Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stepwise hydride transfer in the biosynthesis of chlorophyllHydride transfer is an important reaction for chemistry (e.g., fuel cells), as well as biology (e.g., respiratory chain and photosynthesis). Often, one partial reaction involves the transfer of a hydride ion (H−). But does this hydride transfer involve one step or several individual steps? In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now provided the first proof of stepwise hydride transfer i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sewage and animal waste having serious impact on U.K. coastline, new research concludesAnalysis of fragile seagrass meadows by Cardiff University and Swansea University scientists has shown that consistent pollution from sewage and livestock waste is affecting their survival.
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Science | The Guardian

Why it's too soon to classify gaming addiction as a mental disorderConcerns over the addictive properties of video games are reasonable but there is a lack of rigorous research behind the WHO’s expected classification Video games played on smartphones, tablets, computers and consoles have been a popular form of leisure for some time now. In Europe, recent figures indicate that games are played by more than two thirds of children and adolescents, and a substantia
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Scientific American Content: Global

Renewing the Contract between Academia and SocietyUniversities owe the public a fresh look at their educational and research missions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Everyday activities associated with more gray matter in brains of older adultsHigher levels of lifestyle physical activity are associated with more gray matter in the brains of older adults, according to a Rush University Medical Center study published in the Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences.
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Live Science

On the Battlefield, Ants Treat Each Other's War WoundsThese ants care for one another.
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Feed: All Latest

Facebook Funded Most of the Experts Who Vetted Messenger KidsEqually notable are the experts Facebook did not consult: Two large nonprofits say they weren’t informed about the app until weeks or days before its debut.
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Feed: All Latest

China Wants to Make a Mark in Space—But It'll Need a Little HelpWhen it comes to space, China has always come in third place. But a new partnership with Luxembourg might launch it into orbit.
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The Atlantic

House Conservatives Revolt Over ImmigrationAs is traditional during Infrastructure Week , nobody on Capitol Hill is talking about infrastructure. Instead, lawmakers are zeroing in on immigration and the young undocumented immigrants whose protection from deportation expires in March. But while all eyes are on the Senate’s not-so-freewheeling debate on those issues, the real action is perhaps in the lower chamber. There, House Republicans
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Live Science

The Color of Blood: Here Are Nature's Reddest Reds (Photos)It's customary to give ravishing red gifts on Valentine's Day — think red roses, red boxes of chocolate or even your heart (figuratively speaking).
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New Scientist - News

Transgender woman is first to be able to breastfeed her babyAn experimental treatment regimen has enabled a transgender woman to exclusively breastfeed her baby for six weeks, during which time the baby grew healthily
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Live Science

Monster Antarctic Iceberg Gets Its Big Break in First-of-Its-Kind VideoIceberg A-68, which broke off from the Larsen C ice shelf in Antarctica, takes center stage in newly released footage.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Linking cytosolic and chloroplast ribosome biogenesis in plantsScientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have found that eukaryotic and bacterial growth regulation systems of independent origins are connected to the control of chloroplast rRNA transcription in a primitive red alga.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Winter Olympics: Could Plastic "Ice" Help Overcome Bias toward Colder Countries?Bobsled, luge and skeleton tracks lined with plastic rather than ice could make those sports more accessible worldwide -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren

Forskere: Sådan kan træ blive et stærkere byggemateriale end stålEn ny teknik mere end tidobler almindeligt træs styrke.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Breaking local symmetry—why water freezes but silica forms a glassEveryone knows that water freezes at 0 degrees C. Life on Earth would be vastly different if this were not so. However, water's cousin, silica, exhibits wayward behavior when cooled that has long puzzled scientists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers turn fashion waste into multifunctional materialA research team from the National University of Singapore (NUS) Faculty of Engineering has devised a fast, cheap and green method to convert cotton-based fabric waste, such as unwanted clothing, into highly compressible and ultralight cotton aerogels. The researchers also demonstrated the application of this novel material to keep military water bottles cold and for effective control of rapid blee
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study: Running helps brain stave off effects of chronic stressThe study, newly published in the journal of Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, finds that running mitigates the negative impacts chronic stress has on the hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for learning and memory.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Most parents don't believe their child's BMI report cardFifty-three percent of parents who receive their child's body mass index (BMI) report card do not believe that it accurately categorizes their child as underweight, normal weight, overweight, or obese, according to research out today in Health Promotion Practice, a SAGE Publishing journal.
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New Scientist - News

Valentine’s Day seems to cause a mini baby-boom 9 months laterNational Health Service data reveals that around Valentine’s Day there is a 5 per cent rise in the number of babies conceived in England
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New Scientist - News

China’s reckless attitude to space debris needs to changeRecent near misses show China's pursuit of space prowess seems to trump debris risks. The re-entry of its space station is another looming drama, says Paul Marks
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The Atlantic

The Bogus 'Free Speech' Argument Against UnionsFree speech has no fiercer advocate than Professor Eugene Volokh of the University of California at Los Angeles . As a teacher of First Amendment law, director of a First Amendment amicus brief clinic, and a founder of the libertarian-leaning Volokh Conspiracy blog, Volokh lets almost no free-speech sparrow fall anywhere in the U.S. without weighing in, usually against government and in favor of
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The Scientist RSS

Researchers Produce Alpaca Antibodies Using YeastWith multiple applications in biomedicine, the antibodies can now be made quickly, cheaply, and without the need for an alpaca or one of its relatives.
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Ingeniøren

Gigantisk svaghed i Skype – kaldes 'umulig' at fikseSikkerhedsforsker har kontaktet Microsoft i september om sikkerhedshul i Skype. Men problemet er meget stort, og derfor er der ikke sket meget.
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NYT > Science

Peru Moves to Protect ‘One of the Last Great Intact Forests’While the United States may be weakening protections for wilderness, the creation of Yaguas National Park protects millions of acres from development and deforestation.
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Science : NPR

The Key To Raising A Happy ChildA new book warns parents: Stop micromanaging your kids. Think of yourself less as their boss, and more like a consultant. (Image credit: Chris Kindred for NPR)
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Science | The Guardian

Tired of texting? Google tests robot to chat with friends for youWith its new Reply system the firm is taking the art of conversion one step forwards – or should that be backwards? Are you tired of the constant need to tap on a glass keyboard just to keep up with your friends? Do you wish a robot could free you of your constant communication obligations via WhatsApp, Facebook or text messages? Google is working on an AI-based auto-reply system to do just that.
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Ingeniøren

Siemens Gamesa får historisk ordre på verdens største havmølleparkØrsted har valgt Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy (SGRE) til både at levere og servicere 1386 MW vindkraft til 2. fase af Ørsteds gigantiske, britiske havmølleprojekt, Hornsea Two.
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Ingeniøren

Rumfarts­eventyr får liftoff i nordfynsk hangarOrdrebogen er allerede fuld hos den nystiftede rumfartsvirksomhed Space Compo­site Structure Denmark. Nu vil ejeren sammen med SDU opbygge en hyldevare­produktion af rumfarts­kompositter i en hangar i H.C. ­Andersen-lufthavnen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists found an alternative to water chlorinationResearchers of Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University (SPbPU) have developed a unique device for complex water purification that can improve or, in some cases, replace disinfection with chlorine.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

European officials: Virtual currencies are no way to payEuropean finance officials are underlining their skepticism toward virtual currencies like bitcoin, saying they are risky for investors and inefficient as a way to pay for things.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

High-efficiency, low-cost catalyst for water electrolysisA research team led by Professor Sangaraju Shanmugam of Energy Science and Engineering at DGIST has developed highly efficient, ultra-durable core-shell nanostructured electrocatalyst and successfully replaced the precious anode in water electrolysis, through the collaboration with the research group of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL).
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Science | The Guardian

Does the Illuminati control the world? Maybe it’s not such a mad idea | Julian BagginiQuestioning the hidden power of elites – whether big pharma or secret societies – is really quite sane If the Illuminati is real, it’s got to be the least secret secret society in the universe. It’s so bad at keeping itself hidden that its existence is proclaimed all over the internet by people whose investigative toolkit consists entirely of Google and a lively imagination. The most recent would
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Ingeniøren

Tidligere nordkoreansk hacker: Vi hackede kun med ét formålIfølge en afhopper fra Nordkorea er statshackerne fra det lukkede land sjældent ude efter informationer.
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The Atlantic

The War on Valentine's Day in IndiaIn the days before Valentine’s Day 2009, members of a group called the Sri Ram Sena dragged several young women out of a pub in Mangalore, a city in southwest India, and beat them. According to the group, whose members lobby, sometimes violently, for the religious and cultural dominance of Hinduism in Indian society, the women had violated the country’s traditional values by hanging out in a bar
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Ingeniøren

TDC udruller landsdækkende netværk til Internet of ThingsEfter langs tid venten er TDC nu klar til at lancere deres lavfrekvente narrowband IoT-netværk. Storkøbenhavn er allerede dækket og i 2018 bliver netværket landsdækkende
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Ingeniøren

I dag curler danskerne: Forskere har fundet forklaringen bag stenenes ‘curl’Tidligere forklaringer er på glatis, mener svenske forskere, som forklarer, at roterende curlingsten bevæger sig i en blød bue, fordi de laver ridser i isen.
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Dagens Medicin

Jo, vores etik er i ordenMichael Westermann beskyldninger om mangel på etik blandt de praktiserende ørelæger bygger på misforståelser, manglende information og forkerte data.
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Dagens Medicin

Thyholm er sikret lægehus de næste tre årRegion Midtjylland har netop indgået aftale med Falck Lægehuse, der sikrer borgerne på Thyholm lægehjælp de næste tre år.
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Dagens Medicin

Praksislæge: Nye praksis vil ikke løse problemet med lægemangelRegion Hovedstaden og PLO vil komme den store lægemangel til livs ved at oprette syv nye praksis i hovedstadsområdet. Men praktiserende læge i Ballerup Margith Grønbæk mener ikke, at det vil løse problemet. Løsningen er en anden, siger hun.
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Science : NPR

Win Like Flynn: A Bichon Frise Is This Year's Top Dog At Westminster ShowThe white fluff ball rose to the top of the pack among 2,800 entrants at the annual show held at Madison Square Garden in New York. (Image credit: Mary Altaffer/AP)
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Dagens Medicin

Specialuddannelse målrettet sygeplejersker i almen praksis rammer ved siden afDet er svært at se, at sygeplejersker i almen praksis vil få et kompetenceløft af den nye specialuddannelse i borgernær sygepleje, siger formand for sygeplejerskerne i almen praksis og næstformand i PLO.
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Science | The Guardian

Hot stuff: the thermal cameras giving us a new way of seeing our bodiesHow do our bodies regulate themselves – and is it even true that we have a single body temperature? New technology will tell us I’m one of those people who always feels cold. Maybe it’s my upbringing in the chilly north, or maybe it’s down the quirks of my own physiology, but I’m reliably found next to the fire, hiding from draughts that no-one else had noticed, or buried inside enough jumpers to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Giant London glasshouse to reopen with world's rarest plantsA gleaming monument to the ambition and creativity of its age, the world's largest Victorian glasshouse will once again welcome visitors to see some of the world's rarest plants following a lengthy facelift.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Coal-loving Poland struggles with killer smogSmog kills tens of thousands of Poles each year, yet environmental activists say the right-wing government of the coal-loving nation has been dragging its feet on combatting air pollution.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

App delivery boom shakes up China food sectorGuo Bonan has opened several new branches of his "8Peppers" spicy Sichuan-style restaurants across Shanghai since last year, and not one has a dining room.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Toshiba tips return to black as it sells chip, nuclear unitsTroubled Japanese conglomerate Toshiba said on Wednesday it would swing into the black for the full fiscal year as it completes the multi-billion-dollar sale of its chip business to restore its balance sheet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ants nurse wounded warriors back to health: studyAfrican Matabele ants dress the wounds of comrades injured during hunting raids and nurse them back to health, according to an "astonishing" discovery reported Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Uber loss leapt in 2017 as final quarter showed hopeRide-share titan Uber on Tuesday revealed that its losses last year swelled despite signs in the final three months that it was stemming the red ink.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hunting wolves in Serbia's southern forestsRifle fire rips through the silence of the forest and fields on the slopes of Jastrebac mountain in southern Serbia. Two wolves have just fallen victim to a legal hunt.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US IPO for Baidu video unit as Q4 net income flattensChinese search engine giant Baidu will spin off its Netflix-like video arm iQiyi and list it in the US market, the company said in a statement that revealed its net profit grew only one percent during the fourth quarter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Major Xerox investor sues to block takeover by FujifilmOne of Xerox's biggest shareholders filed suit Tuesday to challenge the US photocopier and printer maker's planned takeover by Japanese technology firm Fujifilm.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Report: Fertilizer, manure top Lake Erie phosphorus sourcesA U.S.-Canadian agency says there's little doubt that commercial fertilizer and manure are the top sources of phosphorus pollution in western Lake Erie.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Decoding behavioral variation in ant clonesGenetically identical clonal ants show surprising diversity in their attraction to sweetness, according to new research in the journal Royal Society Open Science. While differences in behavior and preferences among a species are usually attributed to genetic variation, the cause of multiple phenotypes is less clear-cut for ants that are identical clones.
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Science | The Guardian

Detailed thermal imaging reveals heat map of a badminton player – videoTechnology behind thermal imaging is advancing, enabling cameras to produce a detailed heat map of the human body. In this sequence the blood vessels of a badminton player can been seen expanding, becoming brighter and lighter as the body becomes hotter with movement Hot stuff: the thermal cameras giving us a new way of seeing our bodies Photography: Robert Hollingworth Camera loan: FLIR Thanks t
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Science | The Guardian

Why do women talk so much? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Nichi HodgsonEvery day millions of people ask Google life’s most difficult questions. Our writers answer some of the commonest queries ‘A woman’s tongue wags like a lamb’s tail”, so an old English saying goes, and if you deign to type “why do women …” into Google’s search bar, the search engine will finish your sentence accordingly with “talk so much”. We’ve been brought up to believe that women are the talkat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fighting for love: Dominant male pheasants learn fasterDominant male pheasants learn faster than their downtrodden rivals, new research shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Polar vortex defies climate change in the SoutheastOverwhelming scientific evidence has demonstrated that our planet is getting warmer due to climate change, yet parts of the eastern U.S. are actually getting cooler. According to a Dartmouth-led study in Geophysical Research Letters, the location of this anomaly, known as the "U.S. warming hole," is a moving target.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Carefully managed fire can promote rare savanna speciesCarefully managed fires generate the maximum diversity of birds and mammals in savannas, new research from the University of York suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cover crops in nitrogen's circle of lifeA circle of life-and nitrogen-is playing out in farms across the United States. And researchers are trying to get the timing right.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Excess emissions' make significant contribution to air pollutionWhen Hurricane Harvey struck Texas in August, industrial facilities in the state shut down, then reopened a few days later. In doing so, they produced nearly 2,000 tons of "excess emissions"—air pollutants in addition to what was allowed as part of their normal operation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scalable and cost-effective manufacturing of thin film devicesEngineers at Rutgers University-New Brunswick and Oregon State University are developing a new method of processing nanomaterials that could lead to faster and cheaper manufacturing of flexible thin film devices - from touch screens to window coatings, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Carefully managed fire can promote rare savanna speciesIn the first continent-wide study of the effects of fire on bird and mammal diversity in the African savanna environment, researchers have found that increasing 'pyrodiversity' boosts the variety of species of mammals by around 20 percent and of birds by 30 percent in savannas with high rainfall.
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Science | The Guardian

Watch ants rescue their wounded comrades – videoResearchers have observed African Matabele ants treating their wounded comrades. The ants, frequently injured by termites, appear to apply an antibiotic saliva to the wounds of their injured. Nursing in nature: Matabele ants observed treating injured comrades Continue reading...
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Ingeniøren

100 dage tilbage: Her er en GDPR-guide til junglen af ændringer i databeskyttelseDatabeskyttelsesforordningen nærmer sig – Version2 giver dig her et overblik over de vigtigste ændringer, som træder i kraft den 25. maj.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Target of rapamycin: Linking cytosolic and chloroplast ribosome biogenesis in plantsScientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have found that eukaryotic and bacterial growth regulation systems of independent origins are connected to the control of chloroplast rRNA transcription in a primitive red alga.
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Science | The Guardian

Vaginal mesh implants: new material could reduce complicationsAlternative material could replace current controversial implants, which have prompted many complaints of pain and discomfort Scientists believe they have come up with an alternative to the material used in vaginal mesh implants which prompted a huge number of women to complain they had been left in severe pain. Related: Vaginal mesh implants: 'If I lift my leg my whole body shakes' Continue read
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Science | The Guardian

'Evolution in real time': silent crickets still singing for a mateScientists are fascinated that Hawaiian crickets still perform their vigorous mating call, despite having evolved to lose their song to avoid a deadly new parasite Male field crickets traditionally attract a mate by “singing” – creating a sound by rhythmically scraping their wings back and forth. In Hawaii, however, their song attracts a less welcome female: parasitic flies, whose larvae devour a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rutgers-led innovation could spur faster, cheaper, nano-based manufacturingEngineers at Rutgers University-New Brunswick and Oregon State University are developing a new method of processing nanomaterials that could lead to faster and cheaper manufacturing of flexible thin film devices -- from touch screens to window coatings, according to a new study. The 'intense pulsed light sintering' method uses high-energy light over an area nearly 7,000 times larger than a laser t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Excess emissions' make significant contribution to air pollutionA study by Indiana University researchers shows that excess emissions -- which occur with plant shut-downs, start-ups and malfunctions, and not just in connection with natural disasters -- can make serious contributions to overall air pollution.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cover crops in nitrogen's circle of lifeA circle of life-and nitrogen-is playing out in farms across the United States. And researchers are trying to get the timing right. The goal is to time nutrient release from cover crops to better match the nutrient needs of specific cash crops.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Suiker's equations prevent 3-D-printed walls from collapsing or falling over3-D-printed materials commonly are soft and flexible during printing, leaving printed walls susceptible to collapse or falling over. Professor Akke Suiker had a Eureka moment and saw the solution to this structural problem. He developed a model with which engineers can now easily determine the dimensions and printing speeds for which printed wall structures remain stable. His formulae are so eleme
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Climb stairs to lower blood pressure and strengthen leg musclesIf you don't have the time or money for aerobic and resistance training, why not try climbing the stairs? A new study demonstrates that stair climbing not only lowers blood pressure but also builds leg strength, especially in postmenopausal women with estrogen deficiencies who are more susceptible to vascular and muscle problems. The study results are published online today in Menopause, the journ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Safe-sleep recommendations for infants have not reduced sudden deaths in newbornsAn analysis by investigators from MassGeneral Hospital for Children and Newton-Wellesley Hospital of trends in sudden unexpected infant death finds that the drop in such deaths that took place following release of the 1992 American Academy of Pediatrics 'back to sleep' recommendations, did not occur in infants in the first month of life.
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New on MIT Technology Review

“We’re in a diversity crisis”: cofounder of Black in AI on what’s poisoning algorithms in our livesTimnit Gebru looks around the AI world and sees almost no one who looks like her. That’s a problem for all of us.
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Big Think

Caffeine reduces brain blood flow. So how does it energize our minds?While more controlled psychostimulants like amphetamines and cocaine facilitate a rush of blood to the whole brain, caffeine actually restricts blood flow overall. Read More
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Ingeniøren

Undersøgelse: Headhuntere har fået et nyt yndlingsbytteSelv med få års erfaring bliver flertallet af projektledere forsøgt forført af rekrutteringsagenter fra andre firmaer. Det viser en ny undersøgelse blandt medlemmerne af IDA’s projektlederpanel. Læs også, hvordan du nærmer dig rollen som projektleder.
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Ingeniøren

Transportminister modsiger den officielle fremskrivning: Vi får elbiler langt hurtigereEnergistyrelsens prognose viser, at kun fire pct. af bilerne på de danske veje vil køre på strøm i 2030. Den vil transportminister Ole Birk Olesen (LA) dog ikke stirre sig blind på, for han ser selv på bilproducenternes investeringer og bruger sin sunde fornuft til at konkludere, at elbilerne kom...
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NYT > Science

Australia Diary: Missing a Blue-Tongued FriendA reader discovers her husband had a loyal companion while tending to his garden.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Building a DNA barcode library for the Canadian flora using herbarium collectionsResearchers have built a DNA barcode library for the vascular plant flora of Canada based entirely on herbarium collections. DNA barcode libraries are important to facilitate plant identification for a variety of studies including analysis and regulation of supplements, food, and environmental or ancient DNA. The scale of the study surpasses previous library-building efforts, providing barcodes fo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can't buy me love: Materialism in marriage linked to devaluation of marriageResearchers have provided more insight into what may be one of the roots of the dissatisfaction caused by materialism -- a diminished view of the importance of marriage itself.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New turbulent transport modeling shows multiscale fluctuations in heated plasmaResearchers used a 'reduced physics' fluid model of plasma turbulence to explain unexpected properties of the density profile inside a tokamak experiment. Modeling plasma's turbulent behavior could help scientists optimize the tokamak performance in future fusion reactors like ITER.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genetic limits threaten chickpeas, a globally critical foodScientists have discovered an extreme lack of genetic diversity and other threats to the future adaptability of domestic chickpeas, the primary source of protein of 20 percent of the world's people. But they also collected wild relatives of chickpeas in Turkey that hold great promise as a source of new genes for traits like drought-resistance, resistance to pod-boring beetles, and heat tolerance.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Beetle Liberation Due to RegurgitationThe bombardier beetle can spray its hot brew of toxic chemicals even after bring swallowed, to force a predator into vomiting it back out. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News

Ants care for wounded comrades by licking their wounds cleanIf a Matabele ant loses a limb in a battle with termites, its nestmates will tend its injuries - a behaviour never before seen in any non-human animal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ketone drink could help diabetics by lowering blood sugarFor the first time it has been shown that drinking a ketone supplement can lower blood sugar levels, presenting a potential future method to control spikes in blood sugar experienced by diabetics.
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Feed: All Latest

The 'Black Panther' Director of Photography Is a Cinematic SuperheroRachel Morrison is the first female cinematographer to be nominated for an Academy Award—and continues to blaze a trail.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New vaginal mesh material could help thousands of women affected by life changing complicationsScientists from the University of Sheffield have developed a material that could be used as an alternative to the current vaginal mesh material, polypropylene, used to treat pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fighting for love: Dominant male pheasants learn fasterDominant male pheasants learn faster than their downtrodden rivals, new research shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shorter time between first medical contact to PCI in heart patients linked to saving livesHeart experts are calling for immediate action following new research in the European Heart Journal that shows every minute counts for patients who suffer the most severe type of heart attack. The study shows numbers of deaths rise steadily and rapidly the longer the time between patients' first contact with a medical professional and when they are treated in hospital with percutaneous coronary in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medical care for wounded antsAnts dress the wounds their mates have suffered in battle. Such behavior is believed to be unique among animals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diet or regular? Decoding behavioral variation in ant clonesClonal ants appear to be diverse in responding to sweetened water, suggesting epigenetic regulation in behavioral variation and colony survival.
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Science | The Guardian

'Paramedic ants' observed treating injured comradesThe social insects have been seen cleaning wounds and possibly administering antibiotics to prevent infection When the battle is done the victors head home, their march broken only to gather the wounded, who are hauled back to base for life-saving treatment. Not a heroic scene from the second world war, but the daily grind for African Matabele ants, which leave their nests in the hundreds to laun
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain imaging helps redefine intelligenceNYU Langone study offers the first solid evidence that functional MRI scans of brain entropy are a new means to understanding human intelligence.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Newly discovered gene may protect against heart diseaseScientists have identified a gene that may play a protective role in preventing heart disease. Their research revealed that the gene, called MeXis, acts within key cells inside clogged arteries to help remove excess cholesterol from blood vessels.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What is a 'normal' blood pressure response during exercise testing?New data suggest that the guidelines used to evaluate an individual's peak blood pressure response during cardiopulmonary exercise testing, which were last updated in 1996 and help doctors screen for hypertension and cardiovascular disease, may need to be revised.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ocean winds influence seal pup migrationScientists have confirmed what native Alaskans have observed for centuries -- maritime winds influence the travel patterns of northern fur seal pups. New research shows strong winds can potentially displace seal pups by hundreds of kilometers during their first winter migration.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

PFASs, chemicals commonly found in environment, may interfere with body weight regulationA class of chemicals used in many industrial and consumer products was linked with greater weight gain after dieting, particularly among women, according to a new study. The chemicals -- perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) -- have been linked with cancer, hormone disruption, immune dysfunction, high cholesterol, and obesity.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Shipping noise can disturb porpoises and disrupt their mealtimeNoise from ships may disturb harbor porpoises enough to keep them from getting the food they need.
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Futurity.org

Product labels like ‘Fair Trade’ mean less than you’d thinkBuying ethically sourced products is not as straightforward as it might seem, according to the first large-scale analysis of sustainable sourcing practices. Imagine, for example, you want some chocolate. You scan the market shelf for a bar with a Fair Trade or Rainforest Alliance certification because you don’t want your indulgence to drive labor abuse and deforestation. It’s the right thing to d
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: How Cockroaches Crash Into Walls and Keep GoingThe ability of the ancient pests may owe less to their speed than to their tough-shock absorbent exoskeletons. The finding could help engineers design tougher robots.
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NYT > Science

Debunked: The Strange Tale of Pope Gregory and the RabbitsScientists have often recounted a story about the domestication of rabbits involving a pope and Lent. But it’s just not true.
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Futurity.org

Millennials don’t want to delay spouse, house, kidsMillennials are marrying, buying homes, and starting families later in life. But this group—young adults in their 20s and 30s—hope to reach important life goals at the same age as previous generations, including those now in their 60s, 70s, and older, according to a new study . Researchers found that the ideal timing of major milestones has remained relatively constant across generations. “Millen
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Futurity.org

This part of the brain makes fear come flooding backA new discovery pinpoints the part of the brain that triggers fear relapse, a finding that could advance the treatment of disorders like post-traumatic stress disorder. “Patients often undergo exposure therapy to reduce their fear of situations and stimuli associated with trauma,” says Steve Maren, professor of psychological and brain sciences at Texas A&M University. “Although exposure therapy i
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NYT > Science

Anne Treisman, Who Studied How We Perceive, Dies at 82Her theories on how the brain sorts the avalanche of sensory input it receives to focus on a particular thing have been foundational in the field.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Polar vortex defies climate change in the Southeast U.S.Overwhelming scientific evidence has demonstrated that our planet is getting warmer due to climate change, yet parts of the eastern US are actually getting cooler. According to a new study, the location of this anomaly, known as the 'US warming hole,' is a moving target. During the winter and spring, the US warming hole sits over the Southeast, as the polar vortex allows arctic air to plunge into
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Surgical infections linked to drug-resistant bugs, study suggestsPeople having surgery in low income countries are more likely to develop an infection than those in wealthier nations, which may be linked to drug-resistant bacteria, research led by the University of Edinburgh suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Surgical infections linked to drug-resistant bugs, study suggestsPatients having surgery in low income countries are more likely to develop an infection than those in wealthier nations, which may be linked to drug-resistant bacteria, research suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pimavanserin: Relief from psychosis in dementia, without devastating side-effectsNew research led by the University of Exeter Medical School, and published today in Lancet Neurology found that pimavanserin significantly improves psychosis symptoms in people with the condition, without the devastating side-effects of currently used antipsychotics. The research found an even greater benefit in those with the most severe psychotic symptoms.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Full of PotentialWhat We’re Following Security Issues: Top officials from the NSA, the CIA, the FBI, and other agencies told the Senate Intelligence Committee that Russia plans to interfere with America’s upcoming midterm elections after successfully targeting some states’ voter data in 2018. While the officials called for “a national cry” to inform and warn the public, implementing protections may be up to Presi
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Live Science

The ‘Screaming Mummy’ Was a Murderer Who Killed HimselfHe's back. Prince Pentawere, a man who tried (probably successfully) to murder his own father, Pharaoh Ramesses III, is back in the news for a "screaming mummy" exhibit.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Facial attraction: Red-fronted lemurs recognize photos of their own speciesWild red-fronted lemurs (Eulemur rufrifrons) appear to be able to recognize individuals belonging to the same species (conspecifics) from photographs, a study suggests.
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Popular Science

WATCH: 24 of the most famous space launches everSpace SpaceX's Falcon Heavy test is just the latest. On February 6, SpaceX tested its Falcon Heavy rocket, the largest since NASA's Saturn V. In honor of that, here are 24 of the most famous space launches ever.
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Live Science

China's Secretive Stealth Fighter Is Finally Combat-ReadyChina announced that the J-20, a plane to rival the American F-35, has entered service in the People's Liberation Army with "comprehensive combat capabilities."
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: The Wray We WereToday in 5 Lines During a Senate Intelligence Committee hearing on global threats facing the United States, Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats said he expects Russia will try to disrupt the upcoming midterm elections. FBI Director Chris Wray said President Trump has not “specifically directed” the intelligence community’s efforts to counter future Russian meddling. Wray also told lawmake
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The Atlantic

The Great Senate Immigration Debate That Wasn'tThis was supposed to be the week when the Senate strutted its stuff, when the vaunted committee of 100 held an open, freewheeling debate to resolve—for now—the weighty issue of immigration and the fate of 700,000 young undocumented immigrants whose protection from deportation could soon expire. There would be no precooked deals foisted upon senators by their leadership, no pointless political gra
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The Atlantic

When Deplorability Is No Longer a DealbreakerLast month, Mollie Hemingway, the Fox News contributor and senior editor at The Federalist , declared herself a Donald Trump supporter for the first time. “I wasn’t a Trump supporter,” the headline of her Washington Post op-ed stated. “I am now.” She cited his actions on judicial nominees, climate policy, regulatory reform, tax cuts, guidelines on how colleges should adjudicate sexual assault, an
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: Some Songbirds Have Brains Specially Designed to Find Mates for LifeSystems in the brains of male and female songbirds are well-developed and finely tuned, but the wiring is different.
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New Scientist - News

Opioid painkillers are prescribed more in northern EnglandThe opioid crisis may have crossed the Atlantic, with signs that opioid painkillers are prescribed more in England in socially-deprived areas in the north
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Newly discovered gene may protect against heart diseaseScientists have identified a gene that may play a protective role in preventing heart disease. Their research revealed that the gene, called MeXis, acts within key cells inside clogged arteries to help remove excess cholesterol from blood vessels.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Genes could record forensic clues to time of deathScientists have found predictable patterns in the way our genetic machinery winds down after death.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Understanding a fly's body temperature may help people sleep betterIn findings that one day may help people sleep better, scientists have uncovered the first molecular evidence that two anciently conserved proteins in the brains of insects and mammals share a common biological ancestry as regulators of body temperature rhythms crucial to metabolism and sleep. The scientists study fruit flies (Drosophila) and mice to solve mysteries about body temperature rhythms
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cost-reduction roadmap outlines two pathways to meet DOE residential solar cost target for 2030Leveraging cost-reduction opportunities in the roof replacement or new construction markets for residential photovoltaic installations could help the United States meet the US Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Office residential solar photovoltaic cost target by 2030.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Palm oil in your Valentine's chocolate? BewareA diet rich in saturated fat and sugar not only leads to obesity, it creates inflammation in the nucleus accumbens, a part of the brain that controls mood and the feeling of reward. And this inflammation can lead to depressive, anxious and compulsive behavior and disrupt metabolism,according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New method maps the dopamine system in Parkinson’s patientsWith the aid of a PET camera, researchers have developed a new method for investigating the dopamine system in the brains of patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease. The method measures levels of a protein called dopamine transporter and could lead to improved diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease and the development of new treatments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Three's company: New alloy sets magnetism benchmarkSpintronics leverages electron spins to enhance solid-state devices by prolonging battery life. Spintronic developments, however, are increasingly running up against the Slater-Pauling limit, the maximum for how tightly a material can pack its magnetization. Now, a new thin film is poised to break through this decades-old benchmark. Researchers now discuss their work constructing a stable thin fil
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fashion waste turned into multifunctional materialA research team has devised a fast, cheap and green method to convert fashion waste into highly compressible and ultralight cotton aerogels.
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Big Think

New California ballot initiative could create a utopia for non-evidence based scienceIf a new ballot initiative receives enough signatures California could become a new haven for non-evidence based science. Read More
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New on MIT Technology Review

A Siri scriptwriter says composing lines for AI is like writing an “absurdist play”
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The Atlantic

Trump’s Top Intelligence Officials Contradict Him on Russian MeddlingThe country’s leading intelligence officials said Tuesday that Russia intends to interfere in the upcoming midterm elections. But they wouldn’t discuss in an open setting what the U.S. intelligence community is doing to stop it—or how it could be combatted without the support of the White House. “There should be no doubt that Russia perceives its past efforts as successful and views the 2018 U.S.
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The Scientist RSS

Gene Activity Could Give Clues to Time of DeathRNA-sequencing data reveal that specific tissues have distinct changes in gene expression after an individual has passed away.
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New on MIT Technology Review

These hackers can help cut your company’s insurance bill
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists identify factors which drive the evolution of herbicide resistanceScientists have identified factors which are driving the evolution of herbicide resistance in crops -- something which could also have an impact on medicine as well as agriculture.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Motion capture-like technology for tracking protein shapeResearchers have demonstrated a motion capture-like technology that tracks how proteins fold and change shape using fluorescent probes. The research could lead to improvements in drugs used to treat neurodegenerative diseases, as well as new methods of imaging that may also allow for earlier detection.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breaking local symmetry: Why water freezes but silica forms a glassResearchers have simulated water and silica at low temperature. Despite structural similarities, the two liquids act differently when they are cooled: water freezes into ice, while silica continues to supercool, and eventually forms a glass. This arises from poor symmetry-breaking in silica; although atoms arrange properly in the first shell in both liquids, local rotational symmetry is harder to
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Improved prediction of pesticide residuesThe use of pesticides can lead to a build-up of toxic and ecologically harmful residues in the soil. Until recently, it was not possible to ascertain in detail to which pesticides this applies and to what extent. Now, researchers have developed a model which allows the formation of potentially toxic residues to be more accurately predicted.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rapid decompression key to making low-density liquid waterWater is so common that we take it for granted. Yet water also has very strange properties compared to most other liquids. In addition to ordinary water and water vapor, or steam, there are at least 17 forms of water ice, and two proposed forms of super-cooled liquid water. New work from high-pressure geophysicists finds evidence of the long-theorized, difficult-to-see low-density liquid phase of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Oregon woman first known case of human infected with cattle eyeworm speciesA 26-year-old Oregon woman was the first known case of a human being infected with the cattle eyeworm Thelazia gulosa, which normally affects large animals. She was likely infected while being around cows near her rural home, experts conclude.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Kidney stones on the riseKidney stones are a painful health condition, often requiring multiple procedures at great discomfort to the patient. Growing evidence suggests that the incidence of kidney stones is increasing steadily, especially in women. Researchers investigated the rise in stone formers to determine if this is a new trend, or simply an improvement in the way kidney stones are detected.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Predictors for infidelity and divorceNew research highlights ways to keep love and also identifies clear predictors for failed relationships.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Obesity associated with longer survival for men with metastatic melanomaObese patients with metastatic melanoma who are treated with targeted or immune therapies live significantly longer than those with a normal body mass index (BMI), investigators report.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Polar vortex defies climate change in the SoutheastOverwhelming scientific evidence has demonstrated that our planet is getting warmer due to climate change, yet parts of the eastern US are actually getting cooler. According to a Dartmouth-led study in Geophysical Research Letters, the location of this anomaly, known as the 'US warming hole,' is a moving target. During the winter and spring, the US warming hole sits over the Southeast, as the pola
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain imaging helps redefine intelligenceNYU Langone study offers the first solid evidence that functional MRI scans of brain entropy are a new means to understanding human intelligence.
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Live Science

Why Is It So Easy to Cheat at the Olympics?Thousands of athletes are getting away with doping. Here's how they exploit the system.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A piece of Mars is going homeSpaceX Tesla E. MuskA chunk of Mars will soon be returning home.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Materialism in marriage linked to devaluation of marriage: studyMadonna may have loved living in a material world as a material girl, but a recent study shows that married couples should avoid living according to this '80s jam at all costs.
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Science : NPR

Candy Heart Messages Getting Stale? Computer-Generated Options Are No HelpComputer programs known as neural networks learn by example. So a researcher plugged in some typical Valentine's Day candy heart messages — and got some weird new word combos. "BEAR WIG," anyone? (Image credit: Melissa Deakin Photography/Getty Images)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New turbulent transport modeling shows multiscale fluctuations in heated plasmaResearchers at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility, a DOE Office of Science user facility operated by General Atomics, used a "reduced physics" fluid model of plasma turbulence to explain unexpected properties of the density profile inside a tokamak experiment. Modeling plasma's turbulent behavior could help scientists optimize the tokamak performance in future fusion reactors like ITER.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

True to type: From human biopsy to complex gut physiology on a chipThe small intestine is the main site where we digest and absorb nutrients and minerals from food, and it is also a place where many intestinal infections occur and digestive and inflammatory disorders manifest themselves. To better understand the intestine in its normal and pathological states, researchers have created "organoids" by isolating intestinal stem cells from human biopsy samples. These
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Presence, persistence of estrogens in vernal pools an emerging concernEstrogens in treated wastewater that find their way into temporary wetlands known as vernal pools persist for weeks or even months, according to researchers, who suggest that persistence may have implications for these critical aquatic habitats.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cabozantinib shows promise as first line treatment for differentiated thyroid cancerA kinase inhibitor called cabozantinib could be a viable therapy option for patients with metastatic, radioactive iodine-resistant thyroid cancer. In a recent trial tumors shrunk in 34 out of 35 patients who took the drug, and more than half of those patients saw the tumor size decrease by more than 30 percent.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mending broken hearts -- by reprogramming cellsScientists have reprogrammed ordinary cells called fibroblasts into new and healthy heart muscle cells, and recorded changes that appear to be necessary for this reprogramming.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Pride tops guilt as a motivator for environmental decisionsA lot of pro-environmental messages suggest that people will feel guilty if they don't make an effort to live more sustainably or takes steps to ameliorate climate change. But a recent study finds that highlighting the pride people will feel if they take such actions may be a better way to change environmental behaviors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sex differences in lifespan: X chromosome not the reasonThe shorter average lifespan of males compared to females appears not to be a result of the fact that males have only one X chromosome. This is the conclusion from a research study on fruit flies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Screening for ovarian cancer not recommendedThe US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends against screening for ovarian cancer in women without symptoms and who are not known to be at high risk (such as those who have certain hereditary cancer syndromes that increase the risk for ovarian cancer).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

World's biggest city database shines light on our increasingly urbanized planetThe world's largest data platform on cities reveals the planet is even more urbanized than we thought.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Medical cannabis significantly safer for elderly with chronic pain than OpioidsA new study found cannabis therapy is safe and efficacious for elderly patients who are seeking to address cancer symptoms, Parkinson's disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, and other medical issues. After six months, more than 18 percent of patients surveyed had stopped using opioid analgesics or had reduced their dosage.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Light-activated cancer drugs without toxic side effects: Fresh insightFuture cancer drugs that are activated by light and don't cause the toxic side-effects of current chemotherapy treatments are closer to becoming a reality, thanks to new research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study finds depression and fatigue increase women's risk of work-related injuriesWomen who suffer from depression, anxiety, and fatigue are more likely to be injured at work, according to a new study published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine. The study found that these health factors significantly affected women's risk of injury but not men's risk.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

True to type: From human biopsy to complex gut physiology on a chipPublished in Scientific Reports, Donald Ingber's team at the Wyss Institute leverages the organoid approach to isolate intestinal stem cells from human biopsies, but goes on to break up the organoids and culture the patient-specific cells within our Organ Chips where they spontaneously form intestinal villi oriented towards the channel lumen, and the epithelium in close apposition to human intesti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Presence, persistence of estrogens in vernal pools an emerging concernEstrogens in treated wastewater that find their way into temporary wetlands known as vernal pools persist for weeks or even months, according to researchers, who suggest that persistence may have implications for these critical aquatic habitats.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetic limits threaten chickpeas, a globally critical foodScientists have discovered an extreme lack of genetic diversity and other threats to the future adaptability of domestic chickpeas, the primary source of protein of 20 percent of the world's people. But they also collected wild relatives of chickpeas in Turkey that hold great promise as a source of new genes for traits like drought-resistance, resistance to pod-boring beetles, and heat tolerance.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can't buy me love: Materialism in marriage linked to devaluation of marriageResearchers in BYU's School of Family Life have provided more insight into what may be one of the roots of the dissatisfaction caused by materialism -- a diminished view of the importance of marriage itself.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New turbulent transport modeling shows multiscale fluctuations in heated plasmaResearchers at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility used a 'reduced physics' fluid model of plasma turbulence to explain unexpected properties of the density profile inside a tokamak experiment. Modeling plasma's turbulent behavior could help scientists optimize the tokamak performance in future fusion reactors like ITER. They discuss their findings in this week's Physics of Plasmas.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genetic limits threaten chickpeas, a globally critical foodPerhaps you missed the news that the price of hummus has spiked in Great Britain. The cause, as the New York Times reported on February 8: drought in India, resulting in a poor harvest of chickpeas. Far beyond making dips for pita bread, chickpeas are a legume of life-and-death importance—especially in India, Pakistan, and Ethiopia where 1 in 5 of the world's people depend on them as their primary
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Snapping shrimp may act as 'dinner bell' for gray whales off Oregon coastScientists have for the first time captured the sounds of snapping shrimp off the Oregon coast and think the loud crackling from the snapping of their claws may serve as a dinner bell for eastern Pacific gray whales.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Powerful LED-based train headlight optimized for energy savingsResearchers have designed a new LED-based train headlight that uses a tenth of the energy required for headlights using conventional light sources. If operated 8 hours every day, the electricity savings of the new design would reduce emissions of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide by about 152 kilograms per year.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Energy-efficient encryption for the internet of thingsA special-purpose chip hardwired to implement elliptic-curve cryptography in general and the datagram transport layer security protocol in particular reduces power consumption by 99.75 percent and increases speed 500-fold, to help enable the internet of things.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple signs NBA star Durant to produce new TV seriesNBA star Kevin Durant has agreed to co-produce a basketball-themed drama television series that will be part of Apple's original television programming.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ocean winds influence seal pup migrationScientists have confirmed what native Alaskans have observed for centuries - maritime winds influence the travel patterns of northern fur seal pups. New research presented at the Ocean Sciences Meeting here today shows strong winds can potentially displace seal pups by hundreds of kilometers during their first winter migration.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Building a DNA barcode library for the Canadian flora using herbarium collectionsThe dry, mothball-scented stacks of a herbarium might seem to be far away from the cutting edge of plant science. However, the curated plant specimens stored there contain irreplaceable genetic, morphological, ecological, and chemical information just waiting to be analyzed with modern techniques. In a new study in a recent issue of Applications in Plant Sciences, Dr. Maria Kuzmina at the Universi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA's longest running survey of ice shattered records in 2017Last year was a record-breaking one for Operation IceBridge, NASA's aerial survey of the state of polar ice. For the first time in its nine-year history, the mission, which aims to close the gap between two NASA satellite campaigns that study changes in the height of polar ice, carried out seven field campaigns in the Arctic and Antarctic in a single year. In total, the IceBridge scientists and in
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Big Think

Few things are as dangerous as economists with physics envyScientists are supposed to reach their conclusions after doing research and weighing the evidence but, in economics, conclusions can come first, with economists supporting a thesis that fits their moral worldview. Read More
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The Atlantic

Syria's War Is Fueling Three More ConflictsWhen an Israeli jet crashed after being shot down over Syria over the weekend, it marked a serious escalation in the Syrian Civil War. But it also reflected an ongoing reality, one that is growing more dangerous: Syria’s war encompasses at least three other international conflicts, each of which are heating up. In the last few weeks alone, Turkey has clashed with Syrian Kurds and threatened a U.S
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Feed: All Latest

2018 Worldwide Threats Briefing: 5 Takeaways, From Russia to ChinaIn a Senate hearing Tuesday, the heads of the three-letter intelligence agencies detailed their greatest concerns.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

TV's influence on pregnancy, childbirth more powerful than many women admitUC sociology research may reveal a surprisingly stronger-than-expected influence from TV reality shows and other media on pregnant women's perception and management of their pregnancy and childbirth -- possibly impacting more highly educated consumers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists create most sophisticated human liver model yetScientists have developed the most sophisticated mini-livers to date. These organoids can potentially help scientists better understand certain congenital liver diseases as well as speed up efforts to create liver tissue in the lab for transplantation into patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA's longest running survey of ice shattered records in 2017Last year was a record-breaking one for Operation IceBridge, NASA's aerial survey of the state of polar ice.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The virginity fraud | Nina Dølvik Brochmann and Ellen Støkken DahlThe hymen is still the most misunderstood part of the female body. Nina Dølvik Brochmann and Ellen Støkken Dahl share their mission to empower young people through better sex education, debunking the popular (and harmful) myths we're told about female virginity and the hymen.
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Popular Science

China shot down another missile in spaceEastern Arsenal Like a hypersonic bullet hitting another hypersonic bullet. This month, China used a long-range missile to shoot down another long-range missile—in space.
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Live Science

No, Iran, Lizard 'Spies' Can't Detect UraniumDespite outlandish claims by an Iranian military advisor, lizards have no special attributes or skills that would allow them to detect the location of hidden uranium mines.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Building a DNA barcode library for the Canadian flora using herbarium collectionsResearchers have built a DNA barcode library for the vascular plant flora of Canada based entirely on herbarium collections. DNA barcode libraries are important to facilitate plant identification for a variety of studies including analysis and regulation of supplements, food, and environmental or ancient DNA. The scale of the study surpasses previous library-building efforts, providing barcodes fo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ocean winds influence seal pup migrationScientists have confirmed what native Alaskans have observed for centuries -- maritime winds influence the travel patterns of northern fur seal pups. New research presented at the Ocean Sciences Meeting here today shows strong winds can potentially displace seal pups by hundreds of kilometers during their first winter migration.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

BBC to ban single-use plastics by 2020 after Blue Planet IIThe move comes after the 'shocking' scale of plastic waste featured on the Blue Planet II series.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What is a 'normal' blood pressure response during exercise testing?New data from the University of Illinois at Chicago suggest that the guidelines used to evaluate an individual's peak blood pressure response during cardiopulmonary exercise testing, which were last updated in 1996 and help doctors screen for hypertension and cardiovascular disease, may need to be revised.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple CEO leaves investors dangling on future dividend hike (Update)Apple's next big thing will likely be a large dividend increase financed by a tax cut on its overseas profits, but the famously secretive company isn't giving any clues about how big it might be.
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The Atlantic

The Unsinkable Benjamin Netanyahu?Benjamin Netanyahu IsraeliIsraeli police recommended Tuesday that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu be indicted on charges of bribery, fraud, and breach of trust. The announcement signals the culmination of a year-long investigation into the longtime Israeli leader and sparks questions about his ability to remain in power. Netanyahu is insisting he will remain in office. “Over these years, there have been no less than 15
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The Atlantic

Astronomers Are Already Planning for the Next 'Pale Blue Dot'In 1977, humans launched twin robotic probes into space several weeks apart. The two Voyager spacecraft barreled away from Earth for a tour of our planet’s siblings in the solar system. At each encounter, the Voyagers set records for the best-looking pictures of these planets humanity had ever taken, far better than anything seen through a telescope. There was Jupiter , furiously churning with ga
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study finds earthquakes continue for years after gas field wastewater injection stopsEfforts to stop human-caused earthquakes by shutting down wastewater injection wells that serve adjacent oil and gas fields may oversimplify the challenge, according to a new study from seismologists at Southern Methodist University, Dallas.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pregnant women deficient in vitamin D may give birth to obese childrenVitamin D deficiency in pregnant women could preprogram babies to grow into obese children and adults, according to a Keck School of Medicine of USC-led study. Researchers found that 6-year-olds born to mothers with very low vitamin D levels during their first trimester had bigger waists -- about half an inch plumper on average -- than peers whose mothers had enough vitamin D in early pregnancy. T
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cancer-killing virus acts by alerting immune systemA new UC San Francisco study has shown that a cancer-killing ('oncolytic') virus currently in clinical trials may function as a cancer vaccine -- in addition to killing some cancer cells directly, the virus alerts the immune system to the presence of a tumor, triggering a powerful, widespread immune response that kills cancer cells far outside the virus-infected region.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chemical cluster could transform energy storage for large electrical gridsResearchers at the University of Rochester and University at Buffalo believe they have found a promising compound that could transform the energy storage landscape. The compound has properties that make it an ideal candidate material for redox flow batteries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SMU study finds earthquakes continue for years after gas field wastewater injection stopsShutting down oil and gas wastewater injection wells may not stop human-induced earthquakes quickly, say seismologists at Southern Methodist University, Dallas. The scientists analyzed earthquakes at DFW Airport that began in 2008 and found that even though wastewater injection was halted after a year, earthquakes continued for at least seven more years. They concluded that high-volume injection,
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Big Think

Study links 4/20 to an increase in deadly car crashesU.S. drivers faced a 12% greater risk of dying in a car crash on April 20 over the past 25 years. The likely explanation? High drivers. Read More
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Big Think

Are action films snubbed at the Oscars?Are there really no good action and adventure films anymore, or is there an inherent bias toward them? Read More
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Popular Science

We're told to fear robots. But why do we think they'll turn on us?Technology The robot uprising is a myth. Digital doomsayers have told us to fear robots. But why should we believe beings of our own making will turn on us?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain sciences researcher pinpoints brain circuit that triggers fear relapseScientists have made a breakthrough discovery in the process of fear relapse.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Intensive agriculture influences US regional summer climate, study findsScientists agree that changes in land use such as deforestation, not just emissions of greenhouse gases, can play a significant role altering the world's climate systems. Now, a new study reveals how another type of land use, intensive agriculture, can impact regional climate.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Plants feel the heat, especially at nightScientists have solved a 79-year-old mystery by discovering how plants vary their response to heat stress depending on the time of day. This understanding could help with breeding commercial crops able to produce higher yields in hotter climates as predicted under climate change.
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NYT > Science

Finding a Lost Strain of Rice, and Clues to Slave CookingThe search for the missing grain led to Trinidad and Thomas Jefferson, and now excitement among African-American chefs.
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Big Think

Hidden on the Falcon Heavy were the first books for a space libraryOnboard Elon Musks’s Tesla Roadster were hidden the first books of of a library in space. Read More
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The Atlantic

How the White House Gamed the Security-Clearance SystemThe Rob Porter fiasco has exposed the White House’s duplicity, disorganization, and disregard for domestic violence, but it has also exposed some of the issues with the system for granting security clearance to federal employees. Until his abrupt resignation last week amid allegations of physical and verbal abuse by two ex-wives , Porter had served as staff secretary, handling classified material
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gene expression patterns may help determine time of deathInternational team of scientists shows that changes in gene expression in different tissues can be used to predict the time of death of individuals. Their results may have implications for forensic analyses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Shifting shorelines at Lake Tahoe caused by ancient lava damsPleistocene basaltic lavas form a small volcanic field that was erupted from seven vents in the northwestern Lake Tahoe basin. Most of these lavas were erupted above the water and produced lava flows that dammed the lake outlet and flowed into an early Lake Tahoe. The resulting steam explosions produced deltas composed of fragmental deposits as well as pillow lavas.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Missing link to novel superconductivity revealedScientists have discovered a state of magnetism that may be the missing link to understanding the relationship between magnetism and unconventional superconductivity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

One or more soda a day could decrease chances of getting pregnantA new study has found that the intake of one or more sugar-sweetened beverages per day -- by either partner -- is associated with a decreased chance of getting pregnant.
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Big Think

Mini ice age? Why the Sun will lose 7% of its power in about 30 yearsBrrrrrrr. Read More
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

An evolutionary perspective on nutrition and social decision making [Social Sciences]We were intrigued by findings reported by Strang et al. (1) that the balance of carbohydrate to protein in a breakfast preparation influenced subsequent human social decision making. Specifically, compared with a low-carbohydrate/high-protein breakfast, consumption of a high-carbohydrate/low-protein breakfast increased participants’ tendency to punish violations of social norms, assessed as...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Raison and Raichlen: Why does nutrition impact social decision making? [Social Sciences]In our PNAS article (1), we show how the macronutrient composition of a meal can impact social decision making. Specifically, with a greater protein intake, participants' plasma tyrosine levels were elevated, which resulted in a more tolerant participants’ response toward unfair offers. In other words, with a greater carbohydrate intake,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Weighing the evidence for a body mass-regulating gravitostat [Biological Sciences]The intriguing paper by Jansson et al. (1) reports the identification of a body mass-regulating homeostat that operates in rodents independently of leptin. In response to implantation of capsules weighing 15% of body weight the authors observed that ∼80% of this load was offset by a reduction in biological body...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Reply to Lund: Where does the gravitostat fit in? [Biological Sciences]We appreciate the thoughtful reflection by Jens Lund (1) on different aspects of our recent article in PNAS (2). Lund is right to point out that results from studies of the effects of hypergravity on body mass and body fat in rodents support the gravitostat hypothesis (2). Hypergravity and increased...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

On the complex dynamics of savanna landscapes [Applied Mathematics]Simple mathematical models can exhibit rich and complex behaviors. Prototypical examples of these drawn from biology and other disciplines have provided insights that extend well beyond the situations that inspired them. Here, we explore a set of simple, yet realistic, models for savanna–forest vegetation dynamics based on minimal ecological assumptions....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

RNA force field with accuracy comparable to state-of-the-art protein force fields [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation has become a powerful tool for characterizing at an atomic level of detail the conformational changes undergone by proteins. The application of such simulations to RNA structures, however, has proven more challenging, due in large part to the fact that the physical models (“force fields”) available...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Landau-Ginzburg theory of cortex dynamics: Scale-free avalanches emerge at the edge of synchronization [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Understanding the origin, nature, and functional significance of complex patterns of neural activity, as recorded by diverse electrophysiological and neuroimaging techniques, is a central challenge in neuroscience. Such patterns include collective oscillations emerging out of neural synchronization as well as highly heterogeneous outbursts of activity interspersed by periods of quiescence,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Superresolution imaging of individual replication forks reveals unexpected prodrug resistance mechanism [Chemistry]Many drugs require extensive metabolism en route to their targets. High-resolution visualization of prodrug metabolism should therefore utilize analogs containing a small modification that does not interfere with its metabolism or mode of action. In addition to serving as mechanistic probes, such analogs provide candidates for theranostics when applied in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Wireless optoelectronic photometers for monitoring neuronal dynamics in the deep brain [Engineering]Capabilities for recording neural activity in behaving mammals have greatly expanded our understanding of brain function. Some of the most sophisticated approaches use light delivered by an implanted fiber-optic cable to optically excite genetically encoded calcium indicators and to record the resulting changes in fluorescence. Physical constraints induced by the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Auxetic metamaterials from disordered networks [Engineering]Recent theoretical work suggests that systematic pruning of disordered networks consisting of nodes connected by springs can lead to materials that exhibit a host of unusual mechanical properties. In particular, global properties such as Poisson’s ratio or local responses related to deformation can be precisely altered. Tunable mechanical responses would...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Light-enabled reversible self-assembly and tunable optical properties of stable hairy nanoparticles [Engineering]The ability to dynamically organize functional nanoparticles (NPs) via the use of environmental triggers (temperature, pH, light, or solvent polarity) opens up important perspectives for rapid and convenient construction of a rich variety of complex assemblies and materials with new structures and functionalities. Here, we report an unconventional strategy for...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

K63 ubiquitylation triggers proteasomal degradation by seeding branched ubiquitin chains [Biochemistry]Different polyubiquitin chain linkages direct substrates toward distinct cellular pathways. K63-linked ubiquitylation is known to regulate proteasome-independent events such as signal transduction, but its function in the context of heterogeneous ubiquitin chains remains unclear. Here, we report that K63 ubiquitylation plays a critical role in proteasome-mediated substrate degradation by serving..
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Identification of Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) binding sites on the branched actin filament nucleator Arp2/3 complex [Biochemistry]Arp2/3 complex nucleates branched actin filaments important for cellular motility and endocytosis. WASP family proteins are Arp2/3 complex activators that play multiple roles in branching nucleation, but little is known about the structural bases of these WASP functions, owing to an incomplete understanding of how WASP binds Arp2/3 complex. Recent...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Molecular basis for the recognition of the human AAUAAA polyadenylation signal [Biochemistry]Nearly all eukaryotic messenger RNA precursors must undergo cleavage and polyadenylation at their 3′-end for maturation. A crucial step in this process is the recognition of the AAUAAA polyadenylation signal (PAS), and the molecular mechanism of this recognition has been a long-standing problem. Here, we report the cryo-electron microscopy structure...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

High integrin {alpha}V{beta}6 affinity reached by hybrid domain deletion slows ligand-binding on-rate [Biochemistry]The role of the hybrid domain in integrin affinity regulation is unknown, as is whether the kinetics of ligand binding is modulated by integrin affinity state. Here, we compare cell surface and soluble integrin αVβ6 truncation mutants for ligand-binding affinity, kinetics, and thermodynamics. Removal of the integrin transmembrane/cytoplasmic domains or...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structures and mechanism of dipeptidyl peptidases 8 and 9, important players in cellular homeostasis and cancer [Biochemistry]Dipeptidyl peptidases 8 and 9 are intracellular N-terminal dipeptidyl peptidases (preferentially postproline) associated with pathophysiological roles in immune response and cancer biology. While the DPP family member DPP4 is extensively characterized in molecular terms as a validated therapeutic target of type II diabetes, experimental 3D structures and ligand-/substrate-binding modes of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mechanism of inhibition of retromer transport by the bacterial effector RidL [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Retrograde vesicle trafficking pathways are responsible for returning membrane-associated components from endosomes to the Golgi apparatus and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and they are critical for maintaining organelle identity, lipid homeostasis, and many other cellular functions. The retrograde transport pathway has emerged as an important target for intravacuolar bacterial pathogens....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Structure of the fission yeast actomyosin ring during constriction [Cell Biology]Cell division in many eukaryotes is driven by a ring containing actin and myosin. While much is known about the main proteins involved, the precise arrangement of actin filaments within the contractile machinery, and how force is transmitted to the membrane, remains unclear. Here we use cryosectioning and cryofocused ion...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

LncRNA IDH1-AS1 links the functions of c-Myc and HIF1{alpha} via IDH1 to regulate the Warburg effect [Cell Biology]The oncoprotein c-Myc plays an important role in regulating glycolysis under normoxia; yet, in cancer cells, HIF1α, which is essential for driving glycolysis under hypoxia, is often up-regulated even in the presence of oxygen. The relationship between these two major regulators of the Warburg effect remains to be fully defined....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

RGMb protects against acute kidney injury by inhibiting tubular cell necroptosis via an MLKL-dependent mechanism [Cell Biology]Tubular cell necrosis is a key histological feature of acute kidney injury (AKI). Necroptosis is a type of programed necrosis, which is executed by mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) upon its binding to the plasma membrane. Emerging evidence indicates that necroptosis plays a critical role in the development of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Arabidopsis mRNA decay landscape arises from specialized RNA decay substrates, decapping-mediated feedback, and redundancy [Cell Biology]The decay of mRNA plays a vital role in modulating mRNA abundance, which, in turn, influences cellular and organismal processes. In plants and metazoans, three distinct pathways carry out the decay of most cytoplasmic mRNAs: The mRNA decapping complex, which requires the scaffold protein VARICOSE (VCS), removes a protective 5′...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Effects of rapamycin on growth hormone receptor knockout mice [Developmental Biology]It is well documented that inhibition of mTORC1 (defined by Raptor), a complex of mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), extends life span, but less is known about the mechanisms by which mTORC2 (defined by Rictor) impacts longevity. Here, rapamycin (an inhibitor of mTOR) was used in GHR-KO (growth hormone receptor...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Farming the mitochondrial ancestor as a model of endosymbiotic establishment by natural selection [Evolution]The origin of mitochondria was a major evolutionary transition leading to eukaryotes, and is a hotly debated issue. It is unknown whether mitochondria were acquired early or late, and whether it was captured via phagocytosis or syntrophic integration. We present dynamical models to directly simulate the emergence of mitochondria in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Loss of Capicua alters early T cell development and predisposes mice to T cell lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma [Genetics]Capicua (CIC) regulates a transcriptional network downstream of the RAS/MAPK signaling cascade. In Drosophila, CIC is important for many developmental processes, including embryonic patterning and specification of wing veins. In humans, CIC has been implicated in neurological diseases, including spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) and a neurodevelopmental syndrome. Additionally, we...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Male-specific IL-33 expression regulates sex-dimorphic EAE susceptibility [Immunology and Inflammation]The cellular and molecular basis of sex-dimorphic autoimmune diseases, such as the CNS demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS), remains unclear. Our studies in the SJL mouse model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), reveal that sex-determined differences in Il33 expression by innate immune cells in response to myelin peptide immunization...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

OLT1177, a {beta}-sulfonyl nitrile compound, safe in humans, inhibits the NLRP3 inflammasome and reverses the metabolic cost of inflammation [Immunology and Inflammation]Activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome induces maturation of IL-1β and IL-18, both validated targets for treating acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. Here, we demonstrate that OLT1177, an orally active β-sulfonyl nitrile molecule, inhibits activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome. In vitro, nanomolar concentrations of OLT1177 reduced IL-1β and IL-18 release following...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Anti-PD-1/anti-CTLA-4 efficacy in melanoma brain metastases depends on extracranial disease and augmentation of CD8+ T cell trafficking [Immunology and Inflammation]Inhibition of immune checkpoints programmed death 1 (PD-1) and cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) on T cells results in durable antitumor activity in melanoma patients. Despite high frequency of melanoma brain metastases (BrM) and associated poor prognosis, the activity and mechanisms of immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) in metastatic tumors...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Platelets release pathogenic serotonin and return to circulation after immune complex-mediated sequestration [Immunology and Inflammation]There is a growing appreciation for the contribution of platelets to immunity; however, our knowledge mostly relies on platelet functions associated with vascular injury and the prevention of bleeding. Circulating immune complexes (ICs) contribute to both chronic and acute inflammation in a multitude of clinical conditions. Herein, we scrutinized platelet...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

E-cigarette smoke damages DNA and reduces repair activity in mouse lung, heart, and bladder as well as in human lung and bladder cells [Medical Sciences]E-cigarette smoke delivers stimulant nicotine as aerosol without tobacco or the burning process. It contains neither carcinogenic incomplete combustion byproducts nor tobacco nitrosamines, the nicotine nitrosation products. E-cigarettes are promoted as safe and have gained significant popularity. In this study, instead of detecting nitrosamines, we directly measured DNA damage induced...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Disruption of the anaphase-promoting complex confers resistance to TTK inhibitors in triple-negative breast cancer [Medical Sciences]TTK protein kinase (TTK), also known as Monopolar spindle 1 (MPS1), is a key regulator of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which functions to maintain genomic integrity. TTK has emerged as a promising therapeutic target in human cancers, including triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Several TTK inhibitors (TTKis) are being evaluated...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Pyruvate cycle increases aminoglycoside efficacy and provides respiratory energy in bacteria [Microbiology]The emergence and ongoing spread of multidrug-resistant bacteria puts humans and other species at risk for potentially lethal infections. Thus, novel antibiotics or alternative approaches are needed to target drug-resistant bacteria, and metabolic modulation has been documented to improve antibiotic efficacy, but the relevant metabolic mechanisms require more studies. Here,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Superior colliculus neuronal ensemble activity signals optimal rather than subjective confidence [Neuroscience]Recent studies suggest that neurons in sensorimotor circuits involved in perceptual decision-making also play a role in decision confidence. In these studies, confidence is often considered to be an optimal readout of the probability that a decision is correct. However, the information leading to decision accuracy and the report of...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Heterogeneity within the frontoparietal control network and its relationship to the default and dorsal attention networks [Neuroscience]The frontoparietal control network (FPCN) plays a central role in executive control. It has been predominantly viewed as a unitary domain general system. Here, we examined patterns of FPCN functional connectivity (FC) across multiple conditions of varying cognitive demands, to test for FPCN heterogeneity. We identified two distinct subsystems within...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Effects of the ecto-ATPase apyrase on microglial ramification and surveillance reflect cell depolarization, not ATP depletion [Neuroscience]Microglia, the brain’s innate immune cells, have highly motile processes which constantly survey the brain to detect infection, remove dying cells, and prune synapses during brain development. ATP released by tissue damage is known to attract microglial processes, but it is controversial whether an ambient level of ATP is needed...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Restoring GABAergic inhibition rescues memory deficits in a Huntington’s disease mouse model [Neuroscience]Huntington’s disease (HD) is classically characterized as a movement disorder, however cognitive impairments precede the motor symptoms by ∼15 y. Based on proteomic and bioinformatic data linking the Huntingtin protein (Htt) and KCC2, which is required for hyperpolarizing GABAergic inhibition, and the important role of inhibition in learning and memory,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Entorhinal fast-spiking speed cells project to the hippocampus [Neuroscience]The mammalian positioning system contains a variety of functionally specialized cells in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) and the hippocampus. In order for cells in these systems to dynamically update representations in a way that reflects ongoing movement in the environment, they must be able to read out the current...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Path integration in place cells of developing rats [Neuroscience]Place cells in the hippocampus and grid cells in the medial entorhinal cortex rely on self-motion information and path integration for spatially confined firing. Place cells can be observed in young rats as soon as they leave their nest at around 2.5 wk of postnatal life. In contrast, the regularly...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Brain-state dependent astrocytic Ca2+ signals are coupled to both positive and negative BOLD-fMRI signals [Neuroscience]Astrocytic Ca2+-mediated gliovascular interactions regulate the neurovascular network in situ and in vivo. However, it is difficult to measure directly both the astrocytic activity and fMRI to relate the various forms of blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signaling to brain states under normal and pathological conditions. In this study, fMRI and GCaMP-mediated Ca2+...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

TRPV1 channels and the progesterone receptor Sig-1R interact to regulate pain [Pharmacology]The Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) ion channel is expressed in nociceptors where, when activated by chemical or thermal stimuli, it functions as an important transducer of painful and itch-related stimuli. Although the interaction of TRPV1 with proteins that regulate its function has been previously explored, their modulation by...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Phosphatidylinositol-(4, 5)-bisphosphate regulates calcium gating of small-conductance cation channel TMEM16F [Physiology]TMEM16F, which is activated by elevation of intracellular calcium to trigger phospholipid scrambling and the collapse of lipid bilayer asymmetry to mediate important cellular functions such as blood coagulation, also generates a small-conductance calcium-activated cation current. How TMEM16F activation may be regulated is an open question. By recording TMEM16F Ca2+-activated...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

AtCAP2 is crucial for lytic vacuole biogenesis during germination by positively regulating vacuolar protein trafficking [Plant Biology]Protein trafficking is a fundamental mechanism of subcellular organization and contributes to organellar biogenesis. AtCAP2 is an Arabidopsis homolog of the Mesembryanthemum crystallinum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 adaptor protein 2 (McCAP2), a member of the syntaxin superfamily. Here, we show that AtCAP2 plays an important role in the conversion to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Proȷecting one’s own spatial bias onto others during a theory-of-mind task [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Many people show a left-right bias in visual processing. We measured spatial bias in neurotypical participants using a variant of the line bisection task. In the same participants, we measured performance in a social cognition task. This theory-of-mind task measured whether each participant had a processing-speed bias toward the right...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Stimulus generalization as a mechanism for learning to trust [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]How do humans learn to trust unfamiliar others? Decisions in the absence of direct knowledge rely on our ability to generalize from past experiences and are often shaped by the degree of similarity between prior experience and novel situations. Here, we leverage a stimulus generalization framework to examine how perceptual...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Neuronal control of astrocytic respiration through a variant of the Crabtree effect [Neuroscience]Aerobic glycolysis is a phenomenon that in the long term contributes to synaptic formation and growth, is reduced by normal aging, and correlates with amyloid beta deposition. Aerobic glycolysis starts within seconds of neural activity and it is not obvious why energetic efficiency should be compromised precisely when energy demand...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

DJ-1 deficiency impairs synaptic vesicle endocytosis and reavailability at nerve terminals [Neuroscience]Mutations in DJ-1 (PARK7) are a known cause of early-onset autosomal recessive Parkinson’s disease (PD). Accumulating evidence indicates that abnormalities of synaptic vesicle trafficking underlie the pathophysiological mechanism of PD. In the present study, we explored whether DJ-1 is involved in CNS synaptic function. DJ-1 deficiency impaired synaptic vesicle endocytosis...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Robust kinase- and age-dependent dopaminergic and norepinephrine neurodegeneration in LRRK2 G2019S transgenic mice [Neuroscience]Mutations in LRRK2 are known to be the most common genetic cause of sporadic and familial Parkinson’s disease (PD). Multiple lines of LRRK2 transgenic or knockin mice have been developed, yet none exhibit substantial dopamine (DA)-neuron degeneration. Here we develop human tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) promoter-controlled tetracycline-sensitive LRRK2 G2019S (GS) and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Evidence that asymmetry of the membrane/cytoskeletal complex in human red blood cell ghosts is responsible for their biconcave shape [Physiology]The main conclusion of the results reported in this article is that during centrifugation, sphered red blood cell ghosts become oriented in their attachment to a coverslip such that a dense band within the ghosts lies parallel to the centrifugal field. The result of the orientation of this dense band...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Centipedes subdue giant prey by blocking KCNQ channels [Physiology]Centipedes can subdue giant prey by using venom, which is metabolically expensive to synthesize and thus used frugally through efficiently disrupting essential physiological systems. Here, we show that a centipede (Scolopendra subspinipes mutilans, ∼3 g) can subdue a mouse (∼45 g) within 30 seconds. We found that this observation is...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Endoplasmic reticulum acyltransferase with prokaryotic substrate preference contributes to triacylglycerol assembly in Chlamydomonas [Plant Biology]Understanding the unique features of triacylglycerol (TAG) metabolism in microalgae may be necessary to realize the full potential of these organisms for biofuel and biomaterial production. In the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii a chloroplastic (prokaryotic) pathway has been proposed to play a major role in TAG precursor biosynthesis. However,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Economic value of ecological information in ecosystem-based natural resource management depends on exploitation history [Sustainability Science]Ecosystem approaches to natural resource management are seen as a way to provide better outcomes for ecosystems and for people, yet the nature and strength of interactions among ecosystem components is usually unknown. Here we characterize the economic benefits of ecological knowledge through a simple model of fisheries that target...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Murari et al., Climate change and agricultural suicides in India [Correction]LETTER Correction for “Climate change and agricultural suicides in India,” by Kamal Kumar Murari, T. Jayaraman, and Madhura Swaminathan, which was first published December 29, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1714747115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:E115). The editors note that, in the first paragraph, lines 5–6, “an increase in 1 °C temperature in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Das, Unfounded assumptions in linking crop-damaging temperature and suicide in India [Correction]LETTER Correction for “Unfounded assumptions in linking crop-damaging temperature and suicide in India,” by Saudamini Das, which was first published December 29, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1715331115 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 115:E116). The editors note that, in the first paragraph, line 2, “suicides during 1987–2013” should instead appear as “suicides during 1980–2013.”...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Correction for Sanderman et al., Soil carbon debt of 12,000 years of human land use [Correction]SUSTAINABILITY SCIENCE Correction for “Soil carbon debt of 12,000 years of human land use,” by Jonathan Sanderman, Tomislav Hengl, and Gregory J. Fiske, which was first published August 21, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1706103114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:9575–9580). The authors would like to note the following: “We regret that two small...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]How centipedes slay giant prey Golden head centipede attacks a mouse. Centipedes are known to subdue large prey by using potent, broad-acting venom. However, venom synthesis requires substantial metabolic investment, and the mechanisms of action of centipede venoms remain unclear. Lei Luo et al. (pp. 1646–1651) report that a golden...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Profile of Steve Granick [Profiles]Steve Granick says a simple underlying principle—the desire for an interesting life with meaningful human relations—has guided his career. During undergraduate study at Princeton University, Granick majored in sociology, mainly because he was interested in literature, humanities, and social sciences. He took just one obligatory science class—introductory physics—and found it...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Resolving single-actin filaments within the contractile ring of fission yeast [Cell Biology]Cell division is an essential step in the life of all cells. Fungi, amoeboid, and mammalian cells divide by the assembly and constriction of a contractile ring of actin, myosin, and other highly conserved proteins (1). The mechanism of cytokinesis is best understood in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Combined...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Tobacco smoking, E-cigarettes, and nicotine harm [Medical Sciences]Tobacco smoking has caused more than 20 million premature American deaths in the 50 y after the first US Surgeon General Report of Smoking and Health (1). The recognition of this major health hazard has led to efforts to both prevent the initiation of smoking and aid smokers in quitting,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Conceptualizing degrees of theory of mind [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Successful navigation of the social world requires making accurate inferences about the contents of other people’s minds, being able to represent in one’s own mind the thoughts, beliefs, and intentions of another. This “theory of mind” (ToM) ability allows us to explain and predict others’ behavior in terms of their...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Unique parasite aDNA in moa coprolites from New Zealand suggests mass parasite extinctions followed human-induced megafauna extinctions [Ecology]Having split early from Gondwana, Zealandia (now modern New Zealand) escaped discovery until the late 13th century, and therefore remains an important glimpse into a human-free world. Without humans or other land mammals, diverse and peculiar birds evolved in isolation, including several flightless moa species, the giant pouakai eagle (Harpagornis...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Adaptive value of novel MHC immune gene variants [Evolution]The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a core component of the vertebrate immune system and has puzzled immunologists, geneticists, and evolutionary biologists for more than half a century. The so-called classical MHC genes (in humans also called HLA) code for cell surface molecules that present antigens to immune effector cells...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Iterative near-term ecological forecasting: Needs, opportunities, and challenges [Sustainability Science]Two foundational questions about sustainability are “How are ecosystems and the services they provide going to change in the future?” and “How do human decisions affect these trajectories?” Answering these questions requires an ability to forecast ecological processes. Unfortunately, most ecological forecasts focus on centennial-scale climate responses, therefore neither meeting...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Relevance of packing to colloidal self-assembly [Applied Physical Sciences]Since the 1920s, packing arguments have been used to rationalize crystal structures in systems ranging from atomic mixtures to colloidal crystals. Packing arguments have recently been applied to complex nanoparticle structures, where they often, but not always, work. We examine when, if ever, packing is a causal mechanism in hard...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Nature and evolution of incommensurate charge order in manganites visualized with cryogenic scanning transmission electron microscopy [Applied Physical Sciences]Incommensurate charge order in hole-doped oxides is intertwined with exotic phenomena such as colossal magnetoresistance, high-temperature superconductivity, and electronic nematicity. Here, we map, at atomic resolution, the nature of incommensurate charge–lattice order in a manganite using scanning transmission electron microscopy at room temperature and cryogenic temperature (∼93 K). In diffract
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Lysosomal enzyme tripeptidyl peptidase 1 destabilizes fibrillar A{beta} by multiple endoproteolytic cleavages within the {beta}-sheet domain [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ), which is associated with Alzheimer’s disease, can be caused by excess production or insufficient clearance. Because of its β-sheet structure, fibrillar Aβ is resistant to proteolysis, which would contribute to slow degradation of Aβ plaques in vivo. Fibrillar Aβ can be internalized by microglia, which are...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Assembly mechanism of the CARMA1-BCL10-MALT1-TRAF6 signalosome [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The CARMA1–BCL10–MALT1 (CBM) signalosome is a central mediator of T cell receptor and B cell receptor-induced NF-κB signaling that regulates multiple lymphocyte functions. While caspase-recruitment domain (CARD) membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) protein 1 (CARMA1) nucleates B cell lymphoma 10 (BCL10) filament formation through interactions between CARDs, mucosa-associated lymphoid tissu
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Method to generate highly stable D-amino acid analogs of bioactive helical peptides using a mirror image of the entire PDB [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Biologics are a rapidly growing class of therapeutics with many advantages over traditional small molecule drugs. A major obstacle to their development is that proteins and peptides are easily destroyed by proteases and, thus, typically have prohibitively short half-lives in human gut, plasma, and cells. One of the most effective...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

High-resolution structure prediction of {beta}-barrel membrane proteins [Biophysics and Computational Biology]β-Barrel membrane proteins (βMPs) play important roles, but knowledge of their structures is limited. We have developed a method to predict their 3D structures. We predict strand registers and construct transmembrane (TM) domains of βMPs accurately, including proteins for which no prediction has been attempted before. Our method also accurately...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Disease-causing mutation in {alpha}-actinin-4 promotes podocyte detachment through maladaptation to periodic stretch [Cell Biology]α-Actinin-4 (ACTN4) bundles and cross-links actin filaments to confer mechanical resilience to the reconstituted actin network. How this resilience is built and dynamically regulated in the podocyte, and the cause of its failure in ACTN4 mutation-associated focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), remains poorly defined. Using primary podocytes isolated from wild-type (WT)...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

ATR-Chk1 activation mitigates replication stress caused by mismatch repair-dependent processing of DNA damage [Cell Biology]The mismatch repair pathway (MMR) is essential for removing DNA polymerase errors, thereby maintaining genomic stability. Loss of MMR function increases mutation frequency and is associated with tumorigenesis. However, how MMR is executed at active DNA replication forks is unclear. This has important implications for understanding how MMR repairs O6-methylguanine/thymidine...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Family with sequence similarity 13, member A modulates adipocyte insulin signaling and preserves systemic metabolic homeostasis [Cell Biology]Adipose tissue dysfunction is causally implicated in the impaired metabolic homeostasis associated with obesity; however, detailed mechanisms underlying dysregulated adipocyte functions in obesity remain to be elucidated. Here we searched for genes that provide a previously unknown mechanism in adipocyte metabolic functions and identified family with sequence similarity 13, member...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Multidimensional photon correlation spectroscopy of cavity polaritons [Chemistry]The strong coupling of atoms and molecules to radiation field modes in optical cavities creates dressed matter/field states known as polaritons with controllable dynamical and energy transfer properties. We propose a multidimensional optical spectroscopy technique for monitoring polariton dynamics. The response of a two-level atom to the time-dependent coupling to...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Efficiency of quantum vs. classical annealing in nonconvex learning problems [Computer Sciences]Quantum annealers aim at solving nonconvex optimization problems by exploiting cooperative tunneling effects to escape local minima. The underlying idea consists of designing a classical energy function whose ground states are the sought optimal solutions of the original optimization problem and add a controllable quantum transverse field to generate tunneling...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Inner Workings: How the butterfly got its spots (and why it matters) [Developmental Biology]The colorful canvas of the butterfly wing is an exceptional example of evolutionary innovation and adaptation. Compared with their forebears, whose wings wore patterns of black, brown, and gray, the Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) evolved a more varied palette of pigmentation. With the capacity for complex color patterns, such as...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Endocrine regulation of airway clearance in Drosophila [Developmental Biology]Fluid clearance from the respiratory system during developmental transitions is critically important for achieving optimal gas exchange in animals. During insect development from embryo to adult, airway clearance occurs episodically each time the molt is completed by performance of the ecdysis sequence, coordinated by a peptide-signaling cascade initiated by ecdysis-triggering...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Field migration rates of tidal meanders recapitulate fluvial morphodynamics [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]The majority of tidal channels display marked meandering features. Despite their importance in oil-reservoir formation and tidal landscape morphology, questions remain on whether tidal-meander dynamics could be understood in terms of fluvial processes and theory. Key differences suggest otherwise, like the periodic reversal of landscape-forming tidal flows and the widely...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Coprolites reveal ecological interactions lost with the extinction of New Zealand birds [Ecology]Over the past 50,000 y, biotic extinctions and declines have left a legacy of vacant niches and broken ecological interactions across global terrestrial ecosystems. Reconstructing the natural, unmodified ecosystems that preceded these events relies on high-resolution analyses of paleoecological deposits. Coprolites are a source of uniquely detailed information about trophic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Immunogenetic novelty confers a selective advantage in host-pathogen coevolution [Evolution]The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is crucial to the adaptive immune response of vertebrates and is among the most polymorphic gene families known. Its high diversity is usually attributed to selection imposed by fast-evolving pathogens. Pathogens are thought to evolve to escape recognition by common immune alleles, and, hence, novel...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

De novo mutation in RING1 with epigenetic effects on neurodevelopment [Genetics]RING1 is an E3-ubiquitin ligase that is involved in epigenetic control of transcription during development. It is a component of the polycomb repressive complex 1, and its role in that complex is to ubiquitylate histone H2A. In a 13-year-old girl with syndromic neurodevelopmental disabilities, we identified a de novo mutation,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Sirt4 is a mitochondrial regulator of metabolism and lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster [Genetics]Sirtuins are an evolutionarily conserved family of NAD+-dependent deacylases that control metabolism, stress response, genomic stability, and longevity. Here, we show the sole mitochondrial sirtuin in Drosophila melanogaster, Sirt4, regulates energy homeostasis and longevity. Sirt4 knockout flies have a short lifespan, with increased sensitivity to starvation and decreased fertility and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Disruption of the ciliary GTPase Arl13b suppresses Sonic hedgehog overactivation and inhibits medulloblastoma formation [Genetics]Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor, and overactivation of the Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway, which requires the primary cilium, causes 30% of MBs. Current treatments have known negative side effects or resistance mechanisms, so new treatments are necessary. Shh signaling mutations, like those that remove...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Holo-lipocalin-2-derived siderophores increase mitochondrial ROS and impair oxidative phosphorylation in rat cardiomyocytes [Immunology and Inflammation]Lipocalin-2 (Lcn2), a critical component of the innate immune response which binds siderophores and limits bacterial iron acquisition, can elicit spillover adverse proinflammatory effects. Here we show that holo-Lcn2 (Lcn2–siderophore–iron, 1:3:1) increases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and attenuates mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in adult rat primary cardiomyocy
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Targeting JAK2 reduces GVHD and xenograft rejection through regulation of T cell differentiation [Immunology and Inflammation]Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) signal transduction is a critical mediator of the immune response. JAK2 is implicated in the onset of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), which is a significant cause of transplant-related mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Transfer of JAK2−/− donor T cells to allogeneic recipients leads to attenuated...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Mast cells promote small bowel cancer in a tumor stage-specific and cytokine-dependent manner [Immunology and Inflammation]Mast cells (MCs) are tissue resident sentinels that mature and orchestrate inflammation in response to infection and allergy. While they are also frequently observed in tumors, the contribution of MCs to carcinogenesis remains unclear. Here, we show that sequential oncogenic events in gut epithelia expand different types of MCs in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

In vivo wireless photonic photodynamic therapy [Medical Sciences]An emerging class of targeted therapy relies on light as a spatially and temporally precise stimulus. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinical example in which optical illumination selectively activates light-sensitive drugs, termed photosensitizers, destroying malignant cells without the side effects associated with systemic treatments such as chemotherapy. Effective clinical application...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Plasticity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis NADH dehydrogenases and their role in virulence [Microbiology]Worldwide control of the tuberculosis (TB) epidemic has not been achieved, and the latest statistics show that the TB problem might be more endemic than previously thought. Although drugs and a TB vaccine are available, TB eradication faces the challenges of increasing occurrences of multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Adaptation of commensal proliferating Escherichia coli to the intestinal tract of young children with cystic fibrosis [Microbiology]The mature human gut microbiota is established during the first years of life, and altered intestinal microbiomes have been associated with several human health disorders. Escherichia coli usually represents less than 1% of the human intestinal microbiome, whereas in cystic fibrosis (CF), greater than 50% relative abundance is common and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Hippocampal expression of a virus-derived protein impairs memory in mice [Microbiology]The analysis of the biology of neurotropic viruses, notably of their interference with cellular signaling, provides a useful tool to get further insight into the role of specific pathways in the control of behavioral functions. Here, we exploited the natural property of a viral protein identified as a major effector...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Myopic (HD-PTP, PTPN23) selectively regulates synaptic neuropeptide release [Neuroscience]Neurotransmission is mediated by synaptic exocytosis of neuropeptide-containing dense-core vesicles (DCVs) and small-molecule transmitter-containing small synaptic vesicles (SSVs). Exocytosis of both vesicle types depends on Ca2+ and shared secretory proteins. Here, we show that increasing or decreasing expression of Myopic (mop, HD-PTP, PTPN23), a Bro1 domain-containing pseudophosphatase implicat
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Polaronic behavior in a weak-coupling superconductor [Physics]The nature of superconductivity in the dilute semiconductor SrTiO3 has remained an open question for more than 50 y. The extremely low carrier densities (1018–1020 cm−3) at which superconductivity occurs suggest an unconventional origin of superconductivity outside of the adiabatic limit on which the Bardeen–Cooper–Schrieffer (BCS) and Migdal–Eliashberg (ME) theories...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Child first language and adult second language are both tied to general-purpose learning systems [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Do the mechanisms underlying language in fact serve general-purpose functions that preexist this uniquely human capacity? To address this contentious and empirically challenging issue, we systematically tested the predictions of a well-studied neurocognitive theory of language motivated by evolutionary principles. Multiple metaanalyses were performed to examine predicted links between language...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Alarm calls evoke a visual search image of a predator in birds [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]One of the core features of human speech is that words cause listeners to retrieve corresponding visual mental images. However, whether vocalizations similarly evoke mental images in animal communication systems is surprisingly unknown. Japanese tits (Parus minor) produce specific alarm calls when and only when encountering a predatory snake. Here,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Insecurity, polio vaccination rates, and polio incidence in northwest Pakistan [Social Sciences]Pakistan is one of three countries in which endemic transmission of poliovirus has never been stopped. Insecurity is often cited but poorly studied as a barrier to eradicating polio. We analyzed routinely collected health data from 32 districts of northwest Pakistan and constructed an index of insecurity based on journalistic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Statistical tests and identifiability conditions for pooling and analyzing multisite datasets [Statistics]When sample sizes are small, the ability to identify weak (but scientifically interesting) associations between a set of predictors and a response may be enhanced by pooling existing datasets. However, variations in acquisition methods and the distribution of participants or observations between datasets, especially due to the distributional shifts in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue

Automated monitoring of behavior reveals bursty interaction patterns and rapid spreading dynamics in honeybee social networks [Systems Biology]Social networks mediate the spread of information and disease. The dynamics of spreading depends, among other factors, on the distribution of times between successive contacts in the network. Heavy-tailed (bursty) time distributions are characteristic of human communication networks, including face-to-face contacts and electronic communication via mobile phone calls, email, and...
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

In effort to treat rare blinding disease, researchers turn stem cells into blood vesselsPeople with a mutated ATF6 gene have a malformed or missing fovea, the eye region responsible for detailed vision. From birth, vision is severely limited, and there is no cure. UC San Diego School of Medicine researchers were the first to link ATF6 to this type of vision impairment. Now, in a study published Feb. 13 in Science Signaling, the team discovered that a chemical that activates ATF6 conv
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

PFASs, chemicals commonly found in environment, may interfere with body weight regulationBoston, MA - A class of chemicals used in many industrial and consumer products was linked with greater weight gain after dieting, particularly among women, according to a study led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The chemicals -- perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs) -- have been linked with cancer, hormone disruption, immune dysfunction, high cholesterol, and obesity.
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Live Science

The Happiest States in 2017: Full ListA new poll from Gallup-Healthways shows which states had the highest and lowest well-being in 2017.
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Live Science

US Happiness Plummeted in 2017: These 21 States Saw Declines in Well-BeingLast year was not a good one for Americans' happiness — a record number of states saw declines in their residents' well-being, according to a new poll.
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Science | The Guardian

Chemicals in packaging, carpets and non-stick pans 'may contribute to obesity'Studies have also linked compounds called perfluoroalkyl substances to cancer, high cholesterol and immune problems Chemicals used to make non-stick pots and pans, stain-resistant carpets, and food packaging may contribute to high levels of obesity by disrupting the body’s ability to burn calories, scientists say. Researchers at Harvard University examined the effects of compounds called perfluor
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Germany eyes free transport to banish air pollution"Car nation" Germany has surprised neighbours with a radical proposal to reduce road traffic by making public transport free, as Berlin scrambles to meet EU air pollution targets and avoid big fines.
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Popular Science

How much can Olympic uniforms help or hurt an athlete?Technology The right tech can make you literally dressed for success. When it comes to Olympic get-ups, it’s about more than just looking good. Just like the athletes that wear them, the apparel that the competitors wear need to perform at…
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

US intel chief issues warning about climate changeThe top US intelligence official issued a warning on Tuesday about the dangers of climate change in testimony that was seemingly at odds with the skepticism of President Donald Trump and other members of his administration.
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Inside Science

Engineering the Ice Out of Bobsled, Luge and SkeletonSports Plastic tracks could reduce the cost of Olympic “sliding” events and make the sports more environmentally friendly and accessible. 02/09/2018 Peter Gwynne, Contributor https://www.insidescience.org/news/engineering-ice-out-bobsled-luge-and-skeleton
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can a cockroach teach a robot how to scurry across rugged terrain?Researchers build a robot that moves more like a cockroach.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Money only buys happiness for a certain amountThere is an optimal point to how much money it takes to make an individual happy, and that amount varies worldwide, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Graphene on toast, anyone?The same scientists who introduced laser-induced graphene have enhanced their technique to produce what may become a new class of edible electronics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The end of yo-yo dieting? Brain switch that controls fat burning uncoveredScientists have discovered a molecular switch in the brain that regulates fat burning -- and could provide a way to control weight gain following dieting.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

March Madness mentality: Faced with chance to win, most coaches go for tieWhen faced with a choice between a 'fast' option that offers a greater chance of ultimate victory but also a significant chance of immediate defeat, and a 'slow' option with both a lower chance of winning and a lesser chance of immediate defeat, people often opt for the 'slow' option because of their aversion to sudden death.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

By 2100, arid cities will suffer from more severe heat waves than temperate citiesBy 2100, arid cities like Phoenix will become hotbeds for heatwaves compared to their rural surroundings, while cities on the eastern seaboard will be less severely affected by heatwaves compared to theirs. The findings highlight the importance of heat-mitigation strategies and infrastructures such as green roofs.
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Viden

Vi kender kun en brøkdel af verdens bakterier. Nu har danske forskere fundet en løsningBakterier kan med ny metode identificeres langt hurtigere.
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The Atlantic

The American Dream on Thin IceEditor’s Note: Read all of The Atlantic’s Winter Olympics coverage . It’s an undeniable fact that the United States’ standing as an international power has taken a serious hit over the past year. And this emerging, still unfamiliar reality is about to be put on full display. As America falls a few notches in the eyes of its peers, Russia and other nations stand to gain in tremendous ways. This di
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ears for IcarusOn 13 February, a Russian rocket carried the antenna of the Icarus mission to the International Space Station (ISS). The Icarus on-board computer was thus joined by another key component of the orbiting animal tracking system. Using the system developed by scientists from the Max Planck Society in cooperation with the Russian space agency Roscosmos, the German Aerospace Center and the University o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA eyes powerful Tropical Cyclone Gita in the South PacificNASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image of Category 3 Tropical Cyclone Gita as it continues to bring heavy rainfall, powerful winds and storm surge to Fiji Islands after pounding the island of Tonga.
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The Atlantic

Russia Can Keep the Peace Between Israel and IranThere are still many unanswered questions about the reported incident with the Iranian drone in northern Israel last week, but two things should be clear. First, the 12-year-old lull between Israel and Hezbollah will come to an end if a new understanding about the rules governing conflict in this region is not reached. And second, Russia will need to help broker that new understanding. As for the
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Viden

VIDEO Hovedløs robot-køter springer ud som gentlemanRobothund viser nye galante evner. Nu kan den holde døren for sin armeløse tvilling.
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Viden

QUIZ: Hvor meget ved du om Danmarks første computer?I dag fylder computeren DASK 60 år.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

By 2100, arid cities will suffer from more severe heat waves than temperate citiesHeat waves are among the deadliest and most common of environmental extremes. As the earth continues to warm due to the buildup of greenhouse gases, heat waves are expected to become more severe, particularly for cities, where concrete and a dearth of trees create what's known as the urban heat island effect.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Shifting shorelines at Lake Tahoe caused by ancient lava damsPleistocene basaltic lavas form a small volcanic field that was erupted from seven vents in the northwestern Lake Tahoe basin. Most of these lavas were erupted above the water and produced lava flows that dammed the lake outlet and flowed into an early Lake Tahoe. The resulting steam explosions produced deltas composed of fragmental deposits as well as pillow lavas.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Snapping shrimp may act as 'dinner bell' for gray whales off Oregon coastScientists have for the first time captured the sounds of snapping shrimp off the Oregon coast and think the loud crackling from the snapping of their claws may serve as a dinner bell for eastern Pacific gray whales, according to new research being presented at the Ocean Sciences Meeting here today.
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The Atlantic

Winners of the 2018 Underwater Photographer of the Year ContestOrganizers of the Underwater Photographer of the Year Contest have just announced the winning photographers and images for 2018, with German photographer Tobias Friedrich being named Underwater Photographer of the Year 2018. More than 5,000 images were submitted this year by photographers from around the world. Prizes and commendations were handed out in a number of categories including Wide Angl
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New Scientist - News

Face-recognition software is perfect – if you’re a white manThree leading face-recognition systems correctly identified white men 99 per cent of the time but did badly at identifying women with darker skin
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New Scientist - News

A single atom is visible to the naked eye in this stunning photoThis photo shows a strontium atom suspended in electric fields. A blue laser makes the tiny dot visible, though it’s only 215 billionths of a millimetre wide
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New Scientist - News

Skincare science is frivolous and warrants attack, right? WrongIt won't save the world and is misused in adverts but skincare science isn’t nonsense. So why is resurgent interest in it under fire, wonders Lara Williams
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New Scientist - News

Expedition to uncover hidden life in mystery Antarctic realmIn July 2017 a huge iceberg broke away from Antarctica’s Larsen C ice shelf, revealing a marine world that was concealed for thousands of years
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists create patterned graphene onto food, paper, cloth, cardboardRice University scientists who introduced laser-induced graphene (LIG) have enhanced their technique to produce what may become a new class of edible electronics.
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Big Think

The meaning of life according to NietzscheHaving trouble finding the meaning of life? Nietzsche had the same problem. His philosophy offers us a few suggestions for finding the solution. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Money only buys happiness for a certain amountThere is an optimal point to how much money it takes to make an individual happy, and that amount varies worldwide, according to research from Purdue University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

UCLA scientists develop low-cost way to build gene sequencesA new method pioneered by UCLA researchers enables an average biochemistry laboratory to make its own gene sequences for only about $2 per gene, a process that previously would require its researchers to pay a commercial vendor $50 to $100 per gene. The approach, described in the journal Science, will make it possible for scientists to mass produce thousands of genes screen for their roles in dise
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists identify immune cascade that fuels complications, tissue damage in chlamydia infectionsResearch in mice pinpoints immune mechanism behind tissue damage and complications of chlamydia infection, the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States.Separate immune mechanisms drive bacterial clearance versus immune-mediated tissue damage and subsequent disease.Therapies are needed to avert irreversible reproductive organ damage that can arise as a result of silent infectio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIH-funded researchers identify risk factors for sleep apnea during pregnancySnoring, older age and obesity may increase a pregnant woman's risk for sleep apnea -- or interrupted breathing during sleep -- according to researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health.
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Science | The Guardian

People with autism need protection | LettersReaders air their views on news of bullying in a Somerset care home and the treatment of autistic children in France We were shocked, as the family of a 26-year-old autistic son who has been in four residences since leaving school, to read of the abuse in a National Autistic Society care home ( Somerset care home staff bullied autistic residents, review finds , 9 February). To think that this coul
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Self-driving servicer now baselined for NASA's Restore-L satellite-servicing demonstrationOne test changed the fortunes of an advanced 3-D imaging lidar system now baselined for NASA's Restore-L project that will demonstrate an autonomous satellite-servicing capability.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Prehistoric Wine Discovered in Inaccessible Caves Forces a Rethink of Ancient Sicilian CultureThe samples represent the oldest vino found in Europe or the Mediterranean region -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Genes remain active after deathCells continue to function even after an individual dies, a discovery that could be developed into a forensic tool.
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Live Science

This Ancient Society Buried Disabled Children Like KingsAbout 34,000 years ago, a group of hunters and gatherers buried their dead - including two boys with physical conditions - using the utmost care. However, these dead were buried in fairly different ways, a new study finds.
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Live Science

Photos: 2 Paleolithic Boys Were Buried with Fox Teeth and SpearsAbout 34,000 years ago, a hunter-gatherer group buried two young boys who had physical conditions in elaborate graves.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Powerful LED-based train headlight optimized for energy savingsResearchers have designed a new LED-based train headlight that uses a tenth of the energy required for headlights using conventional light sources. If operated 8 hours every day, the electricity savings of the new design would reduce emissions of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide by about 152 kilograms per year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cost-reduction roadmap outlines two pathways to meet DOE residential solar cost target for 2030Leveraging cost-reduction opportunities in the roof replacement or new construction markets for residential photovoltaic (PV) installations could help the United States meet the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technologies Office (SETO) residential solar photovoltaic cost target by 2030, according to new research from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New sustainable production method could advance plastics and pharmaceuticalsA team of chemical engineers has developed a new, cost-effective method for synthetically producing a biorenewable platform chemical called triacetic acid lactone (TAL) that can be used to produce innovative new drugs and sustainable plastics at an industrial scale.
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Science : NPR

'How To Think Like An Anthropologist' — And Why You Should Want ToIn step with Matthew Engelke's book published Tuesday, Barbara J. King says thinking anthropologically has never been more critical than in today's world, where assumptions are made and shared widely. (Image credit: Robert Decelis Ltd/Getty Images)
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Science | The Guardian

How Pitcairn made history on votes for women | Brief lettersVotes for women | Obtaining the pill | Henry Moore sculpture | Asma Jahangir | Ballet reviews | Evolution In 2013 Pitcairn islanders celebrated 175 years of women’s right to vote ( Letters , 10 February). Pitcairn may be small and remote but the islanders are justifiably proud of this contribution to world history. Liz Timms Berwick-upon-Tweed, Northumberland • In 1972, I wasn’t able to have an ev
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA eyes powerful Tropical Cyclone Gita in the South PacificNASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image of Category 3 Tropical Cyclone Gita as it continues to bring heavy rainfall, powerful winds and storm surge to Fiji Islands after pounding the island of Tonga.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Missing link to novel superconductivity revealed at Ames LaboratoryScientists at the US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have discovered a state of magnetism that may be the missing link to understanding the relationship between magnetism and unconventional superconductivity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Can a cockroach teach a robot how to scurry across rugged terrain?Researchers build a robot that moves more like a cockroach.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Shifting shorelines at Lake Tahoe caused by ancient lava damsPleistocene basaltic lavas form a small volcanic field that was erupted from seven vents in the northwestern Lake Tahoe basin. Most of these lavas were erupted above the water and produced lava flows that dammed the lake outlet and flowed into an early Lake Tahoe. The resulting steam explosions produced deltas composed of fragmental deposits as well as pillow lavas.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Gene expression patterns may help determine time of deathInternational team of scientists led by Roderic Guigó at the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG) in Barcelona shows that changes in gene expression in different tissues can be used to predict the time of death of individuals. Their results, which are published in Nature Communications this week, may have implications for forensic analyses.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study finds sea level rise acceleratingGlobal sea level rise has been accelerating in recent decades, rather than increasing steadily, according to a new study based on 25 years of NASA and European satellite data.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cabozantinib shows promise as first line treatment for differentiated thyroid cancerA kinase inhibitor called cabozantinib could be a viable therapy option for patients with metastatic, radioactive iodine-resistant thyroid cancer. In a trial initiated and led by the Abramson Cancer Center and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, tumors shrunk in 34 out of 35 patients who took the drug, and more than half of those patients saw the tumor size decrease
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The Atlantic

In Black Lightning, There’s No Right Way to Fix a CityThis story contains spoilers for the first four episodes of Black Lightning. In the second episode of the new series Black Lightning , Principal Jefferson Pierce addresses a group of parents who have become increasingly concerned about the gang problem in their community. In a spirit of optimism, he quotes Martin Luther King Jr.: “The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why the seafloor starts movingWhen the seabed loses its stability and starts to move, it often happens in much larger dimensions than landslides ashore -- and at slopes with very low gradients. At the same time, discplacement of large amounts of sediment under water scan cause devastating tsunamis. However, why and when submarine landslides develop is hardly understood. Marine scientists have now published possible causes base
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Too much TV at age 2 makes for less healthy adolescentsSkipping breakfast, eating junk food and doing less well in school might all result from watching TV too young, a new study finds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Quality toolkit improves care in Indian hospitalsA simple toolkit of checklists, education materials and feedback reporting improved the quality of care, but not outcomes, in a group of 60 hospitals in south India, according to a Northwestern Medicine study published in JAMA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Intensive agriculture influences US regional summer climate, study findsScientists agree that changes in land use such as deforestation, not just emissions of greenhouse gases, can play a significant role altering the world's climate systems. Now, a new study by researchers at MIT and Dartmouth College reveals how another type of land use, intensive agriculture, can impact regional climate.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Graphene on toast, anyone?Rice University scientists who introduced laser-induced graphene have enhanced their technique to produce what may become a new class of edible electronics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Brain sciences researcher pinpoints brain circuit that triggers fear relapseSteve Maren, the Claude H. Everett Jr. '47 Chair of Liberal Arts professor in the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Texas A&M University, and his Emotion and Memory Systems Laboratory (EMSL) have made a breakthrough discovery in the process of fear relapse.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers examine electroreception in early vertebratesSharks, as well as a number of other living primitive fishes, have the amazing ability to detect electric fields in their surroundings. This characteristic -- called electroreception -- is thought to be one of the earliest vertebrate sensory systems to appear, but its origins are mysterious. In the journal Palaeontology, investigators have now reviewed the evidence for all putative electroreceptor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Investigators highlight potential of exercise in addressing substance abuse in teensExercise has numerous, well-documented health benefits. Could it also play a role in preventing and reducing substance misuse and abuse in adolescents? In a review article recently published in Birth Defects Research, researchers supply a rationale for the use of exercise, particularly assisted exercise, in the prevention and adjunctive treatment of substance-use disorders.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lower-dose radiation effective, safe for HPV+ head & neck cancer after induction chemoResults of the phase II OPTIMA clinical trial indicate that patients with head and neck cancers associated with the human papillomavirus (HPV), including those with advanced nodal disease, can receive substantially lower radiation doses safely and effectively if they respond to induction chemotherapy initially.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Phase II trial shows activity of durvalumab in recurrent/metastatic head and neck cancerAnalysis of the phase II CONDOR trial indicates that the immune checkpoint inhibitor durvalumab is tolerable among heavily pre-treated patients with recurrent or metastatic head and neck cancer and has the potential to slow growth in tumors with low or negative expression of the PD-L1 protein.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cabozantinib shows significant first-line activity for differentiated thyroid cancerResults of a new phase II clinical trial indicate that cabozantinib offers an active therapy option for patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC) that has progressed following surgery and treatment with radioactive iodine (RAI). Thirty-four of 35 patients in the trial experienced a reduction in tumor size following treatment with the targeted kinase inhibitor, and more than half experience
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nivolumab immunotherapy safe, feasible during chemoradiation for adv. head and neck cancerAnalysis of a clinical trial, RTOG Foundation 3504, finds that nivolumab immunotherapy can be administered safely in conjunction with radiation therapy and chemotherapy for patients with newly diagnosed local-regionally advanced head and neck cancers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Plants feel the heatSainsbury Laboratory scientists have solved a 79-year-old mystery by discovering how plants vary their response to heat stress depending on the time of day. This understanding could help with breeding commercial crops able to produce higher yields in hotter climates as predicted under climate change.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study maps molecular mechanisms crucial for new approach to heart disease therapyIn this study, published in Cell Reports, two labs at UNC and a group at Princeton University reprogrammed ordinary cells called fibroblasts into new and healthy heart muscle cells, and recorded changes that appear to be necessary for this reprogramming.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The end of yo-yo dieting? Monash researchers uncover brain switch that controls fat burningScientists have discovered a molecular switch in the brain that regulates fat burning -- and could provide a way to control weight gain following dieting.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers discover new lead-free perovskite material for solar cellsPerovskite solar cells are a promising new low-cost photovoltaic technology, but most contain toxic lead. A team led by Brown researchers has introduced solar cells with a new titanium-perovskite material that gets the lead out.
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Science : NPR

Super Sensitive Sensor Sees What You Can'tEngineers at Dartmouth College have developed a computer chip that can detect a single particle of light. Cameras with the chip would have visual abilities even a superhero would envy. (Image credit: Jiaju Ma)
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New on MIT Technology Review

Biologists would love to program cells as if they were computer chipsA startup is selling “circuits” for making drugs and chemicals inside bacteria.
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The Atlantic

Russia's Air Industry Is a Victim of Its Own SuccessFour minutes after taking off from Moscow on Sunday afternoon, a Saratov Airlines Antonov An-148 headed for Orsk plummeted 6,000 feet into the ground, killing all 71 one people on board. In the aftermath, the images that appeared on television were all too familiar. Jagged metal scattered in a snowy field. Trees ripped apart, debris hanging from their branches. Police lines and disconsolate relat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Plants feel the heatIt's not just humans and animals that suffer when the mercury rises, plants feel the heat too. Heat stress is a major issue in agriculture and can significantly reduce crop yield. Even small increases in temperature can affect plant growth and development. While plants cannot move to a shady spot to escape the heat, they have developed strategies to protect themselves from heat stress when the sun
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why the seafloor starts movingWhen the seabed loses its stability and starts to move, it often happens in much larger dimensions than landslides ashore -- and at slopes with very low gradients. At the same time, discplacement of large amounts of sediment under water scan cause devastating tsunamis. However, why and when submarine landslides develop is hardly understood. Marine scientists from GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

March Madness mentality: Faced with chance to win, most coaches go for tieWhen faced with a choice between a 'fast' option that offers a greater chance of ultimate victory but also a significant chance of immediate defeat, and a 'slow' option with both a lower chance of winning and a lesser chance of immediate defeat, people often opt for the 'slow' option because of their aversion to sudden death.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

BU: One or more soda a day could decrease chances of getting pregnantA new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers has found that the intake of one or more sugar-sweetened beverages per day -- by either partner -- is associated with a decreased chance of getting pregnant.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pride tops guilt as a motivator for environmental decisionsA lot of pro-environmental messages suggest that people will feel guilty if they don't make an effort to live more sustainably or takes steps to ameliorate climate change. But a recent study from Princeton University finds that highlighting the pride people will feel if they take such actions may be a better way to change environmental behaviors.
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Quanta Magazine

Neutron Lifetime Puzzle Deepens, but No Dark Matter SeenWhen physicists strip neutrons from atomic nuclei, put them in a bottle, then count how many remain there after some time, they infer that neutrons radioactively decay in 14 minutes and 39 seconds, on average. But when other physicists generate beams of neutrons and tally the emerging protons — the particles that free neutrons decay into — they peg the average neutron lifetime at around 14 minute
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The Atlantic

A Breast-Cancer Surgeon Returns to Work After Breast CancerEarlier this month, Liz O’Riordan found herself once again, scalpel in hand, staring down at a woman with breast cancer. The patient was 65 years old, and had reacted to her diagnosis with stoicism. Fine, she had said. I have breast cancer. Chop it out and move on. O’Riordan had done just that many times before, in her career as a breast-cancer surgeon. But this case was different. It would be th
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The Atlantic

What It Takes to Actually Convict Police of MisconductSomething amazing happened over the course of a recent trial in Baltimore: Witnesses laid out the way that the city’s Gun Trace Task Force acted as a de facto criminal gang , but with the advantages of a police badge and the power of the state. Officers assigned to the unit robbed hundreds of thousands of dollars from drug dealers, pocketing the money. They targeted cars for searches based on mak
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Energy-efficient encryption for the internet of thingsA special-purpose chip hardwired to implement elliptic-curve cryptography in general and the datagram transport layer security protocol in particular reduces power consumption by 99.75 percent and increases speed 500-fold, to help enable the internet of things.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Interdisciplinary approach yields new insights into human evolutionThe evolution of human biology should be considered part and parcel with the evolution of humanity itself, proposes Nicole Creanza, assistant professor of biological sciences. She is the guest editor of a new themed issue of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B that takes an interdisciplinary approach to human evolution.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cost-reduction roadmap outlines two pathways to meet DOE residential solar cost target for 2030Leveraging cost-reduction opportunities in the roof replacement or new construction markets for residential photovoltaic installations could help the United States meet the US Department of Energy Solar Energy Technologies Office residential solar photovoltaic cost target by 2030, according to new research from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Powerful LED-based train headlight optimized for energy savingsResearchers have designed a new LED-based train headlight that uses a tenth of the energy required for headlights using conventional light sources. If operated 8 hours every day, the electricity savings of the new design would reduce emissions of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide by about 152 kilograms per year.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Snapping shrimp may act as 'dinner bell' for gray whales off Oregon coastScientists have for the first time captured the sounds of snapping shrimp off the Oregon coast and think the loud crackling from the snapping of their claws may serve as a dinner bell for eastern Pacific gray whales, according to new research being presented at the Ocean Sciences Meeting here today.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Kindred AI is using human pilots to do what robots can’tMeet the man controlling warehouse bots from thousands of miles away.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

New technique shows how 2-D thin films take the heatA new method exposes how 2-D materials react when heated, which could help engineers build sturdy next-gen electronics.
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Viden

VIDEO Danmarks første computer fylder 60 årDASK var en moppedreng på 3,5 tons, som fyldte en hel villa. Men den havde en regnekapacitet, som let overgås af en mobiltelefon i dag.
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Scientific American Content: Global

If We Found Life on Mars, How Would We Know?Despite decades of Red Planet exploration, the protocols for confirming evidence of life there are still quite hazy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Understanding a fly's body temperature may help people sleep betterIn findings that one day may help people sleep better, scientists have uncovered the first molecular evidence that two anciently conserved proteins in the brains of insects and mammals share a common biological ancestry as regulators of body temperature rhythms crucial to metabolism and sleep. Publishing their data in the journal Genes & Development, the scientists study fruit flies (Drosophila) a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Palm oil in your Valentine's chocolate?A diet high in saturated fat causes, in addition to obesity and metabolic changes associated with a prediabetic state, anxiodepressive and compulsive behaviors. All of these effects were shown to be tied to inflammation in the nucleus accumbens, a region of the brain that controls mood and reward. This is revealed by a new study conducted by a team from the CHUM Research Center (CRCHUM) and the Un
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sleepless in Japan: How insomnia killsLaypeople tend to think that insomnia is usually a symptom of something else, like stress, a bad diet or a sedentary lifestyle, but this may not be true at all. It is possible that insomnia itself causes many of the conditions that it is seen as a symptom of.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

By 2100, arid cities will suffer from more severe heat waves than temperate citiesBy 2100, arid cities like Phoenix will become hotbeds for heatwaves compared to their rural surroundings, while cities on the eastern seaboard will be less severely affected by heatwaves compared to theirs. The findings highlight the importance of heat-mitigation strategies and infrastructures such as green roofs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is cupping therapy effective among athletes?Swimmer Michael Phelps's continued dominance at the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Olympics was accompanied by worldwide awareness of cupping.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Most children with sickle cell anemia not receiving key medication to stay healthyOne of the greatest health threats to children with sickle cell anemia is getting a dangerous bacterial infection -- but most are not receiving a key medication to reduce the risk, a new study suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Three's company: New alloy sets magnetism benchmarkSpintronics leverages electron spins to enhance solid-state devices by prolonging battery life. Spintronic developments, however, are increasingly running up against the Slater-Pauling limit, the maximum for how tightly a material can pack its magnetization. Now, a new thin film is poised to break through this decades-old benchmark. Researchers discuss their work constructing a stable thin film ma
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Screening for ovarian cancer not recommendedThe US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends against screening for ovarian cancer in women without symptoms and who are not known to be at high risk (such as those who have certain hereditary cancer syndromes that increase the risk for ovarian cancer).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ACA dependent coverage provision associated with increased use of prenatal careThe dependent coverage provision of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) that allowed young adults to stay on their parents' insurance until they were 26 was associated with increased use of prenatal care, increased private insurance payment for births, and a modest reduction in preterm births.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Google wants your e-mails to be a window to the web
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Professor hopes key to deep-space exploration is the moonThe secret to deep-space exploration could be buried deep within the moon.
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Futurity.org

Therapy dogs ease suffering in the I.C.U.Specially trained therapy dogs in the intensive care unit can substantially ease the physical and emotional suffering of patients, say clinicians. Therapy dogs have long been welcome “nonpharmacological interventions” for less sick hospitalized patients, but their presence in the ICU is new for many hospitals. A group of clinicians wrote in an editorial in the journal Critical Care that a therapy
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Would Delivery Drones Be All That Efficient? Depends Where You LiveCalifornia Tech Edelman Bay AreaEnvironmental scientists are using their models to pit drones against delivery trucks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK cryptocurrency firms launch trade bodySeven of Britain's top cryptocurrency firms on Tuesday linked up to create CryptoUK, a trade body that will oversee the controversial sector, amid ongoing jitters over volatile Bitcoin.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

To prevent cyberattacks, paper suggests agency similar to National Transportation Safety BoardAfter arguably the worst year ever for cyberattacks and data breaches, Indiana University research suggests it may be time to create an independent cybersecurity agency board comparable in approach to the National Transportation Safety Board that investigates airplane crashes and train derailments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

To prevent cyberattacks, agency similar to National Transportation Safety Board suggestedAfter arguably the worst year ever for cyberattacks and data breaches, Indiana University research suggests it may be time to create an independent cybersecurity agency board comparable in approach to the National Transportation Safety Board that investigates airplane crashes and train derailments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Penn chemists develop motion capture-like technology for tracking protein shapeResearchers at the University of Pennsylvania demonstrated a motion capture-like technology that tracks how proteins fold and change shape using fluorescent probes. The research could lead to improvements in drugs used to treat neurodegenerative diseases, as well as new methods of imaging that may also allow for earlier detection.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

SNMMI and ASNC issue joint guidelines for quantification of myocardial blood flow using PETThe Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging's (SNMMI) Cardiovascular Council and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) have issued the joint position paper, Clinical Quantification of Myocardial Blood Flow Using PET, which was jointly published in the Journal of Nuclear Cardiology and The Journal of Nuclear Medicine.
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Popular Science

The UN Climate Panel needs more womenNexus Media News The lack of female scientists on the UN's panel of climate scientists is hurting the quality of scientific research. Women are grossly underrepresented on the UN’s panel of climate scientists, and those who do take part risk being marginalized or harassed. This isn’t just a matter of…
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Ingeniøren

Efter fjernede plakater på DTU: Ny kampagne fokuserer på respekt for andres grænserMindre end en uge efter at DTU’s ledelse pillede plakater mod sexisme ned, bliver problemet igen adresseret. Denne gang med studenterorganisationen PF som afsenderen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Three's company: New alloy sets magnetism benchmarkThe burgeoning field of spintronics leverages electron spins—as opposed to their charge—to enhance solid-state devices like hard drives and cell phone components by prolonging battery life. Spintronic developments, however, are increasingly running up against a barrier known as the Slater-Pauling limit, the maximum for how tightly a material can pack its magnetization. Now, a new thin film is pois
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The surprising ingredient that makes businesses work better | Marco AlveràWhat is it about unfairness? Whether it's not being invited to a friend's wedding or getting penalized for bad luck or an honest mistake, unfairness often makes us so upset that we can't think straight. And it's not just a personal issue -- it's also bad for business, says Marco Alverà. He explains how his company works to create a culture of fairness -- and how tapping into our innate sense of wh
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The Atlantic

Beware the Northside Skull and Bone GangOn the morning of Mardi Gras, before the first light of dawn, dozens of skeletons flood the streets of the 6th Ward neighborhood of Tremé in New Orleans. For 200 years, its residents have awakened on the first day of the carnival to the clattering of bones and oversized skulls. Embodying the undead is the Northside Skull and Bone Gang, comprised of descendants of Native Americans and slaves. Its
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The Atlantic

Big-City Life on Very Little WaterSouth Africa Game ParkCAPE TOWN, South Africa—I was warned right away, at the airport: “We have a water crisis with severe restrictions in place,” read a Buick-sized sign in the arrivals area. So it was true. I had spent the past week in South Africa on a reporting trip and had decided to pass through Cape Town on my way back, in part out of curiosity about the water shortage. The news coverage sounded scary: Because
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

ESO's VLT working as 16-meter telescope for first timeThe ESPRESSO instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile has used the combined light of all four of the 8.2-meter Unit Telescopes for the first time. Combining light from the Unit Telescopes in this way makes the VLT the largest optical telescope in existence in terms of collecting area.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Transatlantic test for Airbus low-cost airlinerThe long-range version of Airbus's updated single-aisle aircraft took off Tuesday on a flight from Paris to New York in what could be a boon for low-cost flights across the Atlantic.
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Live Science

Ant Species Stay Healthy with Self-Made AntibioticsCould DIY antimicrobials made by ants help humans fight disease?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists identify factors which drive the evolution of herbicide resistanceScientists from the University of Sheffield have identified factors which are driving the evolution of herbicide resistance in crops -- something which could also have an impact on medicine as well as agriculture.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ESO's VLT working as 16-meter telescope for first timeThe ESPRESSO instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile has used the combined light of all four of the 8.2-meter Unit Telescopes for the first time. Combining light from the Unit Telescopes in this way makes the VLT the largest optical telescope in existence in terms of collecting area.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Light-activated cancer drugs without toxic side effects: Fresh insightFuture cancer drugs that are activated by light and don't cause the toxic side-effects of current chemotherapy treatments are closer to becoming a reality, thanks to new research made possible by the Monash Warwick Alliance, an intercontinental collaboration between the University of Warwick (UK) and Monash University (Australia).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ryanair drops airfares to Catalonia over secession crisisRyanair said Tuesday it slashed airfares to Catalonia to continue filling its planes, blaming the secession crisis for keeping visitors away.
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Ingeniøren

Lys bremser elektroner, men teoretikerne er ikke enige om en forklaringUnder påvirkning af et meget kraftigt elektromagnetisk felt vil elektroner udsættes for en såkaldt ‘radiation reaction’, som teoretikerne har svært ved at beskrive. Men nu er fænomenet for første gang studeret i laboratorieforsøg med lasere.
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Science | The Guardian

How to be an academic without working 60 hours a week | Lucy FoulkesA Twitter argument about how many hours academics should work prompted Lucy Foulkes to seek out advice for early career researchers Last week a tweet about academics’ working hours went viral: I tell my graduate students and post-docs that if they’re working 60 hours per week, they’re working less than the full professors, and less than their peers. https://t.co/mapWtvmBWp Continue reading...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google takes on Snapchat with its own 'Stories' formatGoogle launched its own "stories" format Tuesday to compete with Snapchat and Instagram with image-driven news articles aimed at mobile phone and tablet users.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Eclipse season starts for NASA's SDOOn Sunday, Feb. 11, 2018, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, saw a total solar eclipse in space when Earth crossed its view of the Sun. Also known as a transit, Earth's passage was brief, lasting from 2:10 a.m. to 2:41 a.m. EST and covering the entire face of the Sun.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New model for evaluating rangeland systems launchesRangelands are the dominant land type across the planet and millions of people rely on the natural goods and services and food security the lands provide. A recently released model, G-Range, allows scientists and policymakers to understand how changes in climate will potentially impact rangelands by running global simulations in a single process, rather than repeating hundreds or thousands of proc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Who should be held responsible for the Aliso Canyon gas leak?A USC-led analysis of the Aliso Canyon gas leak determined corporate dysfunction by the SoCalGas Co. and lax regulatory oversight charted the path to the largest greenhouse gas leak in U.S. history.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Medical cannabis significantly safer for elderly with chronic pain than opioidsThe new study, published in The European Journal of Internal Medicine, found cannabis therapy is safe and efficacious for elderly patients who are seeking to address cancer symptoms, Parkinson's disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, and other medical issues. After six months, more than 18 percent of patients surveyed had stopped using opi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Eclipse season starts for NASA's SDOOn Sunday, Feb. 11, 2018, NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, saw a total solar eclipse in space when Earth crossed its view of the sun.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New device measures blink reflex parameters to quickly and objectively identify concussionThe Blink ReflexometerTM offers a valid, reliable tool for identifying concussion head injuries, report investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina and The Citadel in the January issue of Cogent Engineering. Comparing blink reflex parameters in football players suspected of having sustained a concussion to healthy players revealed specific, significant differences. Noninvasive and qu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

World's biggest city database shines light on our increasingly urbanized planetThe world's largest data platform on cities, launched by the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, reveals the planet is even more urbanized than we thought.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Digital liver scanning technology could halve the number of liver biopsies needed in the NHSA study has revealed that a new scanning technology could almost halve the number of liver biopsies carried out on people with fatty liver disease.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Award winning algorithm could improve accuracy and speed of diagnosis of retinal diseaseA new technique for identifying and diagnosing damage to the human retina has been awarded 'Best Student Paper' at the industry-leading BIOIMAGING 2018 conference in Portugal.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Light-activated cancer drugs without toxic side effectsFuture cancer drugs that are activated by light and don't cause the toxic side-effects of current chemotherapy treatments are closer to becoming a reality, thanks to new research made possible by the Monash Warwick Alliance, an intercontinental collaboration between the University of Warwick (UK) and Monash University (Australia).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Blue mussel shape is a powerful indicator for environmental changeTemperature, salinity and food supply are key influences on the shape of common blue mussels (Mytilus spp.), reveals a new study involving scientists from British Antarctic Survey. The research is published this week (12th February 2018) in the journal Scientific Reports.
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New on MIT Technology Review

The Olympics has been hit by new and destructive malware
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Clues to aging found in stem cells' genomesIn fruit flies, repeating genetic elements shrink with age, but then expand in future generations, a resurgence that may help explain how some cells stay immortal.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Science self-corrects: Cancer gene does not pass reproducibility testAbout 10 years ago, several labs discovered that a gene called MELK is overexpressed, or turned on to a high degree, in many cancer cell types. This evidence has prompted multiple ongoing clinical trials to test whether drugs that inhibit MELK can treat cancer in patients. Now, researchers report that MELK is not actually involved in cancer. It's a story about how science self-corrects.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Tasmanian devil populations continue to declineOngoing monitoring of wild Tasmanian devils shows that overall population numbers are continuing to decline, due to the presence of devil facial tumor disease.
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Live Science

Something Violent Happened to Our Solar System's First Interstellar VisitorAn interstellar object called 'Oumuamua has confounded astronomers ever since it passed through our solar system in October of last year.
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Feed: All Latest

When Modeling the Mississippi River, a Supercomputer Won't DoFiguring out the Mississippi’s hydrodynamics matters so much that Louisiana has dropped $18 million on a 10,800-square-foot model of Big Muddy’s sinuous meanders.
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Scientific American Content: Global

The Case for the "Self-Driven Child"In a new book, an argument for giving children more of a sense of control over their lives -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Improved prediction of pesticide residuesThe use of pesticides can lead to a build-up of toxic and ecologically harmful residues in the soil. Until recently, it was not possible to ascertain in detail to which pesticides this applies and to what extent. Now, researchers from the UFZ and the Technical University of Denmark, have developed a model which allows the formation of potentially toxic residues to be more accurately predicted.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breaking local symmetry: Why water freezes but silica forms a glassUniversity of Tokyo researchers simulated water and silica at low temperature. Despite structural similarities, the two liquids act differently when they are cooled: water freezes into ice, while silica continues to supercool, and eventually forms a glass. This arises from poor symmetry-breaking in silica; although atoms arrange properly in the first shell in both liquids, local rotational symmetr
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Popular Science

Every DIYer should know about these appsDIY Seven essential phone apps for your next project. Need help on your next DIY project? These apps have you covered. They offer everything from inspiration to tutorials to augmented reality tools.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

World's biggest city database shines light on our increasingly urbanised planetThe JRC has launched a new tool with data on all 10,000 urban centres scattered across the globe. It is the largest and most comprehensive database on cities ever published.
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Futurity.org

Little ‘toilet paper’ sensor detects heartbeats and blinksEngineers used tissue paper—similar to toilet tissue—to make a new kind of wearable sensor that can detect a pulse or a blink of an eye. The sensor, which is light, flexible, and inexpensive, could be used for health care, entertainment, and robotics, researchers say. Tearing tissue paper that’s loaded with nanocomposites and breaking the paper’s fibers makes the paper acts like a sensor. It can
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New on MIT Technology Review

The UK government had its own AI built to block extremist video
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Claw-like nanowires filter bacteria from bloodA team of researchers from institutions across China has developed a new type of dialyser —one capable of capturing up to 97 percent of bacteria present in a blood sample. In their paper published in the journal Nature Communications, the group explains the origins of their device, how the filter was made and how well it worked during testing.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

X chromosome not the reason for sex differences in lifespanThe shorter average lifespan of males compared to females appears not to be a result of the fact that males have only one X chromosome. This is the conclusion from a research study on fruit flies at Linköping University, Sweden. The results have been published in the scientific journal Evolution.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

#EpicDuckChallenge shows we can count on dronesA few thousand rubber ducks, a group of experienced wildlife spotters and a drone have proven the usefulness and accuracy of drones for wildlife monitoring. A new study showed that monitoring wildlife using drones is more accurate than traditional counting approaches.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Efforts are needed to tap into the potential of nutraceuticalsA growing demand exists for nutraceuticals, which seem to reside in the grey area between pharmaceuticals and food.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When it comes to extinction, body size mattersModels for extinction risk are necessarily simple. Most reduce complex ecological systems to a linear relationship between resource density and population growth -- something that can be broadly applied to infer how much resource loss a species can survive. This week in Nature Communications, an interdisciplinary team of scientists proposes a more nuanced model for extinction that also shows why a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Rock art: Life-sized sculptures of dromedaries found in Saudi ArabiaAt a remarkable site in northwest Saudi Arabia, archaeologists have discovered camelid sculptures unlike any others in the region. They are thought to date back to the first centuries BC or AD. The find sheds new light on the evolution of rock art in the Arabian Peninsula.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New models give insight into the heart of the Rosette NebulaNew research offers an explanation for the discrepancy between the size and age of the Rosetta Nebula's central cavity and that of its central stars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Improved prediction of pesticide residuesThe use of pesticides can lead to a build-up of toxic and ecologically harmful residues in the soil. Until recently, it was not possible to ascertain in detail to which pesticides this applies and to what extent. Now, researchers from the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), working in partnership with colleagues from the Technical University of Denmark (DTU), have developed a model
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists extend stochastic thermodynamics deeper into quantum territoryPhysicists have extended one of the most prominent fluctuation theorems of classical stochastic thermodynamics, the Jarzynski equality, to quantum field theory. As quantum field theory is considered to be the most fundamental theory in physics, the results allow the knowledge of stochastic thermodynamics to be applied, for the first time, across the full range of energy and length scales.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Trump Budget Would Slash Science across AgenciesNASA, NOAA, EPA and the Interior and Energy departments hope Congress will push back -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

Google’s Guinea-Pig CityQ uayside is a nondescript, 12-acre chunk of land on the southern edge of Toronto’s downtown. It’s just three miles from my apartment, but getting there takes almost an hour by subway, bus, and foot. When I finally arrive at 333 Lake Shore Boulevard East on a windy day in early January, I find a vacant parking lot full of snow. The abandoned Victory Soya Mills silos loom at its edge—a remnant of
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Ingeniøren

Kæmpekran er klar til at bygge bro ved FrederikssundSom et Meccano-sæt for viderekomne er en 155 meter lang montagekran nu blevet samlet af ca. 5000 dele og er klar til at samle de 492 broelementer til Kronprinsesse Marys Bro.
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Ingeniøren

Video: Sådan støbes Frederikssund-broens fundamenterKom med på byggepladsen med projektchef Henrik Vincentsen, som forklarer, hvordan fundamenter og bropiller til Kronprinsesse Marys Bro støbes, og hvordan den 150 meter lange montagekran skal samle brodækket med de 492 præfabrikerede elementer.
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Dagens Medicin

Lægeforeningen kræver læger i sundhedsministerens nye ankenævnSundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby (V) lægger op til at etablere et ankenævn for læger og sundhedspersonale, så de kan klage over særligt indgribende afgørelser på tilsynsområdet. Lægeforeningen kræver, at læger får plads i ankenævnet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How to reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas industry across North AmericaU.S. natural gas production has boomed in the past decade, driving gas prices sharply downward. Natural gas has become a competitive choice for electricity generation, edging out coal. Because gas contains less carbon than coal, greenhouse gas emissions from power plants have dropped, and the U.S. grid has become cleaner, more efficient and more flexible. More natural gas is also entering the powe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Rapid decompression key to making low-density liquid waterWater makes up more than 70 percent of our planet and up to 60 percent of our bodies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An X-ray camera that can resolve tens of thousands of X-ray colorsNASA is part of an international team developing a cutting edge microcalorimeter X-ray camera that will provide extraordinarily detailed information about energetic cosmic phenomena.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Technological breakthrough for monitoring and predicting landslidesEngineering and Computer Science student Jonathan Olds was looking for a research project for his Master's and his supervisor, Professor of Network Engineering in the School of Engineering and Computer Science Winston Seah, suggested developing and testing an automated solution for the long-term monitoring of landslides. The result of that research is AccuMM, which Jonathan validated with a pilot
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

APSOS in Tibet: Probing the whole atmosphereAn NSFC-funded research facility named 'Atmospheric Profiling Synthetic Observation System' (APSOS) was built at the Yangbajain International Cosmic Ray Observatory in Tibet, China, in late 2017. It aims to deepen our understanding on the interactions within the whole (neutral) atmosphere layers and is now in full operation. International collaborations are strongly encouraged,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

High-efficiency and low-cost catalyst for water electrolysisA research team in DGIST has newly developed metal-rich graphitic nanocarbon layers encapsulated electrocatalysts and introduce as cheapest electrode materials for the cost-effective hydrogen gas generation via water electrolysis. It is expected to be used to replace all the state-of-the-art precious metal electrocatalysts of oxygen evolution reaction (OER).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New model for evaluating rangeland systems launchesA new global rangeland model allows people to understand how changes in climate will potentially impact rangelands.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Who should be held responsible for the Aliso Canyon gas leak?A USC-led analysis of the Aliso Canyon gas leak determined corporate dysfunction by the SoCalGas Co. and lax regulatory oversight led to the largest greenhouse gas leak in US history. The study is the first to report what went wrong and why an estimated 97,100 metric tons of methane polluted a Los Angeles neighborhood for four months. The findings have pivotal implications because the US operates
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Too much TV at age 2 makes for less healthy adolescentsSkipping breakfast, eating junk food and doing less well in school might all result from watching TV too young, a Canadian study finds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NUS researchers turn fashion waste into multifunctional materialA research team led by Associate Professor Hai Minh Duong and Professor Nhan Phan-Thien from the Department of Mechanical Engineering at National University of Singapore's Faculty of Engineering has devised a fast, cheap and green method to convert fashion waste into highly compressible and ultralight cotton aerogels.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rapid decompression key to making low-density liquid waterWater is so common that we take it for granted. Yet water also has very strange properties compared to most other liquids. In addition to ordinary water and water vapor, or steam, there are at least 17 forms of water ice, and two proposed forms of super-cooled liquid water. New work from Carnegie high-pressure geophysicists finds evidence of the long-theorized, difficult-to-see low-density liquid
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher discusses successful mission to transport the Icarus antennas to the International Space StationSince 13 February, two key components of the Icarus mission have been orbiting in space. Following the on-board computer, which was carried to the International Space Station (ISS) in October 2017, another Soyuz Progress rocket has now transported the antennas of the joint German-Russian Icarus project to the ISS. Martin Wikelski, Director at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Radolfzell
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Missing link to novel superconductivity revealedScientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory have discovered a state of magnetism that may be the missing link to understanding the relationship between magnetism and unconventional superconductivity. The research, recently published in npj Quantum Materials, provides tantalizing new possibilities for attaining superconducting states in iron-based materials.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Higher temperatures likely to affect sharp-tailed grouse, study findsA study by University of Nebraska-Lincoln researchers has found that predicted increased temperatures across the Great Plains are likely to influence the survival of the sharp-tailed grouse, a native game bird species, by reducing nesting space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cell membrane as material for bone formationThe burst of cells forming cartilage is associated with mineralization during the early stages of bone formation, and nanofragments of the cell membranes can act as nucleation sites for amorphous calcium phosphate, as reported in two studies just published in Integrative Biology and ASC Biomaterials Science and Engineering.
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Scientific American Content: Global

How Technology Can Make Valentine's Day Much, Much BetterBrain implants could eliminate miscommunication between lovers -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Despite rise in Pacific Northwest fires, critical unburned areas remainWhile increased fire activity has threatened Pacific Northwest forests, University of Idaho researchers have found a silver-lining: the proportion of unburned areas critical for post-fire recovery has remained unchanged.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chemists develop motion capture-like technology for tracking protein shapeIn many modern animated movies, the trick to achieving realistic movements for individual characters and objects lies in motion-capture technology. This process often involves someone wearing a tracking suit covered in small, colored balls while a camera captures the position of those colored balls, which is then used to represent how the person is moving.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers conduct chemical analysis of three chemically peculiar starsResearchers have carried out a chemical abundance analysis of three chemically peculiar stars, HD 51959, HD 88035 and HD 121447. The research, based on spectroscopic data acquired by the Fiber-fed Extended Range Optical Spectrograph (FEROS), finds that the three objects are nitrogen-enhanced barium stars. The results were presented February 5 in a paper published on arXiv pre-print server.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Opinion: It's time for a more realistic approach to conservationThe tropics are home to the greatest diversity of plants and animals on Earth. Yet many of these hotspots are in war zones that disregard the rules of democracy and nurture an indefinite influence of corruption.
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Futurity.org

Better way into brain could cut gene therapy side effectsResearchers have found a structure on the small viruses that deliver gene therapy that makes them better at crossing from the bloodstream into the brain. This is a key factor for administering gene therapies at lower doses to treat brain and spinal disorders, which could reduce the number of adverse side effects, researchers say. Gene therapies could be a way to revolutionize the treatment of man
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Futurity.org

Why Neanderthals were good hunters—but lousy artistsNeanderthals had large brains and made complex tools but never demonstrated the ability to draw recognizable images, unlike early modern humans who created vivid renderings of animals and other figures on rocks and cave walls. That artistic gap may be due to differences in the way they hunted, an expert on predator-prey relations and their impacts on the evolution of behavior says. Richard Coss,
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Elongated heads were a mark of elite status in an ancient Peruvian societyElites in ancient Peruvian society developed a signature, stretched-out head shape over several centuries.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Learning about love from online datingLooking for love online? You may have unwittingly included yourself in a giant science experiment, with some interesting results.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The surprising academic origins of memesThere's never a dull moment on the internet, and that's got a lot to do with the fact that the content shared online is constantly changing – thanks in part to the creativity of users who remix, parody or caption popular images or videos, to create memes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New hole-punched crystal clears a path for quantum lightOptical highways for light are at the heart of modern communications. But when it comes to guiding individual blips of light called photons, reliable transit is far less common. Now, a collaboration of researchers from the Joint Quantum Institute (JQI), led by JQI Fellows Mohammad Hafezi and Edo Waks, has created a photonic chip that both generates single photons, and steers them around. The devic
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What ancient footprints can tell us about what it was like to be a child in prehistoric timesWestern society has a rather specific view of what a good childhood should be like; protecting, sheltering and legislating to ensure compliance with it. However, perceptions of childhood vary greatly with geography, culture and time. What was it like to be a child in prehistoric times, for example – in the absence of toys, tablets and television?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

OHSU, CDC unravel mysterious eye infectionA 26-year-old Oregon woman was the first known case of a human being infected with the cattle eyeworm Thelazia gulosa, which normally affects large animals. She was likely infected while being around cows near her rural home, experts conclude in a paper published in the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Sewage Shows the Way to a Novel Diabetes VaccineViruses found in contaminated water may protect against type 1 diabetes -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review

How Trump’s budget would hit US science and tech
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New on MIT Technology Review

Drones that dodge obstacles without guidance can pursue you like paparazziA skilled autopilot function will make drones far more ubiquitous and useful.
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New on MIT Technology Review

The company that made smartphones smart now wants to give them built-in AIARM’s latest mobile processors are tuned to crunch machine-learning algorithms as efficiently as possible.
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Dagens Medicin

Nyt manifest vil forbedre anvendelsen af data i sundhedsvæsenetEn ny græsrodsbevægelse vil med otte teser i et manifest skabe klarhed over, hvordan kvalitetsdata i sundhedsvæsenet skal forstås og anvendes.
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Science | The Guardian

Crack and cheese: do things really affect your brain 'like drugs'?Claims that cheese, sex and Facebook affect your brain in the same way as drugs fundamentally misunderstand how it all works The internet is a weird place. Part of this is due to how things linger rather than disappear, as they tended to do with more “traditional” media. Nowadays, people’s jobs can (rightly or wrongly) be endangered for tweets they wrote years ago . The adage about “today’s news
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microtubule bridges organize the cytoskeletons of cells in the early embryoScientists at A*STAR have discovered how cells in the nascent embryo organize the 'bones' that make up the skeleton, known as microtubules. While this discovery has resolved one mystery, it also raises a range of new questions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New nanoporous metal foams uses sunlight to clean up waterAtom University of OxfordA researcher from the University of Bath is leading the way in creating a new, more efficient way for the water industry to safely remove micropollutants from water without increasing their carbon footprint.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sampling bias might be distorting view of upheaval due to global warmingA small team of researchers from The University of Melbourne, the Georg Eckert Institute and Freie Universität has found problems with research related to assessing the propensity for war amid environmental changes due to global warming. In their paper published in the journal Nature Climate Change, the group argues that much of current research on the topic suffers from several bias flaws. Cullen
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The Scientist RSS

Molecule Found in Huntingtons Patients Kills Cancer CellsResearchers were able to slow tumor growth in a mouse model of human ovarian cancer.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Tardigrades!The microscopic water bears will be featured in an exhibition at the Harvard Museum of Natural History beginning Saturday, February 17.
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The Scientist RSS

Proposed Federal Budget Slashes Funds to EPA, CDCFunds for the NIH and NSF would stay flat, while some agencies, including the FDA and NASA, would see increases.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Timing is key if marketers want consumers to share their video contentYouTube TV PriceSpend any time online or browsing social media, and you're likely to come across branded video content. Advertisers and marketers want people to not only see their content but to enjoy it so much that they share it with their friends. A new study from the University of Kansas has found that the prominence of the brand and the advertisers' decision to disclose whether the content is branded can hea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How sharks and other animals evolved electroreception to find their preyMany creatures can use electric fields to communicate, sense predators or stun their prey with powerful electric shocks, but how this ability came about was a mystery.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Genetic study of soil organisms reveals new family of antibioticsA team of researchers at Rockefeller University has discovered a new family of antibiotics by conducting a genetic study of a wide range of soil microorganism antibiotics. In their paper published in the journal Nature Microbiology, the group describes their study and how well samples of the new antibiotic worked in rats.
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Dana Foundation

#Brainweek Partner Interview: Cecilia M. FoxThis is the second in a series of Brain Awareness Week partner interviews, in which partners share their experiences and tips for planning successful events. Cecilia M. Fox, Ph.D., is a professor of biological sciences and the director of the Neuroscience Program at Moravian College. She is also president of the Lehigh Valley Society for Neuroscience Chapter. For several years, you’ve organized a
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Ingeniøren

Miljøstyrelsen til EU: Send os forskning og erfaringer om resistente svampeHar landbruget eller hele samfundet skylden for, at svampe bliver resistente over for azoler? Miljøstyrelsen vil nu indsamle forskning fra andre EU-lande for at få et bedre overblik.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Stemming the Plastic Tide: 10 Rivers Contribute Most of the Plastic in the OceansThe Yangtze alone pours up to an estimated 1.5 million metric tons into the Yellow Sea -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Amazon fish challenges mutation ideaAmazon Service PrimeStudy of an Amazon fish has challenged ideas about how DNA gathers deadly mutations over time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Interdisciplinary approach yields new insights into human evolutionThe evolution of human biology should be considered part and parcel with the evolution of humanity itself, proposes Nicole Creanza, assistant professor of biological sciences. She is the guest editor of a new themed issue of the Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, the oldest scientific journal in the world, that focuses on an interdisciplinary approach to human evolution.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Smart cane' could one day help flag gait problems, falling risks more quicklyFeeling a little unsteady and don't know why?
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Popular Science

Millions of Americans can't stay home with the flu, so it spreadsHealth In America, paid sick leave is not guaranteed. In the 2009 H1N1 pandemic alone, [estimates suggest that around 5 to 7 million more people got the flu from someone who came to work sick, and that an additional 1,500…
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Clues to aging found in stem cells' genomesIn fruit flies, repeating genetic elements shrink with age, but then expand in future generations, a resurgence that may help explain how some cells stay immortal.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

#EpicDuckChallenge shows we can count on dronesA few thousand rubber ducks, a group of experienced wildlife spotters and a drone have proven the usefulness and accuracy of drones for wildlife monitoring.A University of Adelaide study showed that monitoring wildlife using drones is more accurate than traditional counting approaches.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Rocket manElon Musk just launched the world's most powerful rocket. It's only a fraction of what he's up to.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gene improves plant growth and conversion to biofuelsA research team led by the University of Georgia has discovered that manipulation of the same gene in poplar trees and switchgrass produced plants that grow better and are more efficiently converted to biofuels.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Database for steganalysis of forensic evidenceThere is nothing striking or remarkable about the tens of thousands of pictures an Iowa State University research team has spent the past 18 months collecting for a new database.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Tissue paper sensors show promise for health care, entertainment, roboticsUniversity of Washington engineers have turned tissue paper – similar to toilet tissue – into a new kind of wearable sensor that can detect a pulse, a blink of an eye and other human movement. The sensor is light, flexible and inexpensive, with potential applications in health care, entertainment and robotics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Innovative restoration of coral reefs helps protect Caribbean islandsThe catastrophic 2017 hurricane season provided ample demonstrations of the increasing vulnerability of Caribbean populations and infrastructure to natural disasters. Researchers at UC Santa Cruz and the Nature Conservancy have now measured the protective role of coral reefs and field-tested a solution that reduces coastal risks by combining innovative engineering with restoration ecology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Intensive agriculture influences U.S. regional summer climate, study findsScientists agree that changes in land use such as deforestation, and not just greenhouse gas emissions, can play a significant role altering the world's climate systems. Now, a new study by researchers at MIT and Dartmouth College reveals how another type of land use, intensive agriculture, can impact regional climate.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Fake news production and social media 'trolls'A network of digital workers are designing political disinformation campaigns, creating fake news and fanning the flames of public discontent in the Philippines, new research has found.
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Feed: All Latest

Robots Don’t Deserve Workers’ Rights—YetWIRED columnist Jason Pontin on how robotic automation could someday transform human employment—and what we will owe our new AI workers.
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Feed: All Latest

New Study Shows Bay Area Residents Increasingly Distrust Tech CompaniesCalifornia Tech Edelman Bay AreaA new survey shows that California residents—and the Bay Area specifically—has had it up to here with Big Tech.
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Feed: All Latest

Scientists Know How You’ll Respond to Nuclear War—and They Have a PlanUsing data from smartphones, satellites, remote sensors, and census surveys, modelers can create synthetic populations—and watch what they do in a disaster.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

#EpicDuckChallenge shows we can count on dronesA few thousand rubber ducks, a group of experienced wildlife spotters and a drone have proven the usefulness and accuracy of drones for wildlife monitoring.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Cannibal Sex and Love Darts: Animal Libido Is Not for the Fainthearted [Slide Show]Some creatures have unusual ways of courting their Valentines -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Viden

Apple vil skrue ned for opdaterings-ræsetFærre nye features i de kommende styresystemer skal sikre færre fejl — og at firmaet kan levere de lovede nyheder til tiden.
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Scientific American Content: Global

To Fight Fatal Infections, Hospitals May Turn to AlgorithmsMachine learning could speed up diagnoses and improve accuracy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

This Electronic Skin May Help Prevent Robots from Crushing UsA metallic robot hand with "Terminator"-like power sounds good for the movies. But what about a real-life future where that android is now cradling your baby or just shaking your hand?
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Dagens Medicin

Tidligere sundhedsborgmester bliver direktør for MødrehjælpenNinna Thomsen (SF), tidligere sundheds- og omsorgsborgmester i København, tiltræder 15. marts som direktør for Mødrehjælpen.
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Dagens Medicin

Sundhedsstyrelsen sender metode for rehabilitering af kræft i høringDet reviderede forløbsprogram for rehabilitering og palliation i forbindelse med kræft beskriver den samlede indsats og skal sikre kvalitet i processen.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Rock art: Life-sized sculptures of dromedaries found in Saudi ArabiaAt a remarkable site in northwest Saudi Arabia, a CNRS archaeologist and colleagues from the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage have discovered camelid sculptures unlike any others in the region. They are thought to date back to the first centuries BC or AD. The find sheds new light on the evolution of rock art in the Arabian Peninsula.
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The Atlantic

Sympathy for Janet on The Good PlaceThis article contains mild spoilers through Season 2 of The Good Place. “I’m not a girl,” Janet, the friendly afterlife robot, tells Jason, her charmingly doltish dead boyfriend, in the second-season finale of The Good Place . “I’m also not just a Janet anymore. I don’t know what I am!” Indeed. What is Janet, now? Among the twists in the season closer for Michael Schur’s breezily profound NBC sit
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Feed: All Latest

Amino Apps Makes the Case for Anonymity OnlineThe saying goes, "On the internet, no one knows you're a dog." Is that a good thing for an app for teens?
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Feed: All Latest

Everyone Hates Silicon Valley, Except Its ImitatorsLeaders behind Silicon Prairie, Silicon Shire, and Silicon Holler say they see the flaws in the nation's tech hub, and hope to avoid the same mistakes.
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Feed: All Latest

The Inevitable Agony of Olympic SpoilersIn the age of push notifications it's nearly impossible not to get spoiled on a big win. Should fans just accept defeat?
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Live Science

Photos: Stone Age Skulls Found on Wooden StakesOne day, when archaeologists in Sweden were surveying a forest in advance of a construction project, they made a perplexing find — the battered skulls of people who had lived about 8,000 years ago, including two that still had pointed stakes in them.
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Live Science

Gut Reaction: Does Intense Training Affect Olympic Athletes' Poop?How do Olympic athletes' diets and exercise regimens affect their performance … in the bathroom?
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Live Science

8,000-Year-Old Heads on Stakes Found in Mysterious Underwater GraveThe discovery of a burial containing 8,000-year-old battered human skulls, including two that still have pointed wooden stakes through them, has left archaeologists baffled, according to a new study from Sweden.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

What will it take to go to Venus?Undeterred by funding woes, scientists are scraping together ideas to tackle heat, pressure and acidity challenges of landing on Venus.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Life-sized sculptures of dromedaries found in Saudi ArabiaAt a remarkable site in northwest Saudi Arabia, a CNRS archaeologist and colleagues from the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) have discovered camelid sculptures unlike any others in the region. They are thought to date back to the first centuries BC or AD. The find sheds new light on the evolution of rock art in the Arabian Peninsula and is the subject of an article publis
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Viden

Klik ikke! Snedig orm hærger FacebookMan skal være særligt kritisk, når man modtager videolinks fra venner.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Why Culture Clashes at the Olympics MatterDifferences in language and customs will inevitably lead to miscommunications and misunderstandings among the athletes -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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NYT > Science

A Hot, Dry Winter in California. Could It Be Drought Again?A persistent ridge of air in the Pacific is keeping winter storms away, and the Sierra snowpack, source of much of the state's water, is suffering.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Will Astronomers Be Ready for the Next 'Oumuamua?It may already have arrived. Here’s how scientists are preparing for the next close encounter -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A synthetic cell that produces anti-cancer drugs within a tumorTechnion-Israel Institute of Technology researchers have successfully treated a cancerous tumor using a "nano-factory" – a synthetic cell that produces anti-cancer proteins within the tumor tissue. The research, which was published in Advanced Healthcare Materials, combines synthetic biology, to artificially produce proteins, and targeted drug delivery, to direct the synthetic cell to abnormal tis
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Upscaling turbulence for better laboratory studiesTurbulence in oceans, in the atmosphere or in industry is billions of times stronger than in lab experiments. Simply upscaling the lab results is not an option. Theoretically, however, there is a regime of turbulence in which scaling laws apply. Researchers of University of Twente succeeded in reaching this 'asymptotic ultimate regime' of turbulence by introducing roughness at the surface at which
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scalable two-dimensional materials advance future-gen electronicsSince the discovery of the remarkable properties of graphene, scientists have increasingly focused research on the many other two-dimensional materials possible, both those found in nature and concocted in the lab. However, growing high quality, crystalline 2-D materials at scale has proven a significant challenge.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers find warmer oceans could increase invasive 'sea squirts'They're lovingly called 'sea squirts', but certain marine soft-bodied animals, or tunicates, could cause a giant-sized problem in cold water areas like the Gulf of Maine. New research from the University of New Hampshire shows that with a water temperature increase of just two degrees Celsius (or 3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) predicted in the coming years, the invasive tunicate species Botrylloides viol
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers create DNA wires 100 times more sensitive than other biosensorsScientists in Sweden today reported a nanoengineering innovation that offers hope for treatment of cancer, infections and other health problems – conductive wires of DNA enhanced with gold which could be used to electrically measure hundreds of biological processes simultaneously.
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Ingeniøren

Ny målemetode skal afsløre mikroplast i drikkevandetEn ny målemetode udviklet af forskere fra Aarhus Universitet skal hjælpe Miljøstyrelsen med at kortlægge omfanget af mikroplast i vores postevand.
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Dagens Medicin

Norge siger ja til Spinraza – på visse betingelserNorske børn med muskelsygdommen spinal muskelatrofi kan nu få behandling med lægemidlet Spinraza. En lang række forudsætninger skal dog være opfyldt.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Transportable optical clock used to measure gravitation for the first timeA European collaboration involving clock experts from the National Physical Laboratory (NPL), the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) and the Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM) has used a transportable optical atomic clock to measure gravitation for the first time. The results of the experiment were published in Nature Physics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why did gas hydrates melt at the end of the last ice age?Methane hydrates, also known as "burning ice," occur at all ocean margins. The compound of gas and water occurs in the seafloor and it is only stable under relatively high pressures and low temperatures. If the pressure is too low or the temperature too high, the hydrates dissociate (break down), the methane is released and the gas can seep from the seafloor into the ocean. Thus, scientists fear t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Software package processes huge amounts of single-cell dataScientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed a program that for managing enormous datasets. The software, called Scanpy, is a candidate for analyzing the Human Cell Atlas, and has recently been published in Genome Biology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Avoiding increases of extreme heat events over East Asia by 0.5 degrees CThe Paris Agreement adopted by the United Nation Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Conference of the Parties in December 2015 officially included the 2 degrees C Global Temperature Target in the conference results and pursued efforts "to limit the level of global temperature rise to 1.5 degrees C above pre-industrial levels." At 1.5/2 degrees C temperature warming level, changes in g
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cultural cross-fertilisation to rescue soilsSharing best practice farming techniques with farmers from different cultures and traditions could help increase the quality of our soils – a vital step in ensuring that we can grow enough food for people in the coming decades.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

South Africa declares drought a 'national disaster'South Africa on Tuesday declared a "national disaster" over a drought that has ravaged parts of the country and threatened to leave the city of Cape Town without domestic tap water.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK to unveil new tech to fight extremist content onlineThe British government is unveiling new technology to remove extremist material from social media.
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The Atlantic

Educated Is a Brutal, One-of-a-Kind MemoirT ara Westover’s one-of-a-kind memoir is about the shaping of a mind, yet page after page describes the maiming of bodies—not just hers, but the heads, limbs, and torsos of her parents and six siblings, too. The youngest child in a fundamentalist Mormon family living in the foothills of Buck’s Peak, in Idaho, she grew up with a father fanatically determined to protect his family against the “brai
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The Atlantic

Goat on a Pile of Scrap LumberThe goat lowers his head like a fur-covered anvil, as if he knows all things in the world change. His eyes are bisected by a horizon line of yellow light. You’re wondering what might happen if you move closer. There’s a language we speak to ourselves and one we use for others. I told you, he’s lowered his head. Nevertheless, you can see for yourself he’s chewing. What he swallows becomes his rumi
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Ingeniøren

Personfølsom fuldmagt blev tilgængelig for 1.400 personer på sundhed.dkIfølge Digitaliseringsstyrelsen har 14 personer set en helt fremmed persons fuldmagt på sundhed.dk. Sikkerhedshullet er lukket, men det vides endnu ikke helt, hvordan fejlen opstod.
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Big Think

Why income inequality is not the injustice we perceive it to be"The starting point for understanding inequality in the context of human progress is to recognize that income inequality is not a fundamental component of well-being." Read More
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Ingeniøren

Norges nye ubåd kan blive den første med lithium-ion-batterier – eller den sidste med blybatterierNorges nye ubåd – den såkaldte 212CD-klasse – kommer midt i et teknologiskifte.
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Dagens Medicin

Forbedringer på vej til medicinhåndtering i SundhedsplatformenDet er for besværligt at håndtere medicin i Sundhedsplatformen. Derfor øremærker Region Hovedstaden og Region Sjælland 15 mio. kr. til forbedringer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

When it comes to extinction, body size mattersModels for extinction risk are necessarily simple. Most reduce complex ecological systems to a linear relationship between resource density and population growth -- something that can be broadly applied to infer how much resource loss a species can survive. This week in Nature Communications, an interdisciplinary team of scientists proposes a more nuanced model for extinction that also shows why a
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The Atlantic

'America First' Is Straining Bill Gates's OptimismBill Gates isn’t a big fan of “America First.” In a recent episode of The Atlantic Interview, he told Jeffrey Goldberg, the editor in chief of The Atlantic , “the long-term benefit of [nations] trusting each other, even beyond one or two terms of office, is a pretty gigantic thing.” That’s not to say Gates is pessimistic about the future. His and Melinda Gates’s tenth annual letter, released Tues
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Science : NPR

Your Besotted Brain: A Neuroscience Love SongA Valentine's music video from Skunk Bear explores the ways your brain and body change when you fall in love — and change again as love deepens and matures. (Image credit: Adam Cole/NPR's Skunk Bear)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

When it comes to extinction, body size mattersOn a certain level, extinction is all about energy. Animals move over their surroundings like pacmen, chomping up resources to fuel their survival. If they gain a certain energy threshold, they reproduce, essentially earning an extra life. If they encounter too many empty patches, they starve, and by the end of the level it's game over.
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Ingeniøren

Nu mister kineserne også job til robotterFoxconn-datterselskabet Innolux vil fyre 10.000 medarbejdere og erstatte dem med robotter. Samtidig fortsætter Kinas fremstillingsindustri ufortrødent marchen mod en robotdomineret fremtid.
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Viden

BILLEDSERIE: Sådan ser vores livsvigtige bakterier udVi forbinder ofte bakterier med sygdom, men faktisk kan vi slet ikke leve uden dem. Rul ned og se de bakterier, der hjælper os.
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The Atlantic

Korea's Divided Families Are Hoping for a ReunionEditor’s Note: Read all of The Atlantic’s Winter Olympics coverage . In the fall of 2010, in a banquet hall in Kangwon Province in North Korea , South Korean lawmaker Woo Won Shik took a seat at table number 74. He had come with his mother to a government-sponsored meeting for families divided by the Korean War. They were there to meet Woo’s older sister, who had been left behind in North Korea i
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Ingeniøren

Sky-løsning skal gøre bilbranchen klar til GDPR: Håndtering af samtykke stinker lidtSoftwareløsning skal sørge for, at bilforhandlere ikke får problemer, når de indsamler og opbevarer det kritiske samtykke.
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Ingeniøren

1.218 droner slår verdensrekord ved vinter-OLIntel sendte 1.218 quadcopter-droner i luften i forbindelse med åbningsceremonien ved vinter-OL i Pyeongchang i Sydkorea. Verdens hidtil største droneshow blev dog ikke sendt live på grund af logistiske problemer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Russia launches cargo spacecraft after aborted liftoff (Update)Russia on Tuesday launched an unmanned Progress cargo ship to the International Space Station after a glitch led officials to postpone the planned liftoff two days earlier.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New models give insight into the heart of the Rosette NebulaA hole at the heart of a stunning rose-like interstellar cloud has puzzled astronomers for decades. But new research, led by the University of Leeds, offers an explanation for the discrepancy between the size and age of the Rosetta Nebula's central cavity and that of its central stars.
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Feed: All Latest

Introducing Google AMP Stories, a Whole New Way to Read WIREDOptimized for your phone—permanent and searchable like the best of the web.
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New Scientist - News

NASA may lose a major space telescope and space station fundingPresident Trump wants to cut back on major NASA projects, including a space telescope to study dark matter and dark energy, and US funding for the space station
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Ingeniøren

Ransomware lammede fjernvarme-firma: »Selv vores internetadgang har været nede«Isoplus Fjernvarmeteknik har været medtaget af et ransomware-angreb, som også ramte ERP-systemet.
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Viden

Varm på is: Rekordlav mængde havis ved ArktisUdbredelsen af havis i Arktis har ikke været mindre i januar siden de første satellitmålinger begyndte i 1979.
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Viden

Ville du designe din baby smukkere eller mere talentfuld, hvis du kunne?Moderne genteknologi kan bruges til at give dit barn fordele i livet. Ville du gøre det, hvis du fik frit valg? Test din egen holdning af.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New models give insight into the heart of the Rosette NebulaNew research, led by the University of Leeds, offers an explanation for the discrepancy between the size and age of the Rosetta Nebula's central cavity and that of its central stars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Worsening Ethiopian drought threatens to end nomadic lifestyleDown a sandy track past a desiccated animal carcass lies a cluster of half-built huts that Ethiopia's government and aid agencies hope will blunt the worsening toll of repeated droughts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Water: Why the taps run dryThe world has abundant freshwater but it is unevenly distributed and under increasing pressure, UN agencies say, as highlighted by the severe shortages in Cape Town.
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Science-Based Medicine

Answering Our Critics – Again!Critics of Science-Based Medicine keep making the same old tired arguments, despite the fact that their arguments have been repeatedly demolished. Here is a list of recurrent memes, with counterarguments.
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Viden

VIDEO: Er landbørn sundere end bybørn?Forskere laver bakterietests på et land- og et bybarn for at undersøge, hvilke bakterier de møder i deres daglige omgivelser
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

For global water crisis, climate may be the last strawBefore man-made climate change kicked in—and well before "Day Zero" in Cape Town, where taps may run dry in early May—the global water crisis was upon us.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Virtual field trips: Schools embrace advanced adventuresOn a February afternoon in a Brooklyn classroom, 16-year-old Taylor Engler came face to face with a cow.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ideology is not main factor that pushes children to join terrorist groupsCounter-terror efforts based on widely-held assumptions about the ideological motivations of children and youth recruited into extremist groups are unlikely to be effective, and could backfire, concludes new research released today by the United Nations University (UNU), a UN think-tank.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Surprising results from a unique bat study in the US reveal shifting behavioral patterns due to environmental changeHistorical radar data from weather monitoring archives have provided unprecedented access to the behaviours of the world's largest colony of migratory bats and revealed changes in the animals' seasonal habits with implications for pest management and agricultural production.
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Viden

Sådan ser verden ud med en babys øjneNyfødte børn har svært ved at se, og de kan ikke fokusere. Men i løbet af seks måneder begynder øjnene for alvor at fungere. Kig med her og se, hvordan babyens syn udvikler sig.
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Big Think

Map of Pangea reveals which countries shared borders 300 million years agoEnter an ancient version of Earth, where Santa Claus lives in South Korea, Cuba is land-locked, and Antarctica and India share the same climate. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Microjet generator for highly viscous fluidsGenerating microjets of highly viscous fluids is important to prevent blurring in key modern applications such as inkjet printing, but such technology is being held back because most printers handle only low-viscosity liquids, e.g. water-based ink. This study proposes a simple structure that uses an impulsive force to generate high-viscosity microjets of fluids similar even to honey, and with non-
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Kidney stones on the rise, Mayo Clinic study findsKidney stones are a painful health condition, often requiring multiple procedures at great discomfort to the patient. Growing evidence suggests that the incidence of kidney stones is increasing steadily, especially in women. Using data from the Rochester Epidemiology Project, Mayo Clinic researchers investigated the rise in stone formers to determine if this is a new trend, or simply an improvemen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Efforts are needed to tap into the potential of nutraceuticalsA growing demand exists for nutraceuticals, which seem to reside in the grey area between pharmaceuticals and food.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients lack information about imaging examsPatients and their caregivers desire information about upcoming imaging examinations, but many are not getting it, according to a new study. The researchers found that half of all patients and caregivers end up seeking information on their own.
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Feed: All Latest

Maven, GM's Car-Sharing Company, Launches in TorontoMaven isn't just a way to rent Chevy Malibus by the hour. It's a way to gain crucial logistics and fleet experience as the world shifts away from private car ownership.
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The Scientist RSS

Love in the Scientific LiteratureThere are countless ways for scientists to say, 'I love you.' Naming a slime-mold beetle after your wife (and another after your ex-wife) is, apparently, one of them.
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Ingeniøren

7 hverdagsfejl, der forhindrer din forfremmelseMange handlinger kan løfte din karriere, men flere valg i din hverdag kan koste dig muligheder for at blive forfremmet. Jobfinder har syv tips til, hvad du skal undgå at gøre.
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Ingeniøren

Brancheforening: Skrækscenariet om elvarme holder ikkeMed sænket elvarmeafgift vil varmepumper og fjernvarme være billigere end elvarme for et standard-hus, mener Dansk Energi. Brancheforeningen angriber energiprofessor Henrik Lunds elvarme-scenarie med egne beregninger i hånden.
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Live Science

Respiratory System: Facts, Function and DiseasesGood air in, bad air out.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When the body attacks the brain: Immune system often to blame for encephalitis, study findsEncephalitis caused by the immune system attacking the brain is similar in frequency to encephalitis from infections.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Innovative restoration of coral reefs helps protect Caribbean islandsResearchers have measured the protective role of coral reefs and field-tested a solution that reduces coastal risks by combining innovative engineering with restoration ecology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wastewater treatment plants could generate electricityResearchers are working on improving the efficiency of microbial fuel cells (MFC) by using modified graphite felt. Primary results show that the new MFC can generate 20 percent higher voltage than usual cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers raise a 170-million-year question over mysterious moss geneA surprise discovery provides insight into how cells build their external walls and raises questions about a one-of-a-kind, fused gene.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study examines shift work and genetic risk factors for type 2 diabetesA new study takes a deep look at the connection between shift work and type 2 diabetes. Investigators leveraged data on hundreds of thousands of people in the UK Biobank to better understand how shift work -- especially frequent night work -- contributes to the likelihood of type 2 diabetes. The team also developed a genetic risk score for type 2 diabetes, examining genetic data for tens of thousa
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Which commonly prescribed drug is more effective for infants with epilepsy?Levetiracetam was found to be superior to phenobarbital as initial monotherapy for infants with nonsyndromic epilepsy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New insight into workings of building blocks of lifePioneering new research could offer a fascinating new insight into how genomic information is read.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Turbulence: Adequate scaling thanks to surface roughnessTurbulence in oceans, in the atmosphere or in industry, is billions of times stronger than in lab experiments. Simply upscaling the lab results is not an option. Theoretically, however, there is a regime of turbulence in which scaling laws apply. Researchers have succeeded in reaching this 'asymptotic ultimate regime' of turbulence, by introducing roughness at the surface at which turbulent liquid
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New method for waking up devicesA device that's turned off doesn't suck battery life, but it also doesn't work. Now a low-power system that's always on the alert can turn devices on when they are needed, saving energy in the networked internet of things.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Study shows benefits of exercise can outweigh health effects of severe obesityNew study that shows physical activity may be equally and perhaps even more important than weight for people living with severe obesity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Engaging family in care of hospitalized loved ones enhances healing, reduces readmission ratesA voluntary program that allows family members of hospitalized patients to participate in their care enhanced healing and reduced readmission rates.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ideology is not main factor that pushes children to join terrorist groupsCounter-terror efforts based on the assumption that children recruited into extremist groups are motivated by ideology are unlikely to be effective, and could even backfire, concludes a two-year research project led by the United Nations University.
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NYT > Science

Trump Administration Targets Obama-Era Effort to Limit MethaneThe rule, dating from President Barack Obama’s final days in office, survived a Senate vote in 2017 but now faces formal repeal.
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Science : NPR

California Officials Set Up Invasive Swamp Rodent HotlineNutria can grow up to 2.5 feet, weigh 20 pounds and wreak destruction wherever they go. State authorities believed they were extinct, but recent sightings have led to a call for the public to help. (Image credit: Michael Probst/AP)
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