study published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry is the first to describe a signaling pathway that affects communication—a process called quorum sensing—between Streptococcus bacteria cells.
10min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
No volcanic winter in East Africa from ancient Toba eruptionThe massive Toba volcanic eruption on the island of Sumatra about 74,000 years ago did not cause a six-year-long "volcanic winter" in East Africa and thereby cause the human population in the region to plummet, according to new University of Arizona-led research.
10min
Big Think
People with depression use language differently – here’s how to spot itWhat's the secret language of depression? Read More
11min
Latest Headlines | Science News
This ancient creature looks like a spider with a tailA newly discovered ancient creature looks like a spider and has silk spinners and spidery male sex organs.
12min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Emerald ash borer: How cities and towns can prepare for invasionSince its discovery in the United States in 2002, the emerald ash borer has swiftly become the most destructive non-native forest pest to ever invade the country. As the insect's range continues to grow, despite ongoing efforts to fight it, communities with ash trees in both urban areas and woodlands are left to pick up the pieces.
16min
The Atlantic
The Symbolism of Elon Musk Sending a Car Into SpaceElon Musk SpaceXCAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.—Decades ago, the business of launching stuff beyond Earth’s orbit fell solely under the purview of governments. When the stuff being sent wasn’t robotic hardware or scientific instruments, the people who chose what it would be approached the decision-making with a certain amount of seriousness about what it would say about the senders, what it would all mean . This stuff, aft
16min
The Scientist RSS
Dozens of Editorial Board Members Resign from JournalMore than 70 editors left the Journal of Molecular Medicine after SpringerNature closed an editorial office and selected a new editor-in-chief.
17min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How exercise training promotes a sound mind in a sound bodyA new study shows that the same mechanisms behind the beneficial effects of exercise training on the brain also help to counteract fat and to strengthen the immune system. The results may ultimately give rise to new obesity and diabetes drugs.
21min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Immune system dysfunction may occur early in Alzheimer’s diseaseStudy offers new insights into how brain and rest of body communicate.
21min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The future of wireless communications is terahertzElectrical and optical engineers have designed a novel platform that could tailor telecommunication and optical transmissions. They experimentally demonstrated their system using a new transmission wavelength with a higher bandwidth capacity than those currently used in wireless communication. These experiments open up new horizons in communication and photonics technology.
21min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Remarkable stability in perovskite solar cellsResearchers have created an environmentally stable, high-efficiency perovskite solar cell, bringing the emerging technology a step closer to commercial deployment.
21min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
HINODE captures record-breaking solar magnetic fieldAstronomers in Japan have observed the strongest magnetic field ever directly measured on the surface of the Sun. They determined that it was generated as a result of gas outflow from one sunspot pushing against another sunspot.
21min
Science : NPR
WATCH LIVE: SpaceX Launches Powerful Falcon Heavy RocketThe private space company is launching a rocket more powerful than any other in use today — and it'll be bearing a cherry red roadster into an elliptical Earth-Mars orbit. Watch the launch live here. (Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
23min
NYT > Science
A Brain Implant Improved Memory, Scientists ReportElectrodes threaded into the brains of epilepsy patients enhanced their recall on word tests by about 15 percent.
34min
Live Science
Here's What It Looks Like When G-Force Knocks You OutDon't get cocky. If you were this kid, you'd pass out, too.
47min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Emerald ash borer: How cities and towns can prepare for invasionIn Pennsylvania, where emerald ash borer has been present since 2007, municipalities have found successful ash-management plans under guidance of the state's Department of Conservation and Natural Resources, and they offer a model for other regions to follow. A new guide published in the open-access Journal of Integrated Pest Management outlines a set of four options for communities to choose from
48min
Scientific American Content: Global
Brain "Pacemaker" Could Help You Remember Only What You Might ForgetAn implant is the latest development in research on neural stimulation to boost cognition -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
52min
The Atlantic
An End to Gerrymandering in Ohio?On Monday night, the Ohio state Senate did something truly unprecedented: With near-unanimous support from both Republicans and Democrats, the chamber approved Senate Resolution 5, a measure that would for the first time require bipartisan input and approval for federal congressional maps. The measure is expected to pass the state House today, and it will appear on the ballot in the May primary e
52min
Big Think
Is climate change a reason to never have kids? Some say yesEnvironmental concerns have caused some to opt-out of reproduction, both to help the planet and to protect their would-be children. Read More
54min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Venus flytraps don't eat the insects that pollinate themWhile most people are familiar with Venus flytraps and their snapping jaws, there is still a lot that scientists don't know about the biology of these carnivorous plants. Researchers have for the first time discovered which insects pollinate the rare plants in their native habitat -- and discovered that the flytraps don't dine on these pollinator species.
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gonorrhea in China shows waning susceptibility to WHO-recommended antibioticsNeisseria gonorrhoeae strains resistant to azithromycin and/or with decreased susceptibility to ceftriaxone are common in China, according to a prevalence study. The study also showed that the prevalence of dual resistance in N. gonorrhoeae isolates increased from 2013 to 2016. The results suggest that dual therapy with azithromycin and ceftriaxone, recommended by WHO and many countries to treat g
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mouse study reveals what happens in the gut after too much fructoseResearchers report that in mice, fructose, a sugar found in fruit, is processed mainly in the small intestine, not in the liver as had previously been suspected. Sugary drinks and processed high-sugar foods overwhelm the small intestine and spill into the liver for processing. Additionally, the authors learned that the ability of the small intestine to process fructose is higher after a meal.
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sequential model chips away at mysteries of aircraftIce accumulation on aircraft wings is a common contributing factor to airplane accidents. Most existing models focus on either ice that freezes as a thin film on the airfoil, or immediately after it impacts the wing. Researchers have announced a new model, accounting for a combination of these forms, that they hope will melt our misunderstanding of ice accretion.
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New CRISPR method efficiently corrects Duchenne muscular dystrophy defect in heart tissueScientists have developed a CRISPR gene-editing technique that can potentially correct a majority of the 3,000 mutations that cause Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by making a single cut at strategic points along the patient's DNA, according to a new study.
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists make it possible to rank the risk of resistance genesA new study will help to predict antibiotic resistance evolution and thus guide future drug development.
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New method enables high-resolution measurements of magnetismScientists have made significant progress allowing very high resolution magnetic measurements. With their method it is possible to measure magnetism of individual atomic planes.
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Light switch: Porous polymer films with shape memoryWhether for separation processes, photovoltaics, catalysis, or electronics, porous polymer membranes are needed in many fields. Membranes with micropores that switch between different shapes and/or sizes would expand the possibilities. Scientists have now introduced a process that produces porous films made from shape memory polymers with precise dimensions. The shape and size of the pores can be
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Data-driven shale dialogue: water quality concernsResearch examines a dialogue about shale drilling between concerned citizens, watershed groups, government regulators and personnel from large energy companies by focusing on publicly available water quality data.
57min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new way of generating ultra-short bursts of lightA close relative of the laser has been confined to the lab due to its finicky nature, but a recent discovery may now bring the technology into a range of applications from health care to environmental science.
57min
Science | The Guardian
SpaceX Falcon Heavy launch: gigantic rocket set for first test – liveWatch live: A heavy-duty rocket from Elon Musk’s private company will launch for the first time and aims to make spaceflight cheaper and easier Report: Elon Musk seeks to revive Apollo era with Falcon Heavy rocket test Sign up: Get Lab Notes, our weekly science update 8.44pm GMT The rocket is shrouded in steam and mist, T-minus 30 seconds, a huge cheer. 8.44pm GMT The rocket is on internal power.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New compound may stop bacteria from causing sicknessA study published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry is the first to describe a signaling pathway that affects communication -- a process called quorum sensing -- between Streptococcus bacteria cells.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No volcanic winter in East Africa from ancient Toba eruptionThe Toba supereruption on the island of Sumatra about 74,000 years ago did not cause a six-year-long 'volcanic winter' in East Africa and thereby cause the human population in the region to plummet, according to new research based on an analysis of ancient plant remains from lake cores. The new findings disagree with the Toba catastrophe hypothesis, which says the eruption and its aftermath caused
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bilingualism could offset brain changes in Alzheimer'sAfter more than a decade of research, this much we know: it's good for your brain to know another language. A new study goes further, however, focusing specifically on the effects of knowing a second language for patients with Alzheimer's disease and mild cognitive impairment.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sea ice algae blooms in the darkResearchers have measured a new world record: Small ice algae on the underside of the Arctic sea ice live and grow at a light level corresponding to only 0.02 percent of the light at the surface of the ice. Algae are the primary component of the Arctic food web and produce food far earlier in the year than previously thought.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Language previously unknown to linguists discovered in Southeast AsiaA language previously unknown to linguists -- dubbed Jedek -- has been found in the Malay Peninsula, researchers from Sweden report. The community in which Jedek is spoken is more gender-equal than Western societies, there is almost no interpersonal violence, they consciously encourage their children not to compete, and there are no laws or courts, according to the researchers.
1h
The Atlantic
The Congressman Who Infuriates the PresidentAdam Schiff, the ranking member on the House Intelligence Committee, says the president has been “watching too much Fox News in the morning.” In an interview on Tuesday, Schiff told me that Trump’s early-morning tweet on Monday, in which he called Schiff a “liar” and a “leaker,” was predictable given Donald Trump Jr.’s contentious interview with the committee last year, and the current controvers
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
40-year controversy in solid-state physics resolvedAn international team has shown that the puzzling properties of samarium hexaboride do not stem from the material being a topological insulator, as it had been proposed to be. Theoretical and initial experimental work had previously indicated that this material, which becomes a Kondo insulator at very low temperatures, also possessed the properties of a topological insulator. The team has now publ
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
White cheeks are more titillatingMale blue tits with white cheeks are healthier and more likely to mate with higher quality partners than their counterparts with duller cheek feathers. Having purer white cheeks also indicates that a blue tit was better able to overcome an infection with parasites during the previous year.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Liquid crystal molecules form nano ringsScientists have investigated an intriguing form of self-assembly in liquid crystals: When the liquid crystals are filled into cylindrical nanopores and heated, their molecules form ordered rings as they cool -- a condition that otherwise does not naturally occur in the material. This behavior allows nanomaterials with new optical and electrical properties.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Worm 'uploaded' to computer and taught amazing tricksThe tiny worm C. elegans is the only living being whose neural network has been analyzed completely. It can therefore be transferred to a computer, creating a virtual copy of the worm which behaves in exactly the same way to external stimuli. Such a 'virtual worm' can learn amazing tricks -- its neural network can even be used to balance a pole, which is a standard control problem in computer scie
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Virus-cracking' molecules advance fight against hepatitis BIndiana University researchers have found that certain molecules -- currently under clinical trial -- are able to 'crack' the protective shell of the hepatitis B virus, suggesting it may be possible to attack the virus after its already taken hold in the body. There is currently no cure for the virus, which can cause liver failure and cancer.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Love actually: Computer model may decode Facebook emoticonsWhile the trusty 'like' button is still the most popular way to signal approval for Facebook posts, a computer model may help users and businesses navigate the increasingly complicated way people are expressing how they feel on social media, according to Penn State researchers.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dementia care improved by just one hour of social interaction each weekThe new research assessed the WHELD program to upskill key care home staff to deliver person-centered care. That involves simple measures such as talking to residents about their interests and involving them in decisions around their own care.It was combined with just one hour a week of social interaction. The program improved quality of life and reduced agitation and aggression in people with dem
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gonorrhea in China shows waning susceptibility to WHO-recommended antibioticsNeisseria gonorrhoeae strains resistant to azithromycin and/or with decreased susceptibility to ceftriaxone are common in China, according to a prevalence study published this week in PLOS Medicine. The study also showed that the prevalence of dual resistance in N. gonorrhoeae isolates increased from 2013 to 2016. The results suggest that dual therapy with azithromycin and ceftriaxone, recommended
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
Edible electronics tattooed on your food could help track your healthThe development of organic circuits that can be transferred onto food and pills paves the way for a new era of biomonitoring.
1h
Feed: All Latest
Winter Olympics 2018: What’s the Hardest Move in Ice Dancing? Twizzles2018 Winter OlympicsOlympians make things look easy when they're not. But the hardest parts of their jobs aren't always what you think.
1h
Live Science
SpaceX Falcon Heavy: What's Up with the Giant Rocket?A humongous rocket is about to launch into space today (Feb. 6), if all goes as planned, according to SpaceX.
1h
Big Think
Researchers: More profit, as well as human lives, if we replace tobacco farms with solar.Think the increase in revenue will influence some farmers to make the switch? Read More
1h
The Atlantic
Volatility Is Scary—but It's NormalBy the end of the day on Monday, the Dow had lost more than 1,100 points since the markets had opened that morning—its largest one-day drop ever. The day’s losses totalled up to around 4.6 percent percent of the index’s value, which is not insignificant, but also not unheard of: A drop of more than 3 percent followed Brexit back in 2016. And Monday’s losses weren’t on anywhere near the scale of B
1h
Popular Science
These self-destructing electronics can turn your data to dust on commandTechnology A radio signal tells the components to vaporize. Scientists have patented electronic components that vaporize when heated by a chemical reaction.
2h
Ingeniøren
DTU’s ledelse stopper anonym kampagne mod sexismeEn time efter at kampagnen #ogsåpåDTU blev sat i gang med en række plakater, blev de fjernet. Den anonyme gruppe bør træde frem, opfordrer rektor
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Another piece to the puzzle in naked mole rats' long, cancer-free lifeCellular senescence is an evolutionary adaptation that prevents damaged cells from dividing out of control and developing into cancer. However, senescence has a negative side: by stopping cell division, it also accelerates aging. In a surprising finding, biologists have shown that naked mole rats experience the same cellular senescence as much shorter-lived mice, yet they continue to live long, ca
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Taking terahertz data links around the bendA new study shows terahertz data links are possible even without direct line-of-sight between transmitter and receiver, a promising finding for future ultra-high-capacity terahertz data networks.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Full-length serotonin receptor structure seen for first timeA team of researchers have used Nobel prize-winning microscope technology to see full length serotonin receptors for the first time. The tiny proteins -- approximately a billionth of a meter long -- are common drug targets, despite limited available information about their structure. Now, new images provide snapshots of the receptors, including details about molecular binding sites that could lead
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New ethics committee aims to help veterinarians navigate complex care situationsClinicians and researchers have developed a first-of-its-kind veterinary medical ethics committee to aid care providers in navigating complex care situations.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The dawn of gallium oxide microelectronicsPushing semiconductor technology to its full potential requires smaller designs at higher energy density, and transparent conductive oxides are a key emerging material, offering the unlikely combination of conductivity and transparency over the visual spectrum. One conductive oxide has unique properties that allow it to function well in power switching: gallium oxide, a material with an incredibly
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sea floor uplift after last ice age causes methane release in the Arctic todayPresent-day release of methane from an area of the Arctic Ocean is an effect of the uplift of the sea floor, rather than anthropogenic ocean warming, a new study states.
2h
Viden
VIDEO Kinesere sender kæmpedrone med passagerer i luftenKinesiske Ehang har offentliggjort en video, der viser, at firmaets passagerdrone rent faktisk virker efter hensigten.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Duck faeces shed light on plant seed dispersalMallards are among the most abundant and widespread duck species in the world, yet little attention has been paid to date to their role in spreading plant seeds. A new study in the Journal of Ecology reveals a number of plants that were not previously known to be part of the diet of waterbirds.
2h
Popular Science
Four apps that will help you learn to play musicGadgets Pick up an instrument, learn your favorite songs, and practice a bit of music theory. Pick up an instrument, learn your favorite songs, and practice a bit of music theory.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chemtrails vs. contrails (video)It's easy to look at the white trail behind a jet aircraft and imagine all manner of chemicals raining down from above. However, airplane contrails are simply what happens when jet engines burn fuel. In this video, Reactions explains the straightforward chemistry of contrails.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SpaceX counts down to first launch of Falcon Heavy rocketSpaceX Falcon HeavySpaceX counted down Tuesday to the first ever launch of the world's most powerful rocket in operation, the Falcon Heavy, which could someday carry supplies to the Moon or even Mars.
2h
Live Science
Biomed CEO Injects Himself with DIY Herpes Vaccine — Why That's Not a Good IdeaSelf-experimentation is risky and of limited scientific value.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sleepless in Latin America: Blind cavefish, extreme environments and insomniaA new study has found that differences in the production of the neuropeptide Hypocretin, previously implicated in human narcolepsy, may explain variation in sleep between animal species, or even between individual people. It may also provide important insight into the evolution of sleep and how we might build a brain that does not need to sleep.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A cyanine dye acid test that won't drown in waterNear-infrared cyanine dyes are go-to tools for studying the inner workings of cells and investigating the biochemistry of disease, including cancer. But even though they have low toxicity and plenty of applications, these fluorescent dyes have a weakness: Put them in water and they quit working. A new dye overcomes this problem.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Evolutionary biology: Sponges can economize on oxygen useSponges lack a signaling pathway that responds to low intracellular oxygen levels in more complex animals. Do they use a different mechanism for this purpose or did their earliest ancestors evolve at a time when less oxygen was available?
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Untimely immune cell clocks may contribute to obesity and diabetes in shift workersAbout 15 million Americans don't have a typical nine-to-five workday, and many of these -- nurses, firefighters and flight attendants, among many other professions -- may see their schedule change drastically one week to the next. As a result, these shift workers' biological clocks, which keep track of the time of day, cannot keep accurate time, potentially making the negative effects of a high fa
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ebola virus exploits host enzyme for efficient entry to target cellsResearchers have identified a key process that enables the Ebola virus to infect host cells, providing a novel target for developing antiviral drugs.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What magnets have to do with pistachiosA study using thousands of pistachio trees shows that ecological systems can be governed by the Ising model, which is typically used to explain permanent magnets. It also helps explain synchrony in nature, such as why a field of fruit trees blossom at the same time.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Five things to know about Elon Musk's space projectsSpaceX Falcon HeavySpaceX chief executive Elon Musk on Tuesday plans to send his own Tesla roadster into space aboard the world's most powerful rocket in operation, the Falcon Heavy—to the tune of David Bowie's "Space Oddity."
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Newsweek in turmoil as top editorial staff sackedThe news media group Newsweek was in turmoil this week amid the firing of its top editorial staff, reportedly for investigating the finances of their own company.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Strong earthquake rattles east coast of TaiwanA magnitude-6.4 earthquake struck Tuesday near the coast of Taiwan, and people may be trapped inside a building.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU to probe Apple plan to buy music app ShazamApple Shazam European CommissionThe European Union said on Tuesday it will probe tech giant Apple's plan to buy leading song recognition app Shazam because of fears the deal may "adversely affect competition."
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
False tsunami alert sent to US coastsTsunami Warning AlertA tsunami warning test was accidentally sent as a real alert to the phones of residents along the US East and Gulf Coasts and the Caribbean on Tuesday—just weeks after a false missile alert triggered panic in Hawaii.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study points to connection between religion and riskResearch co-authored by Portland State University finance professor Jing Zhao found that the religious beliefs of the population in counties where hedge funds are headquartered influence the riskiness of hedge fund managers' portfolios.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
September 2017 earthquakes highlight successes of Mexico's early warning systemMexico's earthquake early warning system gave Mexico City's residents almost two minutes of warning prior to the arrival of strong seismic waves from the September 7, 2017 Tehuantepec earthquake centered off the southern coast of Mexico, according to a report in the journal Seismological Research Letters.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Satellite-based earthquake early warning system tested against Chilean great quakesResearchers testing a satellite-based earthquake early warning system developed for the U.S. West Coast found that the system performed well in a "replay" of three large earthquakes that occurred in Chile between 2010 and 2015. Their results, reported in the journal Seismological Research Letters, suggest that such a system could provide early warnings of ground shaking and tsunamis for Chile's co
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research uncovers mechanism behind water-splitting catalystCaltech researchers have made a discovery that they say could lead to the economically viable production of solar fuels in the next few years.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New CRISPR method efficiently corrects DMD defect in heart tissueScientists have developed a CRISPR gene-editing technique that can potentially correct a majority of the 3,000 mutations that cause Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by making a single cut at strategic points along the patient's DNA, according to a study from UT Southwestern Medical Center.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Children affected by prenatal drinking more numerous than previously estimatedResearchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found a significant number of children across four regions in the United States were determined to have fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). The new findings may represent more accurate prevalence estimates of FASD among the general population than prior research.
2h
Viden
Elon Musk: Virker min raket, er det "game over" for de andreFølg opsendelsen af SpaceX nyeste raket Falcon Heavy herunder. Hvis den altså ikke eksploderer på affyringsrampen.
2h
The Atlantic
On the Proper Name for the Trump Era: ‘Democracide’, ‘Ochlocracy’, or Something ElseYesterday I posted an item about the challenge of calling the Trump era by its proper name—and explaining why the Dutch writer Rob Riemen, in his new book To Fight Against This Age , argues that it’s destructive and misleading not to use the plain term “fascism.” Readers have written to endorse (or oppose) the wisdom of using the “fascist” label, and to suggest other terms. Despite the Atlantic’s
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sequential model chips away at mysteries of aircraftIce accumulation on aircraft wings is a common contributing factor to airplane accidents. Most existing models focus on either ice that freezes as a thin film on the airfoil, or immediately after it impacts the wing. Researchers have announced a new model, accounting for a combination of these forms, that they hope will melt our misunderstanding of ice accretion.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Here's what happened when black politicians held powerNew research provides the strongest evidence to date that the race of a political officeholder can have a significant effect on policy - at least historically.
2h
Big Think
Will the ketogenic diet really help you lose weight?A lot of the research on ketosis is positive, but the trending of the diet brings its own problems. Read More
2h
Scientific American Content: Global
Your Mobile Phone Can Give Away Your Location, Even If You Tell It Not ToMost people expect that turning their phone’s location services off disables mobile surveillance, but there are ways apps can avoid or escape those restrictions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Blog » Languages » English
Mecha vs. Kaiju: The Epic Throwdownmecha From Japanese メカ (meka) , from an abbreviation of the English mechanical (anime, manga) A large armoured robot on legs, typically controlled by a pilot seated inside kaiju From Japanese 怪獣 (かいじゅう, kaijū) , from Middle Chinese 怪 (kwɛ̀j, “strange, fantastic”) +‎ 獸 (ʃùw, “beast”) (compare Mandarin 怪兽 (guàishòu) ) A giant monster, particularly such as those common to Japanese science fiction fi
2h
New Scientist - News
Have we just found thousands of planets outside our galaxy?Strange fluctuations in the light spectra emitted from near a quasar could be due to the effect of around 2000 planets flung out of their solar systems
3h
New Scientist - News
Nano-claw snatches bacteria from blood like tiny Venus flytrapInspired by the Venus flytrap, a minuscule claw can grab pathogens from diseased blood and may prove useful against antibiotic-resistant bacteria
3h
New Scientist - News
Ancient rock art rewrites the natural history of ArabiaThe archaeological record suggests few large animals lived in Arabia in the last few thousand years, but prehistoric rock art from the area depicts a host of big beasts
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA technology to help locate electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wavesA compact detector technology applicable to all types of cross-disciplinary scientific investigations has found a home on a new CubeSat mission designed to find the electromagnetic counterparts of events that generate gravitational waves.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Full-length serotonin receptor structure seen for first timeA team of researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have used Nobel prize-winning microscope technology to see full length serotonin receptors for the first time. The tiny proteins—approximately a billionth of a meter long—are common drug targets, despite limited available information about their structure. Now, new images published in Nature Communications provide snapsh
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
Cyber warfare is taking to the skies, aboard drones
3h
NYT > Science
That Tsunami Alert Was Just a Test. Relax, Bushwick.Tsunami Warning AlertAccuWeather reported a National Weather Service test alert as the real thing, and people from Texas to Maine received the warnings.
3h
NYT > Science
Far More U.S. Children than Previously Thought May Have Fetal Alcohol DisordersNew research estimates that neurological disorders caused by mothers drinking during pregnancy are at least as common as autism.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers take terahertz data links around the bendAn off-the-wall new study by Brown University researchers shows that terahertz frequency data links can bounce around a room without dropping too much data. The results are good news for the feasibility of future terahertz wireless data networks, which have the potential to carry many times more data than current networks.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find that the amino acid arginine may have played a more important role in the chemical origins of lifeLife as we know it originated roughly 3.5 to 4 billion years ago in the form of a prebiotic ("before life") soup of organic molecules that somehow began to replicate themselves and pass along a genetic formula. Or so goes the thinking behind the RNA World, one of the most robust hypotheses of the origin of life.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Portland State study points to connection between religion and riskResearch co-authored by Portland State University finance professor Jing Zhao found that the religious beliefs of the population in counties where hedge funds are headquartered influence the riskiness of hedge fund managers' portfolios.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Production of solar fuels inches closer with discovery by Caltech scientistsResearchers in the lab of Caltech's Harry Gray have discovered how a catalyst splits water using solar power, opening the door to economically viable solar-fuel production.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA finds wind shear tearing Tropical Cyclone Cebile apartNASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean and found that wind shear was adversely affecting Tropical Cyclone Cebile.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UNC researchers identify patterns of HIV risk among people who inject drugs in VietnamIn an effort to combat HIV infections among men who inject drugs in Vietnam, researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill conducted the first study to explore how this population mixes together. Their results were published in the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immune system dysfunction may occur early in Alzheimer's diseaseAn association between inflammation biomarkers in both blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and markers of Alzheimer's disease (AD) associated pathology, has been found by researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus working with the University of Wisconsin Alzheimer's Disease Research Center and the University of California San Francisco Memory and Aging Center.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study on cause of Legionnaires' disease outbreak in Flint led by CSU researchersAn outbreak of Legionnaires' disease in 2014-15 in Flint, Mich., was likely caused by a change in the city's drinking water supply, according to a study led by Colorado State University researchers.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Magnetic brain stimulation alters negative emotion perceptionA new study reports that processing of negative emotion can be strengthened or weakened by tuning the excitability of the right frontal part of the brain.
3h
The Atlantic
He Dares Call It TreasonDonald Trump has often had harsh words for his critics, even calling them “un-American,” but on Monday, he ratcheted that up significantly while talking about the State of the Union during an appearance in Ohio. “You’re up there, you’ve got half the room going totally crazy, wild—they loved everything, they want to do something great for our country. And you have the other side, even on positive
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Making a good thing better: An acid test that won't drown in waterNear-infrared cyanine dyes are go-to tools for studying the inner workings of cells and investigating the biochemistry of disease, including cancer.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The future of wireless communications is terahertzElectrical and optical engineers in Australia have designed a novel platform that could tailor telecommunication and optical transmissions. Collaborating scientists from the University of New South Wales in Sydney and Canberra, the University of Adelaide, the University of South Australia and the Australian National University experimentally demonstrated their system using a new transmission wavel
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new radiation detector made from grapheneGraphene is a remarkable material: light, strong, transparent and electrically conductive. It can also convert heat to electricity. Researchers have recently exploited this thermoelectric property to create a new kind of radiation detector.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
Uber’s algorithm for paying drivers is causing a gender gap
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new radiation detector made from grapheneGraphene is a remarkable material: light, strong, transparent and electrically conductive. It can also convert heat to electricity, and researchers have recently exploited this thermoelectric property to create a new kind of radiation detector. Classified as a bolometer, the new device has a fast response time and works over a wide range of temperatures. With a simple design and relatively low cos
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mapping the Maya: Laser technology reveals secrets of ancient civilizationThe Maya civilization began to emerge about 3,000 years ago, and reached its peak during the Classic Period, from about A.D. 250-900. Now, technology called LiDAR (light detection and ranging) has uncovered thousands of new Maya structures previously undetected beneath smothering vegetation.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gallium oxide has an advantage over silicon in producing cheaper and smaller devicesSilicon has long been the go-to material in the world of microelectronics and semiconductor technology. But silicon still faces limitations, particularly with scalability for power applications. Pushing semiconductor technology to its full potential requires smaller designs at higher energy density.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
You might be paying too much for ads on Google, BingBefore you dish out money to bid for a top-ranked ad position on a search engine, you may want to pause and make sure it's actually going to pay off.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Farmed seafood and livestock stack up differently using alternate feed efficiency measureA new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for a Livable Future found that, contrary to widely held assumptions, farmed fish and shrimp convert protein and calories in feed to edible seafood at rates similar to livestock (i.e., cattle, pigs, and chickens). The study contributes new insights into what is known as feed conversion efficiency - that is,
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hydrogen: fuel of the future?As the race to find energy sources to replace our dwindling fossil fuel supplies continues apace, hydrogen is likely to play a crucial role in the future.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Matchmaking for cancer careComputer scientists from the University of Delaware and Georgetown University have developed a new system to rapidly determine which cancer drugs are likely to work best given genetic markers for a patent -- the first publicly available system of its kind. This will allow doctors to better access data linking genetic factors and treatment results spread among hundreds of academic journals. This is
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bilingualism could offset brain changes in Alzheimer'sAfter more than a decade of research, this much we know: it's good for your brain to know another language.A new Concordia study goes further, however, focusing specifically on the effects of knowing a second language for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI; a risk state for AD).
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
VCU scientists seek to perfect calculations for comparing cervical cancer radiation dosesResearch from VCU Massey Cancer Center has found that one of the standard practices for comparing cervical cancer radiation therapy treatments may be misleading, and the use of an alternative mathematical formula could be used to more effectively predict and potentially improve outcomes for patients.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New CRISPR method efficiently corrects DMD defect in heart tissueScientists have developed a CRISPR gene-editing technique that can potentially correct a majority of the 3,000 mutations that cause Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by making a single cut at strategic points along the patient's DNA, according to a study from UT Southwestern Medical Center.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Type-2 diabetes: Insulin held up in trafficIn a new study, researchers from the universities of Uppsala and Lund show why insulin secretion is not working properly in patients suffering from type-2 diabetes. The report is published in the journal Cell Metabolism.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How exercise training promotes a sound mind in a sound bodyA new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden shows that the same mechanisms behind the beneficial effects of exercise training on the brain also help to counteract fat and to strengthen the immune system. The results, which are published in the journal Cell Metabolism, can ultimately give rise to new obesity and diabetes drugs.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Searching for targeted treatments for inflammatory diseasesInflammatory diseases such as Crohn's disease and multiple sclerosis have been linked to faults in a critical immune pathway that enables inflammation to continue unchecked.Researchers from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne, Australia, have shed new light on how this immune response is controlled, and hope it could lead to new drugs for people with these chronic diseases.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mouse study reveals what happens in the gut after too much fructosePrinceton University researchers report that in mice, fructose, a sugar found in fruit, is processed mainly in the small intestine, not in the liver as had previously been suspected. Sugary drinks and processed high-sugar foods overwhelm the small intestine and spill into the liver for processing. Additionally, the authors learned that the ability of the small intestine to process fructose is high
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Satellite-based earthquake early warning system tested against Chilean great quakesResearchers testing a satellite-based earthquake early warning system developed for the US West Coast found that the system performed well in a 'replay' of three large earthquakes that occurred in Chile between 2010 and 2015.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
September 2017 earthquakes highlight successes of Mexico's early warning systemMexico's earthquake early warning system gave Mexico City's residents almost two minutes of warning prior to the arrival of strong seismic waves from the Sept. 7, 2017 Tehuantepec earthquake centered off the southern coast of Mexico, according to a report in the journal Seismological Research Letters.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
Cognitive Ability and Vulnerability to Fake NewsResearchers identify a major risk factor for pernicious effects of misinformation -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Science | The Guardian
Terracotta Army to go on display in LiverpoolLiverpool FC’s popularity in China a key factor in attracting ancient treasures to Merseyside A regiment of 2,200-year-old terracotta warriors will go on show in Liverpool this week as part of a blockbuster exhibition showcasing the largest haul of early Chinese treasures to reach British shores. The show at the World Museum came to Merseyside partly because of the popularity in China of Liverpoo
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
Geneticists Unravel Secrets of Super-Invasive CrayfishDNA analysis suggests the self-cloning species is a genetic hybrid that emerged in an aquarium in the 1990s -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new radiation detector made from grapheneGraphene is a remarkable material: light, strong, transparent and electrically conductive. It can also convert heat to electricity, and researchers have recently exploited this thermoelectric property to create a new kind of radiation detector. Classified as a bolometer, the new device has a fast response time and works over a wide range of temperatures. With a simple design and relatively low cos
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The recipe for lifeUCSB researchers find that the amino acid arginine may have played a more important role in the chemical origins of life
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
This AI software dreams up new designs for 3-D-printed parts before your eyes
3h
Live Science
What Is the Point of Elon Musk's Big Rocket?The hype around the launch of SpaceX's new rocket is reaching epic proportions. But is it all just PR for Elon Musk?
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News
When it’s playtime, many kids prefer reality over fantasyGiven a choice between fantasy play and doing the things that adults do, children prefer reality-based tasks, studies suggest.
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Ancient kids’ toys have been hiding in the archaeological recordSome unusual finds from thousands of years ago are actually toys and children’s attempts at mimicking adult craftwork.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
Junk news on social media is shared predominantly by the right wing
4h
Viden
Stop nu! Sådan slipper du af med den sang, du har på hjernenDu har helt sikkert oplevet, at du ikke kunne få en sang ud af hovedet. Her er en guide til, hvad du kan gøre fremover.
4h
Viden
Grand Prix-feber: Derfor får du en sang på hjernenBestemte elementer i sange gør, at din hjerne lettere husker dem.
4h
Live Science
SpaceX's Falcon Heavy Rocket: By the NumbersTo gain a fuller understanding of Falcon Heavy's caliber and the ambitions behind the SpaceX launch, it is worthwhile to look at the numbers.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Here's what happened when black politicians held powerNew research provides the strongest evidence to date that the race of a political officeholder can have a significant effect on policy -- at least historically.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Full-length serotonin receptor structure seen for first timeA team of researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have used Nobel prize-winning microscope technology to see full length serotonin receptors for the first time. The tiny proteins -- approximately a billionth of a meter long -- are common drug targets, despite limited available information about their structure. Now, new images published in Nature Communications provide
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NREL scientists demonstrate remarkable stability in perovskite solar cellsResearchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) created an environmentally stable, high-efficiency perovskite solar cell, bringing the emerging technology a step closer to commercial deployment.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Another piece to the puzzle in naked mole rats' long, cancer-free lifeCellular senescence is an evolutionary adaptation that prevents damaged cells from dividing out of control and developing into cancer. However, senescence has a negative side: by stopping cell division, it also accelerates aging. In a surprising finding, Rochester biologists have shown that naked mole rats experience the same cellular senescence as much shorter-lived mice, yet they continue to liv
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers take terahertz data links around the bendA new study shows terahertz data links are possible even without direct line-of-sight between transmitter and receiver, a promising finding for future ultra-high-capacity terahertz data networks.
4h
The Atlantic
Can Solo Work as a Serious Film?The first trailer for the upcoming Solo: A Star Wars Story— a spinoff-slash-prequel focused on the legendary Han Solo (now being played by Alden Ehrenreich)—made me instantly think of another iconic blockbuster hero. There’s the famous scene in Jurassic Park where Dr. Ian Malcolm (Jeff Goldblum) lectures the park’s creator on the foolishness of cloning dinosaurs: “Your scientists were so preoccup
4h
Popular Science
No one told Babe Ruth he had cancer, but his death changed the way we fight itHealth The Great Bambino’s treatment came at a major turning point in medicine. Though doctors' efforts to save him from cancer were ultimately unsuccessful, the record-setting Ruth became a cancer pioneer in the process.
4h
Big Think
Is Valentine’s Day at an elementary school a good idea?We should stop “celebrating” Valentines Day in elementary-school classrooms. Read More
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
Watch Live as SpaceX's Falcon Heavy Rocket Launches TodayWhether a success or a failure, the first test flight of the world's current most powerful rocket guarantees fireworks -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Ingeniøren
Opgør med kaotiske regler: Takstsystemet vest for Storebælt ændresForvirrende regler og forskellige priser på samme rejse skal nedkæmpes med en ændring af det offentlige takstsystem i Vestdanmark.
4h
Ingeniøren
Svensk selvkørende lastbil vil konkurrere med Teslas SemiSvenske Einride er snart klar med en selvkørende og eldrevet lastbil, der skal konkurrere mod Tesla og Daimler. Første kunde er dagligvarekæden Lidl.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A cyanine dye acid test that won't drown in waterNear-infrared cyanine dyes are go-to tools for studying the inner workings of cells and investigating the biochemistry of disease, including cancer. But even though they have low toxicity and plenty of applications, these fluorescent dyes have a weakness: Put them in water and they quit working. A new dye overcomes this problem.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sleepless in Latin America: Blind cavefish, extreme environments and insomniaA study led by researchers from Florida Atlantic University has found that differences in the production of the neuropeptide Hypocretin, previously implicated in human narcolepsy, may explain variation in sleep between animal species, or even between individual people. It may also provide important insight into the evolution of sleep and how we might build a brain that does not need to sleep.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UC San Diego-Harvard group reports shift in awareness from Chopra well-being programA new study by Paul J. Mills, Ph.D., and colleagues has shown that an intensive six-day Ayurveda-based mind-body program led to a significant and sustained increase in self-awareness, with related mental and physical health benefits.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Magnetic brain stimulation alters negative emotion perceptionA new study published in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging reports that processing of negative emotion can be strengthened or weakened by tuning the excitability of the right frontal part of the brain.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smartly containing the cloud increases computing efficiency, says first-of-its-kind studyVirginia Tech researchers discovered ways to further improve computing efficiency using management tools for cloud-based light-weight virtual machine replacements called containers.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Venus flytraps don't eat the insects that pollinate themWhile most people are familiar with Venus flytraps and their snapping jaws, there is still a lot that scientists don't know about the biology of these carnivorous plants. Researchers have for the first time discovered which insects pollinate the rare plants in their native habitat -- and discovered that the flytraps don't dine on these pollinator species.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study of first-graders shows fetal alcohol spectrum disorders prevalent in US communitiesA study of more than 6,000 first-graders across four US communities has found that a significant number of the children have fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD), with conservative rates ranging from 1 to 5 percent in community samples. The new findings represent more accurate prevalence estimates of FASD among general US communities than prior research.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sequential model chips away at mysteries of aircraftIce accumulation on aircraft wings is a common contributing factor to airplane accidents. Most existing models focus on either ice that freezes as a thin film on the airfoil, or immediately after it impacts the wing. Researchers have announced a new model, accounting for a combination of these forms, that they hope will melt our misunderstanding of ice accretion. They discuss their model in this w
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The dawn of gallium oxide microelectronicsPushing semiconductor technology to its full potential requires smaller designs at higher energy density, and transparent conductive oxides are a key emerging material, offering the unlikely combination of conductivity and transparency over the visual spectrum. One conductive oxide has unique properties that allow it to function well in power switching: gallium oxide, a material with an incredibly
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Guidelines extended to improve the use of feedback from patients in clinical trialsResearchers have recommended changes to international guidelines used in the development of clinical trials in an effort to gain information about the impact of the treatment on participating patients and their quality of life.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penn researchers prove that precisely timed brain stimulation improves memoryThe Restoring Active Memory program, led by Michael Kahana and Daniel Rizzuto at the University of Pennsylvania, is one step closer to its goal of creating a fully implantable neural monitoring and stimulation system. The team, which includes researcher Youssef Ezzyat, has shown that precisely timed electrical stimulation to the left side of the brain can reliably and significantly enhance learnin
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The future of wireless communications is terahertzElectrical and optical engineers in Australia have designed a novel platform that could tailor telecommunication and optical transmissions. They experimentally demonstrated their system using a new transmission wavelength with a higher bandwidth capacity than those currently used in wireless communication. Reported this week in APL Photonics, these experiments open up new horizons in communication
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A hole in the heart increases post-surgical risk of strokeNew research published in the Journal of the American Medical Association indicates that a common anatomic anomaly -- a hole between the upper chambers of the heart that fails to close after birth -- doubles the risk of stroke within 30 days of non-cardiac surgery. The research suggests the hole itself, known as a patent foramen ovale (PFO), contributes to the risk for stroke in patients following
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Advances open new frequency range for wireless communicationsThe 'internet of things,' which make everything from your toaster to your front door accessible online, has driven an explosion in data traffic and taken up huge amounts of bandwidth. However, a new range of frequencies in the terahertz region of the spectrum may soon be available for use. A paper in this week's APL Photonics demonstrates the feasibility of using THz carrier waves for data transmi
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rate of children affected by drinking during pregnancy may be higher than previously estimatedChildren whose mothers drank alcohol during pregnancy can have fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, and the frequency of these disorders, which can cause developmental disabilities, may be higher than previously estimated.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reduced energy from the sun might occur by mid-century: Now scientists know by how muchThe Sun might emit less radiation by mid-century, giving planet Earth a chance to warm a bit more slowly but not halt the trend of human-induced climate change.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New tech for controlling genetic inheritance and genome engineeringIn 2015, biologists developed a breakthrough technology known as "active genetics," which results in parents transmitting a genetic trait to most of their offspring (instead of 50 percent receiving the trait under standard inheritance). Immediate targets of active genetics included gene-drive systems for immunizing mosquitoes against vector borne diseases such as malaria. Researchers also proposed
4h
Science : NPR
SpaceX Prepares To Launch Powerful Falcon Heavy RocketA rocket more powerful than any other in use today is scheduled to launch before 4:00 p.m. ET Tuesday, complete with a cherry red Tesla car on board. (Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
4h
The Atlantic
I Spent Two Years Trying to Fix the Gender Imbalance in My StoriesIn December 2015, I wrote a story about the potential uses of the gene-editing technology known as CRISPR. That piece, based on a conference that I attended in Washington, D.C., quoted six men and one woman. The six men included five scientists and one historian, all quoted for their professional expertise. The one woman was a communications director at a tissue bank organization, and her quote w
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Insecure workers less likely to have access to family friendly arrangementsNew research shows that workers who fear they may lose their jobs are less likely to have access to family-friendly flexible working arrangements.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Twitter reveals how future-thinking Americans are and how that affects their decisionsIndividuals who tend to think further into the future are more likely to invest money and to avoid risks, finds a new paper by psychologists at Emory University. The Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) published the research, which tapped big data tools to conduct text analyses of nearly 40,000 Twitter users, and to run online experiments of behavior of people who provided their
4h
Science | The Guardian
Does watching Fast and Furious turn drivers into speed merchants?A survey has observed a spike in the average speeds of those who had just seen one of the franchise’s films. But it might be best to cover the brakes before leaping to any hasty conclusions The next time you get a speeding ticket, it might be worth arguing that the movies are to blame. A research paper by Dr Anupam Jena of Harvard medical school has suggested films in the Fast and Furious franchi
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
Chemistry May Yield Lucrative Use for Wasted MethaneMethane that leaks from fracking wells can be captured and converted into a product used in plastics manufacturing -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: Chemtrails vs. contrailsIt's easy to look at the white trail behind a jet aircraft and imagine all manner of chemicals raining down from above. However, airplane contrails are simply what happens when jet engines burn fuel.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Outdoor instruction makes students more open to learningBeing taught science subjects outdoors increases student motivation. A study therefore suggests offering more outdoor instruction at the lower secondary level.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Big data methods learn the fitness landscape of the HIV Envelope proteinDespite significant advances in medicine, an effective vaccine for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is still not available, although recent hope has emerged through the discovery of antibodies capable of neutralizing diverse HIV strains. However, HIV can sometimes evade known broadly neutralizing antibody responses via mutational pathways, which makes it all the more difficult to design an e
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Viruses -- lots of them -- are falling from the skyAn astonishing number of viruses are circulating around the Earth's atmosphere -- and falling from it -- according to new research. The study marks the first time scientists have quantified the viruses being swept up from the Earth's surface into the free troposphere, beyond Earth's weather systems but below the stratosphere where jet airplanes fly. The viruses can be carried thousands of kilomete
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Data-driven shale dialogueIt's been a decade since the start of the Marcellus Shale gas boom in Pennsylvania, and today more than 10,000 unconventional gas wells dot the state's hills and valleys.
4h
Feed: All Latest
AI Just Learned How to Boost the Brain's MemoryIf we can’t understand our own brains, maybe the machines can do it for us.
4h
Live Science
SpaceX's Falcon Heavy Megarocket Gets 1st Test Launch Today: Watch It LiveSpaceX's giant new rocket, the Falcon Heavy, is set for its risky first test launch today (Feb. 6) from the historic Pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
4h
Live Science
This Fossil Spider Has a Weird Extra AppendageA 100-million-year-old spider trapped in amber has something you just don't see nowadays.
4h
Quanta Magazine
With Strategic Zaps to the Brain, Scientists Boost MemoryFor the past two decades, neuroscientists have been treating movement and neurological disorders with deep brain stimulation, a technique in which electrodes planted in specific regions of the brain send electrical impulses through targeted neural circuitry. More recently, they’ve been trying brain stimulation to enhance memory as well — but with mixed results. In a study appearing today in Natur
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
You might be paying too much for ads on Google, BingNew research out of Binghamton University, State University of New York suggests that instead of just spending to get that top spot, advertisers should be considering other factors as well to ensure they are getting the best results from their sponsored search advertising campaigns.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is hydrogen the fuel of the future?As the race to find energy sources to replace our dwindling fossil fuel supplies continues apace, hydrogen is likely to play a crucial role in the future.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Forty-year controversy in solid-state physics resolvedAn international team at BESSY II headed by Professor Oliver Rader has shown that the puzzling properties of samarium hexaboride do not stem from the material being a topological insulator, as it had been proposed to be. Theoretical and initial experimental work had previously indicated that this material, which becomes a Kondo insulator at very low temperatures, also possessed the properties of a
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lithium -- it's not just for batteries: It can also reduce instabilities in fusion plasmasScientists have found that lithium powder can eliminate instabilities known as edge-localized modes (ELMs) when used to coat a tungsten plasma-facing component called the 'divertor.'
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Farmed seafood and livestock stack up differently using alternate feed efficiency measureA new study by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Center for a Livable Future found that, contrary to widely held assumptions, farmed fish and shrimp convert protein and calories in feed to edible seafood at rates similar to livestock (i.e., cattle, pigs, and chickens).
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Iberian Peninsula rodents migrated due to climate change 12 million years agoChanges in Southwestern Europe's climate which happened between 12 and 5 million years ago had a drastic impact over the rodent communities. These profound changes in environmental conditions led to a separation between species adapted to arid environments which migrated to interior regions of the Iberian Peninsula and species adapted to humid environments thriving where Catalonia and France are t
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
The "Gesundheit Machine" Collects Campus Cooties in Race Against a Fierce FluMaryland researchers hope to trace how the virus spreads -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lithium—it's not just for batteries: The powdered metal can reduce instabilities in fusion plasmasYou may be most familiar with the element lithium as an integral component of your smart phone's battery, but the element also plays a role in the development of clean fusion energy. When used on tungsten surfaces in fusion devices, lithium can reduce periodic instabilities in plasma that can damage the reactor walls, scientists have found.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rapid land changes forecast for East African savannahsA study presenting a 5000-year environmental history of the popular tourist destination Amboseli National Park in Kenya has shown that the impact of climate change on land is more rapid than previously thought.
4h
The Atlantic
Looking Beyond Chief WahooLast week, the Cleveland Indians announced that beginning in 2019 they would no longer use the red-faced Chief Wahoo logo on their hats and uniforms. They would continue to wear the image for one more season, and they would keep selling merchandise bearing the Native American cartoon (at least in part to maintain their copyright ), but the most controversial insignia in sports was otherwise being
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Boeing, Embraer near deal on commercial air business: sourceUS aerospace giant Boeing and Brazil's Embraer are close to an agreement to combine their commercial air operations into a new company, a person familiar with the talks told AFP Tuesday.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
General Motors reports $5.2 bn loss on charge for US tax reformA huge one-time charge for US tax reform pushed General Motors quarterly earnings into the red, but the automaker said Tuesday that earnings were better-than-expected when the tax hit is excluded.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rare dinosaur discovery in Egypt could signal more findsA skeleton has been unearthed in Egypt's Western Desert, whose ancient sands have long helped preserve remains, but unlike most finds this one isn't a mummy—it's a dinosaur.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Showtime for SpaceX's big new rocket with sports car on topSpaceX's big new rocket stood ready to blast off on its first test flight Tuesday, as crowds began gathering at daybreak for the afternoon launch debut.
4h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
This deep-sea mystery is changing our understanding of life | Karen LloydHow deep into the Earth can we go and still find life? Marine microbiologist Karen Lloyd introduces us to deep-subsurface microbes: tiny organisms that live buried meters deep in ocean mud and have been on Earth since way before animals. Learn more about these mysterious microbes, which refuse to grow in the lab and seem to have a fundamentally different relationship with time and energy than we d
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How one state bridged the cultural divide on climate change to prepare for a stormier futureThe year 2017 painted a grim picture of coastal storms in the eastern United States. Hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria were deadly and destructive harbingers of how climate change contributes to bigger storms with stronger winds, greater extreme precipitation, and higher storm surge due to rising seas.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study underscores tuberculosis risk for working elephantsMorris Animal Foundation-funded researchers recently found approximately 17 percent of working African elephants at several Zimbabwe ecotourism facilities tested positive for tuberculosis antibodies. The findings are a red flag for researchers as infected elephants potentially can pass the disease on to humans and other species with which they come in contact, including wild elephants.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Outdoor instruction makes students more open to learningBeing taught science subjects outdoors increases student motivation. A study by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the University of Mainz therefore suggests offering more outdoor instruction at the lower secondary level.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unknown language discovered in Southeast AsiaA previously unknown language has been found in the Malay Peninsula by linguists from Lund University in Sweden. The language has been given the name Jedek.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
White cheeks are more titillatingMale blue tits with white cheeks are healthier and more likely to mate with higher quality partners than their counterparts with duller cheek feathers. Having purer white cheeks also indicates that a blue tit was better able to overcome an infection with parasites during the previous year. This is according to Elisa Pérez Badás of the Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales in Spain. She is lead auth
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
South Africa needs good water management—not new water lawsBecause water is shared by everyone, there have to be some rules to govern the way it is used. But it's a difficult resource and when things go wrong, the temptation is to blame the unpredictable water – or the rules.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Active genetics technology opens new horizonsIn 2015, University of California San Diego biologists Ethan Bier and Valentino Gantz developed a breakthrough technology known as "active genetics," which results in parents transmitting a genetic trait to most of their offspring (instead of 50 percent receiving the trait under standard inheritance). Immediate targets of active genetics included gene-drive systems for immunizing mosquitoes agains
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Twitter reveals how future-thinking Americans are and how that affects their decisionsThe researchers tapped big data tools to conduct text analyses of nearly 40,000 Twitter users, and to run online experiments of behavior of people who provided their Twitter handles.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Data-driven shale dialogueResearch published in the journal Science examines a dialogue about shale drilling between concerned citizens, watershed groups, government regulators and personnel from large energy companies by focusing on publicly available water quality data.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pores with a memoryWhether for separation processes, photovoltaics, catalysis, or electronics, porous polymer membranes are needed in many fields. Membranes with micropores that switch between different shapes and/or sizes would expand the possibilities. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have introduced a process that produces porous films made from shape memory polymers with precise dimensions. The shape
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Insecure workers less likely to have access to family-friendly arrangementsNew research shows that workers who fear they may lose their jobs are less likely to have access to family-friendly flexible working arrangements.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Liquid crystal molecules form nano ringsAt DESY's X-ray source PETRA III, scientists have investigated an intriguing form of self-assembly in liquid crystals: When the liquid crystals are filled into cylindrical nanopores and heated, their molecules form ordered rings as they cool -- a condition that otherwise does not naturally occur in the material. This behavior allows nanomaterials with new optical and electrical properties, as the
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Did surface life evolve on Mars? Newly published research casts increased doubtSurface life on Earth is abundant because of the availability of sunlight, surface water, generally moderate climate conditions. But the planet Mars would have never experienced such habitable conditions at the surface, according to new research. However, below the surface, hydrothermal systems on Mars may have provided the right environment for life on the Red Planet, researchers argue.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Zika brain damage may go undetected in pregnancyZika virus may cause significant damage to the fetal brain even when the baby's head size is normal, according to a primate study. The damage can be difficult to detect even with sophisticated brain scans. It may also occur from infections during childhood and adolescence. Hard hit are brain regions that generate new brain cells. Fetal brain structures that may be injured include those where neura
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ants: Master manipulators for biodiversity, or sweet treatsSymbiotic ants manipulate aphid reproduction rates to achieve a specific mix of green and red aphids, maintaining the inferior green aphids which produce the ants' favorite snack.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ozone at lower latitudes is not recovering, despite Antarctic ozone hole healingThe ozone layer -- which protects us from harmful ultraviolet radiation -- is recovering at the poles, but unexpected decreases in part of the atmosphere may be preventing recovery at lower latitudes.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can over-the-counter pain meds influence thoughts and emotions?Over-the-counter pain medicine such as Ibuprofen and acetaminophen may influence how people process information, experience hurt feelings, and react to emotionally evocative images, according to recent studies.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
There are more mammal species than we thoughtA recent study highlights that over 1,000 new species of mammals have been described globally during the last dozen years, a finding that contradicts the notion that our mammalian relatives are well known. This rate of species discovery is driven by advances in DNA analysis methods and field exploration. This new listing of all living mammal species is publicly accessible in the Mammal Diversity D
5h
Dagens Medicin
Læger flygter fra psykiatrihospital i RisskovSyv overlæger har forladt Psykiatrisk Hospital Risskov, fordi de føler vagtplanen er for presset og ikke kan stå inde for fagligheden. Psykiatriledelsen tager individuelle møder med lægerne.
5h
Dagens Medicin
Opgaveflytning af hjertepatienters rehabilitering bekymrer Dansk Cardiologisk SelskabNye anbefalinger for hjertepatienter skal ifølge Sundhedsstyrelsen gøre overgangene for patienterne mere smidige. Formanden for Dansk Cardiologisk Selskab er bekymret for patienternes rehabiliteringstilbud.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dinosaurs were 'too successful for their own good'The migration of the dinosaurs across the globe was so rapid that it may have contributed to their demise, new research has found.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microscope enables researchers to control motion within living cellsSimple motion inside biological cells, such as the streaming of cytoplasm—the liquid cell interior—is widely believed to be essential for cells and the development of complex organisms. But due to the lack of suitable tools, this intracellular motion could so far not be tested as hypothesized. Now, a team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics (MPI-CBG)
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Venus flytraps don't eat the insects that pollinate themWhile most people are familiar with Venus flytraps and their snapping jaws, there is still a lot that scientists don't know about the biology of these carnivorous plants. Researchers have for the first time discovered which insects pollinate the rare plants in their native habitat – and discovered that the flytraps don't dine on these pollinator species.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What sexism in call centres can teach us about sexism in societyAlthough you are likely to have dealt with both male and female call centre agents, the fact is that 71% of workers in the global call centre industry are female. Dubbed the "female ghetto" or, more positively, "female-friendly workplaces", women are significantly over-represented in call centres.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review
The ozone layer is thinning in places around the equator
5h
The Atlantic
How Humans Sank New OrleansB elow sea level . It’s a universally known topographical factoid about the otherwise flat city of New Orleans, and one that got invoked ad nauseam during worldwide media coverage of Hurricane Katrina and its catastrophic aftermath in 2005. Locally, the phrase is intoned with a mix of civic rue and dark humor. It’s also off by half. Depending on where exactly one frames the area measured, roughly
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Clocking electrons racing faster than light in glassLiving life in the fast lane can be tremendously exciting, giving us the 'time of our lives' but how long does it really last? Experiments have answered this question for a bunch of electrons traveling faster than light (fasten your seatbelts!) through a piece of glass.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reversing severe bone lossResearchers have identified a treatment for a rare bone loss disorder that might also lead to help for aging brittle bones.
5h
Live Science
A Ticking Time Bomb of Mercury Is Hidden Beneath Earth's PermafrostThe mercury's rising — and probably spilling into our oceans.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists make it possible to rank the risk of resistance genesA new study published in Nature Communications will help to predict antibiotic resistance evolution and thus guide future drug development.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New method enables high-resolution measurements of magnetismIn a new article, published in Nature Materials, researchers from Beijing, Uppsala and Jülich have made significant progress allowing very high resolution magnetic measurements. With their method it is possible to measure magnetism of individual atomic planes.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sea floor uplift after last ice age causes methane release in the Arctic todayPresent-day release of methane from an area of the Arctic Ocean is an effect of the uplift of the sea floor, rather than anthropogenic ocean warming, a new study in Nature Communications states.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Risks in using electronic management systems at universitiesNew electronic management systems provide educational support, help establish effective monitoring of students' achievements both online and offline, can receive and analyze reports on student performance, and track academic progress. However, advances in digital technologies and changes in teaching methods in higher educational institutions require quick adaptation of staff members to innovations
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Worm uploaded to a computer and trained to balance a poleThe tiny worm C. elegans is the only living being whose neural network has been analyzed completely. It can therefore be transferred to a computer, creating a virtual copy of the worm which behaves in exactly the same way to external stimuli. Such a 'virtual worm' can learn amazing tricks -- its neural network can even be used to balance a pole, which is a standard control problem in computer scie
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
White cheeks are more titillatingMale blue tits with white cheeks are healthier and more likely to mate with higher quality partners than their counterparts with duller cheek feathers. Having purer white cheeks also indicates that a blue tit was better able to overcome an infection with parasites during the previous year. This is according to Elisa Pérez Badás (Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, Spain) who is lead author of a
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Optical ceramic meets metal-organic frameworksAs a special type of ceramics, optical ceramics are transparent and show great potentials as laser gain medium because they combine the high stability of crystals and the large size of glasses, fluids, and other noncrystalline materials. Recently, researchers from Sun Yat-Sen University reported that by simply slowing down the solvent evaporation rate, metal-organic framework nanocrystals can fuse
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sea ice algae blooms in the darkResearchers from Aarhus University have measured a new world record: Small ice algae on the underside of the Arctic sea ice live and grow at a light level corresponding to only 0.02 percent of the light at the surface of the ice. Algae are the primary component of the Arctic food web and produce food far earlier in the year than previously thought.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antibiotic-resistant plasmids flourish in hospital plumbingTo better understand how antibiotic-resistant organisms spread in hospitals, investigators at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Bethesda, Md., recently collected samples from pipes beneath the hospital's intensive care unit and from outside manholes draining hospital wastewater. They conducted whole-genome analyses on the samples to study the bacterial plasmids, or rings of DNA, that can
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study highlights importance of vertebrate pollinatorsThe importance of birds, mammals and reptiles for pollinating plants around the world is the subject of a major new study involving the University of East Anglia.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New method enables high-resolution measurements of magnetismIn a new article, published in Nature Materials, researchers from Beijing, Uppsala and Jülich have made significant progress allowing very high resolution magnetic measurements. With their method it is possible to measure magnetism of individual atomic planes.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why sarcasm is such a brilliantly inclusive and effective way to teach children—notThe image of the sarcastic teacher is a common one. From the masterful speech given by Socrates at his trial for corruption (his "apology"), to the withering insults of Mr Gilbert on The Inbetweeners TV show, sarcasm and teachers seem inextricably linked.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Atomic flaws create surprising, high-efficiency UV LED materialsLight-emitting diodes (LEDs) traditionally demand atomic perfection to optimize efficiency. On the nanoscale, where structures span just billionths of a meter, defects should be avoided at all costs—until now.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Innovative monitoring technique can help protect the world's elephants, study findsA quick and cost-effective approach to monitoring the health of elephant populations could help measure the impact of poaching on the animals, according to a new study involving the University of Stirling.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Worm uploaded to a computer and trained to balance a poleIs it a computer program or a living being? At TU Wien (Vienna), the boundaries have become blurred. The neural system of a nematode was translated into computer code – and then the virtual worm was taught amazing tricks.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Material gradients could strengthen polymer componentsCombining flexible and stiff materials has bestowed bamboo with a strength-to-weight ratio that rivals steel. Gradually transitioning from a soft to hard substance allows the squishy squid to slice up prey with rigid, scissor-like beaks.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First experimental evidence for superionic iceScientists have provided the first experimental evidence for superionic conduction in water ice at planetary interior conditions, verifying a 30-year-old prediction.
5h
Dagens Medicin
Lægeformand vil have præcise tal om læringselementet i STPSDet øgede læringselement i Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed fra 10 til 25 pct. fik Lægeforeningen til at bakke op om ministerens otte tiltag om mere tillid. Hvis stigningen primært skyldes styrelsessplit, mener lægeformand, at Lægeforeningen har forholdt sig til et forslag på falske præmisser.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New use of limited data helps prevent species lossA team of researchers have discovered that studying small groups of wildlife and how they share scarce resources in particular environments can be critical to preventing wide-spread species loss.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cat plague is back after nearly 40 years in hiding – here's what you need to knowA deadly feline disease is now spreading between cats after hiding in nature for nearly 40 years. Multiple cases of feline parvovirus, also known as cat plague, or panleukopenia, have been reported in stray kittens in the greater Melbourne area this week.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pesticide bans might give us a buzz, but they won't necessarily save the beesPublic pressure is growing in Australia to ban the sale of pesticides called neonicotinoids because of their harmful effects on bees.
5h
Big Think
Where to watch the SpaceX Falcon Heavy launch todaySpaceX Falcon HeavyToday's launch of the Falcon Heavy is being streamed all over the Internet this afternoon Read More
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Workbench for virus designETH's Zurich researchers have developed a technology platform that allows them to systematically modify and customise bacteriophages. This technology is a step towards making phage therapies a powerful tool for combating dangerous pathogens.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Studying outdoors is betterBeing taught science subjects outdoors increases student motivation. A study by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the University of Mainz therefore suggests offering more outdoor instruction at the lower secondary level.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Small errors, fatal consequencesIn Germany, every year more than 100,000 cases of illness are statistically recorded whose pathogen can be transferred via food. These reported cases are only the tip of the iceberg, however, as the actual number is estimated to be well over a million. The majority of infections are probably caused by food and for this reason, the proper handling of food in communal catering facilities and restaur
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Serious shortcomings in aging tests of new solar cell materialsResearchers at Aalto University have analyzed 261 aging tests conducted on perovskite and dye-sensitized solar cells. Major shortcomings were discovered in both how the results had been reported and how tests had been implemented.The researchers have written a detailed checklist for doing high-quality aging tests and how to take testing conditions into consideration and how to select the measureme
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover off-switch for 'molecular machine' active in many diseasesA discovery by Queensland scientists could be the key to stopping damage caused by uncontrolled inflammation in a range of common diseases including liver disease, Alzheimer's and gout.University of Queensland researchers have uncovered how an inflammation process automatically switches off in healthy cells, and are now investigating ways to stop it manually when it goes awry.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new role for the 'pigments of life'Chemically reconfiguring 'porphyrins' has opened new possibilities for their use in diverse applications in chemistry, biochemistry and energy science.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vitamin A in cattle fodder is potentially protecting against cow's milk allergyInfants can develop an allergy to cow's milk that usually subsides by adulthood but may increase risk for developing other allergic diseases. The allergic reaction can, however, be prevented by two components of cow's milk interacting together, as researchers of the Messerli Research Institute of Vetmeduni Vienna now describe in Scientific Reports. Loading of vitamin A metabolite retinoic acid to
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why treating water scarcity as a security issue is a bad ideaHelen Zille, the Premier of the Western Cape in South Africa, has made two startling claims about the water crisis in the province. She says there will be anarchy when the taps run dry, and that normal policing will be inadequate.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers developing phase-change memory devices for more powerful computingA collaboration between the lab of Judy Cha, the Carol and Douglas Melamed Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering & Materials Science, and IBM's Watson Research Center could help make a potentially revolutionary technology more viable for manufacturing.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How Facebook has become the world's largest echo chamberI began my research career in the last century with an analysis of how news organisations were adapting to this strange new thing called "the Internet". Five years later I signed up for Twitter and, a year after that, for Facebook.
5h
Big Think
Why do we buy roses on Valentine's Day?Amongst other reasons, because they don't mind planes. Read More
6h
Futurity.org
High-fat diets may be worse for shift workersShift workers’ constantly changing schedules make it tough for their biological clocks to keep accurate time. The results could make the negative effects of a high-fat diet even more pronounced, a new study suggests. About 15 million Americans don’t have a typical nine-to-five workday, and many of them—nurses, firefighters, and flight attendants, among other professions—may see their schedule cha
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unknown language discovered in Southeast AsiaA previously unknown language has been found in the Malay Peninsula by linguists from Lund University in Sweden. The language has been given the name Jedek. 'Documentation of endangered minority languages such as Jedek is important, as it provides new insights into human cognition and culture,' says Joanne Yager, doctoral student at Lund University.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bayesian model selection shows extremely polarized behavior when the models are wrongScientists from University College London (UCL) and the Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS, AMSS), have reported progress in understanding problems associated with Bayesian model selection.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Big data methods learn the fitness landscape of the HIV Envelope proteinData scientists from the HKUST and their collaborators from MIT have employed a computational approach to estimate the fitness landscape of gp160, the polyprotein that comprises HIV's spike. The inferred landscape was then validated through comparisons with diverse experimental measurements.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Active genetics technology opens new horizonsEmploying CRISPR/Cas9 advancements, UC San Diego researchers are using new active genetics technology to reveal new fundamental mechanisms that control gene activity. The authors also provide experimental validation for using active genetics as an efficient means for targeted gene insertion, or 'transgenesis,' and single-step replacement of genetic control elements.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HKU scientist makes key discoveries in the search for life on MarsDr. Joseph Michalski and his colleagues have published papers recently that cast increased doubt on the idea of surface life evolving on Mars.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clocking electrons racing faster than light in glassLiving life in the fast lane can be tremendously exciting, giving us the 'time of our lives' but how long does it really last? Experiments at the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Mumbai have answered this question for a bunch of electrons traveling faster than light (fasten your seatbelts!) through a piece of glass. This study has appeared in the Physical Review Letters on Feb. 5, 20
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study underscores tuberculosis risk for working elephantsMorris Animal Foundation-funded researchers recently found approximately 17 percent of working African elephants at several Zimbabwe ecotourism facilities tested positive for tuberculosis antibodies. The findings are a red flag for researchers as infected elephants potentially can pass the disease on to humans and other species with which they come in contact, including wild elephants.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New evidence shows potential of two drugs to block malaria transmissionAn international team of researchers has shown that two different compounds-one, an older malaria drug, the other a common laboratory dye with known antimalarial properties-can safely and effectively be added to treatment regimens to block transmission of the most common form of malaria in Africa.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why nerve cells die in ALS and frontotemporal dementiaScientists have for the first time discovered a mechanism that limits the number of 'cellular janitors' in the nervous system, leading to increased risk for two neurodegenerative diseases: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia, according to a Keck School of Medicine of USC study published today in Nature Medicine.
6h
Popular Science
24 hidden Windows settings to help you compute betterDIY Take over Microsoft's operating system. Underneath the surface of your Windows computer, you'll find hidden settings to help you stay private, save energy, and more. Here are 24 customizations to try.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Building to withstand natural disasters pays off, new research showsFor every dollar the government spends to make existing buildings more resistant to wildfires, earthquakes, floods and hurricanes, $6 is saved in property losses, business interruption and health problems, according to a new study.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Moon's slow retreat from frozen EarthResearchers provide new insight into the moon's excessive equatorial bulge, a feature that solidified in place over four billion years ago as the moon gradually distanced itself from the Earth.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unusual lung structures may raise risk of pulmonary diseaseThe internal anatomy of our lungs is surprisingly variable, and some of those variations are associated with a greater risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a new study has found.
6h
Inside Science
How Sustainable Is Your Favorite Sandwich?How Sustainable Is Your Favorite Sandwich? Scientists examine the environmental impact of the U.K.'s love affair with prepackaged sandwiches. Sandwich-top-image.jpg Image credits: Rob Bertholf via flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Culture Tuesday, February 6, 2018 - 09:15 Annie Roth, Contributor (Inside Science) -- It’s no secret that the U.K. has an insatiable appetite for sandwiches. Scienti
6h
Ingeniøren
Professor: Det haster at få undersøgt smittespredning fra svinefarmeMRSA-rapport viser øget risiko for at blive smittet med husdyr-MRSA, når man bor i nærheden af en svinefarm - også uden dyrekontakt. Hvordan det kan lade sig gøre skal kortlægges, siger professor.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
How Fake Surgery Exposes Useless TreatmentsIt can reveal whether popular operations are actually effective -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
Futurity.org
Climate change could turn military bases into foreign policy problemsA new study digs into the impact climate change may have on US military bases around the world, using an abandoned Army base located under the ice in Greenland. Greenland’s vast ice sheet has long been home to the base, originally used for Project Iceworm, a US Army initiative designed to deploy ballistic missiles with nuclear warheads against the Soviet Union. When the project was shuttered in 1
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HINODE captures record breaking solar magnetic fieldAstronomers at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) using the HINODE spacecraft observed the strongest magnetic field ever directly measured on the surface of the sun. Analyzing data for five days around the appearance of this record breaking magnetic field, the astronomers determined that it was generated as a result of gas outflow from one sunspot pushing against another sunspot
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ebola virus exploits host enzyme for efficient entry to target cellsResearchers have identified a key process that enables the Ebola virus to infect host cells, providing a novel target for developing antiviral drugs.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Viruses -- lots of them -- are falling from the skyAn astonishing number of viruses are circulating around the Earth's atmosphere -- and falling from it -- according to new research from scientists in Canada, Spain and the US.The study marks the first time scientists have quantified the viruses being swept up from the Earth's surface into the free troposphere, beyond Earth's weather systems but below the stratosphere where jet airplanes fly. The v
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new way of generating ultra-short bursts of lightA close relative of the laser has been confined to the lab due to its finicky nature, but a recent discovery may now bring the technology into a range of applications from health care to environmental science.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reversing severe bone lossResearchers have identified a treatment for a rare bone loss disorder that might also lead to help for aging brittle bones.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ants: Master manipulators for biodiversity, or sweet treatsSymbiotic ants manipulate aphid reproduction rates to achieve a specific mix of green and red aphids, maintaining the inferior green aphids which produce the ants' favorite snack.
6h
Ingeniøren
Liftoff! Falcon Heavy er i luften - stil spørgsmål til DTU SpaceEfter flere års forsinkelse har Elon Musks rumfartsselskab SpaceX i aften klokken 21:45 sendt verden største raket - Falcon Heavy - til vejrs.
6h
Science | The Guardian
Gill Gorell Barnes: ‘Fathers are no less important than mothers’ | David BrindleWhen families split, men get left behind emotionally and lose out on bonding with their children to the detriment of both, says the renowned family therapist From the age of seven Gill Gorell Barnes found herself mixing with a louche 1950s crowd in a cafe run by her father in London’s Soho. The experience left her entirely non-judgmental, she reflects, teaching her to respect actors, musicians an
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mathematicians work to expand their new pictorial mathematical language into other areasA picture is worth 1,000 words, the saying goes, but a group of Harvard-based scientists is hoping that it may also be worth the same number of equations.
6h
Feed: All Latest
Can Crisis Line Messaging Help Improve Workplace Culture?The nonprofit Crisis Text Line is launching a spin-off company that uses AI to help teach people how to talk to each other
6h
Feed: All Latest
Olympics 2018: Like Bobsleigh Better Than Basketball? Fantasy Olympian Is Right For You2018 Winter OlympicsAlso, fantasy basketball teams have nothing on the "Sore Lugers."
6h
Dagens Medicin
Flere end hver 10. kommune har fundet faste læger til plejehjemEn undersøgelse fra KL viser, at flere kommuner har styr på plejehjemslægerne. Specielt er der sket et ryk på de kommuner, der har faste læger på mere end halvdelen af kommunens plejehjem.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
Debate Blooms over Anatomy of the World's First FlowerSome researchers say statistical prediction of the ancestral blossom yielded an unlikely structure -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Untimely immune cell clocks may contribute to obesity and diabetes in shift workersAbout 15 million Americans don't have a typical nine-to-five workday, and many of these -- nurses, firefighters and flight attendants, among many other professions -- may see their schedule change drastically one week to the next. As a result, these shift workers' biological clocks, which keep track of the time of day, cannot keep accurate time, potentially making the negative effects of a high fa
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Theoretical physicists manipulate light with nanoscale objectsFor years, scientists have long wrestled with the control and manipulation of light, a long-standing scientific ambition with major implications for the development of technology. With the growth in nanophotonics, scientists are making gains faster than ever exploiting structures with dimensions comparable to the wavelength of light.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Serious shortcomings in aging tests of new solar cell materialsResearchers at Aalto University have found that only a fraction of stability tests done on new types of solar cells meet proper requirements. Tests lack common standards and should have been done in real-world conditions and in groups of several cells.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Three new millisecond pulsars discovered in Terzan 5 globular clusterAn international team of astronomers has found three new millisecond pulsars (MSPs) in a Milky Way globular cluster called Terzan 5. The new discovery increases the number of identified pulsars in Terzan 5 to 37 and makes this cluster the most efficient factory of MSPs in the galaxy known to date. The finding is reported January 30 in a paper published on arXiv.org.
6h
Futurity.org
This ancient arachnid had a long, whippy tailResearchers have discovered a new species of arachnid, resembling a spider with a tail, in amber from Myanmar (formerly Burma), from the mid-Cretaceous age around 100 million years ago. “There’s been a lot of amber being produced from northern Myanmar and its interest stepped up about ten years ago when it was discovered this amber was mid-Cretaceous; therefore, all the insects found in it were m
6h
Futurity.org
Ancient dice weren’t as fair as they are todayWhile we expect modern dice to be fair, with each number having an equal probability of being rolled, that hasn’t always been the case, with the long, shifting history of dice reflecting changing ideas about the role of “chance” in life, new research suggests. “Standardizing the attributes of a die…may have been one method to decrease the likelihood that an unscrupulous player had manipulated the
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery of a primordial metabolic system that gives us a glimpse of the origin of life on EarthMulti-omics research on Thermosulfidibacter (isolated from a hydrothermal field in the Southern Okinawa Trough) has enabled the discovery of possibly the most primordial form of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
HINODE captures record breaking solar magnetic fieldAstronomers at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) using the HINODE spacecraft observed the strongest magnetic field ever directly measured on the surface of the Sun. Analyzing data for 5 days around the appearance of this record breaking magnetic field, the astronomers determined that it was generated as a result of gas outflow from one sunspot pushing against another sunspot.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ants—master manipulators for biodiversity, or sweet treatsSymbiotic ants manipulate aphid reproduction rates to achieve a specific mix of green and red aphids, maintaining the inferior green aphids which produce the ants' favorite snack.
7h
Science | The Guardian
Desperate for help: prescription drug addicts turn to the webLack of government-funded services means growing numbers have nowhere else to turn Thousands of people dependent on prescription drugs are desperately turning to online help groups and calling up charity helplines because of a lack of government-funded services. A growing number of people struggling with addiction to painkillers, benzodiazepines and antidepressants are guiding each other through
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why do some firms survive a crisis and others don't?An international study of small and medium-sized firms has been launched to find out why some are more resilient than others when a crisis hits, at both the level of the firm and in the wider economy.
7h
Dana Foundation
#Brainweek Partner Interview: Piero Paolo BattagliniThis is the first in a series of Brain Awareness Week partner interviews, in which partners share their experiences and tips for planning successful events. Piero Paolo Battaglini is a full professor of physiology at the University of Trieste in Italy. He is also a member of the European Dana Alliance for the Brain. Your past Brain Awareness Week events have ranged from theatre production to radi
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows social media an effective tool for predicting voting outcomesA new study reveals social media may highlight intergroup polarization of voter opinion more adequately than traditional polls when predicting election outcomes.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Viruses—lots of them—are falling from the skyAn astonishing number of viruses are circulating around the Earth's atmosphere – and falling from it – according to new research from scientists in Canada, Spain and the U.S.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dig site in Tuscany reveals Neanderthals used fire to make toolsA team of researchers from several institutions in Italy has found evidence of Neanderthals using fire to craft tools approximately 171,000 years ago. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group outlines where the naturally preserved wood artifacts were found and how they discovered their purpose.
7h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Colorado Potato BeetlesLeptinotarsa decemlineata has been decimating agricultural crops since at least the 19th century, and by sequencing its genome researchers hope to explore new strategies for controlling the pest.
7h
The Scientist RSS
CDC Identifies Seoul Virus Outbreak Among Pet Rat OwnersThese are the first known cases of individuals catching the virus from their pets in Canada or the U.S.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
Proposed Space Station Aims for the Moon and beyondThe ambitious plan to send astronauts to lunar orbit has drawn skepticism -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Popular Science
This flu season has killed 53 kids so far. Here’s what worried parents should do.Health Most of those children never got vaccinated. This flu season has been scary, but there are precautions to take that can really help keep you and your family healthy.
7h
Ingeniøren
Esbjerg-skib bygget af nordkoreanske tvangsarbejdere19 nordkoreanske tvangsarbejdere har bygget skroget på Esvagt Njord, der blev bestilt af det danske rederi Esvagt. Historien kommer fuldstændig bag på Esvagt, hvis direktør finder sagen uacceptabel.
7h
The Atlantic
The Man Who Saw Inside HimselfSonia Ramamoorthy has plenty of smart patients. A surgeon at the University of California at San Diego, she counts among her patients members of that school’s faculty, many of whom arrive at her clinic remarkably well informed. “They’ve been to the internet, and they’ll come in with 50 questions,” she says. But nothing prepared her for Larry Smarr. During her consultation with him about an intest
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unusual lung structures may raise risk of pulmonary diseaseThe internal anatomy of our lungs is surprisingly variable, and some of those variations are associated with a greater risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a new study led by researchers at McGill University and the Columbia University Irving Medical Center has found.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cognitive sensors in production processesAs a direct result of Industrie 4.0, industrial production is becoming increasingly customized. And industry's long-term goal is batch size one. In practice, however, digitalization still frequently means individual solutions that are only partially connected or not connected at all. As a consequence, neither subsequent processes nor advance planning can benefit from data recorded. To facilitate t
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How old compounds could become tomorrow's life-saversUniversity of Leeds scientists are looking back in time at previously discarded chemical compounds, to see if any could be developed for new antibiotics.
7h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Kosttilskud reparerer skader i hjernen hos mus med AlzheimersNeurologiske skader i hjernen i forbindelse med Alzheimers kan repareres af en form for kosttilskud,...
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New NASA space sensors to address key Earth questionsWhy is the Arctic warming faster than the rest of the planet? Does mineral dust warm or cool the atmosphere? NASA has selected two new, creative research proposals to develop small, space-based instruments that will tackle these fundamental questions about our home planet and its environment. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, is a key participant on both instruments.
7h
Feed: All Latest
Self-Driving Cars' Massive Power Consumption Is Becoming a ProblemAll those computers and sensors can hurt fuel economy and range, practical problems for commercial systems.
7h
Feed: All Latest
Snapchat, Wickr, Confide: How Ephemeral Messaging Threatens HistoryWIRED columnist Felix Salmon on the problem with disappearing-messaging apps.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UBC researchers use drones to track jellyfish bloomsJellyfish blooms are becoming more widespread and scientists are looking for ways to understand them better, including their impact on species like salmon that compete with them for food sources. Now, researchers at the University of British Columbia have enlisted aerial drones to track these jellyfish clusters, their behaviours, and populations in greater detail.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Autonomous 3-D scanner supports individual manufacturing processesLet's say the armrest is broken in your vintage car. As things stand, you would need a lot of luck and persistence to find the right spare part. But in the world of Industrie 4.0 and production with batch sizes of one, you can simply scan the armrest and print it out. This is made possible by the first ever 3-D scanner capable of working autonomously and in real time. The autonomous scanning syste
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How solitary cockroaches gave rise to social termites—tales from two genomesTermites are "social cockroaches." They evolved from ancestral solitary cockroaches some 150 million years ago, at least 50 million years before bees, ants and wasps evolved similar intricate societies independently of termites. Termites live in complex societies characterized by division of labor of castes and close coordination of tasks among members of the colony. For example, the queen and kin
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
Olympic Clothing Designers Try to Beat the Cold with TechnologyWith electric self-warming jackets and new insulated fabrics, Team USA hopes to overcome record-setting chills -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Combined optics, science instruments of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope arrive in CaliforniaThe two halves of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope now reside at Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems in Redondo Beach, California, where they will come together to form the complete observatory.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Final results from LISA Pathfinder satelliteThe final results from the ESA satellite LISA Pathfinder (LPF) have been published today. Using data taken before the end of the mission in July 2017, the LPF team – including researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics in Hannover and Leibniz Universität Hannover – significantly improved first results published in mid 2016. LPF now has exceeded the requirements for key tec
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First experimental evidence for superionic iceAmong the many discoveries on matter at high pressure that garnered him the Nobel Prize in 1946, scientist Percy Bridgman discovered five different crystalline forms of water ice, ushering in more than 100 years of research into how ice behaves under extreme conditions.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New studies of clay formation provide clues about early Martian climateNew research published in Nature Astronomy seeks to understand how surface clay was formed on Mars despite its cold climate.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Porous polymer films with shape memoryWhether for separation processes, photovoltaics, catalysis, or electronics, porous polymer membranes are needed in many fields. Membranes with micropores that switch between different shapes and/or sizes would expand the possibilities. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have introduced a process that produces porous films made from shape memory polymers with precise dimensions. The shape
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Life-size paper tribute hails Suffragette icons and celebrates 100 years of women's' right to voteTrailblazing women who successfully fought for the right to vote have been honoured in a life-size paper tribute handcrafted to mark 100 years of women's suffrage.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lactation hormone cues birds to be good parentsToppling a widespread assumption that a "lactation" hormone only cues animals to produce food for their babies, Cornell researchers have shown the hormone also prompts zebra finches to be good parents.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ecological functioning of urban waterwaysNUS scientists have established key environmental drivers linking microbial ecology with urban design to enhance nutrient removal and attenuate algal blooms in urban waterways.
8h
Live Science
An Ancient Hyena May Have Chomped Down on This Neanderthal's FaceAbout 65,000 years ago, a large carnivore - perhaps a cave hyena - chomped down on the face of a (likely dead) Neanderthal. Then, that carnivore partially digested two of the hominin's teeth before regurgitating them, a new study suggests.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover new ways to streamline uranium enrichmentBuilding and operating multistage sorters for enriching uranium used in nuclear power plants requires major investment. MEPhI researchers have calculated performance criteria that could lower construction costs for plants of this kind.
8h
The Atlantic
A New Leader in the Push for Diversity of Thought on CampusAs of this year, more than 1,500 college professors and a couple hundred graduate students have joined Heterodox Academy, a nonprofit founded in 2015 on the premise that research and teaching suffer when college campuses lack diverse viewpoints. Amid recent tumult in academia, where student protests have been common and clashes over free speech and intellectual inquiry have made national headline
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sponges can economize on oxygen useSponges lack a signaling pathway that responds to low intracellular oxygen levels in more complex animals. Do they use a different mechanism for this purpose or did their earliest ancestors evolve at a time when less oxygen was available?
8h
Viden
Professor: Koldt vejr gør luftforureningen værrePå de kolde dage bliver der lagt et "låg" på forureningen fra kilder som benzin- og dieselmotorer.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
Wait--the Ozone Layer Is Still Declining?The lower stratosphere’s ozone continues to decrease, despite the world’s success in phasing out ozone-depleting chemicals -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Feed: All Latest
The EPA’s Pollution Estimates Stink. Everyone Uses Them AnywayAnd low-balling isn’t limited to toxic chemicals.
8h
Feed: All Latest
The Supersonic Parachutes Carrying NASA's Martian DreamsA new generation of space scientists is using high tech materials to resurrect the long-neglected supersonic parachute.
8h
Dagens Medicin
Forskning i gravides kvalme får milliontilskudOverlæge Ellen Løkkegaard fra Nordsjællands Hospital har fået 1,7 mio. kr. i tilskud til at undersøge effekten af to forskellige lægemidler til behandling af kvalme i graviditeten.
8h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Pollinators are usually safe from a Venus flytrapA first-ever look at what pollinates the carnivorous Venus flytrap finds little overlap between pollinators and prey.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
Why Don't Babies Smile from Birth?Their facial muscles work fine, but the neural networks that let them recognize the feeling of happiness take a while to develop -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
California Farms Are a Silent but Sizable Source of Air PollutionSoil microbes convert fertilizer to nitrogen oxides, emitting about as much of the gases as on-road vehicles in the state -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
NYT > Science
Watch the SpaceX Falcon Heavy Rocket Launch TodayElon Musk SpaceXElon Musk has disrupted the business of sending rockets into space, and hopes to achieve a milestone by testing the most powerful rocket currently operating in the world today.
9h
Dagens Medicin
Anja Pinborg er ny professor og leder på FertilitetsklinikkenDanmarks største offentlige fertilitetsklinik på Rigshospitalet har fået ny professor og lægelig leder.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can over-the-counter pain meds influence thoughts and emotions?Over-the-counter pain medicine such as Ibuprofen and acetaminophen may influence how people process information, experience hurt feelings, and react to emotionally evocative images, according to recent studies. Examining these findings and how policymakers should respond, a new article is out today in Policy Insights from the Behavioral and Brain Sciences, a Federation of Associations in Behaviora
9h
The Atlantic
Devin Nunes, 'Great American Hero'?Donald Trump’s flair for insults is well noted, but his knack for backhanded compliments is perhaps under-appreciated. Note the finely calibrated use of the conditional tense in this Friday morning tweet: Representative Devin Nunes, a man of tremendous courage and grit, may someday be recognized as a Great American Hero for what he has exposed and what he has had to endure! — Donald J. Trump (@re
9h
The Atlantic
How the Nunes Memo Harms Intelligence OversightThe infamous #memo has finally been #released—and landed with a flop and a fizzle. Far from the “worse than Watergate” scandal we were promised, the overwhelming consensus of informed commentators has been that the document prepared by staff for Representative Devin Nunes, chair of the House Intelligence Committee, not only failed to unearth any real impropriety in the investigation of former Tru
9h
New Scientist - News
We shouldn’t hide the gory details of how meat reaches our plateEating animals is a choice we are all entitled to make but we should at least do so with consideration of their lives and deaths
9h
New Scientist - News
There could be entire stars and planets made out of dark matterMystery dark matter may not just form halos around galaxies. It could clump together like ordinary matter to make dark planets or stars
9h
New Scientist - News
Rare wooden tools show that Neanderthals got creative with fireWooden tools are hardly ever preserved, but a cache found in Italy suggests Neanderthals made them with fire and used them to dig up foods like tubers
9h
New Scientist - News
Weird ice found on Neptune and Uranus has now been made on EarthBizarre ice that forms under intense pressure and high temperatures may cause Neptune’s and Uranus’s odd magnetic fields. Now, we’ve made this stuff on Earth
9h
New Scientist - News
Some people with epilepsy can learn to stop their own seizuresAlertness training seems to help some people with epilepsy to stop themselves from having seizures, and has been linked to changes in their brain structure
9h
New Scientist - News
DeepMind’s virtual psychology lab seeks flaws in digital mindsGoogle’s AI company has released a simulated 3D environment in which machines can pit themselves against cognitive tests designed for humans
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Understanding conditions for star formationResearchers have demonstrated how a gas escapes ice at an extremely cold temperature, providing insight into star formation in interstellar clouds. The mechanism by which hydrogen sulphide is released as gas in interstellar molecular clouds is described by scientists in Japan and Germany, in the journal Nature Astronomy. The process, known as chemical desorption, is more efficient than previously
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Do companies need corporate universities?Researchers at the Higher School of Economics, International Laboratory of Intangible-driven Economy (IDlab), have examined the role of corporate universities in developing human capital and improving performance. Their findings were published in the Journal of Intellectual Capital.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists explain the impacts of aerosol radiative forcingAerosols are colloids of tiny solid or liquid particles suspended in the atmosphere. Their diameters typically range between 0.001 and 100 μm. Aerosols are recognized as a major factor influencing global and regional climate change owing to their ability to scatter and absorb solar radiation. Indirectly, they modulate Earth's energy balance by altering cloud properties—in particular, cloud droplet
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
AI in pest control increases its efficiency and environmental impactThe losses suffered by Brazilian agriculture owing to crop pests and diseases amount to R$55 billion per year, according to data from the Brazilian Agricultural Research Corporation (EMBRAPA). Agrosmart, a digital agriculture company based in Campinas, São Paulo State, plans to change this situation using Internet of Things (IoT) technology. Agrosmart is developing a connected application that wil
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Treatment of nitrogen-polluted sediment using marine anammox bacteriaWorking on a way to alleviate eutrophication in coastal waters, a research collaboration between Kumamoto University in Japan and the Virginia Institute of Marine Science (VIMS) in the U.S. reports a combination of bacteria with the potential to lighten the impact of excess nitrogen found in many coastal water systems.
10h
Ingeniøren
Spillemyndigheden: Teleselskaber skal blokere skinbetting-siderDet skal ikke være muligt at lokke unge til gambling - heller ikke selv om der er tale om ingame-genstande fremfor penge, mener Spillemyndigheden, der beder danske udbydere blokere en række hjemmesider.
10h
Ingeniøren
»Graverende beregningsfejl« rammer MotorregistretSkat har fundet »graverende beregningsfejl« i den sidste test før implementering af en række ændringer i Motorregistret.
10h
Ingeniøren
Myndigheder i vildrede: Ingen ved, om Condotte er ude af kontrakt på StorstrømsbroTrods bombastiske politiske udmeldinger kan den konkurstruede italienske entreprenørvirksomhed Condotte måske stadig nå at komme med på byggeriet af Storstrømsbroen.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ribosomes found to induce somatic cell pluripotencyIn 2012, a Japanese research group discovered that human skin cells acquire pluripotency when introduced to lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus acidophilus). Now, the same group of researchers has found that the cause of somatic cell conversion into pluripotent stem cells is the ribosome, a protein synthesizing cellular organelle.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The discovery of a third form of flagella-mediated motility in symbiotic bacteriaProfessor Takayuki Nishizaka and Dr. Yoshiaki Kinosita from Gakushuin University, together with Dr. Yoshitomo Kikuchi from AIST, have discovered an unforeseen form of flagella-mediated motility shown by pest bean bug symbionts, which entails swimming by wrapping their flagellar filaments around their cell bodies. Bacteria with this form of flagella-mediated motility were able to traverse glass sur
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Great white shark named George stalks Everglade watersA great white shark named George has been spotted lingering off the Florida coast near the Everglades and Gulf of Mexico.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
German prosecutors raid Audi again in 'dieselgate' probeGerman prosecutors said they had raided offices belonging to high-end carmaker Audi Tuesday, the second sweep in a week related to diesel emissions cheating at the Volkswagen subsidiary.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microplastics: No small problem for filter-feeding ocean giantsPlastic pollution has recently gained increasing attention for its effects on marine mammals, fish and birds. However, it is still not fully understood to what extent small pieces of plastic, known as microplastics, impact marine life and ecosystems.
10h
Ingeniøren
GRAFIK: Sådan virker Falcon Heavy
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Boeing announces service orders worth nearly $1 billionBoeing said Tuesday its global services unit has signed deals worth nearly $1 billion at the Singapore Airshow in areas like parts, maintenance, modification and training.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Central banker takes stab at bitcoin 'bubble'The head of the Bank of International Settlements, the central bank for central banks, on Tuesday lambasted bitcoin as a speculative bubble and said authorities need to be ready to protect public trust in the financial system.
10h
Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsstyrelsen udgiver nye anbefalinger for hjertesygdomDe nye anbefalinger skal sikre smidige patientforløb. Som noget nyt beskriver de det samlede forløb, som patienter kommer igennem, lige fra mistanken opstår til opfølgningen på behandlingen.
10h
Ingeniøren
Skæbnedag for Falcon Heavy – verdens største raket med Tesla ombordKærkommen evolution med en ærgerlig nyttelast, siger DTU space-forsker. Følg opsendelsen i aften på Ing.dk og stil spørgsmål til forskeren.
11h
Ingeniøren
Miljøjournalist: MRSA-rapport kan blokere for svinefarmeDansk forskning viser øget risiko for svine-MRSA jo tættere man bor på en svinefarm - også for folk uden dyrekontakt. Nu kan borgergrupper måske bruge det som skyts til at stoppe nye svinefarme.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Everglades needs more fresh water to fight salt water intrusionAs sea levels continue to rise, more areas of the coastal Everglades will be susceptible to salt water intrusion, according to a new study by Florida International University.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Supercomputing more light than heatSolar cells can't stand the heat. Photovoltaics lose some energy as heat in converting sunlight to electricity. The reverse holds true for lights made with light-emitting diodes (LED), which convert electricity into light. Some scientists think there might be light at the end of the tunnel in the hunt for better semiconductor materials for solar cells and LEDs, thanks to supercomputer simulations
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Singapore risks destroying past in race to build: top archaeologistSingapore faces a race against time to save its past, according to its top archaeologist, who warns relentless development in the land-scarce city-state comes at a heavy price.
11h
NYT > Science
ScienceTake: How the Snake Pours Its Way Across the GroundLaboratory tests of a 70-year-old hypothesis illuminate the details of a subtle form of snake locomotion.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seattle says Facebook is violating law about election adsFacebook People BusinessFacebook is violating a Seattle law that requires the company to reveal who pays for political advertising on its influential social media platform, the city's elections watchdog said Monday.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Toyota forecasts record net profit for full fiscal yearJapanese car giant Toyota on Tuesday revised its earnings forecast, saying it expected to see a record annual net profit thanks to robust global sales and a weaker yen.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China solar supplier grows in India to avoid trade controlsOne of China's biggest makers of solar panels said Tuesday it will invest $309 million to expand manufacturing in India in a move to guard against what it complained is a rising threat of import controls in the United States and other markets.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google spinoff, Uber whale on each other as trial opensAn epic court battle between Uber and a Google spinoff, centered on the alleged theft of self-driving car technology, began with accusations of sinister plots and other devious behavior lobbed in both directions.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bitcoin drops below $6,000 for first time in three monthsBitcoin plunged more than 20 percent to fall below $6,000 on Tuesday, its latest sharp loss following a series of setbacks, with a global stock market collapse fuelling the selling.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study sheds light on Moon's slow retreat from frozen EarthA study led by University of Colorado Boulder researchers provides new insight into the Moon's excessive equatorial bulge, a feature that solidified in place over four billion years ago as the Moon gradually distanced itself from the Earth.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
There are more mammal species than we thoughtA recent study published in the Journal of Mammalogy, at Oxford University Press, highlights that over 1000 new species of mammals have been described globally during the last dozen years, a finding that contradicts the notion that our mammalian relatives are well known. This rate of species discovery parallels that seen in global amphibians, and is driven by advances in DNA analysis methods and f
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel research approach sheds light on how midsize predators interactA novel research approach by Oregon State University has resulted in a key step toward better protecting the fisher, an important forest predator that findings show is the dominant small carnivore when present.
12h
Science | The Guardian
E-cigarettes should be on sale in hospital shops, health body saysMore could be done to get people to switch to products that are safer than smoking cigarettes, say Public Health England Vaping should be widely encouraged as a way to help people quit smoking, and e-cigarettes should even be offered for sale in hospital shops, the government’s public health body has said. At least 20,000 people a year could be giving up cigarettes thanks to vaping, according to
12h
Science-Based Medicine
MyMedLab Offers Expensive, Useless, Nonstandard Lab TestsDirect to consumer lab testing is good marketing but not good medicine. For instance, there is no reason to spend $199 to measure glyphosate levels in your blood.
12h
Science | The Guardian
SpaceX: Elon Musk seeks to revive Apollo era with Falcon Heavy rocket testSpaceX’s Falcon Heavy will be the most powerful to leave Earth since the Saturn V in the 1970s – and will hurl a Tesla electric car into space SpaceX Falcon Heavy launch – live The most powerful rocket to leave Earth in a generation is set for its maiden flight from Florida on Tuesday, its whimsical payload lending a touch of showmanship to a pioneering test mission that could have significant im
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The ozone layer continues to thinThe vital ozone layer has continued to deplete in recent years over the densely populated mid-latitudes and tropics, while it is recovering at the poles. This is documented by an international research team in the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ozone at lower latitudes is not recovering, despite Antarctic ozone hole healingThe ozone layer -- which protects us from harmful ultraviolet radiation -- is recovering at the poles, but unexpected decreases in part of the atmosphere may be preventing recovery at lower latitudes.
14h
Science | The Guardian
Ozone layer not recovering over populated areas, scientists warnWhile the hole over Antarctica has been closing, the protective ozone is thinning at the lower latitudes, where the sunlight is stronger and billions of people live The ozone layer that protects people from the sun’s ultraviolet radiation is not recovering over most highly populated regions, scientists warned on Tuesday. The greatest losses in ozone occurred over Antarctica but the hole there has
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ozone at lower latitudes is not recovering, despite Antarctic ozone hole healingThe ozone layer - which protects us from harmful ultraviolet radiation - is recovering at the poles, but unexpected decreases in part of the atmosphere may be preventing recovery at lower latitudes.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study sheds light on moon's slow retreat from frozen EarthA study led by University of Colorado Boulder researchers provides new insight into the moon's excessive equatorial bulge, a feature that solidified in place over four billion years ago as the moon gradually distanced itself from the Earth.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
There are more mammal species than we thoughtA recent study published in the Journal of Mammalogy, at Oxford University Press, highlights that over 1,000 new species of mammals have been described globally during the last dozen years, a finding that contradicts the notion that our mammalian relatives are well known. This rate of species discovery is driven by advances in DNA analysis methods and field exploration. This new listing of all liv
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Aging immune system may explain age-related cancer risk increaseA new study suggests aging immune system plays a larger role in cancer incidence than previously thought. Findings may explain higher likelihood of men developing cancer than women. This epidemiological research could have major implications for global fight against cancer if borne out by further studies.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Your immune system may be able to protect against MRSA infectionsAfter years of investigation, researchers have discovered how the immune system might protect a person from recurrent bacterial skin infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (staph).
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Soil characteristics may be related to chronic wasting disease persistence, study findsDeer infected with chronic wasting disease are doomed to a slow and certain death, eventually wasting away as they lose the ability to eat and drink. There is no cure and no vaccine, and the number of infected deer continues to rise every year. But scientists recently published a new study that could help explain the movement of the disease across the landscape.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Powerful battery createdMove over, lithium-ion; now, there's a better battery on the horizon. A multi-institution team of scientists has discovered an exceptional metal-oxide magnesium battery cathode material, moving researchers one step closer to delivering batteries that promise higher density of energy storage on top of transformative advances in safety, cost and performance in comparison to their ubiquitous lithium-
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technology for accelerated wound healing discoveredResearchers have found a new way of accelerating wound healing. The technology and the mode of action involves using lactic acid bacteria as vectors to produce and deliver a human chemokine on site in the wounds. The research group is the first in the world to have developed the concept for topical use and the technology could turn out to be disruptive to the field of biologic drugs.
16h
Ingeniøren
Grafikkort anvendes som 'hjerner' bag kunstig intelligensNvidia leverer grafikkort til millioner af gamere, men kortene er også den foretrukne computerkraft bag neurale netværk over hele verden på grund af sin proprietære API.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cascading inflammation associated with lyme arthritis linked to overactive immune responseScientists believe they identified a mechanism that activates T cells, a key component of the immune system, which could explain the elusive link between a tick bite and persistent Lyme arthritis.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Duck faeces shed light on plant seed dispersalMallards are among the most abundant and widespread duck species in the world, yet little attention has been paid to date to their role in spreading plant seeds. A new study in the Journal of Ecology reveals a number of plants that were not previously known to be part of the diet of waterbirds.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel research approach sheds light on how midsize predators interactA novel research approach has resulted in a key step toward better protecting the fisher, an important forest predator that findings show is the dominant small carnivore when present.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fabricating nanocrystalline diamonds to study materials under extreme conditionsA nanocrystalline diamond built by plasma vapor deposition has already produced a pressure nearly two times greater than that found at the center of the Earth. A new study finds that the manufacturing process of these novel, nanocrystalline-diamond micro-anvils has proved to be 'remarkably consistent' and demonstrates 'a high level of reproducibility in fabrication.'
16h
Live Science
Asparagus: Health Benefits, Risks (Stinky Pee) & Nutrition FactsAsparagus contains a stimulating blend of nutrients, making this member of the lily family a fantastic food for your health.
16h
Ingeniøren
Fire tegn på at din kollega er narcissistDårlige kollegaer kan ødelægge dagligdagen - især hvis de er alt for selvoptagede og selvcentrerede. Find ud af om, der gemmer sig en narcissist på din arbejdsplads.
16h
Ingeniøren
VIDEO: Forstå hvorfor man bruger grafikkort til kunstig intelligensGrafikkort er den foretrukne computerkraft bag kunstig intelligens, men hvorfor?
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Risk assessment tool can now better predict pressure injuries in childrenPressure-related skin injuries, a nurse-sensitive quality indicator in hospitals, are associated with increased morbidity and higher costs of care. There's been much attention focused on hospital-acquired pressure injuries (HAPI) in the adult population. However, while preventable, immobility-related and medical device-related pressure injuries (MDPI) also occur in hospitalized infants and childre
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
IVF: What makes a good egg?In approximately 15 percent of cases where couples are unable to conceive, the underlying cause of infertility is not known. Researchers have identified a protein in mice that must be present in eggs for them to complete normal development. Without the protein, called ZFP36L2, the eggs appear ordinary, but they cannot be fertilized by sperm.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Children with heart failure from dilated cardiomyopathy are seeing a dramatic improvement in outcomes in recent yearsNew research has shown that for children with heart failure from dilated cardiomyopathy there has been a dramatic improvement in outcomes of medical management in the past few years. The study also shows that significantly fewer of these patients die from heart disease.
16h
Feed: All Latest
As Waymo v. Uber Kicks Off, Travis Kalanick Is in the CrosshairsAs the blockbuster legal fight goes to trial, Waymo makes clear who it wants to paint as the big baddie.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel research approach sheds light on how midsize predators interactA novel research approach has resulted in a key step toward better protecting the fisher, an important forest predator that findings show is the dominant small carnivore when present.
18h
The Scientist RSS
Opinion: Do Not Believe the HypeMarijuana ointments as cancer treatments remain a distant prospect.
18h
The Scientist RSS
Spiders with Long Tails Found in Ancient AmberThis discovery closes a 170-million-year gap in the fossil record.
18h
Science : NPR
Risky Antipsychotic Drugs Still Overprescribed In Nursing HomesToo many people with dementia are being given sedating drugs to make them easier to handle in understaffed facilities, a new study finds, despite federal warnings to stop the practice. (Image credit: Bruno Ehrs/Getty Images)
18h
The Atlantic
Devin Nunes's Next TargetDevin Nunes has a new target: Jonathan Winer, the Obama State Department’s special envoy to Libya, and longtime Senate aide to John Kerry. Winer received a memorandum from political activist Cody Shearer and passed it along to Christopher Steele, the former British intelligence official who had compiled his own dossier on Donald Trump. The release of last week’s House Intelligence Committee memo
18h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Dinosaurs ‘too successful for their own good’A study modelling how dinosaurs spread worldwide shows they may have been a victim of their own success.
19h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Elon Musk's huge Falcon Heavy rocket set for launchSpaceX Falcon HeavyThe entrepreneur will attempt to fly the world's most powerful rocket with his own Tesla as payload.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
To reduce overdose deaths, US needs to pilot the use of supervised injection facilitiesThe authors of a new commentary come out strong in support of supervised injection facilities, or SIFs. They say that SIFs save lives by bringing addiction out of the shadows. The evidence suggests they may be right.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dye kills malaria parasites at speed not seen beforeResearch shows that the dye methylene blue is a safe antimalarial that kills malaria parasites at an unprecedented rate. Within two days, patients are cured of the disease and no longer transmit the parasite if they are bitten again by a mosquito.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nearly one in three pugs has an abnormal gaitNearly one in three pugs has an abnormal gait, which in turn is linked to other health issues, finds a Swedish study of owners of the breed.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Toward gonorrhea vaccine: Researchers take important stepResearchers are paving the way toward a new therapeutic approach for gonorrhea by shedding light on the mechanism behind important proteins on the Neisseria gonorrhoeae bacteria's outer membrane.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Following treatment guidelines more important than volume for assessing heart failure careLooking at how well hospitals adhere to treatment guidelines for heart failure is more important than comparing patient volumes at hospitals, new research shows.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New ACIP Adult Immunization Schedule recommends changes to shingles and MMR vaccinesThe Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) released its 2018 Recommended Immunization Schedule for adults with changes to the administration of the herpes zoster and measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccines.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drinking hot tea associated with a 5-fold increased risk for esophageal cancer for someConsuming hot tea at high temperatures is associated with an increased risk for esophageal cancer in those who also drink alcohol and smoke cigarettes, a new study finds.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lactation hormone cues birds to be good parentsToppling a widespread assumption that a “lactation” hormone only cues animals to produce food for their babies, researchers have shown the hormone also prompts zebra finches to be good parents.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New study sheds light on the the dark side of Hong Kong's most lucrative seafood tradeHong Kong is the global hub for the more than USD 1 billion Live Reef Food Fish Trade (LRFFT), much of it unreported and unregulated with serious consequences for vulnerable species, food security and livelihoods in Southeast Asia.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Police shootings reflect structural racism, study findsThe deaths of Trayvon Martin, Tamir Rice, Sandra Bland, Michael Brown, and other unarmed black victims at the hands of police sparked a national conversation about racism and policing, from the Black Lives Matter movement to kneeling NFL players. But a new study finds states with a greater degree of structural racism, particularly residential segregation, have higher racial disparities in fatal po
19h
cognitive science
Brain scans can predict the song you're listening to without hearing itsubmitted by /u/KerrangMagazine [link] [comments]
20h
Futurity.org
Bogus health claims on ‘toddler drinks’ can confuse parentsLabels on formulas and milks sold as “toddler drinks” can confuse parents about their healthfulness or necessity, a new study suggests. The study examines how US policies and regulations can support clear and truthful labeling of toddler drinks, given that international and US health experts and pediatricians don’t recommend them. In order to foster healthy toddler diets, the researchers recommen
20h
NYT > Science
Matter: This Mutant Crayfish Clones Itself, and It’s Taking Over EuropeEvery marbled crayfish is a female clone. The population is exploding in Europe, but the species seems to have originated in the American Southeast.
20h
Science : NPR
Fossils In Amber May Provide Link Between Ancient Arachnids And Modern SpidersTwo teams of researchers are studying tailed spiders captured and preserved about 100 million years ago, which could provide evidence of the species' evolution.
21h
Futurity.org
‘Bacterial burden’ starts early in lungs of kids with CFFor young children with cystic fibrosis, the lungs’ bacterial population changes in the first few years of life as respiratory infections and inflammation set in, new research suggests. The study, which appears in PLOS Pathogens , offers a way to predict the onset of lung disease in children with CF and suggests a larger role for preventive therapies, such as hypertonic saline. Cystic fibrosis ca
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dye kills malaria parasites at speed not seen beforeResearch shows that the dye methylene blue is a safe antimalarial that kills malaria parasites at an unprecedented rate. Within two days, patients are cured of the disease and no longer transmit the parasite if they are bitten again by a mosquito. This discovery was made by Radboud university medical center scientists and international colleagues during a research project conducted in Mali. The re
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dissatisfaction in three dimensionsA recent paper asserts that mood and body satisfaction can take major hits after viewing oneself represented as a 3-D avatar.
21h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: A Certain Form of PartisanshipWhat We’re Following The Super Bowl: The Philadelphia Eagles beat the New England Patriots 41 to 33 in a suspenseful, spectacular matchup that pitted an underdog team against five-time champions. Justin Timberlake’s halftime show was less impressive: The pop star’s apparently halfhearted performance failed to command attention. For those still gloating at the Patriots’ defeat, here’s the case aga
21h
Futurity.org
2017 was ‘just an average year’ for shark attacksWith 88 reported unprovoked shark attacks and five fatalities worldwide, 2017 was “just an average year,” according to the University of Florida International Shark Attack File . While the number of reported attacks is slightly higher than the most recent five-year annual average of 83, the five fatalities are just below the average of six deaths per year. Of the total, 60 percent (53) occurred i
21h
Futurity.org
Some people with diabetes lack blood sugar ‘awareness’New research sheds light on why many type 1 diabetics fail to respond to potentially dangerous drops in their blood sugar levels. The brains of people with type 1 diabetes react differently to low blood sugar compared with healthy adults, the researchers say. “There is a progressive loss of coordinated brain response to low blood sugar…” In healthy, non-diabetic adults, a drop in blood sugar stim
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nearly one in three pugs has an abnormal gaitNearly one in three pugs has an abnormal gait, which in turn is linked to other health issues, finds a Swedish study of owners of the breed, and published online in Vet Record.
21h
Live Science
Does All That Headbanging Leave a Mark on Woodpeckers' Brains?Woodpecker brains aren't immune to repeated impacts.
21h

Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.