Big Think
Why rape cases should not be subject to reasonable doubtIs it better to have the harm of 100 sexual assaults than the harm of one false conviction? Read More
55min
Science | The Guardian
Premature babies healthier when parents help with hospital care, study showsBabies in trial put on more weight in first three weeks and parents were less stressed Premature babies do better if their parents are allowed to help care for them in hospital alongside the nurses, rather than being treated as visitors and left on the sidelines, a new study shows. Many parents feel acutely anxious, stressed and out of control when their child is in a newborn intensive care unit
26min
Live Science
FDA's New Warning on Kratom: What Makes Something an Opioid?The herbal substance kratom contains compounds that can be considered opioids, the FDA said this week.
42min

LATEST

Futurity.org
Olympian brains adapt to lots of spins and flipsWhen Olympic figure skaters, snowboarders, and ski jumpers execute breathtaking spins and flips, they pull them off because of two fundamental improvements in the way their brains work, says biomedical engineer Kathleen Cullen. First, their brains have built intricate models for the sensory input that comes in during a proper triple Salchow or Lutz. Everyone’s brain builds models—typically for or
4min
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: The Path of Least ResistanceWhat We’re Following It’s a Deal: The Senate has reached a bipartisan budget agreement that lays out federal spending for the next two years. Republicans pushed for an increase in military funding, while Democrats called for money to address the opioid crisis, infrastructure, and other domestic programs. Both parties got what they wanted, but the result, if the budget is passed, will be a $300 bi
4min
New Scientist - News
Training parents to work in hospitals benefits premature babiesWhen the parents of premature babies in intensive care units are trained in basic nursing care and put to work, their infants put on weight more quickly
8min
Futurity.org
3D-printed foam parts could stay strong as subs dive deepA new process uses 3D printing to create components of syntactic foam—extremely strong and lightweight composites used in vehicles, airplanes, and ships. Researchers say the breakthrough holds particular promise for submarines because it will allow manufacturers to print components with complex shapes capable of surviving stresses at greater depths. Syntactic foams, a mixture of billions of micro
18min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anti-obesity programs in schools unlikely to halt child obesity epidemicSchool based programs aimed at preventing obesity in children are unlikely to have much impact on the childhood obesity epidemic, suggests a randomized controlled trial published by The BMJ today.
23min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Case for assisted dying 'stronger than ever' says The BMJA series of articles published by The BMJ today, explore the debate around assisted dying, in which, subject to safeguards, terminally ill people who are near to death, suffering, and of sound mind, could ask for drugs that they would take to end their lives.
23min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drugs, alcohol and suicides contributing to alarming drop in US life expectancyDrugs, alcohol and suicides are contributing to an alarming drop in US life expectancy, particularly among middle-aged white Americans and those living in rural communities, warn experts in The BMJ today.
23min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New results point out the need to modify the current strategy for yaws eradicationAn international collaboration led by ISGlobal provides new evidence that will help improve the current WHO strategy to eradicate yaws. It concludes that eradication will require more than a single round of mass drug treatment in order to capture those absent during the first round; that a bigger geographical area needs to be targeted in order to prevent imported cases; and that drug resistance mo
23min
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Starfish See Pretty Well in the Deep Ocean. By the Way, Starfish Have Eyes.In the deep seas, starfish make their own light, possibly to signal one another for mating, and they’ve evolved sophisticated eyes to see it.
59min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Self-sealing miniature 'wound' created by engineersBiomedical engineers have developed a miniature self-sealing model system for studying bleeding and the clotting of wounds. The researchers envision the device as a drug discovery platform and potential diagnostic tool.
1h
Popular Science
How to stream way too much Olympic coverage for the 2018 Winter GamesTechnology There's more content to stream this year than you can shake a hockey stick at. There are lots of ways to watch this year's Olympics, even if you don't have cable anymore.
1h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: When the Tanks Go Marching InToday in 5 Lines Senate leaders announced a massive budget deal that would increase military and domestic spending over the next two years. The deal received pushback from House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, who said she would not agree to a plan that did not address immigration . White House staff secretary Rob Porter resigned after allegations that he abused his two ex-wives. During a speech in
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Macromolecular machines for controlled drug deliveryResearchers have demonstrated the design and synthesis of a smart globular macromolecular machine vehicle for actively controlled cancer drug delivery, which would enhance the drug's efficacy.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google Brain founder Andrew Ng creates $175 million AI FundSilicon Valley is increasingly betting that artificial intelligence will be the next breakthrough technology, and its latest stake is a new venture fund led by a respected AI expert.
1h
Feed: All Latest
Feds Take Down Infraud, a $530M Cybercrime Forum That Lasted 7 YearsInfraud may not have been as famous as dark web markets like the Silk Road and Alphabay, but it far outlasted both.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smart home unit Nest is spun back into GoogleNest Google HardwareGoogle is taking back Nest, the smart home unit of parent firm Alphabet, as part of an effort by the tech giant to battle rivals like Amazon and its Alexa digital assistant.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Water forecast is bleak for major reservoir in Southwest USOne of the most important reservoirs in the southwestern U.S. will likely collect less than half its normal amount of spring runoff this year because of a warm, dry winter across much of the region, forecasters said Wednesday.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Challenging core belief: Have we misunderstood how Earth's solid center formed?It is widely accepted that the Earth's inner core formed about a billion years ago when a solid, super-hot iron nugget spontaneously began to crystallize inside a 4,200-mile-wide ball of liquid metal at the planet's center.
1h
The Scientist RSS
FDA Declares Kratom an Opioid. Were Here to Explain What It Does.The Scientist speaks with a clinical toxicologist to discuss how the supplement acts in the brian and what the agency's declaration means for research.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The American College of Rheumatology recommends biosimilar use in new white paperThe ACR has published a new white paper that provides a comprehensive overview of the scientific, clinical, economic and prescribing issues pertaining to biosimilar use. The paper encourages providers to incorporate these drugs into treatment plans of patients with rheumatic diseases.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Youth consider mobile health units a safe place for sexual health servicesMobile health units bring important medical services to communities across the country. A new study indicates that mobile health units may provide a new approach for offering sexual health education and services to adolescents.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
This new company wants to sequence your genome and let you share it on a blockchainPeople will be able to earn cryptocurrency in exchange for letting pharma companies use their data.
2h
The Atlantic
Can Speaker Ryan Convince House Republicans to Support the Budget Deal?As Senate leadership celebrated their agreement on a massive two-year budget deal , Speaker Paul Ryan struggled to convince his conference’s right flank that the legislation was worth supporting. The Senate hasn’t even yet passed its funding package—which includes a stopgap bill to keep the government open until March 23, along with a two-year, $300 billion increase in defense in domestic spendin
2h
The Atlantic
The Rise and Fall of John Kelly's ReputationThere’s only ever really one story arc in Washington. A new face arrives in town, impresses people, and reaches dizzying new heights. Before too long, however, the capital becomes disillusioned and turns on him (or occasionally her). That’s the story of Rob Porter, the White House staff secretary, who announced his departure on Wednesday after published allegations of abuse from his two ex-wives.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research reveals plant wonderland inside China's cavesExciting new data on cave flora has been published today in PLOS ONE in a paper by researchers from the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew and the Guangxi Institute of Botany in China.
2h
Big Think
Why the Olympics have always been a better stage for politics than sport"Sports is war minus the shooting," said George Orwell. So far, however, a thawing of tensions between North Korea and South Korea has been the big political story of the 2018 Olympic Games. Read More
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineering professor identifies the progress and untapped potential of wearable sensorsWhen it comes to biometric sensors, human skin isn't an ally.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study first to document multiple paternity in nests, hatchlings of threatened sea turtlesWho's your daddy? No, it's not a TV clip from "The Jerry Springer Show" to identify who the "real" father is. Rather, it is a groundbreaking study of sea turtle nests and hatchlings using paternity tests to uncover "who are your daddies?"
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sweet route to greater yieldsThree years ago, biotechnologists demonstrated in field trials that they could increase the productivity of maize by introducing a rice gene into the plant that regulated the accumulation of sucrose in kernels and led to more kernels per maize plant.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team demos new atomic effect for potential isotopic batteryA multinational research team led by Army scientists successfully induced a controlled release of stored isotopic energy using a physical effect involving atomic electrons that was proposed more than 40 years ago but never before demonstrated experimentally.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers build alien ocean to test NASA outer space submarineBuilding a submarine gets tricky when the temperature drops to -300 Fahrenheit and the ocean is made of methane and ethane.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fruit bat's echolocation may work like sophisticated surveillance sonarNew research from the University of Washington suggests that the Egyptian fruit bat is using similar techniques to those preferred by modern-day military and civil surveillance. The results could inspire new directions for driverless cars and drones.
2h
Big Think
It used to be Uber vs. Taxis. Now it's Uber vs. You.Uber, Lyft, ZipCar, and other transportation companies have signed onto a new pledge to curb urban congestion—in their favor. Read More
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GPM satellite finds rainfall pushed away from Tropical Cyclone Cebile's centerVertical wind shear continued to hammer Tropical Cyclone Cebile in the Southern Pacific Ocean and NASA's GPM core satellite saw rainfall was pushed away from the center.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Published study reports use of nutritional ketosis with mobile app intervention could reverse Type 2A newly published study has shown that an individualized approach to nutritional ketosis (utilizing fat rather than glucose to fuel the body), combined with remote monitoring via a mobile application, could sustainably and safely reverse Type 2 diabetes.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CU researchers identify potential treatment for diastolic dysfunction in heart failureResearchers at the University of Colorado School of Medicine have identified a potential treatment target for patients with a common type of heart failure. In a study published in the Feb. 7 issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine, the researchers tested the effect of an investigational drug called givinostat in treating diastolic dysfunction, which is a heart relaxation abnormality th
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Self-sealing miniature 'wound' created by engineersBiomedical engineers have developed a miniature self-sealing model system for studying bleeding and the clotting of wounds. The researchers envision the device as a drug discovery platform and potential diagnostic tool.
2h
Feed: All Latest
Scammers Are Stealing Bitcoin on Twitter With a Classic SchemeA new twist on the classic Nigerian Prince scheme has jumped from gaming communities to Twitter. And now it's spreading.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cognitive enhancement therapy improves outcomes for adults with autismFew research efforts have focused on interventions for adults, but a new six-year collaborative trial tested two treatments for adults with autism -- and found strong, but different, results.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UPMC researchers solving treatment resistance in most common breast cancerFor the first time researchers have identified recurrent ESR1 fusion proteins in human breast cancer, to understand how they function and help lead to improved treatments for the disease.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tracking oxygen saturation, plus vital signs, to identify vulnerable preemiesWhile near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) long has been used to monitor oxygenation in conditions in which blood flow is altered, such as bleeding in the brain, how NIRS values relate to other vital sign measures in NICU babies was unknown.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Eye could provide 'window to the brain' after strokeResearch into curious bright spots in the eyes on stroke patients' brain images could one day alter the way these individuals are assessed and treated. A team of scientists at the National Institutes of Health found that a chemical routinely given to stroke patients undergoing brain scans can leak into their eyes, highlighting those areas and potentially providing insight into their strokes. The s
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What happens when women stop MS treatment during pregnancy?Two new studies look at the effects of stopping the newer, stronger drug natalizumab for multiple sclerosis (MS) during pregnancy. Natalizumab is generally prescribed for people with MS who have not responded to or cannot tolerate other treatments for MS as it can have a rare but potentially fatal side effect.
2h
The Atlantic
Trump Wants a Military Parade—So What?Let’s get this out of the way: America still holds military parades. Regularly. They are held in small towns across the country to honor veterans, to remember those who were killed on the battlefield, and to showcase a community’s ties to the military. But the last time there was a military parade in Washington, George H.W. Bush was president. It was 1991 and the U.S. had just won the war in Iraq
2h
The Atlantic
Peggy Fleming and the 1968 Winter OlympicsEditor’s Note: This is part of The Atlantic’s ongoing series looking back at 1968. All past articles and reader correspondence are collected here . New material will be added to that page through the end of 2018. Fifty years ago this week the 1968 Winter Olympics began in Grenoble, France, where 37 countries competed, including West Germany and East Germany, who were permitted to enter as separat
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Super wood could replace steelEngineers have found a way to make wood more than 10 times stronger and tougher than before, creating a natural substance that is stronger than many titanium alloys.
2h
Live Science
Why Does the Tesla Look So Fake in Space? We Asked a ChemistEven Elon Musk thinks his space-cruising midnight-cherry Tesla Roadster looks weird.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New research reveals plant wonderland inside China's cavesOver five years (2009-2014) researchers have delved into the depths of some of China's most unexplored and unknown caves in the largest ever study on cave floras. Surveying over 60 caves in the Guangxi, Guizhou and Yunnan regions, they were able to assess the vascular plant diversity of cave flora in more detail than ever before.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sweet route to greater yieldsThree years ago, biotechnologists demonstrated in field trials that they could increase the productivity of maize by introducing a rice gene into the plant that regulated the accumulation of sucrose in kernels and led to more kernels per maize plant. They have now unravelled the intimate details of the relationships governing the increased productivity and hope to transfer the biotechnology to oth
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Who's your daddy? Good news for threatened sea turtlesA groundbreaking study of sea turtle nests and hatchlings using paternity tests to uncover 'who are your daddies?' is the first to document multiple paternity in loggerhead sea turtle nests in southwest Florida. What started out as a study on female sea turtle promiscuity is proving to be very good news for this female-biased species facing rising risks of extinction due to climate change.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Changes in mouse breast tissue after exposure to fracking chemicalsEnvironmental scientists report that they observed changes in mammary gland development of female mice exposed during early development to the chemicals used in unconventional oil and gas (UOG) extraction -- including fracking -- at levels environmentally relevant to humans.
3h
The Scientist RSS
DNA Analysis Paints New Picture of 10,000-Year-Old Briton'Cheddar Man' had dark hair and blue eyes, a sequencing analysis suggests.
3h
The Atlantic
A New Era of Big Spending in Trump's WashingtonCongressional leaders struck the biggest bipartisan breakthrough of the Trump era by going back to the old rules of Washington: The quickest way to reach consensus is by cracking open the federal piggy bank and divvying up what falls out. A two-year budget agreement announced on Wednesday achieves a hard-fought fiscal peace, but at a steep price for taxpayers and the federal deficit: an increase
3h
The Atlantic
Other Presidents Who Have Met Famous Black PeopleDonald Trump Jr. recently defended his father from charges of racism in an interview with The Daily Caller , offering as evidence a past history of photographs taken of the elder Trump with African American celebrities: "It’s amazing—all the rappers, all his African American friends, from Jesse Jackson or Al Sharpton, have pictures with him.” Since the mid-20th century, U.S. presidents and those
3h
Popular Science
China's working on the next generation of military exoskeleton. Here's what it can do.Eastern Arsenal Getting ever closer to Iron Man-like capabilities. China's defense contractors are entering the field in a major way. Here's the next generation of military exoskeletons.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Star-like cells may help the brain tune breathing rhythmsNIH scientists caused rats to breathe at a lower rate and tire out on a treadmill earlier than normal by silencing star-shaped brain cells, called astrocytes. The results suggest that astrocytes play a more active role than traditionally thought in how the brain controls breathing and other vital functions.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Specific protein may reduce inflammation, improve survival during the fluGM-CSF, a protein that modifies the immune response to the flu, helped reduce lung inflammation and improve survival during influenza in mice in a lab, according to Penn State researchers.
3h
Science | The Guardian
Dinosaur-killing asteroid caused molten rock to burst from ocean floor – studyScientists believe asteroid set off chain of cataclysmic eruptions Violent eruptions occurred on floor of Pacific and Indian oceans The giant space rock that wiped out the dinosaurs may have set off a chain of cataclysmic volcanic eruptions on land and undersea, claims a new study that is already dividing scientists. About 66 million years ago, a six-mile wide asteroid smacked into earth, creatin
3h
Live Science
Billions of Viruses Are Falling to Earth Right Now (But That Isn't Why You Have the Flu)Billions of airborne viruses waft down on us every day, carried by air currents that disperse them around the world.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gadgets for seniors: Ambitious techies roll out robots, smart gear for their eldersFor older adults who grew up before the personal computer, iPhones and Amazon Echo became technological mainstays in everyday life, a growing number of startups are working on smart devices with features designed to keep aging minds and bodies healthy.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Streaming platform Hulu could be wild card in Fox-Disney megadealWalt Disney Co.'s deal for much of the film and television assets of 21st Century Fox could help remake the streaming platform Hulu a legitimate rival to Netflix.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
GPM satellite finds rainfall pushed away from Tropical Cyclone Cebile's centerVertical wind shear continued to hammer Tropical Cyclone Cebile in the Southern Pacific Ocean and NASA's GPM core satellite saw rainfall was pushed away from the center.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fast-spinning spheres show nanoscale systems' secretsSpin a merry-go-round fast enough and the riders fly off in all directions. But the spinning particles in a Rice University lab do just the opposite.
3h
NYT > Science
In Sweeping War on Obesity, Chile Slays Tony the TigerNew regulations, which corporate interests delayed for almost a decade, require explicit labeling and limit the marketing of sugary foods to children.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First model to capture crosstalk in social dilemmasThe idea that previous interactions can affect unrelated future decisions might seem obvious: the stranger in front of you pays for your coffee, and then you pay for the stranger behind you. You've had no interaction with the latter, and no reason to do them a favor, but you do it anyway. Similarly, if a friend refuses to help, you might be less inclined to help the next person who asks you for so
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Readers ask about supernovas, dark energy and moreReaders had questions about a supernova that continuously erupts, the difference between dark energy and dark matter, and more.
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News
In play, kids and scientists take big mental leapsActing Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill explores the science behind children's play and how kids like to mimic the same things adults do.
3h
Live Science
Yup, Flat-Earthers Think the Falcon Heavy Launch Was a ConspiracySurprise: They don't believe it.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fast-spinning spheres show nanoscale systems' secretsA Rice University lab studies the effects of a spinning magnetic field on magnetically responsive particles. The findings could help researchers use these colloidal particles as models for 2-D materials whose enhanced properties have led to improved performance in applications ranging from electronics, data storage, catalysis and photonics.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sweet route to greater yieldsThree years ago, biotechnologists demonstrated in field trials that they could increase the productivity of maize by introducing a rice gene into the plant that regulated the accumulation of sucrose in kernels and led to more kernels per maize plant. They have now unravelled the intimate details of the relationships governing the increased productivity and hope to transfer the biotechnology to oth
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Child development experts discover potential upside to prenatal stressNew research with prairie voles by child development experts at UC Davis suggests that prenatal stress promotes developmental plasticity in babies, making them especially likely to benefit from good parenting as well as suffer from negligent care.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The big burnSome 13,000 years ago, a cataclysmic event occurred on Earth that was likely responsible for the collapse of the Clovis people and the extinction of megafauna such as mammoths and mastodons.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Recent study in Oregon reveals public considers alcohol more harmful than marijuanaA new study, led by researchers at RTI International, surveyed more than 1,900 adults in Oregon prior to the legalization of marijuana in the state and found that more than half (52.5 percent) consider alcohol to be more harmful than marijuana while few (7.5 percent) believe marijuana is more harmful to a person's health.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First-ever questionnaire assesses impact of brachial plexus injury and surgical outcomesAfter extensive research, investigators at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) have developed the first-ever patient questionnaire to measure the physical and emotional impact of brachial plexus injury. The survey also seeks to assess patients' expectations and treatment outcomes.
3h
New Scientist - News
The worst mass extinction may have begun with mass sterilisationThere seems to have been a surge in ultraviolet radiation during the Permian extinction 252 million years ago, and it might have left plants infertile rather than kill them
3h
New Scientist - News
A much better asthma drug has shown promise in early experimentsExisting asthma drugs can fade in effectiveness and have side effects. But preliminary experiments suggest a new kind of drug could be more effective
3h
Live Science
When Will SpaceX Lose Connection with Starman?SpaceX's star dummy, riding in space inside a cushy Tesla Roadster, could lose contact with Earth any time.
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Science | The Guardian
Women working for Wellcome Trust ‘earn 21% less than men’ on averageFigures released by charity – one of the world’s biggest funders of biomedical research – make ‘uncomfortable reading’, says director Women working at Britain’s largest charity earn 21% less on average than men, gender pay gap figures reveal. The Wellcome Trust , one of the world’s biggest funders of biomedical research, is the latest major institution to make public its record on gender and pay
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Got a coastal bridge to retrofit? There's an optimal approach for thatLife-cycle engineers incorporate -- for the first time -- the three most common failure modes for bridges vulnerable to floods, hurricanes and tsunamis into a risk assessment framework to optimize retrofitting strategies.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A genetic trigger adds branches to plants, could boost crop yieldsWhen it comes to agriculture from branched plants, such as apple trees, the more branches that bear fruit, the better. But in the real world, there's a limit to the number of branches that plants make -- a gene tends to put the brakes on this splitting process called shoot branching. Today researchers reveal a chemical that can reverse this limitation, possibly leading to improved crop production.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Multiple chronic diseases leave patients with adversely high costsCurrent strategies for treating patients with several chronic diseases are putting an unnecessary financial burden on countries' health systems and individuals, a global study has found. Experts say that the current clinical practice of tackling each disease in isolation may lead to the prescription of unnecessary medicines, resulting in patient expenses that are disproportionate to the number of
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Removing fossil fuel subsidies will not reduce CO2 emissions as much as hopedRemoving fossil fuel subsidies would have only a small effect on CO2 emissions and renewable energy use, new research has shown. The largest emissions savings would be in oil and gas exporting countries, where fewer poor people would be affected, and subsidy removal can be aided by currently low oil prices.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How the immune system decides which bacterial species to attackA new study reveals a mechanism by which the immune system may decide whether a bacterial species is a partner in bodily processes or an invader worthy of attack.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Simple molecule could prevent, alleviate pre-diabetesRestoring levels of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ), a key molecule in energy production in cells, could overcome insulin resistance or pre-diabetes -- a precursor to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Skyrmions open a door to next-level data storageSkyrmions are tiny magnetic swirls that are hard to undo and may be perfect for miniaturizing electronics.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Super wood could replace steelEngineers at the University of Maryland, College Park have found a way to make wood more than 10 times stronger and tougher than before, creating a natural substance that is stronger than many titanium alloys.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Who's your daddy? Good news for threatened sea turtlesA groundbreaking study of sea turtle nests and hatchlings using paternity tests to uncover 'who are your daddies?' is the first to document multiple paternity in loggerhead sea turtle nests in southwest Florida. What started out as a study on female sea turtle promiscuity is proving to be very good news for this female-biased species facing rising risks of extinction due to climate change.
4h
The Atlantic
Here's How U.S.-North Korea Crises Typically EndHow will the standoff over North Korea’s nuclear weapons end? Will Kim Jong Un buckle under pressure and roll back his nuclear program, or will he press forward in completing an arsenal that can threaten the whole world? Will Donald Trump make good on his threats to take military action against the North, or will he focus on deterring Kim from ever using his nukes? It’s impossible to answer these
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pheromone from insect that transmits citrus greening (HLB) identifiedA new discovery makes it possible to synthesize the substance and use it in traps to attract and kill Asian citrus psyllid, helping control worst pest faced by citrus industry - in Florida alone, orange production has decreased in the order of 90 million boxes in the last 15 years.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Helping authorities respond more quickly to airborne radiological threatsA new technique uses existing technologies to detect potential airborne radiological materials in hours instead of days.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Autism genetics study calls attention to motor skills, general cognitive impairmentA new study of the genetic factors involved in the causation of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) draws fresh attention to the impact these illnesses have on motor skills, and more broadly on cognitive function. Careful inference from the data suggests to researchers that the genetic factors causing ASD broadly diminish the brain's cognitive functions.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New fuel standards will decrease childhood asthma casesA new study quantifies health benefits of new a standard for shipping fuel, finding it will result in a 3.6 percent reduction of childhood asthma globally.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Two-step process to thwart cancer cellsScientists have found a new way to kill liver cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth. This research could accelerate the development of new treatments for liver cancer, which is currently difficult to cure.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Intense laser experiments provide first evidence that light can stop electronsBy hitting electrons with an ultra-intense laser, researchers have revealed dynamics that go beyond 'classical' physics and hint at quantum effects. This radiation reaction -- demonstrated in the lab for the first time -- is thought to occur around objects such as black holes and quasars.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Large-group living boosts magpie intelligenceGrowing up in a large social group makes Australian magpies more intelligent, new research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists crack structure of enzyme complex linked to cancerA research team has solved the crystal structure for an enzyme that plays a key role in DNA methylation, the process by which methyl groups are added to the DNA molecule. The breakthrough reveals how the enzyme recognizes and methylates its substrates. In humans, errors in methylation have been associated with various diseases, including cancer. DNA methylation also critically influences plant and
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Towards a better prediction of solar eruptionsJust one phenomenon may underlie all solar eruptions. Researchers have identified the presence of a confining 'cage' in which a magnetic rope forms, causing solar eruptions. It is the resistance of this cage to the attack of the rope that determines the power and type of the upcoming flare. This work has enabled the scientists to develop a model capable of predicting the maximum energy that can be
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Live Science
Watch Live @ 7 p.m. ET: The Riddle of the Quantum SphinxIn this Perimeter Institute Public Lecture, physicist Robert Spekkens will explain why he thinks many quantum mysteries are a result of fairly simple mistakes concerning the nature of quantum states.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple Music may soon become the most popular music streaming service in USIn the race for global music streaming supremacy, the gap between Spotify and Apple Music is getting smaller.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Polluted air may pollute our moralityExposure to air pollution, even imagining exposure to air pollution, may lead to unethical behavior, according to findings published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. A combination of archival and experimental studies indicates that exposure to air pollution, either physically or mentally, is linked with unethical behavior such as crime and cheating.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
WSU researchers build alien ocean to test NASA outer space submarineBuilding a submarine gets tricky when the temperature drops to -300 Fahrenheit and the ocean is made of methane and ethane. Washington State University researchers are working with NASA to determine how a submarine might work on Titan, the largest of Saturn's many moons and the second largest in the solar system. The space agency plans to launch a real submarine into Titan seas in the next 20 year
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exposure to chemicals used during fracking may cause pre-cancerous lesions in miceToday, researchers at the University of Missouri and the University of Massachusetts released a study that found that female mice exposed to mixtures of chemicals used in fracking operations during prenatal development had abnormal mammary glands in adulthood. Additionally, some of the mice developed pre-cancerous mammary lesions that may suggest they will be more sensitive to chemicals that cause
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A pair of RNA scissors with many functionsArming CRISPR/Cas systems with an enzyme that also controls the translation of genetic information into protein.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fruit bat's echolocation may work like sophisticated surveillance sonarHigh-speed recordings of Egyptian fruit bats in flight show that instead of using a primitive form of echolocation, these animals actually use a technique recently developed by humans for surveillance and navigation.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Army-led effort demos new atomic effect for potential isotopic batteryArmy-led research team successfully demonstrates atomic effect first proposed more than 40 years ago.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Challenging core belief: Have we misunderstood how Earth's solid center formed?Researchers at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, are posing an important question about the formation of planet Earth's inner core, arguing that it's time to consider the nucleation paradox at the heart of the issue.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research reveals plant wonderland inside China's cavesSW China previously unexplored caves contain 418 vascular plants. Thirty-one of the species documented are known only from caves. Habitat threatened from tourism, agriculture and mining. Photosynthesis possible at lower light levels than previously documented.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biosensors will be inexpensive, do more, go everywhereWhen it comes to biometric sensors, human skin isn't an ally but an obstacle. University of Cincinnati professor Jason Heikenfeld examines the promise and pitfalls ahead for the biosensor industry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alzheimer's disease: Dual mechanism of actions of overactive and cytosolic BRCA1 in neuronal deathA new study suggests an association between overactive and cytosolic BRCA1, the major guardian of genomic stability, and neurons death in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Upregulated BRCA1 is associated with both aberrant DNA damage response (DDR) and dysfunction of presenilin 1 (PS1). The findings support the hypothesis that genotoxic stress manifested among others by activation of DDR and destabilizati
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The Atlantic
Inside Facebook's Fast-Growing Content-Moderation EffortMonika Bickert is a serious, impressive person. Before she became Facebook’s head of global policy management, she put her Harvard law degree to work as an assistant U.S. attorney going after corrupt government officials. On February 2, Bickert spoke very intentionally and precisely about how Facebook’s content-management team and policies are constructed at the Santa Clara University School of L
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Big Think
Why Elon Musk hopes the Falcon Heavy launch will spark ‘new space race’Elon Musk SpaceXSpaceX CEO Elon Musk is encouraging aerospace companies to up their game after successfully launching the most powerful rocket since NASA's Saturn V. Read More
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Live Science
Does OTC Pain Medicine Mess with Your Head?Taking over-the-counter pain relievers might do more than suppress aches and pains: A new review suggests that these medications, including ibuprofen and acetaminophen, could influence people's psychology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The social evolution of termitesSimilar genes involved in the evolution of insect societies as in bees and ants.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cities of the future may be built with locally available volcanic ashCities of the future may be built with volcanic ash. A new MIT study finds volcanic ash adds strength and sustainability to traditional cement.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Which fetal size standard should be used for diagnosing a small- or large-for-gestational-age fetusIn this special supplement to the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology (AJOG) leading experts describe six fetal growth size standards in current use and discuss their strengths and limitations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hairy tongues help bats drink upA new model devised by MIT engineers describes how hairy tongues help bats drink up.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New approach reduces immune response to tissue engineered vascular graftsUsing RNA interference (RNAi) technology to silence an immune-stimulating complex in endothelial cells (EC), the main cellular component of blood vessels, researchers have made it possible to use the plentiful supply of donor ECs instead of a patient's own cells to generate tissue engineered vascular grafts for transplantation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Insight into chromatin therapies for breast cancer could aid personalized medicineMost traditional chemotherapy for cancer has dangerous side effects, but new research is finding ways to develop 'targeted agents' that reduce the side effects and are better tailored to individual patient needs. While these innovations are exciting, a new study shows how certain cancer inhibitors need to be examined more carefully to better understand fine-grained effects and counter-effects, whi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Printable, colorful camouflage with polymersIn nature, colors can serve as a form of communication, but they can also hide animals and plants, camouflaging them from sight. Researchers now report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces that they have developed polymers that can better mimic nature's color-changing abilities than existing polymers. They say the materials could enable smart decorations, camouflage textiles and improved anti-cou
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Autism genetics study calls attention to motor skills, general cognitive impairmentA new study of the genetic factors involved in the causation of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) draws fresh attention to the impact these illnesses have on motor skills, and more broadly on cognitive function. CSHL's Michael Wigler says that careful inference from the data suggests to him that the genetic factors causing ASD broadly diminish the brain's cognitive functions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Redefined Alzheimer's biology has implications for drug designA new study argues that Alzheimer's disease is likely triggered by the failure of a system that clears wastes from the brain -- and actually begins decades before memories fade.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New drug therapy could lead to more effective treatment for millions with asthmaAfter a four-year study examining more than 6,000 compounds researchers identified a drug (TSG12) that relaxes the muscles and opens the airways in asthma. This drug treatment, which is not toxic in human cells, prevents pulmonary resistance in egg- and dust mite-induced asthma.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study punctures 'you are what you eat' paradigm for carnivore skull shapeFrom dogs to seals to cats, members of the mammalian order Carnivora can vary greatly from one species to another. But for the most part, their skulls all tend to take on some variant of just a few shapes-a pattern scientists have long attributed to shared diets. New research reveals that the evolution of skull shape in this group is actually much more complex and is influenced by nondietary facto
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Seafloor data point to global volcanism after Chicxulub meteor strikeA record of volcanism preserved along ancient mid-ocean ridges provides evidence for heightened worldwide magmatic activity 66 million years ago just after the Chicxulub meteor struck Earth, according to University of Oregon scientists.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can interrupting a cell's power source after injury protect against post-traumatic osteoarthritis?Can interrupting a cell's power source after injury protect against post-traumatic osteoarthritis?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Surprise: Non-dietary factors played important role in shaping skulls of carnivoresFactors other than feeding habits -- including age at sexual maturity and average rainfall in their home habitat -- have greatly influenced skull shape in carnivores, according to a new study. This finding contrasts with the idea that dominant shapes among the skulls of carnivores are mostly attributed to shared diets.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Suicides spiked after death of Robin WilliamsIn the months after Robin Williams committed suicide in 2014, researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health documented a marked 10 percent increase in of suicides. Males aged 30 to 44 were particularly affected. The data also showed there was a 32 percent increase in suffocation suicides in the five months that followed Williams' death by the same method, compared to a 3 per
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Positive attitudes about aging reduce risk of dementia in older adultsResearch has shown that older persons who have acquired positive beliefs about old age from their surrounding culture are less likely to develop dementia. This protective effect was found for all participants, as well as among those carrying a gene that puts them at higher risk of developing dementia, a new study led by the Yale School of Public Health has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists unlock the molecular secret behind long-lived bat speciesScientists have identified part of the molecular mechanism that gives long-lived bat species their extraordinary lifespans compared to other animals. The findings published in the journal Science Advances point to the protective structures at the end of chromosomes, called telomeres.According to the international team of scientists, in the longest-lived species of bats (Myotis) telomeres don't sho
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Increased UV from ozone depletion sterilizes treesUC Berkeley paleobotanists put dwarf, bonsai pine trees in growth chambers and subjected them to up to 13 times the UV-B radiation Earth experiences today, simulating conditions that likely existed 252 million years ago during the planet's worst mass extinction. The UV-B made the pines temporarily sterile and created malformed pollen, evidence that ozone depletion from volcanic eruptions could hav
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Acute treatment suppresses posttraumatic arthritis in ankle injuryA University of Iowa study has identified a method for inhibiting the occurrence of an aggressive form of arthritis that frequently develops following a severe traumatic injury. The preclinical work demonstrates the potential for preventing posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) by targeting very early damage after fractures. These types of fractures in a load-bearing joint can lead to arthritis as q
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Recovering population of Zimbabwean African lions show low genetic diversityThe lion population of Zimbabwe's Savé Valley Conservancy shows low genetic diversity despite improved numbers, according to a study published Feb. 7, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Laura Tensen from the University of Johannesburg, South Africa, and colleagues based in the Savé Valley Conservancy.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Great spotted woodpeckers may recognize each other individually by drumming rhythmsThe drum rolls of great spotted woodpeckers may be used to identify individuals, according to a study published Feb. 7, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Michal Budka from Adam Mickiewicz University, Poland, and colleagues.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Older adults with positive views on aging may have a reduced risk for dementiaOlder adults who have acquired positive beliefs about old age from their surrounding culture are less likely to develop dementia, according to a study published Feb. 7, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Becca Levy from the Yale School of Public Health, USA, and colleagues.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Robotic fish can 'see' and mimic live fishResearchers tapped advances in real-time tracking software and robotics to design and test the first closed-loop control system featuring a bioinspired robotic replica interacting in three dimensions with live zebrafish. The system allows the robotic replica to both 'see' and mimic the behavior of live zebrafish in real time. Robots previously have been deployed alongside live animals to better un
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Printable, colorful camouflage with polymersIn nature, colors can serve as a form of communication, but they can also hide animals and plants, camouflaging them from sight. Researchers now report that they have developed polymers that can better mimic nature's color-changing abilities than existing polymers. They say the materials could enable smart decorations, camouflage textiles and improved anti-counterfeiting measures.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diet may influence the spread of a deadly type of breast cancer, study findsA single protein building block commonly found in food may hold a key to preventing the spread of an often-deadly type of breast cancer, according to a new multicenter study. Investigators found that by limiting an amino acid called asparagine in laboratory mice with triple-negative breast cancer, they could dramatically reduce the ability of the cancer to travel to distant sites in the body. Amon
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Male susceptibility to autism linked to male hormones in early-stage brain developmentExposure to androgens (male hormones) during brain development alters genes related to autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a new study. Using male human cells, researchers identified key genes that are regulated by testosterone and that contribute to the risk for autism, generating important insight into how male hormones might contribute to the increased male susceptibility to ASD.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Printable, colorful camouflage with polymersIn nature, colors can serve as a form of communication, but they can also hide animals and plants, camouflaging them from sight. Researchers now report in ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces that they have developed polymers that can better mimic nature's color-changing abilities than existing polymers. They say the materials could enable smart decorations, camouflage textiles and improved anti-cou
4h
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Build Your Valentine a Retro Gaming Console With These Deals: Vilros, Dell, Amazon EchoNeed new tech for yourself or your sweetie? We have a few suggestions here.
5h
New Scientist - News
Chinese police use face recognition glasses to catch criminalsPolice caught twenty-six people carrying fake IDs and another with links to human trafficking by using smart glasses with automatic face recognition
5h
New Scientist - News
SpaceX’s rocket test wasn’t a complete success – but was closeFalcon Heavy SpaceXSpaceX's historic launch wasn't 100 per cent successful, but there is now a Tesla Roadster floating on an orbit between Mars and Jupiter
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
How to Bear a Bull Market: The Psychology of Volatile Securities TradingThe wild up-and-down swings of the markets this week reveals the underlying dynamics of herd behavior in the buying and selling of securities -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
The Atlantic
How Hard Do Professors Actually Work?If there were a “10 Things That Piss Academics Off the Most” list, ranking near the top would be the perception that academic life is easy and relaxing . Professors get annoyed at having to explain to their neighbors and family members that their work extends far beyond the lecture hall—and far beyond the seven-month-or-so academic year. They might be seen walking their dog in the middle of the d
5h
The Atlantic
Trump Finally Comments on the Stock Slump—by Arguing With ItOn Wednesday morning, President Donald Trump—chief executive of a $19 trillion economy, leader of the free world, commander of a nuclear military force—finally weighed in on the stock market’s sudden decline, by arguing with it. “In the ‘old days,’ when good news was reported, the Stock Market would go up,” he wrote on Twitter . “Today, when good news is reported, the Stock Market goes down. Big
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seafloor data point to global volcanism after Chicxulub meteor strikeA record of volcanism preserved along ancient mid-ocean ridges provides evidence for heightened worldwide magmatic activity 66 million years ago just after the Chicxulub meteor struck Earth, according to University of Oregon scientists.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists unlock the molecular secret behind long-lived bat speciesScientists have identified part of the molecular mechanism that gives long-lived bat species their extraordinary lifespans compared to other animals. The findings published in the journal Science Advances point to the protective structures at the end of chromosomes, called telomeres.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Great spotted woodpeckers may recognize each other individually by drumming rhythmsThe drum rolls of great spotted woodpeckers may be used to identify individuals, according to a study published February 7, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Michal Budka from Adam Mickiewicz University, Poland, and colleagues.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study punctures 'you are what you eat' paradigm for carnivore skull shapeFrom dogs to seals to cats, members of the mammalian order Carnivora can vary greatly from one species to another. But for the most part, their skulls all tend to take on some variant of just a few shapes-a pattern scientists have long attributed to shared diets. New research led by the American Museum of Natural History and the University at Buffalo reveals that the evolution of skull shape in th
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Recovering population of Zimbabwean African lions show low genetic diversityThe lion population of Zimbabwe's Savé Valley Conservancy shows low genetic diversity despite improved numbers, according to a study published February 7, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Laura Tensen from the University of Johannesburg, South Africa, and colleagues based in the Savé Valley Conservancy.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thinning ozone layer may have driven Earth's largest mass extinction 252 million years agoPine trees become temporarily sterile when exposed to ultraviolet radiation as intense as some scientists believe the Earth experienced 252 million years ago during the planet's largest mass extinction, lending support to the theory that ozone depletion contributed to the crisis.
5h
Popular Science
Watch beetles shoot hot chemicals from their butts to escape toad belliesAnimals Bombardier beetles avoid certain death by making toads puke. Bombardier beetles release a potent chemical to persuade the frogs that have eaten them to barf them back up alive.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Freedom, not coercionA feeling of freedom and a sense of responsibility are directly related to one another. Scientists from HSE's International Laboratory of Positive Psychology of Personality and Motivation, the University of Missouri and Omsk State University have become the first to prove this link in a study involving both Russian and American
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Scientific American Content: Global
Woodpeckers Drum to their Own TuneThe length and spacing of woodpecker drum rolls varies enough to tell woodpeckers apart--which could be useful to conservation biologists. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What's next for SpaceX?In successfully sending the world's most powerful rocket into space, SpaceX founder Elon Musk has pulled off yet another spectacular gamble.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biologist invents a way to make Mardi Gras more greenTens of thousands of pounds of plastic Mardi Gras beads enter the environment every year. After the parades, most of the discarded beads end up in the landfill. A biologist at Louisiana State University is developing an innovative way to solve this problem by creating biodegradable Mardi Gras beads.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Better knowledge of evolution leads to greater acceptance of the conceptPrevailing theories about evolution state that belief in the concept is tied only to a person's politics or religion. But according to new research, whether Americans accept or reject the subject also depends on how well they understand it.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Inflammation in testes could explain link between obesity and reduced fertilityA new study suggests that chronic inflammation caused by obesity may harm the male genital tract, leading to lower fertility in obese men.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wage increases do not have a persistent effect on job satisfactionAfter a wage increase, people tend to be more satisfied with their jobs -- and even more so when what they have gained exceeds the wage increases of their colleagues. Yet, this effect on job satisfaction is not persistent.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists successfully test new, safer titanium plate for bone tissue repairFor the first time, patented titanium fiber plates developed by engineers for medical use were put to the test in an animal model. Researchers have found that, unlike conventional plates, the titanium fiber plates do not cause bone embrittlement after close contact with the bone for prolonged periods. This could eliminate the need for plate extraction and the associate surgical risks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chemists develop a simple, easy-to-use method to break down pollutants in waterChemists have found out how stubborn pollutants in water can be disintegrated easily and cost-effectively. To do so researchers only need a green LED light, a catalyst and vitamin C. In this way, they can produce special types of electrons that reliably destroy the pollutants in the water. Until now, complex laser systems were required for this.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Highly efficient ammonia synthesis catalyst developedResearchers have discovered that a catalyst of calcium amide with a small amount of added barium (Ba-Ca(NH2)2) with ruthenium nanoparticles immobilized onto it can synthesize ammonia at an efficiency 100 times greater than that of conventional ruthenium catalysts at low temperatures below 300ºC. The performance of this catalyst is also several times higher when compared to iron catalysts currently
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovery paves way for treatment to prevent blood vessel damageThe discovery of a previously unknown interaction between proteins could provide a breakthrough in the prevention of damage to healthy blood vessels.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New approach can help authorities respond more quickly to airborne radiological threatsResearchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new technique that uses existing technologies to detect potential airborne radiological materials in hours instead of days.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Helping authorities respond more quickly to airborne radiological threatsA new technique uses existing technologies to detect potential airborne radiological materials in hours instead of days.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nostalgia safeguards against negative feelingsPsychologists discover strong correlations between Americans' glorification of their country, nostalgia for the past, and the rejection of collective guilt regarding past crimes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers develop the first model to capture crosstalk in social dilemmasNew model shows crosstalk in repeated social dilemmas impedes cooperation and requires higher levels of forgiveness.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brazilian scientists identify pheromone from insect that transmits citrus greening (HLB)The discovery makes it possible to synthesize the substance and use it in traps to attract and kill Asian citrus psyllid, helping control worst pest faced by citrus industry -- in Florida alone, orange production has decreased in the order of 90 million boxes in the last 15 years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Oil-loving microbes could gobble up slicks and spillsSpills of crude oil that devastate huge areas of the oceanic environment could be cleaned up by naturally occurring microorganisms.
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The Atlantic
Red Clocks Imagines America Without AbortionThe America in Leni Zumas’s new novel, Red Clocks , is so familiar as to be almost unremarkable. Ro, a history teacher, has a father in a retirement home in Florida and a brother who died of a heroin overdose. Susan, a mother, raises two children in the house she grew up in. Gin, a loner, is defiantly private but offers home remedies to local women with health issues but no money or insurance. Ma
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Science | The Guardian
EPA head Scott Pruitt says global warming may help 'humans flourish'EPA administrator says ‘There are assumptions made that because the climate is warming that necessarily is a bad thing’ Scott Pruitt, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency, has suggested that global warming may be beneficial to humans, in his latest departure from mainstream climate science. Pruitt, who has previously erred by denying that carbon dioxide is a key driver of climate chang
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Big Think
Crash diets could lead to sudden heart problems, researchers warnNew research makes one thing clear: crash diets are a terrible idea, at least if you have heart problems. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon warehouses don't lead to broad job growth in counties, study findsAmazon Prime PhonesWhen Amazon discloses its plans to build a new warehouse, the news release is predictable.
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Quanta Magazine
The Argument Against Quantum ComputersSixteen years ago, on a cold February day at Yale University, a poster caught Gil Kalai’s eye. It advertised a series of lectures by Michel Devoret , a well-known expert on experimental efforts in quantum computing . The talks promised to explore the question “Quantum Computer: Miracle or Mirage?” Kalai expected a vigorous discussion of the pros and cons of quantum computing. Instead, he recalled
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ex-Uber CEO grilled about old texts in high-tech heist caseFormer Uber CEO Travis Kalanick is back in a San Francisco courtroom to answer questions about discussions he had with an engineer who is accused of stealing Google's self-driving car technology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
36 indicted in global cybercrime ring that stole $530MThirty-six people were indicted in connection with an international identity theft ring known as a "one-stop shop for cybercriminals" that sold stolen credit card information on the dark web, leading to losses of more than $530 million, U.S. prosecutors said Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tesla's losses grow on Model 3 delaysTesla Elon MuskThe day after Tesla and SpaceX CEO Elon Musk blasted his Tesla Roadster into space, his electric car company's mounting losses brought him back to Earth again.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Removing fossil fuel subsidies will not reduce CO2 emissions as much as hopedRemoving fossil fuel subsidies would have only a small effect on CO2 emissions and renewable energy use, new research has shown. The largest emissions savings would be in oil and gas exporting countries, where fewer poor people would be affected, and subsidy removal can be aided by currently low oil prices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Towards a better prediction of solar eruptionsJust one phenomenon may underlie all solar eruptions. French researchers have identified the presence of a confining 'cage' in which a magnetic rope forms, causing solar eruptions. It is the resistance of this cage to the attack of the rope that determines the power and type of the upcoming flare. This work has enabled the scientists to develop a model capable of predicting the maximum energy that
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows how body prevents potentially useful bacteria from causing diseaseA new study reveals a mechanism by which the immune system may decide whether a bacterial species is a partner in bodily processes or an invader worthy of attack.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists halt breast cancer spreadScientists have discovered that an amino acid called asparagine is essential for breast cancer spread, and by restricting it, cancer cells stopped invading other parts of the body in mice, according to research part-funded by Cancer Research UK and published in the journal Nature today.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diet may influence the spread of a deadly type of breast cancer, study findsA single protein building block commonly found in food may hold a key to preventing the spread of an often-deadly type of breast cancer, according to a new multicenter study published today in the medical journal Nature. Investigators found that by limiting an amino acid called asparagine in laboratory mice with triple-negative breast cancer, they could dramatically reduce the ability of the cance
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First-in-the-US study brings home hospital model to patientsData from pilot study demonstrates reduced cost, decreased utilization, and improved physical activity for acutely ill patients cared for in their homes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists crack structure of enzyme complex linked to cancerA research team led by a biochemist at the University of California, Riverside has solved the crystal structure for an enzyme that plays a key role in DNA methylation, the process by which methyl groups are added to the DNA molecule. The breakthrough reveals how the enzyme recognizes and methylates its substrates. In humans, errors in methylation have been associated with various diseases, includi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Large-group living boosts magpie intelligenceGrowing up in a large social group makes Australian magpies more intelligent, new research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mind-controlling molecules from wasp venom could someday help Parkinson's patientsAfter being stung by a parasitic wasp, the American cockroach loses control of its behavior, becoming host to the wasp's egg. Days later, the hatchling consumes the cockroach alive. While this is a gruesome process for the cockroach, scientists now report the discovery of a new family of peptides in the wasp's venom that could be key to controlling roach minds, and might even help researchers deve
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Versatile sensor against tumor initiating cellsResearchers have developed the first fluorescent sensor to visualize TICs. Functional in lung, central nervous system, melanoma, breast, renal, ovarian, colon, and prostate cancer cell cultures, this could become a useful tool for biopsy-free post-treatment assessment and anti-TIC drug development.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Acne linked with increased risk of depressionIn an analysis of one of the largest electronic medical records databases in the world, researchers found that patients with acne had a significantly increased risk of developing major depression, but only in the first five years after being diagnosed with acne.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biotechnologists look to bacteria in extremely cold environments for 'green' detergentsDespite subzero temperatures, increased UV radiation, little liquid water, and few available nutrients, bacteria living at Earth's poles thrive. They manage it thanks in part to molecules called biosurfactants, which help them separate the complex substrates they feed on into easy-to-metabolize droplets. Researchers now review the hypothetical uses of these cold-loving molecules for 'green' deterg
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The Atlantic
WWI’s Zeppelin Bombings Popularized the Trend of ‘Pyjamas’World War I introduced so many terrifying new ways to die, and chief among those was, of course, death by air. You didn’t even have to be a soldier. For Londoners, the threat began in January 1915, when the Germans sent zeppelins loaded with bombs across the Channel. Eventually, they sent planes, too. The air raids, often at night, accomplished little tactically, but their true purpose was to ter
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple HomePod reviews: Amazing sound quality, not much else, iPhone users onlyA slew of reviews for Apple's new smart speaker HomePod dropped recently, and they all come to the same conclusion: It's good—if you can afford it and only use Apple products such as the iPhone and services such as Apple Music.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study: Humanity will need to make some drastic changes to keep the 'good life' goingBad news, Earthlings: It may be possible for everyone on the planet to live a "good" life. It may also be possible for humans to live within their environmental means.
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Big Think
Where Valentine's Day started: Lupercalia, Rome's most bizarre spring riteWhere does Valentine's Day come from? Let us introduce you to the festival of Lupercalia. Read More
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Scientific American Content: Global
Estate Planning for Your Digital AssetsWhat will happen to your Facebook account when you die? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists rearrange 'chaotic' citrus family treeOranges, grapefruit, lemons and limes are all hybrids, mixed and matched from 10 "wild" citrus species descended from a single Asian ancestor some eight million years ago, scientists said Wednesday.
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Science | The Guardian
Spread of breast cancer linked to compound in asparagus and other foodsUsing drugs or diet to reduce levels of asparagine may benefit patients, say researchers Breast cancer patients could be encouraged to cut asparagus and other foods from their diets in the future to reduce the risk of the disease spreading, scientists say. Researchers are investigating whether a change in diet could help patients with breast tumours after studies in mice showed that asparagine, a
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New on MIT Technology Review
Automation is going to hit workers in three waves, and the first one is already here
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New on MIT Technology Review
Chinese cops are wearing glasses that can recognize faces
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electric cars have benefits, but likely won't save you moneyElectric cars have a lot of perks: zero emissions, a quiet ride and instant acceleration. But can they save you money? Probably not.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Got a coastal bridge to retrofit? There's an optimal approach for thatBridges make great metaphors for connection, as in "bridging our differences" and "building bridges." That may be because bridges play such a vital role in connecting people in real life.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
From aardvarks to zebras: London Zoo counts its creaturesJimmy and Yoda the Galapagos tortoises, Max the Eurasian eagle and Bhanu the lion have stood up to be counted as London Zoo conducts its annual audit of creatures big and small.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Harley-Davidson recalls 175,000 bikes on brake safety fearsIconic US motorcycle maker Harley-Davidson is recalling nearly 175,000 bikes in the United States due to fears the brakes could fail, a government regulator announced Wednesday.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Superdense wood is lightweight, but strong as steelNew superdense wood could be a more lightweight, environmentally friendly alternative to current construction materials.
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Blog » Languages » English
Get ready for February open promos!Hello Eyewirers! Our next round of open promotions for Scouts, Scythes , Mods , and Mentors is approaching. We will also consider new Mystics ! During this time you can fill out the open promotion form here to be considered by HQ without requiring player sponsors. Scout, Scythe, and Mentor Qualifications: Have at least earned 50,000 points and completed 500 cubes Maintain at least 90% accuracy ov
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The robots will see you nowResearchers tapped advances in real-time tracking software and robotics to design and test the first closed-loop control system featuring a bioinspired robotic replica interacting in three dimensions with live zebrafish. The system allows the robotic replica to both 'see' and mimic the behavior of live zebrafish in real time. Robots previously have been deployed alongside live animals to better un
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Got a coastal bridge to retrofit? There's an optimal approach for thatLife-cycle engineering pioneer Professor Dan Frangopol and former Ph.D. student Alysson Mondoro's research incorporates -- for the first time -- the three most common failure modes for bridges vulnerable to floods, hurricanes and tsunamis into a risk assessment framework to optimize retrofitting strategies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First national studies of quality of VA ministroke care and how best to measure that careThe first national study of the quality of care offered by the VA to patients following a transient ischemic attack (TIA) finds US' largest healthcare system is doing a good job but also identifies targets for improvement especially for patients discharged from the ED. Also published is the first study to investigate feasibility of assessing and reliably measuring quality of TIA care using electro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mathematics pushes innovation in 4-D printingNew mathematical results will provide a potential breakthrough in the design and the fabrication of the next generation of morphable materials.
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The Atlantic
Pale’ocracy and Other Names for This EraFollowing this article , and this reader-response note , more responses on the most accurate way to name the political challenge of these times. Pale’ocracy. A reader recommends this term, “because of its varied and versatile potential definitions:” --First, the Greek word pale ’ is defined as “to wrestle,” broadened to mean “to struggle, fight, conflict, contest.” That’s deep Trumpism, especiall
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Large-group living boosts magpie intelligenceGrowing up in a large social group makes Australian magpies more intelligent, new research shows.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Stronger Than Steel, Able to Stop a Speeding Bullet--It's Super Wood!Simple processes can make wood tough, impact-resistant—or even transparent -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
What SpaceX's Falcon Heavy Launch Means for Getting Humans to MarsThe launch is a key stepping-stone in the company's quest to bring colonists to Mars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Giant viruses may play an intriguing role in evolution of life on EarthWe all know viruses cause colds and flu this time of year, but you might be surprised to learn that a virus may have played a key role in the evolution of nearly all life forms on Earth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research suggests the Sicilian mafia arose to power from lemon sales in the 1800sResearchers from Queen's University Belfast, in collaboration the University of Manchester and the University of Gothenburg (Sweden), have uncovered new evidence to suggest that the Sicilian mafia arose to notoriety in the 1800s in response to the public demand for citrus fruits.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Facebook’s app for kids should freak parents outMessenger Kids, its first grab at the under-13 crowd, is not to be trusted. After all, you’ve seen how the company treats adults.
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Big Think
Turns out, Kim Jong-un has a sister. She’s heading for South Korea right now.This marks the first time someone from the Kim Jong-un family has traveled to South Korea. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mind-controlling molecules from wasp venom could someday help Parkinson's patientsAfter being stung by a parasitic wasp, the American cockroach loses control of its behavior, becoming host to the wasp's egg. Days later, the hatchling consumes the cockroach alive. While this is a gruesome process for the cockroach, scientists now report in ACS' journal Biochemistry the discovery of a new family of peptides in the wasp's venom that could be key to controlling roach minds, and mig
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sick bees eat healthierDr Lori Lach, Senior Lecturer at JCU, said the study compared the feeding habits of healthy bees to those infected with the gut parasite Nosema ceranae.
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New on MIT Technology Review
At China’s new smart gas stations, no cash, cards, or smartphone apps will be required
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Science | The Guardian
Forget the car in space: why Elon Musk's reusable rockets are more than a publicity stuntThe onboard Tesla Roadster grabbed the headlines, but the real success of this week’s space adventure was the Falcon Heavy launch vehicle SpaceX has made history: the rocket company, founded in 2002 by billionaire playboy Elon Musk, has launched his cherry-red Tesla Roadster into space , on course to the asteroid belt after overshooting its intended Mars orbit. As with so much Musk does, the even
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Science | The Guardian
SpaceX rocket set to overshoot Mars and hurtle towards asteroid beltTesla sports car was launched by Falcon Heavy rocket on Tuesday SpaceX mission originally planned to end in Mars-like orbit Elon Musk’s cherry red Tesla sports car and its dummy test pilot Starman were on a new course hurtling towards the asteroid belt on Wednesday after overshooting their planned trajectory. Just hours after Tuesday’s spectacular launch from Florida of Falcon Heavy, the world’s
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The Atlantic
Germany's Long Road to Roughly Where It StartedAngela Merkel Social DemocratsFor four months, Germany—that reputed pillar of stability in a tumultuous Europe—limped along without a government. The country’s elections in September not only failed to deliver a clear governing majority for German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s conservatives, but it also brought unprecedented gains for the populist party Alternative für Deutschland party (AfD), marking the first time a far-right
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New analysis proves protein supplements provide significant benefits for weight liftersThe debate is over. Dietary protein supplements significantly improve muscle strength and size when taken by healthy adults who lift weights, a determination reached by McMaster scientists who analyzed dozens of research studies.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mind-controlling molecules from wasp venom could someday help Parkinson's patientsAfter being stung by a parasitic wasp, the American cockroach loses control of its behavior, becoming host to the wasp's egg. Days later, the hatchling consumes the cockroach alive. While this is a gruesome process for the cockroach, scientists now report in ACS' journal Biochemistry the discovery of a new family of peptides in the wasp's venom that could be key to controlling roach minds, and mig
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Giant viruses may play an intriguing role in evolution of life on EarthA virus may have influenced the evolution of multicellular life. University of Iowa biologist Albert Erives found a virus family that has a similar set of genes as eukaryotes, placing giant viruses in the evolutionary journey of most plants, insects, and animals. Results published in the journal Epigenetics & Chromatin.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An experiment in mice palliates kidney disease caused by diabetesA research group succeeds in removing a protein from kidney cells involved in blood filtration.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Queen's research suggests the Sicilian mafia arose to power from lemon sales in the 1800sResearchers from Queen's University Belfast, in collaboration the University of Manchester and the University of Gothenburg (Sweden), have uncovered new evidence to suggest that the Sicilian mafia arose to notoriety in the 1800s in response to the public demand for citrus fruits.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Inflammation in testes could explain link between obesity and reduced fertilityA new study suggests that chronic inflammation caused by obesity may harm the male genital tract, leading to lower fertility in obese men.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biotechnologists look to bacteria in extremely cold environments for 'green' detergentsDespite subzero temperatures, increased UV radiation, little liquid water, and few available nutrients, bacteria living at Earth's poles thrive. They manage it thanks in part to molecules called biosurfactants, which help them separate the complex substrates they feed on into easy-to-metabolize droplets. On Feb. 7 in the journal Trends in Biotechnology, researchers review the hypothetical uses of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Better knowledge of evolution leads to greater acceptance of the conceptPrevailing theories about evolution state that belief in the concept is tied only to a person's politics or religion. But according to new research from the University of Pennsylvania, whether Americans accept or reject the subject also depends on how well they understand it.
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The Atlantic
Peace Through Bombings: The U.S. Strategy in AfghanistanPummeling someone into reconciliation might seem like a curious strategy. But that’s what the Trump administration is proposing to do to the Taliban as it seeks to bring an end to the war in Afghanistan. “We will do everything we can to support the ANDSF fight against the Taliban in order to drive them to the negotiating table,” Randall Schriver, the assistant secretary of defense, said Tuesday t
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The Atlantic
Elon Musk's Victory LapSpaceX Elon MuskCAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.—You had to see it to believe it, and even then, you weren’t quite sure it really happened. The successful launch of the Falcon Heavy, the world’s most powerful rocket, stunned spectators on Tuesday—including the man who invented it. “It seems surreal to me,” Elon Musk, the founder and CEO of SpaceX, said Tuesday night, a few hours after the flight. “I had this image of just a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biotechnologists look to bacteria in extremely cold environments for 'green' detergentsDespite subzero temperatures, increased UV radiation, little liquid water, and few available nutrients, bacteria living at Earth's poles thrive. They manage it thanks in part to molecules called biosurfactants, which help them separate the complex substrates they feed on into easy-to-metabolize droplets. On February 7 in the journal Trends in Biotechnology, researchers review the hypothetical uses
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Better knowledge of evolution leads to greater acceptance of the conceptPrevailing theories about evolution state that belief in the concept is tied only to a person's politics, religion or both. But according to new research out of the University of Pennsylvania published in BioScience, the journal of the American Institute of Biology, whether Americans accept or reject the subject also depends on how well they understand it.
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Science | The Guardian
Culture and the mind: a new theory of human intelligence – Science Weekly podcastWhat role might culture play in intelligence? And how does human culture differ from culture found in other animals? Nicola Davis explores our evolutionary history Subscribe and review on Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud and Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter In 1921, residents of the small town of Swaythling in southern England were shocked to find the milk
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study questions link between medical marijuana and fewer opioid deathsSeveral studies have shown an association between legalizing medical marijuana and lower death rates from opioids. A new study finds that link is more complex than previously described and appears to be changing as both medical marijuana laws and the opioid crisis evolve.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Re-introducing an 'old' antibiotic may help fight multi-drug resistant bacteriaA new study indicates that the drug fosfomycin may be effective for treating multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. In most European countries, the oral formulation is only approved as a 3 gram single dose for the treatment of uncomplicated cystitis; however a new study found that a dosing regimen of 6-12 grams per day divided in 3 doses is required for the treatment of systemic multi-drug-resi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How old antibiotic compounds could become tomorrow's life-saving drugsAs the fight against drug-resistant infections continues, University of Leeds scientists are looking back at previously discarded chemical compounds, to see if any could be developed for new antibiotics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Back pain is common in highly active older adultsMany well-functioning and highly active older adults experienced back pain, which was linked with poorer perceived and observed walking endurance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Here is the perfect spot for a birds' inner compassMigratory birds use a magnetic compass in their eye for navigation. Its basic sensory mechanisms have long remained elusive, but now researchers reveal exactly where in the eye, the birds' control center for navigation is situated.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deep brain stimulation -- a new treatment approach in patients with multiple sclerosisA pilot study conducted by researchers from Charité's NeuroCure Cluster of Excellence has shown that treatment with deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS) significantly reduces symptoms of fatigue in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Published in the current issue of the journal Neurology: Neuroimmunology & Neuroinflammation, results from this research suggest that TMS is a safe option
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Highly efficient ammonia synthesis catalyst developedResearchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have discovered that a catalyst of calcium amide with a small amount of added barium with ruthenium nanoparticles immobilized onto it can synthesize ammonia at an efficiency 100 times greater than that of conventional ruthenium catalysts at low temperatures below 300ºC. The performance of this catalyst is also several times higher when compared to iron
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chemists develop a simple, easy-to-use method to break down pollutants in waterChemists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg have found out how stubborn pollutants in water can be disintegrated easily and cost effectively. To do so researchers only need a green LED light, a catalyst and vitamin C. In this way, they can produce special types of electrons that reliably destroy the pollutants in the water. Until now, complex laser systems were required for this. The s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HKBU breakthrough in macromolecular machines for controlled drug delivHKBU scholars demonstrated the design and synthesis of a smart globular macromolecular machine vehicle for actively controlled cancer drug delivery, which would enhance the drug's efficacy.
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The Guardian's Science Weekly
Culture and the mind: a new theory of human intelligence – Science Weekly podcastWhat role might culture play in intelligence? And how does human culture differ from culture found in other animals? Nicola Davis explores our evolutionary history
7h
Live Science
No, Space X's Falcon Heavy Has Not Passed Mars AlreadyA tweet from Elon Musk may have been a little fuzzy on the rocket's whereabouts.
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New on MIT Technology Review
AI-controlled brain implants help improve people’s memory
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Science : NPR
Our Ancestors, Elon Musk And The First Car In SpaceMusk's successful rocket launch is a step on the ambitious road to Mars; as with our adventurous ancestors, where we might go seems to be limited only by our imagination, says Marcelo Gleiser. (Image credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain training for old dogs: Could touchscreen games be the Sudoku of man's best friend?Spoiling old dogs in their twilight years by retiring them to the sofa and forgiving them their stubbornness or disobedience, doesn't do our four-legged friends any good. Regular brain training and lifelong learning create positive emotions and can slow down mental deterioration in old age. Physical limitations, however, often do not allow the same sort of training as used in young dogs. Cognitive
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists successfully test new, safer titanium plate for bone tissue repairFor the first time, patented titanium fiber plates developed by Japanese engineers for medical use were put to the test in an animal model.Researchers from Shinshu University found that, unlike conventional plates, the titanium fiber plates do not cause bone embrittlement after close contact with the bone for prolonged periods. This could eliminate the need for plate extraction and the associate s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Male susceptibility to autism linked to male hormones in early-stage brain developmentExposure to androgens (male hormones) during brain development alters genes related to autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a new study published in Biological Psychiatry. Using male human cells, researchers at the University of Strasbourg, France, identified key genes that are regulated by testosterone and that contribute to the risk for autism, generating important insight into how male
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wage increases do not have a persistent effect on job satisfactionAfter a wage increase, people tend to be more satisfied with their jobs -- and even more so when what they have gained exceeds the wage increases of their colleagues. Yet, this effect on job satisfaction is not persistent. Two economists from University of Basel reported these findings in a study recently published in the Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery paves way for treatment to prevent blood vessel damageThe discovery of a previously unknown interaction between proteins could provide a breakthrough in the prevention of damage to healthy blood vessels.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Global dental lights market expected to reach $960 million by 2026Dental lights are used to deliver high quality illumination to dentists and provide a true image with a reduced shadow white light that helps them match shades, identify various details and also helps them in diagnosing tissues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Multiple chronic diseases leave patients with adversely high costsCurrent strategies for treating patients with several chronic diseases are putting an unnecessary financial burden on countries' health systems and individuals, a global study has found. Experts say that the current clinical practice of tackling each disease in isolation may lead to the prescription of unnecessary medicines, resulting in patient expenses that are disproportionate to the number of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Versatile sensor against tumor initiating cellsThe IBS researchers developed the first fluorescent sensor to visualize TICs. Functional in lung, central nervous system, melanoma, breast, renal, ovarian, colon, and prostate cancer cell cultures, this could become a useful tool for biopsy-free post-treatment assessment and anti-TIC drug development.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Acute coronary syndromes -- Did prasugrel & ticagrelor offer same benefits as clopidogrel?In patients presenting with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) either with or without ST-segment elevation MI (STEMI and NSTEMI), dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) is recommended for at least 1 year independently of whether revascularization is performed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Geography matters: Prescribing patterns for opioids in dermatologyStudy suggests opioid prescribing isn't widespread among dermatologists, but opportunities exist in concentrated areas to reduce use.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breast cancer patients often mispredict well-being after mastectomyWomen with breast cancer who underwent a mastectomy without breast reconstruction generally underestimated their future quality of life, while those who had immediate reconstruction generally overestimated it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Intense laser experiments provide first evidence that light can stop electronsBy hitting electrons with an ultra-intense laser, researchers have revealed dynamics that go beyond 'classical' physics and hint at quantum effects.
7h
The Atlantic
Who to Watch at the Winter OlympicsEditor’s Note: Find all of The Atlantic ’s Winter Olympics 2018 coverage here . On Friday, the 2018 Winter Olympics opening ceremony will get underway in Pyeongchang, South Korea. For every athlete involved, the arrival of the Games marks the realization of a lifelong dream, the payoff for countless hours of training and sacrifice. For the nations represented, the Games are a show of goodwill and
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The Atlantic
Where Did All the Advertising Jobs Go?They are everywhere. Singing jingles in living rooms. Lining phone screens. Inhabiting the voices of podcast hosts. Looming like Dr. T.J. Eckleburg from highway billboards. They are ads. But while the work of stealing attention might seem infinitely employable, something strange is happening behind the scenes of America’s most inescapable industry. For the first time on record, the number of adve
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technology could reduce spread of antibiotic resistance genes through compostScientists at the University of York have found a way to remove antibiotic resistant genes from industrial compost, which could prevent them entering the food chain.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Light controls two-atom quantum computationScientists have demonstrated mathematical operations with a quantum gate between two trapped atoms that is mediated by photons.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain training for old dogs: Could touchscreen games become the Sudoku of man’s best friend?Spoiling old dogs in their twilight years by retiring them to the sofa and forgiving them their stubbornness or disobedience, doesn’t do our four-legged friends any good. Regular brain training and lifelong learning create positive emotions and can slow down mental deterioration in old age. Physical limitations, however, often do not allow the same sort of training as used in young dogs. In a new
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shoals of sticklebacks differ in their collective personalitiesResearch has revealed that, among schooling fish, groups can have different collective personalities, with some shoals sticking closer together, being better coordinated, and showing clearer leadership than others.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A blueprint for future blood-nerve barrier and peripheral nerve disease researchResearchers have detailed, for the first time, the normal human transcriptome of the blood-nerve barrier. This barrier -- a tight covering of endothelial cells -- maintains the microenvironment of peripheral nerves. Knowledge of the transcriptome will aid research in peripheral nerve disease.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Five ingenious ways snakes manipulate their bodies to hunt and surviveDo a quick search for "snakes" in the news and you'll find people terrified, bitten or, sadly, killed by these creatures. Many of us fear their slithering ways and researchers have found evidence which suggests that humans have evolved a tendency to spot snakes more easily than other animals.
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Science | The Guardian
Why Elon Musk’s SpaceX launch is utterly depressing | Nathan RobinsonElon Musk is right: silly and fun things are important. But some of them are an indefensible waste of resources On Wednesday, two things happened. In Syria, 80 people were killed by government airstrikes. Meanwhile, in Florida, Elon Musk fired a sports car into space. Guess which story has dominated mainstream news sites? The much-anticipated launch of Musk’s Falcon Heavy rocket, the most powerfu
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Live Science
Norovirus Sickens Olympic Security Guards Days Before Opening CeremonyThere's an added challenge at the 2018 Winter Olympics, according to news reports: An outbreak of norovirus.
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Futurity.org
How to avoid spreading the flu at workWorkplaces remain hotbed of possible flu contagion, despite recommendations that people get their vaccinations. Even an ordinary seasonal flu epidemic will still kill several thousand people every year in the US alone. This year’s flu, which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates caused more than 125,000 illnesses since the beginning of the season, shows no sign of abating. Nell
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Feed: All Latest
Photos: Meet the World's Most Hardcore LARPersThis is what it looks like to take Live Action Role Playing to the next level.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How architecture can create dignity for all | John CaryIf architect and writer John Cary has his way, women will never need to stand in pointlessly long bathroom lines again. Lines like these are representative of a more serious issue, Cary says: the lack of diversity in design that leads to thoughtless, compassionless spaces. Design has a unique ability to dignify and make people feel valued, respected, honored and seen -- but the flip side is also t
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Humans are overloading the world’s freshwater bodies with phosphorusHuman activities are driving phosphorus levels in the world’s lakes and other freshwater bodies to a critical point.
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The Atlantic
Trump Likely Can't Avoid Talking to MuellerEarlier this week, after weeks of rumblings about Donald Trump speaking to Special Counsel Robert Mueller, The New York Times reported that the president’s lawyers are urging him not to testify to Mueller. “His lawyers are concerned that the president, who has a history of making false statements and contradicting himself, could be charged with lying to investigators,” the Times reported. That’s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technique boosts eyewitness recallNew research from a memory expert at James Cook University in Australia shows there may be a simple way to help eyewitnesses of crimes remember more about what they have seen.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sick bees eat healthierJames Cook University scientists in Queensland, Australia have shown that sick bees try to look after themselves by eating healthy food.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simple molecule could prevent, alleviate pre-diabetesRestoring levels of coenzyme Q10 (CoQ), a key molecule in energy production in cells, could overcome insulin resistance or pre-diabetes -- a precursor to type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electrons give resist layer electrical chargeLeiden physicists found a surprising interaction between electrons and a resist layer. The resist appears to charge and discharge due to incoming electrons. Publication in Physical Review Letters.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intense laser experiments provide first evidence that light can stop electronsBy hitting electrons with an ultra-intense laser, researchers have revealed dynamics that go beyond 'classical' physics and hint at quantum effects.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Giant viruses may play an intriguing role in evolution of life on EarthA virus may have influenced the evolution of multicellular life. Biologist have found a virus family that has a similar set of genes as eukaryotes, placing giant viruses in the evolutionary journey of most plants, insects, and animals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Arming CRISPR/Cas systems with enzyme that also controls translation of genetic information into proteinCRISPR/Cas systems are known as promising "gene scissors" in the genome editing of plants, animals, and microorganisms by targeting specific regions in their DNA - and perhaps they can even be used to correct genetic defects. A team of scientists have now identified an enzyme, a special pair of RNA scissors, which is involved in CRISPR/Cas systems and the correct regulation of gene expression - in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chemists make bicycle-like molecular driveMolecular cars have been known for some time, but scientists have now synthesized molecules that operate like the pedals of a bicycle. Fueled by light, the molecules can be used as molecular switches that pave the way for the design of functional molecular systems effective under severe spatial restrictions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Type-2 diabetes: Insulin held up in trafficIn a new study, researchers show why insulin secretion is not working properly in patients suffering from type-2 diabetes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Searching for targeted treatments for inflammatory diseasesInflammatory diseases such as Crohn's disease and multiple sclerosis have been linked to faults in a critical immune pathway that enables inflammation to continue unchecked. Researchers have shed new light on how this immune response is controlled, and hope it could lead to new drugs for people with these chronic diseases.
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Futurity.org
Terahertz signals don’t lose much data while bouncing off wallsTerahertz frequency data links can bounce off walls without dropping too much data, new research shows. The results are good news for the possibility of future terahertz wireless data networks, which have the potential to carry many times more data than current networks. Today’s cellular networks and WiFi systems rely on microwave radiation to carry data, but the demand for more and more bandwidt
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Science : NPR
Linguists Discover Previously Unidentified Language In MalaysiaSwedish researchers were studying one rare language in Southeast Asia, when they discovered a group of 280 resettled people speaking a different language, never observed or documented before. (Image credit: Niclas Burenhult/Lund University)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists find strong link between climate change and wildfiresWildfires in western states have been increasing in number and severity over the past few decades. They cause severe destruction to property, sometimes harm or kill people, and cost a lot of money to local and state governments. One recent wildfire in the news, the Thomas Fire in California, has burned through more than 379 square miles and incurred damages greater than $110.2 million. Preventing
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Space sports car now flying toward asteroid belt beyond MarsElon Musk SpaceXThe world's first space sports car is cruising toward the asteroid belt, well beyond Mars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Baby, it's cold in there: Explorers test endurance in PolandUsing a group of explorers, scientists are testing the endurance of humans and equipment in temperatures around minus 50 degrees Celsius (minus 58 Fahrenheit) at a laboratory in southern Poland.
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Ingeniøren
Asfaltveje skal kunne repareres uden at stoppe trafikkenMed et ligninbaseret bindemiddel skulle det blive lettere at reparere asfaltveje og at undgå at lukke dem i længere tid ad gangen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the digitalisation of everything is making us more lonelyThe UK government recently appointed its first minister of loneliness. The move came in response to increasing concern of a loneliness epidemic sweeping Western society.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Kubik on Space StationA miniaturised laboratory inside the orbital laboratory that is ESA's Columbus module, this 40 cm cube has been one of its quiet scientific triumphs.
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Science | The Guardian
How dangerous is Jordan B Peterson, the rightwing professor who 'hit a hornets' nest'?Since his confrontation with Cathy Newman, the Canadian academic’s book has become a bestseller. But his arguments are riddled with ‘pseudo-facts’ and conspiracy theories The Canadian psychology professor and culture warrior Jordan B Peterson could not have hoped for better publicity than his recent encounter with Cathy Newman on Channel 4 News . The more Newman inaccurately paraphrased his belie
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Ingeniøren
Spildevand løber ud i Limfjorden i AalborgEn vandprøve ved badebroen ved Lindholm Strandpark i Aalborg viser, at der løber spildevand ud i Limfjorden.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rail industry says key safety technology not due until 2020The railroad industry is playing down expectations that a safety technology that could have prevented recent deadly train crashes will be in operation across the United States by the end of the year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Los Angeles Times sold to local billionaire for $500 million (Update)A billionaire doctor struck a $500 million deal Wednesday to buy the Los Angeles Times, ending the paper's quarrelsome relationship with its Chicago-based corporate overseers and bringing it under local ownership for the first time in 18 years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why some fireflies become femme fatales in their race for survivalFireflies are the flashy stars of the insect world. At night, you can see them coming because each little bug shines like a lamp – and, appropriately, they belong to the beetle family Lampyridae.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Are traffic-clogged U.S. cities ready for congestion pricing?New York is the latest city to contemplate congestion pricing as a way to deal with traffic problems. This strategy, which requires motorists to pay fees for driving into city centers during busy periods, is a rarity in urban public policy: a measure that works and is cost-effective.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A step toward sensitive and fast gluten detectionFor people with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivities, the number of food options in the stores is growing. But current tests for gluten are not finding all of the substance in foods, resulting in some products being labeled "gluten free" when they really aren't. Now researchers reporting in ACS Sensors say they have developed a fast gluten detector that has the potential to detect and quantify
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A genetic trigger adds branches to plants, could boost crop yieldsWhen it comes to agriculture from branched plants, such as apple trees, the more branches that bear fruit, the better. But in the real world, there's a limit to the number of branches that plants make—a gene tends to put the brakes on this splitting process called shoot branching. Today in ACS Central Science, researchers reveal a chemical that can reverse this limitation, possibly leading to impr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Light controls two-atom quantum computationSome powerful rulers of the world may dream of the possibility to get in touch with their colleagues on different continents unnoticed by friends or foes. Someday, new quantum technologies could allow for making these wishes come true. Physicists around the world are working on the realization of large scale quantum networks in which single light quanta transfer (secret) quantum information to sta
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists make bicycle-like molecular driveMolecular cars have been known for some time, but scientists from the University of Amsterdam's Van 't Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences (HIMS) and the University of Murcia have now synthesized molecules that operate like the pedals of a bicycle. Fueled by light, the molecules can be used as molecular switches that pave the way for the design of functional molecular systems effective under sev
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Scientific American Content: Global
Bacterial "Tape Recorder" Could Keep Tabs on Bodily FunctionsScientists have used CRISPR to turn microbes into tiny recording devices -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News
Pre-life molecules found floating in nearby galaxyWe’ve seen signs of the most complex molecules ever detected outside our galaxy in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a fairly primitive galaxy 160,000 light years away
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Paris flooding harks back to one of the great breakthroughs in hydrologyThe city of Paris was recently on high flood alert after a deluge of rain. Parisians looked on with increasing concern as the River Seine continued to rise, the water levels creeping up the legs of the Zouave statue on the Pont d'Alma bridge in central Paris, which has served as an unofficial flood gauge since the devastating 1910 floods in the city. Thankfully, the immediate threat to Paris appea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More prosperous teachers have no impact on the quality of educationMore than 60% of the national education budget in Indonesia is used to improve teachers' welfare. The budget is used in almost one hundred percent of all regions in the country. However, raising salaries and providing teacher allowances do not necessarily improve the quality of learning or the number of school graduates.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the continent's languages can unlock the potential of young AfricansAfrica is the home of 2144 languages. Oddly, most development theoreticians consider this a barrier to economic and social growth. Sociolinguists and educationists know better: the African continent's multilingualism is a powerful resource.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to use critical thinking to spot false climate claimsMuch of the public discussion about climate science consists of a stream of assertions. The climate is changing or it isn't; carbon dioxide causes global warming or it doesn't; humans are partly responsible or they are not; scientists have a rigorous process of peer review or they don't, and so on.
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Feed: All Latest
With AI, Your Apple Watch Could Flag Signs of DiabetesApple Heart CardiogramThe connection between heart rate and diabetes is poorly understood. But that’s not stopping a deep learning tool from finding one in your wearables data.
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cognitive science
A brain implant improved memory. The device works like a pacemaker, sending electrical pulses to aid the brain when it is struggling to store new information, but remaining quiet when it senses that the brain is functioning well.submitted by /u/SophiaDevetzi [link] [comments]
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Futurity.org
These 3 steps can make colon surgery saferColon operations come with special risks because the colon teems with microbes that can cause havoc if they escape during or after surgery. But a new study points to a way to reduce the risk of infections after colectomies for the hundreds of thousands of Americans who have such operations each year because of cancer, polyps, diverticulitis, or inflammatory bowel disease. The approach was associa
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rainforest collapse 307 million years ago impacted the evolution of early land vertebratesResearchers have discovered that the mass extinction seen in plant species caused by the onset of a drier climate 307 million years ago led to extinctions of some groups of tetrapods, the first vertebrates to live on land, but allowed others to expand across the globe.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Symptoms of alcoholism make taking medication to treat the disease more difficultSymptoms of alcoholism make it more difficult for some people to regularly take the prescription drug naltrexone, which could help treat their disease, a researcher has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using shark scales to design better drones, planes, and wind turbinesA team of evolutionary biologists and engineers have demonstrated a new structure inspired by shark skin that could improve the aerodynamic performance of planes, wind turbines, drones, and cars. The research sheds light on a decades-old mystery about sharkskin.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New light shed on antibiotics produced by antsAnts, like humans, deal with disease. To deal with the bacteria that cause some of these diseases, some ants produce their own antibiotics. A new comparative study identified some ant species that make use of powerful antimicrobial agents -- but found that 40 percent of ant species tested didn't appear to produce antibiotics. The study has applications regarding the search for new antibiotics that
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Touchscreen games for dog brain trainingSpoiling old dogs in their twilight years by retiring them to the sofa and forgiving them their stubbornness or disobedience, doesn't do our four-legged friends any good. Regular brain training and lifelong learning create positive emotions and can slow down mental deterioration in old age. Physical limitations, however, often do not allow the same sort of training as used in young dogs. In a new
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rapid detection and recovery—the science of hunting meteoritesAt 8:10 p.m. on Jan. 16, hundreds of people in Michigan reported the bright glow of a meteor streaking through the sky, rattling windows as it broke the sound barrier. The meteor then broke apart in the Earth's atmosphere, and its pieces rained quietly to the ground.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
3-D printing breakthrough for lightweight syntactic foams could help submarines dive deeperA team of materials scientists at NYU Tandon School of Engineering has developed the first process to 3-D print components of syntactic foam—extremely strong and lightweight composites used in vehicles, airplanes, and ships. Their breakthrough holds particular promise for submarines because it will enable manufacturers to print components with complex shapes capable of surviving stresses at greate
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
This is why you won't be able to swat that flySummer in Australia is defined by sport, but the most-played sport isn't cricket or tennis – it's fly swatting. Have you ever tried to swat a fly? You can swipe, slap, slash or swoosh your hands at these sometimes-annoying backyard pests and almost always miss.
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Dagens Medicin
Læger vil være med til at gennemgå politianmeldelserEkspertlæger bør deltage i gennemgang af politianmeldelser, mener Lægeforeningen.
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New on MIT Technology Review
SpaceX’s monster rocket success will make big launches affordable
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Dagens Medicin
Grove jokes belaster lægers arbejdsmiljøHver tiende overlæge oplever mobning på arbejdspladsen. Det skyldes bl.a. grove jokes på hospitalerne, viser ny forskning.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Hendra vaccine has no effect on racehorse performanceVaccination against the deadly Hendra virus in horses does not reduce their racing performance, according to new research published in the Australian Veterinary Journal.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Versatile sensor against tumor initiating cellsMost cancer deaths are caused by recurrent or metastatic tumors. Conventional therapies target rapidly dividing tumor cells, but are unable to eradicate the highly chemoresistant tumor initiating cells (TICs), ultimately responsible for relapse and spreading of the tumors in other parts of the body. A team of researchers at the Center for Self-assembly and Complexity, within the Institute for Basi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Phosphate rock an effective fertilizer in KenyaFarming in western Kenya is challenging, to put it mildly. Although farmers can cycle two full crops in a single year, extremely poor soils and expensive traditional fertilizers, such as triple superphosphate (TSP), keep yields low. But results of a new University of Illinois study offer Kenyan farmers hope in the form of phosphate rock.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dive into the world of moleculesBrand new technology in the classroom: students immerse themselves in a "mixed reality" and use HoloLens glasses to learn a fundamental principle of proteins.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Equipping CRISPR/Cas9 with an enzyme that controls translation of genetic information into proteinCRISPR/Cas systems are known as promising "gene scissors," editing the genomes of plants, animals and microorganisms by targeting specific regions in their DNA. They might also be used to correct genetic defects. A team of scientists led by Juliane Behler and Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Hess from the University of Freiburg have now identified an enzyme that functions as a pair of RNA scissors involved in C
9h
The Atlantic
The Trumping of the FBIPresident Trump and his allies are claiming that the memo released by House Intelligence Committee Chair Devin Nunes proves that the federal investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election is a partisan witch hunt motivated by a fraudulent document produced by an anti-Trump source. Trump, who tweeted that he was “vindicated” by the memo, also shared a few lines from a Wall Street Jou
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Science | The Guardian
Mutant, all-female crayfish spreading rapidly through Europe can clone itselfGenome study finds the invasive clonal freshwater crayfish is descended from a single female and reproduces without males A voracious pest that mutated in a German aquarium and is marching around the world without the need for sexual reproduction may sound like science fiction, but a genetic study has revealed that a rapidly spreading all-female army of crayfish is descended from a single female
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Viden
DTU-direktør om SpaceX-raket: Ingeniørkunst i kosmisk klasseEfter flere udsættelser steg SpaceXs hidtil største raket endelig til vejrs i går. Det vækker stor begejstring hos danske forskere.
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Popular Science
How to prevent your social media accounts from oversharingDIY Protect your privacy. Don't want your social media accounts to broadcast your presence? Here's how to turn off automatic sharing and keep your updates to a minimum.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to prevent cities from drying upIn December 2017, Dr Seona Candy drove through the vineyards of the Franschhoek Valley near Cape Town towards the banks of the Sonderend River. In the late 1970s, the waterway was dammed to create the biggest reservoir in South Africa's Western Cape. Behind the thick walls of the Theewaterskloof Dam lay the capacity to hold 480 million cubic metres of water, nearly half of Cape Town's water supply
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Driverless cars could create new jobs in a welcome boost to Australia's motor industryThe race to market for widespread driverless cars may be on, but that doesn't mean we're anywhere near a deployable reality. Much of the initial hype has settled down, and the claims made by manufacturers and startups with regards to timelines have moderated.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Doctors played a role in ideas about racial differences, book saysSlavery and racism played their roles in planting beliefs about race and racial difference, but so did medicine, says the author of a new book.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wheat gluten found to restore bonds in brittle human hairA team of researchers from Jiangnan University in China and the University of Nebraska in the U.S. has found that integrating wheat gluten into a shampoo helps restore bonds, making hair less brittle. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the team describes their experiments with wheat gluten and hair and what they found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Starfish on ocean floor found to have well developed eyesA team of researchers from the University of Copenhagen and the Greenland Institute of Natural Resources has found that starfish living in the dark on the ocean floor have eyes on their arms that are similar to other starfish living near shore. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes their study of the unique sea creatures and what they learned about sta
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What causes ionic wind?The phenomenon of ionic wind has been known about for centuries: by applying a voltage to a pair of electrodes, electrons are stripped off nearby air molecules, and the ionized air collides with neutral air molecules as it moves from one electrode to the other. The effect is easy enough to produce that it often appears at science fairs, and may even have a future in spacecraft propulsion. However,
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Dagens Medicin
Akupunktur virker ikke
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The robots will see you nowFor more than a decade, biomimetic robots have been deployed alongside live animals to better understand the drivers of animal behavior, including social cues, fear, leadership, and even courtship. The encounters have always been unidirectional; the animals observe and respond to the robots. But in the lab of Maurizio Porfiri, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the NYU Tandon S
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Crowd workers, AI make conversational agents smarterConversational agents such as Siri, Alexa and Cortana are great at giving you the weather, but are flummoxed when asked for unusual information, or follow-up questions. By adding humans to the loop, Carnegie Mellon University researchers have created a conversational agent that is tough to stump. It's not the first chatbot to use human brainpower to answer a broad range of questions. What sets it
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Small molecule could make a big difference for arthritis patientsScientists at the Keck School of Medicine of USC have discovered a molecule that enhances cartilage regeneration and decreases inflammation.
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Feed: All Latest
Inside NBC’s Social Media Strategy for the 2018 Winter Olympics2018 Winter OlympicsThe days of #NBCFail are over—the network is planning to keep the PyeongChang video pipe flowing free and strong.
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Feed: All Latest
The AW609 Is a V-22 Osprey-Inspired Private PlaneLeonardo's AW609 is a VTOL aircraft meant for the civilian market.
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Feed: All Latest
Biopunks are Pushing the Limits With Implants and DIY DrugsSurgically installed vibrator or earthquake-sensing foot sensors, anyone?
10h
Ingeniøren
Datatilsynet kritiserer Skat: Gav borgeres identitet i bytte for et CPR-nummerEndnu engang får Skats TastSelv-service kritik for mangelfuld beskyttelse af persondata.
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The Scientist RSS
How Toxic is the Worlds Most Popular Herbicide Roundup?Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Roundup, is designed to be toxic to plants, but scientists observe some untoward effects on animals in the lab.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Sea Turtle RescueBiologists in Florida rounded up more than 1,000 sea turtles when they were threatened by a cold snap in January.
10h
The Scientist RSS
Legionnaires Outbreak in Flint Linked to Low Chlorine Levels in WaterNew evidence supports the idea that a drop in concentrations of the disinfectant during the town's water crisis caused several deaths and severe illness.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
Chimps, Horses, Kangaroos and Even Bees Can Be Righties or LeftiesA surprising number of animals exhibit handedness—bees included -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org
$1 test strips find fentanyl in street drugsLow-price test strips that accurately detect fentanyl in street drugs could potentially help opioid abusers avoid fatal overdoses, a new study shows. The cost of the strips is about $1 each. “We are at a pivotal moment in the overdose epidemic, and we need to embrace the full range of interventions that can save lives,” says Susan Sherman, professor of health, behavior, and society at Johns Hopki
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New Scientist - News
I got DNA tested to see if I would pass on diseases to my kidsMany doctors now suggest people consider getting their DNA checked for genetic diseases before starting a family. Alice Klein decided to take the test
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Plastic bottle scheme that could help clean the oceansAs the scale of plastic pollution in the world's oceans becomes ever more apparent, could bottle deposit schemes help turn the tide?
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Hedgehog numbers 'down by half', warn wildlife groupsHedgehogs are continuing to decline in the UK, particularly in rural areas, according to a new report.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
UK 'could adopt' Norway bottle recycling systemA Scandinavian deposit-based system for recycling bottles is thought likely to be adopted in the UK.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
The story of Elon Musk rocket launchThe rocket's payload is Elon Musk's own Tesla, and two of the three rocket segments have landed.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
The oddities sent into spaceA car, a golf ball, a pie... and other items items dispatched on cosmic journeys over the years.
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Dagens Medicin
Medicinsk Enhed på Hvidovre Hospital får ny ledende overlægeI midten af februar tiltræder Steen Andersen som ledende overlæge på Medicinsk Enhed. En stilling han ser frem til at påbegynde.
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Ingeniøren
Dansk landbrug om MRSA: Tiden er ikke rigtig til støvundersøgelserStatens Serum Institut vil gerne undersøge, om husdyr-MRSA spredes gennem f.eks. luften. Landmændenes hovedfokus er reduktion af antibiotikabrugen på svinefarmene, ligesom man afventer forskellige andre MRSA-undersøgelser.
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Dagens Medicin
Lovgivning spænder ben for samarbejde inden for psykiatrienDet ville være nemmere, hvis det tværsektorielle samarbejde kunne tage udgangspunkt i borgerens behov frem for lovgivningen, der kræver et klart myndighedsansvar uden vekslen, mener ledere fra Psykiatriens Hus i Silkeborg.
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Scientific American Content: Global
To Protect Ocean Life, Marine Reserves Have to Be Redrawn Based on ScienceBig marine reserves look good on maps, but it takes tough rules close to shore to improve fisheries and biodiversity -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science
Climate scientists are working on a way to predict snow eight months in advanceScience The key: first, model hurricanes. For Sarah Kapnick, Atlantic hurricanes and California snowstorms aren’t far apart.
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Science-Based Medicine
What Not To Write in an E-mail to SBMWhat to do, and what not to do, when sending a critical e-mail to SBM or elsewhere – assuming you want to be taken seriously.
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Dagens Medicin
Ny lægefaglig direktør til Regionshospitalet HorsensRegion Midtjylland har udnævnt overlæge Nils Falk Bjerregaard som ny lægefaglig direktør for Regionshospitalet Horsens.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A genetic trigger adds branches to plants, could boost crop yieldsWhen it comes to agriculture from branched plants, such as apple trees, the more branches that bear fruit, the better. But in the real world, there's a limit to the number of branches that plants make -- a gene tends to put the brakes on this splitting process called shoot branching. Today in ACS Central Science, researchers reveal a chemical that can reverse this limitation, possibly leading to i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A step toward sensitive and fast gluten detectionFor people with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivities, the number of food options in the stores is growing. But current tests for gluten are not finding all of the substance in foods, resulting in some products being labeled 'gluten free' when they really aren't. Now researchers reporting in ACS Sensors say they have developed a fast gluten detector that has the potential to detect and quantify
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Feed: All Latest
Air Gap Hacker Mordechai Guri Steals Data With Noise, Light, and MagnetsResearcher Mordechai Guri has spent the last four years exploring practically every method of stealthily siphoning data off of a disconnected computer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The IMAGE satellite's stunning returnOne-sixty-six, where are you? Oh, there you are.
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Feed: All Latest
Something's Off About This Slow-Motion Bullet VideoIt's time to do some physics-based forensics.
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Science : NPR
A Banana Grown At Subzero Temps Also Has An Edible PeelBanana crops aren't in the best shape, but new varieties could help. Japanese Mongee bananas debuted this winter, bred to be cold-resistant and pesticide-free. Plus, you can eat the peel. (Image credit: Courtesy of D&T Farm Inc.)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New life for endangered coastal lupineA rare, coastal flowering plant known as Tidestrom's lupine—threatened by native deer mice that can munch up to three-quarters of its unripe fruits under cover of an invasive beachgrass—has been given a new life with the large-scale removal of that grass, a long-term study shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Swiss mobile data of 800,000 customers is stolenA Swiss mobile phone operator says its data systems were breached late last year and the contact details of about 800,000 customers were compromised.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Police kill unarmed blacks more often, especially women, study findsBlacks, especially women, are more likely to have been unarmed when killed by police than non-blacks, and that risk appears to increase in police departments with a greater presence of non-white officers, according to a new study of nationwide data from Washington University in St. Louis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Confirming the risks of pesticide use in Burkina FasoPoor pesticide practices in Burkina Faso pose a threat to human health and the environment. An EPFL thesis has quantified this problem for the first time through an analysis of soil, water, sediment, vegetable and hair samples.
11h
The Atlantic
How Superhero Movies Became Escapist Fun AgainI n 2008, the director Christopher Nolan released The Dark Knight , the central installment of his Batman trilogy. It was a remarkably good film in a genre not known for reliably producing “serious” fare—and alas, it inevitably inspired imitators: moody, self-important capes-and-tights movies that the Hollywood studios seem only now, blessedly, to be leaving behind. From the mid-20th century onwa
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Viden
Mød manden bag genbrugsraketterne og bilen i rummetElon Musk har skabt Tesla og SpaceX, der har sendt en bil mod Mars. Se med, da DR mødte ham i 2015.
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Scientific American Content: Global
When to Worry about a BruiseBruising is a common physical symptom. What causes bruising and how do you know when a bruise is something you should worry about? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Scientist RSS
Blind Cavefish in Mexico Offer Clues to Sleep RegulationTwo studies identify a signaling pathway that contributes to the fish's sleeplessness.
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New Scientist - News
We can now read the whole genome of a fetus in the wombKnowing the ins and outs of our children's genetic secrets before they are born could help reduce the likelihood of many diseases - but could it be misused?
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New Scientist - News
Online chatter could give warning of incoming cyber attacksAn early warning system that monitors cyber-security discussions online could help prevent the next big malware outbreak
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New Scientist - News
Early Briton from 10,000 years ago had dark skin and blue eyesA genetic analysis of Cheddar Man, one of the first people to settle in Britain after the last ice age, suggests that his skin was dark
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New Scientist - News
The US agency that guards the environment is going to be hobbledScott Pruitt, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency, has talked up his mission to scale back its powers. It's so shortsighted, says Ian Graber-Stiehl
11h
Ingeniøren
Brandfare: Tusindvis af Lenovo-Thinkpads tilbagekaldesEn løs skrue på Lenovos populære bærbare Thinkpad X1 Carbon, kan sætte ild i batteriet. Nu tilbagekaldes titusindevis af bærbare computere
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Newly discovered buildings reveal clues to ancient Egyptian dynastiesThe archaeological excavation of an ancient Egyptian city at Tell Edfu in southern Egypt, led by the Oriental Institute of the University of Chicago, has discovered well-preserved settlement remains dating to an important turning point in ancient Egyptian history, when the pharaohs began to renew interest in the provincial regions in the far south of their kingdom.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA tests atomic clock for deep space navigationIn deep space, accurate timekeeping is vital to navigation, but many spacecraft lack precise timepieces on board. For 20 years, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, has been perfecting a clock. It's not a wristwatch; not something you could buy at a store. It's the Deep Space Atomic Clock (DSAC), an instrument perfect for deep space exploration.
11h
The Atlantic
In Trump's First Year, the U.S. Lost Almost 10,000 Solar JobsSince the end of the Great Recession, two things have been true of the American solar industry: It was growing like gangbusters, and basically everyone liked it. From 2010 to 2016, the number of solar jobs in the United States nearly tripled, roaring from about 93,000 to more than 260,000. In 2016 alone, the solar industry grew 17 times faster than the U.S. economy. By the end of that year, there
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research finds 52 times more online anti-ad blocking than previously thoughtThe web is only "free" because our attention is sold to the highest bidder via complex real-time auction systems, based on data-mining algorithms, that serve up ads. If you were a fan of the AMC series Mad Men, with its depiction of smartly crafted agents of persuasion, you probably hate the irritating interruptions of today's digital messaging.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hairy tongues help bats drink upAnimals have evolved all manner of adaptations to get the nutrients they need. For nectar-feeding bats, long snouts and tongues let them dip in and out of flowers while hovering in mid-air. To help the cause, their tongues are covered in tiny hairs that serve as miniature spoons to scoop and drag up the tasty sap.
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Science | The Guardian
'What a mess Brexit is becoming': your best comments todayWe look at some of the articles provoking reader conversation today, including Ireland and Brexit, Musk’s rocket launch and groundbreaking DNA analysis Ireland weighing in on the Brexit customs union debate , an article on SpaceX’s successful rocket launch and discussion on a new DNA discovery have got you talking today. To join in the conversation you can click on the links in the comments below
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mathematics explains why Crispr-Cas9 sometimes cuts the wrong DNAThe discovery of the Cas9 protein has simplified gene editing, and may even make it possible to eliminate many hereditary diseases in the near future. Using Cas9, researchers have the ability to cut DNA in a cell to correct mutated genes, or paste new pieces of genetic material into the newly opened spot. Initially, the Crispr-Cas9 system seemed to be extremely accurate. However, it is now apparen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reduced energy from the sun might occur by mid-century—now, scientists know by how muchThe sun might emit less radiation by mid-century, giving planet Earth a chance to warm a bit more slowly but not halt the trend of human-induced climate change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Widespread galactic cannibalism in Stephan's Quintet revealed by CFHTAn extremely deep multi-band optical image from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT, Hawaii. USA) casts a new light on the formation process of the famous group of 5 colliding galaxies. The image reveals structures undetected thus far, in particular a very extended red halo composed of old stars, and centered on an elliptical galaxy, NGC 7317, which had been ignored in previous studies on the
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A Bid to Solve California’s Housing Crisis Could Redraw How Cities GrowCalifornia State Senator Scott Wiener is pushing a bill that would rejigger zoning laws—and fight climate change, reduce traffic, and build a new urban future
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Feed: All Latest
How to Fix Your Facebook News FeedIt's easy to feel beholden to the Facebook's algorithm tweaks, but there are plenty of ways to customize your experience.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two small asteroids safely pass Earth this weekTwo small asteroids recently discovered by astronomers at the NASA-funded Catalina Sky Survey (CSS) near Tucson, Arizona, are safely passing by Earth within one lunar distance this week.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Iberian Peninsula rodents migrated due to climate change twelve million years agoAccording to an investigation led by the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), the oldest studied rodent fauna that inhabited the Iberian Peninsula 12 million years ago progressively shifted north toward humid environments to survive climate change that caused prominent dry and cold environments in central Iberia.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
40-year controversy in solid-state physics resolvedAn international team at BESSY II headed by Prof. Oliver Rader has shown that the puzzling properties of samarium hexaboride do not stem from the material being a topological insulator, as was previously proposed. Theoretical and initial experimental work had indicated that this material, which becomes a Kondo insulator at very low temperatures, also possessed the properties of a topological insul
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Liquid crystal molecules form nano ringsAt DESY's X-ray source PETRA III, scientists have investigated an intriguing form of self-assembly in liquid crystals: When the liquid crystals are filled into cylindrical nanopores and heated, their molecules form ordered rings as they cool—a condition that otherwise does not occur naturally in the material. This behavior enables nanomaterials with new optical and electrical properties, as the te
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists make it possible to rank the risk of resistance genesA new study published in Nature Communications will help to predict antibiotic resistance evolution and thus guide future drug development. The genes that equip bacteria with resistance to clinically used antibiotics have been found in many natural environments. Nevertheless, a functional overview of the resistance genes found in common human bacterial pathogens has been missing so far.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Scientists are tracking how the flu moves through a college campusResearchers are following the spread of viruses and illness among students in a cluster of University of Maryland dorms to learn more about how the bugs infect.
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The Atlantic
How to Survive Being Swallowed by Another AnimalIn the 1997 movie Anaconda , there are, to put it mildly, a few scientific inaccuracies. Chief among them: Anacondas do not regurgitate their still-living prey to experience the thrill of a second kill, as the movie’s snake does with Jon Voight . They will sometimes puke up a meal, but since they constrict their victims before swallowing, the expelled individual would be very much dead. But some
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The Atlantic
The New Tax Law’s Subtle Subversion of Public SchoolsThis story was updated on February 7, 2018. American public schools have long been, and remain, deeply unequal. At the most dilapidated and underperforming schools, teachers are blamed for stagnant graduation rates, students are derided for low tests scores, and parents are chastised for not being involved. Too often, however, scrutiny of these schools’ performance doesn’t take into account the s
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Scientific American Content: Global
NASA Should Start Funding SETI AgainThe search for extraterrestrial intelligence should be a part of the agency’s Astrobiology mission—but thanks to a 1992 law, it’s not -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
New on MIT Technology Review
A new DNA test will look for 190 diseases in your newborn’s genetic codeBut not all parents may want to know the results.
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Dagens Medicin
PLO godkender modstræbende gratis HPV-vaccine til homoseksuelle drengePraktiserende Lægers Organisation siger modstræbende ja til, at læger gratis giver unge drenge HPV-vaccination. PLO mener, det diskriminerer heteroseksuelle drenge og frygter, at de vaccinerede drenge udstilles som homoseksuelle, før de har styr på deres seksualitet.
12h
The Atlantic
House Democrats Turn on One of Their OwnRepresentative Dan Lipinski is a rare find in Congress these days: an anti-abortion Democrat who voted against the Affordable Care Act. Of the 34 Democrats who broke with the party on that most consequential vote eight years ago, just three remain in office. And none have had it quite so easy as Lipinski, a low-key former college professor who in 2005 inherited a Chicago-area House seat that his
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Dagens Medicin
Nye lægepraksisser skal afhjælpe lægemangel i HovedstadenDet forventes i aften, at Region Hovedstaden endeligt beslutter at oprette syv nye lægepraksisser i udvalgte hovedstadskommuner for at undgå større lægemangel.
12h
Ingeniøren
Tusindvis af Android-enheder ramt af ny malwareKinesiske sikkerhedsforskere advarer mod en ny type malware, der selv spreder sig på netværk ved hjælp af port 5555, der ellers ofte står lukket.
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Ingeniøren
DTU Space: Falcon Heavy overpræsterede i gårVerdens største raket kom længere på brændstoffet end planlagt og viste også, at den kan genstarte i ekstremt miljø efter timers pause.
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Science | The Guardian
Adventures in brain-hacking: how an electrical stimulator boosted my IQFrom the smart drug modafinil to oxygen chambers, interest in cognitive enhancement is growing. But can it actually make you cleverer? I tried to find out People have always sought advantages over their rivals. But trying to improve intelligence as a way to do it has been off-limits. An education can be bought, but ability? You either had it or you didn’t. Now a new science called cognitive enhan
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The Atlantic
The Populist Right's Elitist Approach to Surveillance AbusesOne persistent critique of Republicans holds that they are hypervigilant about protecting the powerful, yet blind or unresponsive to injustices suffered by most Americans. At times, the critique is unfair; but it does describe the GOP’s posture toward Donald Trump versus most everyone else who deals with the FBI or U.S. intelligence. President Trump gets the benefit of hyper-vigilance. In the tel
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Live Science
Russia at the Winter Olympics: Decision to Ban Some Athletes Changes Yet AgainMore than a dozen Russian athletes who recently had their lifetime bans from the Olympics overturned may not be allowed to compete in this year's Winter Olympics after all.
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Live Science
That Really Is a Live Owl's Eyeball, Seen Through Its EarSome say that eyes are the windows to the soul. But in some owls, the ears are windows to the animals' eyeballs.
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Live Science
Here's How Many Americans Now Have HerpesHerpes infections have declined in the United States in recent years, according to a new report.
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Live Science
Starfish Can See You … with Their Arm-EyesIf you were to look at this little, funky starfish, there's a chance the well-armed sea creature would look back at you, with up to 50 eyes!
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bayesian model selection shows extremely polarized behavior when the models are wrongScientists from University College London (UCL) and the Academy of Mathematics and Systems Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS, AMSS), have reported progress in understanding problems associated with Bayesian model selection. The research suggests that the Bayesian method tends to produce very high-posterior probabilities for estimated evolutionary trees even if the trees are clearly wrong,
12h
The Atlantic
Notre Dame Switches Its Position on Birth-Control Coverage—AgainUpdated on February 7 at 8:40 a.m. EST Notre Dame has decided to ban “abortion-inducing drugs” from third-party-provided insurance plans. It will also begin providing coverage for “simple contraceptives” in the university plan. * The move was announced in a letter from its president, Father John Jenkins, to the university community on Wednesday. It was not immediately clear which drugs the ban en
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sea ice algae blooms in the darkResearchers from Aarhus University have measured a new world record: Small ice algae on the underside of the Arctic sea ice live and grow at a light level corresponding to only 0.02 percent of the light at the surface of the ice. Algae are the primary component of the Arctic food web and produce food far earlier in the year than previously thought.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Optical ceramic meets metal-organic frameworksCeramic, a kind of poly-crystalline monolith sintered by inorganic, non-metallic crystallites, is normally opaque due to defects, voids and birefringence. Eliminating the inner light scatter creates transparent or optical ceramics.
13h
Ingeniøren
Nordhavn får landets kraftigste oplader til elbilerDanmarks første 150 kW oplader til elbiler er netop åbnet i den nye bydel Nordhavn i København. Endnu er der ingen biler på det danske marked, som kan udnytte alle 150 kW.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mistake in fisheries statistics shows false increase in catchesCountries' improvements to their fisheries statistics have been contributing to the false impression that humanity is getting more and more fish from the ocean when, in reality, global marine catches have been declining on average by around 1.2 million tonnes per year since 1996.
13h
Ingeniøren
Ozonlag svækkes over jordens mest befolkede områderOzonhullet er ved at lukke, men det er et resultat af, at ozon i højere grad bevæger sig mod polerne. Det efterlader milliarder af planetens indbyggere med et svækket ozonlag, viser forskning.
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Cheddar Man: DNA shows early Briton had dark skinScientists put a face to Cheddar Man, Britain's oldest complete skeleton from 10,000 years ago.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Japan's SoftBank prepares listing of mobile unitJapanese telecoms giant SoftBank on Wednesday said it had begun preparing to list its mobile unit in a move reports said could raise up to $18 billion, making it one of the country's biggest ever initial public offerings.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chinese police don high-tech glasses to nab suspectsChinese police are sporting high-tech sunglasses that can spot suspects in a crowded train station, the newest use of facial recognition technology that has drawn concerns among human rights groups.
14h
Science : NPR
Why #MeToo Happened In 2017Why did the #MeToo movement take off recently and not decades ago? The story of a playwright who was publicly accused of sexual misconduct in the 1990s and again in 2017 offers some clues. (Image credit: Courtesy of Jana Mestecky)
14h
Dagens Medicin
PLO-formand på rundrejse for at sikre bedst muligt klyngesamarbejdeDe praktiserende lægers formand, Christian Freitag, er på rundrejse i alle landets fem regioner for at indsamle erfaringer og forventninger til det nye klyngesamarbejde, der officielt begynder 1. april.
14h
Science | The Guardian
Timelapse of Elon Musk's dummy astronaut orbiting Earth in a Tesla – videoElon Musk's Starman can be seen sitting in $100,000 Tesla Roadster navigating Earth. Musk's plan is for the car, with the message 'don't panic' on the dashboard and David Bowie playing through the speakers, to cruise through high-energy radiation belts that circuit the planet, towards deep space Space oddity: how Elon Musk and SpaceX sent a car towards Mars Continue reading...
14h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Mobning og hån er hverdag blandt læger og sygeplejerskerMobning og hån er hverdag blandt læger og sygeplejersker Læger og sygeplejersker håner,...
14h
Ingeniøren
Derfor rammer influenza-vaccinerne skrupforkert i årI Danmark og resten af den vestlige halvkugle har vi satset på de forkerte typer af vira denne vintersæson.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New move to act for research assessment reformProfessor Stephen Curry is calling for research assessment reform. As chair of a new steering committee behind the San Francisco Declaration on Research Assessment (DORA), Curry's call to action is bolstered by investments from nine organizations in the US and Europe combined with signatures on the Declaration for each of the UK's seven Research Councils. The news is announced in a World View colu
14h
Viden
Rumraket sender Tesla-stifter tættere på drømmen om koloni på Mars- Jeg frygtede en kæmpe-eksplosion ude på rampen, siger manden bag opsendelsen af verdens kraftigste raket.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SpaceX's big new rocket blasts off, puts sports car in spaceSpaceX Launch RocketSpaceX's big new rocket blasted off Tuesday on its first test flight, carrying a red electric sports car aiming for an endless road trip past Mars.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'World's loneliest bird' Nigel dies in New ZealandNew Zealand wildlife lovers are mourning the death of a gannet named Nigel, dubbed "the loneliest bird in the world" due to the absence of any feathered friends on his island home.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SoftBank's profits soar on sales growth, Sprint improvementJapanese internet and energy company SoftBank Group Corp. is reporting a more than 11-fold surge in profit for the fiscal third quarter thanks to strong sales and to improved results from U.S. carrier Sprint.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ethical leadership can have negative consequences, researchers sayEthical leadership is a good thing, right?
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Beetlejuice'—it works for real beetles tooIn Tim Burton's classic comedy "Beetlejuice", the toxic title character can escape from his inferno only if someone pronounces his name three times in a row.
16h
Science | The Guardian
A discussion, not a war: two opposing experts talk dinosaur family treesScientific disagreements are rife but rarely vicious – even over something as radical as a shakeup of dinosaur relationships In 2017 a startling paper suggested that the conventional view of the fundamental relationships between different groups of dinosaurs was incorrect . A huge new analysis including many early dinosaurs and their nearest relatives suggested that a rearrangement of the dinosau
16h
Viden
Kraftfuld raket med Tesla-bil på toppen er i luftenSpaceX har affyret verdens kraftigste raket, Falcon Heavy, fra Florida tirsdag aften dansk tid.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
At trial, former Uber CEO seeks to fend off conspiracy talkFormer Uber chief executive Travis Kalanick appeared tense and tentative as he took the witness stand Tuesday seeking to counter allegations that his company stole autonomous driving secrets from former Google car unit Waymo.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Red pandas rescued in Laos stir fears over exotic pet tradeThe rescue in Laos of three endangered red pandas trafficked from China has raised fears the rare animals are increasingly being coveted by exotic pet owners.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nigerian cryptocurrency craze unfazed by bitcoin plungeWhile bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies have suffered precipitous falls in recent weeks, the units remain popular in Nigeria where they make it easier to do business.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change threatens future of golf: reportWetter winters and coastal erosion linked to climate change are threatening the future of golf, a report backed by governing body the R&A warned on Wednesday.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SpaceX beams cool video of Tesla in spaceWhat a fine view of Mother Earth and what a smooth ride.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DNA shows first modern Briton had dark skin, blue eyesThe first modern Briton had dark skin and blue eyes, London scientists said on Wednesday, following groundbreaking DNA analysis of the remains of a man who lived 10,000 years ago.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Work among the penguins? France is looking for candidatesFancy a job at the North or South Pole? A French research institute is looking for you.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russian hackers hunt hi-tech secrets, exploiting US weaknessRussian cyberspies pursuing the secrets of military drones and other sensitive U.S. defense technology tricked key contract workers into exposing their email to theft, an Associated Press investigation has found.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Elon Musk, visionary Tesla and SpaceX founderFrom cars to rockets, Elon Musk dreams big.
17h
Ingeniøren
Softwarefirma om GDPR: Vi skal finde på workarounds for at opfylde reglerneDer mangler forståelse for, hvordan reglerne i Persondataforordningen fungerer i praksis, mener CEO.
17h
Ingeniøren
Sådan guides turisterne rundt i Østjylland af lokationsdataTDC bruger anonyme lokationsdata bundet op på mastepositioner til at hjælpe den østjyske turistorganisation med at målrette deres markedsføring.
17h
Science | The Guardian
First modern Britons had 'dark to black' skin, Cheddar Man DNA analysis revealsThe genome of Cheddar Man, who lived 10,000 years ago, suggests that he had blue eyes, dark skin and dark curly hair The first modern Britons, who lived about 10,000 years ago, had “dark to black” skin, a groundbreaking DNA analysis of Britain’s oldest complete skeleton has revealed. The fossil, known as Cheddar Man, was unearthed more than a century ago in Gough’s Cave in Somerset . Intense spec
17h
Science | The Guardian
How archaeologists discovered an ancient Assyrian city – and lost it againTurkey’s Ilisu dam will flood hundreds of ancient sites, including the city of Tušhan, but there is now a rich record of what will be lost It’s a sad fact of archaeological life that we can often only find things when they’re about to be lost forever, but such is the unhappy marriage between rescue archaeology and infrastructure development. Construction of the Ilisu dam , on the river Tigris in
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study by Ben-Gurion Univerisity researchers shows female physician bias in ICU admissionsAccording to the findings, female physicians admitted approximately 20 percent fewer of their female patients to the ICU than did male physicians, and 12 percent fewer female patients than male patients to the intensive cardiac care unit.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Many epilepsy patients take drug combinations that interactIn an Epilepsia analysis of 2008-2010 Medicare claims data, one in four older Americans with new-onset epilepsy and more than one-third with prevalent epilepsy received a combination of antiepileptic drugs and non-epilepsy drugs that could interact to alter the effectiveness of the non-epilepsy drugs. Also, more than 1 in 5 patients received a drug combination that could alter the effect of the an
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How should biosimilars be used to treat rheumatic diseases?Products that are 'biosimilar' or interchangeable with a licensed biological product hold considerable promise for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions such as rheumatic diseases, and possibly at a reduced cost. In Arthritis & Rheumatology, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) has published its latest position statement (or Whitepaper) on the rationale for the use of biosimilars
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More work is needed to determine appropriate drug doses for childrenChildren should not be considered 'small adults' when it comes to prescribing medications, but it can be difficult to determine the right dosage of a particular drug for young patients.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Back pain is common in highly active older adultsIn a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study, many well-functioning and highly active older adults experienced back pain, which was linked with poorer perceived and observed walking endurance.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Re-introducing an 'old' antibiotic may help fight multi-drug resistant bacteriaA new study indicates that the drug fosfomycin may be effective for treating multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. In most European countries, the oral formulation is only approved as a 3 gram single dose for the treatment of uncomplicated cystitis; however the Pharmacology Research & Perspectives study found that a dosing regimen of 6-12 grams per day divided in 3 doses is required for the tr
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Yoga benefits patients with metabolic syndromeIn a recent Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports study, one year of yoga training decreased pro-inflammatory adipokines and increased an anti-inflammatory adipokine in adults with metabolic syndrome and high-normal blood pressure.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Acne linked with increased risk of depressionIn an analysis of one of the largest electronic medical records databases in the world, researchers found that patients with acne had a significantly increased risk of developing major depression, but only in the first five years after being diagnosed with acne.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Changes in mouse breast tissue after exposure to fracking chemicalsIn a new study the authors believe is the first of its kind, environmental scientists led by Laura Vandenberg at the University of Massachusetts Amherst report that they observed changes in mammary gland development of female mice exposed during early development to the chemicals used in unconventional oil and gas (UOG) extraction -- including fracking -- at levels environmentally relevant to huma
18h
Science | The Guardian
SpaceX oddity: how Elon Musk sent a car towards MarsA Starman sitting in a tin can is currently navigating the heavens, soundtracked by David Bowie. How did it – and we – get there? Video: watch the launch of the Falcon Heavy rocket It takes a beat or two for the brain to compute. The image is startling, incongruous, barmy. A car floats in space. At the wheel is a spacesuit, seatbelt on. Earth hangs behind it. The two objects don’t work together.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How old antibiotic compounds could become tomorrow's life-saving drugsAs the fight against drug-resistant infections continues, University of Leeds scientists are looking back at previously discarded chemical compounds, to see if any could be developed for new antibiotics.
19h
Live Science
Volcano Facts and Types of VolcanoesA volcano is an opening in Earth's crust where magma breaks through.
19h
Ingeniøren
Implementering af it-systemer kræver mere end teknisk snildeTeknisk viden skal suppleres med viden om organisation og ledelse. Den erkendelse fik den 28-årige civilingeniør Rasmus Steiniche efter kort tid i sit første job. Svaret var en MMT, der ligger lige til højrebenet for en ingeniør, mener han.
20h
Live Science
Spirulina: Nutrition Facts & Health BenefitsSpirulina, a supplement made from blue-green algae, is touted as a "superfood." It is highly nutritious, but there is not enough evidence to determine if Spirulina is effective for treating any health conditions.
20h
Live Science
6 Simple Machines: Making Work EasierHumans have invented six devices that combine to make work easier. These six simple machines are the wheel and axle, the lever, the inclined plane, the pulley, the screw and the wedge.
20h
Feed: All Latest
The Big Question in *Waymo v. Uber*: What on Earth Is a Trade Secret, Anyway?Plus, a well-hydrated former Uber CEO Travis Kalanick takes the stand.
21h
New Scientist - News
Beetles escape alive after almost 2 hours in a toad’s stomachBombardier beetles sometimes get eaten by toads, but they can squirt hot, toxic jets of liquid from their backsides so the toads often vomit them right back up
22h
New Scientist - News
Seeing SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy rocket take off for the first timeSpaceX test launched its Falcon Heavy rocket, the most powerful since the Saturn V rocket. Leah Crane went to Cape Canaveral to see it lift off up close
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study shines new light on how Salmonella 'die' at low temperaturesThe most economical way to kill bacteria that cause common food-borne illnesses -- mostly caused by Salmonella enterica -- is heat, but, the mechanisms that kill Salmonella at lower temperatures were not fully understood until now, according to a team of researchers.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Workbench for virus designResearchers have developed a technology platform that allows them to systematically modify and customize bacteriophages. This technology is a step towards making phage therapies a powerful tool for combating dangerous pathogens.
22h
Science | The Guardian
Australia's cat plague is back after 40 years – and the solution is vaccinationHerd immunity is essential. If parvovirus vaccination rates fall below 70%, cats are in trouble A deadly feline disease is now spreading between cats after hiding for nearly 40 years. Multiple cases of feline parvovirus, also known as cat plague, or panleukopenia, have been reported in stray kittens in the greater Melbourne area this week. Feline parvovirus was a common disease in the 1960s and 1
22h
NYT > Science
Idaho Stripped Climate Change From School Guidelines. Now, It’s a Battle.Idaho is the only state whose legislature has removed climate change from its education standards. Teachers and students testified for it to be reinstated.
22h
Scientific American Content: Global
Elon Musk Does It AgainHis Falcon Heavy rocket lifts off on the first try, puts a Tesla auto into orbit—and maybe changes the business of space commerce and exploration forever -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
The Scientist RSS
Starfish in the Deep Sea Can SeeA study of 13 starfish species reveals that even animals that live at depths where sunlight doesn't reach have functioning eyes.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shoals of sticklebacks differ in their collective personalitiesResearch from the University of Cambridge has revealed that, among schooling fish, groups can have different collective personalities, with some shoals sticking closer together, being better coordinated, and showing clearer leadership than others.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using shark scales to design better drones, planes, and wind turbinesA team of evolutionary biologists and engineers at Harvard University have demonstrated a new structure inspired by shark skin that could improve the aerodynamic performance of planes, wind turbines, drones, and cars. The research sheds light on a decades-old mystery about sharkskin.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
China's need to turn milk greenHistorically, China consumed little milk but increasing prosperity has lifted consumption more than 25 times over the past five decades, making the country the world's fourth largest milk producer after the EU, New Zealand and the US, and the trend is projected to continue. Without concerted action, the demand threatens environmental sustainability globally.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rainforest collapse 307 million years ago impacted the evolution of early land vertebratesResearchers at the University of Birmingham have discovered that the mass extinction seen in plant species caused by the onset of a drier climate 307 million years ago led to extinctions of some groups of tetrapods, the first vertebrates to live on land, but allowed others to expand across the globe. This research is published today (7th February 2018) in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Socie
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study sheds new light on antibiotics produced by antsAnts, like humans, deal with disease. To deal with the bacteria that cause some of these diseases, some ants produce their own antibiotics. A new comparative study identified some ant species that make use of powerful antimicrobial agents -- but found that 40 percent of ant species tested didn't appear to produce antibiotics. The study has applications regarding the search for new antibiotics that
23h
Science | The Guardian
Scientists capture exploding beetles' amazing escapes from toads' stomachsBombardier beetles observed causing audible toxic explosions inside toads stomachs causing them to vomit their lunch to freedom The toad’s reaction to the explosion deep in its stomach is not instantaneous. But in time the body shakes, the mouth opens, and the culprit is expelled: a mucus-covered beetle that will live to fight another day. Japanese scientists captured footage of the great escape
23h
Inside Science
BRIEF: The Bug That Can Survive A Toad's StomachBRIEF: The Bug That Can Survive A Toad's Stomach Ingested bombardier beetles force toads to puke them out. Toad_vs_beetle_preview.jpg Image credits: Courtesy of Shinji Sugiura and Takuya Sato Creature Tuesday, February 6, 2018 - 19:15 Marcus Woo, Contributor (Inside Science) -- With a flick of its tongue, the toad snags a snack. But this meal is a bombardier beetle, famous for its explosive weapo
23h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: Toads Eat Beetles. Sometimes, Beetles Make Them Regret Their Meal Choice.When toads swallow bombardier beetles, the beetles produce a poison that prompts some of the toads to vomit them up still alive, researchers found.
23h
Latest Headlines | Science News
It’s a bad idea for a toad to swallow a bombardier beetleToads are tough. But there are some insects even they shouldn’t swallow.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using shark scales to design better drones, planes, and wind turbinesTo build more aerodynamic machines, researchers are drawing inspiration from an unlikely source: the ocean.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study sheds new light on antibiotics produced by antsAnts, like humans, deal with disease. To deal with the bacteria that cause some of these diseases, some ants produce their own antibiotics. A new comparative study identified some ant species that make use of powerful antimicrobial agents - but found that 40 percent of ant species tested didn't appear to produce antibiotics. The study has applications regarding the search for new antibiotics that
23h
Futurity.org
We’re ‘addicted’ to socializing—not our smartphonesWe may be glued to our smartphones because of an evolutionary drive for socializing, rather than a technological addiction to them, new research suggests. “…we need to start having a conversation about the appropriate way to use smartphones…” The desire to watch and monitor others, but also to be seen and monitored by others, runs deep in our evolutionary past, explains Samuel Veissière, a cognit
1d
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Big BangWhat We’re Following Partisan Problems: President Trump described congressional Democrats’ failure to clap at his State of the Union address as “treasonous” during an appearance in Ohio. Though the White House says the comment was “tongue in cheek,” even a casual accusation of treason could set a dangerous precedent. Trump had kinder words for Representative Devin Nunes of California, who he twee
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rainforest collapse 307 million years ago impacted the evolution of early land vertebratesResearchers at the University of Birmingham have discovered that the mass extinction seen in plant species caused by the onset of a drier climate 307 million years ago led to extinctions of some groups of tetrapods, the first vertebrates to live on land, but allowed others to expand across the globe. This research is published today in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China's need to turn milk greenChina will need more than three times as much milk by 2050 as it produced in 2010 and, without changes to its current supply lines, the demand will lift global greenhouse gas emissions from dairy herds by 35%, expand dairy land by 32% and increase nitrogen pollution from dairy production by 48%.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shoals of sticklebacks differ in their collective personalitiesResearch from the University of Cambridge has revealed that, among schooling fish, groups can have different collective personalities, with some shoals sticking closer together, being better coordinated, and showing clearer leadership than others.
1d
Popular Science
SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy launch was (mostly) a successFalcon Heavy SpaceXSpace There's a car in space right now. Patience was in short supply during the leg-jiggling, finger-tapping, tension-filled hours before the launch of the Falcon Heavy.
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Futurity.org
Viruses disarm immune cell ‘soldiers’ to cause chronic infectionResearchers have discovered a molecular mechanism that may help to explain how viruses that cause chronic infections, such as HIV or hepatitis c virus, manage to outsmart their hosts’ immune systems. The discovery could provide new targets for treating a wide range of diseases. Fighting off infections depends largely on our bodies’ capacity to quickly recognize infected cells and destroy them, a
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Futurity.org
People who think further into the future less likely to take risksPeople who tend to think further into the future may be more likely to invest money and avoid risks, a new study suggests. Researchers tapped big data tools to conduct text analyses of nearly 40,000 Twitter users and to run online experiments of their behavior. “Twitter is like a microscope for psychologists…” The researchers also found an association between longer future-sightedness and less ri
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Scientific American Content: Global
Homebodies Economize on Energy UseToday’s work-from-home, on-demand culture means more days at home—and translates into greater energy savings, too. Karen Hopkin reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org
These molecules fight viruses by cracking their shellsResearchers have discovered that a certain kind of molecule can break through the shells viruses use to protect their DNA. The molecule could aid in the fight against the hepatitis B virus, which can cause liver failure and liver cancer. It’s estimated that 2 billion people worldwide have had a hepatitis B virus infection in their lifetime, with about 250 million—including 2 million Americans—liv
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The Atlantic
Assad Is Still Using Chemical Weapons in SyriaSyrian Russian DamascusUN investigators are looking into reports the Syrian regime used chemical weapons on at least two rebel-held towns in recent days. The reports mark at least the sixth time the regime of President Bashar Assad has used such weapons against civilian population centers. The UN Commission of Inquiry on Syria said Tuesday it had received multiple reports “that bombs allegedly containing weaponized chl
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Popular Science
Bitcoin is bonkers right now. Here's why you shouldn't count it out.Technology Better security and smart regulation is a good start. The fluctuations are enough to make anyone wonder: What’s going on?
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Futurity.org
Feeding dogs raw chicken tied to potentially deadly paralysisEating raw chicken meat increases a dog’s risk of developing a debilitating and potentially fatal form of paralysis by more than 70 times, according to a new study. Matthias le Chevoir of the University of Melbourne and chief investigator on the project, says the cause of acute polyradiculoneuritis (APN) in dogs has baffled the veterinary community for a long time. “We recommend owners choose reg
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Futurity.org
Another clue to how naked mole rats live long, cancer-free livesResearchers have found that while naked mole rats do have a specific mechanism to keep older cells from dividing, the mechanism operates differently in the small rodents, which may be another clue to the mystery of why they live so long and stay so healthy. Naked mole rats live up to 30 years, the longest of any rodent, and have remarkable resistance to age-related diseases like cancer. The buck-
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Feed: All Latest
Microsoft, IBM Facial Analyses Struggle With Race and GenderStudy finds that facial-recognition services from Microsoft and IBM are significantly more accurate for men than women and for whites than blacks, adding to concerns about bias in artificial intelligence.
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Feed: All Latest
How Self-Driving Cars Use Lidar Laser Sensors to SeeLaser-shooting sensors are a key component of self-driving cars. But we can also use them to defeat our enemies.
1d
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Memo Fight, Rocket FlightToday in 5 Lines SpaceX successfully launched the Falcon Heavy, the world’s most powerful operational rocket. Senate leaders said they are close to an agreement on a long-term budget deal. White House Chief of Staff John Kelly said that President Trump will be briefed on a Democratic rebuttal to a Republican memo alleging surveillance abuses by the FBI. The Ohio state legislature approved a congr
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Science | The Guardian
Falcon Heavy, world’s most powerful rocket, successfully launches – videoSpaceX launch Falcon Heavy, the world’s most powerful rocket, into space from its launchpad in Cape Canaveral, Florida. The successful liftoff makes it the most powerful in operation and second only to the Apollo era Falcon Heavy: SpaceX’s giant rocket launches successfully Continue reading...
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Big Think
A true story about rape in America that's almost too hard to believeWhat explains our propensity to blame the victim, even in cases of sexual assault and rape? A true story of sexual crime in America reveals some key misunderstandings we may all hold. Read More
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Science | The Guardian
Falcon Heavy, world’s most powerful rocket, successfully launches – videoSpaceX launch Falcon Heavy, the world’s most powerful rocket, into space from its launchpad in Cape Canaveral, Florida. The successful liftoff makes it the most powerful in operation and second only to the Apollo era Falcon Heavy: SpaceX’s giant rocket launches successfully Continue reading...
1d
NYT > Science
Secrets of a Snake’s Belly CrawlNew tests of an old hypothesis reveal how snakes pour themselves along the ground in a straight line.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cockroach ancient geographic and genomic history traced back to last supercontinentArmed with a vast amount of genomic information, a team of researchers led by Dr. Thomas Bourguignon, now professor at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, has performed the first molecular dating to gain the clearest picture yet of the biogeographical history of cockroaches. They have traced back the key evolutionary time points of the cockroach -- all the way back almost 300 million
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New on MIT Technology Review
Geneticists are using laser-powered chips to search through DNA fasterPerforming some calculations with light is 10 times quicker and uses a quarter as much energy.
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The Atlantic
Congress Braces for Another Shutdown Fight—With Two Days Left to GoIn an all-too-familiar situation of late, the House and Senate once more find themselves grappling over a stopgap measure to fund the government—with just two days left to go before their self-imposed deadline. On Tuesday evening, the House kicked off negotiations with a bill that would fund domestic programs through March 23, while boosting defense spending for the whole year. The plan came toge
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Live Science
Radiation Will Tear Elon Musk's Rocket Car to Bits in a YearElon Musk has launched his sportscar into deep space. Stellar radiation is going to tear it to bits.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ethical leadership can have negative consequences, Baylor University researchers sayA new Baylor University study published in the Journal of Business Ethics reveals that ethical leadership compounded by job-hindrance stress and supervisor-induced stress can lead to employee deviance and turnover.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The recipe for lifeLife as we know it originated roughly 3.5 to 4 billion years ago in the form of a prebiotic ("before life") soup of organic molecules that somehow began to replicate themselves and pass along a genetic formula. Or so goes the thinking behind the RNA World, one of the most robust hypotheses of the origin of life. Researchers have now found evidence that the amino acid arginine (or its prebiotic wor
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cockroach ancient geographic and genomic history traced back to last supercontinentCockroaches are so hardy, a popular joke goes, that they've occupied the Earth long before humans first appeared —-and will probably even outlast us long after we have annihilated each other by nuclear war.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Will Disney's streaming service roar - or squeak?Will Disney's upcoming streaming services be the mouse that roared ... or squeaked?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snapback for Snap on upside revenue surpriseSnapchat parent company Snap Inc. saw a big snapback in shares Tuesday as the youth-oriented social network reported stronger-than-expected revenue growth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Foxconn putting US headquarters in MilwaukeeFoxconn Technology Group says it will establish a U.S. headquarters in Milwaukee as part of a massive investiment it is making in an electronics manufacturing plant in southeast Wisconsin.
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Science | The Guardian
Terrawatch: clues of unexpected creatures in the ocean depthsRecently discovered fossil worm burrows reveal that, in the right sediment, life can survive far deeper than imagined B lue Planet II gave us a glimpse of the weird and wonderful life that swims and floats in the deep ocean, but what about the creatures that live beneath the ocean floor? Present day surveys suggest that shrimps and worms inhabit the top tens of centimetres of seabed, but it was a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study questions link between medical marijuana and fewer opioid deathsSeveral studies have shown an association between legalizing medical marijuana and lower death rates from opioids. A new study finds that link is more complex than previously described and appears to be changing as both medical marijuana laws and the opioid crisis evolve.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Starving liver cancerScientists at the University of Delaware and the University of Illinois at Chicago have found a new way to kill liver cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth. This research could accelerate the development of new treatments for liver cancer, which is currently difficult to cure.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Want to help your partner stress less? Listen from the heartWhen we feel supported, we feel less stress. But sometimes we think we are being supportive of a romantic partner and we're not. Who hasn't experienced the self-satisfaction of feeling like we're 'helping' only to find we've only made the situation worse.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Arm exercise improves walking ability after strokeA new study shows that arm exercises may improve walking ability months and even years after having a stroke. The study tested the influence of arm training on post-stroke leg function.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Smartly containing the cloud increases computing efficiency, says first-of-its-kind studyResearchers discovered ways to further improve computing efficiency using management tools for cloud-based light-weight virtual machine replacements called containers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lithium -- it's not just for batteries: It can also reduce instabilities in fusion plasmasScientists have found that lithium powder can eliminate instabilities known as edge-localized modes (ELMs) when used to coat a tungsten plasma-facing component called the 'divertor.'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
More robust listeria risk assessment by including heat-injured cellsDeveloping assessment models that more accurately predict the risk of Listeria contamination, particularly with regard to heat-injured cells, will help food manufacturers enhance food safety protocols—and protect consumers from foodborne pathogens.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds cleaner ship fuels will reduce childhood asthma by 3.6 percent globallyMarine shipping fuels will get a whole lot cleaner in 2020 when a regulation by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) requires fuels to contain 80-86 percent less sulphur.
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Feed: All Latest
SpaceX Successfully Launches the Falcon Heavy—And Elon Musk's RoadsterThe Falcon Heavy rocket is now the most powerful launch vehicle in the world.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Child aids paleontologists in discovery of new ancient fish speciesThe fossil, called Candelarhynchus padillai, is approximately 90 million years old, and has no modern relatives.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Antibiotic-resistant plasmids flourish in hospital plumbingTo better understand how antibiotic-resistant organisms spread in hospitals, investigators recently collected samples from pipes beneath the hospital's intensive care unit and from outside manholes draining hospital wastewater. They conducted whole-genome analyses on the samples to study the bacterial plasmids, or rings of DNA, that can confer resistance to antibiotics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Twitter reveals how future-thinking Americans are and how that affects their decisionsThe researchers tapped big data tools to conduct text analyses of nearly 40,000 Twitter users, and to run online experiments of behavior of people who provided their Twitter handles.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Farmed seafood and livestock stack up differently using alternate feed efficiency measureA new study found that, contrary to widely held assumptions, farmed fish and shrimp convert protein and calories in feed to edible seafood at rates similar to livestock (i.e., cattle, pigs, and chickens)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists discover off-switch for 'molecular machine' active in many diseasesA discovery could be the key to stopping damage caused by uncontrolled inflammation in a range of common diseases including liver disease, Alzheimer's and gout. Researchers have uncovered how an inflammation process automatically switches off in healthy cells, and are now investigating ways to stop it manually when it goes awry.
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Science : NPR
Theoretical Physicist Joseph Polchinski Dies At 63Influential physicist Joseph Polchinski has died at 63. Caltech Professor Sean Carroll remembers Polchinski and the significant contributions he made to theoretical physics.
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Science : NPR
Despite Progress, Cities Struggle With Ambitious Climate GoalsDozens of cities are vowing to cut their carbon emissions and uphold the U.S. commitment to the Paris climate deal. Despite progress, many are falling short of their most ambitious goals. (Image credit: Dan Boyce for NPR)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A blueprint for future blood-nerve barrier and peripheral nerve disease researchResearchers have detailed, for the first time, the normal human transcriptome of the blood-nerve barrier. This barrier -- a tight covering of endothelial cells -- maintains the microenvironment of peripheral nerves. Knowledge of the transcriptome will aid research in peripheral nerve disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New fuel standards will decrease childhood asthma casesNew study in Nature Communications quantifies health benefits of new standard for shipping fuel, finding it will result in a 3.6 percent reduction of childhood asthma globally.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Relationship factors affect decisions about contraceptive use among young adultsThe dynamics of a couple's relationship, including the exclusivity of the partnership, the level of commitment to the partnership and participation in sexual decision-making with their partner, impact young adults' decisions related to contraceptive use, new research shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New algorithm decodes spine oncology treatmentExperts explain their approach to treating patients who are living longer with cancer that has spread to the spine, as the options for metastatic spine tumors increase.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Symptoms of alcoholism make taking medication to treat the disease more difficultSymptoms of alcoholism make it more difficult for some people to regularly take the prescription drug naltrexone, which could help treat their disease, a researcher at Oregon State University has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists can now measure activity of key cancer cell-survival proteinA recent study from the University of Michigan Life Sciences Institute and the University of California, San Francisco, has opened new options to further develop a potential cancer-fighting therapy, clearing an early hurdle in the lengthy drug-discovery process. The findings, published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, reveal new ways to measure the activity of a protein that is associated w
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Live Science
Success! SpaceX Launches Falcon Heavy Rocket on Historic Maiden VoyageThe first Falcon Heavy rocket built by the private spaceflight company SpaceX soared on its maiden voyage today (Feb. 6) — a historic test flight that also sent a car toward Mars and included two confirmed booster landings.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
SpaceX just launched its biggest rocket for the first timeSpaceX just launched the Falcon Heavy — the most powerful rocket since the Saturn V — for the first time.
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The Atlantic
A Triumphant First Launch for Elon Musk's Giant RocketSpaceX Elon MuskUpdated on February 6 at 7:29 p.m. ET CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.—Seven years ago, the Falcon Heavy was a model rocket, sitting on a table in a conference room in Washington, D.C., in front of some reporters and a couple empty seats. On Tuesday, the rocket dreamed up by SpaceX CEO Elon Musk stood 230 feet tall, on the famed launchpad at Kennedy Space Center where the Saturn V flew the first humans to th
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How we can help hungry kids, one text at a time | Su KahumbuSu Kahumbu raises badass cows -- healthy, well-fed animals whose protein is key to solving a growing crisis in Africa: childhood nutritional stunting. With iCow, a simple SMS service she developed to support small-scale livestock farmers, the TED Fellow is helping farmers across the continent by texting them tips on caring for and raising animals. Learn more about how this cheap innovation is help
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Science | The Guardian
Falcon Heavy: Elon Musk's giant SpaceX rocket makes triumphant launchSpaceX rocket lifts off on trailblazing deep space mission At least two of three reusable rockets return safely to Earth Space oddity: how Elon Musk and SpaceX sent a car towards Mars Space X Falcon Heavy launch – as it happened The world’s most powerful new space rocket blasted into the heavens above Florida’s east coast on Tuesday afternoon on a trailblazing deep-space mission that Elon Musk, f
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dementia care improved by just one hour of social interaction each weekIncreasing the amount of social interaction for people with dementia living in care homes to just one hour a week improves quality of life when combined with personalized care.
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The Atlantic
The Truth About Poland's Role in the HolocaustThe best history provokes cognitive dissonance. And any version of past events that purports definitively to clarify good vs. evil should be viewed as suspect. A case in point is the public outcry over new legislation in Poland that would criminalize perceived attacks on Polish actions during World War II. The law, which was recently ratified by the parliament in Warsaw and which President Andrze
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The Atlantic
The Launch of the SpaceX Falcon HeavySpaceX is ready for the first test launch of its 27-engine Falcon Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral, Florida. The rocket, which is the most powerful in the world, is designed to one day ferrying humans to the moon or Mars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World's biggest rocket soars toward Mars after perfect launchTesla Elon MuskThe world's most powerful rocket, SpaceX's Falcon Heavy, blasted off Tuesday on its highly anticipated maiden test flight, carrying CEO Elon Musk's cherry red Tesla roadster toward an orbit near Mars.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Elon Musk's Falcon Heavy rocket launches successfullyFalcon Heavy SpaceXThe world's most powerful rocket successfully lifts clear of its pad on historic maiden flight.
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