Ingeniøren
Danmarks første supercomputer fylder 60 årI 1958 blev den danske cifferregnemaskine DASK indviet. Danmarks Tekniske Museum holder fødselsdag for den i næste uge.
3h
Viden
Sodavand med sødemiddel øger ikke fedtniveauet i kroppenNy forskning peger på, at det er sundere at vælge sodavand med sødemiddel end med sukker.
10h
Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsminister, lad være med at tale ned til os3.609 læger i brev til Ellen Trane Nørby: Hold vores følelser udenfor, og forhold dig nøgternt til den danske lægestands protester.
7h

LATEST

EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New immunotherapy combination tolerable, effective in patients with advanced kidney cancerCombining an anti-angiogenesis agent, which blocks blood vessel formation, with an immunotherapy agent, was found to have promising anti-tumor activity and no unexpected side effects in an early-phase clinical trial in patients with advanced kidney cancer.
9min
Science | The Guardian
Talking animals: we aren’t the only species capable of speech …Ongoing studies show that some mammals and birds can mimic the sound of the human voice Research published last month proved that orca, or killer, whales have the ability to mimic the complexities of human speech. Josep Call, professor in evolutionary origins of mind at the University of St Andrews, was a co-author of the study. He said: “I think here we have the first evidence that killer whales
28min
Scientific American Content: Global
Who Invented the Mind–Body Problem?Germans were debating the “body–soul problem” by the mid-19th century, but Socrates pondered the problem first -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
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Can Season 2 of Netflix's 'Dark' Possibly Be Good?'Dark'—Netflix’s first original series to be produced in Germany—is a somber intergenerational time-travel drama that may not be for everyone.
1h
Live Science
8 Trillion 'Gallons'! Huge Blob of Magma Found Atop Undersea VolcanoThe Kikai caldera near Japan has been busy.
2h
The Atlantic
Russia Is Still Exploiting America's DivisionsRussian meddling in American democracy didn’t start with Donald Trump’s election to the presidency, and, new reporting makes clear, it hasn’t ended with his inauguration. The New York Times and the Intercept reported Friday that a Russian intermediary attempted to sell compromising material on the president to American intelligence agencies last year. What started in an effort to recover American
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bali volcano decreases in activity, alert status loweredIndonesian authorities lowered the alert status of Bali's Mount Agung volcano from the highest level on Saturday following a significant decrease in activity and said thousands of people who have fled its slopes for government shelters may return home.
2h
Live Science
Man Who Traveled to Watch Historic SpaceX Launch Found Dead in MotelPolice are looking for a person of interest seen in motel surveillance video.
3h
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Space Photos of the Week: New Horizons Breaks a Record for Long-Distance PhotographyThe spacecraft was 3.79 billion miles from Earth when it snapped this photo of a Kuiper Belt object.
3h
Big Think
Alibaba looks to upgrade the technology used in the OlympicsThe world’s largest e-commerce company has proposed some really interesting upgrades. Read More
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
Fossil Bat Stories, Part 1Sometimes there just aren’t enough bats -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
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Tech Deals: Amazon Kindle, Dell Notebooks, Rocket LeagueLooking for a new smart TV, loaded laptop, or e-reader? We have what you need right here.
4h
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An Apple Leak, a Cybercrime Forum Takedown, and More Security News This WeekAn Apple leak, a massive cybercrime forum, and more of the week's top security news.
4h
The Atlantic
When the Islamic State Came to LibyaTRIPOLI—As U.S. military forces hunt down the remnants of the Islamic State in Syria and Iraq, they are also waging a quieter campaign in the fractured country of Libya. Conducted primarily from the air and through special-operations personnel based in the western city of Misrata, the effort aims to eradicate cells of fighters who fled the group’s stronghold in the central city of Sirte before it
4h
The Atlantic
Fire Sermon Is a Profoundly Strange Meditation on DesireD esire gets a bad rap , and not just from prudes. Buddhists, for instance, come out pretty firmly against it (desire, they say, is the root of suffering), and even atheists like me are susceptible to the wisdom of the Buddha. But Jamie Quatro sees it differently. Maggie, the protagonist and intermittent narrator of Quatro’s new novel, Fire Sermon , wants to want. Her desire is what makes her hum
5h
Ingeniøren
Elektronisk pille måler de indre gasserFordøjelsessystemets sundhedstilstand afsløres af de gasser, som tarmfloraen danner. Nu kan en sensor i pillestørrelse måle gasserne hele vejen igennem.
5h
Big Think
Imaginary Histories, Possible Futures – Jacob Sager Weinstein (Children's Author) – Think Again - a Big Think Podcast #134Wild boars in the sewers of London. Augmented humans of the future. Jason's high school friend, celebrated children's author Jacob Sager Weinstein, on imaginary histories and possible futures. Read More
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
How to (Try to) Not Take Things PersonallySavvy Psychologist helps us all be less sensitive to inevitable criticism -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
BBC News - Science & Environment
The barren desert preparing astronauts for life on MarsResearchers have created a simulation of the red planet with the hope humans will one day live there.
5h
The Atlantic
Golden Exits Is a Quiet, Mature Indie DramaThe Brooklyn of Alex Ross Perry’s Golden Exits , which takes place almost entirely in one small brownstone-dotted neighborhood of the borough, is hazy and sun-kissed. An early establishing shot of the sludgy Gowanus Canal looks positively Venetian, a tremendous achievement given that it is one of the most polluted bodies of water in the United States. The tranquility on display feels lovely, but
6h
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Job One for Quantum Computers: Boost Artificial IntelligenceThe fusion of quantum computing and machine learning has become a booming research area. Can it possibly live up to its high expectations?
6h
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Google Autocomplete Suggestions Are Still Racist, Sexist, and Science-DenyingThe feature suggests that “Islamists are evil” and “Hitler is my hero,” among other offensive prompts.
6h
Science | The Guardian
‘Suddenly my world would flip’: the woman who is permanently lostSharon’s world is regularly reversed by a rare brain malfunction. Now neurologists, and Wonder Woman, have come to the rescue In 1952, when she was a child, Sharon was playing in the front garden. She was blindfolded while her friends ran around her, laughing, trying not to be caught in a game of blind man’s buff. Sharon grabbed hold of someone’s sleeve and whipped off the scarf that covered her
7h
The Atlantic
What Trump-Era Democrats Can Learn From LBJLast week, Robert Schenkkan’s new play, The Great Society , opened at the Arena Stage in Washington. This riveting sequel to the Tony-award winning All the Way, about the Lyndon Johnson presidency, is a haunting piece of theater for liberals to watch in February of 2018, when President Trump and the Republican Congress have been swinging a political wrecking ball at Barack Obama’s legacy. The two
7h
Ingeniøren
Iværksætter fokuserer solen til billig varmeEt helt nyt solfangerprincip er skabt ud fra en teknologi, som manglede et produkt. Men det kræver tålmodighed at være iværksætter inden for energisystemer.
7h
Dagens Medicin
Ny lægeprotest – denne gang mod sundhedsministeren3.609 læger har skrevet under på et brev, der kalder sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby nedladende, og forlanger større respekt for de danske læger.
7h
NYT > Science
Trump’s Infrastructure Plan May Ignore Climate Change. It Could Be Costly.President Trump wants to spend $1.5 trillion on rebuilding roads and bridges, but experts say failing to account for climate change will add to costs.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bordeaux's 'magnificent' lost vintage pushes small growers to the edgeSurveying a nearly empty cellar, Frederic Nivelle of Bordeaux's prestigious Chateau Climens, reflects on what might have been an outstanding year for the sweet white Sauternes wine.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alibaba's Ma hopes Beijing 2022 can be smarter, cheaper, fasterBillionaire Alibaba co-founder Jack Ma foresees an Olympics that is better for fans and athletes and is more economical—and hopes Beijing 2022 will be the pinnacle of that vision.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mexico hopes fish farming can help save endangered porpoiseMexico hopes fish farming can help weaken the illegal market for the totoaba fish and help save the critically endangered vaquita porpoise, of which less than 30 survive.
8h
New on MIT Technology Review
The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending February 10, 2018)This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.
8h
Ingeniøren
Ugens debat: Gennembrud for SpaceX-raket ... Og rækkevidderekord for TeslaEfter flere års forsinkelse sendte Elon Musks rumfartsselskab, SpaceX, tirsdag aften klokken 21.45 dansk tid verdens største raket, Falcon Heavy, ud i rummet fra Kennedy Space Center i Florida. Elon Musks gamle Tesla Road­ster fungerede som missionens ‘pay load’, og rumfartsinteresserede over he...
9h
Science : NPR
Sue The T. Rex Is Making Big Moves With Her Big BonesThe famous fossil calls the Chicago Field Museum home and is moving from the main exhibit hall to a private suite on the second floor. (Image credit: Courtesy of The Field Museum)
9h
Science | The Guardian
The Genius Within by David Adam review – to what extent is intelligence determined by genes?Zapping his brain and taking ‘smart pills’, Adam’s fascinating history of how we define intelligence raises intriguing questions about our future The old myth that you only use 10% of your brain is obviously rubbish. If an iron spike went through the 90% you never use, why would you care? But what might be true is that we only typically use a small part of our brain’s potential function. What if
10h
Science | The Guardian
Met Office still 'best forecaster in galaxy' despite BBC rejectionUK weather group’s influence continues to be felt in everything from space missions to farming Frozen ducks’ feet and the flight paths of midges: the uses of forecasts by the Met Office over the 160 years that it has quietly underpinned the fabric of the nation are many and varied. They played a crucial role in D-day and still serve our military today; they keep planes in the sky and space missio
11h
The Atlantic
Trump Won't Declassify Democratic Rebuttal to NunesThe White House has opted not to declassify a memo written by Congressman Adam Schiff and his Democratic colleagues on the House Intelligence Committee until the panel complies with Justice Department and FBI recommendations to redact certain portions of the document. The 10-page document was written in response to a memo written by the committee’s chairman, Devin Nunes, outlining alleged surveil
14h
Live Science
Facts About FrackingHydraulic fracturing, commonly called fracking, is a drilling technique used for extracting oil or natural gas from deep underground.
15h
New Scientist - News
Dark matter could be produced by twisted gravitational wavesIf gravitational waves – ripples in space time – have a handedness, primordial particles could interact with them to form a dark matter superfluid that spreads through the cosmos
17h
New Scientist - News
This record-breaking photo was taken from 6 billion km awayNew Horizons is one of the furthest spacecraft from Earth. It sent back pictures of two objects in the Kuiper belt, the most distant photographs ever taken
17h
New Scientist - News
Birds ‘dream sing’ by moving their vocal muscles in their sleepZebra finches sing during the day, and at night while they sleep their vocal organs act out the motions of singing, a bit like a sleepwalking person
17h
New Scientist - News
We should use nukes to deflect asteroids, says astro algorithmWe've never had to deflect an incoming asteroid before it hits Earth, so how do we know the best way to do it? An algorithm says nuclear weapons are the most effective
17h
The Atlantic
The Korean Unification Flag Isn't as Unifying as It SeemsEditor’s Note: Read all of The Atlantic’s Winter Olympics coverage . In one of the many overtures of peace agreed upon by Seoul and Pyongyang ahead of the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, a reunification flag took the place of the North and South Korean national flags at the opening ceremony on Friday. The symbolism of the flag, which was carried by the joint Korean delegation as it marched, is not s
17h
Big Think
Distinctive brain pattern helps habits formWant to work out more? Eat more healthily? Quit smoking? These neurons control the fate of your habits. Read More
18h
NYT > Science
Lower Drug Prices: New Proposals Carry Lots of PromisesThe White House is considering a plan to lower out-of-pocket costs for people in Medicare drug plans, who often pay inflated prices for their drugs.
18h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: ‘Maybe It’s an Opportunity’What We’re Following Looking at Lawmakers: The U.S. government shut down briefly overnight after Senator Rand Paul held up the vote on a budget bill over concerns about overspending. Even so, the Senate passed the bill around 2 a.m. on Friday, and the House—in spite of an extended opposing speech by Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi—followed suit at 5:30. Democratic leaders have recently made substant
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Soft chemotherapy is very effective in older patients when added to targeted treatment in an aggressive breast cancer subtypeA trial published todayin The Lancet Oncology, shows that, in older patients with HER2 positive metastatic breast cancer (an aggressive breast cancer subtype where the cancer has spread to other parts of the body), a combination of a 'soft' chemotherapy with antiHER2 therapy is highly active and has low toxicity, important in a frail population.
18h
Big Think
Why your next must-have gadget will probably self-destructMajor advancements in the field of transient electronics have paved the way for gadgets that evaporate. That's important for consumers, and the planet. Read More
18h
Popular Science
Dust, meteorites, cosmic rays and everything else currently destroying the Tesla in spaceSpace This probably isn't covered under Elon Musk's warranty... SpaceX successfully launched a Tesla Roadster into space—but what will happen to it up there?
19h
Latest Headlines | Science News
4 questions about the new U.S. budget deal and scienceA new spending package could lead to U.S. science agencies getting a bump in funding.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gene therapy researchers find a viral barcode to cross the blood-brain barrierResearchers have discovered a structure on viruses that makes them better at crossing from the bloodstream into the brain – a key factor for administering gene therapies at lower doses for treating brain and spinal disorders. Experiments also showed decreased liver toxicity.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lights, camera, action! New endomicroscopic probes visualize living animal cell activityResearchers report they have developed two new endoscopic probes that significantly sharpen the technology’s imaging resolution and permit direct observation of fine tissue structures and cell activity in small organs in sheep, rats and mice.
19h
Live Science
These Are the Most Out-of-This-World Photos Ever Taken — LiterallyIt may be blurry, but this image is now the farthest pic ever taken by a spacecraft.
19h
Science | The Guardian
Elon Musk: the real-life Iron ManRobert Downey Jr used the entrepreneur as a role model for his part in the 2008 film Elon Musk is the archetypal serial entrepreneur, with a string of successes before the startups that would make him famous. Robert Downey Jr turned to Musk for help getting into character as Tony Stark for the 2008 film Iron Man. Musk’s enthusiastic embrace of technology for technology’s sake and his desire to pu
19h
Live Science
How Did a Man's Rectum End Up 'Falling Out' of His Body?The man was sitting on the toilet playing games on his phone for half and hour when this happened.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Placebo pills prescribed honestly help cancer survivors manage symptomsFatigue in cancer survivors is significantly reduced by placebo pill, even when it is known it is a fake pill.
19h
Big Think
This A.I. can analyze your blood to predict how long you'll live—and it's freeA company specializing in A.I. medicine will tell you how long you’re likely to live. Read More
19h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Off BrandToday in 5 Lines President Trump said the departure of staff secretary Rob Porter—who resigned following reports that he had abused two of his ex-wives—was “very sad,” adding that he hopes Porter “will have a wonderful career.” Associate Attorney General Rachel Brand reportedly plans to step down from her role at the Justice Department. Trump signed a sweeping spending bill, reopening the federal
20h
Inside Science
BRIEF: New Metamaterial Shepherds Sound Across the Water/Air DivideBRIEF: New Metamaterial Shepherds Sound Across the Water/Air Divide The innovation could one day help marine biologists eavesdrop on whales and equip submarines with more sensitive sonar. UnderwaterWhale_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Damsea via Shutterstock Technology Friday, February 9, 2018 - 17:00 Catherine Meyers, Editor (Inside Science) -- Normally, the underwater world is like an acoustic L
20h
Live Science
Humans Cared for Sick Puppies Long Ago, Ancient Burial ShowsAncient people likely cared for a sick, domesticated pup for weeks on end before it died about 14,000 years ago during the Paleolithic era, a new study finds.
20h
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The *Waymo v. Uber* Settlement Marks a New Era for Self-Driving Cars: RealityThe lawsuit encapsulated the way this industry used to work, and its end signals a shift into the future.
20h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: At Site of Japanese Volcano’s Supereruption, an Immense Lava Dome LurksScientists are studying the magma plumbing of the scar left by Akahoya eruption 7,300 years ago to help better predict future volcanic activity.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Virginia aquarium captures video of octopus being bornA remarkable video showing the birth of an octopus at the Virginia Aquarium has been viewed more than 1 million times on social media.
20h
The Scientist RSS
NSF Will Require Reporting of Sexual HarassmentThe agency could demand institutions it funds to remove researchers who are found guilty of misconduct from NSF-supported projects.
20h
The Scientist RSS
Primitive Humans Eggs Grown to Full Maturity in the LabSuch a technique could combat infertility, but it's still not clear whether these eggs are normal and functional.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using technology to detect hidden threatsSoldiers in combat have to constantly scan their surroundings for improvised explosive devices (IEDs), a signature weapon of modern warfare. These homemade bombs are often hidden—nestled in bushes, buried underground, or sometimes stuffed inside other objects.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Device that measures cell strength could help identify drugs for asthma, hypertensionEngineers, doctors and scientists at UCLA and Rutgers University have developed a tool that measures the physical strength of individual cells 100 times faster than current technologies.
20h
Science : NPR
Blue Dye Kills Malaria Parasites — But There Is One CatchMethylene blue used to be an anti-malarial treatment but fell out of favor. Researchers wondered, what if it were added to a current medication? (Image credit: Jay Reed/NPR )
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Many parents of children with disabilities don't make care plansMany parents of children with disabilities don't make advance care plans in the event of the parent's or other caretaker's death or disability, according to a new nationwide survey by special education professor Meghan Burke at the University of Illinois.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows liver cells with whole genome duplications protect against cancerResearchers at the Children's Medical Center Research Institute (CRI) at UT Southwestern have discovered that cells in the liver with whole genome duplications, known as polyploid cells, can protect the liver against cancer.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New brain disease test for Parkinson's, dementia with Lewy bodiesScientists have modified a test for early diagnosis of prion diseases with the goal of improving early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. The group tested cerebral spinal fluid samples from people with Parkinson's disease; people with dementia with Lewy bodies; and controls, some of whom had Alzheimer's disease. The test correctly excluded all the controls and diagnose
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Clock protein controls daily cycle of gene expression by regulating chromosome loopsIt's well known that the human body functions on a 24-hour schedule. The up-and-down daily cycles of a long-studied clock protein called Rev-erb coordinates the ebb and flow of gene expression by tightening and loosening loops in chromosomes, according to new research.
21h
Blog » Languages » English
The Eyewire Winter Games return!Remember the first Eyewire Winter Games? That was all the way back in 2014, coinciding with the XXII Olympic Winter Games in Sochi. Actually, that’s so long ago that many Eyewirers of today hadn’t yet joined! For those who don’t remember, then: it wasn’t our first ever challenge week, but it was an early one, and in fact it lasted two whole weeks. Reminisce here! We’ve come a ways since that time
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blood test plus ultrasound boosts liver cancer detection by 40 percentCombining ultrasound imaging with a blood test for high alpha fetoprotein (AFP) levels improves detection of early-stage liver cancer by as much as 40 percent, researchers at UT Southwestern's Simmons Cancer Center found.
21h
The Atlantic
A Scandal That Exposes the White House’s ‘Adults’On Friday, as the White House rushed to quell increasing anger about the exit of staff secretary Rob Porter and its handling of domestic violence, President Trump stoked the controversy, suggesting he believed Porter’s denials, despite photographic evidence. “We found out about it recently and I was surprised by it, but we certainly wish him well and it's a tough time for him,” Trump said, in his
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Measurements from 3-D augmented reality holographic models shown to be highly accurateMeasurements taken on projected augmented reality 3-D holographic models were shown to be essentially as accurate as 'gold standard' measurements and nearly approaching that of PACS measurements, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2018 Annual Meeting, set for April 22-27 in Washington, D.C.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Efficient technique discovered for isolating embryonic stem cells in cowsScientists at the University of California, Davis, have developed a highly efficient method of isolating embryonic stem cells in cows. Producing embryonic stem cells from large livestock species like cattle is important for genetic testing, genome engineering, and studying human disease.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Snacking snakes act as ‘ecosystem engineers’ in seed dispersalDespite the bad rap snakes often get, they are more central to ecology than most people realize. New research reveals that snakes might even play a key role in dispersing plant seeds.
21h
The Atlantic
Waymo vs. Uber Fizzles Just as It Was Getting GoodWell, it’s over. The technology world’s most hotly anticipated trial in years has ended in a settlement: This morning, Uber and Waymo announced that the dispute over an alleged theft of trade secrets would be settled for 0.34 percent of Uber’s equity, valued at about $245 million. Waymo had been seeking about $1 billion in damages. The newish Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi issued a substantial statem
21h
The Atlantic
Ditching Andrew Jackson for Mary JacksonAn elementary school in Utah has traded one Jackson for another in a change that many say was a long time coming. Jackson Elementary School in Salt Lake City will no longer be named for Andrew Jackson, the seventh U.S. president, whose slave ownership and treatment of Native Americans are often cited in the debate over memorializing historical figures associated with racism. Instead, the school w
21h
The Atlantic
Photos of the Week: Moving a Tyrannosaurus, Philadelphia Victorious, a Drive to MarsThe successful launch of the Falcon Heavy rocket, an electric car in orbit, colorful Carnival costumes, the opening ceremony of the 2018 Winter Olympics, Turkish Van cats, continued airstrikes in Syria, an earthquake in Taiwan, post-Super Bowl celebrations in Philadelphia, and much more.
21h
The Atlantic
North Korea's Undeserved Olympic GloryEditor’s Note: Read all of The Atlantic’s Winter Olympics coverage . After a year of fire-and-fury threatening and nuclear-button measuring , of Little-Rocket-Man and mentally-deranged-dotard name-calling, of apocalyptic warnings about another war on the Korean peninsula, it was heartening to witness. There they were, the South and North Korean Olympic teams marching together in sparkling white j
21h
The Atlantic
A Week Around the World With The AtlanticWhat We’re Writing The Winter Olympics: The 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea, kicked off today. Here’s a list of the most promising athletes to watch for as the Games get underway, spanning four continents. The Games carry the heavy burden of the world’s hope that sports diplomacy will lead to peace between North and South Korea. But Krishnadev Calamur asks: Do the Olympics really
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Metasurfaces enable improved optical lens performanceProducing the perfect color images we need and love often requires multiple, heavy lenses so that each color focuses in exactly the same plane. Now engineers have developed a new theory that solves the problem using a single thin lens comprised of gradient index materials and metasurface layers to properly direct the light.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Only one-third of patients diagnosed with depression start treatmentDespite the wide availability of effective treatments for depression and a growing effort nationwide to detect and begin treating depression during primary care visits, only about one-third of individuals newly diagnosed with depression start treatment.
22h
Live Science
Global Warming vs. Solar Cooling: The Showdown Begins in 2020The sun may be dimming, temporarily. Don't panic; Earth is not going to freeze over. But will the resulting cooling put a dent in the global warming trend?
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New images reveal how the ear's sensory hairs take shapeOur ability to hear relies on tiny bundles of hair-like sensors inside the inner ear. Scientists have identified a key component of the machinery that makes these bundles grow in an orderly fashion.
22h
Popular Science
Anker Soundbuds Curve are champions among cheap, wireless headphonesGadgets These $30 headphones can go a long way—just don't tell your audiophile friends. A cheap pair of headphones can be a great investment, even if you're a music snob.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Printed paper-based device could drug testing more efficient and affordableEngineers have devised a way to make testing for new drugs more efficient and affordable, and reduce the time for helpful medications to reach the public. The printed paper-based device can speed up and improve the accuracy of the drug screening process. Their work could also be used to diagnose diseases, identify environmental contaminants and pinpoint biological warfare agents.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Improving drone performance in headwindsStability of unmanned aerial vehicles in heavy winds can be improved through rotor placement and angle.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Organic food provides significant environmental benefits to plant-rich dietsA study of the diets of 34,000 people confirms that a diet high in fruit and vegetables is better for the planet than one high in animal products. The study also finds that organic food provides significant, additional climate benefits for plant-based diets, but not for diets with only moderate contribution from plant products. This is the first-ever study to look at the environmental impacts of b
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can ultraviolet light fight the spread of influenza?Overhead far-UVC light, a type of ultraviolet light that is harmless to humans, effectively killed airborne flu virus, researchers have found. The lighting may offer a new weapon against the spread of flu virus in public spaces.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Timing is everything, to our genesScientists discover critical gene activity follows a biological clock, affecting diseases of the brain and body.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Avoiding blackouts with 100% renewable energyResearchers propose three separate ways to avoid blackouts if the world transitions all its energy to electricity or direct heat and provides the energy with 100 percent wind, water and sunlight. The solutions reduce energy requirements, health damage and climate damage.
22h
The Atlantic
The Government Gets Into the Church-Rebuilding BusinessTucked among the provisions in the budget bill passed by Congress on Friday are new rules about how FEMA, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, works with houses of worship. According to the new law, religious nonprofits can’t be excluded from disaster aid just because of their religious nature, which had been the agency’s policy in certain contexts prior to January. The move resolves a long-s
22h
The Atlantic
'Russia Is Our Adversary'Instead of debating whether or not Russia attempted to influence the 2016 elections—in ways that ranged from encouraging incorrect voting methods to promoting fake rallies to sharing false election stories—Americans should be debating how to counter this activity. The 2018 midterm elections are fast approaching, and the threat remains. Before I was elected to represent southwestern Texas in the U
22h
Feed: All Latest
Gadget Lab Podcast: Are You Addicted to Your Phone?WIRED senior writer Robbie Gonzalez joins us this week to discuss addictive smartphone apps and the science behind technology addiction.
22h
Live Science
Earth's Inner Core Shouldn't Technically ExistYep: we're all living on a giant paradox.
22h
Inside Science
Engineering the Ice Out of Bobsled, Luge and SkeletonEngineering the Ice Out of Bobsled, Luge and Skeleton Plastic tracks could reduce the cost of Olympic “sliding” events and make the sports more environmentally friendly and accessible. Bobsled_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Tim Hipps via Wikimedia Commons Rights information: Public Domain Sports Friday, February 9, 2018 - 14:30 Peter Gwynne, Contributor (Inside Science) -- The sledding events are
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cockroach ancient geographic and genomic history traced back to last supercontinentArmed with a vast amount of genomic information, a team of researchers has performed the first molecular dating to gain the clearest picture yet of the biogeographical history of cockroaches. They have traced back the key evolutionary time points of the cockroach -- all the way back almost 300 million years ago when the Earth's mass was organized into the Pangaea supercontinent.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Blood sodium levels may affect cognition in older adultsIn generally healthy older men, slightly lower sodium levels in the blood were related to both cognitive impairment and declines in cognitive function over time. Additional studies are needed to determine whether correction of lower serum sodium may influence cognition in older adults.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hearing loss linked to poor nutrition in early childhood, study suggestsYoung adults who were undernourished as preschool children were approximately twice as likely to suffer from hearing loss as their better- nourished peers, a new study suggests.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists take big step toward stopping cancer metastasisNew research may give scientists a chance to target tumors before they metastasize. The study shows that a protein called LTBP3 fuels a chain reaction that leads some early developing tumors to grow new blood vessels. These vessels then act like highways to spread cancer cells throughout the body, seeding metastatic tumors very early on.
22h
NYT > Science
Take a Number: Herpes Is Slowly Retreating, but the Infection Remains CommonAbout half of Americans aged 14 to 49 have HSV-1 or HSV-2. The latter, genital herpes, infects twice as many women as men.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Routine imaging scans may predict fracture risk in older adultsRoutine body CT scans may help clinicians estimate an individual's risk of future osteoporotic fracture, according to new study.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Simple rules can help fishery managers cope with ecological complexityA team of ecologists and economists are the first to test whether real-life ecological interactions produce economic benefits for the fishing industry.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Apalutamide delays progression of nonmetastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancerA multi-institutional phase 3 trial found that treatment with an investigational androgen receptor inhibitor significantly delayed the development of metastasis in patients with prostate cancer that had become resistant to standard androgen-deprivation therapy.
22h
Live Science
The Most Interesting Thing Shot into Space This Week Wasn't a TeslaThere was a second payload on board the SpaceX Falcon Heavy that launched Tuesday, and it's built to last 14 billion years.
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Live Science
Why the Asteroid Approaching Earth Was Only Spotted 5 Days AgoNASA didn't spot the asteroid, 2018 CB, that will skim by Earth today until a few days ago. Here's why it snuck under the radar.
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Time's Just About Up to Secure the 2018 Midterm ElectionsThe first primary for the 2018 midterm elections takes place March 6—and many states are still woefully underprepared.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover efficient and sustainable way to filter salt and metal ions from waterWith two billion people worldwide lacking access to clean and safe drinking water, joint research by Monash University, CSIRO and the University of Texas at Austin published today in Sciences Advances may offer a breakthrough new solution.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New lithium collection method could boost global supplyWith continual technological advancements in mobile devices and electric cars, the global demand for lithium has quickly outpaced the rate at which it can be mined or recycled, but a University of Texas at Austin professor and his research team may have a solution.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New malleable 'electronic skin' self-healable, recyclableUniversity of Colorado Boulder researchers have developed a new type of malleable, self-healing and fully recyclable 'electronic skin' that has applications ranging from robotics and prosthetic development to better biomedical devices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lab-grown eggs could pave way towards new fertility treatmentsHuman eggs have been developed in the lab from their earliest stage to full maturity, in a study that could lead to improved fertility treatments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
AI computer vision breakthrough IDs poachers in less than half a secondResearchers have long been applying AI to protect wildlife. Initially, computer scientists were using AI and game theory to anticipate the poachers' haunts, and now they have applied artificial intelligence and deep learning to spot poachers in near real-time.
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Science | The Guardian
Safety blunders expose lab staff to potentially lethal diseases in UKExclusive: breaches investigated involve dengue virus, anthrax and other deadly pathogens Safety breaches at UK labs that handle harmful bacteria, viruses and fungi have spread infections to staff and exposed others to potentially lethal diseases, the Guardian has learned. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) has investigated a series of mistakes over the past two years that led to scientists fa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover efficient and sustainable way to filter salt and metal ions from waterWith two billion people worldwide lacking access to clean and safe drinking water, joint research by Monash University, CSIRO and the University of Texas at Austin published today in Sciences Advances may offer a breakthrough new solution.
23h
NYT > Science
News Analysis: Trump, Tell Us About Your Flu ShotOur germophobic president must do more to protect American health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chemist designs diabetic treatment minus harmful side effectsSyracuse University professor Robert Doyle has figured out how to control glucose levels in the bloodstream without the usual side effects of nausea, vomiting or malaise.
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Blog » Languages » English
Team Kaiju reigns supreme!We, for one, welcome our new kaiju overlords. The victory in this VS goes to the kaiju! Well fought, one and all. When you’ve dusted yourselves off, take a look at the leaderboard! Artwork by Daniela Gamba
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Popular Science
A fish that barely sleeps could help turn humans into all-night party animalsAnimals The Mexican cavefish have no eyes, little pigment, and require about two hours of sleep per night to survive. The blind Mexican cavefish only needs two hours of sleep a night to survive and thrive—researchers are trying to understand how and why.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Microscopic chariots deliver molecules within our cellsUnderstanding how the dynein-dynactin complex is assembled and organized provides a critical foundation to explain the underlying causes of several dynein-related neurodegenerative diseases.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Aerial imagery gives insight into water trendsResearchers say aerial images taken from drones or helicopters are just as accurate as more conventional field methods used for estimating river discharge.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Direct link between glands and implanting embryos critical to pregnancyResearchers used 3-D imaging with molecular testing to uncover new insight into the earliest stages of mammalian pregnancy -- offering clues to unsolved questions in pregnancy. The scientists demonstrate in mice that glands in the uterus must link and communicate directly with the embryo so it will implant and begin pregnancy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stand-alone system to produce drinking water by means of solar energyResearchers in applied electrochemistry and electrocatalysis have developed a stand-alone system for desalinating and treating water through electrodialysis. The system is directly powered by solar energy and can be applied in off-grid areas.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sleepless in Japan: How insomnia killsLay people tend to think that insomnia is usually a symptom of something else, like stress, a bad diet or a sedentary lifestyle, but this may not be true at all. It is possible that insomnia itself causes many of the conditions that it is seen as a symptom of. Using previous research that shows that insomnia causes a decrease in blood flow in the front dorsal lobe of the brain, which correlates wi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Impact companion animals have on ownersA new study suggests that pets provide benefits to those with mental health conditions.
23h
Live Science
This Special UV Light Could Zap Flu Germs from the AirA special type of ultraviolet (UV) light may be able to "zap" flu germs right out of the air, a new study suggests.
23h
Big Think
CERN may have just found a hypothetical quasiparticleCERN’s LHC has just found evidence of the odder on quasiparticle after a 44-year search. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Astrophysicists settle cosmic debate on magnetism of planets and starsUsing one of the world's most powerful laser facilities, a team of scientists experimentally confirmed a long-held theory for cosmic magnetic field generation: the turbulent dynamo. By creating a hot turbulent plasma the size of a penny, that lasts a few billionths of a second, the researchers recorded how the turbulent motions can amplify a weak magnetic field to the strengths of those observed i
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mysterious lives of narwhalsNarwhals are some of the most elusive creatures in the ocean, spending most of their lives in deep water far from shore. But new research may shed a bit of light on these enigmatic marine mammals.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Artists envisioned the future of work, and the results are pure fantasyFrom landfill recycler to skyscraper printer: predictions of how you will be employed in 2030.
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Big Think
Why North Korea has already won the Winter OlympicsThe Olympic Games are the perfect backdrop for international propaganda. Read More
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cognitive science
In a randomized clinical study involving adults age 56 to 71 that recently published in Neurobiology of Aging, researchers found that after cognitive training, participants' brains were more energy efficient, meaning their brain did not have to work as hard to perform a task.submitted by /u/SophiaDevetzi [link] [comments]
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Big Think
The Flat Earth Society has revealed that SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy launch was a hoaxSpaceX made history Tuesday after successfully launching its Falcon Heavy rocket into space, but not all are convinced any of that actually happened. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Winter storm in US Midwest snarls roads, hits flightsA significant winter storm brought heavy snowfalls to parts of the US Midwest on Friday, causing flight cancelations, snarling roads and closing schools.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Aerial imagery gives insight into water trendsWith an ever-growing human population and its inherent demand for water, there is a critical need to monitor water resources. New technology could make it more feasible than ever to measure changes in the water flow of rivers.
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The Atlantic
What Was the Most Influential Act of Protest in History?Gordon S. Wood, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian and author The protests against the Stamp Act in 1765, which inevitably led to the creation of the United States a decade later. Harry Leslie Smith, World War II veteran, activist, and author, Harry’s Last Stand Like in our own era, corruption and nepotism were ubiquitous in the 16th century. They stifled social and scientific progress. Were it not
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Popular Science
Five rad and romantic ways to turn your home into a karaoke barGadgets On Valentine's Day, warm up those pipes and start serenading. Five rad and random ways to turn your home into a romantic Valentine’s Day karaoke bar so you can serenade your way into their heart.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New Horizons captures record-breaking images in the Kuiper BeltNASA's New Horizons spacecraft recently turned its telescopic camera toward a field of stars, snapped an image – and made history.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Aerial imagery gives insight into water trendsUSU researchers say aerial images taken from drones or helicopters are just as accurate as more conventional field methods used for estimating river discharge.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter preparing for years aheadNASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has begun extra stargazing to help the space agency accomplish advances in Mars exploration over the next decade.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Airbus to pay 81 mn euros to end German corruption probe (Update)European aircraft manufacturer Airbus on Friday said it had agreed to pay a fine of 81.25 million euros ($99 million) to end a German corruption probe into the 2003 sale of Eurofighter jets to Austria.
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Live Science
The 'Perfect Human Pathogen' Is Spreading at the Winter OlympicsWhen it comes to human pathogens, norovirus gets the gold.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Water-soluble warped nanographeneGraphene and its nano-sized little sibling, nanographene, are well known for their remarkable photoelectronic properties. However, biomedical applications are hampered by the insolubility of the materials, especially in water. A Japanese team of scientists has now introduced substituted 'warped nanographene,' which is soluble in a broad range of solvents while maintaining its photophysical propert
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Forging a quantum leap in quantum communicationThe major drawback of quantum communication today is the slow speed of data transfer, which is limited by the speed at which the parties can perform quantum measurements. Researchers have now devised a method that overcomes this.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Your gadget's next power supply? Your bodySearching for a power outlet may soon become a thing of the past. Instead, devices will receive electricity from a small metallic tab that, when attached to the body, is capable of generating electricity from bending a finger and other simple movements.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Texas flood: Researchers compare pollution levels before and after Hurricane HarveyRecent years have seen rising interest in improving post-disaster research. Although understanding the wide-ranging effects of disasters is vital for an effective public health response, a lack of baseline data has made it difficult to attribute post-disaster changes in environmental conditions to the impacts of disasters.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neanderthals' lack of drawing ability may relate to hunting techniquesVisual imagery used in drawing regulates arm movements in manner similar to how hunters visualize the arc of a spear.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clock protein controls daily cycle of gene expression by regulating chromosome loopsIt's well known that the human body functions on a 24-hour schedule. The up-and-down daily cycles of a long-studied clock protein called Rev-erb coordinates the ebb and flow of gene expression by tightening and loosening loops in chromosomes, according to new research.
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Big Think
Neither a borrower nor a lender be: But how many ideas did Shakespeare himself 'borrow'?The game is afoot! It seems Shakespeare borrowed language from his contemporaries more directly than we previously realized. Read More
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Bolivia's lonely frog: Scientists race to find mate for RomeoRomeo, a 10-year-old Sehuencas water frog, has been given a dating profile as part of the search.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists create functioning kidney tissueScientists have successfully produced human kidney tissue within a living organism which is able to produce urine, a first for medical science. The study signifies a significant milestone in the development of treatment for kidney disease.
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The Atlantic
Inflationary Populism Is Trump's Path ForwardShortly after Trump’s election, the political scientist Mark Blyth argued that the outcome was not an idiosyncratic event, but rather the culmination of a long-brewing revolt against an anti-inflationary regime that had been built up over 30 years by parties of the center-right and center-left. If the inflation of the 1970s made that era a debtor’s paradise, the years since have for the most part
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The Atlantic
Photos of the Opening Ceremony of the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter OlympicsScenes of the spectacular performances, fireworks, official proclamations, and the parade of nations that just took place in Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium in South Korea, signaling the start of the 2018 Winter Olympic Games.
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The Atlantic
The Quiet Modernism of Pyeongchang's Opening CeremonyEditor’s Note: Read all of The Atlantic’s Winter Olympics coverage . If the most memorable Olympics opening ceremonies of recent years have anything in common, it’s an unabashedly bonkers streak. In London in 2012, multiple Mary Poppinses and a stunt double of Queen Elizabeth II descended from the heights of the stadium, while an appearance by the character Mr. Bean ended with a fart noise. In So
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New on MIT Technology Review
A phone that says “no” to little kid fingersAn algorithm for detecting who’s swiping the screen could help make phones child-proof.
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Feed: All Latest
Uber and Waymo Settle Autonomous Driving Tech Lawsuit for $245 MillionAfter a heated few days in court, Uber and Waymo have agreed to a truce—one that gives Google an added stake in its autonomous vehicle rival.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook pledges $10 mn for community leadersFacebook said Friday that it will issue up to $10 million (8.2 million euros) in grants to help support and train community leaders around the world.
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Feed: All Latest
Can Figure Skaters Master the Head-Spinning Physics of a Quintuple Jump?As recently as a few years ago, a quintuple jump seemed out of the question. Today? Not so much. Here's what it would take.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microscopic chariots deliver molecules within our cellsOn the cellular highway, motor proteins called dyneins rule the road. Dyneins "walk" along structures called microtubules to deliver cellular cargo, such as signaling molecules and organelles, to different parts of a cell. Without dynein on the job, cells cannot divide and people can develop neurological diseases.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA finds heaviest rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Gita's northern quadrantNASA's GPM core satellite examined rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Gita soon after the storm came together. Tropical Cyclone Gita formed near American Samoa in the Southwestern Pacific Ocean and triggered warnings and watches on Feb. 9. A Tropical Cyclone Warning is in force for Niue.
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Science | The Guardian
US flu season now as bad as 2009 swine flu epidemicSome doctors say this is the worst flu season they have seen in decades. Some people are saying that, too The flu has further tightened its grip on the US This season is now as bad as the swine flu epidemic nine years ago. A government report on Friday shows one of every 13 visits to the doctor last week was for fever, cough and other symptoms of the flu. That ties the highest level seen in the U
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microscopic chariots deliver molecules within our cellsUnderstanding how the dynein-dynactin complex is assembled and organized provides a critical foundation to explain the underlying causes of several dynein-related neurodegenerative diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA finds heaviest rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Gita's northern quadrantNASA's GPM core satellite examined rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Gita soon after the storm came together. Tropical Cyclone Gita formed near American Samoa in the Southwestern Pacific Ocean and triggered warnings and watches on Feb. 9. A Tropical Cyclone Warning is in force for Niue.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discharge strategies to prevent asthma readmissions'Improving how we care for children who are hospitalized with asthma includes preparing them for a successful return home with the best tools to manage their illness and prevent a future hospital visit,' says Kavita Parikh, M.D., M.S.H.S.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
The small intestine, not the liver, is the first stop for processing fructoseIn mice, fructose gets processed in the small intestine before getting to the liver.
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New Scientist - News
Is the quantum computer revolution really just five years away?Many of those involved in the race to unleash the power of quantum computing predict it will happen soon. Here's why, says Graeme Malcolm
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NYT > Science
Wealth Matters: A Battle Over Diamonds: Made by Nature or in a Lab?The quality of synthetic diamonds has increased to the point where they have made their way into jewelry stores, but buyers may lose out in the end.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Waymo, Uber end trade secrets theft trial with settlement (Update)Uber Waymo D. KhosrowshahiWaymo and Uber announced an agreement Friday in the blockbuster federal lawsuit over allegedly stolen trade secrets from the former Google self-driving car project.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unlimited movie-theater deal could be too good to surviveMoviePass is trying to bring to movie theaters what Netflix did for DVDs and online streaming: Let subscribers watch as many movies as they want for $10 a month.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chicken pox vaccine linked with shingles at the vaccination site in some childrenNew research reports several cases of shingles that developed at the original vaccination site in healthy children after they were immunized against chicken pox. Most of these cases were initially misdiagnosed as other skin rashes. While some of these patients underwent tests to help make the diagnosis, all of the children recovered without complications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cool Snake - Warmth-loving Grass Snake survived the Ice Age in Central EuropeUsing genetic analyses, scientists have discovered that not all Grass Snakes retreated to warm southern refugia during the last Central European Ice Age. They offer first evidence for the survival of a warmth-loving, egg-laying reptile during this cold period.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Amazon is taking package delivery into its own handsUber Waymo D. Khosrowshahi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research uncovers the mysterious lives of narwhalsNarwhals are some of the most elusive creatures in the ocean, spending most of their lives in deep water far from shore. But research being presented at the 2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting here on Monday may shed a bit of light on these enigmatic marine mammals.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Waymo and Uber have reached a settlement in their trade secrets battleUber Waymo D. Khosrowshahi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tropical Storm watch up in Guam, NASA sees 02W formTropical Depression 02W formed in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean late on February 8 as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Early treatment decisions can alter the course of care for acute pancreatitis patientsManagement and treatment decisions made within the first 48 to 72 hours of hospital admission for acute pancreatitis patients can significantly alter the course of disease and duration of hospitalization. A new clinical guideline from the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA), published in Gastroenterology, the official journal of AGA, focuses on the critical decisions made during initial
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Science | The Guardian
Runways, rockets and Russell’s teapot | Brief lettersStonehenge tunnel | Ants and acid | Lost from the Guardian | Yorkshire pudding | Elon Musk Would it be possible to have a free gamble on which major public work will be completed first: the Stonehenge tunnel or Heathrow’s third runway ( First proposals for Stonehenge’s £1.6bn road tunnel revealed , 8 February)? David Prothero Harlington, Bedfordshire • Morwenna Ferrier ( The faddy eater , G2, 8 Fe
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The Scientist RSS
Cuts to Prevention and Public Health Fund Puts CDC Programs at RiskReductions from the budget passed today and a $750-million shift of funds to the Children's Health Insurance Program add pressure to public health initiatives, including immunizations and outbreak responses.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tropical Storm watch up in Guam, NASA sees 02W formTropical Depression 02W formed in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean late on February 8 as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research uncovers the mysterious lives of narwhalsNarwhals are some of the most elusive creatures in the ocean, spending most of their lives in deep water far from shore. But research being presented at the 2018 Ocean Sciences Meeting here on Monday may shed a bit of light on these enigmatic marine mammals.
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Science | The Guardian
The new space race: how billionaires launched the next era of explorationThe launch of SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy rocket into deep space has fired dreams of a new era of 21st-century discovery Scientists and aerospace veterans, many of them still in awe at the cascade of smoke and fire, the roar of a 20-story machine hurtling into the sky, and the sight of a billionaire’s electric car floating past Earth, welcomed Elon Musk to the podium in Cape Canaveral this week. “We wa
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Science : NPR
Computational Propaganda: Bots, Targeting And The FutureComputational propaganda was invented by people who realized the possibilities emerging from the intersection of new technologies and behaviors they create — and it's frightening, says Adam Frank. (Image credit: Saul Gravy/Getty Images)
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Big Think
5 steps to disrupting your comfort zone and embracing creativityIn her new book, Creative Change , social psychologist Jennifer Mueller says everyone loves the idea of creativity even while we prefer the status quo. Read More
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The Atlantic
A Visual History of SportsTo celebrate the 2018 Winter Olympics, here’s an animated tour of the history of sports. The first recorded sport in history was spear throwing, which arose in 70,000 BC out of a need for ancient hunters to practice their skills. Bowling was the first known ball game, appearing in Egypt in 3,200 BC; later, there was Pitz, played by the ancient Maya in 2,500 BC, followed by Episkyros, known as “co
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The Atlantic
Fifty Shades Freed: A SpoilereviewFor reasons that are now obscure to me—and were by definition ill-conceived—I read Fifty Shades of Grey at that terrible moment in American history when it seemed that everyone else was reading it too. I don’t believe that I read either of the book’s sequels, though I can’t attest to that with much confidence. Suffice to say that I made either the wise decision to skip them or the only marginally
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers help robots think and plan in the abstractNew research shows how robots can autonomously construct abstract representations of their surroundings and use them to plan for multi-step tasks.
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Scientific American Content: Global
California Truck Rules Set Up Potential Conflict with Trump AdministrationThe rules seek to preserve the state’s authority to regulate emissions from two sectors that the administration has backed away from -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
Toad Eats Beetle, Immediately Regrets It — Watch Retching AftermathToads might want to be careful what meal they catch with their sticky, pink tongues. It could be a toxic beetle that makes them throw up … and then scurries away to tell the tale, a new study from Japan finds.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Did We Just Find Exoplanets in Another Galaxy?New observations of a supermassive black hole in a faraway galaxy hint that planets are plentiful throughout the universe -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
Meet the Adorable Olympic Mascots, Soohorang and BandabiWhat's the story behind South Korea's Olympic mascots?
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Dagens Medicin
STPS: Det er altid svært at indrømme, at man har taget fejlAnne-Marie Vangsted – vil du ikke nok forklare mig, hvordan du efter døgnvagten med Kristian Rørbæk Madsen kan sige, at du ikke så nogle ulovligheder?
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The Atlantic
What Investors Really FearThe Dow Jones Industrial Average has fallen by 1,000 points only twice in its 122-year history. The first time was Monday. The second was Thursday. There are two points to make about this. First, stocks have had a miserable week . The Dow erased nearly $3 trillion in wealth with a 10 percent plunge that officially qualifies as what’s called a market “correction.” Second, stocks have had a marvelo
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Popular Science
Meet the birds that work as wingmen for other malesAnimals Welcome to the strange world of cooperative courtship. Sex in the animal kingdom isn’t all about competition. Sometimes males help each other out.
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Popular Science
Lightning nearly struck this kid. What happened?It seemed harmless enough, to play in the rain with an umbrella under an overflowing rain gutter. The thunderstorm was passing and the worst of it was over. Or was it?
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Ingeniøren
Video: Cifferregnemaskinen DASK var Danmarks første supercomputerI 1956 præsenterede Bent Scharøe Petersen Danmarks første supercomputer DASK i Ingeniøren. Se og hør, hvordan maskinen fungerede. Vi er dykket ned i Ingeniørens arkiver – og det kan du også.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Routine imaging scans may predict fracture risk in older adultsRoutine body CT scans may help clinicians estimate an individual's risk of future osteoporotic fracture, according to new study results published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research.
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Futurity.org
Hearing loss more likely after undernourished early yearsYoung adults who were undernourished as preschool children are almost twice as likely to suffer from hearing loss as better-nourished peers, a study suggests. The study analyzed the relationship between the hearing of more than 2,200 young adults in Nepal and their nutritional levels as children 16 years earlier. Hearing loss is the fourth-leading cause of disability worldwide, and an estimated 8
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Inside Science
A System So Cold It's HotA System So Cold It's Hot Scientists describe a physical system that is both below “absolute zero” and above “absolute hot” at the same time. topimage.jpg Image credits: Myriams-Fotos via Pixabay Rights information: CC0 Creative Commons Physics Friday, February 9, 2018 - 09:30 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Can temperature drop below absolute zero? What happens then? Does it pop out a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Small asteroid to shave safely by Earth FridayAn asteroid bigger than a city bus is on track to zoom by Earth Friday at a safe but close distance, less than one-fifth as far away as the Moon, NASA said.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
3 lessons of revolutionary love in a time of rage | Valarie KaurWhat's the antidote to rising nationalism, polarization and hate? In this inspiring, poetic talk, Valarie Kaur asks us to reclaim love as a revolutionary act. As she journeys from the birthing room to tragic sites of bloodshed, Kaur shows us how the choice to love can be a force for justice.
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The Atlantic
The Olympics Do Not MatterEditor’s Note: Read all of The Atlantic ’s Winter Olympics coverage . The two greatest moments of the Olympics, the ones that have been passed down through legend and archival footage, involve the Cold War. There was Al Michaels shouting “Do you believe in miracles?” at the 1980 winter games in Lake Placid when the unheralded U.S. hockey team faced—and defeated—the mighty Soviets. There was also
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Striking the right balance between secrecy and accountability when undercover policing goes wrongMedia coverage of alleged historic misconduct by undercover police officers has led to the creation of a public inquiry into undercover policing. The inquiry has highlighted the tension between accountability and secrecy when mistakes have been made.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Forging a quantum leap in quantum communicationQuantum communication, which ensures absolute data security, is one of the most advanced branches of the "second quantum revolution". In quantum communication, the participating parties can detect any attempt at eavesdropping by resorting to the fundamental principle of quantum mechanics - a measurement affects the measured quantity. Thus, the mere existence of an eavesdropper can be detected by i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers to develop new allergy relief device using cold plasma technologyResearchers at the University of Liverpool are developing an innovative device that uses cold plasma technology to tackle the problem of airborne allergens in the home.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Your gadget's next power supply? Your bodySearching for a power outlet may soon become a thing of the past. Instead, devices will receive electricity from a small metallic tab that, when attached to the body, is capable of generating electricity from bending a finger and other simple movements.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists create functioning kidney tissueScientists have successfully produced human kidney tissue within a living organism which is able to produce urine, a first for medical science.The study led by Professors Sue Kimber and Adrian Woolf from The University of Manchester, signifies a significant milestone in the development of treatment for kidney disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CNIC scientists describe the mechanism of heart regeneration in the zebrafishA new study published in Nature Communications describes a high level of plasticity among different cell populations in the regenerating zebrafish heart
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Odd gluon compounds may be lurking in the protonsProtons are known to contain quarks and gluons. But are gluons behaving as expected?
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New Scientist - News
Deadly superbugs are evolving to beat alcohol hand sanitisersAlcohol-based hand sanitisers were introduced in hospitals to stop the spread of drug-resistant superbugs like MRSA. Now it seems the bacteria have got the upper hand
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New Scientist - News
We need to start taking vaping seriously as a way to save livesE-cigarettes were once seen as a sinister cousin to ordinary smoking. Now doctors in the UK think they could be a public health lifeline
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Improving drone performance in headwindsThe prevalence of multi-rotor drones has increased dramatically in recent years, but in headwinds, they pitch upwards unpredictably. Engineers from Tohoku University, Japan, have shown that angling the rotor blades of a quad-rotor unmanned aerial vehicles by just 20 degrees can reduce pitching by a quarter. Their work is published in the International Journal of Micro Air Vehicles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Synthesis of a water-soluble warped nanographene and its application for photo-induced cell deathGraphene and its nano-sized little sibling, nanographene, are well known for their remarkable photoelectronic properties. However, biomedical applications are hampered by the insolubility of the materials, especially in water. A Japanese team of scientists has now introduced substituted "warped nanographene," which is soluble in a broad range of solvents while maintaining its photophysical propert
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New on MIT Technology Review
Brexit could hit the UK’s advanced manufacturing hard
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Ingeniøren
Vind og sol-pulje barberes – pengene går til testmøllerEfter pres fra Vindmølleindustrien sender regeringen og Dansk Folkeparti flere penge efter testmøller uden for testcentrene. Pengene tages fra puljen til teknologineutrale sol- og vind-udbud.
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Futurity.org
60% of black women killed by police were unarmedBlack people, especially women, are more likely to have been unarmed when killed by police than non-blacks, according to a new study of nationwide data. This risk also appears to increase in police departments with a greater presence of non-white officers, report the researchers. “…the ‘hands up, don’t shoot’ slogan of the post-Ferguson movement becomes most relevant when you also ‘say her name.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NIH scientists adapt new brain disease test for Parkinson's, dementia with Lewy bodiesNIH scientists have modified a test for early diagnosis of prion diseases with the goal of improving early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. The NIAID-led group tested cerebral spinal fluid samples from people with Parkinson's disease; people with dementia with Lewy bodies; and controls, some of whom had Alzheimer's disease. The test correctly excluded all the control
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Forging a quantum leap in quantum communicationThe major drawback of quantum communication today is the slow speed of data transfer, which is limited by the speed at which the parties can perform quantum measurements. Researchers at Bar-Ilan University have devised a method that overcomes this "speed limit", and enables an increase in the rate of data transfer by more than 5 orders of magnitude! Their findings were published today in the journ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chicken pox vaccine linked with shingles at the vaccination site in some childrenNew research in Pediatric Dermatology reports several cases of shingles that developed at the original vaccination site in healthy children after they were immunized against chicken pox.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Water-soluble warped nanographeneGraphene and its nano-sized little sibling, nanographene, are well known for their remarkable photoelectronic properties. However, biomedical applications are hampered by the insolubility of the materials, especially in water. A Japanese team of scientists has now introduced substituted 'warped nanographene,' which is soluble in a broad range of solvents while maintaining its photophysical propert
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A super resolution view of chemical reactionsResearchers from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences have demonstrated, using a super resolution microscopic technique, how to follow chemical reactions taking place in very small volumes. The method of analysis developed by the Warsaw physicists in collaboration with PicoQuant GmbH is the first to make it potentially possible to observe reactions not only inside
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New discovery offers hope of protecting premature babies from blindnessNow there is hope of a new way to protect extremely premature babies from impaired vision or blindness resulting from the eye disease retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). A study at Sahlgrenska Academy published in JAMA Ophthalmology points to a clear link between ROP and low levels of the fatty acid arachidonic acid, measured in children's blood.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mangroves protect coastlines, store carbon – and are expanding with climate changeWith the help of technology, humans can traverse virtually every part of our planet's surface. But animals and plants are less mobile. Most species can only live in zones where temperature and rain fall within specific ranges.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Riddles in time and spaceWhen archaeologist Simone Mühl returned to the site of her excavations in last summer, she could hardly believe her eyes. The whole area was under water. When she had last seen it, the low mound at the center of the site was surrounded by fields of grain. Now fishing boats were anchored around it. "It was a fascinating sight, for I had never seen the mound like that before," she says. Gird-i Shaml
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Virtual reality training to help catch drug traffickingWorld drug usage is growing significantly every year. So is drug trafficking: Although the value of this market is difficult to calculate, experts evaluate it at approximately USD $400 billion.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel voice recognition technology completes Interpol's legal arsenalWatching mainstream forensics-related TV shows could easily make us believe that there is no piece of evidence stronger than conclusive DNA samples or fingerprints. Yet, that would be forgetting the importance of voice recognition. Thanks to new Speaker-Identification technology and a large database of voices maintained by Interpol, the latter will now become much easier.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Building with waste and recycled materialA residential module fully constructed from reusable, recyclable, and compostable materials: This is the premise for the newest unit in NEST, the modular research and innovation building run by Empa and Eawag in Dübendorf. On 8 February 2018, the NEST "Urban Mining & Recycling" unit will open its doors and henceforth house two students. At the same time, as an active lab it will also help to advan
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New intelligent system learns from simple problems to solve complex onesResearchers at The Australian National University (ANU) have designed a new type of intelligent system based on deep learning that can learn to solve decision-making problems, including problems more complex than it has been trained to solve.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thais arrest alleged Russian cybercrime market operatorPolice in Thailand announced Friday they have arrested a Russian national accused by U.S. authorities of running an online cybercrime marketplace where everything from stolen credit card information to hardware for compromising ATM machines could be purchased.
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Big Think
Researchers say we have a 'narcissism epidemic'. So what's causing it?Are you an important person? The answer you give may indicate to psychologists how narcissistic you are. Similarly, the culture you are born into plays an important role. Read More
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Science | The Guardian
Don’t knock Donald Trump for playing so much golf. Here’s why | Oliver BurkemanIt really is good that he is out in nature Spending time in nature, as you’re surely aware by now, is good for your mental health . Like, really, really good. People criticise Donald Trump for whiling away so many hours on golf courses , but they’re wrong: imagine the damage he’d wreak if his rage and repressed self-loathing weren’t offset by the restorative benefits of all that greenery! So ther
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Live Science
3 Ways the US Should Prepare for the Next Flu PandemicThe flu is wreaking havoc globally this year. While the U.S. has made huge strides in preparing for and treating the flu, we have a long way to go as we prepare for the next pandemic.
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Futurity.org
Kudos to snakes for moving seeds aroundSnakes may play a key role in dispersing plant seeds, new research suggests. Plants disperse their seeds by “hitchhiking” on animals, with the seeds clinging to fur or feathers, or stored in a cheek pouch or a bird’s crop. Sometimes, seeds are swallowed whole and survive the gut intact to emerge viable. This kind of seed dispersal has been critical to plants throughout their evolution, allowing t
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Live Science
In Photos: South Korea from AboveAs the Olympic Games kick off, here's a look at the diverse and beautiful East Asian nation, South Korea, in these amazing photos from above.
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Arctic Permafrost Holds a Crazy Amount of Mercury--and That's Bad NewsA new study on the Northern Hemisphere’s mercury has troubling implications for wildlife and human health -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren
Ole Birk Olesen kaldt i samråd om ulovligt svar i IC4-sagenDansk Folkeparti har nu indkaldt transportministeren til samråd, efter at han har undladt at gøre rede for, hvordan han vil reagere på Rigsrevisionens afdækning af nye problemer i IC4-sagen. Det er et brud på loven, siger både statsrevisorer og professor i forvaltningsret.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hidden depths—why groundwater is our most important water sourceVivid scenes of worried Cape Town residents clutching empty water vessels in long snaking queues are ricocheting around the globe. Everyone is asking, "How did this happen?" Or, more precisely, "Can it happen in my city?" The importance of effective water management has been shoved, blinking, into the limelight.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bid to find a Valentine for Romeo, world's 'loneliest frog'With Valentine's Day approaching, please spare a thought for Romeo the lonesome Bolivian frog.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Broadcom offers $8 bn to Qualcomm if deal is blockedSingapore-based Broadcom said Friday it would pay rival Qualcomm $8 billion if regulators fail to approve a proposed merger between the two computer chip giants.
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Viden
Facebook tester 'synes-ikke-om' knap
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Futurity.org
Does air pollution lead to more unethical behavior?Anxiety caused by exposure to pollution may make people more prone to cheating and unethical behavior, according to new research. And that can be a driver behind the higher crime rates in high-pollution areas. “We wanted to know what explains this connection between air pollution and criminal activity,” says Julia Lee, assistant professor of management and organizations at University of Michigan’
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How the brain constructs the worldHow are raw sensory signals transformed into a brain representation of the world that surrounds us? SISSA investigators have now uncovered the contributions to perception of a brain region called posterior parietal cortex. In two separate papers published in Neuron and Nature, they show that posterior parietal cortex contributes to the merging of signals from different sensory modalities, as well
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study highlights the impact companion animals have on ownersA new study, published in BMC Psychiatry, conducted by researchers from the universities of Liverpool, Manchester and Southampton, suggests that pets provide benefits to those with mental health conditions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Few-layer Tellurium was predicted to be a promising successor of black phosphorusMono-elementary semiconductors have unique advantages in terms of their chemical simplicity. Exploring for a high-performance two-dimensional elementary semiconductor is paramount for future electronics. Recently, a team led by Profs. Wei Ji at Renmin University of China and Yang Chai at the Hong Kong Polytechnic University theoretically predicted few-layer α-Tellurium to be a promising elementary
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Metals known to have harmful health effects found in indigenous exposed to oil spillsPeople from two indigenous communities in the Peruvian Amazon who live close to the country's longest oil pipeline have mercury, cadmium and lead in their bodies at concentrations that could be harmful to their health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chinese researchers report first lung stem cell transplantation clinical trialA research team from Tongji University in China have made a breakthrough in human lung regeneration technology. For the first time, researchers have regenerated patients' damaged lungs using autologous lung stem cell transplantation in a pilot clinical trial. The study can be found in the open-access journal Protein & Cell which is published by Springer Nature.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover another reason for the naked mole rats' long, cancer-free lifeA new international study has identified clues concerning the cellular processes that contribute to the naked mole rat's resistance to cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simple tests may predict older patients' risk of falling while hospitalizedSimple Tests May Predict Older Patients' Risk of Falling While Hospitalized A study of 807 older individuals admitted to hospital found that those who had poorer physical function at the time of admission were more likely to fall during their hospital stay; 329 falls occurred in 189 patients, including 161 injurious falls, of which 24 were serious.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stacking on the grapheneTohoku University researchers have fabricated two types of trilayer graphene with different electrical properties.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Active delivery of Cas9-sgRNA complex in the cell by using ultrasound-propelled nanomotorsIn cancer research, the "Cas-9-sgRNA" complex is an effective genomic editing tool, but its delivery across the cell membrane to the target (tumor) genome has not yet been satisfactorily solved. American and Danish scientists have now developed an active nanomotor for the efficient transport, delivery, and release of this gene scissoring system. As detailed in their paper in the journal Angewandte
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New on MIT Technology Review
The first lab-grown human eggs could help fight infertility
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
From chemical reaction to living cells – what kicked off the development of early life on earth?Chemists based in Munich have demonstrated that the alternation in wet and dry conditions on early Earth could have been enough to kick off the prebiotic synthesis of the RNA nucleosides found in all domains of life.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Texas flood: Researchers compare pollution levels before and after Hurricane HarveyRecent years have seen rising interest in improving post-disaster research, with calls for more and better studies coming from the academic community and agencies such as the National Institutes of Health. Although understanding the wide-ranging effects of disasters is vital for an effective public health response, a lack of baseline data has made it difficult to attribute post-disaster changes in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Small gold mines in Senegal create high mercury contaminationA Duke University-led study has found dangerously high levels of mercury and its more toxic chemical cousin, methylmercury, in soils, sediments and rivers near artisanal gold mines in the West African nation of Senegal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Acoustic nanomotorsIn cancer research, the 'Cas-9-sgRNA' complex is an effective genomic editing tool, but its delivery across the cell membrane to the target (tumor) genome has not yet been satisfactorily solved. American and Danish scientists have now developed an active nanomotor for the efficient transport, delivery, and release of this gene scissoring system. As detailed in their paper in the journal Angewandte
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
McMaster University engineers make drug testing more efficient and affordableMcMaster University engineers have devised a way to make testing for new drugs more efficient and affordable, and reduce the time for helpful medications to reach the public.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neanderthals' lack of drawing ability may relate to hunting techniquesVisual imagery used in drawing regulates arm movements in manner similar to how hunters visualize the arc of a spear.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improving drone performance in headwindsStability of unmanned aerial vehicles in heavy winds can be improved through rotor placement and angle, according to a team from Tohoku University and Kanazawa Institute of Technology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UTHealth leads ACSM paper on safety recommendations for energy drinksHelpful guidance and warnings regarding the potential dangers that energy drinks present to at-risk populations, primarily children, were published in a paper led by a cardiologist at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) for the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers make drug testing more efficient and affordableMcMaster University engineers have devised a way to make testing for new drugs more efficient and affordable, and reduce the time for helpful medications to reach the public.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bursting with excitement – A look at bubbles and fluids in spaceWatching a bubble float effortlessly through the International Space Station may be mesmerizing and beautiful to witness, but that same bubble is also teaching researchers about how fluids behave differently in microgravity than they do on Earth. The near-weightless conditions aboard the station allow researchers to observe and control a wide variety of fluids in ways that are not possible on Eart
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Global warming – we have lessons to learn from the Pliocene epochCarbon levels around 3 million years ago were similar to those of today and temperatures were even warmer. If something so significant is mirrored in the past, what else can we learn about extreme climate changes?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: Why study mouse lemurs?Like humans, mouse lemurs sometimes develop amyloid brain plaques and other Alzheimer's-like symptoms as they age. Because mouse lemurs are primates, they are a closer genetic match to humans than mice or rats are.
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Popular Science
How to share photos without blasting them all over the internetDIY Show off cute baby pics without losing your privacy. You want to show off pictures to friends and family members—without compromising privacy. Here are the best ways to share photos among a small private group.
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The Atlantic
Catholics Have a Messaging Problem in ChinaNearly half a century after Mao Tse-Tung banned religion in China, the country is home to an estimated 72 percent of the world’s religiously unaffiliated people. Yet if Christianity continues to grow at its current rate there, in a few years there will be more Christians in China than in any other country in the world. By claiming just a sliver of China’s population of 700 million religiously una
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Science : NPR
Jedidah Isler: What Role Do Supermassive Black Holes Play In The Cosmos?Scientists believe at the center of every galaxy is a supermassive black hole. Jedidah Isler describes how gamma ray telescopes have expanded our knowledge of this mysterious aspect of space. (Image credit: Ryan Lash/TED)
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Science : NPR
Natasha Hurley-Walker: How Do Radio Telescopes Reveal The Universe We Can't See?Natasha Hurley-Walker explains how a new radio telescope helps us "see" without light. She says these telescopes can tell us about millions of galaxies — and maybe even the beginning of time. (Image credit: Natasha Hurley Walker)
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Science : NPR
Sara Seager: How Close Are We To Finding Life On Another Planet?In our galaxy alone, there are hundreds of billions of planets. And Sara Seager is looking for the perfect one, a "Goldilocks" planet— neither too hot nor too cold— that could support life. (Image credit: Bret Hartman/TED)
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Science : NPR
Allan Adams: Can Gravitational Waves Tell Us How The Universe Began?In 2015, scientists first detected gravitational waves— ripples in space caused by massive disturbances. Allan Adams says this discovery helps answer some of our biggest questions about the universe. (Image credit: Bret Hartman/TED)
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Asteroid set for 'close' 43,300 mile flight past Earth on FridayThe asteroid, up to 40m in size and only discovered five days ago, passes by on Friday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Moulds produce plant growth hormonePlants, bacteria and various fungi produce a specific group of hormones known as auxins. Together with other hormones, they cause plant cells to stretch and thus, for example, the rapid growth of young shoots. The manner in which plants produce these substances has been intensively studied for decades, and is accordingly described in great detail. In contrast, how this biosynthesis takes place in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An international plastics treaty could avert a 'Silent Spring' for the seasGlobal problems —like our plastic-choked seas —need global solutions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Walking' fish help scientists to understand how we left the oceanOur ancestors' transition out of the water and onto the land was a pivotal moment in evolution. No longer buoyed by water, early tetrapods (animals with four limbs) had to overcome gravity in order to move their bodies. Exactly how those early pioneers first evolved the fundamental capacity to walk has fascinated scientists for many years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In a first, scientists successfully induce spawning in wild bonefishA team led by Florida Institute of Technology's Jonathan Shenker and Paul Wills of Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute at Florida Atlantic University has for the first time successfully induced spawning of wild bonefish and hatched the fertilized eggs into larvae.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers patent quick tests for cocaineFIU students and their professor have patented a series of new tests that can quickly, accurately and cost-effectively confirm the presence of cocaine.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Leaky atmosphere linked to lightweight planetThe Red Planet's low gravity and lack of magnetic field makes its outermost atmosphere an easy target to be swept away by the solar wind, but new evidence from ESA's Mars Express spacecraft shows that the Sun's radiation may play a surprising role in its escape.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Salk researchers discover how liver responds so quickly to foodSalk researchers have uncovered how the liver can have a speedy response to food; liver cells store up pre-RNA molecules involved in glucose and fat metabolism.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
No glaciers, no water?The world's largest rivers begin in glaciated mountain regions. However, climate change may cause many glaciers to disappear. Will water become scarce?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Modeling human behavior with AirbnbResearchers at Idiap and EPFL have been working with psychologists to understand how people form first impressions from photos. They focused on how people respond to properties available on Airbnb. Better analysis of human behavior should allow scientists to program machines capable of making more "human" decisions.
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Futurity.org
‘Agroforestry’ may be new weapon in climate change fightAgroforestry could play an important role in mitigating climate change because it sequesters more atmospheric carbon in plant parts and soil than conventional farming, report researchers. An agricultural system that combines trees with crops and livestock on the same plot of land, agroforestry is especially popular in developing countries because it allows small shareholder farmers—who have littl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Particle interactions on Titan support the search for new physics discoveriesNuclear physicists are using the nation's most powerful supercomputer, Titan, at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility to study particle interactions important to energy production in the sun and stars and to propel the search for new physics discoveries
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study uncovers gender gap in earnings of Uber driversUChicago economists helped lead a study that found men working for the ride-sharing platform Uber earned about 7 percent more per hour than women.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Homo sapiens' drawing ability may relate to hunting techniquesNeanderthals had large brains and made complex tools but never demonstrated the ability to draw recognizable images, unlike early modern humans who created vivid renderings of animals and other figures on rocks and cave walls. That artistic gap may be due to differences in the way they hunted, suggests a University of California, Davis, expert on predator-prey relations and their impacts on the ev
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Getting a gripThe Bloodhound supersonic car aims to run in South Africa this October, and there is a lot to prepare.
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NYT > Science
Are Hand Dryers Actually Full of Bacteria? A Viral Photo Doesn’t Tell the Whole StoryA photo of a petri dish covered in fungi and bacteria spread online. But studies disagree on whether hand dryers are really less hygienic than paper towels.
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Science : NPR
'Invisibilia': The Otherworldly Alien Hand Syndrome, AnimatedImagine trying to play the piano or button a shirt, while one hand does something else, entirely of its own volition. Invisibilia explored this phenomenon. More stories are coming in the new season. (Image credit: Giant Ant for NPR)
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Feed: All Latest
'Shadow of the Colossus' Review: A Game of Rituals, Being Re-Enacted BeautifullyThe 2005 game has returned for a new generation, relating a story that is itself about retelling.


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