BBC News - Science & Environment
Potato plasticsBetter recycling and compostable materials could be an answer to our plastic pollution problem.
12min
Big Think
What happens with North Korea after the Olympics?The Olympic Games may provide a pause in the diplomatic row between North Korea and the United States, but what is likely to happen once the Olympic torch is extinguished on February 25th? Read More
55min
Futurity.org
Lesser-known relative of the laser could leave the lab soonResearchers may have found a way to solve the weakness of a type of light source similar to lasers. The alternative light source could lead to smaller, lower-cost, and more efficient sources of light pulses. “Sometimes you completely reshape your understanding of systems you think you know…” Although critical for varied applications, such as cutting and welding, surgery and transmitting bits thro
47min
Squarespaceexternal image B20258164.204717214;dc_trk_aid=404521129;dc_trk_cid=92678018;ord=151813787;dc_lat=;dc_rdid=;tag_for_child_directed_treatment=?
SquarespaceCreate your beautiful portfolio website with Squarespace. Start your free trial.
Sponsored

LATEST

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New map profiles induced earthquake risk for West TexasA map created by geophysicists can help predict which parts of West Texas and New Mexico may be at risk of fracking-induced earthquakes. The map could guide oil discovery efforts in the region.
5min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Search for genetically stable bioengineered gut and liver tissue takes step forwardBefore medical science can bioengineer human organs in a lab for therapeutic use, two remaining hurdles are ensuring genetic stability -- so the organs are free from the risk of tumor growth -- and producing organ tissues of sufficient volume and size for viable transplant into people. Scientists now report achieving both goals with a new production method for bioengineered human gut and liver tis
5min
Futurity.org
More effective asthma drug could reshape treatmentA new treatment could lead to more effective drug therapy for millions of individuals with asthma and other respiratory disorders, including chronic obstruction pulmonary disease (COPD). “We hope this will give patients a better option.” In a study published in Science Translational Medicine , Luis Ulloa, an immunologist at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School and lead study author, says he and coll
12min
Futurity.org
Horseback riding therapy eases veterans’ PTSDMilitary veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder may have significant decreases in symptoms just weeks after taking part in therapeutic horseback riding (THR), a new study shows. Veterans are often prescribed THR as a complementary therapy, but until now, little has been known about how effective it is. “PTSD is an anxiety disorder that occurs after exposure to life-threatening events or inj
19min
BBC News - Science & Environment
Power switchWind and solar energy are expected to account for more than half of Tamil Nadu's power by 2027.
24min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lab-grown eggs could pave way towards new fertility treatmentsHuman eggs have been developed in the lab from their earliest stage to full maturity, in a study that could lead to improved fertility treatments.
29min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vape shops could be 'valuable allies' to NHSNew research shows that the NHS should consider working with reputable vape shops to help smokers quit. The study finds that vape shops provide behavioral support which could help people stop smoking and remain smoke free.
29min
Science | The Guardian
Breakthrough as human eggs developed in the lab for first timeDeveloping eggs from earliest stages to maturity could open the door to new approach to fertility preservation Women at risk of premature fertility loss might have cause for new hope as researchers reveal that human eggs can be developed in the lab from their earliest stages to maturity. While the feat has previously been achieved for mouse eggs, and has given rise to live young after fertilisati
33min
Futurity.org
Trees that bloom in sync are kind of like magnetsA computer model may help explain why trees bloom at the same time, a new study suggests. In 2015, researchers developed a computer model showing that one of the most famous models in statistical physics, the Ising model, could be used to understand why events occur at the same time over long distances. In the new study, which appears in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stem cell research provides hope for tasmanian devils with a deadly, transmissible cancerUsing stem cell therapy, researchers have taken the first step toward developing an effective treatment for devil facial tumor disease (DFTD), which is decimating Tasmanian devils in the wild.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Devoted frog fathers guard their eggs from predatorsA new study has revealed that male white-spotted bush frogs dedicatedly guard their fertilized eggs from other cannibalistic male frogs and predators. The study confirmed that the adult male white-spotted bush frogs are the sole caregivers of their offspring, predominantly by attending to and guarding the eggs.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Recreating liver tumors as organoids for faster, more accurate drug screeningA major challenge in developing liver cancer drugs is that preclinical testing occurs in tumor models that do not accurately reflect human tumor features, causing drug candidates to later fail in clinical testing. Now, Singaporean researchers have grown organoids from liver tumors on specially engineered 3-D scaffolds. These organoids replicate important features of the original tumor, including g
1h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Trove of hummingbird flight data reveals secrets of nimble flyingTweaks in muscle and wing form give different hummingbird species varying levels of agility.
1h
Futurity.org
How our brains know trash from treasureOur brains can detect an object’s value almost as soon as we see it, a new study shows. The brain can begin processing value just 80 milliseconds—less than a tenth of a second—after seeing an object, researchers say. That means the brain is basically figuring out if something is quality or junk essentially at the same time it recognizes what it is. “We need to instantly evaluate and understand th
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder share molecular traits, study findsMost medical conditions are largely defined by their physical symptoms. Psychiatric illnesses, however, are largely defined by a person's behavior. A new study challenges that distinction, identifying many shared -- and distinct -- patterns of gene expression in the brains of people with autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The data hint at potential targets that may one day lead to new tre
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ball games and circuit strength training boost bone health in schoolchildrenThe type of exercise that children get in school does make a difference, according to a major Danish study. Schoolchildren 8 to 10 years old develop stronger bones, increased muscular strength and improved balance when ball games or circuit training are on the timetable.
1h
The Atlantic
What Does It Take to Get Fired in the Trump White House?Deputy White House Press Secretary Raj Shah had an impossible job in Thursday’s press briefing: Go to the lectern and explain what happened with the resignation of Staff Secretary Rob Porter . Sure enough, Shah struggled. In a rare step for this administration, Shah acknowledged errors in the White House’s approach—“We all could have done better over the last few days in dealing with this situati
1h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: The Bigger Question Remains UnansweredWhat We’re Following Women and the White House: The revelation that two ex-wives of former White House Staff Secretary Rob Porter told the FBI in the course of a background check that he had abused them had many observers wondering how Porter could have been hired at all. Yet the allegations of violence against women committed by President Trump and other former members of his team may explain wh
1h
Live Science
Elon Musk's Tesla Roadster and Starman Leave Earth Forever in This Final PhotoSpaceX CEO Elon Musk has unveiled the final photo of his Tesla Roadster and its Starman mannequin sailing off into deep space after launching on the first Falcon Heavy rocket Tuesday (Feb. 6), and it is spectacular.
1h
Live Science
Starman's SpaceX Spacesuit Would Leave You Dead in MinutesIf you take a deep-space selfie like Starman, make it very, very quick.
1h
Popular Science
What snakes lack in legs they make up for with strange body manipulationsAnimals An elongated spine is just as useful as a pair of arms and legs Although it seems strange to us, snakes’ lack of legs mean that they have evolved numerous fantastic techniques to survive, making ingenious use of their cylindrical…
1h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Nancy Drew a LineToday in 5 Lines The House and Senate are expected to vote on a massive budget deal that will prevent another government shutdown and increase federal spending by about $300 billion. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said she will not vote for the bill because it doesn’t address the so-called “dreamers,” undocumented immigrants brought to the U.S. as children, but it’s not clear how many Democra
2h
The Atlantic
The Dark Consequences of Poland's New Holocaust LawPARIS—The Polish historian Jan T. Gross, an expert on the country during World War II, didn’t mince words when I asked him about Poland’s new law that would criminalize mentioning the complicity of “the Polish nation” in the crimes of the Holocaust. “It’s terrible,” he said by phone from Berlin, where he lives. “It criminalizes all survivors of the Holocaust. Every Jew who is still alive and come
2h
Latest Headlines | Science News
The wiring for walking developed long before fish left the seaThese strange walking fish might teach us about the evolutionary origins of our own ability to walk.
2h
Science : NPR
Major Psychiatric Disorders Have More In Common Than We Thought, Study FindsUnderstanding the molecular basis of major disorders such as autism, schizophrenia and bipolar is hopeful, because it could help in developing better treatments for them. (Image credit: Sebastian Kaulitzki/Getty Images/Science Photo Library RF)
2h
Feed: All Latest
The Physics of SpaceX's Wicked Double Booster LandingWhat can we learn from the video of the simultaneous landings?
2h
Live Science
The Next Falcon Heavy Will Carry the Most Powerful Atomic Clock Ever Launched into SpaceA toaster-sized atomic clock will hitch a ride on the next SpaceX Falcon Heavy launch.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Socioecological network finds space for cattle, fish, and people in the big mountain westThe social and ecological systems of mountains and their river basins are best approached holistically when dealing with complex problems in natural resources management, say ecologists working with the Mountain Social Ecological Observatory Network (MntSEON). An open access special issue of ESA's journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment on "Social-ecological systems in mountain landscapes
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Obesity drives US health care costs up by 29 percent, varies by stateRecent research by John Cawley, professor of policy analysis and management at Cornell University, provides new insights on how individual states are affected by the health care costs of obesity.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simple rules can help fishery managers cope with ecological complexityA team of ecologists and economists are the first to test whether real-life ecological interactions produce economic benefits for the fishing industry. The results were published online Jan. 29 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA seeks the gold in Winter Olympics snowNASA engineer Manuel Vega can see one of the Olympic ski jump towers from the rooftop of the South Korean weather office where he is stationed. Vega is not watching skiers take flight, preparing for the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics and Paralympic games. Instead, he's inspecting the SUV-sized radar beside him. The instrument is one of 11 NASA instruments specially transported to the Olympics to
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A view from above and below: Hatchery chinook salmon are self-sorting in tanksHatchery-raised chinook salmon sort themselves into surface- and bottom-oriented groups in their rearing tanks, and this behavior might be due in part to the fish's genes.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Undergraduate student uncovers genes associated with aggressive form of brain cancerUsing publicly available data and novel computer software called KINC, an undergraduate researcher in genetics and biochemistry was able to uncover a group of 22 genes that are implicated together as having involvement in glioblastoma, the most aggressive type of brain cancer.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New '4-D goggles' allow wearers to be 'touched' by approaching objectsA team of researchers has developed a pair of '4-D goggles' that allows wearers to be physically 'touched' by a movie when they see a looming object on the screen, such as an approaching spacecraft.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Influence of increasing carbon dioxide levels on the seabedSubseabed CO2 storage is a potential future climate change mitigation technology. In a holistic approach, this study presents how leaking CO2 affects sandy seabed habitats and their inhabitants. Researchers discovered that increased CO2 levels drastically alter the ecosystem. Most of the animals inhabiting the site disappeared due to the effect of the leaking CO2. The functioning of the ecosystem
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Savanna fires pump Central African forests full of nitrogenResearchers are revealing the unexpected role that large-scale fires and high nitrogen deposition play in the ecology and biogeochemistry of these lush Central African forests.
2h
Live Science
Feelings of Hunger After Weight Loss May Never Go AwayTo truly keep the pounds away, people may have to deal with feelings of increased hunger for the rest of their lives, according to a new study.
3h
Feed: All Latest
These Bose Noise-Cancelling Headphones Are Half-Off Right NowIf you're in the market for excellent noise-cancelling headphones, grab these and don't look back.
3h
Science | The Guardian
Space tourists will have to wait as SpaceX plans bigger rocketTwo people had approached the company about a flight around the moon 50 years after Apollo 8 The successful maiden flight of SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy rocket on Tuesday should have paved the way for an audacious mission to send a pair of tourists around the moon later in the year. But Elon Musk, SpaceX’s chief executive, said on Monday that the company would delay such endeavours in favour of develop
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
AI computer vision breakthrough IDs poachers in less than half a secondResearchers at the USC Center for Artificial Intelligence in Society have long been applying AI to protect wildlife. Initially, computer scientists were using AI and game theory to anticipate the poachers' haunts, and now they have applied artificial intelligence and deep learning to spot poachers in near real-time.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Metasurfaces enable improved optical lens performanceProducing the perfect color images we need and love often requires multiple, heavy lenses so that each color focuses in exactly the same plane. Now Penn State engineers have developed a new theory that solves the problem using a single thin lens comprised of gradient index materials and metasurface layers to properly direct the light.
3h
NYT > Science
Two Prostate Cancer Drugs Delay Spread of the Disease by Two YearsThe treatments could help hundreds of thousands of men worldwide stave off pain and chemotherapy, but researchers don’t yet know if they will extend lives.
3h
NYT > Science
America’s Ski Trails Are Vanishing. This Olympian Has Taken Up the Cause.Winter athletes like the cross-country skier Jessie Diggins are demanding action on climate change.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Enzyme plays a key role in calories burned both during obesity and dietingEver wonder why obese bodies burn less calories or why dieting often leads to a plateau in weight loss? In both cases the body is trying to defend its weight by regulating energy expenditure. In a new paper, researchers identify the enzyme TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) as a key player in the control of energy expenditure during both obesity and fasting.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Competing for blood: How ecologists are solving infectious disease mysteriesBy looking at malaria infections and hookworms as competitors battling over a key resource -- red blood cells -- ecologists were able to explain why co-infected patients often got sicker after being dewormed: without the hookworms to keep it in check, the malaria infection ran rampant.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Big step toward stopping cancer metastasisNew research may give scientists a chance to target tumors before they metastasize. The study shows that a protein called LTBP3 fuels a chain reaction that leads some early developing tumors to grow new blood vessels. These vessels then act like highways to spread cancer cells throughout the body, seeding metastatic tumors very early on.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Surprise finding points to DNA's role in shaping cellsWorking at the intersection of biology and physics, scientists have made a surprising discovery at the root of cell formation. They found that DNA executes an unexpected architectural role in shaping the cells of bacteria. Studying the bacterium Bacillus subtilis, the researchers used an array of experiments and technologies to reveal that DNA, beyond serving to encode genetic information, also 'p
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The beneficial aspects of mindfulness for students of computer engineeringSubjected to the same practice exercise, the group of students that participated in mindfulness sessions obtained better results than those that did not take part in this activity.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nursery stock, homeowner preferences drive tree diversity in Salt Lake ValleyWhat factors shape the formation of a new urban forest? Researchers' survey of tree species diversity in the Salt Lake Valley found that diversity can be shaped by the species available in nurseries, the preferences of the homeowners, and even the tree selections of their neighbors.
3h
Science : NPR
How The Launch Of SpaceX's Falcon Heavy Fits Into The Company's Other-Wordly PlansThis week SpaceX successfully launched the world's most powerful rocket in decades. NPR's Ari Shapiro speaks with writer Tim Urban about what this rocket will do near term, and how it takes Elon Musk one step closer to his grand vision of a million-person colony on Mars.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biochar could replace unsustainable peat moss in greenhouse industryPlant lovers are familiar with peat moss as the major component of potting mix, but harvest of the material is becoming unsustainable. Not only is peat being removed faster than it can re-form, its use in potting mix contributes to the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hearing loss linked to poor nutrition in early childhood, study suggestsYoung adults who were undernourished as preschool children were approximately twice as likely to suffer from hearing loss as their better- nourished peers, a new study suggests.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stem cell research provides hope for tasmanian devils with a deadly, transmissible cancerUsing stem cell therapy, Morris Animal Foundation-funded researcher Dr. Deanne Whitworth and her colleagues at the University of Queensland, have taken the first step toward developing an effective treatment for devil facial tumor disease (DFTD), which is decimating Tasmanian devils in the wild. The team's findings were recently published in Stem Cells and Development.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Apalutamide delays progression of nonmetastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancerA multi-institutional phase 3 trial led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital and University of California, San Francisco found that treatment with an investigational androgen receptor inhibitor significantly delayed the development of metastasis in patients with prostate cancer that had become resistant to standard androgen-deprivation therapy.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biochar could replace unsustainable peat moss in greenhouse industryPlant lovers are familiar with peat moss as the major component of potting mix, but harvest of the material is becoming unsustainable. Not only is peat being removed faster than it can re-form, its use in potting mix contributes to the release of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Illegal South African abalone flowing into Hong Kong: reportIllegally poached abalone from South Africa is pouring into Hong Kong where the gastronomic gastropods are a traditional and expensive banquet favourite, a new study warned Friday.
3h
Live Science
What a Spectacle! Praying Mantises Wear Tiny 3D Glasses, for SciencePutting 3D glasses on praying mantises has opened researchers' eyes to the insects' unusual stereo vision.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ebola virus infects reproductive organs in monkeysEbola virus can infect reproductive organs of male and female macaques, according to a new study, suggesting humans could be similarly infected. Prior studies have revealed sexual transmission of Ebola virus, and viral RNA persisting in semen following recovery. While little is known about viral persistence in female reproductive tissues, pregnant women with Ebola virus disease have a maternal dea
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sniffing out a mate with precisionMale cockroaches can 'see' the spatial distribution of female pheromones to locate a sexual mate, according to researchers.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snacking snakes act as 'ecosystem engineers' in seed dispersalDespite the bad rap snakes often get, they are more central to ecology than most people realize. New research reveals that snakes might even play a key role in dispersing plant seeds.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Brainpower wins over brawn when male hummingbirds display for matesWhen male animals compete over mates, it's often a showy affair: think of elk tangling antlers or tom turkeys strutting and gobbling. But for a Costa Rican hummingbird, it seems mental prowess holds the edge over mere physical flamboyance.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One-in-three chance Hayward fault will rupture within 30 yearsIn the next 30 years, there is a one-in-three chance that the Hayward fault will rupture with a 6.7 magnitude or higher earthquake. Such an earthquake will cause widespread damage to structures, transportation and utilities, as well as economic and social disruption in the East Bay.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Apgar scores in neonates predict risk of CP and epilepsyAn infant’s scores on the so-called Apgar scale can predict the risk of a later diagnosis of cerebral palsy or epilepsy. The risk rises with decreasing Apgar score, but even slightly lowered scores can be linked to a higher risk of these diagnoses, according to an extensive observational study.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first timeScientists have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Deep-brain exploration with nanomaterialStudying deep brain tissues noninvasively is difficult. Now scientists have developed a way to send light deep into the brain without invasive optical fibers. The method uses infrared light outside the head to activate upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs). When these nanoparticles absorb near-infrared laser light, they emit visible photons to deep areas in the brain, allowing remote optogenetic stim
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breakthrough in controlling the transmission of lightResearchers detail the development of a new light wave-isolation method.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Undergraduate student uncovers genes associated with aggressive form of brain cancerUsing publicly available data and novel computer software called KINC, an undergraduate researcher in genetics and biochemistry at Clemson University was able to uncover a group of 22 genes that are implicated together as having involvement in glioblastoma, the most aggressive type of brain cancer.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New '4-D goggles' allow wearers to be 'touched' by approaching objectsA team of researchers at UC San Diego and San Diego State University has developed a pair of '4-D goggles' that allows wearers to be physically 'touched' by a movie when they see a looming object on the screen, such as an approaching spacecraft.
3h
Big Think
How refugees have the power to change the society they joinWhat history can teach us about refugees. Read More
3h
Big Think
South Korea will use "drone-catching drones" to defend the Winter OlympicsSouth Korean officials say with confidence that this will be the safest Olympics on record. Read More
3h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How protest is redefining democracy around the world | Zachariah MampillyThe democratic process is messy, complicated and often inefficient -- but across Africa, activists are redefining democracy by putting protest at its center. In an illuminating talk, political scientist Zachariah Mampilly gives us a primer on the current wave of protests reshaping countries like Tunisia, Malawi and Zimbabwe -- and explains how this form of political dissension expands our politica
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study explains how your brain helps you learn new skillsResearchers from the Gladstone Institutes uncovered how a special type of neuron improves the efficiency of procedural learning. They initially wanted to show how the specialized brain cells, called fast-spiking interneurons, cause movement disorders, such as Tourette's syndrome, dystonia, and dyskinesia. As it turns out, that isn't the case. But their work led them to an even greater discovery.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Snacking snakes act as 'ecosystem engineers' in seed dispersalDespite the bad rap snakes often get, they are more central to ecology than most people realize. New research reveals that snakes might even play a key role in dispersing plant seeds.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brainpower wins over brawn when male hummingbirds display for matesWhen male animals compete over mates, it's often a showy affair: think of elk tangling antlers or tom turkeys strutting and gobbling. But for a Costa Rican hummingbird, it seems mental prowess holds the edge over mere physical flamboyance.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
Science at the 2018 Winter OlympicsDiscover the physics of snowboarding, curling and skating, get inside the minds of athletes, and explore all things Olympics -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google fined in India for abusing dominant positionGoogle has been fined more than $21 million in India for "search bias" and abuse of its dominant position, competition regulators said Thursday.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A view from above and below: Hatchery chinook salmon are self-sorting in tanksHatchery-raised chinook salmon sort themselves into surface- and bottom-oriented groups in their rearing tanks. This behavior might be due in part to the fish's genes, according to an Oregon State University study.
4h
New Scientist - News
First glimpse of how genes may cause mental health problemsGeneticists are starting to unpick what causes psychiatric conditions like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and even some autism-like developmental conditions
4h
New Scientist - News
Oldest dog burial suggests prehistoric humans loved dogs as petsA dog that was buried with its owners 14,000 years ago was chronically ill throughout its life, yet its owners repeatedly nursed it back to health – suggesting a deep bond of friendship
4h
New Scientist - News
App guesses your emotions to target you with advertsData from smartphone sensors can be used to predict our mood, leading to better movie recommendations – and more effective ads
4h
New Scientist - News
Is Elon Musk’s playboy space odyssey really the future we want?The Falcon Heavy rocket’s first launch has put a red Tesla Roadster into space. The images are beautiful and fun, but the wider implications aren’t great
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chimpanzee self-control is related to intelligenceAs is true in humans, chimpanzees' general intelligence is correlated to their ability to exert self-control and delay gratification, according to new research.
4h
The Atlantic
The Amazon-ification of Whole FoodsAmazon announced on Thursday that certain members of its Prime subscription program can order Whole Foods items to be delivered within two hours. The program debuts this week in several neighborhoods in Austin, Dallas, Virginia Beach, and Cincinnati. Delivery is free for orders over $35—not exactly a challenge at a store nicknamed “Whole Paycheck”—with a $4.99 charge for cheaper purchases . Despe
4h
Feed: All Latest
'Altered Carbon' and TV's New Wave of TranshumanismNobody wants these dumb meat-sack bodies anymore. Now TV is asking if what replaces them will be any better.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Circulating lipids play roles in many diseasesLipids are fatty molecules that play important signaling and storage roles in the body, but having an excess of some lipids, like cholesterol, is a risk factor for many metabolic diseases. Recent articles in the Journal of Lipid Research investigate the role of cholesterol and other lipids in the blood in cardiovascular disease, hepatitis, and rare genetic disorders.
4h
The Atlantic
The Real Bias at the FBIDepending on who you ask, you can get some pretty disparate views of the role of the nation’s most important law-enforcement bureau. Certain Democrats were or remain convinced that the FBI’s handling of the Hillary Clinton email-server case—from then-Director James Comey’s condemnation of her “extremely careless” behavior to his late-October letter briefly reopening the investigation—was intended
4h
The Atlantic
The Gravity-Defying Globe of DeathIt’s the ultimate daredevil act: The Globe of Death, a sphere made of mesh steel, in which several of the world’s best dirtbike riders defy gravity in a synchronized, pedal-to-the-metal ballet. The stunt, which can be explained by the physics phenomenon of centripetal force, dates back to the early 20 th century. It is extremely dangerous; even the slightest miscalculated movement can result in c
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A view from above and below: Hatchery chinook salmon are self-sorting in tanksHatchery-raised chinook salmon sort themselves into surface- and bottom-oriented groups in their rearing tanks, and this behavior might be due in part to the fish's genes.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What makes the bacteria behind lyme disease tick?The precise mechanisms of how humans become infected with Lyme disease are still unclear. Researchers from UConn Health are advancing the understanding of how the causative bacterial agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), survives in ticks and mammals.
4h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Secrets of solar flares are unlockedScientists may finally understand the mechanism behind solar flares., which can play havoc with technology on Earth.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Evolution -- and skill -- help hefty hummingbirds stay spryEvolved differences in muscle power and wing size -- along with a touch of skill -- govern hummingbirds' inflight agility, according to new research. As opposed to other winged animals, larger species of hummingbirds are able to adapt to outmaneuver smaller species.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bacteria-infected mosquitoes might be good thing for MiamiMosquitoes are a year-round downside to living in subtropical Miami, but millions of bacteria-infected mosquitoes flying in a suburban neighborhood are being hailed as an innovation that may kill off more bugs that spread of Zika and other viruses.
5h
The Atlantic
Pyeongchang Preview: Ready for the Winter OlympicsTomorrow, the Opening Ceremony of the 2018 Winter Olympics will take place in Pyeongchang, South Korea, kicking off more than two weeks of winter-sports action in the Taebaek Mountains. Contractors have been finishing venues and support structures, course workers have been grooming the slopes and tracks, volunteers have been greeting international teams as they arrive, athletes have been settling
5h
The Atlantic
Letters: The Comments ApocalypseWe Want to Hear From You Last week, Jeffrey Goldberg, The Atlantic’s editor in chief, announced the creation of a new online Letters section , and the related decision to shut down comments on TheAtlantic.com. “We are choosing now to elevate respectful, intelligent discourse and argument,” he wrote. “We want smart and critical readers to have a more visible role on our site, and we’re looking for
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dams drive risk of fish extinction in the U.S.Dams drive local extinction risk of native fish in the southern United States, according to a study by Florida International University.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Twitter shares surge after reporting first profitable quarterTwitter Jack DorseyTwitter on Thursday reported its first profitable quarter and a growth in ad sales, but the tech firm is still struggling to attract new users.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New glucagon delivery system reduces episodes of post-bariatric surgery hypoglycemiaThe number of bariatric surgeries is increasing, as is the incidence of post-bariatric hypoglycemia (PBH). Physicians do not have adequate tools to treat this condition. A smart glucagon device developed by Joslin Diabetes Center and the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences has been shown to reduce episodes of PBH.
5h
Popular Science
This people-moving drone has completed more than 1,000 test flightsEastern Arsenal The flying taxi could soon be spotted in Dubai and Las Vegas. Ehang Corp, a major drone maker, has been busy testing its flying taxis.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tiny crystal shapes get close look from Mars roverStar-shaped and swallowtail-shaped tiny, dark bumps in fine-layered bright bedrock of a Martian ridge are drawing close inspection by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover.
5h
The Scientist RSS
Gene Expression Overlaps Among Psychiatric DisordersTranscriptional profiling of post-mortem human brains reveals commonalities in the genes over- and under-expressed in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, autism, and major depression.
5h
The Scientist RSS
DBS with Nanoparticle-Based Optogenetics Modifies Behavior in MiceResearchers develop a new technique to selectively activate neurons deep in the rodent brain, taking a step toward noninvasive brain stimulation for neurological disorders.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Asteroid coming close Friday: Don't worry, we're safeAnother asteroid is headed our way—the second this week—but there's no need to worry.
5h
The Atlantic
The World Spends $400 Billion Propping Up Oil Companies. Is That Bad?In the thrilling world of multinational industrial policy, it’s about as high-stakes a fight as you can get. Every year, the world’s governments spend hundreds of billions of dollars making it cheaper to extract and burn fossil fuels. Almost as regularly, their representatives get together and beg everyone else to stop doing that. Then they go home and keep doing it themselves. The pattern has wo
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Savanna fires pump Central African forests full of nitrogenThe remote forests of Africa's Congo Basin have long been a blind spot for scientists working to understand how Earth's natural cycles respond to the environmentally unique characteristics of different regions.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Surprise finding points to DNA's role in shaping cellsAs a basic unit of life, the cell is one of the most carefully studied components of all living organisms. Yet details on basic processes such as how cells are shaped have remained a mystery. Working at the intersection of biology and physics, scientists at the University of California San Diego have made an unexpected discovery at the root of cell formation.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New map profiles induced earthquake risk for West TexasA map created by Stanford geophysicists can help predict which parts of West Texas and New Mexico may be at risk of fracking-induced earthquakes. The map could guide oil discovery efforts in the region.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Timing is everything, to our genesSalk scientists discover critical gene activity follows a biological clock, affecting diseases of the brain and body.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Evolution -- and skill -- help hefty hummingbirds stay spryEvolved differences in muscle power and wing size -- along with a touch of skill -- govern hummingbirds' inflight agility, according to new research in the journal Science. As opposed to other winged animals, larger species of hummingbirds are able to adapt to outmaneuver smaller species.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UCLA study sheds light on genetic overlap between major psychiatric disordersMost medical conditions are largely defined by their physical symptoms. Psychiatric illnesses, however, are largely defined by a person's behavior. A UCLA-led study challenges that distinction, identifying many shared -- and distinct -- patterns of gene expression in the brains of people with autism, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. The data hint at potential targets that may one day lead to ne
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ways to make data sharing between the global north and south more fairMany researchers in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are hesitant to embrace open data policies. In this Policy Forum, David Serwadda et al. highlight the underlying concerns behind this hesitancy, as well as ways to foster more trust and equality surrounding open datasets.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A noninvasive way to manipulate neural activity with optogeneticsA new optogenetic technique allows for deep brain neural stimulation or inhibition by applying light externally to the skull, rather than via invasive optical fibers.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The secrets behind hummingbirds' flight agility revealedWhich traits best allow hummingbirds to turn on a dime, in midair, at fast speeds? A new study reveals that the most agile hummingbirds owe their nimbleness to muscle capacity and wing morphology.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A less hazardous means to create phosphorus compoundsScientists have identified a precursor that helps convert phosphorus into a range of useful compounds, all the while bypassing the need for hazardous intermediate substances that have been conventionally required for such reactions.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first timeScientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deep-brain exploration with nanomaterialStudying deep brain tissues noninvasively is difficult. Now RIKEN scientists in Japan have developed a way to send light deep into the brain without invasive optical fibers. The method uses infrared light outside the head to activate upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs). When these nanoparticles absorb near-infrared laser light, they emit visible photons to deep areas in the brain, allowing remote o
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Influence of increasing carbon dioxide levels on the seabedSubseabed CO2 storage is a potential future climate change mitigation technology. In a holistic approach, this study presents how leaking CO2 affects sandy seabed habitats and their inhabitants. Researchers of the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen discovered that increased CO2 levels drastically alter the ecosystem. Most of the animals inhabiting the site disappeared due to th
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What happens when women stop MS treatment during pregnancy?Two new studies look at the effects of stopping the newer, stronger drug natalizumab for multiple sclerosis (MS) during pregnancy. Natalizumab is generally prescribed for people with MS who have not responded to or cannot tolerate other treatments for MS as it can have a rare but potentially fatal side effect.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Research explores workers' response to abusive supervisionA recent study examined the damaging impact abusive supervision has in the workplace including the ways employees respond with retaliatory behavior, which lowers productivity.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Could asking one question help us better understand women and infants' health?"Have you ever been sexually active for a year or more without using contraception and becoming pregnant?" A study suggests that asking this question could help clinicians better understand women and infants' health.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
More efficient method devised to drug test athletesIt will now be easier, faster and cheaper to catch athletes who take performance-enhancing drugs.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Peptide improves glucose and insulin sensitivity, lowers weight in miceTreating obese mice with catestatin (CST), a peptide naturally occurring in the body, showed significant improvement in glucose and insulin tolerance and reduced body weight, report researchers.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Thousands of lives would be saved if counties met ATS clean air standardsThousands of lives would be saved each year, and many more serious illnesses avoided, if U.S. counties met standards set by the American Thoracic Society for the two most important air pollutants, according to a new report.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Autism Shares Brain Signature with Schizophrenia and Bipolar DisorderGene expression patterns in the brains of people with these conditions, new research finds -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Evolution—and skill—help hefty hummingbirds stay spryEvolved differences in muscle power and wing size—along with a touch of skill—govern hummingbirds' inflight agility, according to new research in Science.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Inventors have their own Oscars: The Sci-Tech AwardsEngineers and inventors who create innovations for the movie business have their own Academy Awards.
5h
Big Think
In world first, Bermuda repeals its same-sex marriage lawLess than one year after legalizing same-sex marriage, Bermuda has repealed the Supreme Court ruling that authorized gay marriage. Read More
5h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: These Skates Are Made for WalkingA fish that scurries along the seafloor uses the same neurons and genes that help land vertebrates walk, suggesting the blueprint for walking originated much earlier than previously thought.
5h
NYT > Science
Archaeologists in Egypt Discover 4,400-Year-Old TombThe tomb is believed to belong to Hetpet, a powerful priestess, and it contains rare paintings of her hunting and fishing.
5h
Ingeniøren
Dine tweets fortæller, hvor risikovillig du er – og soludbrud og kolibrier rydder forsiderBig data kan fortælle, i hvor høj grad personer foretrækker langsigtet belønning i forhold til kortsigtet gevinst. Science og Nature sætter fokus på henholdsvis Solens aktivitet og kolibriers manøvredygtighed.
5h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Watch nerve cells being born in the brains of living miceFor the first time, scientists have seen nerve cells being born in the brains of adult mice.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Molecular 'magnets' could improve cancer immunotherapyChemicals that attract specialised immune cells toward tumours could be used to develop better immunotherapies for cancer patients, according to new research published in Cell.Scientists at the Francis Crick Institute have discovered that immune cells called Natural Killer cells accumulate in tumours and release chemicals that attract specialised dendritic cells (cDC1) - white blood cells known fo
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ball games and circuit strength training boost bone health in schoolchildrenThe type of exercise that children get in school does make a difference. This is shown by a major Danish study from researchers at the University of Southern Denmark and University of Copenhagen. Eight to ten-year-old schoolchildren develop stronger bones, increased muscular strength and improved balance when ball games or circuit training are on the timetable.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
FSU researchers: Savanna fires pump Central African forests full of nitrogenFlorida State University researchers are part of a global team of scientists revealing the unexpected role that large-scale fires and high nitrogen deposition play in the ecology and biogeochemistry of these lush Central African forests.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Surprise finding points to DNA's role in shaping cellsWorking at the intersection of biology and physics, scientists at UC San Diego have made a surprising discovery at the root of cell formation. They found that DNA executes an unexpected architectural role in shaping the cells of bacteria. Studying the bacterium Bacillus subtilis, the researchers used an array of experiments and technologies to reveal that DNA, beyond serving to encode genetic info
5h
Popular Science
We suck at recycling straws—so maybe we should ban themEnvironment Reduce, reuse. A California state representative is trying to ban plastic straws at restaurants. Maybe it's time to rethink single-use plastics entirely.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers run first tests of unique system for welding highly irradiated metal alloysScientists of the Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS) and partners from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have conducted the first weld tests to repair highly irradiated materials at DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
6h
Live Science
The First Europeans Had a Striking Combination of FeaturesScientists have put a smiling face to one of the first human residents of Great Britain.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dairy calves are natural optimists or pessimists, just like usSome calves are inherently optimistic or pessimistic, just as humans are, a new study has found. The study also assessed fearfulness through standard personality tests, and found that fearfulness and pessimism are closely related.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Alien honeybees could cause plant extinctionNew research indicates that introduced 'alien' honeybees are competing for resources with native bees and threatening the survival of plants that rely on interactions with specific pollinators.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Schools alone cannot help to prevent childhood obesity, study findsSchool-based healthy lifestyle interventions alone are not effective in the fight against childhood obesity, researchers have warned.
6h
Big Think
Five Oscar-winning films that fail the Bechdel gender testThink of some of the greatest films of all time. Now try to remember the conversations that women have in them. Can't remember? Don't worry, they probably just obsess over men. Read More
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When it comes to genes, lichens embrace sharing economyUniversity of Colorado Boulder researchers have discovered the first known molecular evidence of obligate symbiosis in lichens, a distinctive co-evolutionary relationship that could shed new light on how and why some multicellular organisms consolidate their genomes in order to co-exist.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
TSRI scientists take big step toward stopping cancer metastasisTSRI scientists identify molecule that fuels cancer metastasis.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Avoiding blackouts with 100% renewable energyResearchers propose three separate ways to avoid blackouts if the world transitions all its energy to electricity or direct heat and provides the energy with 100 percent wind, water and sunlight. The solutions reduce energy requirements, health damage and climate damage.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers run first tests of unique system for welding highly irradiated metal alloysScientists of the Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS) and partners from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) have conducted the first weld tests to repair highly irradiated materials at DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA finds a weak and wispy Tropical Cyclone CebileVertical wind shear had already taken its toll on Tropical Cyclone Cebile when NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean on Feb. 8. Cebile, now a subtropical cyclone, appeared to have wispy clouds circling it, and the storm was devoid of rainfall.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Termites' unique gut 'factory' key to global dominationTermites have achieved ecological dominance and now some of the ingredients for their success have been determined to lie in their unique gut microbiome 'factories' - which enable the creatures to eat wood, soil and other material generally not considered as food sources by other animals but rather as indigestible.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Are you rocky or are you gassy? Astronomers unlock the mysteries of super-EarthsA star about 100 light years away in the Pisces constellation, GJ 9827, hosts what may be one of the most massive and dense super-Earth planets detected to date according to new research led by Carnegie's Johanna Teske. This new information provides evidence to help astronomers better understand the process by which such planets form.
6h
Viden
Home sweet home: Intelligent termostat flytter hjem til sin morNest, som producerer termostater og andet udstyr til 'det smarte hjem', bliver igen en integreret del af Google. Denne gang som en brik i den samlede hardware-afdeling.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Micro to macro mapping—observing past landscapes via remote-sensingRemotely detecting changes in landforms has long relied upon the interpretation of aerial and satellite images. Effective interpretation of these images, however, can be hindered by the environmental conditions at the time the photo was taken, the quality of the image and the lack of topographical information.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tea Party movement has paved the way for racialized language in US politicsOvertly racially motivated rhetoric is becoming increasingly acceptable in Republican politics in the US. Two Italian researchers now argue that this can partly be traced back to the conservative Tea Party movement which has reshaped the Republican party's identity away from its traditional conservative axioms to one that is more nativist and racially tinged. Luigi Leone and Fabio Presaghi from th
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How good a match is it? Putting statistics into forensic firearm identificationOn February 14, 1929, gunmen working for Al Capone disguised themselves as police officers, entered the warehouse of a competing gang, and shot seven of their rivals dead. The St. Valentine's Day Massacre is famous not only in the annals of gangland history, but also the history of forensic science. Capone denied involvement, but an early forensic scientist named Calvin Goddard linked bullets from
6h
Big Think
For the first time in Gerber's history, its "spokesbaby" is a boy with Down syndromeEach year since 2010, thousands of parents submit photos of their children for consideration in Gerber's "Spokesbaby" contest. This year the winner made history. Read More
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Pillownauts' help future manned missions to MarsThe 3-day bed rest study is being carried out in Nottingham in parallel to a 60-day bed rest study by the European Space Agency at the MEDES facility in Toulouse, France. Bed rest is a tried and tested way to measure the effects of weightlessness on the human body which include bone and muscle mass loss, cardiovascular decline and impaired carbohydrate metabolism which could be a risk for type 2 d
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Double trouble: Invasive insect species overlooked as a result of a shared nameAn invasive leaf-mining moth, feeding on cornelian cherry, has been gradually expanding its distributional range from its native Central Europe northwards for a period likely longer than 60 years. During that period, it has remained under the cover of a taxonomic confusion, while going by a name shared with another species that feeds on common dogwood.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Competing for blood: How ecologists are solving infectious disease mysteriesA study released today from an international team of researchers shines new light on "co-infections," infectious diseases that attack the immune system simultaneously. The findings offer insights for treating malaria and worm infections and can help public health officials disentangle how infectious diseases compete in the human body.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA leverages proven technologies to build agency's first planetary wind lidarNASA scientists have found a way to adapt a handful of recently developed technologies to build a new instrument that could give them what they have yet to obtain: never-before-revealed details about the winds on Mars and ultimately Titan, Saturn's largest moon.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stroke risk factors unique to women identifiedInvestigators are exploring the effects of potential risk factors that are unique to women, including hormone levels, hormone therapy, hormonal birth control, pregnancy and time of menarche and menopause.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New approach to stop transmission of malaria from humans to mosquitoesSome people develop an immune response following a malaria infection that stops them from infecting other mosquitoes. The antibodies that these people produce are sucked up by the mosquito and destroy the malaria parasite in the mosquito's stomach. Researchers have discovered that 1 in 25 malaria patients prevent the disease from spreading in this way. They also unraveled the defense proteins resp
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Could an 8-million-year-old gene help the citrus industry? Researchers think soAfter 100 years of assertions about the roots of citrus, a global group of scientists has traced the evolutionary history of Florida's signature crop up to 8 million years ago in the Himalayas of Southeast Asia.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Marketing of lower strength alcohol products may increase drinkingWines and beers with lower alcohol content aren't being actively marketed as alternatives to regular strength alcohol products and thus may not be promoting healthier drinking habits in consumers, according to a new study.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vapers are vulnerable to pneumoniaThe vapor from e-cigarettes seems to help pneumonia-causing bacteria stick to the cells that line the airways, according to new research.
6h
The Atlantic
A Language's Popularity Could Influence Its Grammar and VocabularyIt’s a peculiar observation that the more people speak a language, the simpler its grammar tends to be. English and Mandarin, for instance, have notably straightforward structures. On the other hand, languages spoken in just a single mountain valley or village can have gorgeously intricate grammars, full of gender and cases and declensions. They also tend to have rather small vocabularies. Meanwh
6h
The Atlantic
The Weirdest—and Possibly Best—Proposal to Resolve the North Korea Crisis“Washington has a long habit of painting its enemies 10 feet tall—and crazy,” as Fareed Zakaria once noted . Thus, National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster in December called North Korea’s nuclear-weapons program—which according to American intelligence still probably lacks the capacity to hit the U.S. mainland with a nuclear weapon—“the most destabilizing development, I think, in the post-World W
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alien honeybees could cause plant extinctionNew research indicates that introduced 'alien' honeybees are competing for resources with native bees and threatening the survival of plants that rely on interactions with specific pollinators.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change, urbanization driving opossum's northward marchThe headline reads like something from the satirical newspaper The Onion: "Grand Forks opossum slain; body to go to University of Michigan for research."
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NY Times reports more subscribers, posts Q4 lossThe New York Times said Thursday it saw accelerating growth in digital subscribers in the fourth quarter, delivering a lift to share prices for the prestigious newspaper group.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Israeli archaeologists unveil rare Roman-era mosaicIsraeli archaeologists on Thursday unveiled what they called a "rare and beautiful" Roman mosaic floor excavated in the ancient Mediterranean port city of Caesarea.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA finds a weak and wispy Tropical Cyclone CebileVertical wind shear had already taken its toll on Tropical Cyclone Cebile when NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean on Feb. 8. Cebile, now a subtropical cyclone, appeared to have wispy clouds circling it, and the storm was devoid of rainfall.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gut bacteria: It can be good, and bad, for healthA new study found that impairing a rare group of cells (called Paneth cells) in the small intestine allows gut bacteria to invade the organ and cause major inflammation. The study was conducted in mice, but has implications for the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), a group of disorders characterized by chronic inflammation in the digestive track.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nursery stock, homeowner preferences drive tree diversity in Salt Lake ValleyUtah's early residents would be surprised to see the canopy of trees that covers the Salt Lake Valley today. Few trees are native to the valley, which means that most of the trees present there today are imported. It's a much different situation from a natural forest, which is shaped by climate, water availability and biodiversity. So, what factors shape the formation of a new urban forest?
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biologists decipher a key piece of the odor-detection puzzle in flies, mosquitoesBiologists at the University of California, Riverside have discovered surprisingly that the complex odor-detecting machinery of the fruit fly Drosophila is heavily influenced by one specific odor receptor. This same receptor also exists in crop-damaging fly species and disease-carrying mosquitoes, opening the possibility for new chemical cocktails to control pests and render people "invisible" to
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bitcoin crash could derail other cryptocurrenciesA sharp fall in the value of Bitcoin may cause other cryptocurrencies to crash, but is unlikely to have a significant impact on traditional assets, according to new research published in the journal Economics Letters.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dairy calves are natural optimists or pessimists, just like usSome calves are inherently optimistic or pessimistic, just as humans are, a new University of British Columbia study has found.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
3-D vision discovered in praying mantisMiniature glasses have revealed a new form of 3-D vision in praying mantises that could lead to simpler visual processing for robots.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Walking fish suggests locomotion control evolved much earlier than thoughtCartoons that illustrate evolution depict early vertebrates generating primordial limbs as they move onto land for the first time. But new findings indicate that some of these first ambulatory creatures may have stayed under water, spawning descendants that today exhibit walking behavior on the ocean floor.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Harnessing the power of genomic sequencing augments diagnosis and treatment of lymphoid cancerA new study has established that hybrid-capture sequencing is the method of choice for sequencing 'actionable' gene mutations across the most common forms of lymphoid cancer. Due to its applicability in routinely acquired formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues, this assay can be implemented by clinical laboratories into routine diagnostic workflows. It reliably identifies potentially actionable
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devicesTheoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SFU innovation revolutionizes the microscope, allows R&D to accelerate discoveryA new microscope developed by SFU researchers Mike Kirkness and Nancy Forde spins thousands of times faster than a fairground swing ride, and subjects its contents to forces hundreds of times higher than in a NASCAR race or rocket liftoff.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More efficient method devised to drug test athletesIt will now be easier, faster and cheaper to catch athletes who take performance-enhancing drugs.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Repetition key to self-healing, flexible medical devicesMedical devices powered by synthetic proteins created from repeated sequences of proteins may be possible, according to materials science and biotechnology experts, who looked at material inspired by the proteins in squid ring teeth.
6h
The Atlantic
Why Didn’t the White House See Domestic Violence as Disqualifying?On New Year’s Day, 1996, future Trump campaign chair Steve Bannon was charged with three misdemeanor counts of domestic violence by the Santa Monica police. The charges were eventually dropped when his then-wife did not appear at the trial. On the day that she called the police to her house, however, she told them that at the beginning of their relationship, there had been “3-4 arguments that bec
6h
The Atlantic
How a Nazi Made the Ballot in IllinoisNazi Alisyn CamerotaThe Illinois Republican Party is condemning the man poised to be its nominee for Congress in the state’s third congressional district as a Nazi. So how did he end up on the ballot? The answer points to failures of democratic safeguards on every level, from a state party unable to recruit an alternative candidate in a highly partisan district, to voters signing ballot-access petitions without payi
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are you rocky or are you gassy?A star about 100 light years away in the Pisces constellation, GJ 9827, hosts what may be one of the most massive and dense super-Earth planets detected to date according to new research led by Carnegie's Johanna Teske. This new information provides evidence to help astronomers better understand the process by which such planets form.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Distinctive brain pattern helps habits formNeuroscientists have found that certain neurons in the brain are responsible for grouping behaviors together into a single habitual routine, in a process known as 'chunking.' These neurons, located in a brain region highly involved in habit formation, fire at the beginning and the end of a habitual behavior, but not in the middle.
6h
Big Think
Bill Gates' next project? Revolutionize how people use the bathroomBill Gates has been working since 2011 with some of the brightest minds to solve a health crisis affecting more than 2 billion people worldwide. Read More
6h
The Atlantic
How the Olympics Got DisneyfiedEditor’s Note: Find all of The Atlantic ’s Winter Olympics 2018 coverage here . On Friday in Pyeongchang, South Korea, the Winter Olympics will officially kick off in a frenzy of K-pop and designer costumes , with a glitzy opening ceremony held in a roofless and potentially frigid $100 million stadium that will be used precisely four times before it is knocked down. It is the latest iteration of
7h
The Atlantic
How Extinction Shaped the Australian OutbackDaniel Pauly, a fisheries scientist, coined the term “shifting baselines” in 1995 to describe how depleted fish populations came to be considered normal by generations that had never experienced the teeming abundance their grandparents had known. The concept is now a fundamental one in conservation. As ecosystems change and as human memory dims, former states are forgotten and newer, altered stat
7h
Big Think
DNA sequencing reveals 'Cheddar Man'—Britain's oldest skeleton—was definitely not a white guyCheddar Man is now complete. Read More
7h
Big Think
Brain scans reveal that you and your bestie literally think alikeA new study finds that the more two people think alike, the more their brains operate the same way. Read More
7h
Live Science
Could We Beat the Opioid Epidemic by Easing Pain with Marijuana?Can marijuana's use for pain relief slow the opioid epidemic?
7h
Big Think
Want to lose weight without even trying? Have your partner lose it for you.Just like obesity, weight-loss can also "spread like a virus." Read More
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Could asking one question help us better understand women and infants' health?"Have you ever been sexually active for a year or more without using contraception and becoming pregnant?" A study by George Mason University's Dean of the College of Health and Human Services, Dr. Germaine M. Buck Louis, and colleagues from the University at Albany and Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) suggests that asking this question could
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research explores workers' response to abusive supervisionA recent Naveen Jindal School of Management study examined the damaging impact abusive supervision has in the workplace including the ways employees respond with retaliatory behavior, which lowers productivity.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA leverages proven technologies to build agency's first planetary wind lidarNASA scientists have found a way to adapt a handful of recently developed technologies to build a new instrument that could give them what they have yet to obtain: never-before-revealed details about the winds on Mars and ultimately Titan, Saturn's largest moon.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New tool helps physicians estimate survival for patients with cancers that have spread to boneA simple three-factor tool can help doctors estimate survival time in patients with long bone metastases (LBMs) -- advanced cancer that has spread to the bones of the limbs, reports a study in the February 7, 2018, issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in partnership with Wolters Kluwer. Reliable survival estimates in these cases can help prevent overtreatment and
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biologists decipher a key piece of the odor-detection puzzle in flies, mosquitoesBiologists at the University of California, Riverside have discovered surprisingly that the complex odor-detecting machinery of the fruit fly Drosophila is heavily influenced by one specific odor receptor. This same receptor also exists in crop-damaging fly species and disease-carrying mosquitoes, opening the possibility for new chemical cocktails to control pests and render people "invisible" to
7h
Viden
Aktivist kæmper for dine digitale rettigheder mod tech-giganterEn østrigsk aktivist har startet en ny organisation, der vil sagsøge tech-virksomheder, som krænker dine digitale rettigheder.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
In Memoriam: Joe Polchinski, 1954–2018He was a theoretical physicist's theoretical physicist who made fundamental contributions to our understanding of black holes and string theory, among other things -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
New on MIT Technology Review
What the hell is a climate model—and why does it matter?Better technology, techniques, and data sharing have allowed scientists to try novel experiments—or simply run many more of them.
7h
The Atlantic
What Scientists Learned From Putting 3-D Glasses on Praying MantisesPraying mantises spend most of their lives being still. But to put 3-D glasses on these insects, Vivek Nityananda had to get them to stay really still. He would put their cages in a freezer for five minutes, to quite literally chill them out, before sticking their legs down with tiny blobs of Plasticine. He then put a little drop of beeswax between their eyes, and pushed two tear-shaped colored f
7h
Feed: All Latest
How the Government Controls Sensitive Satellite DataIt might just buy exclusive rights to image it doesn't want out there.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rutgers professor studies trans fat consumption in the wake of policy shiftsTrans fat policies have led to a decline in its availability in the global food supply, according to Rutgers School of Public Health professor Shauna Downs. Although all forms of trans fat regulation have proven to be effective, trans fat bans have the potential to make the largest impact on cardiovascular disease rates worldwide.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Citizen scientists rewarded by having new slug species named after themAn intrepid group of Norwegian divers has sponsored slug safaris to discover new sea slug species in northern waters.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How good a match is it? Putting statistics into forensic firearm identificationWhen comparing bullets or cartridge cases, a forensic firearms examiner can offer an expert opinion as to whether or not they match. But they cannot express the strength of the evidence numerically, the way a DNA expert can when testifying about genetic evidence. Now, a team of researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed a statistical approach for ballist
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Termites' unique gut 'factory' key to global dominationTermites have achieved ecological dominance and now some ingredients for their success have been determined to lie in their unique gut microbiome 'factories' -- which enable the creatures to eat wood and other material relatively free of competition. New research shows the majority of termite gut microorganisms is not found in any other animals and that they are not only inherited from parents but
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sniffing out a mate with precisionMale cockroaches can 'see' the spatial distribution of female pheromones to locate a sexual mate, according to researchers from Hokkaido University and the University of Konstanz.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds only one-third of patients diagnosed with depression start treatmentDespite the wide availability of effective treatments for depression and a growing effort nationwide to detect and begin treating depression during primary care visits, only about one-third of individuals newly diagnosed with depression start treatment, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in the Journal of General Internal Medicine.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Distinctive brain pattern helps habits formMIT neuroscientists have found that certain neurons in the brain are responsible for grouping behaviors together into a single habitual routine, in a process known as 'chunking.' These neurons, located in a brain region highly involved in habit formation, fire at the beginning and the end of a habitual behavior, but not in the middle.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals molecular mechanisms of memory formationMIT neuroscientists have uncovered a cellular pathway that allows specific synapses to become stronger during memory formation. The findings provide the first glimpse of the molecular mechanism by which long term memories are encoded in a region of the hippocampus called CA3.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Enzyme plays a key role in calories burned both during obesity and dietingEver wonder why obese bodies burn less calories or why dieting often leads to a plateau in weight loss? In both cases the body is trying to defend its weight by regulating energy expenditure. In a paper publishing in Cell on Feb. 8, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers identify the enzyme TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) as a key player in the control of energy expenditure
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Search for genetically stable bioengineered gut and liver tissue takes step forwardBefore medical science can bioengineer human organs in a lab for therapeutic use, two remaining hurdles are ensuring genetic stability -- so the organs are free from the risk of tumor growth -- and producing organ tissues of sufficient volume and size for viable transplant into people. Scientists report in Stem Cell Reports achieving both goals with a new production method for bioengineered human
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chimpanzee self-control is related to intelligence, Georgia State study findsAs is true in humans, chimpanzees' general intelligence is correlated to their ability to exert self-control and delay gratification, according to new research at Georgia State University.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Spectacular' finding: New 3-D vision discovered in praying mantisMiniature glasses have revealed a new form of 3-D vision in praying mantises that could lead to simpler visual processing for robots.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Walking fish suggests locomotion control evolved much earlier than thoughtCartoons that illustrate evolution depict early vertebrates generating primordial limbs as they move onto land for the first time. But new findings indicate that some of these first ambulatory creatures may have stayed under water, spawning descendants that today exhibit walking behavior on the ocean floor. The results appear Feb. 8 in the journal Cell.
7h
Feed: All Latest
Norovirus Is a Terrible Gut Bug. The Olympics Could Make It WorseSouth Korean Olympics officials are dealing with an outbreak of norovirus among security personnel. If it spread to athletes, it could be very, very bad.
7h
Big Think
A U.S. scientist claims a "humanzee" man-chimp hybrid was createdDid researchers actually make a human-chimp hybrid? Some famous scientists have made stunning claims that went against the scientific consensus. Read More
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Self-defeating humor promotes psychological well-being, study revealsResearchers provide new data on the consequences of using different styles of humor, emphasizing the importance of analyzing cultural differences in future psychological research.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Zipping-up' rings to make nanographenesNanographenes are attracting wide interest from many researchers as a powerful candidate for the next generation of carbon materials due to their unique electric properties. Scientists have now developed a fast way to form nanographenes in a controlled fashion. This simple and powerful method for nanographene synthesis could help generate a range of novel optoelectronic materials, such as organic
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists observe nanowires as they growScientists have followed the growth of tiny wires of gallium arsenide live. Their observations reveal exact details of the growth process responsible for the evolving shape and crystal structure of the crystalline nanowires. The findings also provide new approaches to tailoring nanowires with desired properties for specific applications.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Double trouble: Invasive insect species overlooked as a result of a shared nameAn invasive leaf-mining moth, feeding on cornelian cherry, has been gradually expanding into northern Europe under the cover of a taxonomic confusion for a period likely longer than 60 years. It has been sharing a name with another species. For the first time, a recent article properly distinguishes between the two insects and tries to reconstruct the invasion of the 'true' moth behind the name of
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sticking sugar to proteinResearchers have succeeded in determining the 3D structure of the enzyme that attaches sugar chains to proteins.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cosmic x-rays may provide clues to the nature of dark matterResearchers have presented a novel theory of dark matter, which implies that dark matter particles may be very different from what is normally assumed. In particular, their theory involves dark matter particles which are extremely light -- almost one hundred times lighter than electrons, in stark contrast to many conventional models that involve very heavy dark matter particles instead.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Light and copper catalysis improves amine synthesisChemists have developed a novel and efficient method to make amines, which are among the most important structural compounds in pharmaceuticals and organic materials.
7h
The Atlantic
These Young Socialists Have a Plan to Rescue GermanyWhen 28-year-old Kevin Kühnert took the stage last month at the Social Democratic Party’s (SPD) federal congress in Bonn, Germany, he seemed ready to spearhead a left-wing insurrection. Kühnert is the leader of Jusos (an abbreviation for Jungsozialisten , or young socialists), the youth wing of the left-leaning SPD, Germany’s oldest and second-most-powerful political party. At the gathering in Bo
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Walking fish suggests locomotion control evolved much earlier than thoughtCartoons that illustrate evolution depict early vertebrates generating primordial limbs as they move onto land for the first time. But new findings indicate that some of these first ambulatory creatures may have stayed under water, spawning descendants that today exhibit walking behavior on the ocean floor. The results appear February 8 in the journal Cell.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Spectacular' finding: New 3-D vision discovered in praying mantisMiniature glasses have revealed a new form of 3D vision in praying mantises that could lead to simpler visual processing for robots.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chimpanzee self-control is related to intelligence, study findsAs is true in humans, chimpanzees' general intelligence is correlated to their ability to exert self-control and delay gratification, according to new research at Georgia State University.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
Space Technology Could Change the Balance of Power in AfricaNations from Morocco to Nigeria to South Africa and more are beginning to reap the geopolitical advantages of going into orbit -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Big Think
Why President Trump wants a military parade in Washington D.C.President Donald Trump has requested that the U.S. armed forces stage a parade in the nation's capital to feature America's military might. The timing and source of the request has drawn a mixture of opinion. Read More
7h
Big Think
10 fascinating Valentine’s Day celebrations from around the worldValentine’s Day celebrations occur all around the world in different ways that reflect local ideas about love. Read More
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smart Thermometer improves flu forecastingA new approach tested by researchers at the University of Iowa shows that de-identified data from a 'smart thermometer' connected to a mobile phone app can track flu activity in real time at both population and individual levels and the data can be used to significantly improve flu forecasting. The findings are published online Feb. 8 in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum dots display promise for polymersRice University scientists employ the power of the sun to build functional synthetic polymers using photosensitive, semiconducting quantum dots as a catalyst.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More efficient method devised to drug test athletesIt will now be easier, faster and cheaper to catch athletes who take performance-enhancing drugs.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Therapeutic riding programs help veterans cope with PTSDIn the United States, military veterans diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) often are prescribed therapeutic horseback riding (THR) as a complementary therapy, but little is known about how these programs affect PTSD in military veterans. Now, a University of Missouri study has determined that veterans had a significant decrease in PTSD scores just weeks after THR. Results show th
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers help robots think and plan in the abstractNew research shows how robots can autonomously construct abstract representations of their surroundings and use them to plan for multi-step tasks.
7h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic to Host Event on #MeToo: Observations, Criticisms, and What’s Next for the MovementWashington, D.C. (February 8, 2018)—The #MeToo movement has forced a reckoning. From clear cut cases of assault, harassment, and misogyny to poor communication, bad dates, and uncomfortable situations, American society is wrestling with what gender and power mean in the workplace, in personal relationships, and in the media. On Tuesday, February 13, The Atlantic will bring together the writers wh
8h
The Atlantic
Voting Open in Third Annual Renewal Awards: 25 Nonprofits in Running for $150,000 in GrantsWashington, D.C. (February 7, 2018)—Twenty-five nonprofits from across the country have been chosen from nearly 3,000 nominations to compete for $150,000 in funding through The Renewal Awards , a project of The Atlantic and Allstate. The nationwide competition—now in its third year—aims to recognize local organizations driving positive change in their communities and bringing progress to the coun
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Veterans health administration outlines recommendations to combat 'crisis' of MDROsThe Veterans Health Administration is leading efforts to prevent the spread of dangerous multi-drug resistant organisms (MDROs), as detailed in a series of articles published in the February issue of Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, the journal of the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America. The articles identify gaps in the existing knowledge about MDROs and set a research agenda
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nature, meet nurtureIs it nature or nurture that ultimately shapes an organism? A new study reveals a dramatic landscape of gene expression changes across all cell types in the mouse visual cortex after a sensory experience, many linked to neural connectivity and the brain's ability to rewire itself to learn and adapt.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Micro to macro mapping -- Observing past landscapes via remote-sensingNew multi-scale relief modelling algorithm helps archaeologists rediscover topographical features of the past.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers develop breakthrough technique to combat cancer drug resistanceThe ability for cancer cells to develop resistance to chemotherapy drugs -- known as multi-drug resistance -- remains a leading cause for tumor recurrence and cancer metastasis, but recent findings offer hope that oncologists could one day direct cancer cells to 'turn off' their resistance capabilities.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Include patient's bucket list in end-of-life care conversationsTalking to patients with chronic and serious illnesses about their life goals and bucket-lists can help clinicians present treatment options and participate in informed decision-making with a clearer understanding of the potential impact of medical treatments.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Thirdhand smoke lingers in casino months after smoking banDecades of smoking in casinos causes the massive buildup of toxic residue on walls, furniture, and in carpets, according to a new study. The researchers found that the residue, known as thirdhand smoke, declined significantly after smoking was banned in a Northern California casino. But even six months later, toxic tobacco smoke residue remained above levels found in hotels or private homes with s
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
From black hat to white hat: Findings tip assumptions about TAK1 in muscle growthConvention was that the signaling protein, transforming growth factor-ß-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is detrimental to muscle health since it activates pathways associated with muscle wasting. However deactivating TAK1 did not preserve muscle health as expected, but resulted in the opposite effect: muscle wasting.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drug shown to reverse brain deficits caused by alcoholResearchers have identified a drug that could potentially help our brains reboot and reverse the damaging impacts of heavy alcohol consumption on regeneration of brain cells. Their studies in adult mice show that two weeks of daily treatment with the drug tandospirone reversed the effects of 15 weeks of binge-like alcohol consumption on neurogenesis - the ability of the brain to grow and replace n
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic basis of quantitative traits and diseases in JapaneseResearchers presented one of the largest non-European genome-wide association study (GWAS) of quantitative biological traits to date, identifying 1,407 trait-associated loci for 58 traits in 162,255 Japanese individuals. By incorporating the additional GWAS results of the 32 complex diseases and traits in Japanese, they further identified numerous loci that control more than one trait, together wi
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
iPS cell-derived inner ear cells may improve congenital hearing lossA Japanese research group has successfully grafted human iPS cell-derived inner ear cells that express human-derived proteins into the inner ears of embryonic mice. Hereditary hearing loss accounts for about half of all congenital hearing loss cases, and this work is a major contribution toward research that targets the embryonic inner ear.
8h
BBC News - Science & Environment
DNA story of when life first gave us lemonsFrom sweet oranges to bitter lemons, all citrus fruit came from the Himalayas millions of years ago, say scientists.
8h
New Scientist - News
Deep-sea fish lay eggs near hydrothermal vents to keep them warmPacific white skate lay their eggs onto the sizzling hot rocks of hydrothermal vents in the depths of the sea, possibly because the heat speeds up their development
8h
Live Science
Deep-Sea Volcanic Vents Incubate Eggs for These Underwater MomsEggs over easy? Skates warm their egg cases with thermal vents.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Eye could provide 'window to the brain' after strokeResearch into curious bright spots in the eyes on stroke patients' brain images could one day alter the way these individuals are assessed and treated. A team of scientists has found that a chemical routinely given to stroke patients undergoing brain scans can leak into their eyes, highlighting those areas and potentially providing insight into their strokes.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First hybrid nanotech device mimicking blood-brain barrierResearchers fabricated an artificial device reproducing a 1:1 scale model of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), the anatomical and functional structure that protects the central nervous system from external substances, such as contaminants, but also drugs when they are injected intravenously into the body. The device will be fundamental for studying new therapeutic strategies to overcome blood-brain b
8h
Science : NPR
All The Rage Of Aquarius: How Astrology Hangs OnWhy does everyone keep talking about Mercury retrograde?
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Repetition key to self-healing, flexible medical devicesMedical devices powered by synthetic proteins created from repeated sequences of proteins may be possible, according to materials science and biotechnology experts, who looked at material inspired by the proteins in squid ring teeth.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Global stair lifts market expected to reach US$ 1,000 million by the end of 2025Stair lifts are used for individual or personal purposes and are mostly installed in residential and commercial spaces/public spaces.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rapid land changes forecast for East African savannahsA study, presenting a 5000-year environmental history of the popular tourist destination, Amboseli National Park in Kenya, has shown that the impact of climate change on land is more rapid than previously thought.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The beneficial aspects of mindfulness for students of computer engineeringSubjected to the same practice exercise, the group of students that participated in mindfulness sessions obtained better results than those that did not take part in this activity.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technology could reduce spread of antibiotic resistance genes through compostScientists at the University of York have found a way to remove antibiotic resistant genes from industrial compost, which could prevent them entering the food chain.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dairy calves are natural optimists or pessimists, just like usSome calves are inherently optimistic or pessimistic, just as humans are, a new University of British Columbia study has found. The study also assessed fearfulness through standard personality tests, and found that fearfulness and pessimism are closely related.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ebola virus infects reproductive organs in monkeysEbola virus can infect reproductive organs of male and female macaques, according to a new study, suggesting humans could be similarly infected. Prior studies have revealed sexual transmission of Ebola virus, and viral RNA persisting in semen following recovery. While little is known about viral persistence in female reproductive tissues, pregnant women with Ebola virus disease have a maternal dea
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change, urbanization driving opossum's northward marchThe headline reads like something from the satirical newspaper The Onion: 'Grand Forks opossum slain; body to go to University of Michigan for research.'
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic gene mutations: Opening new therapeutic avenues in metastatic prostate cancerInternational study shows the prognostic and predictive value of DNA-repair gene mutations in more precisely selecting standard therapies for the treatment of metastatic prostate cancer.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Black patients more likely to be excluded from prostate cancer trialsStudy finds nearly half of all prostate cancer randomized clinical trials use lab results that are more likely to exclude black patients due to racial variations in laboratory values.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When it comes to genes, lichens embrace sharing economyUniversity of Colorado Boulder researchers have discovered the first known molecular evidence of obligate symbiosis in lichens, a distinctive co-evolutionary relationship that could shed new light on how and why some multicellular organisms consolidate their genomes in order to co-exist.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First 3-D imaging of excited quantum dotsQuantum dots are rapidly taking center stage in emerging applications and research developments, but researchers are still studying how to precisely control the growth of these nanoscale particles and their underlying quantum behavior. For instance, defects form during production of semiconductor materials, so identical dots can differ in composition from one another. To learn more about these def
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists realize breakthrough in controlling the transmission of lightIn the cover-story paper published in today's Nature Electronics, researchers at the Advanced Science Research Center (ASRC) at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York (CUNY) and at the University of Texas at Austin detail the development of a new light wave-isolation method.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
New Study Finds Cutting Oil Subsidies Will Not Stop Climate ChangeThe effect of removing fossil fuel subsidies would fall far short of the reductions promised in the Paris Agreement -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Popular Science
A park ranger's guide to visiting national parks during a government shutdownEnvironment Shutdowns aren't as simple as they used to be. Here’s how you should navigate an ambiguous and inconsistent system of park closures. You can take it from me—I’m a former park ranger.
8h
Feed: All Latest
Car Scratch Removal Test: 3M, Turtle Wax, Meguiar's, QuixxOur writer tests several tactics and products promising to remove scratches from your vehicle, be they tiny or deep.
8h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Top 10 papers from Physical Review’s first 125 yearsThe most prestigious journal in physics celebrates its 125th anniversary, highlighting dozens of its most famous papers.
8h
Science : NPR
Embracing Winter's Chill Through Snow ArtistrySimon Beck's large-scale snow images — like the one made earlier this month in Minneapolis — bring extra beauty to this cold winter season, says commentator Barbara J. King. (Image credit: Great Northern Festival)
8h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
This company pays kids to do their math homework | Mohamad JebaraMohamad Jebara loves mathematics -- but he's concerned that too many students grow up thinking that this beautiful, rewarding subject is difficult and boring. His company is experimenting with a bold idea: paying students for completing weekly math homework. He explores the ethics of this model and how it's helping students -- and why learning math is crucial in the era of fake news.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tea Party movement has paved the way for racialized language in US politicsOvertly racially motivated rhetoric is becoming increasingly acceptable in Republican politics in the US. Two Italian researchers argue that this can partly be traced back to the conservative Tea Party movement which has reshaped the Republican party's identity away from its traditional conservative axioms to one that is more nativist and racially tinged. Luigi Leone and Fabio Presaghi from the Sa
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teleconsulting to bring specialised expertise in rare cancers across EuropeHow collaborative networks are giving patients with rare cancers a chance at better outcomes.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Compounds isolated from rattlesnake venom show activity against hepatitis C virusStudies conducted by Brazilian researchers and published in PLOS ONE and Scientific Reports also found compounds derived from Brazilian plants to be promising against hepatitis C. In spite of the virus' resistance, tests yielded a sharp decline in viral activities such as reproduction and cell invasion.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alien honeybees could cause plant extinctionNew research indicates that introduced 'alien' honeybees are competing for resources with native bees and threatening the survival of plants that rely on interactions with specific pollinators.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Competing for blood: How ecologists are solving infectious disease mysteriesBy looking at malaria infections and hookworms as competitors battling over a key resource -- red blood cells -- Princeton ecologists Andrea Graham and Sarah Budischak were able to explain why co-infected patients often got sicker after being dewormed: without the hookworms to keep it in check, the malaria infection ran rampant.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breakthrough in controlling light transmissionOperation of modern-day technology requires an ever-increasing use of broadband frequency signals. This, in turn, has grown the demand for reliable, efficient methods of signal transmission that prevent interference and are more efficient in their use of the scarcely available frequency spectrum. These requirements are constrained, however, by reciprocity—a law of physics that forces the transmiss
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First 3-D imaging of excited quantum dotsQuantum dots are rapidly taking center stage in emerging applications and research developments, from enhanced LCD TVs and thin-film solar cells, to high-speed data transfer and fluorescent labeling in biomedical applications.
8h
New on MIT Technology Review
How creepy is your smart home? Really, very creepy
8h
The Economist: The world this week
Politics this week
8h
The Economist: The world this week
Business this week
8h
The Economist: The world this week
KAL’s cartoon
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
After Launching the World's Most Powerful Rocket, What's Next for SpaceX?Crewed flights of the Dragon spacecraft and preparations for the Big Falcon Rocket are on the agenda -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Feed: All Latest
The Center for Humane Technology Wants to Spark a Grassroots Ethical Tech RevolutionTristan Harris and the Center for Humane Technology wants to spark an ethical tech movement that starts with the people, not companies or Congress.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A lightning-based nowcast-warning approach to predict short-duration rainfallScientists have noticed and taken advantage of lightning to predict approaching rainstorms, but there are few potent prediction or warning methods available for the rainfall caused by short duration rainfalls(SDR) events. After studying the relationship between lightning and precipitation over Beijing during the warm seasons of 2006 and 2007, scientists developed a lightning-based nowcast-warning
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists develop a 'third eye' to examine stem cellsThe researchers employed the triple labeling technique to analyze stem cells in the brain, the intestine, and testis, using additional tricks to effectively expand the technique to quadruple labeling of dividing stem cells.The new method will increase the accuracy and speed of stem cell division analysis and reveal new populations of stem cells.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cosmic x-rays may provide clues to the nature of dark matterResearchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz in Germany have presented a novel theory of dark matter, which implies that dark matter particles may be very different from what is normally assumed. In particular, their theory involves dark matter particles which are extremely light -- almost one hundred times lighter than electrons, in stark contrast to many conventional models that involve ve
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
A Drug Widely Used to Treat PTSD Symptoms Has Failed a Rigorous TrialThe medication is currently prescribed for many veterans -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
New on MIT Technology Review
Like it or not, the future of cryptocurrency will be determined by bureaucratsDigital coins don’t fit traditional regulatory definitions—what policymakers do about that will determine where the technology goes from here.
9h
Ingeniøren
Nye afgifter har skudt salget af hybridbiler i vejretMens januar satte rekord for salget af pluginhybridbiler med 357 styk, så blev der bare solgt 41 rene elbiler. Nye lave afgifter har bragt prisen på pluginhybrider ned i et priseleje hvor private kan være med.
9h
Science | The Guardian
Discovery of Windsor Neolithic monument excites archaeologistsScientists expect to uncover entire circuit of causewayed enclosure at Berkshire quarry A Neolithic monument has been discovered less than two miles from Windsor Castle. Dating from 5,500 years ago, it is one of the earliest known examples of monument-building in Britain. A ceremonial gathering place known as a causewayed enclosure has been revealed with the discovery of a series of encircling di
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sticking sugar to proteinETH researchers have succeeded in determining the 3D structure of the enzyme that attaches sugar chains to proteins -- a breakthrough that they recently published in the journal Science.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bitcoin crash could derail other cryptocurrenciesA sharp fall in the value of Bitcoin may cause other cryptocurrencies to crash, but is unlikely to have a significant impact on traditional assets, according to new research published in the journal Economics Letters.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devicesTheoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Light and copper catalysis improves amine synthesisEPFL chemists have developed a novel and efficient method to make amines, which are among the most important structural compounds in pharmaceuticals and organic materials. The study is published in Nature Catalysis.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HDAC6 inhibitors protect against neuronal damage and have therapeutic potentialInhibiting HDAC6 improves the structural stability of cells and protects against neuronal damage. Leuven research uncovered that targeting this mechanism could be a promising therapeutic approach for peripheral neuropathies, whether due to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) or as a side effect of chemotherapy.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
From black hat to white hat: Findings tip assumptions about TAK1 in muscle growthConvention was that the signaling protein, transforming growth factor-ß-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is detrimental to muscle health since it activates pathways associated with muscle wasting. However deactivating TAK1 did not preserve muscle health as expected, but resulted in the opposite effect: muscle wasting.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Double trouble: Invasive insect species overlooked as a result of a shared nameAn invasive leaf-mining moth, feeding on cornelian cherry, has been gradually expanding into northern Europe under the cover of a taxonomic confusion for a period likely longer than 60 years. It has been sharing a name with another species. For the first time, a recent paper in the open access journal Nota Lepidopterologica properly distinguishes between the two insects and tries to reconstruct th
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists observe nanowires as they growAt DESY's X-ray source PETRA III, scientists have followed the growth of tiny wires of gallium arsenide live. Their observations reveal exact details of the growth process responsible for the evolving shape and crystal structure of the crystalline nanowires. The findings also provide new approaches to tailoring nanowires with desired properties for specific applications. The scientists, headed by
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nursery stock, homeowner preferences drive tree diversity in Salt Lake ValleyWhat factors shape the formation of a new urban forest?Researchers' survey of tree species diversity in the Salt Lake Valley found that diversity can be shaped by the species available in nurseries, the preferences of the homeowners, and even the tree selections of their neighbors.
9h
Futurity.org
Fracking chemicals linked to precancerous lesions in miceFemale mice exposed to chemicals used in unconventional oil and gas (UOG) operations before birth may develop precancerous lesions and other abnormalities on their mammary glands later, a new study suggests. Additionally, some of the mice involved in the study developed precancerous mammary lesions that may suggest they will be more sensitive to chemicals that cause cancer. Using more than 1,000
9h
Science | The Guardian
Girl, interrupted: the science behind my stutter – and what not to say to mePeople tend to be misinformed about stammering. Here’s why finishing my sentences or telling me to ‘slow down’ doesn’t help I’ve heard the misconceptions for most of my life. “Just slow down,” a stranger told me as a child. “You’re talking too fast – that’s why you stutter!” Later on, as my stutter carried on into adolescence and adulthood, strangers and loved ones alike offered up their own judg
9h
The Atlantic
Where Is Elon Musk's Space Tesla Actually Going?CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.—There is, at this very moment, a shiny red car floating around in our solar system. The car, a 2008 Tesla Roadster, hitched a ride to space on what is now the most powerful rocket in operation, the Falcon Heavy, built by Elon Musk’s company SpaceX. The goal of the Falcon Heavy’s first flight —aside from not blowing up—was to put the Tesla into an elliptical orbit between Eart
9h
Quanta Magazine
When Probability Meets Real LifeIt is natural for scientific thinkers to try to apply rational methods to assess risk in everyday life. Should you get a flu shot , for example, if you’re under 40 and in good health? Should you jump out of an airplane (with a parachute)? The lofty goal of applying reason to risk assessment, however, is thwarted by two things: First, in the absence of certainty we typically make decisions based o
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Zipping-up' rings to make nanographenesNanographenes are attracting wide interest from many researchers as a powerful candidate for the next generation of carbon materials due to their unique electric properties. Scientists at Nagoya University have now developed a fast way to form nanographenes in a controlled fashion. This simple and powerful method for nanographene synthesis could help generate a range of novel optoelectronic materi
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Self-defeating humor promotes psychological well-being, study revealsResearchers from the University of Granada provide new data on the consequences of using different styles of humor, emphasizing the importance of analyzing cultural differences in future psychological research.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Global hematology diagnostics market estimated to expand at a robust CAGR over 2021Hematology includes various IVD technologies such as blood analysis, flow cytometry, immunodiagnostics, molecular diagnostics, hemostasis, histology, and cytology.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
iPS cell-derived inner ear cells may improve congenital hearing lossA Japanese research group has successfully grafted human iPS cell-derived inner ear cells that express human-derived proteins into the inner ears of embryonic mice. Hereditary hearing loss accounts for about half of all congenital hearing loss cases, and this work is a major contribution toward research that targets the embryonic inner ear.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uber drivers aren't employees, French court rules (Update)Ride-hailing giant Uber has won a case filed by a French driver claiming he should be considered an employee, a ruling that added to legal uncertainty in Europe about how to regulate the company.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Kale to go: Amazon to roll out delivery at Whole FoodsWhole Foods Amazon PrimeAmazon delivery is coming to Whole Foods.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Twitter turns first profit ever, but problems remainTwitter beat Wall Street's cautious expectations with its first quarterly profit in history, but that isn't going to solve the company's broader problems any time soon.
9h
Dagens Medicin
Justering af fastfrysningsmodel skal sikre bedre lægedækningFastfrysning af speciallæger på de store universitetshospitaler havde ingen effekt, og derfor justerer Danske Regioner nu modellen. Formand for overlægerne tror ikke, at ‘pisk’ virker.
9h
Popular Science
Seven event-planning apps to bring people togetherDIY Organize your party with ease. Getting ready to plan a big party or organize a family reunion? You might need an app or two to help bring everyone together. Here are our top picks.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hydrothermal vents speed development of deep-sea marine animal eggsA team of scientists from the University of Rhode Island and the Charles Darwin Research Station exploring the seafloor northwest of the Galapagos Islands in 2015 made an unexpected discovery. Large numbers of egg cases of a deep-sea skate – relatives of sharks and rays – were observed adjacent to the hot water emitted from hydrothermal vents, which the scientists said the skates use to accelerate
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists simplify process to make polymers with light-triggered nanoparticlesRice University scientists plan to employ the power of the sun to build functional synthetic polymers using photosensitive quantum dots—microscopic semiconducting particles—as a catalyst.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New theory of dark matter based on the detection of unusual X-ray radiation from galaxiesDark matter is increasingly puzzling. Around the world, physicists have been trying for decades to determine the nature of these matter particles, which do not emit light and are therefore invisible to the human eye. Their existence was postulated in the 1930s to explain certain astronomical observations. As visible matter, like the one that makes up the stars and the Earth, constitutes just 5 per
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
It matters who your mother is, even for fishTilapia has become a top seafood staple on many dinner tables worldwide. New research shows the Tilapia-industry can produce more of the finest cuts by paying closer attention to maternal breeding factors.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Emotional bond between humans and dogs dates back 14,000 yearsPrehistoric people may well have had an emotional bond with domesticated dogs much earlier than we thought. Leiden Ph.D. candidate and vet Luc Janssens discovered that a dog found at the start of the last century in a grave dating back 14,000 years had been sick for a long time and had been cared for. Publication in the Journal of Archaeological Science.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World-first genetic analysis reveals Aussie white shark numbersOf all apex predators, the white shark Carchardon carcharias (commonly known as the great white) is perhaps the most fascinating. The potential danger from (very rare) human interaction has embedded the species in our national consciousness.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to make healthy buildings in an era of mass migrationWorldwide population growth and mass migrations are putting the infrastructure of many cities under strain. With city governments under pressure to provide more housing and work spaces, people can end up living and working in poorly designed or low quality buildings.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Light and copper catalysis improves amine synthesisEPFL chemists have developed a novel and efficient method to make amines, which are among the most important structural compounds in pharmaceuticals and organic materials. The study is published in Nature Catalysis.
10h
Futurity.org
Our lungs aren’t all identicalOur lungs’ internal anatomy is surprisingly variable and some of these anatomical variations are associated with a higher risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a new study indicates. The variations occur in large airway branches in the lower lobes of the lungs and can be readily detected with standard CT scans. The findings suggest that people with certain variations might, in the
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals genetic basis of quantitative traits and diseases in JapaneseOsaka University-centered researchers presented one of the largest non-European genome-wide association study (GWAS) of quantitative biological traits to date, identifying 1,407 trait-associated loci for 58 traits in 162,255 Japanese individuals. By incorporating the additional GWAS results of the 32 complex diseases and traits in Japanese, they further identified numerous loci that control more t
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drug shown to reverse brain deficits caused by alcoholQueensland University of Technology (QUT) researchers have identified a drug that could potentially help our brains reboot and reverse the damaging impacts of heavy alcohol consumption on regeneration of brain cells.Their studies in adult mice show that two weeks of daily treatment with the drug tandospirone reversed the effects of 15 weeks of binge-like alcohol consumption on neurogenesis - the a
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antibacterial applications of graphene oxidesGraphene oxide (GO) is one of the most widely studied engineered nanomaterials. A review discussed the structure-activity relationships (SARs) involved in GO-induced bacterial killing, the molecular initiating events (MIEs) and biosafety in antibacterial applications (cover articles in Science Bulletin, 2018, 63(2): 133-142).
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Recreating liver tumors as organoids for faster, more accurate drug screeningA major challenge in developing liver cancer drugs is that preclinical testing occurs in tumor models that do not accurately reflect human tumor features, causing drug candidates to later fail in clinical testing. Now, Singaporean researchers have grown organoids from liver tumors on specially engineered 3-D scaffolds. These organoids replicate important features of the original tumor, including g
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Devoted frog fathers guard their eggs from predatorsA study led by PhD candidate Mr K. S. Seshadri from the Department of Biological Sciences at the National University of Singapore's Faculty of Science has revealed that male white-spotted bush frogs (Raochestes chalazodes) dedicatedly guard their fertilised eggs from other cannibalistic male frogs and predators. The study confirmed that the adult male white-spotted bush frogs are the sole caregive
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How cancer stem cells drive triple-negative breast cancerResearchers have new findings on a new stem cell pathway that allows a highly aggressive form of breast cancer -- triple-negative breast cancer -- to thrive.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Here is the perfect spot for a birds' inner compassMigratory birds use a magnetic compass in their eye for navigation. Its basic sensory mechanisms have long remained elusive, but now researchers reveal exactly where in the eye, the birds' control center for navigation is situated.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technique boosts eyewitness recallNew research from a memory expert shows there may be a simple way to help eyewitnesses of crimes remember more about what they have seen.
10h
Ingeniøren
Raketmadsens Rumlaboratorium er rømmet på RefshaleøenEjendomsselskabet, der udlejer hangaren, regner med, at den bliver lejet ud pr. 1. marts.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Organic vortex lasers could be used in future 3-D displaysResearchers have developed a new type of organic vortex laser, which is a laser that emits a helical beam of light. In the future, miniature arrays of these vortex lasers, each with a slightly different spiral shape, may be used in applications such as 3D TV displays, microscopy, and as information carriers for visible light communications.
10h
Dagens Medicin
Hjertesygdomme rammer oftere lavtuddannedeLavt uddannede får oftere end højtuddannede en hjertesygdom, viser ny forskning. Samtidig har de også større risiko for at dø af den.
10h
New on MIT Technology Review
Cops have toppled a $530 million cybercrime empire
10h
Futurity.org
Speedy decisions set Olympians apartQuick decision-making and a lot of experience give Olympians an edge, says neuroscientist Christopher Fetsch. Fetsch, assistant professor of neuroscience and researcher in the Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute at Johns Hopkins University, studies how the brain makes decisions, weighing information coming in from the various senses. Take Olympic skiers. They fly down the slope and see a gate. Go
10h
Dagens Medicin
Styrk lægers efteruddannelse på tværs af regionerneDet giver ikke mening, at der fra region til region er forskellige regler for, hvornår læger kan deltage i efteruddannelse, som er sponseret af industrien.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fast-spinning spheres show nanoscale systems' secretsLabs are studying the effects of a spinning magnetic field on magnetically responsive particles. New findings could help researchers use these colloidal particles as models for 2-D materials whose enhanced properties have led to improved performance in applications ranging from electronics, data storage, catalysis and photonics.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Star-like cells may help the brain tune breathing rhythmsScientists caused rats to breathe at a lower rate and tire out on a treadmill earlier than normal by silencing star-shaped brain cells, called astrocytes. The results suggest that astrocytes play a more active role than traditionally thought in how the brain controls breathing and other vital functions.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First hybrid nanotech device mimicking blood-brain barrierResearchers at IIT-Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia fabricated an artificial device reproducing a 1:1 scale model of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), the anatomical and functional structure that protects the central nervous system from external substances, such as contaminants, but also drugs when they are injected intravenously into the body. The device will be fundamental for studying new therapeut
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Thirdhand smoke lingers in casino months after smoking banDecades of smoking in casinos causes the massive buildup of toxic residue on walls, furniture, and in carpets, according to a new study led by scientists at San Diego State University. The researchers found that the residue, known as thirdhand smoke, declined significantly after smoking was banned in a Northern California casino. But even six months later, toxic tobacco smoke residue remained abov
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study identifies how to improve WHO eradication strategy for skin diseaseAn international research collaboration published in The Lancet has found crucial evidence that could help to improve the current World Health Organization (WHO) strategy to eradicate yaws -- a chronic disfiguring and debilitating infectious disease affecting the skin, bones and joints.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SpaceX stages an amazing launch – but what about the environmental impact?SpaceX has now launched the most powerful spacecraft since the Apollo era – the Falcon Heavy rocket – setting the bar for future space launches. The most important thing about this reusable spacecraft is that it can carry a payload equivalent to sending five double-decker London buses into space – which will be invaluable for future manned space exploration or in sending bigger satellites into orb
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A fast and efficient method for graphene nanoribbon synthesisNanographenes are attracting wide interest from many researchers as a powerful candidate for the next generation of carbon materials due to their unique electric properties. Scientists at Nagoya University have now developed a fast way to form nanographenes in a controlled fashion. This simple and powerful method for nanographene synthesis could help generate a range of novel optoelectronic materi
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Strategic sustainability focus delivers competitive advantagesOnce the domain of a company's production/operations department, environmental awareness has steadily expanded to include functions across the entire organization. Over the last three decades, Earth-friendly actions have evolved from recycling and sourcing materials that use recycled content to incorporating sustainability considerations into products and services.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How bats help explain the human brainBy measuring the brain activity of bats, scientists are learning how mammals keep track of everyone in their social circles.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Keep pot away from petsIf you suspect your pet has ingested marijuana, whether in the form of an "edible" or the plant itself, it's important to be upfront with your veterinarian about what has happened.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The principle that governs everything from rocket landings to interest ratesThe successful first test flight of the SpaceX Falcon Heavy launch vehicle Wednesday morning was an amazing technological feat – and fantastic theatre.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sticking sugar to proteinETH researchers have succeeded in determining the 3-D structure of the enzyme that attaches sugar chains to proteins – a breakthrough that they recently published in the journal Science.
10h
Dagens Medicin
Lif: Kun lille stigning i sygehusudgifterne til kræftmedicinSygehusudgifterne til kræftmedicin er kun steget lidt, viser Lægemiddelindustriforeningens analyse. Det står i skarp kontrast til Kræftens Bekæmpelses udmelding om 14-doblede udgifter. Opgørelsesmetoden adskiller de to parter.
10h
Ingeniøren
Kronik: Lad Skandinavien tage førerskab på grøn transport
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers uncover New Zealand's first fossils preserved in amberThe discovery of fossil insects, nematodes and fungi preserved in amber from sites in Otago is shedding new light on New Zealand's geological and biological history.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research explores impacts of abusive supervisionA recent Naveen Jindal School of Management study examined the damaging impact abusive supervision has in the workplace including the ways employees respond with retaliatory behavior, which lowers productivity.
10h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Smart windows could block brightness and harness lightA new type of material pulls double-duty as window shade and solar cell.
10h
Dagens Medicin
Lægeforeningens troværdighed er på spilØNH-lægerne har et etisk problem – de bruger deres lægelige autoritet som afsæt for at anbefale en butik, de selv ejer. Det er mærkværdigt, at Lægeforeningen accepterer, at en gruppe af medlemmer systematisk modarbejder foreningens etiske fundament.
10h
Ingeniøren
Skatteaftale spænder ben for arbejde i udlandet: »Katastrofalt,« siger IDARegeringens skatteaftale betyder, at danskere, der arbejder uden for EU hurtigt kan miste retten til dagpenge. Det får fagforeninger til at råbe op.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Social robot set to revolutionise workplace experienceWorkers at the Fuji Xerox R&D Square in Japan are about to welcome a new workmate who will take on many of their mundane tasks and promote collaboration.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seismic stress map profiles induced earthquake risk for West Texas, New MexicoStanford geophysicists have developed a detailed map of the stresses that act in the Earth throughout the Permian Basin in West Texas and southeastern New Mexico, highlighting areas of the oil-rich region that could be at greater risk for future earthquakes induced by production operations.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop a 'third eye' to examine stem cellsA joint team of scientists from Russia and the United States designed a method for marking dividing stem cells with three different labels. Until now, it was only possible to use two labels simultaneously. The new method will increase the accuracy and speed of stem cell division analysis and reveal new populations of stem cells. In the paper published in Stem Cell Reports, the researchers demonstr
10h
Feed: All Latest
The Tale of the Painting Robot That Didn't Steal Anyone's JobA robotic arm that paints and sands things never wanted to steal Eric Magallon's job—it wanted him to keep it.
10h
Feed: All Latest
As Our Feeds Have Grown, So Have the GIFs We Communicate WithSize and time limits are a thing of the past—and the creations that have emerged redefine the very way we communicate online.
10h
Feed: All Latest
Outdated Auto Safety Rules Threaten the Self-Driving Car RevolutionOpinion: Modernizing car safety rules will foster innovation and possibly save tens of thousands of lives every year. Congress just needs to make it happen.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Peptide improves glucose and insulin sensitivity, lowers weight in miceTreating obese mice with catestatin (CST), a peptide naturally occurring in the body, showed significant improvement in glucose and insulin tolerance and reduced body weight, report University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers.
10h
Science-Based Medicine
Anti-vaccine sentiment associated with belief in conspiracy theoriesA recent survey examined the relationship between opposition to vaccines, belief in conspiracy theories, and other factors. The results suggest that we may need to modify how we address concerns about the safety and effectiveness of vaccines.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
Extreme Brain Teaser-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A way to create liquid droplets inside of air bubblesA team of researchers at Zhejiang University in China has developed a technique to create liquid droplets inside of air bubbles. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes the technique and some possible commercial applications.
11h
Popular Science
How people die from the fluHealth Please go get your flu shot. Seriously. For the many thousands who contract the flu and recover, it may seem unfathomable that you could die from what often feels like a particularly nasty cold. Well, this is…
11h
Dana Foundation
Interview with Science Cheerleader Hilary NicholsonScience Cheerleaders is an organization that works to confront stereotypes around cheerleaders and academics in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). Members travel around the country to speak at schools, festivals, sports games, on TV, and more, to help connect groups traditionally underrepresented in STEM fields. We spoke with member and national coordinator, Hilary Nicholso
11h
Ingeniøren
Kan mørkt stof danne stjerner og planeter?Man kan ikke afvise, at mørkt stof kan klumpe sig tæt sammen på samme måde som almindeligt stof. Men det kræver, at mørkt stof findes i mindst to udgaver – en let og en tung.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bethe strings experimentally observed for the first timeAn international team of researchers has experimentally observed Bethe strings for the first time. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes their experiments and what they observed, and offer possible implications of their work.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Misled Penguins Swim to Feeding Grounds That No Longer Have FoodYoung birds follow the right signal to foraging grounds, but when they arrive there are no fish to eat -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Beetle Escapes Toads StomachThe bombardier beetle forced its devourer to vomit it out by releasing explosive, toxic chemicals.
11h
The Scientist RSS
Study: Telomeres Dont Shorten with Age in Longest-Lived BatsResearchers find that while bats in the Myotis genus don't produce telomerase, the enzyme that lengthens telomeres, they possess 21 telomere maintenance-related genes.
11h
New Scientist - News
Fears of Brexit chaos for medicines agency should worry us allFresh turmoil threatens to worsen disruption of the European Medicines Agency when it quits the UK after Brexit. That should worry all parties, says Inga Vesper
11h
New Scientist - News
The truth about what downing energy drinks really does to kidsCampaigners in the UK want energy drinks banned for under-16s. The latest scientific evidence suggests they are right – these drinks are uniquely bad for children
11h
Dagens Medicin
Lokket med gulerod, men ramt af piskDet risikobaserede tilsyn startede så fint med gulerodsretorik om læring og patientsikkerhed hos os fodterapeuter, men er endt i pisk, påbud og mærkværdige anmærkninger.
11h
Science : NPR
Stop Crying! Tear-Free Onions Are HereFor years, people have been crying about how chopping onions brings on the waterworks. Well, there's finally a tearless onion, but the allium has not quite caught on with the general public yet. (Image credit: Fuse/Getty Images)
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Face of first Brit revealed: Blue eyes, dark hair and skinResearchers have revealed the face of 'Cheddar Man', Britain's oldest nearly complete skeleton at 10,000 years old, with unprecedented accuracy. The results indicate that Cheddar Man had blue eyes, dark colored curly hair and 'dark to black' skin pigmentation.
11h
Dagens Medicin
Sæt farten nedKortere indlæggelser medfører, at patienterne på ingen måde er færdigudredt eller sat i relevant behandling, når de returneres til egen læge i primærsektoren.
11h
The Atlantic
The Men's Figure-Skating Gold Is Nathan Chen's to LoseEditor’s Note: Find all of The Atlantic ’s Winter Olympics 2018 coverage here . Last month, the legendary four-time Olympic medalist and famously truant once-legislator Evgeni Plushenko predicted that the men’s figure-skating event in Pyeongchang would be the most interesting of its kind in the games’ history. The field, after all, is perhaps more crowded with talent than it’s ever been. There ar
11h
The Atlantic
China Loves TrumpI n January of last year, around the time of the presidential inauguration, as jitters about the relationship between Donald Trump and China mounted, I regularly joined the mob of reporters at the Chinese foreign ministry’s daily briefings in Beijing. There, the assembled members of the media would press officials on Trump’s latest anti-China comment or Twitter blast—on tariffs, trade wars, North
11h
Viden
Rum-Tesla på afveje: Ryger langt forbi MarsElon Musks elbil, som Falcon Heavy-raketten tirsdag sendte afsted mod Mars, ender i stedet alene i det tomme rum.
11h
Feed: All Latest
Why America Needs A Nationalized 5G NetworkWIRED columnist Susan Crawford on why the US needs massive government mobilization to solve its digital divide
11h
Feed: All Latest
A Trade War With China Could Catch Tech in the CrossfireChinese Police GlassesChina is bracing for the results of a US investigation of its technology-transfer policies, and some US tech firms fear the blowback.
11h
Feed: All Latest
Which MacBook Should I Buy? (2018)It's never been harder to buy the right Apple laptop. Let us help you with our MacBook buying guide!
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Creating a hotspot for understanding VenusA new simulation facility at the Planetary Spectroscopy Laboratory of the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) could help revolutionise our understanding of the hot, hidden surface of Venus. The Planetary Spectroscopy Laboratory (PSL) can analyse rock samples similar to those found on the surface of Venus at temperatures up to 1000 degrees Celsius, enabling rese
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A first look at how miniscule bubbles affect the texture of noodlesThe texture of a noodle is a remarkably complicated thing. When you bite into a spoonful of ramen noodles, you expect a bit of springiness (or a resistance to your bite) on the outside and a pleasantly soft give on the interior. These variations are so tiny as to be often overlooked, but they matter to noodle quality.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Why Do Curling Stones Curl?Curling at the highest level requires careful calculations and a little finesse with physics. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Dagens Medicin
Skærpet tilsyn med psykiatere kan være nødvendigtDet var fuldt berettiget, at Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed skred håndfast ind over for psykiater Michael Schmidt i Slagelse.
11h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Plastic waste 'building up' in ArcticPlastic waste is building up in the supposedly pristine wilderness of the Norwegian Arctic, scientists say.
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Scotland's red squirrel numbers stabiliseResearchers find that the population has increased in the north east and stopped shrinking nationwide.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In­flu­ence of car­bon di­ox­ide leak­age on the seabedStoring carbon dioxide (CO2) deep below the seabed is one way to counteract the increasing concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere. But what happens if such storage sites begin to leak and CO2 escapes through the seafloor? Answers to this question have now been provided by a study dealing with the effects of CO2 emissions on the inhabitants of sandy seabed areas.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Devoted frog fathers guard their eggs from predatorsA study led by Ph.D. candidate Mr K. S. Seshadri from the Department of Biological Sciences at the National University of Singapore's Faculty of Science has revealed that male white-spotted bush frogs (Raochestes chalazodes) dedicatedly guard their fertilised eggs from other cannibalistic male frogs and predators. The study confirmed that the adult male white-spotted bush frogs are the sole caregi
12h
Dagens Medicin
SST om HPV-vaccine til drenge: Seksualiteten registreres ikkeSundhedsstyrelsen forsikrer, at drenge, der takker ja til det midlertidige tilbud om gratis HPV-vaccination hos egen læge, ikke risikerer at få afsløret deres seksualitet via vaccinationsregistret.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists identify pheromone from insect that transmits citrus greening (HLB)The Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri is only 2 mm long, yet it strikes terror into the hearts of citrus growers in Brazil, China and the United States. This is because it acts as a vector for the bacteria that causes Huanglongbing (HLB), commonly known as citrus greening. HLB originated in Asia and now affects most citrus groves worldwide. The disease is devastating for the citrus industry be
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mathematics pushes innovation in 4-D printingRecent advances in digital factory science make it possible to print more compliant objects across a wider range of length-scales than conventional engineering processes. A bottleneck for enabling the next technological progress resides in filling the gap in the comprehension of the unprecedented degree of complexity dominating this novel technology.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nostalgia safeguards against negative feelingsDonald Trump's campaign slogan resonated deeply with many Americans. Notions of America's greatness and moral superiority have a long tradition and are deeply engrained in the country's culture. Such ideas are often projected into an imagined golden past. But how can this collective nostalgia be reconciled with the many historical wrongs the country has perpetrated?
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Plastic pollution reaching record levels in once pristine ArcticHere's why the Arctic is no longer what you see in the pictures.
12h
Live Science
Why Measuring a Tiny, Spinning Particle Is Such a Big DealThe g-2 experiment has begun and it has the potential to shake up the reigning model of particle physics.
12h
Live Science
Why Is Jupiter's Great Spot Red?What gives Jupiter's Great Red Spot its distinct color? A new study shows why the answer may not be easy to find.
12h
Live Science
The Author of This Physics Paper Is 7 Years Old (and Also a Cat)What has your cat done lately?
12h
Latest Headlines | Science News
50 years on, nuclear fusion still hasn’t delivered clean energyIn 1968, scientists predicted that the world would soon use nuclear fusion as an energy source.
12h
Feed: All Latest
Catherine Price’s New Book, “How to Break Up With Your Phone", Presents a 30-day Program for Remembering That Your Time and Attention Are Finite.A new book presents a 30 day program for handling cell phone addiction.
12h
Feed: All Latest
How to Watch the 2018 Winter Olympics OnlineWondering how to stream the Winter Olympics? Try these three easy steps.
12h
Feed: All Latest
Should Data Scientists Adhere to a Hippocratic Oath?As concerns mount over the uses of data, some in the field are trying to forge ethical guidelines.
12h
Feed: All Latest
One Man's Quest to Make Google's Gadgets GreatGoogle is leaning on Rick Osterloh to completely rewrite its strategy for hardware, with one core goal: Put its virtual assistant everywhere in people's lives.
12h
The Atlantic
How to Parent an Olympic AthleteEditor’s Note: Find all of The Atlantic ’s Winter Olympics 2018 coverage here . Watching a kid’s (usually mediocre) school piano recital can be enough to elicit in her parent a range of emotions, from fear to excitement to overflowing pride. What happens when the big event is not a rec-room recital but, say, the Winter Olympics? Being the parent of a competitive athlete comes with all kinds of pr
12h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Not-So-Simple Secret World of Song Sparrows....or BOOF, the bird who did everything wrong -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Dagens Medicin
Minister lover markant øget fokus på læring i lægetilsynStyrelsen for Patientsikkerhed skal bruge en fjerdedel af sine samlede ressourcer på at styrke læringselementet i tilsyn med sundhedspersoner, fastslår sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Migratory birds eye-localized magnetoreception for navigationMigratory birds use a magnetic compass in their eye for navigation. The involved sensory mechanisms have long remained elusive, but now, researchers have revealed exactly where in the eye avian navigation is situated.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists develop a simple, easy-to-use method to break down pollutants in waterChemists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have determined how stubborn pollutants in water can be disintegrated easily and cost-effectively. The process requires only a green LED light, a catalyst and vitamin C, and can produce hydrated electrons that reliably destroy the pollutants in the water. Until now, complex laser systems were required. The study was recently published i
13h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Day the Earth Stood StillContinents and volcanoes nearly came to a halt billions of years ago, creating a huge planetary pressure cooker -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Highly efficient ammonia synthesis catalyst developedResearchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have discovered that a catalyst of calcium amide with a small amount of added barium (Ba-Ca(NH2)2) with ruthenium nanoparticles immobilized onto it can synthesize ammonia at an efficiency 100 times greater than that of conventional ruthenium catalysts at low temperatures below 300ºC. The performance of this catalyst is also several times hi
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breakthrough in macromolecular machines for actively controlled cancer drug deliveryHong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) scholars demonstrated the design and synthesis of a smart globular macromolecular machine vehicle for actively controlled cancer drug delivery that enhances the drug's efficacy. This breakthrough gives insight to targeted therapy drugs such as Chlorambucil in the treatment of leukemia. The paper, titled "Higher-Generation Type III-B Rotaxane Dendrimers with Cont
13h
Science | The Guardian
The darkest building on Earth: 'An angular black hole waiting to suck you in'Sprayed with Vantablack Vbx2, a pavilion at the Winter Olympics in South Korea absorbs 99% of light. We talk to its British architect Asif Khan, who also invented the ‘selfie-building’ The pistes of Pyeongchang may be blinding white with snow as the Winter Olympics kicks off in South Korea, but among the ice rinks and bobsleigh tracks stands something completely different: the darkest building on
13h
Ingeniøren
Uber undskylder: Ingen god grund til at skjule datalækUber erkender overfor det amerikanske senat, at det var en fejl ikke at fortælle kunder eller myndighederne om et datalæk i 2016, der gjaldt data for 57 millioner individer.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists successfully test new, safer titanium plate for bone tissue repairFor the first time, patented titanium fiber plates developed by Japanese engineers for medical use have been tested in an animal model. Researchers from Shinshu University found that, unlike conventional plates, titanium fiber plates do not cause bone embrittlement after close contact with the bone for prolonged periods. This could eliminate the need for plate extraction and the associated surgica
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Job satisfaction not a persistent effect of wage increasesAfter a wage increase, people tend to be more satisfied with their jobs—and even more so when what they have gained exceeds the wage increases of their colleagues. Yet, this effect on job satisfaction is not persistent. Two economists from University of Basel reported these findings in a study recently published in the Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization.
13h
Ingeniøren
DF sikrer drænrørsopfinder 10 mio. kr. til nye forsøgDrænrørsopfinderen Poul Jacobsen får endnu en chance for at få testet effekten af sine omdiskuterede drænrør.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop the first model to capture crosstalk in social dilemmasPrevious interactions can affect unrelated future decisions: In a line at a coffee shop, a stranger pays for the coffee of the man behind her, who then pays for the next stranger's coffee. He's had no interaction with other customers, and no reason to do them a favor, but he does it anyway. This is an example of crosstalk, in which previous interactions affect unrelated future decisions. And thoug
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mars on Earth: Simulation tests in remote desert of OmanDressed in stark white spacesuits against the backdrop of a desolate, auburn terrain of stony plains and sand dunes, two scientists test a geo-radar by dragging the flat box across the rocky sand.
13h
The Atlantic
The Death of NewsweekNewsweek is in the news—raided by the police last month as part of a probe into the owners’ shady finances, then subjected to a crude purge on Monday, when the owners sacked the editors and reporters who tried to write about the scandal. This was the cinematic coda to a decade of collapse. Whatever its shortcomings, the country lost something with the demise of classic Newsweek —a magazine with g
13h
The Atlantic
Military Parades Are a Waste of Time and MoneySince President Tru mp wants a military parade , let’s talk about parades. I don’t like them. I have an aversion, as a point of fact, to any and all military drill and ceremony aside from that performed at military funerals. The other occasional ceremonies performed by specialist units such as the U.S. Army’s Old Guard or the Marines at the barracks at 8th and I are okay as well, I guess, but eve
13h
The Atlantic
Amazon's Failing Bet on Woody AllenAmazon Whole Foods PrimeAmazon’s entry into the world of filmmaking began in earnest less than three years ago, when the company announced in July 2015 that it had acquired Spike Lee’s Chi-Raq to be the first “Amazon Original Movie.” Quickly enough, Amazon Studios (then headed by Roy Price) pursued a strategy of tapping established indie filmmakers who had risen to fame in the ’80s and ’90s to make their passion project
13h
Viden
157 nye emojis på vej til din mobilGodt nyt for rødhårede, hvidhårede, skaldede og dem med krøller.
13h
Ingeniøren
Forsikring mod arkæologi-udgifter droppetI Regeringens og DFs Vækstplan fra 2016 blev det foreslået at bygherrer skulle kunne forsikre sig mod uventede udgifter til arkæologiske udgravninger. Men planen er droppet igen
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Toward a better prediction of solar eruptionsA single phenomenon may underlie all solar eruptions, according to researchers from the CNRS, École Polytechnique, CEA and INRIA in an article featured on the cover of the February 8 issue of Nature. They have identified the presence of a confining 'cage' in which an entangled magnetic 'rope' forms, causing solar eruptions. It is the resistance of this cage to the attack of the rope that determine
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Removing fossil fuel subsidies will not reduce CO2 emissions as much as hopedRemoving fossil fuel subsidies would have only a small effect on CO2 emissions and renewable energy use, new research has shown. The largest emissions savings would be in oil and gas exporting countries, where fewer poor people would be affected, and subsidy removal can be aided by currently low oil prices.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First report in decades of a forgotten crop pathogen calls for critical close monitoringScientists, breeders, farmers and conservation groups must continue to work in close collaboration to prepare for the potential re-emergence of a forgotten crop pathogen, a new study advises today.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stroke risk factors unique to women identifiedInvestigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital and their colleagues are exploring the effects of potential risk factors that are unique to women, including hormone levels, hormone therapy, hormonal birth control, pregnancy and time of menarche and menopause.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Human antibodies undermine parasite sexSome people develop an immune response following a malaria infection that stops them from infecting other mosquitos. The antibodies that these people produce are sucked up by the mosquito and destroy the malaria parasite in the mosquito's stomach. Researchers from Radboud university medical center discovered that 1 in 25 malaria patients prevent the disease from spreading in this way. They also un
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers uncover how cancer stem cells drive triple-negative breast cancerCleveland Clinic researchers have published findings in Nature Communications on a new stem cell pathway that allows a highly aggressive form of breast cancer -- triple-negative breast cancer -- to thrive.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stroke journal features women's studies on how gender influences stroke risk, treatment and outcomesMany aspects of strokes affect women and men differently, and four articles in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke highlight recent research and identify future research needs.
14h
Science : NPR
California May Have A Way To Block Trump's Offshore Drilling PushIn the 1980s, California towns used local zoning rules to block offshore oil and gas drilling. State lawmakers are considering a similar strategy to push back against the Trump administration. (Image credit: Chris Carlson/AP)
14h
Science : NPR
How To Pack A Space TelescopeOperating a telescope in space is a challenge, but so is moving one on Earth. An inside look at how NASA's James Webb Space Telescope moved from Houston to Los Angeles. (Image credit: Chris Gunn/NASA)
14h
The Atlantic
White Women in the Rustbelt Are Turning on TrumpA massive new measure of state-by-state attitudes toward Donald Trump offers important clues about the pressure points that could tip the 2018 elections. Last week, Gallup released Trump’s average approval rating in all 50 states in 2017 , based on more than 171,000 survey interviews it conducted over the course of the year. That compilation put Trump’s average national approval rating for 2017 a
14h
The Atlantic
Who Murdered Malta's Most Famous Journalist?STRASBOURG—Daphne Caruana Galizia was less than a mile from home when her Peugeot 108 exploded and burst into flames last October, killing her instantly and sending shrapnel into a nearby field. She was 53 and the most famous investigative journalist in Malta. In that tiny country, her scoops consistently made life uncomfortable for the powerful, whether in banks or the prime minister’s office. I
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First report in decades of a forgotten crop pathogen calls for critical close monitoringScientists, breeders, farmers and conservation groups must continue to work in close collaboration to prepare for the potential re-emergence of a forgotten crop pathogen, a new study advises today.
14h
Ingeniøren
GALLERI: Falcon Heavy take-offTirsdag d. 6 februar 2018, klokken 21:45 dansk tid, blev der skrevet rum-historie da SpaceX’ raket, Falcon Heavy, lettede fra Florida. Se de imponerende billeder fra opsendelsen her.
15h
Ingeniøren
Kemiker: Strålingen i rummet gør det snart af med TeslaenElon Musks gimmick med at sende sin Tesla Roadster i kredsløb om Solen har en kort udløbsdato. Den vil snart være rumskrot, vurderer danske Terma og en amerikansk kemiker.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bird senses can improve drone navigationSouth American oilbirds combine echolocation and extremely sensitive vision to find their way through dark caves. Decoding how they do this could help develop autonomous drones.
15h
Science | The Guardian
The trauma trap: what's causing inequalities in emergency care?As US studies reveal worrying disparities in trauma treatment based on patient ethnicity, one surgeon urges more research into inequalities in UK emergency care Ten years ago, when Dr Adil Haider, a trauma surgeon at Harvard Medical School, began investigating disparities in emergency centre outcomes based on information recorded in the US National Trauma Data Bank , he discovered a striking tren
15h
Ingeniøren
5G debuterer til vinter-OL i Sydkorea. »Hype« mener ekspertTraditionen tro bliver nye teknologier fremvist under de Olympiske Lege. Denne gang bebuder telefirmaerne downloadhastigheder 100 gange hurtigere end vores nuværende 4G-netværk - og forsinkelser så lave som 1 millisekund.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nissan slashes profit forecasts after inspection scandalJapanese car giant Nissan on Thursday slashed its forecast for full-year operating profit after admitting that a damaging inspection scandal last year had "adversely impacted" the firm's performance.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tesla aims to calm fears over Model 3 productionA day after launching one of its cars into space, Tesla moved Wednesday to ease concerns on earth over production delays for its Model 3, the key to future growth for the star electric carmaker.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Axing fossil fuel subsidies scant help on climate: studyGetting rid of massive subsidies for oil, gas and coal will not significantly curb carbon pollution or speed the transition to a greener global economy, researchers said Wednesday, challenging widely held assumptions.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Talking to doctors about your bucket list could help advance care planningFor physicians, asking patients about their bucket lists, or whether they have one, can encourage discussion about making their medical care fit their life plans, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
16h
NYT > Science
Norovirus Cases at Olympics More Than Double, Moving Beyond Security StaffThe number of cases has risen to 86, and the virus may be traveling quickly across other Olympic areas.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
As Cape Town drought bites, what is 'Day Zero'?Cape Town is in the grip of a catastrophic three-year-long drought as winter rains have repeatedly failed causing dam levels to drop to dangerously low levels.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Australia tourism industry under climate change threat: studyAustralia's multi-billion dollar tourism industry is under increasing threat from climate change with some of the nation's top natural wonders in the firing line as temperatures and sea levels rise, a study warned Thursday.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Kalanick denies plot to steal secrets in tense courtroom exchangeFormer Uber chief executive Travis Kalanick on Wednesday denied conspiring to steal autonomous driving technology in a tense courtroom appearance that could be key to a blockbuster trial over allegedly ill-gotten trade secrets.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gabon fights elephant poachers with hi-tech tracker collarsEver tried to put a GPS real-time tracking collar on a five-tonne animal?
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vulnerable fear Cape Town's water shut-offAt Cape Town's Nazareth House, a care home for dozens of vulnerable, disabled and orphaned children, feeding time is executed with military precision.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Galapagos fights temptation of lucrative mass tourismWith its iconic giant tortoises, crested black iguanas, huge ocean manta rays and a veritable menagerie of other cool creatures, the Galapagos Islands are one of the most beautiful places you will probably never visit.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient temple left neglected as Yemen war threatens historyAlong a narrow road in Yemen choked by natural gas tankers and heavily armed soldiers lies an ancient temple neglected and threatened in a nation now at war.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The doctor's in, but jury is out on new LA Times ownerThe struggling Los Angeles Times found a local savior in a biotech billionaire willing to buy the storied newspaper from a corporation half a continent away, but the change of ownership brings its own set of questions and uncertainty.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gesture recognition device to fast-track with company's invite to Techstars acceleratorA company founded by a pair of Simon Fraser University alumni has been chosen to fast-track the deployment of its product—a gesture recognition wristband, the next frontier in human-machine interactions—under the mentorship of Techstars, one of North America's biggest startup accelerators.
16h
BBC News - Science & Environment
What's going on in a toddler's brain?Scientists want to find out more about how very young children develop a sense of self.
17h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Nyt center for kunstig intelligens løfter dansk forskning til nye højderEt nyt center på Københavns Universitet, kaldet SCIENCE AI Centre, skal analysere og fortolke...
17h
Ingeniøren
Ny slags fildeling uden datatab og nedbrudTeknologien bag internettet er gammel. En ny protokol-teknologi kan gøre vores digitale netværk hurtigere, mere stabilt - og umuligt at kontrollere.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why you feel hungrier after you lose weightBlame it on hormones: one hunger hormone continues to be elevated after you lose weight, making you feel hungry even though your new, slanker body has had enough to eat.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New marker could help to identify heart attack patients most at riskA new study from the University of Sheffield has shown a new blood test could provide a clue as to why some patients are at higher risk of cardiovascular disease risk after suffering a heart attack.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Thousands of lives would be saved if counties met ATS clean air standardsThousands of lives would be saved each year, and many more serious illnesses avoided, if U.S. counties met standards set by the American Thoracic Society for the two most important air pollutants, according to a new report by the ATS and the Marron Institute of Urban Management at New York University.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Harnessing the power of genomic sequencing augments diagnosis and treatment of lymphoid cancerA new study published in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics has established that hybrid-capture sequencing is the method of choice for sequencing 'actionable' gene mutations across the most common forms of lymphoid cancer. Due to its applicability in routinely acquired formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues, this assay can be implemented by clinical laboratories into routine diagnostic workfl
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blood test cuts time to diagnosis for common, deadly yeast infection, national trial showsA new blood test seems to perform as well as, if not better than, traditional blood cultures at detecting candidemia, a type of fungal yeast infection that commonly strikes hospital patients. Quick detection of the infection has the potential to stop its spread and slow drug resistance.
19h
New on MIT Technology Review
How nuclear weapons research revealed new climate threatsLawrence Livermore Lab’s increasingly powerful climate models have sounded a stark warning for California.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
WHO strategy to eradicate yaws should be revised to achieve eliminationFirst evidence of antibiotic resistance in yaws bacteria highlights need for robust vigilance and improved laboratory surveillance.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tracking oxygen saturation, plus vital signs, to identify vulnerable preemiesWhile near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) long has been used to monitor oxygenation in conditions in which blood flow is altered, such as bleeding in the brain, how NIRS values relate to other vital sign measures in NICU babies was unknown.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sick bees eat healthierScientists have shown that sick bees try to look after themselves by eating healthy food.
20h
Ingeniøren
Overpris på millioner: Bygherrer i København måtte punge ud for arkæologiske undersøgelserKøbenhavns Museum opkrævede på grund af flere fejl 13,5 millioner kroner – svarende til ti procent – for meget fra bygherrer, der skulle betale for arkæologiske undersøgelser på deres grunde.
20h
Feed: All Latest
John Perry Barlow, Bard of the Internet, Dies at 70John Perry BarlowThe co-writer of Grateful Dead hits fought for the internet's highest ideals and co-founded the Electronic Frontier Foundation. He was also an unforgettable friend.
20h
Live Science
Niacin (Vitamin B3): Benefits & Side EffectsNiacin is an essential vitamin that helps the digestive system, skin and nervous system to function.
20h
Ingeniøren
Ekspert: En fejl plager de fleste ledereChefer med lutter gode intentio­ner er ofte blinde for deres egen andel i problemerne. Dermed skader de både trivsel og bundlinje, mener ledelsesrådgiver.
20h
Feed: All Latest
Waymo v. Uber Trial: Travis Kalanick Completes His TestimonyA calm ex-Uber CEO waves away suspicious communications, and Waymo hasn't quite connected the dots.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Deep brain stimulation: A new treatment approach in patients with multiple sclerosisA pilot study has shown that treatment with deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (dTMS) significantly reduces symptoms of fatigue in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). The results from this research suggest that TMS is a safe option for the treatment of patients with MS.
23h
Feed: All Latest
Tesla Burns More Money Than Ever as Model 3 Production Crawls AlongBut CEO Elon Musk is as optimistic as ever that the problems are only temporary.
23h
Popular Science
Is it possible to boost your immune system?Ask Us Anything Every question you’ve ever wanted to know about how not to get sick, answered. Everyone wants to be that person that never gets sick. How do you become that individual?
1d
Futurity.org
How to predict which Olympic athletes won’t chokeBrain scans could reveal which of two equally trained, equally fit, equally talented Olympic athletes will likely choke under pressure, says Vikram Chib. It’s whoever is most excited about winning gold, and all the pride, glory, and potential cash that come with it. “The people that can maintain very stable reward activity tend to be the ones that don’t choke under pressure.” Chib, assistant prof
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research suggests vapers are vulnerable to pneumoniaThe vapor from e-cigarettes seems to help pneumonia-causing bacteria stick to the cells that line the airways, according to research published in the European Respiratory Journal.
1d
Futurity.org
Partial liver transplants have gotten safer for kidsAlternatives to whole liver transplants have become safer for children, opening the way to shorter waitlists as more young patients receive portions of donated organs, a new study suggests. The study shows that patient survival trends have improved significantly both in cases where two children split a deceased donor’s liver and in cases where one child receives part of the liver of a living dono
1d


Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.