Ingeniøren
På Christiania har de hacket sig til styr på varmenHoldet bag Christianias ‘nabo­varmeprojekt’ har med hackede varmemålere, open source, kinesiske mikrochips og opfindsomhed løftet fristadens varmeforsyning ind i det 21. århundrede.
7h
Live Science
If 'Starman' Isn't Headed for the Asteroid Belt, Where's That Dummy Going?The Tesla Roadster and "Starman" dummy that SpaceX launched on its new Falcon Heavy rocket on Tuesday (Feb. 6) does not appear to be heading to the asteroid belt, despite what SpaceX founder and CEO Elon Musk said on Twitter Tuesday evening.
3h
Feed: All Latest
To Fund US Infrastructure, Charge by the Mile, Not the GallonThe gas tax is bad, and there's a better way forward.
6h

LATEST

Science | The Guardian
Trump administration considers privatizing International Space StationDocuments show a plan to cease funding for the orbiting lab by 2024 and pitches running ISS ‘as part of a future commercial platform’ The Trump administration is considering turning the International Space Station over to private enterprise, according to internal documents obtained by the Washington Post , and ceasing to fund the orbiting lab by 2024. While the plan doesn’t not recommend “deorbit
11min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ultra-efficient removal of carbon monoxide using gold nanoparticles on a molecular supportResearchers have developed a way to mount gold nanoparticles on a molecular support known as a polyoxometalate (POM). They successfully applied this to realize nearly 100% conversion of carbon monoxide (CO) over a wide temperature range, demonstrating stable performance over long periods of time. They showed how traces of water uniquely contribute to the catalyst's function, promising insight into
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Giant lava dome confirmed in Japan's Kikai CalderaResearchers have confirmed that a giant lava dome was created in the Kikai Caldera, south of Japan's main islands after the caldera-forming supereruption 7,300 years ago. The dome is in the world's largest class of post-caldera volcano, with a volume of over 32 cubic kilometers. It is possible that currently a giant magma buildup may exist under the Kikai Caldera.
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New findings about why losartan is effective in treating Marfan syndrome may reshape our thinking about patient managementProgressive dilation of the aortic root is considered one of the most serious manifestations of Marfan syndrome. The antihypertensive losartan is one of the two medications recommended by current guidelines attenuate the progression of this aortic enlargement, but which medication works best is still controversial. A new report confirms losartan's efficacy but finds that the underlying mechanism o
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mass production of new class of semiconductors closer to realityChemists have made it easier for manufacturers to produce a new class of faster and cheaper semiconductors.
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Small gold mines in Senegal create high mercury contaminationA new study has found high levels of mercury and methylmercury in soils, sediments and rivers near artisanal gold mines in Senegal. Nearly every sample collected from four mining villages contained mercury levels at least ten times higher than World Health Organization and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards.
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How liver responds so quickly to foodResearchers have uncovered how the liver can have a speedy response to food; liver cells store up pre-RNA molecules involved in glucose and fat metabolism.
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stacking on the grapheneResearchers have fabricated two types of trilayer graphene with different electrical properties.
34min
The Atlantic
The Selective Empathy of #MeToo BacklashThe tweet, as so often happens, was at once shocking and deeply predictable. Peoples lives are being shattered and destroyed by a mere allegation. Some are true and some are false. Some are old and some are new. There is no recovery for someone falsely accused—life and career are gone. Is there no such thing any longer as Due Process? — Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) February 10, 2018 That wa
53min
Science | The Guardian
Since Cheddar Man we’re all immigrants | Brief lettersBritish DNA | The contraceptive pill | Deinocrates | G2 staples | London fatberg The most interesting line in your article on Cheddar Man (7 February) is that only 10% of the white British population can trace their ancestry back to this ancient migrant group, who could well be termed indigenous. Finally, proof that almost everyone on these islands is an immigrant and that it’s time to stop all th
59min
Scientific American Content: Global
Boat Noise Means Fish Can't Learn Their LessonsDamselfish had trouble learning to avoid predators, when that lesson was accompanied by a soundtrack of buzzing boat engines. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
FabLabs Are Showing That Student Makers Have Many FacesOpening the lab door to alternative education, therapeutic emotional support, special needs and behaviorally nonconforming students shows potential benefits that reach far beyond report cards -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
French PM oversees major Airbus deal signed in DubaiFrench Prime Minister Edouard Philippe on Sunday hailed the signing in Dubai of a $16 billion purchase by Emirates Airlines of the Airbus A380 superjumbo commercial airliner.
2h
Live Science
Launch of Superfast Russian Cargo Ship Mission Aborted at Last MinuteThe launch of a Russian cargo ship bound for the International Space Station was aborted in the final minute Sunday (Feb. 11), just as it was poised to fly the fastest resupply mission to the orbiting lab in history.
2h
Big Think
The 7 longest ruling dictators in the worldHere are 7 current dictators that have ruled their countries the longest. Read More
2h
Science | The Guardian
Is it wrong to boil lobsters alive?It would be unthinkable to buy a chicken or lamb to kill at home – but you can have living crustaceans delivered to your door via Amazon. Has society gone to pot over shellfish? Robert Elwood once boiled a lobster alive – lobsters being one of the few creatures we eat that we are allowed to slaughter at home. It is the usual way to kill, and cook, them. “Would I boil a lobster now?” asks Elwood,
2h
Ingeniøren
Kunst og forstenede æg sætter liv i dinosaurerneSamarbejde mellem kunst og videnskab har bragt forskere tættere på sandheden om de forhistoriske dyr, viser udstilling på Statens Naturhistoriske Museum.
3h
Feed: All Latest
What Microsoft’s Antitrust Case Teaches Us About Silicon ValleyTwenty years after the US tried to break up Microsoft, a new crop of giants rule technology in an uneasy balance. And the government seems unable to stop them.
3h
Popular Science
Ice technicians are the secret stars of the Winter OlympicsScience It’s science—on ice. Ice is an important part of the Winter Olympics. To get these slick surfaces just right, athletes rely on experienced ice technicians.
3h
Live Science
A Boy Scrapes His Elbow. One Week Later, Docs Find a Sea Snail in the Wound.A scraped elbow may not seem like an unusual injury, but for one 11-year-old boy in California, his health took an odd turn after he fell and hurt his left elbow while exploring a tide pool.
3h
The Atlantic
A Dangerous Immigration Crackdown in West AfricaAGADEZ, Niger—For centuries, the city of Agadez served as a gateway between sub-Saharan and North Africa. While the camel caravans have been replaced by trucks and Toyota 4x4s, the city’s local communities still rely on the transport of merchandise and contraband to get by. Agadez is also the largest city in Niger’s restive north, the birthplace of ethnic-Tuareg rebellions against the Nigerien st
4h
Viden
"Mænd var så nærige og fedtede, at de genbrugte gummiet flere gange"Fra sjælden kvindeonani til toiletsex. Sådan har vi talt om sex - og er blevet syge af det - siden 1960'erne.
4h
Feed: All Latest
Quincy Jones' Latest Mind-Blowing Interview Tops This Week's Internet NewsIn a new interview the legendary producer proved to be a font of untapped information.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
Buying into Nuclear Power; Selling American Cars in Japan; Advocating for NitroglycerinInnovation and discovery as chronicled in Scientific American -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
Follow That GiraffeIce age tracks put ancient giraffes in an unexpected place -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
Ingeniøren
Små kraftvarmeværker håber på velvilje i nyt energiforligEt tidsbegrænset elproduktionstilskud til decentrale, naturgasfyrede kraftvarmeværker forsvinder i år. Det betyder prisstigninger på mange fjernvarmeværker, der har råbt på handling fra politikerne i flere år.
5h
Ingeniøren
Fjernvarmeværk i Gelsted mister 4.000 kroner pr. kundeGelsted Fjernvarme med bare 402 forbrugere står foran store prisstigninger. Et helt nyt varmepumpeprojekt i 11. time vil dog reducere stigningen, vurderer bestyrelsesformanden.
5h
Feed: All Latest
Winter Olympics 2018: Why I Love Watching CurlingSilence your phone, flip it over, and enter the alternate Curliverse where you can gently slide your worries down the ice on a cushion of tranquility.
5h
Science : NPR
Finding Planets Outside The Milky WayNPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks with University of Oklahoma postdoctoral researcher Eddie Guerras about how his team detected planets outside of our galaxy.
5h
Science : NPR
Teens And GenderNPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks with Nic Rider, post-doctoral fellow at the University of Minnesota whose research shows more teens in the U.S. are identifying as transgender or gender nonconforming.
5h
The Atlantic
Finding New Meaning After An Olympic CareerEditor’s Note: Read more of The Atlantic’s Winter Olympics 2018 coverage . Shortly before getting on the ice at the Pacific Coliseum in Vancouver, Canada, during the 2010 Winter Olympics, the U.S. national champion figure skater and high-school senior Rachael Flatt was writing a paper on Pride and Prejudice for her AP English Literature class. Though it was her first time competing in the Olympic
5h
The Atlantic
The Jet Engine is a Futuristic Technology Stuck in the Past“Falcon Heavy, in a Roar of Thunder, Carries SpaceX’s Ambition Into Orbit.” So reads a New York Times headline on the biggest spectacle of the week. Elon Musk’s latest rocket blasted into the atmosphere with David Bowie’s iconic “Space Oddity” playing on auto-repeat, listened to by no one. Crowds cheered as the rocket roared upon takeoff— carrying a Tesla Roadster as payload, no less—and roared a
5h
The Atlantic
A Better Way to Look at Most Every Political IssueWe sometimes think of political issues in binary terms. Is someone pro-life or pro-choice? But most individuals hold views that are more complicated than a binary can capture. An alternative is to describe a given position on a spectrum. On abortion, an outright ban sits at one extreme; at the other is the elimination of all restrictions on the procedure. In between are a staggering array of cohe
5h
Science : NPR
I Didn't Think There Were Many African Women Scientists. Then I Checked TwitterThe author, a woman scientist from Africa, was stumped by a survey asking her to name women scientists from Africa. (Image credit: Maria Fabrizio for NPR)
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Tilted Road IllusionThe latest viral illusion has a known explanation. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
The Atlantic
The Tina Brown Diaries“There is no such thing as a succès d’estime in America. That’s why it is a French phrase.” Tina Brown never lacked for success in the American fame-and-money sense of the word. Yet for all the acclaim that has come the way of this legendary magazine editor, Brown has also been persistently underestimated. Brown observes of herself: “The perception of me is flashy, fast, and scandalous.” Now Brow
6h
Science : NPR
More Religious Leaders Challenge Silence, Isolation Surrounding SuicideMany faith leaders are looking past suicide as a sin to help spot and support those suffering from mental health issues in their communities. (Image credit: Nicole Xu for NPR)
7h
The Atlantic
The Truth About Military ParadesIt is a safe bet that by the time the Pentagon does actually get around to giving Donald Trump the parade he has demanded, two things will have happened: First, the scale will be considerably less than the hundreds of M-1 tanks roaring up Pennsylvania Avenue deplored by many of the President’s critics; second, the current fuss will be long forgotten in the avalanche of scandals, crises, and const
7h
The Atlantic
Echoes of the Mommy Wars in #MeTooThe first, furious wave of #MeToo has receded, but the reckoning is hardly over. Stories continue to surface. Workplaces (and beyond) continue to grapple with the shifting terrain. The terms of the debate continue to evolve—including, predictably, heated back-and-forths about the dangers of overreach and backlash and witch hunts and neo-puritanism and political correctness run amok. With a moveme
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Marathon Kim Dotcom case back in New Zealand courtInternet mogul Kim Dotcom's legal case returns to court in New Zealand Monday for what may be the Megaupload founder's final chance of avoiding extradition to the United States.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Esports officially arrives in Japan, home of game giantsA crowd cheers, banging on balloons, in front of glitzy stages, each with a giant screen. The rising stars at the sprawling Makuhari Messe hall are the quietly seated men in hoodies and T-shirts, with names like Noppi and Refresh, jiggling on buttons and grimacing at screens.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Q&A: How is the growth of bitcoin affecting the environment?The growth of bitcoin is fueling speculation and debate about the environmental impact of the energy needed to power the virtual currency in the era of climate change. Some questions and answers about the issue:
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russia reschedules Soyuz launch after failure to blast offRussian space agency Roscosmos has delayed the launch of a Soyuz rocket carrying a Progress cargo ship by two days after Sunday's planned lift-off was aborted at the last minute.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earthquake, wind and fire: extreme conditions hit OlympicsAn earthquake triggered an alert and high winds disrupted competition at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics Sunday, as officials warned of a severe freeze and urged fans to wrap up warm.
8h
Viden
Sterile myg med sexlyst skal bekæmpe zikavirus i USAI et forsøg på at forhindre en ny zika-epidemi slippes seks millioner myg nu løs i Florida.
8h
Dagens Medicin
Grotesk doku-tragedie om sygehusenes kerneopgaveANMELDELSE. Teaterstykket ‘Hospitalet’ går fra vidunderlig ironi og sarkasme til et så grotesk forvredet billede af sundhedsvæsenet, at man næsten står af.
9h
Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsfremme og forebyggelse er også en regional opgaveRegionernes tilgang til forebyggelse har hidtil været tøvende og tilbageholdende. Her er tre argumenter til at blive en stærkere spiller indenfor forebyggelse.
9h
Ingeniøren
Industriens robotter er en stor misforståelseDet dur simpelthen ikke at bygge robotter, der efterligner menneskets bevægelser. Mennesket løser opgaverne hurtigere og billigere end de programmerede maskiner, hævdede MIT-professor i Ingeniøren i 1985.
9h
Science | The Guardian
Poison pass: the man who became immune to snake venomRock singer Steve Ludwin has been injecting himself with snake venom for 30 years. In a strange twist, his bizarre habit could now save thousands of lives. His former partner Britt Collins tells his outlandish story Sometime in 2006, when my ex-boyfriend failed to show up for dinner, I assumed something was wrong or perhaps he’d forgotten. About a week later, calling to apologise, he told me he’d
10h
Science | The Guardian
‘Reason is non-negotiable’: Steven Pinker on the EnlightenmentIn an extract from his new book Enlightenment Now, the Harvard psychologist extols the relevance of 18th-century thinking • Read an interview with Steven Pinker on Enlightenment Now here What is enlightenment? In a 1784 essay with that question as its title, Immanuel Kant answered that it consists of “humankind’s emergence from its self-incurred immaturity”, its “lazy and cowardly” submission to t
10h
Science | The Guardian
Steven Pinker: ‘The way to deal with pollution is not to rail against consumption’The feather-ruffling Harvard psychologist’s new book, a defence of Enlightenment values, may be his most controversial yet • Read an extract from Enlightenment Now here Say the word “enlightenment” and it tends to conjure images of a certain kind of new-age spiritual “self-improvement”: meditation, candles, chakra lines. Add the definite article and a capital letter and the Enlightenment becomes
10h
BBC News - Science & Environment
'Oumuamua: 'space cigar's' tumble hints at violent pastThe 'Oumuamua asteroid from outside our Solar System was involved in a collision, a study finds.
11h
Science | The Guardian
One man’s mission to conquer spaceRocket Lab entrepreneur Peter Beck’s recent launch into orbit of Humanity Star drew a barrage of flak. But he remains undaunted Last month, from its base in New Zealand, Peter Beck’s space company, Rocket Lab, conducted its first successful attempt to put satellites in orbit. The launch vehicle, the Electron, carried a payload including the Humanity Star, a very shiny, 65-sided, carbon-fibre satel
11h
Science | The Guardian
Are you self-disciplined or impulsive? Personality quizThe trick is to find a good balance between self restraint and spontaneity Here is a list of statements. Choose the response, a) or b), that best applies to you: I more often a) Stick to a budget b) Spend more than I earn Continue reading...
12h
Big Think
Hate Valentine's Day? Singles Awareness Day is for youSingle people have their own day to celebrate love. Read More
14h
The Atlantic
The False-Accuser-in-ChiefOn Saturday morning, President Trump posted an apparent critique of the #MeToo movement on Twitter. “Peoples lives are being shattered and destroyed by a mere allegation,” he declared. “Some are true and some are false. Some are old and some are new. There is no recovery for someone falsely accused––life and career are gone. Is there no such thing any longer as Due Process?” Within hours, his twe
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chemist designs diabetic treatment minus harmful side effectsScientists have figured out how to control glucose levels in the bloodstream without the usual side effects of nausea, vomiting or malaise.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Efficient technique discovered for isolating embryonic stem cells in cowsScientists have developed a highly efficient method of isolating embryonic stem cells in cows. Producing embryonic stem cells from large livestock species like cattle is important for genetic testing, genome engineering, and studying human disease.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New discovery offers hope of protecting premature babies from blindnessNow there is hope of a new way to protect extremely premature babies from impaired vision or blindness resulting from the eye disease retinopathy of prematurity (ROP). A study points to a clear link between ROP and low levels of the fatty acid arachidonic acid, measured in children's blood.
17h
Science | The Guardian
The Observer view on the future of space travel | Observer editorialEntrepreneurs such as Elon Musk hold the key to exciting and important possibilities The sight of the giant Falcon Heavy rocket roaring into space after its launch last week will have brought, if nothing else, a nostalgic tear to the eyes of many experienced space hands who had gathered to witness the blast-off. From the same Kennedy Space Center launch pad that saw Apollo rockets soar towards the
18h
Science | The Guardian
We’ve trashed the oceans; now we are turning space into a junkyard for billionaires | Kevin McKennaExperts say rocket emissions affect our climate and cause ozone loss, yet too few people seem to care David Attenborough’s Blue Planet series raised our awareness of rubbish tips traversing our oceans and choking some of our most beloved marine species. This has led to a global debate about how we manufacture and dispose of plastics. The Scottish government announced that it is to host an interna
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Device that measures cell strength could help identify drugs for asthma, hypertensionEngineers, doctors and scientists have developed a tool that measures the physical strength of individual cells 100 times faster than current technologies.
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New images reveal how the ear's sensory hairs take shapeOur ability to hear relies on tiny bundles of hair-like sensors inside the inner ear. Scientists have identified a key component of the machinery that makes these bundles grow in an orderly fashion.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New unknown Bryozoa genera and species below thousand meters deep in the Southwestern AtlanticA scientific team has discovered twenty new species and two genera for unknown Bryozoa --most of them were found below 1000 meters deep- in the Southwestern Atlantic.
19h
cognitive science
A new study has found that lower level of sodium in the blood known as hyponatremia is linked with declines in cognitive function with advancing age.submitted by /u/SophiaDevetzi [link] [comments]
20h
Big Think
Let Harvard teach you about Buddhism in this free online course you can take nowHarvard University's popular course on Buddhism returns with an interactive feature and great content. Read More
21h
Science | The Guardian
Cheddar Man changes the way we think about our ancestorsThe study of a 10,000-year-old man surprised people when it revealed his blue eyes and dark skin – and few predicted he would reshape our view of our genetic heritage In 1903 workmen digging a drainage trench in Gough’s Cave in the Cheddar Gorge, in Somerset, uncovered the remains of a young man, sealed under a stalagmite. The figure, feet curled up underneath him, was small, at about 5ft 5in, and
21h
The Beautiful Brain
The Beautiful Brain: The Drawings of Santiago Ramón y Cajal gallery showWe are thrilled about The Beautiful Brain exhibition now open at NYU’s Grey Gallery through March 31 (and more exhibitions to come after that). It’s the first-ever appearance of many of Cajal’s most notable drawings of the nervous system in the U.S. and, we believe, a wonderful milestone in the much-needed effort to cement Cajal as a formative scientific mind along the lines of Marie Curie, Isaac
22h
Viden
Valentins dag: Dine roser har afrikanske rødderValentinsdag er lig med røde roser, men de langstilkede kærlighedserklæringer har været ude på en lang tur, inden de ender i hænderne på danske forbrugere.
22h
Big Think
This awesome species of fish gets by on 2 hours of sleepResearchers are looking into what this fratboy fish of the Mexican underwater cave systems can teach us about sleep regulation. Read More
22h
Scientific American Content: Global
Geologic Mayhem on NetflixIn the mood for disaster? Netflix has some good 'uns for you! -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h

END OF FEED


Vil du være med til at finde de mest interessante nyheder? Send email herom til BioNyt

Se nyheder fra en tidligere dato

Tegn abonnement på

BioNyt Videnskabens Verden (www.bionyt.dk) er Danmarks ældste populærvidenskabelige tidsskrift for naturvidenskab. Det er det eneste blad af sin art i Danmark, som er helliget international forskning inden for livsvidenskaberne.

Bladet bringer aktuelle, spændende forskningsnyheder inden for biologi, medicin og andre naturvidenskabelige områder som f.eks. klimaændringer, nanoteknologi, partikelfysik, astronomi, seksualitet, biologiske våben, ecstasy, evolutionsbiologi, kloning, fedme, søvnforskning, muligheden for liv på mars, influenzaepidemier, livets opståen osv.

Artiklerne roses for at gøre vanskeligt stof forståeligt, uden at den videnskabelige holdbarhed tabes.