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Watch Boston Dynamics’ SpotMini Robot Open a DoorThe SpotMini extends an arm out of its head and turns a handle and opens the door and then props it open for its (armless) SpotMini friend to walk through.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tricking photons leads to first-of-its-kind laser breakthroughA team of optics researchers has demonstrated the first-ever nonmagnetic topological insulator laser, a finding that has the potential to substantially improve the efficiency, beam quality, and resilience of semiconductor laser arrays.
45min
Futurity.org
How hearing loss and depression are connectedHearing loss can create chronic stress that can lead to depression, but high levels of social support—from family, friends, and others—can help alleviate depression, according to new research. Given that hearing loss is a growing social and physical health problem, her study suggests a need for increased vigilance regarding hearing loss among older adults, says study author Jessica West, a PhD st
1h
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Partner selection in lemursRed-fronted lemurs recognize conspecifics in photos.
21min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facial attraction: Red-fronted lemurs recognize photos of their own speciesWild red-fronted lemurs (Eulemur rufrifrons) appear to be able to recognize individuals belonging to the same species (conspecifics) from photographs, a study published in the open access journal BMC Evolutionary Biology suggests.
40min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Progress, but far from perfection, on avoiding risky sedatives in older adultsThey help many people sleep, or feel calmer or less anxious. But in older people, they also double the risk of car crashes, falls and broken hips. That's why the medications known as benzodiazepines show up on international guidelines as drugs that very few people over the age of 65 should take. Yet a sizable percentage of adults in that age group still have an active prescription for one, accordi
45min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tiny drug-delivering capsules could sustain transplanted insulin-producing cellsA drug-carrying microsphere within a cell-bearing microcapsule could be the key to transplanting insulin-secreting pig pancreas cells into human patients whose own cells have been destroyed by type I diabetes.
45min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New cannabis products highly potent, pose mental health risksWith states rapidly legalizing cannabis for medicinal and recreational use, physicians will be increasingly pressed to counsel patients on their frequency of use and dosage, as well as associated risks.
45min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Hot spots' of water quality violationsWhile serious violations like those in the Flint, Michigan, crises are rare, ensuring reliable access to safe drinking water poses challenges for communities across the country, according to a recent study.
59min
Futurity.org
Why some fish leave their embryos in a really hot spotCertain deep-sea fish seem to use volcanic heat from hydrothermal vents to accelerate the development of their embryos. This behavior hasn’t been seen before in marine animals. The fish, deep-sea skates—cartilaginous fish related to rays and sharks—have some of the longest egg incubation times, estimated to last more than four years. “Hydrothermal vents are extreme environments, and most animals
1h
Futurity.org
‘Turbulent dynamo’ may clarify universe’s magnetic mysteryScientists have demonstrated the existence of an elusive phenomenon called “turbulent dynamo,” which had previously never before been measured or observed directly. The universe is filled with magnetic fields, but how it got that way has long been a mystery. To explain the magnetization of the universe—or, rather, how tiny, primordial “seed” magnetic fields grew to astronomical proportions—scient
1h
Futurity.org
If we can ‘turn on’ the urge to drink, can we turn it off?Researchers have discovered out how to induce alcohol-seeking behavior by altering the strength of connections between particular neurons. The work may offer clues about how to curb the urge to drink. About 15.1 million American adults have alcohol use disorder, meaning they cannot stop drinking despite adverse consequences—in other words, they have what is commonly called alcoholism. “Essentiall
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bats as barometer of changeBats spend every night hard at work for local farmers, consuming over half of their own weight in insects, many of which are harmful agricultural pests, such as the noctuid moths, corn earworm and fall armyworm. And now they are arriving earlier in the season, and some of them are reluctant to leave. It seems the bats know more about climate change than we had realized.
1h
Futurity.org
Fewer biopsies with these two new endoscopic probes?Two new endoscopic probes will significantly sharpen imaging resolution and allow direct observation of cells, potentially reducing doctors’ dependence on invasive biopsies, researchers say. The new probes are already permitting direct observation of fine tissue structures and cell activity in small organs in sheep, rats, and mice. Clinical trials are needed to establish their value in humans. En
1h
Futurity.org
Listen: Where do criminals get guns?While policymakers argue about things like background checks for legal gun purchases, criminals, for the most part, are not getting guns through legal means, according to Philip J. Cook. Cook, a researcher at Duke University, has been tracking the underground gun market in America for the last 15 years. For one project, his team went to one of the largest jails in the country and asked the inmate
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
Old Trees Are Ecosystem GoldDavid Lindenmayer of the Australian National University College of Science in Canberra says that older trees play outsized roles in maintaining landscapes and ecosystems. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Futurity.org
Dementia less likely for people with positive attitude about agingPeople who gain positive beliefs about aging from the culture around them are less likely to develop dementia, new research suggests. Researchers found this protective effect for all participants, as well as among those carrying a gene that puts them at higher risk of developing dementia. Researchers found that older people with positive age beliefs who carry one of the strongest risk factors for
1h
Live Science
Arizona Woman Wakes Up with British AccentAn Arizona woman woke up speaking with a British accent, even though she's never left the country.
1h
Big Think
Singles in South Korea celebrate their own kind of Valentine’s Day and it’s inspiringUnderstanding how some East Asians celebrate Valentine’s Day can tell us a lot about Western culture and what the East and West have in common. Read More
1h
Big Think
Australians support universal health care, so why not a universal basic income?In Australia, the idea of a universal basic income has floated in and out of our political arena for years, but remains only that, an idea. Read More
1h
Feed: All Latest
Who's Going to Buy the International Space Station?ISS NASA TrumpWhile NASA and space enthusiasts have been talking about privatizing the ISS for years, Monday’s announcement is the first time the idea has been officially endorsed by the White House.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Obesity associated with longer survival for men with metastatic melanomaObese patients with metastatic melanoma who are treated with targeted or immune therapies live significantly longer than those with a normal body mass index (BMI), investigators report in a study published in Lancet Oncology of 1,918 patients in six independent clinical cohorts.This effect, referred to as the 'Obesity Paradox,' principally manifested itself in men, said Jennifer McQuade, M.D., lea
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cold open water plunge provides instant pain reliefA short, sharp, cold water swim may offer an alternative to strong painkillers and physiotherapy to relieve severe persistent pain after surgery, suggest doctors in the journal BMJ Case Reports.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Slow eating speed may be linked to weight lossSlowing down the speed at which you eat, along with cutting out after dinner snacks and not eating within two hours of going to sleep may all help to shed the pounds, suggests research published in the online journal BMJ Open.
2h
Science | The Guardian
Eating slowly may help prevent obesity, say researchersStudy suggests link between eating slowly and lower waist circumference and BMI, though some experts are sceptical While you might be tempted to wolf down a sandwich or gobble up your dinner, researchers say there may be advantages to taking your time over a meal. According to a study looking at type 2 diabetics, eating slowly could help prevent obesity, with researchers finding a link to both lo
2h
Live Science
NASA Wants to Build a Super Quiet Supersonic JetUnder Trump, NASA is planning to move in a big way into quiet supersonic jets, perhaps at the expense of the agency's science mission.
2h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: ‘A Mere Allegation’What We’re Following Debating #MeToo: Amid the outcry over the White House’s handling of former Staff Secretary Rob Porter’s alleged history of domestic violence, President Trump expressed his indignation on Twitter over “peoples lives ... being shattered and destroyed by a mere allegation.” The tweet drew criticism because of Trump’s own history of both alleged sexual misconduct and false accusa
2h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Even after bedbugs are eradicated, their waste lingersBedbug waste contains high levels of the allergy-triggering chemical histamine, which stays behind even after the insects are eradicated.
2h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Trump budget US cash for International Space StationISS NASA TrumpMr Trump's proposed budget includes funds to transition the space station from public to private.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Weeds out of controlHerbicides can no longer control the weeds that threaten crop productivity and food security in the UK because the plants have evolved resistance, and future control must depend on management strategies that reduce reliance on chemicals. So concludes a nationwide epidemiological assessment of the factors that are driving the abundance and spread of the major agricultural weed, black-grass.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New machine learning algorithm uncovers time-delayed interactions in cellsA new algorithm uses time-series data to show the cause-and-effect interactions that take place inside of living cells.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Limited scope of corporate sustainability revealedThe first large-scale analysis of corporate practices for sourcing sustainable materials shows that many companies address sustainability at some level, but most deal with only one or a subset of materials within a small portion of their supply chain.
2h
The Atlantic
The Fetishization of Kim Yo JongNorth Koreans South KoreanCall it the diplomacy of low expectations: After Kim Jong Un’s regime spent much of the past year threatening its neighbors and the U.S. with its nuclear weapons, his sister got a surprisingly warm reception at the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang. And North Korea—having sent athletes and cheerleaders to the Games as well—got the kind of publicity that should have been reserved for South Korea, whi
2h
Popular Science
Venus flytraps know not to eat the insects that pollinate themEnvironment The carnivorous plants mostly feast on ground critters like spiders and ants. Venus Flytraps have a healthy appetite for a medley of insects, and sometimes even slugs—but they don't eat the bugs that help them reproduce.
2h
Popular Science
A wind tunnel and laser guidance helped the Olympic luge team learn about uniform techTechnology They felt the need for speed. The key piece of equipment at the San Diego Wind Tunnel is a 20-foot fan, powered by a 2,250 horsepower motor, that accelerates air up to 270 miles per hour.
2h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Six More Weeks of InfrastructureToday in 5 Lines The White House released a $4.4 trillion budget proposal that would boost defense spending and make cuts to the social safety net while envisioning huge budget deficits for years to come. Trump also unveiled his $1.5 trillion infrastructure plan to repair and rebuild roads, bridges, highways, and other infrastructure. The Senate is set to begin debate on immigration Monday evenin
3h
Live Science
Life Could Exist in Strange, Alien UniversesA new paper shows that even a universe with wildly altered physical laws might produce life.
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News
14 cattle eyeworms removed from Oregon woman’s eyeOregon woman has the first ever eye infection with the cattle eyeworm Thelazia gulosa.
3h
Live Science
Weird Worm Crawling in Oregon Woman's Eye Has Only Been Seen in CowsA 26-year-old woman in Oregon made a horrifying discovery: Her eyes were infected with small, translucent eye worms.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Opioid use increases risk of serious infectionsOpioid users have a significantly increased risk of infections severe enough to require treatment at the hospital, such as pneumonia and meningitis, as compared to people who don't use opioids.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Predictors for infidelity and divorce highlighted in new researchNew research from Florida State University highlights ways to keep love and also identifies clear predictors for failed relationships.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
NASA Budget Proposal Defunds Space Station, Space Telescopes and MoreThe White House’s controversial plans for U.S. space science and exploration could ignite a budgetary battle with Congress -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Weeds out of controlHerbicides can no longer control the weeds that threaten crop productivity and food security in the UK because the plants have evolved resistance, and future control must depend on management strategies that reduce reliance on chemicals. So concludes a nationwide epidemiological assessment of the factors that are driving the abundance and spread of the major agricultural weed, black-grass.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tricking photons leads to first-of-its-kind laser breakthroughA team of optics researchers from the University of Central Florida has demonstrated the first-ever nonmagnetic topological insulator laser, a finding that has the potential to substantially improve the efficiency, beam quality, and resilience of semiconductor laser arrays.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Weeds out of controlHerbicides can no longer control the weeds that threaten crop productivity and food security in the UK because the plants have evolved resistance, and future control must depend on management strategies that reduce reliance on chemicals.
3h
The Atlantic
All the Trump Budget Cuts Congress Will IgnoreWithin the thousands of pages the White House transmitted to Congress on Monday morning as part of President Trump’s second annual budget request, there is a line that pretty much sums up the whole ritual. “Many of the eliminations and reductions in this volume reflect a continuation of policies proposed in the 2018 President’s Budget that have not yet been enacted by the Congress,” the sentence
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tasmanian devil populations continue to declineOngoing monitoring of wild Tasmanian devils shows that overall population numbers are continuing to decline, due to the presence of devil facial tumour disease. Results of this research—conducted by the Save the Tasmanian Devil Program (STDP) in collaboration with staff from the Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment (DPIPWE), San Diego Zoo Global, Toledo Zoo and the Uni
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study identifies 'hot spots' of water quality violationsWhile serious violations like those in the Flint, Michigan, crisis are rare, ensuring reliable access to safe drinking water poses challenges for communities across the country, according to a recent study led by the University of California, Irvine.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Middle Earth preserved in giant bird dungWhile the giant birds that once dominated New Zealand are all extinct, a study of their preserved dung (coprolites) has revealed many aspects of their ancient ecosystem, with important insights for ongoing conservation efforts.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Smart bomb virus shows promise as brain tumor immunotherapyA common cold virus engineered to attack the most common and deadly of brain tumors allowed 20 percent of patients with recurrent glioblastoma to live for three years or longer, researchers report after a phase I clinical trial.
3h
Live Science
Why People Get Mean When They're Drunk, According to ScienceMRI scans suggest that inside every sober man there's a mean drunk.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Invisible, stretchable circuits to shape next-gen techElectrically conductive films that are optically transparent have a central role in a wide range of electronics applications, from touch screens and video displays to photovoltaics. These conductors function as invisible electrodes for circuit wiring, touch sensing, or electrical charge collection and are typically composed of transparent conductive oxides. But, they have a weakness.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon to lay off 'small' number of people in SeattleAmazon Seattle Times HeadquartersAfter a ramp-up of hiring last year, Amazon says it will cut a "small" number of positions at its Seattle headquarters.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Obesity, other risks play large role in sudden cardiac arrest among the youngObesity and other common cardiovascular risk factors may play a greater role in sudden cardiac arrest among younger people than previously recognized, underscoring the importance of earlier screening, a Cedars-Sinai study has found.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tasmanian devil populations continue to declineOngoing monitoring of wild Tasmanian devils shows that overall population numbers are continuing to decline, due to the presence of devil facial tumour disease. Results of this research -- conducted by the Save the Tasmanian Devil Program (STDP) in collaboration with staff from the Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries, Water and Environment (DPIPWE), San Diego Zoo Global, Toledo Zoo and the
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Full integration of digital breast tomosynthesis reduces false positive rates, study showsRates of false positive breast cancer screening exams fell significantly after complete integration of diagnostic digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), potentially leading to higher quality, lower costs, and fewer unnecessary biopsies, according to a study to be presented at the ARRS 2018 Annual Meeting, set for April 22-27 in Washington, DC.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UCI-led study identifies 'hot spots' of water quality violationsWhile serious violations like those in the Flint, Michigan, crisis are rare, ensuring reliable access to safe drinking water poses challenges for communities across the country, according to a recent study led by the University of California, Irvine.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Science self-corrects: Cancer gene does not pass reproducibility testAbout 10 years ago, several labs discovered that a gene called MELK is overexpressed, or turned on to a high degree, in many cancer cell types. This evidence has prompted multiple ongoing clinical trials to test whether drugs that inhibit MELK can treat cancer in patients. Now, CSHL researchers report that MELK is not actually involved in cancer. It's a story about how science self-corrects.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Most commonly prescribed drug for infantile epilepsy may also be most effectiveLevetiracetam, the most commonly prescribed drug for US infants with epilepsy, may be significantly more effective than the second-choice drug phenobarbital, according to a new study by scientists from Weill Cornell Medicine, NewYork-Presbyterian and 16 other research institutions. The findings provide the first evidence to favor levetiracetam in infants.
4h
Science | The Guardian
Weatherwatch: Extreme flooding on rise in Europe over past 20 yearsScientists track global statistics and conclude past events are not reliable predictors for future risk For the inhabitants of the Cumbrian village of Glenridding, the winter of 2015/16 was a miserable one. Storm Desmond brought the first deluge in December, turning the river into a raging torrent, sweeping through many properties, and cutting the village off from the outside world for a full two
4h
Science | The Guardian
Trump's Nasa budget: flying 'Jetson cars' and a return to the moonMost of those goals, if realized, would come after the end of the Trump administration, which has allocated little of its budget for Nasa The Trump administration unveiled its 2019 budget for Nasa on Monday, promising an outpost on the moon, “Jetson cars” and new attempts to cut funding for the international space station, earth science and astrophysics. Robert Lightfoot, Nasa’s acting administra
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ancient trail of Columbian mammoths uncovered in south-central OregonA fossilized trackway on public lands in Lake County, Ore., may reveal clues about the ancient family dynamics of Columbian mammoths. Researchers who excavated a portion of the path found 117 footprints thought to represent a number of adults as well as juvenile and infant mammoths.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New fuel cell demonstrates exceptional power density and stabilityBy combining a high-activity cathode with a new composition of matter, fuel cell operates at 500-degrees Celsius -- a commercialization sweet spot.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neutron study of glaucoma drugs offers clues about enzyme targets for aggressive cancersA team of researchers is using neutron imaging to study particulate filters that collect harmful emissions in vehicles. A better understanding of how heat treatments and oxidation methods can remove layers of soot and ash from these filters could lead to improved fuel-efficiency.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Building and breaking connections: How neuronal networks influence alcoholismAlthough it has been known that alterations in the connections between neurons in the brain likely play a role in alcohol dependence and other addictions, the cause-and-effect between these brain alterations and behavior has been less clear.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smart bomb virus shows promise as brain tumor immunotherapyA common cold virus engineered to attack the most common and deadly of brain tumors allowed 20 percent of patients with recurrent glioblastoma to live for three years or longer, researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report on a phase I clinical trial in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
4h
The Scientist RSS
Book Excerpt from How to Feed the WorldIn chapter 5, 'The Technology Ticket,' contributing author Uris Baldos urges acceptance and investment in 'precision agriculture' to provide for a burgeoning global population.
4h
The Atlantic
The NASA Space Telescope Trump Wants to CancelThe Trump administration has released its budget proposal for fiscal year 2019 and put dozens of federal programs on the chopping block, including a brand-new NASA space telescope that scientists say would provide the biggest picture of the universe yet, with the same sparkling clarity as the Hubble Space Telescope. The proposal, released Monday, recommends eliminating the Wide-Field Infrared Sur
4h
NYT > Science
Here Are the Places That Struggle to Meet the Rules on Safe Drinking WaterSince 1982, between 3 and 10 percent of water systems in the United States have been in violation of federal health standards each year. Rural areas are especially struggling.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How do children's cancer diagnoses affect parents' income?A new study from Sweden found that social benefits often ease the financial burdens experienced by the parents of children recently diagnosed with cancer, but mothers experienced persistently lower income after benefits diminished. Published early online in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the findings indicate that additional efforts may be needed to address the fin
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New machine learning algorithm uncovers time-delayed interactions in cellsA new algorithm uses time-series data to show the cause-and-effect interactions that take place inside of living cells.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New machine learning algorithm uncovers time-delayed interactions in cellsBiologists have long understood the various parts within the cell. But how these parts interact with and respond to each other is largely unknown.
4h
Popular Science
How to speed up your sledDIY Plunge downhill as fast as you can. Everybody, Olympian or not, enjoys sledding. Even if you can't reach a luge athlete's speed, you can follow these tips to fly downhill as quickly as possible.
4h
The Atlantic
Stop Saying 'Smart Cities'The term “smart city” is interesting yet not important, because nobody defines it. “Smart” is a snazzy political label used by a modern alliance of leftist urbanites and tech industrialists. To deem yourself “smart” is to make the NIMBY ites and market-force people look stupid. Smart-city devotees all over this world will agree that London is particularly smart. Why? London is a huge, ungainly be
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
Trump Budget Gives Last-Minute Reprieve to Science FundingFunding for the National Science Foundation and National Institutes of Health would hold steady after Congress agrees to lift spending caps, but details are fuzzy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
New on MIT Technology Review
2017 was the year consumer DNA testing blew upMore people took genetic ancestry tests last year than in all previous years, combined.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient trail of Columbian mammoths uncovered in south-central OregonA fossilized trackway on public lands in Lake County, Oregon, may reveal clues about the ancient family dynamics of Columbian mammoths.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ancient trail of Columbian mammoths uncovered in south-central OregonA fossilized trackway on public lands in Lake County, Ore., may reveal clues about the ancient family dynamics of Columbian mammoths. Researchers who excavated a portion of the path found 117 footprints thought to represent a number of adults as well as juvenile and infant mammoths.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sea level rise accelerating: acceleration in 25-year satellite sea level recordGlobal sea level rise is not cruising along at a steady rate per year, but rather accelerating a little every year like a driver merging onto a highway.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neurotransmitter may play a role in alcohol relapse, addictionResearchers scanned the brains of individuals with alcohol abuse disorder and found that the neurotransmitter glutamate may play a role in some addition cravings.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bed bug histamines are substantial, persistent in infested homesNuisance pest to medically important threat? New research findings show that bed bugs emit substantial amounts of histamine that persist even after bed bugs are eliminated.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focusScientists have announced that they have successfully combined two different imaging methods -- a type of lens designed for nanoscale interaction with lightwaves, along with robust computational processing -- to create full-color images.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New guide for finding genes linked with behaviorScientists interested in finding specific genes that influence the behavior of humans and animals have a new tool, thanks to a two-year research effort aimed at describing how to apply the latest techniques of molecular genomics to the study of complex behavior.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Captured electrons excite nuclei to higher energy statesFor the first time, scientists demonstrated a long-theorized nuclear effect called nuclear excitation by electron capture. This advance tests theoretical models that describe how nuclear and atomic realms interact and may also provide new insights into how star elements are created.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New sustainable production method could advance plastics and pharmaceuticalsA team of chemical engineers at The University of Texas at Austin has developed a new, cost-effective method for synthetically producing a biorenewable platform chemical called triacetic acid lactone (TAL) that can be used to produce innovative new drugs and sustainable plastics at an industrial scale, as described this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
5h
The Atlantic
Instagram Will Now Tell You When Someone Screenshots Your StoryThe most vibrant new medium invented in past five years isn’t Facebook’s Oculus Rift or Apple’s animoji . It’s the story: the chronological procession of photos, video, and text that erases itself after 24 hours. Invented by Snapchat and borrowed, infamously, by Instagram and now Facebook, it’s the most novel form of social media in the smartphone age. As of last year, 250 million people used the
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tiny fossils, huge landslides: Are diatoms the key to Earth's biggest slides?The biggest landslides on Earth aren't on land, but on the seafloor. These mega-slides can move thousands of cubic kilometers of material, and sometimes trigger tsunamis. Yet, remarkably, they occur on nearly flat slopes of less than three degrees.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Recordings spout secrets behind blue whale behaviorResearchers are using underwater microphones to interpret and characterize the calls of blue whales swimming through Southern California's oceans, revealing new insights into the behavior of these endangered marine mammals.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA tracks Tropical Storm Sanba as it triggers Philippines warningsNASA Budget MoonTropical Storm Sanba, formerly known as 02W has triggered many warnings in the Philippines as it approaches from the east. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of the storm.
5h
Inside Science
Taking Other People’s Medicine in a Glass of WaterTaking Other People’s Medicine in a Glass of Water Fish expend energy metabolizing drugs and personal products in fresh water. Marlborough_East_Wastewater_Treatment_Plant_Aerial.JPG Even modern wastewater treatment facilities are typically unable to intercept a large number of pharmaceuticals. Image credits: Nick Allen via Wikimedia Commons Rights information: CC BY-SA 4.0 Earth Monday, February
5h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Antarctic iceberg expedition set to reveal hidden realmFootage shows the iceberg scientists hope will reveal an Antarctic realm hidden for thousands of years.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
International team sequences first Amazon molly fish genomeNo species is immune from the suffering of unrequited love, but scientists expect to learn volumes about the biological basis of sex from the newly sequenced genome of an all-female, asexual Texas native -- the Amazon molly -- that has thrived as a master of male manipulation over millennia.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA tracks Tropical Storm Sanba as it triggers Philippines warningsTropical Storm Sanba, formerly known as 02W has triggered many warnings in the Philippines as it approaches from the east. NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided forecasters with a visible image of the storm.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New sustainable production method could advance plastics and pharmaceuticalsA team of chemical engineers at The University of Texas at Austin has developed a new, cost-effective method for synthetically producing a biorenewable platform chemical called triacetic acid lactone (TAL) that can be used to produce innovative new drugs and sustainable plastics at an industrial scale.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Beewolves have been successfully using the same antibiotics for 68 million yearsA team of scientists from Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena have now found that beewolves, unlike humans, do not face the problem of antibiotic resistant pathogens. These insects team up with symbiotic bacteria which produce up to 45 different antibiotic substances to protect their offspring against mold fungi. This antibiotic cocktail
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Middle Earth preserved in giant bird dungWhile the giant birds that once dominated New Zealand are all extinct, a study of their preserved dung (coprolites) has revealed many aspects of their ancient ecosystem, with important insights for ongoing conservation efforts.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer killing clue could lead to safer and more powerful immunotherapiesThe study, led by Dr Misty Jenkins from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, explains the crucial mechanisms by which CAR-T cell therapy is able to rapidly target and kill cancer cells, and why it may cause serious side effects.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bentley University study shows NIH spent >$100 billion on basic science for new medicinesFederally funded research contributed to the science underlying all new medicines approved by the FDA from 2010-2016, according to research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The Bentley University study identified >600,000 research publications and >$100 billion in NIH funding related to 210 new medicines, with >90 percent of funding associated with basic science. T
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mutation in single rice gene cancels interspecific hybrid sterilityScientists successfully employed mutagenesis to identify the gene that causes hybrid sterility in rice, which is a major reproductive barrier between species.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover brain pathway that dissociates opioid addiction from analgesiaStudy results may provide mechanism to make opioids safer and more efficient.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sea level rise acceleratingGlobal sea level rise is not cruising along at a steady rate per year, but rather accelerating a little every year like a driver merging onto a highway.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Twenty-five years of satellite data confirm rising sea levelsSatellite data predicts current acceleration rate will cause a dramatic rise in sea level by 2100.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Limited scope of corporate sustainability revealedThe first large-scale analysis of corporate practices for sourcing sustainable materials shows that many companies address sustainability at some level, but most deal with only one or a subset of materials within a small portion of their supply chain.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Albanian sought by US arrested in cybercrime market probePolice in Albania say they have arrested a 25-year-old citizen who is accused of being part of a cybercrime organization that U.S. authorities allege cost consumers and businesses more than half a billion dollars.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Four robots that aim to teach your kids to codeYou've seen apps and toys that promise to teach your child to code. Now enter the robots.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Some black and Latino Christians rely on religion for healingChristians who are comparatively well-represented in the medical field, like Korean-Americans, understand the relationship between faith and health differently than those who are not, like African-Americans and Latinos. Eighty percent of black and Latino Americans interviewed in a recent Rice University study said they believe in the potential healing power of religious faith, while nearly two-thi
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focusFor photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New guide for finding genes linked with behaviorScientists interested in finding specific genes that influence the behavior of humans and animals have a new tool, thanks to a two-year research effort aimed at describing how to apply the latest techniques of molecular genomics to the study of complex behavior.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mutation in single rice gene cancels interspecific hybrid sterilityScientists successfully employed mutagenesis to identify the gene that causes hybrid sterility in rice, which is a major reproductive barrier between species.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Limited scope of corporate sustainability revealedYou want chocolate. You scan the market shelf for a bar with a Fair Trade or Rainforest Alliance certification because you don't want your indulgence to drive labor abuse and deforestation. It's the right thing to do, right?
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research team detects an acceleration in the 25-year satellite sea level recordGlobal sea level rise is not cruising along at a steady 3 mm per year, it's accelerating a little every year, like a driver merging onto a highway, according to a powerful new assessment led by CIRES Fellow Steve Nerem. He and his colleagues harnessed 25 years of satellite data to calculate that the rate is increasing by about 0.08 mm/year every year—which could mean an annual rate of sea level ri
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Middle Earth preserved in giant bird dungWhile the giant birds that once dominated New Zealand are all extinct, a study of their preserved dung (coprolites) has revealed many aspects of their ancient ecosystem, with important insights for ongoing conservation efforts.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Beewolves have been successfully using the same antibiotics for 68 million yearsThe discovery of penicillin about 90 years ago and the widespread introduction of antibiotics to combat infectious diseases have revolutionized human medicine. However, in recent decades, the increase in multidrug-resistant pathogens has confronted modern medicine with massive problems. Insects have their own antibiotics, which provide natural protection against germs. A team of scientists from th
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New method for waking up devicesA device that's turned off doesn't suck battery life, but it also doesn't work. Now a low-power system that's always on the alert can turn devices on when they are needed, saving energy in the networked internet of things.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
IU-led study finds neurotransmitter may play a role in alcohol relapse, addictionIndiana University researchers scanned the brains of individuals with alcohol abuse disorder and found that the neurotransmitter glutamate may play a role in some addiction cravings.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Acoustic imaging reveals hidden features of megathrust fault off Costa RicaGeophysicists have obtained detailed three-dimensional images of a dangerous megathrust fault west of Costa Rica where two plates of the Earth's crust collide. The images reveal features of the fault surface, including long grooves or corrugations, that may determine how the fault will slip in an earthquake.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fox pledges to keep Sky News independent of MurdochRupert Murdoch's 21st Century Fox has vowed to preserve the editorial independence of Sky News in order to secure its takeover of pan-European TV giant Sky, documents showed Monday.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Talks still on for Weinstein Company deal: sourceTalks were still on Monday between a group of investors and the troubled Weinstein Company, despite New York prosecutors throwing a spanner in the works by filing a lawsuit against the movie studio, source said Monday.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snapchat redesign sparks backlash among some usersSnapchat's latest app redesign, aimed at broadening the appeal of the youth-oriented social network, sparked a backlash from many users complaining about the abrupt overhaul of their preferred service.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Acoustic imaging reveals hidden features of megathrust fault off Costa RicaGeophysicists have obtained detailed three-dimensional images of a dangerous megathrust fault west of Costa Rica where two plates of the Earth's crust collide. The images reveal features of the fault surface, including long grooves or corrugations, that may determine how the fault will slip in an earthquake.
5h
Popular Science
Last week in tech: A dummy went to space and we got some new emojisTechnology We'll never get sick of looking at that view of earth from a Tesla in space. 2018 is the year for Teslas in space and Olympians on ice.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review
This entrepreneur wants to make automation a major campaign issue in 2020Uber Drivers Driving
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Neutron study of glaucoma drugs offers clues about enzyme targets for aggressive cancersNew insights from neutron analysis of glaucoma drugs and their enzyme target may help scientists design drugs that more effectively target aggressive cancers.
5h
Big Think
American kids are ditching Facebook in record numbersFor the first time in Facebook's history, the number of daily active users in the U.S. dropped—by about 700,000. Read More
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hip-hop music influencing more African-Americans to try 'Molly''Molly' is growing in popularity within the African-American community. New research shows much of that has to do with rap lyrics.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New guide for finding genes linked with behaviorScientists interested in finding specific genes that influence the behavior of humans and animals have a new tool, thanks to a two-year research effort aimed at describing how to apply the latest techniques of molecular genomics to the study of complex behavior.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focusIn a paper published Feb. 9 in Science Advances, scientists at the University of Washington announced that they have successfully combined two different imaging methods -- a type of lens designed for nanoscale interaction with lightwaves, along with robust computational processing -- to create full-color images.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Some black and Latino Christians rely on religion for healingChristians who are comparatively well-represented in the medical field, like Korean-Americans, understand the relationship between faith and health differently than those who are not, like African-Americans and Latinos.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tiny fossils, huge slides: Are diatoms the key to Earth's biggest slides?The biggest landslides on Earth aren't on land, but on the seafloor. These mega-slides can move thousands of cubic kilometers of material, and sometimes trigger tsunamis. Yet, remarkably, they occur on nearly flat slopes of less than three degrees.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using injectable self-assembled nanomaterials for sustained delivery of drugsNew injectable delivery system forms a non-inflammatory depot that can continuously release drug carriers for months at a time after a single administration.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study sheds new light on mechanism of breast cancer treatment resistanceA study by researchers has illuminated a specific mechanism by which estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancers can become resistant to standard therapies and metastasize.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shorter fitness test still accurately predicts risk of mortalityResearchers have determined a short, five minute treadmill test can predict the risk of mortality. This risk is determined independent of other traditional risk factors including age, weight, blood pressure, smoking status, diabetes, cholesterol, and family history.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using injectable self-assembled nanomaterials for sustained delivery of drugsBecause they can be programmed to travel the body and selectively target cancer and other sites of disease, nanometer-scale vehicles called nanocarriers can deliver higher concentrations of drugs to bombard specific areas of the body while minimizing systemic side effects. Nanocarriers can also deliver drugs and diagnostic agents that are typically not soluble in water or blood as well as signific
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New fuel cell demonstrates exceptional power density and stabilityA team of researchers led by Northwestern University professor and fuel cell pioneer Sossina Haile has created a new fuel cell offering both exceptional power densities and long-term stability at optimal temperatures, a discovery that heightens the viability of incorporating fuel cells into a sustainable energy future.
6h
Big Think
What makes film scores by John Williams so iconic?With his 51st Oscar nomination for Star Wars: The Last Jedi , composer John Williams has mastered the craft of the film score. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Captured electrons excite nuclei to higher energy statesFor the first time, physicists from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory and their collaborators, led by a team from the U.S. Army Research Laboratory, demonstrated a long-theorized nuclear effect. This advance tests theoretical models that describe how nuclear and atomic realms interact and may also provide new insights into how star elements are created.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bed bug histamines are substantial, persistent in infested homesNuisance pest to medically important threat? New research findings from North Carolina State University shows that bed bugs emit substantial amounts of histamine that persist even after bed bugs are eliminated.
6h
Big Think
Spotify study reveals our musical tastes peak as teensNew data shows the way in which we decide what kinds of music we'll like for the rest of our lives by the time we're 14. Read More
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The Atlantic
Could Netflix Be Giving Up on Prestige Films?Just a year ago, at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, Netflix was a big player. The streaming company was a little more than a year into releasing its own original movies for its subscribers, and it was looking for prestige hits to gain a foothold as a distributor Hollywood could take seriously. It acquired one of the best-reviewed films of the festival, Mudbound , for $12.5 million , and the Gran
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bed bug histamines are substantial, persistent in infested homesNew research findings could turn perceptions of the already despised bed bug from nuisance pest into medically important threat. A study from North Carolina State University shows that histamine levels are substantially higher in homes infested by bed bugs than in pest-free homes, and that these histamine levels persist for months - even if the bed bugs have been eliminated from the home.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel classification can lead to new ways to diagnose and treat cancerA novel approach to studying cancer has enabled researchers to group about 10,000 human cancers of 32 different types into 10 classes based on the molecular pathways that drive tumor growth. A better understanding of these pathways can potentially lead to novel ways to diagnose and treat cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows benefits of exercise can outweigh health effects of severe obesityNew study that shows physical activity may be equally and perhaps even more important than weight for people living with severe obesity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new tool for improving uterine transplant surgeryFuture Science Group (FSG) today announced the publication of an article in Future Science OA demonstrating the first use of multispectral imaging in gynecology, in a uterine transplant setting.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lung cancer drug resistance explained by computer simulationsScientists have used molecular simulations to understand resistance to osimertinib -- an anticancer drug used to treat types of lung cancer.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scalable two-dimensional materials advance future-gen electronicsA pair of papers published online in two nanotechnology journals this month provide the basis for growing wafer-scale two-dimensional crystals for future electronic devices
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Naltrexone treatment is more effective for heavy drinkers who use nicotine/cigarettesThere are medications available to help people who drink excessive amounts of alcohol reduce or stop their drinking. One such medication is the opioid antagonist naltrexone, which has been approved for treatment of alcohol dependence by the Food and Drug Administration. Although naltrexone can reduce alcohol craving and help promote recovery for some individuals, it does not work for everyone. Pri
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First scientific expedition to newly exposed Antarctic ecosystemA team of scientists heads to Antarctica this week (14 February) to investigate a mysterious marine ecosystem that’s been hidden beneath an Antarctic ice shelf for up to 120,000 years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study shows vegan diet improves diabetes markers in overweight adultsA plant-based diet improves beta-cell function and insulin sensitivity in overweight adults with no history of diabetes, according to a new study published in Nutrients by researchers from the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine.Measuring the function of beta cells, which store and release insulin, can help assess future type 2 diabetes risk.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Progress, but far from perfection, on avoiding risky sedatives in older adultsThey help many people sleep, or feel calmer or less anxious. But in older people, they also double the risk of car crashes, falls and broken hips. That's why the medications known as benzodiazepines show up on international guidelines as drugs that very few people over the age of 65 should take. Yet a sizable percentage of adults in that age group still have an active prescription for one, accordi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neutron study of glaucoma drugs offers clues about enzyme targets for aggressive cancersA team of researchers from ORNL's Energy and Transportation Science Division is using neutron imaging to study particulate filters that collect harmful emissions in vehicles. A better understanding of how heat treatments and oxidation methods can remove layers of soot and ash from these filters could lead to improved fuel-efficiency.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers inhibit cancer metastases via novel stepsIn one of the first successes of its kind, researchers have inhibited the spreading of cancer cells from one part of the body to another. In doing so, they relied on a new model of how cancer metastasizes that emphasizes epigenetics, which examines how genes are turned on and off.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Blocking action of gene enhancers halts spread of tumor cellsIn one of the first successes of its kind, researchers have inhibited the spreading of cancer cells from one part of the body to another. In doing so, they relied on a new model of how cancer metastasizes that emphasizes epigenetics, which examines how genes are turned on and off.
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Popular Science
In honor of his birthday, let's talk about Charles Darwin's sexy theory of selectionAnimals Happy Darwin-tine's Day, everybody! Charles Darwin's other theory of evolution—sexual selection—is one worth considering.
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The Atlantic
The Obamas' Official Portraits, RevealedKehinde Wiley B. ObamaJasmine, African blue lilies, and Chicago’s favorite flower, chrysanthemum, flourish in the botanical backdrop of President Barack Obama’s official portrait. The 44th president appears seated in an ornate chair, with leafy vines threatening to climb up his pant leg. In her official portrait, First Lady Michelle Obama appears seated, too, in a flowing dress designed by Milly. Between her gown, wit
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Live Science
'Vampire' Deer?! 5 South Korean Animals You May See at the 2018 Winter OlympicsPlease don't feed baby teeth to the Korean magpies (despite what grandma tells you).
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Viden
Faktatjek: Kan du styrke dit immunforsvar og undgå influenza?Ingefær, motion og yoghurt med honning. Internettet flyder over med gode råd til, hvordan du booster dit immunforsvar og undgår influenza. Men virker det?
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tiny fossils, huge slides: Are diatoms the key to Earth's biggest slides?The biggest landslides on Earth aren't on land, but on the seafloor. These mega-slides can move thousands of cubic kilometers of material, and sometimes trigger tsunamis. Yet, remarkably, they occur on nearly flat slopes of less than three degrees.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Building and breaking connections: How neuronal networks influence alcoholismAlthough it has been known that alterations in the connections between neurons in the brain likely play a role in alcohol dependence and other addictions, the cause-and-effect between these brain alterations and behavior has been less clear.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When the body attacks the brain: Immune system often to blame for encephalitis, study findsEncephalitis caused by the immune system attacking the brain is similar in frequency to encephalitis from infections, Mayo Clinic researchers report in Annals of Neurology.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Some racial/ethnic groups have greater chance of developing high blood pressurePeople who are African-American, American Indian/native Alaskan, Asian, or native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islanders have a significantly greater chance of developing hypertension than people who are white or Hispanic who are in the same weight category or live in neighborhoods with similar education levels.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain thickness provides insight into teenage decision-makingYoung adults with thinner cortex in particular brain regions are more impulsive during a decision-making task than teens with thicker cortex, according to a large correlational study of adolescents from the Philadelphia Neurodevelopmental Cohort. The results, published in JNeurosci, suggest that individual differences in brain structure could be used to identify youth at higher risk of making dang
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Altered pain processing after opioid discontinuationAn imaging study of the brain and spinal cord published in JNeurosci reveals pain processing changes in healthy men after receiving a short-term application of a strong opioid. The research provides a plausible mechanism underlying increased pain sensitivity after discontinuation of opioid medication.
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Science | The Guardian
It’s very rare to wake up during a general anaesthetic | LettersAnaesthetists respond to a recent Guardian article Accidental awareness (when a patient becomes conscious during a general anaesthetic) is an incredibly important issue to both patients and anaesthetists ( The long read , 9 February). Patients undergoing surgery can be assured that it is highly uncommon to wake up during a general anaesthetic. The largest ever research study (NAP5) performed on th
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NYT > Science
Mind: The First Step Toward a Personal Memory Maker?Electric pulses to the brain help subjects store memory, scientists have found. But the road to perfecting recall remains daunting.
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New Scientist - News
Super-accurate atomic clock used in real world for first timeAtomic clocks are the best timekeepers, but they usually must be kept in a lab to work. Now, they've been used to measure gravity's effect on time in the Alps
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A prototype is developed to monitor environmental variables in buildingsThe heating should only switch on when necessary, or the house should only be ventilated during the time that it takes to do this, but no longer. The Energy in Building research group has developed a prototype of a piece of equipment capable of monitoring more environmental variables and sending information to the user or even to another device so that action can be taken accordingly.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New fuel cell demonstrates exceptional power density and stabilityBy combining a high-activity cathode with a new composition of matter, fuel cell operates at 500-degrees Celsius -- a commercialization sweet spot.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using injectable self-assembled nanomaterials for sustained delivery of drugsNew injectable delivery system forms a non-inflammatory depot that can continuously release drug carriers for months at a time after a single administration.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Acoustic imaging reveals hidden features of megathrust fault off Costa RicaGeophysicists have obtained detailed three-dimensional images of a dangerous megathrust fault west of Costa Rica where two plates of the Earth's crust collide. The images reveal features of the fault surface, including long grooves or corrugations, that may determine how the fault will slip in an earthquake.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Captured electrons excite nuclei to higher energy statesFor the first time, scientists demonstrated a long-theorized nuclear effect called nuclear excitation by electron capture. This advance tests theoretical models that describe how nuclear and atomic realms interact and may also provide new insights into how star elements are created.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tropical Cyclone Gita packs heavy rain, warnings now for Tonga and FijiHurricane Gita strengthened into a powerful Category 4 hurricane on Feb. 12 and triggered warnings in Tonga and Fiji. NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement Mission or GPM core satellite analyzed Tropical Cyclone Gita and found heavy rainfall occurring within the system. On Feb. 12, Gita was bringing that heavy rain to Tonga and Fiji where warnings were posted. NASA's Terra satellite also provide
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Blog » Languages » English
Sweet vs Spicy: Fighting FlavorsValentine’s Day is almost here and we’ve got an intense flavor battle for all our favorite Eyewirers. Whether you have a sweet tooth or you like to keep things spicy, there’s something for everyone. Sweet Did you know? The sweetener lugduname has been estimated to be between 220,000 and 300,000 times as sweet as sucrose (table sugar), and it one of the most potent known sweeteners. It has not yet
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Trump wants NASA out of space station by 2025, businesses inThe Trump administration wants NASA out of the International Space Station by 2025, and private businesses running the place instead.
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Viden
Videnskabsfolk dyrker menneskeæg i laboratoriumDet laboratorie-dyrkede æg skal blandt andet være med til at hjælpe kræftramte piger, der ikke ellers ville kunne få børn.
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Viden
Vil du ha' super-sæd? Her er 5 gode rådNy forskning viser, at der er meget, du kan gøre for at forbedre din sædkvalitet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tropical Cyclone Gita packs heavy rain, warnings now for Tonga and FijiNASA Moon EarthHurricane Gita strengthened into a powerful Category 4 hurricane on Feb 12 and triggered warnings in Tonga and Fiji. NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement Mission or GPM core satellite analyzed Tropical Cyclone Gita and found heavy rainfall occurring within the system. On Feb. 12, Gita was bringing that heavy rain to Tonga and Fiji where warnings were posted. NASA's Terra satellite also provided
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tiny drug-delivering capsules could sustain transplanted insulin-producing cellsA drug-carrying microsphere within a cell-bearing microcapsule could be the key to transplanting insulin-secreting pig pancreas cells into human patients whose own cells have been destroyed by type I diabetes.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Recordings spout secrets behind blue whale behaviorResearchers are using underwater microphones to interpret and characterize the calls of blue whales swimming through Southern California's oceans, revealing new insights into the behavior of these endangered marine mammals, according to new research being presented at the Ocean Sciences Meeting here on Tuesday.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers raise a 170-million-year question over mysterious moss geneResearchers have identified a fused gene in moss that provides insight into how cells build their external walls. The same discovery raises questions about the one-of-a-kind gene that features two distinct proteins that participate in two distinct functions.
7h
The Atlantic
The Promise of Indoor, Hurricane-Proof ‘Vertical’ FarmsFederico Marques feared the worst for his farm as he watched live coverage of Hurricane Harvey ravaging fields across the Gulf Coast and inundating every pocket of Houston. Marques was trapped at home during Harvey and could only monitor his crops from his couch, anxiously viewing footage from the farm’s single working indoor camera. “We couldn’t get in here for four days,” Marques said as he sho
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The Atlantic
The White House's Problem Is Dishonesty, Not ChaosThe White House’s response to allegations of domestic violence against former Staff Secretary Rob Porter has so stunned reporters that the whole episode has become an exemplar of the total disorganization of the Trump administration. “Abuse Case Exposes Fissures in a White House in Turmoil,” The New York Times intones . Axios ’s Jonathan Swan writes , “This is crazy. Even in a White House that’s
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Global warming could cause key culinary crops to release seeds prematurelyClimate change is threatening crop yields worldwide, yet little is known about how global warming will confuse normal plant physiology. Researchers now show that higher temperatures accelerate seed dispersal in crop species belonging to the cabbage and mustard plant family, limiting reproductive success, and this effect is mediated by a gene called INDEHISCENT.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study suggests way to attack deadly, untreatable nerve tumorsGenomic profiling of mostly untreatable and deadly nerve sheath tumors led scientists to test a possible therapeutic strategy that inhibited tumor growth in lab tests on human tumor cells and mouse models, according to new research. When the international team of researchers analyzed complete screens of genes and genetic material in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs), it revealed pr
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study finds gender and skin-type bias in commercial artificial-intelligence systemsA new article shows that three commercial facial-analysis programs demonstrate gender and skin-type biases, and suggests a new, more accurate method for evaluating the performance of such machine-learning systems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Deep-sea fish use hydrothermal vents to incubate eggsAn international team of researchers have discovered egg cases of deep-sea fish near hydrothermal vents. The team believes that deep-sea skates, a relative of sharks and rays, use the warm water near the vents to accelerate the typically years-long incubation time of their eggs.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Recordings spout secrets behind blue whale behaviorResearchers are using underwater microphones to interpret and characterize the calls of blue whales swimming through Southern California's oceans, revealing new insights into the behavior of these endangered marine mammals, according to new research being presented at the Ocean Sciences Meeting here on Tuesday.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tiny drug-delivering capsules could sustain transplanted insulin-producing cellsA drug-carrying microsphere within a cell-bearing microcapsule could be the key to transplanting insulin-secreting pig pancreas cells into human patients whose own cells have been destroyed by type I diabetes.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lithuanian researchers: Wastewater treatment plants could generate electricityResearchers of Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania are working on improving the efficiency of microbial fuel cells (MFC) by using modified graphite felt. Primary results show that the new MFC can generate 20 percent higher voltage than usual cells.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New cannabis products highly potent, pose mental health risksWith states rapidly legalizing cannabis for medicinal and recreational use, physicians will be increasingly pressed to counsel patients on their frequency of use and dosage, as well as associated risks. The special report in the JAOA aggregates what is known to help physicians give the best evidence-based recommendations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Implanted continuous glucose sensor proven safe and accurate in types 1 and 2 diabetesResults of the PRECISE II study showed the implanted continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system from Eversense to be safe and highly accurate over the 90-day sensor life in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research shows shorter fitness test still accurately predicts risk of mortalityQueen's University researcher Louise de Lannoy has determined a short, five minute treadmill test can predict the risk of mortality. This risk is determined independent of other traditional risk factors including age, weight, blood pressure, smoking status, diabetes, cholesterol, and family history.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers raise a 170-million-year question over mysterious moss geneA surprise discovery provides insight into how cells build their external walls and raises questions about a one-of-a-kind, fused gene.
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Quanta Magazine
Evolution Saves Species From ‘Kill the Winner’ DisastersAt a meeting of the American Society of Naturalists in 1960, the noted British ecologist G. Evelyn Hutchinson posed what he called “ the paradox of the plankton .” Look at a flask of seawater; it will be filled with diverse species of plankton, all competing for the same vital elements and nutrients. Yet natural selection implies that over time, only one species should occupy an ecological niche,
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New on MIT Technology Review
How to teach a robot to screwHumans easily outperform machines when it comes to tightening and loosening screw fasteners.The future of manufacturing and recycling may depend on changing that.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tennessee program becomes first accredited wildlife and fisheries management concentrationThe Society of American Foresters has granted accreditation to the wildlife and fisheries management concentration of study within the wildlife and fisheries science major in the College of Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources at the University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture. This historic achievement represents the first and only time, nationwide, that a concentration of a wildlife
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Viden
Er det farligt at holde et nys tilbage?Hvis du holder et nys tilbage, stiger trykket i hovedet. Men kun i ganske sjældne tilfælde har det vist sig at være farligt.
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Cryptojacking Found in Critical Infrastructure Systems Raises AlarmsOnce confined to browsers, hijacking computers to mine cryptocurrency has branched out to dangerous places.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds gender and skin-type bias in commercial artificial-intelligence systemsA new paper from the MIT Media Lab's Joy Buolamwini shows that three commercial facial-analysis programs demonstrate gender and skin-type biases, and suggests a new, more accurate method for evaluating the performance of such machine-learning systems.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lung cancer drug resistance explained by computer simulationsScientists from the Universities of Bristol and Parma, Italy, have used molecular simulations to understand resistance to osimertinib -- an anticancer drug used to treat types of lung cancer.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Temperature resilient crops now an 'achievable dream' say authors of new studyBreeding temperature-resilient crops is an 'achievable dream' in one of the most important species of commercially cultivated plants, according to a new study.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study sheds new light on mechanism of breast cancer treatment resistanceA study by researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute has illuminated a specific mechanism by which estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancers can become resistant to standard therapies and metastasize.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Global warming could cause key culinary crops to release seeds prematurelyClimate change is threatening crop yields worldwide, yet little is known about how global warming will confuse normal plant physiology. Researchers in the UK now show that higher temperatures accelerate seed dispersal in crop species belonging to the cabbage and mustard plant family, limiting reproductive success, and this effect is mediated by a gene called INDEHISCENT. The findings appear Feb. 1
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study suggests way to attack deadly, untreatable nerve tumorsGenomic profiling of mostly untreatable and deadly nerve sheath tumors led scientists to test a possible therapeutic strategy that inhibited tumor growth in lab tests on human tumor cells and mouse models, according to research in the journal Cancer Cell. When the international team of researchers analyzed complete screens of genes and genetic material in malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (
8h
Big Think
On median, one U.S Senator is as rich as 40 American households"The most pro-business thing you can to is to help middle-class people thrive." Nick Hanauer, venture capitalist and entrepreneur. Read More
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The Atlantic
Can This Company Convince You to Love GMOs?BOSTON—Out on an old Navy dry dock, a biotech company called Ginkgo Bioworks is growing genetically modified organisms by the billions, and it would very much like to tell you about them. “I think people should love GMOs,” Gingko’s CEO and cofounder, Jason Kelly, told me. “We’re super proud of them.” It helps the message, perhaps, that Ginkgo is not a big ag corporation shrouded in secrecy, but a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Deep-sea fish use hydrothermal vents to incubate eggsSome deep-sea skates—cartilaginous fish related to rays and sharks—use volcanic heat emitted at hydrothermal vents to incubate their eggs, according to a new study in the journal Scientific Reports. Because deep-sea skates have some of the longest egg incubation times, estimated to last more than four years, the researchers believe the fish are using the hot vents to accelerate embryo development.
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Science : NPR
What Canola Can Tell Us About Crops And Climate ChangeWhen canola seedpods shatter prematurely, farmers can lose a lot of their crop. Scientists have now figured out how this happens, and it has implications for similar crops facing global warming. (Image credit: Andrew Davies/courtesy John Innes Centre)
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Science | The Guardian
Did you solve it? The joy of gridsThe solutions to today’s puzzles On my puzzle blog earlier today I set you the following three problems about this grid: Continue reading...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Temperature resilient crops now an 'achievable dream'Breeding temperature-resilient crops is an "achievable dream" in one of the most important species of commercially-cultivated plants, according to a new study.
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Big Think
Who was Saint Valentine? And why was he beheaded?Valentine's Day has a surprisingly raunchy history, going back thousands of years. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Today's highest quality composite-piezoelectric developed at NUST MISISNUST MISIS scientists jointly with an international group of scientists have managed to develop a composite material that has the best piezoelectric properties today. The research results were published in Scientific Reports journal.
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'Olympic Destroyer' Malware Hit Pyeongchang Ahead of Opening CeremonyResearchers at Cisco Talos detail a new piece of disruptive, highly infectious malware with a clear target: the Pyeongchang Olympics IT infrastructure.
8h
Ingeniøren
Solcelleforening raser: »Vi troede, vi havde en aftale«Brancheforening beskylder regeringen og Dansk Folkeparti for løftebrud, når de uden videre bruger en del af puljen til sol og vind-udbud til støtte af flere test-vindmøller.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Another blow to fungal infectionThe first successful unpicking of a wheat gene that confers resistance to a devastating fungal disease promises to speed the unraveling of other resistance genes that, together, could provide wheat with a natural barrier to infection at a time when the fungus has already developed tolerance to most types of fungicides.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
No sex for all-female fish speciesAmazon Service PhoneThey reproduce through gynogenesis. Their offspring are clones of the mother. According to established theories, the Amazon molly should have become extinct a long time ago. A new study shows how the fish avoids this fate.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Experimental therapy restores nerve insulation damaged by diseaseWhen the body attacks its own healthy tissues in an autoimmune disease, peripheral nerve damage handicaps people and causes persistent neuropathic pain when insulation on healing nerves doesn't fully regenerate. Unfortunately, there are no effective ways to treat the condition. Now scientists describe an experimental molecular therapy that restores insulation on peripheral nerves in mice, improves
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Alternate method to uncover protein structures, design new drugsAntibodies made by camels, llamas and alpacas allow scientists to study the structure and function of proteins in disease and health. While valuable, the approach is time-consuming, costly and often unsuccessful. Overcoming this barrier, scientists have devised a faster, cheaper and more reliable way to create these critical antibodies using yeast in a test tube.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer-fighting nanorobots programmed to seek and destroy tumorsIn a major advancement in nanomedicine, scientists have successfully programmed nanorobots to shrink tumors by cutting off their blood supply.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lightning storms less likely in a warming planet, study suggestsLightning may strike less often in future across the globe as the planet warms, a scientific study suggests.
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The Atlantic
An Irreplaceable Champion for Pakistan's Dispossessed Is GoneI first met Asma Jahangir, the champion of human rights in Pakistan who died Sunday, at the Supreme Court in Islamabad. It was September 2007, and General Pervez Musharraf’s eight-year rule was tottering. For several months, a popular movement led by lawyers had harried him on the streets, and now, Musharraf feared, the judges were poised to disqualify him from office. As a journalist, I was ther
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The Atlantic
Photos of Carnival 2018 Around the WorldCarnival season 2018 is underway across Europe and the Americas. These pre-Lent festivals, often a blend of local pagan and Catholic traditions, usher out winter and welcome in spring. The largest and most famous—the Carnival in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil—took place over the past few days. Gathered here are images of Carnivals around the world, including images from Brazil, Portugal, Hungary, Bolivia
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines shift work and genetic risk factors for type 2 diabetesA new study takes a deep look at the connection between shift work and type 2 diabetes. Investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital leveraged data on hundreds of thousands of people in the UK Biobank to better understand how shift work -- especially frequent night work -- contributes to the likelihood of type 2 diabetes. The team also developed a genetic risk score for type 2 diabetes, examining
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deep-sea fish use hydrothermal vents to incubate eggsAn international team of researchers have discovered egg cases of deep-sea fish near hydrothermal vents. The team believes that deep-sea skates, a relative of sharks and rays, use the warm water near the vents to accelerate the typically years-long incubation time of their eggs.
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Live Science
The 4/20 Effect: Pot Celebration Day Tied to Rise in Fatal CrashesThousands of pot supporters mark the "high" holiday by lighting up at 4:20 p.m. But the celebration may increase the risk of fatal car crashes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Underreporting in international wildlife tradeResearchers have established several key trends in wildlife trade following an in-depth study on international wildlife trade data. The findings shed light on the market forces driving the movement of wildlife products around the globe, and indicate our understanding of illegal and legal wildlife trade is biased towards certain species and regions of the globe.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Risk of fatal traffic crash higher during annual 4/20 cannabis celebrationUS drivers are more likely to be in a fatal traffic crash during the annual April 20 cannabis celebration. Twenty-five years' worth of data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration shows the number of drivers involved in fatal crashes after 4:20 pm on April 20 is higher compared to the same time intervals on control days one week earlier and one week later.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Portable optical clock used to measure gravitation for the first timeA European collaboration has used one of the world's portable optical atomic clocks to measure gravitation for the first time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Despite odds, fish species that bypass sexual reproduction are thrivingAmazon Service PhoneThe very rare animals that reproduce asexually—only about one in 1,000 of all living vertebrate species—are thought to be at an evolutionary disadvantage compared with their sexually reproduced counterparts. But that theory doesn't hold true regarding the Amazon molly, an all-female fish species that has thrived for millennia in the fresh waters along the Mexico-Texas border.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lightning storms less likely in a warming planet, study suggestsLightning may strike less often in future across the globe as the planet warms, a scientific study suggests.
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Big Think
How did Valentine's Day become so commercial—and is it a bad thing?From striking women with goat’s skin to showering them with chocolates and flowers, here is how Valentine’s Day became the holiday we know today. Read More
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The Atlantic
Does Climate Change Cause More War?It’s one of the most important questions of the 21st century: Will climate change provide the extra spark that pushes two otherwise peaceful nations into war? In the past half-decade, a growing body of research—spanning economics, political science, and ancient and modern history—has argued that it can and will. Historians have found temperature or rainfall change implicated in the fall of Rome a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New chapter begins for kitt peak telescopeWhen the Mayall first opened its eye to the sky 45 years ago, it was one of the largest optical telescopes in existence. Designed to be versatile, its mission was to assist astronomers in addressing the wide diversity of astronomical questions facing the field. Tremendously successful, it played an important role in many astronomical discoveries, such as establishing the role of dark matter in the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solving the dark energy mystery: A new assignment for a 45-year-old telescopeForty-five years ago this month, a telescope tucked inside a 14-story, 500-ton dome atop a mile-high peak in Arizona took in the night sky for the first time and recorded its observations in glass photographic plates.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sibling bullying makes psychotic disorders three times more likelyPeople who were bullied by siblings during childhood are up to three times more likely to develop psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia in early adulthood, according to new research by the University of Warwick.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Canadian stroke victims at higher risk of dying in rural hospitalsCanadians who suffer a stroke have a higher risk of dying if they are treated in a rural hospital rather than an urban one. According to a new study published in PLOS One by Université Laval researchers, the mortality rate in the months that follow a stroke is approximately 25 percent higher for patients treated in rural areas.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No sex for all-female fish speciesThey reproduce through gynogenesis. Their offspring are clones of the mother. According to established theories, the Amazon molly should have become extinct a long time ago. A new study shows how the fish avoids this fate.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lightning storms less likely in a warming planet, study suggestsLightning storms may become less frequent in future as the world warms.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Transportable optical clock used to measure gravitation for the first timeA European collaboration involving clock experts from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and the Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM) has used one of the world's transportable optical atomic clocks to measure gravitation for the first time. The results of the experiment were published in Nature Physics.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Despite odds, fish species that bypasses sexual reproduction is thrivingAn international team of scientists has sequenced the genome of the Amazon molly, a fish that reproduces asexually. The researchers expected that the asexual organism would be at a genetic disadvantage, but the Amazon molly is thriving.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Another blow to fungal infectionThe first successful unpicking of a wheat gene that confers resistance to a devastating fungal disease promises to speed the unraveling of other resistance genes that, together, could provide wheat with a natural barrier to infection at a time when the fungus has already developed tolerance to most types of fungicides.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer-fighting nanorobots programmed to seek and destroy tumorsIn a major advancement in nanomedicine, Arizona State University (ASU) scientists, in collaboration with researchers from the National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (NCNST), of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, have successfully programmed nanorobots to shrink tumors by cutting off their blood supply.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Family history increases breast cancer risk in older women: Weighing screening optionsFamily history of breast cancer continues to significantly increase chances of developing invasive breast tumors in aging women -- those ages 65 and older. The findings of a new study could impact mammography screening decisions later in life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Medicaid expansion in Kentucky improves breast cancer care for women 20 to 64 years oldIn Kentucky, one of the Medicaid expansion states, a University of Louisville study of breast cancer care has found a connection between Medicaid expansion and improved quality of breast cancer care, including an increase in diagnosis of early stage disease and greater utilization of breast-conserving surgery instead of more invasive operations such as mastectomy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is risk of fatal crashes increased on 4/20 counterculture holiday celebrating marijuana?Bottom Line: The popular counterculture holiday '4/20' that celebrates marijuana was associated with an increased risk of fatal traffic crashes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Risk of fatal traffic crash higher during annual 4/20 cannabis celebrationUS drivers are more likely to be in a fatal traffic crash during the annual April 20 cannabis celebration. Twenty-five years' worth of data from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration shows the number of drivers involved in fatal crashes after 4:20 pm on April 20 is higher compared to the same time intervals on control days one week earlier and one week later.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Which commonly prescribed drug is more effective for infants with epilepsy?Levetiracetam was found to be superior to phenobarbital as initial monotherapy for infants with nonsyndromic epilepsy.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No llamas requiredAntibodies made by camels, llamas and alpacas allow scientists to study the structure and function of proteins in disease and health.While valuable, the approach is time-consuming, costly and often unsuccessful.Overcoming this barrier, scientists have devised a faster, cheaper and more reliable way to create these critical antibodies using yeast in a test tube.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Experimental therapy restores nerve insulation damaged by diseaseWhen the body attacks its own healthy tissues in an autoimmune disease, peripheral nerve damage handicaps people and causes persistent neuropathic pain when insulation on healing nerves doesn't fully regenerate. Unfortunately, there are no effective ways to treat the condition. Now scientists at describe in Nature Medicine an experimental molecular therapy that restores insulation on peripheral ne
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thousands of websites infected by 'crypto mining' malwareUK Websites MiningThousands of websites around the world, including many operated by governments, have been infected by hackers using the sites' computing power to "mine" cryptocurrencies, security researchers said.
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The Scientist RSS
DNA Robots Target CancerResearchers use DNA origami to generate tiny mechanical devices that deliver a drug that cuts off the blood supply to tumors in mice.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
General Dynamics to buy CSRA for almost $7 billionThe defense contractor General Dynamics will spend almost $7 billion to acquire CSRA with the Trump administration pushing defense spending aggressively higher.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
German court finds Facebook oversharing user dataA German court has found Facebook is breaching data protection rules with privacy settings that over-share by default and by requiring users to give real names, a consumer rights organisation said Monday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research offers new insight into workings of building blocks of lifePioneering new research could offer a fascinating new insight into how genomic information is read.
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Live Science
Scientists Rush to Explore Underwater World Hidden Below Ice for 120,000 YearsWho knows what "alien" creatures they'll find around Antarctica.
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The Atlantic
Is Dashboard Confessional Still Emo?We are in the throes of the “emo revival,” apparently. It’s a term that’s applied both to newer bands embodying the ethos of the genre—heartfelt, with punk roots—and to the wave of 2000s nostalgia among Millennials. This nostalgia has led to emo-themed dance nights around the U.S. , new music, and tours from bands like Brand New, The Starting Line, and Mae. But in the early 2000s, as emo broke in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
No llamas required—Researchers develop alternate method to uncover protein structures, design new drugsDetouring around a major research roadblock, researchers have found a new way to create valuable antibodies without needing ... llamas?
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Scientific American Content: Global
Researchers Find No Strong Link between Prenatal Ultrasounds and AutismNew study provides more evidence early pregnancy scans are not tied to the disorder -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NYT > Science
He Took a Drug to Prevent AIDS. Then He Couldn’t Get Disability Insurance.Insurers have denied life and disability coverage to men taking Truvada to prevent H.I.V. infection, say gay rights advocates and medical experts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cancer-fighting nanorobots programmed to seek and destroy tumorsIn a major advancement in nanomedicine, Arizona State University (ASU) scientists, in collaboration with researchers from the National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (NCNST), of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, have successfully programmed nanorobots to shrink tumors by cutting off their blood supply.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
For the first time, researchers have isolated a natural resistance gene to SeptoriaWhat is so encouraging about the first successful unpicking of a wheat gene that confers resistance to a devastating fungal disease is the promise it holds for deciphering other resistance genes, en route to a natural barrier to infection, at a time when the fungus has already developed tolerance to most types of fungicides.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain scans show why people get aggressive after a drink or twoResearchers have used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans that measure blood flow in the brain to better understand why people often become aggressive and violent after drinking alcohol. After only two drinks, the researchers noted changes in the working of the prefrontal cortex of the brain, the part normally involved in tempering a person's levels of aggression.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Capitalism isn't an ideology -- it's an operating system | Bhu SrinivasanBhu Srinivasan researches the intersection of capitalism and technological progress. Instead of thinking about capitalism as a firm, unchanging ideology, he suggests that we should think of it as an operating system -- one that needs upgrades to keep up with innovation, like the impending take-off of drone delivery services. Learn more about the past and future of the free market (and a potential
9h
Live Science
Photos: 5,000-Year-Old Scratched Stones Could Be Ancient MapsStone fragments with patterns of lines scratched into them could be the earliest known maps in the world.
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New on MIT Technology Review
DeepMind’s latest AI transfers its learning to new tasksUber Drivers Driving
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why did gas hydrates melt at the end of the last ice age?Large amounts of the greenhouse gas methane are locked up as solid gas hydrates in the continental slopes of ocean margins. Their stability depends on low temperatures and high pressure. However, other factors that influence gas hydrate stability are not as well understood. A research team has found evidence off the coast of Norway that the amount of sediment deposited on the seafloor can play a c
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Salmon face double whammy from toxic stormwaterResearchers have determined that coho salmon that survive polluted stormwater are still at risk. Experiments on both larval zebrafish, a model for salmon, and actual coho salmon showed that toxic runoff can damage hair-like sensors the fish use to find food, sense predators, and find their way in the current.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Star architecture and its impact on the cityThe Guggenheim Museum by star architect Frank Gehry led to an economic boom in the Spanish city of Bilbao. This 'Bilbao Effect' is appealing to many urban planners and politicians who look to better position their cities in economic and social terms by building exceptional architectural projects. Researchers have studied three projects to investigate whether or not the desired effects materialize.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technology enables identification of biomarkers for a wide range of diseasesScientists have developed a way to identify biomarkers for a wide range of diseases by assessing the antibodies we are making to the complex sugars coating our cells. The new, highly sensitive Luminex Multiplex Glycan Array enables the kind of volume needed to establish associations between antibody levels in our blood to these complex sugars, or glycans, and conditions from cancer to autoimmune d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Evidence that medical marijuana outlets sell to other usersA study of four medical marijuana outlets in California suggests that many of their customers don't fit the profile expected for businesses focused on sick patients. Researchers found that some of the dispensaries attracted many customers outside of their immediate area and appeared to target specific ethnic, gender and/or age groups.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research offers new insight into workings of building blocks of lifePioneering new research could offer a fascinating new insight into how genomic information is read.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rubber blanket at an atomic levelTwo-dimensional materials such as graphene, which consist of only one or a few atomic layers, have been a very promising aspect of materials science over recent years. However, one important phenomenon could not be measured accurately up until now: the extreme internal stresses and strains that such materials may be subjected to, which often drastically alter the material's physical properties. TU
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain scans show why people get aggressive after a drink or twoResearchers have used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans that measure blood flow in the brain to better understand why people often become aggressive and violent after drinking alcohol. After only two drinks, the researchers noted changes in the working of the prefrontal cortex of the brain, the part normally involved in tempering a person's levels of aggression.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why did gas hydrates melt at the end of the last ice age?Large amounts of the greenhouse gas methane are locked up as solid gas hydrates in the continental slopes of ocean margins. Their stability depends on low temperatures and high pressure. However, other factors that influence gas hydrate stability are not as well understood. A German-Norwegian research team has found evidence off the coast of Norway that the amount of sediment deposited on the seaf
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The Scanpy software processes huge amounts of single-cell dataScientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed a program that is able to help manage enormous datasets. The software, named Scanpy, is a candidate for analyzing the Human Cell Atlas, and has recently been published in Genome Biology.
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Popular Science
The Olympics still aren't perfectly green, and they might never beEnvironment Creating future Olympic venues requires thinking about how they will be used far into the future. In the past decade, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) has emphasized the measures taken to make the Games sustainable. But in a world where reducing carbon…
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New on MIT Technology Review
Google will allow anyone to use its custom AI chips via the cloudUber Drivers Driving
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The Scientist RSS
Federal Science Funding Could Increase Under New Budget DealCongress has increased discretionary spending caps, making it possible that the budgets of US science agencies will rise this fiscal year.
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The Scientist RSS
The Scientist on PBS News HourAshley Yeager, TS associate editor, explains the possible ramifications of cutting the CDC's Prevention and Public Health Fund.
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NYT > Science
Google Makes Its Special A.I. Chips Available to OthersGoogle Assistant NestThe internet giant developed the tensor processing units, or T.P.U.s, for its data centers. Now other companies can use them through its cloud-computing service.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Magnetic materials increase energy density in power transformationPower transformation. Electrification of vehicles. Creating motors that are efficient. Some of the biggest technologies of the future rest on finding ways to efficiently transform energy. And the backbone that enables the development of these technologies is the field of advanced materials.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First high-precision measurement of the mass of the W boson at the LHCIn a paper published today in the European Physical Journal C, the ATLAS Collaboration reports the first high-precision measurement at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of the mass of the W boson. This is one of two elementary particles that mediate the weak interaction – one of the forces that govern the behaviour of matter in our universe. The reported result gives a value of 80370±19 MeV for the
10h
Ingeniøren
Elektronerne i det tungeste grundstof opfører sig meget usædvanligtEn teoretisk beregning viser, at elektronfordelingen i grundstof nr. 118, oganesson, minder mere om en gas end om den struktur med meget tydelige skaller, som ses i andre grundstoffer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New process allows 3-D printing of nanoscale metal structuresBy mixing metal ions and organic ligands, scientists have developed a process for the 3-D printing of metal structures that are smaller than ever before.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mouse study adds to evidence linking gut bacteria and obesityA new study of mice with the rodent equivalent of metabolic syndrome has added to evidence that the intestinal microbiome -- a 'garden' of bacterial, viral and fungal genes -- plays a substantial role in the development of obesity and insulin resistance in mammals, including humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dyslexia does not reduce pass rates for UK GP licensing examA study has found that UK GPs who declare dyslexia prior to taking the AKT are just as likely to pass the knowledge component of the licensing exam as their counterparts. Candidates who declared dyslexia after initially failing the exam were more likely to be minority ethnic candidates with a primary medical qualification outside of the UK.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Huntington's disease provides new cancer weaponPatients with Huntington's disease, a fatal genetic illness that causes the breakdown of nerve cells in the brain, have up to 80 percent less cancer than the general population. Scientists have discovered why Huntington's is so toxic to cancer cells and harnessed it for a novel approach to treat cancer, a new study reports.
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Popular Science
Olympic stadiums are engineering marvels: here are seven standout facilitiesTechnology The designs made history. And they might be used again. The Olympics aren't just about the athletes. Architects also compete to design the world's most innovative new buildings.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Active workstations in the officeThe promotion of active work stations, such as standing desks and even treadmills in the office has been promoted by manufacturers recently with claims of better physical health, improved posture, even reduced mental stress, and a general boost to wellbeing. A new study by researchers in Finland suggests that many of the proposed benefits and claims are little more than marketing hyperbole.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Making skis strong enough for Olympians to race onOlympians expect top-notch performance from their minds and bodies, but they get crucial advantages from the very best equipment for their sports and the weather conditions they're competing in. Skis, for example, must stand up to near-constant changes in stress during races.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Few jobs can be completely replaced by new technologiesArtificial intelligence, machine learning, and robotics can perform an increasingly wider variety of jobs, and automation is no longer confined to routine tasks. Nevertheless, the automation potential for non-routine tasks seems to remain limited, especially for tasks involving autonomous mobility, creativity, problem solving, and complex communication.
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The Atlantic
Abraham Lincoln's Secret Visits to SlavesShortly before the election of 1860, a man came upon a plantation near Marlin, Texas, some 20 miles southeast of Waco. Though nobody knew who he was, the plantation owner took him in as a guest. The stranger paid close attention to how the enslaved people working on the plantation were treated—how they subsisted on a weekly ration of “four pounds of meat and a peck of meal,” how they were whipped
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Feed: All Latest
Real Scientists Admit When They're WrongRight now society has an epidemic of the opposite: too many people with a bulldog unwillingness to admit when they’re factually wrong.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Exploring the microbiome of an ocean bacteriaAdrift on a boat in the middle of the North Pacific Ocean, the most astounding sight is the utter absence of anything to see. The glassy calm water is undisturbed and gently undulating for miles in every direction. Even if you peer over the edge of the deck into the crystalline blue water, the light of the sun penetrates to a depth of around 600 feet without anything to block its path. There appea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Children aren't starting puberty younger, medieval skeletons revealChildren are entering puberty younger than before, according to recent studies, raising concerns that childhood obesity and hormone-contaminated water supplies may be to blame. However, our archaeological research suggests that there's nothing to worry about. Children in medieval England entered puberty between ten and 12 years of age – the same as today.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nutrition study reveals instability in world's most important fishing regionsOcean food resources are most volatile in areas which hold most of the world's marine resources, like fish, a new study has revealed.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Former Utility CEO Brings Solar Power to AfricaDuke Energy's Jim Rogers is trying to light up rural countries one village at a time -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Evidence that medical marijuana outlets sell to other usersA study of four medical marijuana outlets in California suggests that many of their customers don’t fit the profile expected for businesses focused on sick patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New DNA wires are 100 times more sensitive than other biosensorsScientists have reported a nanoengineering innovation that offers hope for treatment of cancer, infections and other health problems – conductive wires of DNA enhanced with gold which could be used to electrically measure hundreds of biological processes simultaneously.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Standing room only at workThe promotion of active work stations, such as standing desks and even treadmills in the office has been promoted by manufacturers recently with claims of better physical health, improved posture, even reduced mental stress, and a general boost to wellbeing. A new study suggests that many of the proposed benefits and claims are little more than marketing hyperbole.
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Supermicrosurgery helps to combat lymphoedema following tumour removalLymphoedema is fluid retention in the tissue caused by damage to the lymphatic system and is one of the most serious side-effects of cancer operations. The problems caused by the swelling can range from severe pain or skin infections right through to loss of limb function and they detract greatly from a patient's quality of life. The conventional forms of treatment are only partially effective and
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Measles vaccine increases child survival beyond protecting against measlesAnalysis of more than 38,000 children in Ghana shows that all-cause mortality is significantly lower in children who received the measles vaccine after the third diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination. The study adds to growing evidence that, when administered in the WHO recommended sequence, measles vaccination provides non-specific benefits to child survival. The findings have implicatio
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Web-based teaching can improve science understanding for struggling pupilsWeb-based learning tools can help deepen science knowledge among all middle school students, and ease the science literacy gap for underachieving students, according to a three-year study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Before-school physical activity program helps improve body weight and overall wellnessA new study finds that children participating in a 12-week, before-school physical activity program experienced improvement in body weight and social/emotional wellness, compared with their classmates who did not participate.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A method to reveal stresses that alter properties of a materialStresses and strains can drastically alter the properties of a material, and TU Wien has now developed a method to make these internal deformations visible.
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Futurity.org
Psychotic disorders more likely after sibling bullyingKids involved in sibling bullying—as victim or perpetrator—are up to three times more likely to develop psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia in early adulthood, according to a new study. The study is the first to explore the relationship between sibling bullying and the development of psychotic disorders. “If the bullying occurs at home and at school the risk for psychotic disorder is even h
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alternatives to whole liver transplants for children have become safer, study findsIn a new Johns Hopkins study of patient and graft survival trends for pediatric liver transplant recipients between 2002 and 2015, researchers found that outcomes for alternatives to whole liver transplantation (WLT), such as splitting a liver for two recipients or using a part of a liver from a living donor, have improved significantly.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Engaging family in care of hospitalized loved ones enhances healing, reduces readmission ratesA voluntary program being spearheaded by Intermountain Healthcare that allows family members of hospitalized patients to participate in their care enhanced healing and reduced readmission rates.
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Viden
100 nye kæmpemøller skudt op på landjorden: Skal gøre landskabet skønnereVindmøller bør stå ude på havet, mener mange. Men ifølge danske energiselskaber er der gode argumenter for vindmøller på land.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sibling bullying makes psychotic disorders three times more likelyPeople who were bullied by siblings during childhood are up to three times more likely to develop psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia in early adulthood, according to new research. The researchers found that the more frequently children are involved in sibling bullying -- either as bully, victim, or both -- the more likely they are to develop a psychotic disorder.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rubber blanket at an atomic levelTwo-dimensional materials such as graphene, which consist of only one or a few atomic layers, have been a very promising aspect of materials science over recent years. They demonstrate remarkable properties that open up completely new technical possibilities, from sensor technology to solar cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The Scanpy software processes huge amounts of single-cell dataScientists have developed a program that is able to help manage enormous datasets. The software, named Scanpy, is a candidate for analyzing the Human Cell Atlas.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Programming drones to fly in the face of uncertaintyA new system enables drones to fly through forests and avoid obstacles by harnessing uncertainty.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fastest spin on Earth? For animals that rely on legs, scientists say one spider takes goldNew research shows that individuals from the spider family Selenopidae -- commonly known as flattie spiders -- can sense prey approaching from any direction and whip around in one-eighth of a second to strike. High-speed footage reveals that a swift flex of their long legs helps the hunters accomplish this feat, deemed the fastest leg-driven turn of any animal on the planet.
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Dagens Medicin
Syddanmark kan nu tilbyde lungemedicinere samlet uddannelsesforløbSom et forsøg får Region Syddanmark lov til at tilbyde sammenhængende uddannelsesforløb i lungemedicin for at tiltrække flere læger til regionen.
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New Scientist - News
Australia’s deadly 1800s storms help us predict future extremesMeteorologists cannot currently predict the monster storms that occasionally strike Australia, but decades of newspaper accounts suggest there may be a pattern
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New on MIT Technology Review
A cryptojacking attack hit thousands of websites, including government onesUber Drivers Driving
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mouse study adds to evidence linking gut bacteria and obesityA new Johns Hopkins study of mice with the rodent equivalent of metabolic syndrome has added to evidence that the intestinal microbiome -- a 'garden' of bacterial, viral and fungal genes -- plays a substantial role in the development of obesity and insulin resistance in mammals, including humans.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Avoided increases of extreme heat events over East Asia by 0.5 degrees C less warmingMost populous subregions, including eastern China, the Korean Peninsula and Japan, will see more intense, more frequent and longer lasting extreme temperature events under 1.5 degrees C and 2 degrees C warming. The 0.5 degrees C lower warming will help avoid 35 percent - 46 percent of the increases in extreme high-temperature events in terms of intensity, frequency and duration in East Asia with m
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dyslexia does not reduce pass rates for UK GP licensing examA study led by academics at the University of Lincoln has found that UK GPs who declare dyslexia prior to taking the AKT are just as likely to pass the knowledge component of the licensing exam as their counterparts. Candidates who declared dyslexia after initially failing the exam were more likely to be minority ethnic candidates with a primary medical qualification outside of the UK.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Several Berkeley Lab scientists to present talks at 2018 AAAS Annual MeetingSeveral scientists from the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) will present talks at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, to be held Feb. 15 - 19 in Austin, Texas. Topics include a new model for science innovation, new ways to search for dark matter, and developments in advanced bioenergy.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NUS study yields valuable insights on underreporting in international wildlife tradeResearchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have established several key trends in wildlife trade following an in-depth study on international wildlife trade data. The findings shed light on the market forces driving the movement of wildlife products around the globe, and indicate our understanding of illegal and legal wildlife trade is biased towards certain species and regions of
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Global neonatal hearing screening devices market to exceed US$ 44.4 mn in 2025The global neonatal hearing screening devices market was estimated to be valued at US$ 30.3 Mn in 2017 and is anticipated to touch a valuation of nearly US$ 44.4 Mn in 2025 and in the process exhibit a value CAGR of 4.9% during the period of forecast 2017-2025.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biomarker predicts success of Afib treatmentResearchers report successful use of heart imaging to predict the benefit or futility of catheter ablation, an increasingly popular way to treat atrial fibrillation, a common heart rhythm disorder.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Methane emissions reduction from oil and gas in North America examinedAtmospheric methane concentrations continue to increase globally, despite a pledge in 2016 from the leaders of the United States, Canada, and Mexico to reduce methane emissions from each country's oil and gas sector. Additionally, the trilateral methane pledge faces more challenges as the Trump Administration seeks to reverse federal methane research and control efforts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Survivors of childhood heart defects may have higher risk of premature dementiaChildren born with heart defects are more likely to survive into old age because of improved early treatments, but they may be more likely to develop early-onset dementia than people born without heart defects.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tiny engine powered by demixing fluidAn international team of researchers has developed a tiny, liquid-based engine powered by a demixing fluid. In their paper published in the journal Physical Review Letters, the group describes their little engine and possible uses for it.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Routing photons with a topological photonic structureA team of researchers at the University of Maryland has found a new way to route photons at the micrometer scale without scattering by building a topological quantum optics interface. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes their topological photonic structure, how it works, and the ways they tested it. Alberto Amo with Université de Lill in Spain offers a short histor
11h
The Atlantic
Contempt for CourtAn old legal anecdote—attributed to such legal notables as Mae West and the Earl of Birkenhead —depicts a frustrated judge asking an obstreperous lawyer, “Are you displaying contempt of court?” “No, your honor,” the advocate responds. “I am trying to conceal it.” I sometimes think simple politeness—a willingness to conceal contempt for other parties, judges, and even law itself—is all that differ
11h
Ingeniøren
Russisk supercomputer til atomvåben misbrugt til kryptovalutaEn eller flere ingeniører fra Ruslands testcenter for fremstilling af atombomber er blevet anholdt for at forsøge at anvende centrets 1 petaflop kraftige computer til at profitere på Bitcoin-bølgen.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Global Rheumatoid Arthritis diagnosis test market expected to reach US$ 1,002.0 mn in 2027Global rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis tests market has been estimated to be valued at US$ 514.0 Mn in 2016, and is anticipated to increase to US$ 1,002.0 Mn by 2027, registering a CAGR of 6.3% during the forecast period.
11h
Dagens Medicin
Mistilliden til sundhedsministeren og STPS vokserTo lægegrupper kritiserer i et nyt brev sundhedsministerens initiativer til at genskabe tilliden mellem læger og Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed. Samtidig har ministeren modtaget et nyt protestbrev, og stadig flere læger udtrykker mistillid gennem underskriftindsamling.
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Dagens Medicin
#detkuhaværetmig-læger kritiserer sundhedsministerens initiativer om tillidsopbygningSundhedsministeren har forsøgt at genoprette lægers tillid til Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed gennem otte initiativer. Initiativer møder i et brev til ministeren kritik fra #detkuhaværetmig-læger.
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Futurity.org
No, ‘volcanic winter’ didn’t decimate humans in E. AfricaThe massive Toba volcanic eruption on the island of Sumatra about 74,000 years ago didn’t bring about a six-year-long “volcanic winter” in East Africa that caused the human population in the region to plummet, a new study reports. The findings run counter to the Toba catastrophe hypothesis, which says the eruption and its aftermath caused drastic, multiyear cooling, and severe ecological disrupti
11h
Latest Headlines | Science News
5 ways the heaviest element on the periodic table is really bizarreCalled oganesson, element 118 has some very strange properties, according to theoretical calculations by physicists.
11h
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Star Wars News: 'Solo' Had Two Han Solos Behind the ScenesThe new guy got a little help from the man who made Han Solo famous.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fixing cities' water crises could send our climate targets down the gurglerTwo cities on opposing continents, Santiago and Cape Town, have been brought to their knees by events at opposing ends of the climate spectrum: flood and drought.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers discover a near-grazing transiting 'hot Jupiter'An international group of astronomers has detected a new "hot Jupiter" exoplanet making a near-grazing transit of its host star. The newly found alien world, designated WASP-174b, is most likely similar in size and mass to Jupiter, however much hotter than our solar system's biggest planet. The discovery is reported February 2 in a paper published on arXiv.org.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Olympic Motto, Cellular Memories and the Epigenetic Effects of DopingPerformance-enhancing substances such as steroids can still have an effect after athletes stop using them -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New process allows 3-D printing of nanoscale metal structuresBy mixing metal ions and organic ligands, a team led by Julia Greer has developed a process for the 3-D printing of metal structures that are smaller than ever before.
11h
BBC News - Science & Environment
New crayfish that doesn't need males to mate becomes all-powerfulThe self-cloning species, which can be bought in North America, is banned in Europe and two US states.
11h
Big Think
Is this Valentine’s Day thanks to the 36 love questions?Taking stock of the impact of the 36 love questions on Valentine’s Day. Read More
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unsuspecting goby might be new hero of the tropical seasWe're all familiar with the heroism of a tiny fish called Nemo.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How deadly dragonfly wings bust up bacteriaScientists have revealed the intricate detail of how dragonfly wings kill bacteria, thanks to new methods for using very powerful microscopes to see nature's smallest structures in three dimensions.
11h
Science : NPR
A New Goal: Aim To Be Less WrongWhen beginning from the assumption that you are wrong, a criticism may be easier to construe as a helpful pointer, says psychologist Tania Lombrozo. (Image credit: H. Armstrong Roberts/ClassicStock/Getty Images)
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Governments can't be trusted to deliver welfare standards for chickensClaims of secret meetings and manipulation of the policy agenda. A split in government ranks, and threats to withdraw from a national review. It's all just part and parcel of the latest round in the development of Australian animal welfare standards and guidelines, in this case proposed new standards for the poultry and egg industries.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
King tides and rising seas are predictable, and we're not doing enough about itRecent king tides have again caused significant damage to coastal assets in Australia and New Zealand. This time the combination of large tides and coastal storms damaged properties on Torres Strait islands and in Nelson and other coastal areas of New Zealand. It is increasingly recognised worldwide that, despite many coastal adaptation plans being developed, the implementation of these plans is l
12h
Science | The Guardian
Single atoms, soap bubbles and soil: scientists capture their research – in picturesThe winning entries from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) photo competition 2018, which allows researchers and doctoral students to share another side of their work Continue reading...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The benefits of quantum effects for biological, social and technological networksEfficiency in nature's biomolecular processes, such as photosynthesis, is not wholly explained by conventional theory. The EU-funded PAPETS project explored quantum effects to better understand these processes, recently leading to further insights into the possibilities for quantum computation.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A better understanding of the high levels of mercury pollution in the Arctic tundraScientists have been searching for over two decades to explain how the Arctic is contaminated with toxic mercury pollution. A new study sheds light on the likely process, while warning of its hazards to humans and the environment.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hurricane damage survey likely to help worldwideThe biggest natural disaster to ever hit the Caribbean island of Dominica is now likely to provide guidelines for reducing the risk globally of disaster from hurricanes.
12h
Scientific American Content: Global
How Many Gigs are You Wearing?Magnetic clothing could be used to store passwords and other data -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Ingeniøren
Replik: MRSA-debatten: Er det farligt at bo på landet?
12h
Ingeniøren
Apps og sensorer skal sikre brændeovnen en fremtidAlgoritmer, sensorer og computere skal hjælpe den østjyske brændeovnsproducent Hwam over på den rigtige side i miljødebatten.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biomarker predicts success of Afib treatmentJohns Hopkins researchers report successful use of heart imaging to predict the benefit or futility of catheter ablation, an increasingly popular way to treat atrial fibrillation, a common heart rhythm disorder.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fastest spin on Earth? For animals that rely on legs, scientists say one spider takes goldNew research from the University of California Merced and the California Academy of Sciences shows that individuals from the spider family Selenopidae -- commonly known as flattie spiders -- can sense prey approaching from any direction and whip around in one-eighth of a second to strike. High-speed footage reveals that a swift flex of their long legs helps the hunters accomplish this feat, deemed
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines methane emissions reduction from oil and gas in North AmericaAtmospheric methane concentrations continue to increase globally, despite a pledge in 2016 from the leaders of the United States, Canada, and Mexico to reduce methane emissions from each country's oil and gas sector. Additionally, the trilateral methane pledge faces more challenges as the Trump Administration seeks to reverse federal methane research and control efforts.
12h
Live Science
Bizarre 'Spider Stones' Found at Site of Neolithic Sun-WorshipersThe stones may have been part of a ritual sacrifice ceremony, archaeologists say.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The threatened species in our urban jungleIf you're like most Australians, chances are you're an urban dweller, and your idea of "city wildlife" probably includes pigeons, seagulls and those big, hairy possums that wander along powerlines and eat your roses.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Predictive algorithms are no better at telling the future than a crystal ballAn increasing number of businesses invest in advanced technologies that can help them forecast the future of their workforce and gain a competitive advantage.
12h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Camera-Toting PenguinResearchers and BBC filmmakers strapped cameras to animals around the world for a new three-part nature series.
12h
Feed: All Latest
How New Emoji Get Added to Your PhoneEvery year, the governing body Unicode adds new emoji to the nearly 3,000 already in existence. Here's how it picks the additions.
12h
Feed: All Latest
How Ice Skaters Turn Physics Into Astonishing SpinsConservation of angular momentum is the name of the game.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study yields valuable insights on underreporting in international wildlife tradeResearchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have established several key trends in wildlife trade following an in-depth study on international wildlife trade data. The findings shed light on the market forces driving the movement of wildlife products around the globe, and indicate our understanding of illegal and legal wildlife trade is biased towards certain species and regions of
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
France wants to fix 'catastrophic' math scores, conquer fearFrance's government is worried about how many of its schoolchildren consider themselves "stupid at math."
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Less-cool Facebook losing youth at fast pace: surveyWith mom, dad and grandma signing up in increasing numbers, Facebook is losing younger users in the United States at a faster pace than previously estimated, researchers said Monday.
12h
Popular Science
Olympic biathletes are better than you at breathingScience To hit a 1.6-inch target after an all-out cardiovascular sprint, take a deep breath. "It’s like running up a flight of stairs as fast as you can and then trying to thread a needle.”…
12h
Feed: All Latest
'Black Panther': Behind the Scenes of the Marvel Movie's AfrofuturismThe film's challenge was to imagine what Africans would have done given reign over their own culture. The answer is a future that Tony Stark never could have dreamed of.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fastest spin on Earth? For animals that rely on legs, scientists say one spider takes goldThere's no sneaking by this spider. New research from the University of California Merced and the California Academy of Sciences shows that individuals from the spider family Selenopidae—commonly known as flattie spiders—can sense prey approaching from any direction and whip around in one-eighth of a second to strike. High-speed footage reveals that a swift flex of their long legs helps the hunter
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study examines methane emissions reduction from oil and gas in North AmericaAtmospheric methane concentrations continue to increase globally, despite a pledge in 2016 from the leaders of the United States, Canada, and Mexico to reduce methane emissions from each country's oil and gas sector. Additionally, the trilateral methane pledge faces more challenges as the Trump Administration seeks to reverse federal methane research and control efforts.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New process allows 3-D printing of nanoscale metal structuresFor the first time, it is possible to create complex nanoscale metal structures using 3-D printing, thanks to a new technique developed at Caltech.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Landsat 8 marks five years in orbitIn its five years in space, the Landsat 8 Earth-observing satellite has racked up some impressive statistics: 26,500 orbits around the planet, 1.1 million "scenes" captured, a motherlode of images that represents 16 percent of all the observations in the 45-year Landsat archive.
12h
The Atlantic
What Makes Something Funny?“H umor can be dissected, as a frog can,” E. B. White wrote, “but the thing dies in the process and the innards are discouraging to any but the purely scientific mind.” True to form, philosophers, scientists, and certain left-brained comedians have been scrutinizing humor’s innards for centuries, seeking a serious understanding of what makes things funny. According to one scholarly definition, so
12h
Scientific American Content: Global
Submersibles Peer into the Greatest Living Light Show on Earth [Video]Researchers hope to get people talking about our beautiful, complex oceans -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Clay tablets from the cradle of civilisation provide new insight to the history of medicineBefore the Greeks excelled in science and philosophy, culture was blooming in Mesopotamia, located between the Euphrates River and the Tigris River in present day Iraq.
12h
Ingeniøren
P-vagters scannerbiler kan ende i garagenHåndholdte nummerpladescannere har været så succesrige det seneste år, at Københavns Kommune nu overvejer at parkere scannerbiler permanent i garagen
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First expedition to newly exposed Antarctic ecosystemA team of scientists, led by British Antarctic Survey (BAS), heads to Antarctica this week (14 February) to investigate a mysterious marine ecosystem that's been hidden beneath an Antarctic ice shelf for up to 120,000 years.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microscopy breakthrough paves the way for atomically precise manufacturingA University of Texas at Dallas graduate student, his advisor and industry collaborators believe they have addressed a long-standing problem troubling scientists and engineers for more than 35 years: How to prevent the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope from crashing into the surface of a material during imaging or lithography.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Millennials hope to reach life milestones by the same age as other generations, study saysMillennials – young adults in their 20s and 30s – are marrying, buying homes and starting families later in life. But just because they are postponing these major life events does not mean they want to.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discuss climate change and small-scale fisheries in the pacificNations and territories on small islands in the Pacific Ocean are likely to be some of the most drastically affected by global climate change. That's because these communities depend heavily on nearshore, small-scale catches of fish, crustaceans and other marine populations that are likely to be disrupted by changing ocean temperatures and loss of coral reefs. These fisheries are also pillars of c
13h
Scientific American Content: Global
Our Actions Don't Matter in a Cosmic Sense--but That Doesn't Mean They Don't MatterScience reveals our deepest purpose -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dynamic DNA dance identified with new CRISPR/Cas9-based labelingDNA twitches during transcription to bring distant regions in contact and enhance gene expression, according to Stanford researchers who devised a new way to label individual, non-repetitive DNA sequences.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dung beetles' taste preferences uncoveredThe first observational study of a dung beetle species on Langkawi Island in the Andaman Sea reveals insights about its tastes and what that means for the ecosystem.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Standalone system to produce drinking water via solar energyResearchers from the University of Alicante's research group in applied electrochemistry and electrocatalysis have developed a standalone system for desalinating and treating water through electrodialysis. The system is directly powered by solar energy and can be applied in off-grid areas.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find new unknown Bryozoa genera and species below 1000 meters in the Southwestern AtlanticA scientific team has discovered 20 new species and two genera for unknown Bryozoa below 1000 meters in the Southwestern Atlantic, according to an article published in the journal Zootaxa by first author Blanca Figuerola from the University of Barcelona and collaborators.
13h
Feed: All Latest
Inside Facebook's Hellish Two Years—and Mark Zuckerberg's Struggle to Fix it AllFacebook Data WiredFor two years, Facebook has been hijacked, vilified, and besieged. Here's the inside story of the struggle.
13h
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Is Now The Right Time to Try and End Measles?WIRED columnist Maryn McKenna on why public health officials can’t decide whether the time is right to wage war against measles.
13h
Feed: All Latest
How WIRED's March 2018 Cover With Mark Zuckerberg Was CreatedThat bruised Mark Zuckerberg on the March 2018 cover? Here's how the photo-illustration was created to accompany "Facebook's 2 Years of Hell."
13h
Feed: All Latest
Snapchat's Snap Map Will Now Be Available On the WebBy bringing the Snap Map out of the app and onto the web, Snap hopes to bring Snapchat to the masses like never before.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Oumuamua had a violent past and has been tumbling around for billions of yearsThe first discovered interstellar visitor to our solar system has had a violent past, which is causing it to tumble around chaotically, a Queen's University Belfast scientist has discovered.
13h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Ancient ozone holes may have sterilized forests 252 million years agoSwaths of barren forest may have led to Earth’s greatest mass extinction.
13h
Scientific American Content: Global
How to Find a Woman ScientistA new database is fighting the poor visibility of women in STEM by offering female professionals as speakers, panelists, experts, course leaders and advocates for diversity... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Warmth-loving grass snake survived the Ice Age in Central EuropeUsing genetic analyses, Senckenberg scientists have discovered that not all grass snakes retreated to warm southern refugia during the last Central European Ice Age. Together with a colleague from Spain, they offer the first evidence for the survival of a warmth-loving, egg-laying reptile during this cold period. The study was recently published in the journal Scientific Reports.
13h
Viden
Forlig: Google får en flig af UberGoogle får en lille andel af Uber mod at droppe sagsanlæg om stjålne forretningshemmeligheder om selvkørende biler.
13h
Scientific American Content: Global
Life on the RocksScientists are probing deep beneath the ocean’s surface to learn how life on Earth began -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
14h
Science | The Guardian
First images of creatures from Antarctic depths revealedPhotographs of rare species from unexplored area of Antarctic seabed highlight need to protect life in one of the most remote places on the planet (Click images for full caption information) The images below are the first of creatures found in a previously unexplored region of the Antarctic seabed offering a fascinating glimpse of life in one of the most remote and pristine places on the planet .
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Huntington's disease provides new cancer weaponPatients with Huntington's disease, a fatal genetic illness that causes the breakdown of nerve cells in the brain, have up to 80 percent less cancer than the general population. Scientists have discovered why Huntington's is so toxic to cancer cells and harnessed it for a novel approach to treat cancer, a new study reports.
14h
Ingeniøren
Techtopia #39: Kinesisk app vil eje verdenPodcast: Den kinesiske chat-app WeChat er meget mere end bare chat. Den er så altomfattende, at den får Facebook til at ligne en gammel Mayland spiralkalender.
14h
Ingeniøren
Vinter-OL ramt af cyberangrebUnder åbningsceremonien blev OL ramt af et cyberangreb, bekræfter IOC, der dog ikke vil afsløre, hvem der står bag angrebet.
14h
NYT > Science
The New Health Care: Heart Stents Are Useless for Most Stable Patients. They’re Still Widely Used.Why are so many people agreeing to an expensive procedure — and putting themselves at risk — for a placebo effect?
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NYT > Science
Q&A: Feline FoodiesCats pay close attention to what humans call “mouthfeel,” and are sensitive to textures as well as aromas.
14h
Live Science
Watch Elon Musk React to Falcon Heavy Launch in Exclusive National Geographic VideoAn exclusive video from National Geographic shows Elon Musk's surprised, joyful reaction to the successful first launch of a SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket on Feb. 6.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists test new material for neurocomputersScientists from the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), working in cooperation with researchers from the Russian Academy of Sciences, have proposed new materials in which the bipolar effect of resistive switchings (BERS) can be realized. Significantly, these materials could serve as the basis for developing a computer based on memristors that can stor
14h
Live Science
Is This Experimental Japanese Drug the Secret to Stopping the Flu?An experimental drug, made in Japan, may be able to stop flu symptoms within 24 hours.
14h
Science : NPR
The Gap Between The Science On Kids And Reading, And How It Is TaughtTwo-thirds of the nation's schoolchildren struggle with reading. Neuroscientist Mark Seidenberg says teachers need a better understanding of what science knows about how kids learn to read. (Image credit: LA Johnson/NPR)
14h
Ingeniøren
Nasa håber på massiv snestorm under vinter-OLObservationer fra vinter-OL skal være med til at forbedre vejrmodellerne. Udenlandske meteorologiske institutter måler snefald fra jordhøjde og ude fra rummet under de olympiske lege i Pyeongchang.
14h
New Scientist - News
Big tech is unpopular, but we mostly have ourselves to blameConsumer demand and our own ignorance has done much to assist the rise of the likes of Facebook and Google, so restraint and knowledge can do much to tame it
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Metals known to have harmful health effects found in indigenous exposed to oil spillsPeople from two indigenous communities in the Peruvian Amazon who live close to the country's longest oil pipeline have mercury, cadmium and lead in their bodies at concentrations harmful to their health. This was the conclusion of a study carried out jointly by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) and the Peruvian National Center for Occupational Health and Environmental Health Pr
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers have fabricated two types of trilayer graphene with different electrical propertiesResearchers in Japan have found a way to form two materials, each made of three layers of graphene. Each material's graphene is stacked differently and has unique electrical properties. Their work has implications for the development of novel electronic devices, such as photo sensors that convert light into electrical energy.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Exceptional architecture and its impact on citiesThe Guggenheim Museum, designed by star architect Frank Gehry, led to an economic boom in the Spanish city of Bilbao. This "Bilbao Effect" is appealing to many urban planners and politicians who look to better position their cities in economic and social terms by building exceptional architectural projects. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have studied three projects to inve
14h
BBC News - Science & Environment
UK team set for giant Antarctic iceberg expeditionScientists investigate undersea life exposed by the iceberg that broke away from the Antarctic Peninsula.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Few-layer tellurium as a promising successor of black phosphorusTwo-dimensional (2-D) layered materials have received considerable attention for their potential applications since the experimental discovery of graphene. Theoretical two-dimensional elementary semiconductors promise superior features in terms of fabrication, purification and doping. Few-layer black phosphorus (BP) is the first 2-D mono-elementary semiconductor with high electronic carrier mobili
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A super-resolution view of chemical reactionsResearchers from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences have demonstrated, using a super-resolution microscopic technique, how to follow chemical reactions taking place in very small volumes. The method was developed in collaboration with PicoQuant GmbH, and makes it possible to observe reactions within individual cellular organelles such as cell nuclei.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Salmon face double whammy from toxic stormwaterWSU researchers have determined that coho salmon that survive polluted stormwater are still at risk. Experiments on both larval zebrafish, a model for salmon, and actual coho salmon showed that toxic runoff can damage hair-like sensors the fish use to find food, sense predators, and find their way in the current.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Survivors of childhood heart defects may have higher risk of premature dementiaChildren born with heart defects are more likely to survive into old age because of improved early treatments, but they may be more likely to develop early-onset dementia than people born without heart defects.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Measles vaccine increases child survival beyond protecting against measlesAnalysis of more than 38,000 children in Ghana shows that all-cause mortality is significantly lower in children who received the measles vaccine after the third diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis (DTP) vaccination. The study adds to growing evidence that, when administered in the WHO recommended sequence, measles vaccination provides non-specific benefits to child survival. The findings have implicatio
15h
Science : NPR
Smartphone Detox: How To Power Down In A Wired WorldIn an era when many kids get a first smartphone at age 10, psychologists say the devices have turned us into Pavlov's dogs — drooling for the next notification, buzz or text. Ready to dial back? (Image credit: Ryan Johnson for NPR)
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Salmon face double whammy from toxic stormwaterWashington State University researchers have found that salmon face a double whammy when they swim in the stormwater runoff of urban roadways.
15h
The Atlantic
The Female Quran Experts Fighting Radical Islam in MoroccoMorocco is in a region vulnerable to terrorist recruitment, but it hasn’t had a significant attack on its own soil since 2011, when terrorists bombed a Marrakesh café. Yet ethnic Moroccans have been at the center of ISIS attacks in Europe. The only alleged survivor of the 2015 Paris rampage is a Frenchman of Moroccan origin; his trial began last week. The men behind the Brussels airport and tram
15h
Ingeniøren
Livsfarlig skimmelsvamp udvikler resistensEn skimmelsvamp, vi konstant indånder, udvikler resistens mod stoffet, lægerne bruger til at behandle inficerede. Resistensen kan skyldes, at landbruget i høj grad bruger det samme stof til at bekæmpe svampeinfektioner i afgrøderne.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Comcast ponders new bid for 21st Century Fox: US mediaUS cable company Comcast, which in December dropped an attempt to acquire 21st Century Fox, is considering relaunching that bid even though Walt Disney Co. has reached a deal, the Wall Street Journal reported.
15h
Ingeniøren
Amerikansk iværksætter vil samlebåndsrevolutionere byggebranchenMed inspiration fra elektronikbranchen og bilindustrien vil firmaet Katerra gøre byggeprojekter til et højt digitaliseret samlebåndsarbejde. Fabrik i Arizona spytter allerede hele husvægge ud, og i januar rejste virksomheden 5,2 milliarder danske kroner i venturekapital.
16h
Ingeniøren
Overbelastet database bremser kamerabiler fra at scanne nummerpladerTre københavnske kamerabiler har været så effektive til at scanne nummerplader, at databasen bag ikke kunne følge med. Antallet af scannede nummerplader fra kamerabilerne blev derfor reduceret til en tredjedel.
16h
Science-Based Medicine
Quackademic medicine and the delusion of being “science-based”Last week, I was interviewed by the a reporter from the Georgetown student newsletter about its integrative medicine program. It got me to thinking how delusion that one's work is science-based can lead to collaborations with New Age "quantum" mystics like Deepak Chopra.
16h
Ingeniøren
Mindst 113 vandværker har for mange pesticider i drikkevandetEt stigende antal vandværker finder for højt niveau af stoffet desphenyl-chloridazon i drikkevandet. Ekspert kalder det »en katastrofe for vandforsyningen.«
16h
Ingeniøren
Ugens job: HOFOR, Ørsted og flere store firmaer jagter fagfolkPå dagens liste finder du job for ingeniører og naturvidenskabelige kandidater i flere forskellige firmaer. Blandt andet som specialist, projektleder, konsulent og mere endnu.
17h
Science | The Guardian
Thanks to Cheddar Man, I feel more comfortable as a brown Briton | Aarathi PrasadI grew up being told that a prerequisite for our national identity was white skin – that prejudice has been proved false The results of 10,000-year old Cheddar Man’s DNA analysis have hit the headlines in the past few days, accompanied by a striking portrait that needed no words. Here was this bona fide European – indeed, an ancestral Brit – and the man was black. Genetic analysis suggests he had
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US wants to privatize International Space Station: reportCould the International Space Station become a commercial venture run by private industry?
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Back to basics: Taiwan's industrial chicWith watches made from cement, furniture fashioned from factory pipes, and accessories created from motorbike leather, Taiwanese designers are winning new fans at home and abroad with their own brand of industrial chic.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Web-based teaching can improve science understanding for struggling pupilsWeb-based learning tools can help deepen science knowledge among all middle school students, and ease the science literacy gap for underachieving students, according to a three-year study published today in the International Journal of Science Education.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Report calls for national parks to get smartReal-time information from environmental monitors and sensors could soon inform rangers of the conditions of footpaths and monitor the effects of climate change. Bins could send alerts when they are full to reduce unnecessary emissions due to bin collections. Your phone could sense when you tire during a walk, notifying you of the nearest pub for a rest stop. It could even send you the menu, or ma
17h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Nigeria's soil-free salad farmThe entrepreneur growing greens in shipping containers.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Web-based teaching can improve science understanding for struggling pupilsWeb-based learning tools can help deepen science knowledge among all middle school students, and ease the science literacy gap for underachieving students, according to a three-year study published today in the International Journal of Science Education.
18h
Science | The Guardian
Can you solve it? The joy of gridsDot-to-dot puzzles that hit the spot UPDATE: For the solutions click here Hi guzzlers, Today, three challenges using this grid of 16 dots: Continue reading...
18h
Science | The Guardian
Microplastics pollute most remote and uncharted areas of the oceanFirst data ever gathered from extremely remote area of the South Indian Ocean has a surprisingly high volume of plastic particles, say scientists Microplastics have been found in some of the most remote and uncharted regions of the oceans raising more concerns over the global scale of plastic pollution. Samples taken from the middle of the South Indian Ocean – at latitude 45.5 degrees south – sho
18h
Science | The Guardian
Police outsource digital forensic work to unaccredited labsMarket for data analysis called a ‘race to the bottom’, with trials failing because of evidence issues More than a dozen police forces have outsourced digital forensic investigative work to unaccredited private laboratories in the past year, at a time when a series of rape cases have been abandoned because of problems with digital evidence. The collapse of four trials within two months because di
19h
Science | The Guardian
Tracing the tangled tracks of humankind's evolutionary journeyThe path from ape to modern human is not a linear one. Hannah Devlin looks at what we know – and what might be next for our species Let’s go back to the beginning. When did we and our ape cousins part ways? Scientists are still working on an exact date – or even a date to within a million years. Like many of the big questions in human evolution, the answer itself has evolved over the past few dec
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technology enables identification of biomarkers for a wide range of diseasesScientists have developed a way to identify biomarkers for a wide range of diseases by assessing the antibodies we are making to the complex sugars coating our cells.The new, highly sensitive Luminex Multiplex Glycan Array enables the kind of volume needed to establish associations between antibody levels in our blood to these complex sugars, or glycans, and conditions from cancer to autoimmune di
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NIR light may identify breast cancer patients who will benefit most from chemotherapyA new optical imaging system developed at Columbia University uses red and near-infrared light to identify breast cancer patients who will respond to chemotherapy. The imaging system may be able to predict response to chemotherapy as early as two weeks after beginning treatment. Findings from a first pilot study of the new imaging system -- a noninvasive method of measuring blood flow dynamics in
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Star architecture and its impact on the cityThe Guggenheim Museum by star architect Frank Gehry led to an economic boom in the Spanish city of Bilbao. This 'Bilbao Effect' is appealing to many urban planners and politicians who look to better position their cities in economic and social terms by building exceptional architectural projects. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have studied three projects to investigate whe
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Before-school physical activity program helps improve body weight and overall wellnessA MassGeneral Hospital for Children study finds that children participating in a 12-week, before-school physical activity program experienced improvement in body weight and social/emotional wellness, compared with their classmates who did not participate.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Programming drones to fly in the face of uncertaintyMIT CSAIL system enables drones to fly through forests and avoid obstacles by harnessing uncertainty.
20h
Ingeniøren
Medarbejdere i offentlige virksomheder spænder ben for it-projekterKun hver sjette offentlige virksomhed vurderer, at deres medarbejdere har de nødvendige kvalifikationer til at følge den digitale udvikling, viser ny undersøgelse. Konsekvensen er, at offentlige investeringer i velfærdsteknologier og it-platforme kan være spildt.
21h
Ingeniøren
Analytiker: Teslas tillægspakke kan umuligt gøre bilerne selvkørende»Tesla er kommet med mange løfter om selvkørende biler, men i realiteten er softwaren ikke i stand til at gøre bilen selvkørende,« siger analytiker Sam Abuelsamid fra Navigant Research.
21h
The Neurocritic
Policy Insights from The Neurocritic: Alarm Over Acetaminophen, Ibuprofen Blocking Emotion Is OverblownJust in time for Valentine's Day, floats in a raft of misleading headlines: Scientists have found the cure for a broken heart Painkillers may also mend a broken heart Taking painkillers could ease heartaches - as well as headaches Paracetamol and ibuprofen could ease heartaches - as well as headaches If Tylenol and Advil were so effective in “mending broken hearts”, “easing heartaches”, and provi
23h
Big Think
This is the damage a tiny speck of space debris can do at 15,000mphSpace is not the place to put waste, as it turns pretty much anything into a high-velocity projectile capable of causing incredible damage. Read More
23h
Futurity.org
With this device, bending your finger generates powerA small metallic tab that, when attached to the body, is capable of generating electricity from bending a finger and other simple movements could one day power our electronic devices. “No one likes being tethered to a power outlet or lugging around a portable charger. The human body is an abundant source of energy. We thought: ‘Why not harness it to produce our own power?'” says Qiaoqiang Gan, as
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Futurity.org
Happy Darwin Day! 3 signs we’re still evolvingThere are three lines of evidence suggesting humans are still evolving, says evolutionary biologist Scott Solomon in the run-up to International Darwin Day. Monday marks the 209th anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin, the “Father of Evolution.” “We know more about some aspects of the evolution of other species, like Galapagos finches and Caribbean lizards, than we do about our own, ongoing
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Futurity.org
On ‘Day Zero,’ will Cape Town shut off its water?Cape Town, South Africa—a modern city of nearly 4 million residents (plus over 1.5 million tourists yearly)—is on the brink of running out of water. In May, the city could be forced to cut off the vast majority of its taps. Buzz Thompson, a water law expert at Stanford University, recently talked about how Cape Town got into this dire situation, what will happen on “Day Zero” (the day an entire c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Report calls for national parks to get smartNational parks are called to act on recommendations to introduce 'smart' technologies and the Internet of Things to plug funding gaps from decreasing budgets, protect the landscape and keep pace with visitor expectations.
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Futurity.org
3 plans to avoid blackouts using 100% renewable energyResearchers have proposed three different methods for providing consistent power in 139 countries using 100 percent renewable energy. The inconsistencies of power produced by wind, water, and sunlight and the continuously fluctuating demand for energy often hinder renewable energy solutions. In a new paper, which appears in Renewable Energy , the researchers outline several solutions to making cl
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Futurity.org
This protein may boost survival during the fluGM-CSF, a protein that modifies the immune response to the flu, may also help reduce lung inflammation and improve survival during influenza, according to new research. The researchers studied the survival and lung function of mice with influenza in the lab. They found that the mice that received large amounts of a special cytokine—molecules that warn other cells that there’s an infection or othe
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Big Think
New therapy cures cancer with just one injectionIt neutralized not only the tumor it was injected into but malignancies all over the body. Read More
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Futurity.org
Here’s where narwhals like to hang outNarwhals prefer to congregate near unique glacier fjords with thick ice fronts and low to moderate calving activity, where icebergs break off infrequently, new research suggests. “Arctic marine mammals are really good indicators of climate change because they are very specialized…” It appears narwhals prefer the freshwater coming off still, serene glaciers over the silt-filled runoff discharged f
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Futurity.org
Fruit bat clicks may inspire driverless car designThe Egyptian fruit bat uses navigation techniques similar to those modern-day military and civil surveillance use, new research suggests. The finding could inspire new directions for driverless cars and drones. “Before people thought that this bat was not really good at echolocation, and just made these simple clicks,” says Wu-Jung Lee, a researcher at the University of Washington’s Applied Physi
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Big Think
A new brain implant could slow Alzheimer’s progressionOne patient retained the ability to dress herself, make a simple meal, and even change her plans depending on the weather. Read More
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Big Think
The trouble with MarxWhat happens when a good philosopher fudges the facts to promote his politics? Read More
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Science : NPR
PHOTOS: These Images Were Captured Nearly 3.8 Billion Miles From EarthThe distance marks a record: the farthest from Earth an image has been taken. Before NASA's New Horizons probe caught these glimpses in December, the 1990 "Pale Blue Dot" image had held the record. (Image credit: NASA/JHUAPL/SwRI)
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NYT > Science
Trump Rules: F.D.A. Chief Goes Against the Administration StereotypeDr. Scott Gottlieb isn’t rolling back his agency’s mission, although he is straddling the interests of the drug and health industries along with public health.
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Science | The Guardian
Starwatch: in Orion's sword is the hazy blob where stars are bornThe hunter stands bolt upright in the evening sky, with the nebula visible below the belt This week is a good one for finding the constellation of Orion: it stands bolt upright in the evening sky. The chart shows the view looking due south at 20:00 GMT on 12 February. The most noticeable thing to look for is Orion’s belt comprising three stars: Alnitak , Alnilam and Mintaka . Look upwards from th
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NYT > Science
NASA Budgets for a Trip to the Moon, but Not While Trump Is PresidentThe administration sees a greater role for the private sector in returning to the moon and running the International Space Station, which it would stop financing in 2025.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New lithium collection method could boost global supplyWith continual technological advancements in mobile devices and electric cars, the global demand for lithium has quickly outpaced the rate at which it can be mined or recycled, but a research team may have a solution.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Marine Microbes Exchange Fire With Elaborate Subcellular Weapons [Video]Discovery “represents a new extreme in organelle complexity” -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Oroville crisis drives harder look at aging US damsOne year after the worst structural failures at a major U.S. dam in a generation, federal regulators who oversee California's half-century-old, towering Oroville Dam say they are looking hard at how they overlooked its built-in weaknesses for decades.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why base metabolism varies with massA multidisciplinary team of researchers has managed to solve a puzzle that had bewildered biologists for over a century: how and why an organism’s base metabolism varies depending on its mass. Base metabolism is the minimum energy that an organism consumes to stay alive.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Obesity drives U.S. health care costs up by 29 percent, varies by stateRecent research provides new insights on how individual states are affected by the health care costs of obesity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Socioecological network finds space for cattle, fish, and people in the big mountain westThe social and ecological systems of mountains and their river basins are best approached holistically when dealing with complex problems in natural resources management, say ecologists working with the Mountain Social Ecological Observatory Network (MntSEON).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Many parents of children with disabilities don't make care plans, study findsMany parents of children with disabilities don't make advance care plans in the event of the parent's or other caretaker's death or disability, according to a new nationwide U.S. survey.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drivers of hate in the United States have distinct regional differencesIn a new study, geographers sought to understand the factors fueling hate across space. Their findings paint a rather grim reality of America; hate is a national phenomenon, and more complicated than they imagined. The researchers mapped the patterns of active hate groups in every US county in the year 2014, and analyzed their potential socioeconomic and ideological drivers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Workplace stress can take a toll on your brain surgeon, tooA new study finds that two-thirds of neurosurgeons experience burnout during training, and stressors at work are partly to blame.
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The Atlantic
The Hollowing Out of the State Department ContinuesThe State Department’s civilian workforce shrank more than 6 percent overall during the initial eight months of the Trump administration, but that figure masks significantly higher departure rates in critical areas of the country’s diplomatic apparatus. In December 2016, the department employed 2,580 people under the foreign affairs occupation series, according to data from the Office of Personne
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Water filtration breakthrough using metal-organic frameworksWith two billion people worldwide lacking access to clean and safe drinking water, new research may offer a breakthrough solution. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a next-generation material with the largest internal surface area of any known substance, can be used to capture, store and release chemical compounds -- in this case, the salt and ions in sea water.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New malleable 'electronic skin' self-healable, recyclableResearchers have developed a new type of malleable, self-healing and fully recyclable 'electronic skin' that has applications ranging from robotics and prosthetic development to better biomedical devices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Liver cells with whole genome duplications protect against cancer, study showsResearchers have discovered that cells in the liver with whole genome duplications, known as polyploid cells, can protect the liver against cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Blood test cuts time to diagnosis for common, deadly yeast infection, national trial showsA new blood test seems to perform as well as, if not better than, traditional blood cultures at detecting candidemia, a type of fungal yeast infection that commonly strikes hospital patients. Quick detection of the infection has the potential to stop its spread and slow drug resistance.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How the brain constructs the worldHow are raw sensory signals transformed into a brain representation of the world that surrounds us? Investigators have now uncovered the contributions to perception of a brain region called posterior parietal cortex. They show that posterior parietal cortex contributes to the merging of signals from different sensory modalities, as well the formation of memories about the history of recent stimuli
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