Ingeniøren
Super-elcykel skal køre 45 km/t på danske cykelstierEn elmotordrevet cykel, der kan køre 45 km/t, skal i en forsøgsordning ikke længere tælle som en stor knallert. Det betyder bl.a., at de kan køre på cykelstien af personer ned til 15 år, som kan nøjes med en cykelhjelm. Cyklistforbundet advarer om, at det vil koste liv.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effectResearchers from IOCB Prague and IP CAS demonstrated for the first time a single molecule piezoelectric effect. The study published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society represents a breakthrough in understanding the electromechanical behavior of individual molecules and provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoparticles act as surgical blades for improved dental surgeryCurrently, more than 80 nanotechnologies have been approved for a variety of medical applications, from treating cancer to bioimaging to tissue remodeling.
8min

LATEST

New on MIT Technology Review
If we want AI to explain itself, here’s how it should tell us
2min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Oceanographers solve mystery of phytoplankton survival in nutrient-poor PacificUpwelling in the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean provides essential nutrients for the region's microscopic plants, but iron – a key ingredient that facilitates nitrogen consumption – is in short supply. To compensate, the phytoplankton band together to recycle the scarce metal and retain it in their upper-ocean habitat, scientists at the University of California, Irvine have discovered.
2min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
3-D NASA animation displays a surface pit eroded by stars in the Orion nebulaWhen professor Frank Israel graduated at Leiden Observatory some forty years ago, little did he know that one of his theories would be making headlines in 2018—in the form of a 3-D animation on the Internet, no less.
2min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Police in schools—helpful or harmful? It depends on the modelEarlier this month Victorian Opposition Leader, Matthew Guy, announced a plan to place 100 more police officers in schools. This included in 10 "at-risk" secondary schools to "tackle this violent scourge of youth crime, to keep Victorians safe."
2min
The Scientist RSS
First Documented Case of Transgender Mother BreastfeedingDoctors report that a regimen of hormones, an antiemetic drug, and pumping gave the woman enough milk production to feed her baby exclusively breastmilk for six weeks.
2min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Countries with greater gender equality have lower percentage of female STEM graduatesAlthough women currently are well represented in life sciences, they continue to be underrepresented in inorganic sciences, such as computer science and physics. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri and Leeds Beckett University in the United Kingdom have found that as societies become wealthier and more gender equal, women are less likely to obtain degrees in STEM. The researchers call
11min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can our genes help predict how women respond to ovarian cancer treatment?New research, led by Professor Anna deFazio from the Westmead Institute and Westmead Hospital, has shown that the genes we inherit can have a significant impact on how the body processes chemotherapy drugs, which may lead to different clinical outcomes for ovarian cancer patients.
11min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The CRISPR Journal debuts with articles by Rodolphe Barrangou, Fyodor Urnov, et al.The CRISPR Journal, a new peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers announces the publication of its groundbreaking inaugural issue.
11min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Simulations reveal that atomic disorder from radiation can launch a cycle of self-healing in ceramic oxidesScientists discovered a self-healing cycle for defects in ceramics predicted by advanced atomic-level simulations. Irradiation creates defects and causes the ordered atomic structure to become disordered. Simulations showed that creation of a threshold amount of disorder caused the displaced atoms to move faster. This sped up annihilation of the defects and healed the structure.
14min
The Atlantic
American CarnageIn his inaugural address, Donald Trump declared, “This American carnage stops right here and stops right now.” He knew it would not. We know it did not. “I’ll be able to make sure that when you walk down the street in your inner city, or wherever you are, you’re not going to be shot,” he declared during the campaign. “Your child isn’t going to be shot.” He has not been able to make sure of that––
18min
Scientific American Content: Global
Extreme Weather Will Occur More Frequently WorldwideAnd if countries do not meet the Paris climate agreement goals, the risks will be even greater -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
18min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Squeezing into the best shapeUntil now, producing liquids that can be shaped and reshaped on demand hasn't been possible. Scientists discovered a simple way to form stabilized droplets in a variety of structures. Tightly packed nanoparticle-polymer assemblies at droplet surfaces were squeezed into desired shapes assemblies with an electric field. This new approach is a simple route to form droplets of one liquid phase in anot
20min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Current generated when light hits a material reveals electrons behaving like an elusive particleA massless particle, a.k.a. Weyl fermion, predicted nearly 100 years ago, has been found in another corner of physics. Electrons in a semimetal can behave like these particles. They are either right-handed or left-handed—they are mirror images like our hands. Theory predicted that Weyl semimetals could produce handedness-dependent electrical current by shining circularly polarized infrared light o
20min
Ingeniøren
Kronik: Upræcise krav i det nye bygningsreglement skaber forvirring
24min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tiny membrane key to safe drinking waterUsing their own specially designed form of graphene, 'Graphair' scientists have supercharged water purification, making it simpler, more effective and quicker.
26min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
White nose syndrome is killing millions of bats via a contagious fungus – here's how to stop itA dangerous fungus has been sweeping across North America with devastating consequences. In the past decade, between 5m and 7m bats in the US and Canada have been wiped out as a result of the fungal disease known as white nose syndrome, which alters their behaviour in potentially deadly ways. But the latest research shows there might be hope for researchers trying to battle the disease, following
26min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smart and comfortable new textiles for high-tech clothingUncomfortable, rigid, with low air permeability: textile materials capable of conducting electricity can be awkward for day-to-day use. However, researchers at the University of Bayreuth, Donghua University in Shanghai, and Nanjing Forestry University have now developed new nonwoven materials that are electrically conductive as well as flexible and breathable. This paves the way for comfortable hi
26min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Small lakes and temporary ponds release CO2 even when dryTemporary lakes and ponds emit CO₂ even when they are dry, and dry areas emit a larger amount of carbon into the atmosphere. This phenomenon, described now for the first time, could have an impact on the global carbon cycle that controls Earth's climate, according to a study led by Biel Obrador from the University of Barcelona and Núria Catalán from the Catalan Institute for Water Research (ICRA).
26min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Kamikaze sperm and four-headed penises – the hidden ways animals win the mating gameWe all know that individuals fight over potential love interests. Just think of Daniel Cleaver (Hugh Grant) and Mark Darcy (Colin Firth) scuffling – rather impotently – over Bridget Jones in a fountain. But you might be surprised to hear that the fierce rivalry continues behind the scenes – in the form of sperm competition. This is when the sperm of two or more males compete inside the reproductiv
26min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers devise a new, inexpensive way to fabricate microneedlesGetting an injection at the doctor's office is never a fun thing, but a new approach is on the horizon, using what are called microneedles, arrays of tiny needles that deliver medication through the skin without causing pain. But fabricating microneedles is costly, requiring cleanrooms and expensive equipment.
26min
Futurity.org
Light-activated drugs could kill cancer with fewer side effectsLight-activated cancer drugs that don’t cause the toxic side effects of current chemotherapy treatments are closer to becoming a reality, a new study suggests. Researchers say they now know more about how a pioneering platinum-based chemotherapy drug candidate— trans,trans,trans- [Pt(N 3 ) 2 (OH) 2 (py) 2 ]—functions when activated by light. “The current shortcomings of most chemotherapeutic agen
27min
Dagens Medicin
Mange diabetespatienter har svært ved at tale om deres sygdomEn ny undersøgelse fra Diabetesforeningen viser, at næsten halvdelen af de adspurgte diabetesramte synes, at det er udfordrende at involvere sine nærmeste i sin sygdom – og hver tiende holder sin sygdom skjult.
27min
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Peter Diamandis Is the Latest Tech Futurist Betting on Stem CellsFounder of the X Prize is turning his attention to fighting the onset of old age, one stem cell at a time.
32min
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LimeBike's Expansion Shows How Bike-Share Wars Are EscalatingRivalry among established Chinese companies and US startups has intensified into a trash-talking land grab involving electric scooters and electric bikes.
32min
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Your New Virtual Office: Augmented Realty in the WorkplaceAugmented-reality workspaces will transform the way you do your job, and you won’t look weird doing it. At all.
32min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New stem-cell based stroke treatment repairs damaged brain tissueA team of researchers at the University of Georgia's Regenerative Bioscience Center and ArunA Biomedical, a UGA startup company, have developed a new treatment for stroke that reduces brain damage and accelerates the brain's natural healing tendencies in animal models.
32min
Scientific American Content: Global
Could Dogs Help Save the Mongolian Steppe?An American entrepreneur is working to convert Mongolian herders into conservationists by reintroducing the region's traditional livestock protection dog -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
37min
The Atlantic
Why Fashion Is Key to Understanding the World of Black PantherBlack Panther is one of the most highly anticipated films of 2018—not just for its adaptation of the popular comic, but also for its fashion. Since the first teaser trailer was released last June, people have been raving about , and drawing inspiration from, the costumes in the movie’s world of Wakanda. “What are you wearing to the Black Panther premiere?” became a prominent topic of discussion a
55min
Futurity.org
Treating addiction in prison cuts O.D. deaths after releaseA treatment program for opioid addiction launched by the Rhode Island Department of Corrections was associated with a significant drop in drug overdose deaths after inmates were released—and contributed to an overall drop in overdose deaths statewide, a new study finds. “We wanted to see if that intervention could impact statewide overdose mortality, and the answer is a resounding yes.” The progr
55min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the new mozzie emoji can create buzz to battle mosquito-borne diseaseMosquitoes are coming. The Unicode Consortium has just announced that alongside your smiling face – or perhaps crying face – emoji you'll soon be able to add a mosquito.
56min
Dagens Medicin
Ulrich Fredberg modtager Ove-Bøje hædersprisSpeciallæge Ulrich Fredberg har fået Dansk Idrætsmedicinsk Selskabs Ove Bøje-pris for sin indsats på det idrætsmedicinske område.
57min
The Scientist RSS
First Documented Case of Transgender Mother to BreastfeedDoctors report that a regimen of hormones, an antiemetic drug, and pumping gave the woman enough milk production to feed her baby exclusively breastmilk for six weeks.
1h
The Scientist RSS
CT Scans Reveal New Muscles in Horseshoe CrabsThe chelicerates' unique anatomical features make them useful analogs to extinct arthropods.
1h
The Scientist RSS
Amazonian Fish Genome Challenges Long-Held Assumptions About Asexual ReproductionPoecilia formosa, an all-female fish species, has a surprisingly robust genome.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Integrated design strategy lowers the mass and costs of motors that move objects nanometers at a timeProbing intricate cells or high-tech microchip components requires 'nanopositioners' that can scan large areas with extremely small steps. Normally, these positioners have separate fine- and coarse-movement stages, but A*STAR researchers have introduced a parallel-actuated system that integrates the two units for improved energy efficiency.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Merge assistant for trucks takes over from the driverMerging on the motorway or changing lanes: this may quite literally become an automatism for truck drivers in the long term. Jan Loof, mechanical engineer at Eindhoven University of Technology, has developed a system that can take over the steering and enable a vehicle to automatically merge in traffic. However, the driver will always exercise control of the steering wheel. First tests on the road
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Robots and workers of the world, unite!Robots are already changing the way we work—particularly in factories—but worries that they will steal our jobs are only part of the picture, as new technologies are also opening up workplace opportunities for workers and are likely to create new jobs in the future.
1h
Futurity.org
This neurotransmitter may be behind some alcohol cravingsThe neurotransmitter glutamate may play a role in some alcohol cravings, report researchers. Alcohol dependence and alcohol use disorders occur in about 30 percent of all Americans, taking a severe toll on people’s lives, as well as on the health care system and economy. Ninety percent of all attempts to cure the dependence or abuse of alcohol result in relapse within four years. Sights, sounds,
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Secret Behind One Of The Greatest Success Stories In All Of HistoryIn Steven Pinker’s new book, Enlightenment Now, he argues that we live in the best of times—and must remain devoted to reason and humanism if that is to continue -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A magnetic method for polishing metals enables mold templates with microscale featuresInjection molding enables large-scale production of polymer and plastic materials with micrometer-sized features. Now, A*STAR scientists have developed a method for creating mold templates with high precision and few defects.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Companion robots could help our rural schoolsCompanion robots could be used in rural schools to help motivate students to study science and technology, and to provide comfort, according to University of Auckland research.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New printing technique uses cells and molecules to recreate biological structuresResearchers from Queen Mary University of London have developed a printing technique using cells and molecules normally found in natural tissues to create constructs that resemble biological structures.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Maximizing the environmental benefits of autonomous vehiclesThe added weight, electricity demand and aerodynamic drag of the sensors and computers used in autonomous vehicles are significant contributors to their lifetime energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new study.
1h
The Atlantic
The Real Meaning of Due Process in the #MeToo EraIt took two White House aides resigning after allegations of domestic violence for President Trump to bring up due process. On Saturday, Trump tweeted: Peoples lives are being shattered and destroyed by a mere allegation. Some are true and some are false. Some are old and some are new. There is no recovery for someone falsely accused - life and career are gone. Is there no such thing any longer a
1h
Popular Science
Still need a flu shot? Here's how to find one near youHealth It's not too late to get the flu shot and it's really important that you do. You are not alone in your quest for a flu shot, even this late into the season. Here's how to track one down.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Diversity only marginally boosts accuracy of group's predictionsDiversity for boards, juries and other influential decision-making teams can help ensure that the interests of a diverse population are fairly represented and addressed.
1h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Biopesticider kan hjælpe udfasning af resistensskabende svampemiddel på vejForskere fra Københavns Universitet arbejder på et alternativ til landbrugets resistensskabende...
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop harvesting robots that could revolutionise farming practicesScientists at the University of Plymouth are developing ground-breaking technology which could assist fruit and vegetable growers with the challenges they face in harvesting crops.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tissue mechanics essential for cell movementCells that form facial features need surrounding embryonic tissues to stiffen so they can move and develop, according to new UCL-led research.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanosensors improve detection of disease biomarkers in exhaled breathResearchers from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) have developed nanosensors that rapidly analyse the components of exhaled breath to detect trace molecules associated with certain diseases. Their performance and accuracy was improved by designing protein-encapsulated nanocatalysts.
1h
Feed: All Latest
Airbus' Vahana Makes Its First Flight—And Now Must Defeat BureaucracyFor aircraft like Airbus' Vahana, the FAA's outdated rules pose a more serious threat than gravity.
1h
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These Perfectly Imperfect Diamonds Are Built for Quantum PhysicsDe Beers diamond company has a whole division to synthesize quantum-grade diamonds.
1h
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Want More 'Black Panther'? Here Are 5 Comics to ReadWant a crash course on T'Challa before hitting the theater this weekend? Start here.
1h
Futurity.org
Could ‘reprogramming’ these cells fix damaged hearts?Scientists hope to one day create new healthy heart muscle cells within a patient’s own ailing heart. A new study reveals key molecular details that should be useful in developing this ambitious approach. In the study, published in Cell Reports , researchers reprogrammed ordinary cells called fibroblasts into new and healthy heart muscle cells, and recorded changes that appear to be necessary for
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Maximizing the environmental benefits of autonomous vehiclesThe added weight, electricity demand and aerodynamic drag of the sensors and computers used in autonomous vehicles are significant contributors to their lifetime energy use and greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new study.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New printing technique uses cells and molecules to recreate biological structuresResearchers from Queen Mary University of London have developed a printing technique using cells and molecules normally found in natural tissues to create constructs that resemble biological structures.
1h
Science : NPR
$40 Million Later, A Pioneering Plan To Boost Wild Fish Stocks Shows Little SuccessA California program begun 35 years ago to boost waning white seabass populations became a model for other states. Now the first scientific review finds the program had a stunningly low success rate. (Image credit: Mike Shane/Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute )
1h
Dana Foundation
DIY: Sweet BrainsMany of our Brain Awareness Week partners are now hard at work planning their events for March 12-19. Event theme? Check. Venue? Check. Speakers? Check. But what about…food? Our #brainweek partners are by no means responsible for providing food at their activities, but should they want to, here is some sweet inspiration from my kitchen to yours. If you look online, there is no shortage of brain d
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Anthropology of Social MediaWe often hear broad claims about the impact of Facebook and Twitter on our lives—but that impact can be very radically depending on what sort of community you live in -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Butterfly gardens offer some hope for pollinatorsButterflies will use gardens planted to attract them, according to a new study from the University of Georgia. But the researchers cautioned that butterfly gardens can sometimes have a downside by exposing caterpillars to increased threats from predators or disease.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Universal basic income policies don't cause people to leave workforce, study findsNew research from the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy suggests that a universal basic income would not cause people to leave the workforce.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What do you get when you cross an airplane with a submarine?Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed the first unmanned, fixed-wing aircraft that is capable of traveling both through the air and under the water – transitioning repeatedly between sky and sea. The EagleRay XAV, which was developed with funding and assistance from Teledyne Scientific, holds promise for use in applications such as tracking and observing wildlife.
1h
Ingeniøren
Forsker og OL-atlet udfordrer videnskaben om friktionLina Almind Knudsen kæmper både for at knække gåden bag invaliderende tarmsygdomme og for, at Danmark snupper medaljer i en idrætsgren, hvor forskerne er uenige om forholdet mellem kraftpåvirkning og friktionskoefficienter.
1h
BBC News - Science & Environment
UK air pollutants continue declineNitrogen pollutants from motor vehicles fell 12% from 2012 to 2016, according to official statistics.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Vapour trail of the 2013 Chelyabinsk asteroidVapour cloud trail left by the Chelyabinsk asteroid as seen by M. Ahmetvaleev on 15 February 2013.
2h
Science | The Guardian
Ammonia emissions rise in UK, as other air pollutant levels fallLevels of powerful air pollutant rose by 3.2% from 2015 to 2016 according to government statistics Emissions of ammonia have been on the rise in the UK, new statistics from the government show, even while the amount of other pollutants entering the atmosphere has fallen. Levels of the powerful air pollutant rose by 3.2% from 2015 to 2016, the latest year for which statistics are available, accord
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study reveals changes in seabirds' diets dating back 130 yearsToday, the Monterey Bay Aquarium introduces another "first" – a new Ocean Memory Lab – as part of its scientific research program to protect the global ocean, its ecosystems and wildlife.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers publish perspective on fuel cellsFuel cells play a major role in creating a clean energy future, with a broad set of applications ranging from powering buildings to electrifying transportation. But, as with all emerging technologies, researchers have faced many barriers in developing affordable, efficient fuel cells and creating a way to cleanly produce the hydrogen that powers them.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
One big problem with recycling and biofuelResearchers from Karolinska Institutet have developed a quick and non-destructive method to map the carbohydrates of plant matter. By making composition analysis more easy and accessible, this method will help to understand where inefficiencies lie in many processes from paper recycling to the production of biofuel and will eventually lead to less waste and higher quality output.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Amyloid protein transmission through neurosurgeryAmyloid beta pathology -- protein deposits in the brain - might have been transmitted by contaminated neurosurgical instruments, suggests a new UCL-led study.For the paper, published in Acta Neuropathologica, researchers studied the medical records of four people who had brain bleeds caused by amyloid beta build-up in brain blood vessels.All four people had undergone neurosurgery two or three deca
2h
Live Science
Can You Find Elon Musk's Tesla Roadster Zooming Through Space in New Video?After a two-day chase, astrophotographer Rogelio Bernal Andreo captured Elon Musk's Tesla Roadster cruising through the solar system.
2h
The Atlantic
The Case of the Sick Americans in Cuba Gets StrangerToward the end of 2016, years into a slow rapprochement between the United States and Cuba, something strange started happening to CIA agents posing as diplomats in Havana. This something may or may not have been a sonic attack. It may or may not have been deployed by Cubans, Russians, Venezuelans, or any other country with whom the United States has beef. A detailed new accounting of the affair
2h
The Atlantic
What Color Is a Tennis Ball?It seemed like an easy question. The query came from a Twitter poll I spotted on my news feed last week, from user @cgpgrey. “Please help resolve a marital dispute,” @cgpgrey wrote. “You would describe the color of a tennis ball as:” green, yellow, or other. Yellow, obviously , I thought, and voted. When the results appeared, my jaw dropped with cartoonish effect. Of nearly 30,000 participants, 5
2h
Feed: All Latest
How You Could Road Race—and Win—From Your Living RoomVirtual exercise is more immersive, dynamic, and—mercifully—distracting than a traditional treadmill or stationary bike.
2h
Feed: All Latest
North Korea's Olympic Diplomacy Hasn't Stopped Its HackingDespite its Olympics diplomacy towards the South, the Kim regime is still engaged in brazen cybercrime targeting its neighbor.
2h
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Mystro Lets Drivers Juggle Competing Uber and Lyft RidesMystro gives ride-share drivers more leverage and says it can increase drivers' earnings by 30 percent.
2h
Feed: All Latest
Amtrak Survived Richard Nixon—Can It Overcome Donald Trump?The latest budget proposal halves the federal government’s Amtrak commitment—including funding for a safer braking system.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effectResearchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague) and institutional collaborators have demonstrated for the first time a single-molecule piezoelectric effect. The study, published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, represents a breakthrough in understanding the electromechanical behavior of individual molecules and provides a new concept of
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New method to replicate harsh conditions for materialsConfining a plasma jet can be stress-inducing, especially on the shielding materials. Noting the limits inherent in the test methods currently used for such materials, Professor Patrizio Antici and his colleagues have proposed a groundbreaking new solution: using laser-accelerated particles to stress test materials subject to harsh conditions. Recently published in the journal Nature Communication
2h
Live Science
Enriched Uranium Particle Appears Over Alaska — and No One Knows WhyA research plane detected a single particle of enriched uranium over Alaska's Aleutian Islands. The particle's origin is a mystery.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rapid evolution of a calcareous microalgaeWhen simulating future environmental conditions, researchers confront a problem: Laboratory experiments are easy to control and to reproduce, but are insufficient to mimic the complexity of natural ecosystems. In contrast, experiments under real conditions in nature are much more complicated and difficult to control. Scientist of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have combined bo
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists use egg whites for clean energy productionResearchers from the Osaka City University in Japan have developed a way to use egg whites as a substrate to produce a carbon-free fuel. They published their results on February 2nd in Applied Catalysis B.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Atlantic ship tracksThe Copernicus Sentinel-3A satellite takes us over the Atlantic Ocean close to Spain and Portugal where the sky not only features clouds but also criss-cross tracks from maritime vessels.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The search for dark matter—axions have ever-fewer places to hideIf they exist, axions, among the candidates for dark matter particles, could interact with the matter comprising the universe, but at a much weaker extent than previously theorized. New, rigorous constraints on the properties of axions have been proposed by an international team of scientists.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Budget airline Norwegian says profits grounded by fuel, expansion costsLow-cost airline Norwegian Air Shuttle said on Thursday that rising fuel prices and the cost of replacing aircaft and opening up new routes pushed it into the red last year.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Russian cargo ship docks at International Space StationAn unmanned Russian cargo ship has docked successfully at the International Space Station, delivering a fresh batch of supplies for the crew.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Recreating outer space plasma systems in the labThermodynamics provides insight into the internal energy of a system and the energy interaction with its surroundings. This relies on the local thermal equilibrium of a system. The application of classical thermodynamics to systems in disequilibrium is challenging. These include granular gas and materials, hard sphere packing in 3-D, and plasma systems.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global
Better BeefCan a remade cattle industry save the Amazon rainforest? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Ingeniøren
160 meter beton-prop: Tyskere støbte tunnelboremaskine fast for at redde tunnelI næsten et halvt år har en tysk tunnelboremaskine stået faststøbt i en jernbanetunnel. Nu fjernes betonen, så man kan finde ud af hvor skadet maskinen er og genoptage tunnelbyggeriet.
2h
Dagens Medicin
Overlægeformand om OK18: »Det ser sort ud«Det ser ikke ud til, at overenskomstforhandlingerne mellem de offentlige ansatte herunder læger og arbejdsgiverne kan nå at blive færdige i tide. Det siger formanden for Overlægeforeningen Lisbeth Lintz.
2h
The Atlantic
Ruth Bader Ginsburg Opens Up About #MeToo, Voting Rights, and MillennialsOn Monday, The Atlantic contributing editor Jeffrey Rosen spoke at length with Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the National Constitution Center, where Rosen is president and CEO. In a wide-ranging conversation before a live audience, Ginsburg offered a supportive critique of the #MeToo movement, confessed her affection for Millenials, discussed the Supreme Court cases she’d like to see overturned,
3h
The Atlantic
The Immigration-Reform Bill That Could Actually PassConsider the possibility, slim though it may be, that Donald Trump, the most stridently restrictionist U.S. president in decades, will be the one who breaks the current immigration impasse by signing a DACA amnesty, or, to use the locution preferred by the Trump White House, a DACA solution. How exactly would this come pass? On Wednesday morning, the Trump administration announced that the presid
3h
The Atlantic
The Nancy Pelosi DilemmaH ere,” Nancy Pelosi likes to say, “the currency of the realm is the vote.” With a majority of the votes in Congress, you have power. Without them, you have nothing. Pelosi, the House minority leader, knows it as well as anyone in Washington. She had the votes to make history in 2007 when she became speaker of the House, not only becoming the first woman to hold that title but in the process, ris
3h
Ingeniøren
Facebook spammer dig med sms'er, hvis du ikke er aktiv nokHvis du forsøger at højne sikkerheden på din facebookprofil ved at give Facebook dit telefonnummer, risikerer du at udsætte dig selv for en mindre lavine af sms'er, hvis du ikke logger ind nok – og de handler ikke om sikkerhed.
3h
Ingeniøren
FBI, CIA og NSA advarer amerikanere mod telefoner fra HuaweiDe amerikanske efterretningstjenester går sammen om at fraråde produkter fra kinesiske Huawei.
3h
Feed: All Latest
The Final, Terrible Voyage of the 'Nautilus'Kim Wall went for a ride on a submarine, hoping to write a story about a maker of "extreme machines." She never did. I needed to know what happened.
3h
Viden
Facebook sælger app, der sporer alt på din telefonApp gemt inde i Facbook-appen lover at beskytte din færden på nettet, men stjæler selv alle oplysninger om, hvad du foretager dig med din telefon
3h
Ingeniøren
Chips skal analysere DNA med lyspartiklerEt engelsk chip-producent bruger lys i stedet for elektricitet til lave hurtige beregninger af genomdata.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Short kids may have higher future stroke riskBeing a short kid is associated with increased risk of having a stroke in adulthood, according to Danish research published in Stroke, an American Heart Association journal.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Turning background room temperature heat into energyEvery time we convert energy from one form to another, part of that energy is lost in the form of heat. Trying to efficiently get that energy back is very difficult once it is lost to the environment. Thermoelectric devices can change heat energy into electricity, and vice versa. But to capture energy from heat efficiently, these devices typically need to work at high temperatures with a large tem
4h
Ingeniøren
Grundfos: Produkter skal have 3D-printede komponenterPumpeproducenten har en klar ambition om at 3D-­printe komponenter til endelige produkter. Grundfos er overbevist om, det kan lade sig gøre – men det kræver, at man evner at tænke helt anderledes end i dag.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon primed to hire 2,000 new employees in FranceUS online shopping giant Amazon said Thursday it plans to create 2,000 permanent full-time jobs in France this year as consumers are making more and more of their purchases via the internet.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cracking discovery: Japan scientist uses egg white for clean energyA Japanese scientist said Thursday his team has cracked open a method to improve the production of carbon-free energy—by using proteins taken from egg white.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UK blames Russian military for 'malicious' cyberattackBritain has blamed the Russian government for a global cyberattack that mainly hit businesses in Europe last year, accusing Moscow of "weaponizing information" in a new kind of warfare.
4h
The Atlantic
Could Amazon Flip a State?Could Amazon flip a state? Amid all the public chatter over the company’s search for a second North American headquarters, there’s been strikingly little discussion about the potential political impact. But the choice’s electoral implications could be substantial. Just as Democrats are becoming increasingly reliant on younger, better-educated, and urbanized voters, Amazon’s second headquarters co
4h
The Atlantic
Donald Trump's Language Is Reshaping American PoliticsDo the president’s words matter? In Donald Trump’s first year in office, there has been a surprisingly widespread effort to argue that they do not. Liberals and moderates occasionally insist that the media and the public should shift their attention from the president’s vulgar statements to the real policy work happening at federal agencies. Republican lawmakers, meanwhile, have repeatedly ignore
4h
The Atlantic
What's Actually Behind Cape Town's Water CrisisThe city of Cape Town was plonked by its founders onto a peninsula where the Indian and Atlantic oceans merge, often violently, beneath the imposing banks of Table Mountain. To its north lie the fertile fruit and wine farms that weigh down the city’s restaurant tables with unimaginable bounty. Every day when the clock strikes noon, a canon blast echoes from Signal Hill, a reminder of the city’s c
4h
BBC News - Science & Environment
What lies beneathWinning photos from the Underwater Photographer of the Year competition
5h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Great White demystifiedShark diving is helping tourists improve their perception about the largest predatory fish in the world.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
21 dolphins die after washing up on Mexico beachTwenty-one dolphins that were apparently attacked by another species of dolphin have died after washing up on a beach in northern Mexico, authorities said.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shellfish reefs: Australia's untold environmental disasterVirtually all of Australia's shellfish reefs have disappeared, making them the country's most threatened ocean ecosystem, scientists said Thursday, calling for more investment to rescue the important marine habitats.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Qualcomm mulls 'next steps' in Broadcom takeover bidQualcomm said Wednesday its board would "promptly" consider a hostile $121 billion takeover bid by Singapore-based Broadcom following a meeting of top executives of the two computer chipmaking giants.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Japan's crypto exchange Coincheck sued after hackCryptocurrency traders filed a lawsuit Thursday against Japanese exchange firm Coincheck for freezing withdrawals after hackers stole hundreds of millions of dollars in digital assets.
5h
Ingeniøren
Ingeniører ved for lidt om 3D-printDer er for få 3D-print-­specialister i Danmark, mener lederen af Grundfos’ 3D-print-afdeling. Bedre uddannelse, både af kommende og ældre ingeniører, er vejen frem.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China confirms first human case of H7N4 bird fluChina has confirmed the first human case of H7N4 bird flu, prompting Hong Kong to issue a health warning for those travelling to the mainland during the busy Lunar New Year holiday.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uber CEO aims to pare losses and get 'the love back'Uber CEO Dara Khosrowshahi is focused on cutting the company's massive losses and "getting the love back" after a year of damaging revelations about the ride-hailing service's sometimes heartless treatment of its employees, drivers, regulators and rivals.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Airbus profits soar despite new charge on A400M military planeAirbus said Thursday that increased deliveries, windfall gains from divestments and favourable exchange rates enabled profits to take off last year, even though it booked a "substantial" new charge on its A400M military transporter plane.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists study effects of wildfire management on bird populationsOn the tail of California's most destructive and expensive year of firefighting ever, it might seem obvious that vegetation removal would reduce the risk of such a year happening again. But scientists from the University of Arizona and the University of California, Berkeley, are showing that in chaparral, California's iconic shrubland ecosystem, management can devastate wild bird populations and t
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pyeongchang Olympics showcases Korean self-driving vehiclesThere's a competition at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics that has nothing to do with sports, and plenty to do with jousting between automakers and tech companies over autonomously driving vehicles.
5h
Science | The Guardian
Friends, Romans, naked wolf-men ... why an ancient festival is still controversialThe annual Lupercalia festival turned society upside down – and the location of its starting point is still hotly debated Scenes from films like Gladiator and series such as HBO’s Rome might lead you to think that the ancient Romans were liberal in their view of nudity. In fact the opposite was true. It was only during exceptional occasions that Romans were freed from their social norms – and the
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tiny membrane makes Sydney Harbour 'drinkable'Sydney's iconic harbour has played a starring role in the development of new CSIRO technology that could save lives around the world.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Don't blame hurricanes for most big storm surges in NortheastHurricanes spawn most of the largest storm surges in the northeastern U.S., right? Wrong, according to a study by Rutgers University-New Brunswick scientists.
7h
Viden
Droner er bedre til at tælle end menneskerForskere i Australien har afprøvet forskellige metoder til at tælle dyr i naturen – og dronerne vinder.
8h
Science-Based Medicine
Cleveland Clinic genetic experts call out functional medicine on worthless genetic testing and supplement prescribingCleveland Clinic genetics experts call out functional medicine on worthless genetic testing and dietary supplement prescribing: "Poor science, leading to even worse medicine." Irony meters exploded everywhere.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Eye exams linked to kids' reading levelsElementary school children who read below grade level may have challenges with their eyesight even if standard tests show they see 20/20, according to a new study from the University of Waterloo.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Don't blame hurricanes for most big storm surges in northeastHurricanes spawn most of the largest storm surges in the northeastern US, right? Wrong, according to a study by Rutgers University-New Brunswick scientists. Extratropical cyclones , including nor'easters and other non-tropical storms, generate most of the large storm surges in the Northeast, according to the study in the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology. They include a freak November
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Eating yogurt may reduce cardiovascular disease riskA new study in the American Journal of Hypertension, published by Oxford University Press, suggests that higher yogurt intake is associated with lower cardiovascular disease risk among hypertensive men and women.
9h
Ingeniøren
Gulvvarmen, højtaleren, støvsugeren, lyset: Pludseligt endte mit hjem på nettetDet føles både fedt og uhyggeligt, når hjemmet er på nettet.
9h
Ingeniøren
Tre snedige måder at blive bedre venner med chefen påMange ledere kan være svære at komme ind på livet af. Men netop dét kan være vigtigt for at løfte din karriere. Derfor har Jobfinder tre ideer til, hvordan I kan få et bedre forhold – uden at din leder fatter mistanke.
9h
Feed: All Latest
The NY Times Fires Tech Writer Quinn Norton, and It’s ComplicatedQuinn Norton was hired by the paper of record to write about “the power, culture and consequences of technology.” Then those consequences kicked in.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research on the brain's backup motor systems could open door to novel stroke therapiesNew research published in the Journal of Physiology could open the door to new therapies to improve the movement of arms and hands of stroke survivors.
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Higher cigarette taxes may increase use of chewing tobacco and cigars in adolescentsRaising cigarette taxes to combat smoking may increase the use of cigars and smokeless tobacco, such as chewing tobacco, in adolescents according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Public Health, involving 499,381 adolescents.
13h
ArXiv Query
The reciprocal sum of primitive nondeficient numbersWe investigate the reciprocal sum of primitive nondeficient numbers, or pnds. In 1934, Erdos showed that the reciprocal sum of pnds converges, which he used to prove that the abundant numbers have a natural density. We show the reciprocal sum of pnds is between 0.348 and 0.380.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists find key proteins control risk of osteoarthritis during agingScientists explain why the risk of osteoarthritis increases as we age and offers a potential avenue for developing new therapies to maintain healthy joints.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientist studies effects of wildfire management on bird populationsOn the tail of California's most destructive and expensive year of firefighting ever, it might seem obvious that vegetation removal would reduce the risk of such a year happening again. But scientists are showing that in chaparral, California's iconic shrubland ecosystem, management can devastate wild bird populations and that fire-risk reduction is only temporary.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cardiac macrophages found to contribute to a currently untreatable type of heart failureInvestigators have discovered, for the first time, that the immune cells called macrophages contribute to a type of heart failure for which there currently is no effective treatment.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study links fox domestication to gene activity in the pituitary glandA study of foxes offers new insights into the brain changes that occur in wild canids as they become more tame, researchers report. The study links fox domestication to changes in gene activity in the pituitary gland, a brain center that kicks out hormones to regulate various bodily functions, including the stress response.
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Engineers develop smart material that changes stiffness when twisted or bentScientists have developed a rubbery material that transforms itself into a hard composite when bent, twisted or squeezed. The new material could be used in medicine to support delicate tissues or in industry to protect valuable sensors.
13h
New on MIT Technology Review
Old-fashioned silicon might be the key to building ubiquitous quantum computersSilicon isn’t yet ideal for creating quantum machines. But the massive manufacturing ecosystem for silicon chips explains why researchers (and Intel) want to overcome its handicaps.
13h
Futurity.org
Here’s a new plan for finding life on other planetsInstead of looking for water as a sign of life on distant exoplanets, scientists should instead look at an exoplanet’s ionosphere, the thin uppermost layer of atmosphere. For decades, astronomers have been searching these distant exoplanets for signs of life, mostly looking for that most essential molecule, water. But Michael Mendillo and his colleagues have a different idea: search for an ionosp
14h
Science : NPR
WATCH: Penguins Carrying Valentines Will Melt Your HeartBiologists at the California Academy of Sciences handed out red felt hearts to African penguin couples in the aquarium. The birds use the romantic treats to woo and court one another. (Image credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
14h
Futurity.org
Estrogens from wastewater linger in vernal poolsEstrogens in treated wastewater that find their way into temporary wetlands known as vernal pools persist for weeks or even months, report researchers. That persistence may have implications for these critical aquatic habitats. An eight-week study of estrogens’ behavior in three vernal pools produced the findings, which provide insight into current treatment inadequacy and water reuse generally.
14h
Live Science
Lena Dunham's Hysterectomy: Can It Cure Endometriosis?Actress Lena Dunham has revealed that she recently underwent a hysterectomy to treat crippling pain from endometriosis.
14h
Futurity.org
Rare beach flower returns if nibbling mice lose coverLarge-scale removal of an invasive beach grass pays off for a rare, coastal flowering plant called Tidestrom’s lupine. Deer mice can munch up to three-quarters of its unripe fruits under the cover of that grass. “The key is that you have to have pretty near-complete removal of the above-ground biomass of this plant to remove the hiding place, the refuge (for the mouse),” says Eleanor Pardini, ass
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Asthma linked to infertility but not among women taking regular asthma preventersWomen with asthma who only use short-acting asthma relievers take longer to become pregnant than other women, according to research published in the European Respiratory Journal.
14h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Musk's Tesla to stay in space for millions of yearsA car launched by Elon Musk could stay in space for millions of years before hitting Earth or Venus.
14h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Patience and PainWhat We’re Following Shooting in Florida: Up to 17 people were killed and more were injured when a gunman opened fire at a high school in Parkland, Florida. Here’s what we know. Mass shootings have become an all-too-familiar story in the U.S. , and school shootings in particular are an ever-present fear for many parents. But very little research has been done about the victims who survive, and th
14h
The Atlantic
Another School Shooting—But Who’s Counting?A high-school shooting in Parkland, Florida, on Wednesday afternoon has left 17 people dead and numerous others injured, according to officials. The suspect, a 19-year-old former student named Nikolas Cruz who was expelled for unspecified disciplinary reasons, is in custody, according to officials. As details of the attack emerge, news organizations are engaging in a grim tradition: tallying the
14h
Futurity.org
Cockroaches teach robots to clamber and scurryEngineers are building robots that move more like cockroaches. By studying the pests as they clamber across chasms and over obstacles, roboticists hope to learn some of their locomotion secrets that they can then apply to new robot prototypes. “Where they live, you have all sorts of stuff around you, like dense vegetation or fallen leaves or branches or roots,” says Chen Li, assistant professor o
14h
NYT > Science
New York Will Investigate Reports of Gay Men Denied InsuranceDenying men life or disability policies because they take drugs to prevent H.I.V. is discriminatory and may trigger penalties.
14h
NYT > Science
F.D.A. Approves First Blood Test to Detect ConcussionsThe test may be able to quickly identify people with suspected brain injuries that could be widely used by the Pentagon and in sports.
14h
Live Science
Nervous System: Facts, Function & DiseasesThe network of nerves is the body's electrical wiring.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Beewolves have been successfully using the same antibiotics for 68 million yearsScientists have now found that beewolves, unlike humans, do not face the problem of antibiotic resistant pathogens. These insects team up with symbiotic bacteria which produce up to 45 different antibiotic substances to protect their offspring against mold fungi. This antibiotic cocktail has remained surprisingly stable since the symbiosis emerged, about 68 million years ago.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Poor fitness linked to weaker brain fiber, higher dementia riskScientists have more evidence that exercise improves brain health and could be a lifesaving ingredient that prevents Alzheimer's disease.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Supermassive black hole model predicts characteristic light signals at cusp of collisionA new simulation of supermassive black holes -- the behemoths at the centers of galaxies -- uses a realistic scenario to predict the light signals emitted in the surrounding gas before the masses collide, said researchers.
14h
Futurity.org
Fruit fly stem cells offer glimpse of ‘perpetual life’Researchers have discovered that sperm-producing fruit fly stem cells use a genetic trick to stay perpetually young across generations. Certain sections of the fruit fly genome get shorter with age, but, remarkably, some reproductive cells can repair the shrinkage, the researchers report in eLife . This genomic shrinkage may underlie aspects of aging—and hint at ways that select cells might thwar
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blood thinners may raise stroke risk in over-65s with kidney diseasePeople over 65 years old may be increasing their stroke risk by taking anticoagulants for an irregular heartbeat if they also have chronic kidney disease, finds a new study led by UCL, St George's, University of London and the University of Surrey.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study suggests possible link between highly processed foods and cancerA study published by The BMJ today reports a possible association between intake of highly processed ('ultra-processed') food in the diet and cancer.
14h
Science | The Guardian
Ultra-processed foods may be linked to cancer, says studyFindings suggest increased consumption of ultra-processed foods tied to rise in cancers, but scientists say more research is needed “Ultra-processed” foods, made in factories with ingredients unknown to the domestic kitchen, may be linked to cancer, according to a large and groundbreaking study. Ultra-processed foods include pot noodles, shelf-stable ready meals, cakes and confectionery which con
14h
Big Think
What is bitcoin mining and why does it require so much electricity?Once a lucrative exercise anyone could do, bitcoin mining has grown out of control, and governments are weighing what to do. Read More
15h
Popular Science
Kittens from the same litter don't always have the same parentsAnimals It's called heteropaternal superfecundation. Female cats can be impregnated by more than one male, or tomcat, during a single ovulation period. It’s a phenomenon called “heteropaternal superfecundation.”…
15h
The Atlantic
The Party Is Over for Jacob ZumaAfter nine years in power, Jacob Zuma announced Wednesday he was immediately resigning from the office of president of South Africa. He outlasted scandal after scandal, but could not survive overt rejection by his party. The new leader of the African National Congress, Cyril Ramaphosa, had made clear that Zuma’s time was up, and, had he not resigned, he would have been forced out by a vote of no-
15h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: 'It Is a Horrible Day For Us'Today in 5 Lines Broward County Superintendent Robert Runcie said there are “numerous fatalities” after a gunman opened fired at a high school in Parkland, Florida, adding “It is a horrible day for us.” President Trump spoke with Florida Governor Rick Scott about the shooting and offered condolences to the families of the victims. Trump addressed former Staff Secretary Rob Porter’s domestic-viole
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Heavy bones, low body weight: New link between bone cells and blood sugar level foundBone cells do not just form new bone, they also influence the blood sugar level. Scientists have now discovered a new mechanism that controls this link. The metabolism of bone cells determines how much sugar they use; if the bone cells consume more sugar than normal, this can lower the glucose level in the blood. This research may contribute to future therapies for conditions such as osteoporosis
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rapid evolution of a calcareous microalgaeLaboratory experiments are easy to control and reproduce but are insufficient to mimic the complexity of natural ecosystems. In contrast, experiments under real conditions in nature are much more complicated and difficult to control. Scientist have combined both approaches to investigate the response of a major plankton species to increasing ocean acidification.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Practical work-related tasks may reduce burnout in new employeesA new study suggests that immediately charging new employees with simple, direct and meaningful tasks may be more effective in preventing newcomer burnout in the workplace than providing 'emotional' assistance.
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanotechnology could redefine oral surgeryA trip to the dentist or orthodontist usually instills a sense of dread in most patients, and that's before the exam even begins. Add to that the fear of oral surgery with a painful recovery, and many people will avoid these visits at all costs. Now, one group reports a pre-clinical study showing that they could potentially reduce pain and recovery time with the aid of specialized nanotechnology.
15h
Inside Science
Rat Poison May Have Hidden Cost for BobcatsRat Poison May Have Hidden Cost for Bobcats Skin infections have decimated bobcats in southern California. Now, researchers think rat poison may be to blame. bobcat_cropped.jpg Image credits: Pacific Southwest Region USFWS via Flickr Rights information: C.C. by 2.0 Creature Wednesday, February 14, 2018 - 16:15 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- At the start of the 21st century, a healt
15h
Big Think
Dwarf planetary systems will transform the hunt for alien lifeIt would be disappointing and surprising if Earth were the only template for habitability in the Universe. Read More
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tiny membrane key to safe drinking waterUsing their own specially designed form of graphene, 'Graphair', CSIRO scientists have supercharged water purification, making it simpler, more effective and quicker.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New drug improves motor function of children with genetic disorderChildren with later-onset spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) were more likely to show gains in motor function when treated with a new medication compared to children receiving a sham procedure, according to a study published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study demonstrates the impact the drug, nusinersen, can have on older patients with this progressive neuromuscular disorder.
16h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Look to penguins to track Antarctic changesScientists say carbon and nitrogen isotopes found in penguin tissues can indicate shifts in the Antarctic environment.
16h
Live Science
How a Student Photographed a Single Atom With a Store-Bought CameraWarning: Atoms on camera may appear larger than they actually are.
16h
Live Science
How Much Money Would It Take to Make You Happy? Scientists CalculateMoney may not buy you love, but it turns out that the green stuff can bring happiness, to a point.
16h
Big Think
5G debuts at the Winter Olympics and it’s changing how we experience The GamesEvents, entertainment, and transportation are literally being transformed during this year’s Olympics. Read More
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UA scientist studies effects of wildfire management on bird populationsOn the tail of California's most destructive and expensive year of firefighting ever, it might seem obvious that vegetation removal would reduce the risk of such a year happening again. But scientists from the University of Arizona and the University of California, Berkeley, are showing that in chaparral, California's iconic shrubland ecosystem, management can devastate wild bird populations and t
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Majority of Anna's hummingbirds may have feather mites on their tail feathersThe majority of Californian Anna's Hummingbirds appear to have P. huitzilopochtlii feather mites on their tail flight feathers, according to a new study.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Analysis of major earthquakes supports stress reduction assumptionsA comprehensive analysis of 101 major earthquakes around the Pacific ring of fire between 1990 and 2016 shows that most of the aftershock activity occurred on the margins of the areas where the faults slipped a lot during the main earthquakes. The findings support the idea that the area of large slip during a major earthquake is unlikely to rupture again for a substantial time.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Countries with greater gender equality have a lower percentage of female STEM graduatesCountries with greater gender equality see a smaller proportion of women taking degrees in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), a new study has found. Policymakers could use the findings to reconsider initiatives to increase women's participation in STEM, say the researchers.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New method to replicate harsh conditions for testing materialsConfining a plasma jet can be stress-inducing... especially on the materials especially for shielding materials. Noting the limits inherent in the test methods currently used for these materials, scientists have proposed a ground-breaking new solution: using laser-accelerated particles to stress test materials subject to harsh conditions.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neural networks everywhereSpecial-purpose chip that performs some simple, analog computations in memory reduces the energy consumption of binary-weight neural networks by up to 95 percent while speeding them up as much as sevenfold.
16h
Feed: All Latest
Gfycat Uses Artificial Intelligence to Fight Deepfakes PornCan a computer spot deepfakes? The GIF website Gfycat says it can.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A gut reaction...on a chipresearchers from the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University, Instituto Superior Técnico (IST, Portugal), Boston Children's Hospital, and Harvard Medical School (HMS) have published a study using an organ-on-a-chip (Organ Chip) model of the human gut that reveals the intestinal blood vessel cells may play an important part in radiation-induced intestinal injury,
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tissue paper sensors show promise for health care, entertainment, roboticsEngineers have turned tissue paper -- similar to toilet tissue -- into a new kind of wearable sensor that can detect a pulse, a blink of an eye and other human movement. The sensor is light, flexible and inexpensive, with potential applications in health care, entertainment and robotics.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cell biology: Scientists fill in a piece of the copper transport puzzleResearchers have identified the protein that carries copper into mitochondria, where copper is required for the functioning of the cell's energy conversion machinery. The discovery fills in a piece of the puzzle of how copper is distributed and used in the cell.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Living human tracheasBiomedical engineers are growing tracheas by coaxing cells to form three distinct tissue types after assembling them into a tube structure-without relying on scaffolding strategies currently being investigated by other groups.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cutting off cervical cancer's fuel supply stymies tumorsResearchers have shown that cervical tumors that don't respond to radiation may be vulnerable to therapies that also attack the cancer's fuel supply.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Risk of extreme weather events higher if Paris Agreement goals aren't metThe Paris Agreement has aspirational goals of limiting temperature rise that won't be met by current commitments. That difference could make the world another degree warmer and considerably more prone to extreme weather.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Personality: Where does it come from and how does it work?How do our personalities develop? What do we come with and what is built from our experiences? Once developed, how does personality work? These questions have been steeped in controversy for almost as long as psychology has existed.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The 'Super-Ranger' badgers that may hold the key to limiting the spread of bovine TBResearchers have discovered a new ranging behavior in male badgers, which will aid the implementation of a nationwide TB vaccination program.
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Light determines the genes that function in plant growthThe xylem is essential for transporting water across the entire plant body. Its development is heavily regulated by VASCULAR-RELATED NAC-DOMAIN (VND) genes. Scientists report a new experimental system that shows three VND genes are necessary for xylem differentiation in cotyledons in darkness but not in light. The study gives clues on how environmental factors can be modified to stimulate plant gr
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climb stairs to lower blood pressure and strengthen leg musclesIf you don't have the time or money for aerobic and resistance training, why not try climbing the stairs? A new study demonstrates that stair climbing not only lowers blood pressure but also builds leg strength, especially in postmenopausal women with estrogen deficiencies who are more susceptible to vascular and muscle problems.
16h
The Atlantic
Syria's War Has Never Been More InternationalIf the coming defeat of ISIS and rebel forces in Syria was supposed to bring an end to the seven-year conflict there, no one told Iran, Israel, Turkey, Russia, or the United States. Consider the stunning events that have occurred in the last three weeks alone: Last month, Turkey, with Russian approval, launched a military offensive in northwestern Syria against Kurdish fighters it views as terror
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Critics wary as Google's Chrome begins an ad crackdownOn Thursday, Google will begin using its Chrome browser to reshape the web by eradicating ads it deems annoying or otherwise detrimental to users. It just so happens that many of Google's own most lucrative ads will pretty much sail through its new filters.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Supermassive black hole model predicts characteristic light signals at cusp of collisionA new simulation of supermassive black holes—the behemoths at the centers of galaxies—uses a realistic scenario to predict the light signals emitted in the surrounding gas before the masses collide, said Rochester Institute of Technology researchers.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA finds strongest storms in weakening Tropical Cyclone SanbaInfrared data from NASA's Terra satellite found the area of strongest storms in weakening Tropical Cyclone Sanba when it was over the island of Palawan.
17h
Popular Science
Here's what Popular Science editors are reading right nowGadgets "It's some of the best speculative fiction I've ever read." "It's some of the best speculative fiction I've ever read."…
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Faster, cheaper, nano-based manufacturingEngineers are developing a new method of processing nanomaterials that could lead to faster and cheaper manufacturing of flexible thin film devices -- from touch screens to window coatings, according to a new study. The 'intense pulsed light sintering' method uses high-energy light over an area nearly 7,000 times larger than a laser to fuse nanomaterials in seconds.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can't get an image out of your head? Your eyes are helping to keep it there.Through brain imaging, scientists have found evidence that the brain uses eye movements to help people recall vivid moments from the past, paving the way for the development of visual tests that could alert doctors earlier about those at risk for neurodegenerative illnesses.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Running helps brain stave off effects of chronic stressThe study finds that running mitigates the negative impacts chronic stress has on the hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for learning and memory.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shorter time between first medical contact to PCI in heart patients linked to saving livesHeart experts are calling for immediate action following new research in the European Heart Journal that shows every minute counts for patients who suffer the most severe type of heart attack. The study shows numbers of deaths rise steadily and rapidly the longer the time between patients' first contact with a medical professional and when they are treated in hospital with percutaneous coronary in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diet or regular? Decoding behavioral variation in ant clonesClonal ants appear to be diverse in responding to sweetened water, suggesting epigenetic regulation in behavioral variation and colony survival.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pimavanserin: Relief from psychosis in dementia, without devastating side-effectsNew research has found that pimavanserin significantly improves psychosis symptoms in people with Alzheimer's disease, without the devastating side-effects of currently used antipsychotics. The research found an even greater benefit in those with the most severe psychotic symptoms.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA finds strongest storms in weakening Tropical Cyclone SanbaInfrared data from NASA's Terra satellite found the area of strongest storms in weakening Tropical Cyclone Sanba when it was over the island of Palawan.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Supermassive black hole model predicts characteristic light signals at cusp of collisionA new simulation of supermassive black holes--the behemoths at the centers of galaxies--uses a realistic scenario to predict the light signals emitted in the surrounding gas before the masses collide, said Rochester Institute of Technology researchers.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Milky Way ties with neighbor in galactic arms raceAstronomers have discovered that our nearest big neighbor, the Andromeda galaxy, is roughly the same size as the Milky Way.It had been thought that Andromeda was two to three times the size of the Milky Way, and that our own galaxy would ultimately be engulfed by our bigger neighbor.But the latest research, published today, evens the score between the two galaxies.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can learning stress-reducing techniques help reduce seizures?Learning techniques to help manage stress may help people with epilepsy reduce how often they have seizures, according to a study published in the Feb. 14, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
17h
Live Science
Stunning Photos Capture Eerie Underwater Shipwrecks
17h
Live Science
There's a Reason Roaches Love Banging Their Heads Into WallsCockroaches take a head-on approach to obstacles.
17h
Popular Science
Is it possible to die from eating too much chocolate? Asking for a friend.Ask Us Anything It would take 7,084 Hershey chocolate kisses to get chocolate poisoning Chocolate contains theobromine. At very high levels it can be toxic to humans, but that requires a lot of chocolate.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Milky Way ties with neighbor in galactic arms raceAstronomers have discovered that our nearest large neighbour, the Andromeda galaxy, is roughly the same size as the Milky Way. It had been thought that Andromeda was two to three times the size of the Milky Way, and that our own galaxy would ultimately be engulfed by our supposedly bigger neighbour. But the latest research, published today, evens the score between the two galaxies.
17h
Feed: All Latest
Democratic Task Force Outlines Voting Security Plan, With First Primary Just Weeks AwayThe Congressional Task Force on Election Security announced extensive recommendations for strengthening defense. But most of them won't happen any time soon.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Back-and-forth exchanges boost children's brain response to languageCognitive scientists have now found that conversation between an adult and a child appears to change the child's brain, and that this back-and-forth conversation is actually more critical to language development than the '30-million-word gap.'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Use of immunotherapy to treat aggressive colon tumorsResearchers have developed a mouse model that mimics advanced human colon cancer. This model has allowed them to study the immune system response for the first time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
All-terrain microbot moves by tumbling over complex topographyA new type of all-terrain microbot that moves by tumbling could help usher in tiny machines for various applications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dance of auroras: First direct observation of electron frolicThe shower of electrons bouncing across Earth's magnetosphere -- commonly known as the Northern Lights -- has been directly observed for the first time by an international team of scientists. While the cause of these colorful auroras has long been hypothesized, researchers had never directly observed the underlying mechanism until now.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Better together: Silicon qubits plus light add up to new quantum computing capabilityIn a significant step forward for quantum computing in silicon - the same material used in today's computers -- a team has successfully coupled a single electron's quantum information, or spin, to a particle of light, or photon. The goal is to use light to carry quantum information on a futuristic quantum computing chip.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cells 'walk' on liquids a bit like geckosResearchers have discovered that cells can 'walk' on liquids a bit like the way geckos stick to other surfaces.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
TSRI scientists find key proteins control risk of osteoarthritis during agingA study from scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) explains why the risk of osteoarthritis increases as we age and offers a potential avenue for developing new therapies to maintain healthy joints.
17h
Live Science
These Pun-Filled Science Twitter Valentines Are Better Than Cherry PiWe may be a bit biased at Live Science, but we think the best Valentine's Day tweets are the science ones.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Clean plates much more common when we eat at homeWhen people eat at home, there's typically not much left on their plates—and that means there's likely less going to landfills, according to new research from The Ohio State University.
18h
The Atlantic
What's Behind Trump's Rising Popularity?It would be easy to read the headlines this week and conclude that the Trump administration is in even more trouble than normal. The White House still can’t get its story straight on Staff Secretary Rob Porter’s departure amid domestic-violence accusations. Chief of Staff John Kelly seems to be losing support from his subordinates and his boss. And the boss himself is stubbornly refusing to offer
18h
The Atlantic
Pyeongchang 2018: Photos From the First Five DaysAfter five days of competition, Germany leads the Olympic medal standings with 12 total medals, followed by the Netherlands and the United States. High winds have made alpine events difficult and have led to several postponements, but events at the Olympic Sliding Center, Phoenix Snow Park, and other venues have been going smoothly. Here, a look at some of the competition from the first days of t
18h
Science : NPR
WATCH: Ants Act As Medics, Treat Wounds Of Injured Nest-MatesA new study, published on Wednesday in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B , describes how specific individuals in Matabele ant colonies will clean the wounds of injured ants. (Image credit: Erik T. Frank/Julius Maximilian University of Würzburg )
18h
Live Science
The Key to Surviving Superbugs May Be in the Dirt Beneath Our FeetDown in the dirt — and well within our reach — lies what may be a pharmaceutical gold mine.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New method to replicate harsh conditions for materialsConfining a plasma jet can be stress-inducing... especially on the materials especially for shielding materials. Noting the limits inherent in the test methods currently used for these materials, Professor Patrizio Antici and his colleagues have proposed a ground-breaking new solution: using laser-accelerated particles to stress test materials subject to harsh conditions. Recently published in the
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clean plates much more common when we eat at homeWhen people eat at home, there's typically not much left on their plates - and that means there's likely less going to landfills, according to new research from The Ohio State University.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Particulate filter research may enable more fuel-efficient vehiclesResearchers are looking to neutrons for new ways to save fuel during the operation of filters that clean the soot, or carbon and ash-based particulate matter, emitted by vehicles.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Company partnerships may have in-house ramificationsWhen companies partner with a sports team or a charity, the deal is usually about attracting consumers and strengthening their brands. Inside a company, however, what happens to employee allegiance?
18h
Popular Science
STANK LOVE, BEAR WIG, and other sayings from AI-generated candy heartsTechnology The list also includes ME LOVE HAVE and HOLE. Happy Valentine's Day. This is what you get when you ask artificial intelligence to write romantic candy heart messages for you.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Patients with Chagas disease are often infected with an intestinal parasiteIn patients with Chagas disease, the odds of being infected by the intestinal worm Strongyloides stercoralis increases by two-fold, according to a new study. The study underlines the potential benefits of performing a combined screening for both infections among Latin American adults living in Europe.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hydrogen transfer: One thing after the otherHydride transfer is an important reaction for chemistry (e.g., fuel cells), as well as biology (e.g., respiratory chain and photosynthesis). Often, one partial reaction involves the transfer of a hydride ion (H(-)). But does this hydride transfer involve one step or several individual steps? In a new study, scientists have now provided the first proof of stepwise hydride transfer in a biological s
18h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Green' catalysis technique aims to boost pharmaceutical manufacturing efficiencyAbout 70 percent of pharmaceuticals are manufactured using palladium-driven catalytic processes that are either fast or efficient -- but not both. Researchers have now developed a green chemistry method that combines aspects of both processes to improve efficiency at a minimal cost of processing time.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA totals rainfall from destructive Tropical Cyclone GitaTropical Cyclone Gita dropped a lot of rain as it strengthened into a major hurricane in the South Pacific Ocean. NASA's IMERG calculated totals based on satellite observations that revealed over a foot (305 mm) of rain had fallen in various areas.
18h
BBC News - Science & Environment
New antibiotic family discovered in dirtThe compounds are called malacidins and can kill several stubborn infections, including superbug MRSA.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Poor fitness linked to weaker brain fiber, higher dementia riskScientists have more evidence that exercise improves brain health and could be a lifesaving ingredient that prevents Alzheimer's disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Turning background room temperature heat into energyResearchers in Japan have developed a way to recover environmental heat with a new type of thin-film thermoelectric cell, based on two different materials that show changes in their redox potential on cycling of temperature.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
More than a well-balanced breakfast: Scientists use egg whites for clean energy productionEggs may soon fuel more than people in the morning. Researchers in Japan have developed a way to potentially use egg whites as a substrate to produce a carbon-free fuel.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Could sugar chains be the answer to bone growth in osteoporosis?Scientists have shown that altering the structure of sugar chains on the surface of stem cells could help promote bone growth in the body.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Watching myelin patterns form: Evidence for sheath remodeling revealed by in vivo imagingNerve fibers are surrounded by a myelin sheath. Scientists have now made the first-ever 'live' observations of how this protective layer is formed.
18h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic to Host Forum on Women and Children in the Criminal Justice System; February 28 in Washington, D.C.Washington, D.C. (February 14, 2018)-- The growing consensus around criminal justice reform is complex: Republicans and Democrats alike support measures like banning the box, reforming bail systems, expanding reentry programs, and changing sentences for nonviolent offenders. But others express concern that reforms might threaten public safety. On Wednesday, February 28, The Atlantic will host “ D
19h
The Atlantic
A Valentine From Boris JohnsonRoses are red, violets are blue Johnson tried to sell Brexit But said nothing new. One can feel for Boris Johnson, on today of all days. The British foreign secretary, a lead campaigner for the Brexit referendum, now finds himself the frustrated suitor of the nearly half of the British public that voted against it. And despite his Valentine’s Day call for unity—his political equivalent of give me
19h
The Atlantic
The Out OlympicsEditor’s Note: Read more of The Atlantic’s Winter Olympics 2018 coverage . At the 2014 Olympics where he won the silver medal in slopestyle skiing, Gus Kenworthy toyed with the idea of finishing up one of his runs by skiing up to the crowd of spectators and kissing his boyfriend. It would have been a dramatic way for Kenworthy to become the first openly gay male from the U.S. in Winter Olympics h
19h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Quantum computers 'one step closer'Quantum computing has taken a step forward with the recent development of a silicon-based programmable quantum processor.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cutting off cervical cancer's fuel supply stymies tumorsResearchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shown that cervical tumors that don't respond to radiation may be vulnerable to therapies that also attack the cancer's fuel supply.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Possible new principle for cancer therapyA study published in Science Translational Medicine shows that small molecules that specifically inhibit an important selenium-containing enzyme may be useful in combating cancer. When researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden treated cancer in mice using these molecules, they observed rapid tumoricidal effects. Researchers now hope that this new principle for cancer treatment will eventually
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Analysis of major earthquakes supports stress reduction assumptionsA comprehensive analysis of 101 major earthquakes around the Pacific ring of fire between 1990 and 2016 shows that most of the aftershock activity occurred on the margins of the areas where the faults slipped a lot during the main earthquakes. The findings support the idea that the area of large slip during a major earthquake is unlikely to rupture again for a substantial time.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More squid, less fish: North Pacific seabirds alter their prey preferencesOver the last 125 years, and particularly after an uptick in industrial fishing since 1950, North Pacific seabirds -- typically fish consumers -- have shifted their prey preferences, a new study reports; they are eating lower on the food chain, consuming more squid.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Understanding how the body builds immunity, to build better influenza vaccinesScientists are now equipped with a more detailed picture of the human immune system's response to influenza vaccination, thanks to the results of a new investigation.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new class of drug to treat herpes simplex virus-1 infectionResearchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have now identified a small drug molecule that can clear the HSV-1 infection in the cells of the cornea -- the clear outer layer of the eyeball -- and works completely differently than the currently-available drugs, making it a promising potential option for patients who have developed resistance.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Risk of extreme weather events higher if Paris Agreement goals aren't metThe Paris Agreement has aspirational goals of limiting temperature rise that won't be met by current commitments. That difference could make the world another degree warmer and considerably more prone to extreme weather.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How seafloor weathering drives the slow carbon cycleA previously unknown connection between geological atmospheric carbon dioxide cycles and the fluctuating capacity of the ocean crust to store carbon dioxide has been uncovered by two geoscientists from the University of Sydney. Better understanding of the slow carbon cycle will help us predict to what extent the continents, oceans and ocean crust will take up the extra human-induced rise in atmosp
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The 'Super-Ranger' badgers that may hold the key to limiting the spread of bovine TBResearchers have discovered a new ranging behavior in male badgers, which will aid the implementation of a nationwide TB vaccination program, recently announced by the Department of Agriculture, Food and The Marine in Ireland.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Majority of Anna's hummingbirds may have feather mites on their tail feathersThe majority of Californian Anna's Hummingbirds appear to have P. huitzilopochtlii feather mites on their tail flight feathers, according to a study published Feb. 14, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Youki Yamasaki from Washington State University, US, and colleagues.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CT scans reveal new muscles in horseshoe crab appendagesDigital dissection shows that two horseshoe crab appendages -- the pushing leg and the male pedipalp -- each have one more muscle than had been thought, according to a study published Feb. 14, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Russell Bicknell from University of New England, Australia, and colleagues.
19h
New on MIT Technology Review
Missing the Paris climate target by just a little means raising the odds of extreme weather by a lotIf global temperatures rise by just one extra degree, expect record-setting heat waves, downpours, and dry spells to become several times more likely.
19h
The Atlantic
Kevin Cramer Moves Closer to Launching a Senate CampaignUpdated at 2:49 p.m. ET Oklahoma oil tycoon Harold Hamm has offered to be North Dakota Representative Kevin Cramer’s finance chair for his potential Senate bid, The Atlantic has learned—the clearest sign yet that Cramer will make a play for Senator Heidi Heitkamp’s seat. According to two Republican sources with direct knowledge, Cramer would also likely face an uncontested primary: Should he deci
19h
The Atlantic
What Iran Is Really Up To in SyriaBEIRUT—On the day Syrian anti-aircraft missiles downed an American-made Israeli F-16 fighter jet, a banner boasting of the feat in both Arabic and Hebrew script went up in a village in southern Lebanon. To the northeast, loyalists of Bashar al-Assad, the president of Syria, distributed sweets to passersby on the streets of Damascus while the owner of a men’s clothing store put up a sign in his wi
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The Atlantic
When Herpes Infects the EyeHerpes simplex virus type 1 is best known as the culprit behind cold sores. When it’s not causing itchy, crusty sores on the mouth, it hides in the bundle of nerves that run through the face. And it’s super common. An estimated 50 to 90 percent of people harbor lifelong infections of HSV-1—largely without incident. But in some cases, HSV-1 can run through that bundles of nerves in the face and er
19h
Live Science
How Olympic Athletes Fare in Freezing ColdAthletes at the 2018 Olympic Games are dealing with some bitter-cold temperatures. But does the chill affect athlete's performance?
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
CT scans reveal new muscles in horseshoe crab appendagesDigital dissection shows that two horseshoe crab appendages—the pushing leg and the male pedipalp—each have one more muscle than had been thought, according to a study published February 14, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Russell Bicknell from University of New England, Australia, and colleagues.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Majority of Anna's hummingbirds may have feather mites on their tail feathersThe majority of Californian Anna's Hummingbirds appear to have P. huitzilopochtlii feather mites on their tail flight feathers, according to a study published February 14, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Youki Yamasaki from Washington State University, U.S., and colleagues.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How seafloor weathering drives the slow carbon cycleA previously unknown connection between geological atmospheric carbon dioxide cycles and the fluctuating capacity of the ocean crust to store carbon dioxide has been uncovered by two geoscientists from the University of Sydney.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The 'Super-Ranger' badgers that may hold the key to limiting the spread of bovine TBZoologists from Trinity College Dublin, working with a multi-disciplinary team of veterinarians and ecologists from the Department of Agriculture, Food and The Marine (DAFM) and the National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS), have discovered a brand new 'super-ranging' behaviour in badgers, which has major implications for implementing vaccination programmes to limit the spread of bovine tuberculo
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Risk of extreme weather events higher if Paris Agreement goals aren't metThe individual commitments made by parties of the United Nations Paris Agreement are not enough to fulfill the agreement's overall goal of limiting global temperature rise to less than 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. The difference between the U.N. goal and the actual country commitments is a mere 1 C, which may seem negligible. But a study from Stanford University, published Feb. 1
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Analysis of major earthquakes supports stress reduction assumptionsA comprehensive analysis of 101 major earthquakes around the Pacific ring of fire between 1990 and 2016 shows that most of the aftershock activity occurred on the margins of the areas where the faults slipped a lot during the main earthquakes. The findings support the idea that the area of large slip during a major earthquake is unlikely to rupture again for a substantial time.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA totals rainfall from destructive Tropical Cyclone GitaTropical Cyclone Gita dropped a lot of rain as it strengthened into a major hurricane in the South Pacific Ocean. NASA's IMERG calculated totals based on satellite observations that revealed over a foot (305 mm) of rain had fallen in various areas.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Company partnerships may have in-house ramificationsWhen companies partner with a sports team or a charity, the deal is usually about attracting consumers and strengthening their brands. Inside a company, however, what happens to employee allegiance? That's the question asked by researchers of the University of Oregon and two United Kingdom universities in Academy of Management Review.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
NASA's longest running survey of ice shattered records in 2017Last year was a record-breaking one for Operation IceBridge, NASA's aerial survey of the state of polar ice.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
True to type: From human biopsy to complex gut physiology on a chipOrgan Chip technology using donor-derived human intestinal cells offers advantages over organoids and creates new opportunities for personalized medicine.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Presence, persistence of estrogens in vernal pools an emerging concernEstrogens in treated wastewater that find their way into temporary wetlands known as vernal pools persist for weeks or even months, according to researchers, who suggest that persistence may have implications for these critical aquatic habitats.
19h
Science : NPR
Top EPA Science Adviser Has History Of Questioning Pollution ResearchMichael Honeycutt, the top toxicologist for Texas, is the latest chair of the EPA's science advisory board. But some scientists warn his views align more with industry than with scientific consensus. (Image credit: David J. Phillip/AP)
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Science | The Guardian
Transgender woman able to breastfeed in first documented caseDoctors hail breakthrough and say case shows ‘modest but functional lactation can be induced in transgender women’ A 30-year-old transgender woman has been able to breastfeed her child, the first ever case of induced lactation in a transgender woman to be documented in academic literature. Doctors said the case shows “modest but functional lactation can be induced in transgender women”. The accou
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Andromeda galaxy was formed in 'recent' star crash: studyThe Milky Way's neighbouring galaxy, Andromeda, was formed in a colossal crash between two smaller star systems no more than three billion years ago when Earth already existed, researchers said Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to get cleaner air? Germany considers free mass transitHow best to get cleaner air? Some officials in Germany want residents to leave their polluting cars at home.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technology combines LEGO bricks and dronesFrom February 15 to 18, children and families visiting the LEGO World expo in Copenhagen, Denmark will have the chance to make their brick-building dreams take flight with a flock of interactive miniature drones developed by the Human Media Lab at Queen's University in Canada in collaboration with the LEGO Group's Creative Play Lab.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Longer-lived animals have longer-lived proteinsResearchers studying half-lives of evolutionarily related proteins in different species uncovered a link between species lifespan and protein lifespan.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In effort to treat rare blinding disease, researchers turn stem cells into blood vesselsPeople with a mutated ATF6 gene have a malformed or missing fovea, the eye region responsible for detailed vision. From birth, vision is severely limited, and there is no cure. Researchers were the first to link ATF6 to this type of vision impairment. In a new study, the team discovered that a chemical that activates ATF6 converts patient stem cells into blood vessels.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer-killing virus acts by alerting immune systemA new study has shown that a cancer-killing ('oncolytic') virus currently in clinical trials may function as a cancer vaccine -- in addition to killing some cancer cells directly, the virus alerts the immune system to the presence of a tumor, triggering a powerful, widespread immune response that kills cancer cells far outside the virus-infected region.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pregnant women deficient in vitamin D may give birth to obese childrenVitamin D deficiency in pregnant women could preprogram babies to grow into obese children and adults, according to a new study. Researchers found that 6-year-olds born to mothers with very low vitamin D levels during their first trimester had bigger waists -- about half an inch plumper on average -- than peers whose mothers had enough vitamin D in early pregnancy. These kids also had 2 percent mo
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Earthquakes continue for years after gas field wastewater injection stops, study findsShutting down oil and gas wastewater injection wells may not stop human-induced earthquakes quickly, say seismologists. The scientists analyzed earthquakes at DFW Airport that began in 2008 and found that even though wastewater injection was halted after a year, earthquakes continued for at least seven more years. They concluded that high-volume injection, even for a short time, can induce long-la
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Humpback microbiome linked to seasonal, environmental changesJust like with humans, the skin on marine mammals serves as an important line of defense against pathogens in their environment. A new study sheds light on the skin microbiome—a group of microorganisms that live on skin—in healthy humpback whales, which could aid in future efforts to monitor their health.
19h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists fill in a piece of the copper transport puzzleResearchers have identified the protein that carries copper into mitochondria, where copper is required for the functioning of the cell's energy conversion machinery. The discovery, published in the Feb. 9 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, fills in a piece of the puzzle of how copper is distributed and used in the cell.
20h
Quanta Magazine
Smart Swarms Seek New Ways to CooperateIn a lab at the Georgia Institute of Technology, physicists run experiments with robots that look as though they came from the dollar store. The robots can’t move through space. They can’t communicate. Mostly they flap their little arms, like beetles stuck on their backs. But put a lot of these objects together and you get something from nothing: They hit each other, nudge each other and tangle w
20h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Study debunks fishy tale of how rabbits were first tamedA popular tale about rabbit domestication turns out to be fiction.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chemical cluster could transform energy storage for large electrical gridsResearchers believe they have found a promising compound that could transform the energy storage landscape. The compound has properties that make it an ideal candidate material for redox flow batteries.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists identify immune cascade that fuels complications, tissue damage in chlamydia infectionsResearch in mice pinpoints immune mechanism behind tissue damage and complications of chlamydia infection, the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States. Separate immune mechanisms drive bacterial clearance versus immune-mediated tissue damage and subsequent disease. Therapies are needed to avert irreversible reproductive organ damage that can arise as a result of silent infect
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Silicon qubits plus light add up to new quantum computing capabilityA silicon-based quantum computing device could be closer than ever due to a new experimental device that demonstrates the potential to use light as a messenger to connect quantum bits of information—known as qubits—that are not immediately adjacent to each other. The feat is a step toward making quantum computing devices from silicon, the same material used in today's smartphones and computers.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flying LEGO® Bricks: Drones and LEGO® could be the future of playNew technology combines LEGO® bricks and drones created by Queen's University researcher.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
IRB Barcelona paves the way to the use of immunotherapy to treat aggressive colon tumorsThe researchers developed a mouse model that mimics advanced human colon cancer. This model has allowed them to study the immune system response for the first time.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Living human tracheasBiomedical engineers at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, and Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, Mass. are growing tracheas by coaxing cells to form three distinct tissue types after assembling them into a tube structure-without relying on scaffolding strategies currently being investigated by other groups.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Monitoring bacteria on whale skinJust like with humans, the skin on marine mammals serves as an important line of defense against pathogens in their environment. A new study sheds light on the skin microbiome--a group of microorganisms that live on skin--in healthy humpback whales, which could aid in future efforts to monitor their health.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Better together: Silicon qubits plus light add up to new quantum computing capabilityIn a significant step forward for quantum computing in silicon - the same material used in today's computers -- a team led by researchers at Princeton University successfully coupled a single electron's quantum information, or spin, to a particle of light, or photon. The goal is to use light to carry quantum information on a futuristic quantum computing chip.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deforestation in the tropicsScientists at the UFZ have adapted a method from physics to mathematically describe the fragmentation of tropical forests. In the scientific journal Nature, they explain how this allows to model and understand the fragmentation of forests on a global scale. They found that forest fragmentation in all three continents is close to a critical point beyond which fragment number will strongly increase.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A gene that increases the risk of pancreatic cancer controls inflammation in normal tissueA group of researchers at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre has now discovered an unexpected link between the two processes: in the pancreas, one of the genes that increases the risk of developing pancreatic cancer also controls inflammation. This finding offers 'a major conceptual change,' explains Paco Real, from the CNIO, which, as well as helping to understand the origin of tumors, s
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Atlas of brain blood vessels provides fresh clues to brain diseasesEven though diseases of the brain vasculature are some of the most common causes of death in the West, knowledge of these blood vessels is limited. Now researchers from Uppsala University and Karolinska Institutet in Sweden present in the journal Nature a detailed molecular atlas of the cells that form the brain's blood vessels and the life-essential blood-brain barrier. The atlas provides new clu
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dance of aurorasThe shower of electrons bouncing across Earth's magnetosphere -- commonly known as the Northern Lights -- has been directly observed for the first time by an international team of scientists. While the cause of these colorful auroras has long been hypothesized, researchers had never directly observed the underlying mechanism until now.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Practical work-related tasks may reduce burnout in new employeesManagers hoping to avoid employee burnout and early turnover try to provide new employees with gentle assistance during their "easing in" period. But a new Tel Aviv University study published in the Journal of Applied Psychology suggests that immediately charging new employees with simple, direct and meaningful tasks may be no less effective in preventing newcomer burnout.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Would-be social entrepreneurs need more than a kind heartTo want to be a social entrepreneur, empathy is not enough for millennials. They need to feel confident in their ability to solve social problems and feel valued by the people they want to help, according to new research published in the Journal of Business Venturing.
20h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Cutting off a brain enzyme reversed Alzheimer’s plaques in miceInhibiting an enzyme involved in the production of Alzheimer’s protein globs also made old globs, or plaques, disappear in mouse brains.
20h
New Scientist - News
Cape Town is about to run out of water – how did this happen?Cape Town's water reserves are so low that it may soon have to turn off the taps. How did it get this bad, asks Michael Le Page
20h
New Scientist - News
Was SpaceX launch about progress in space, or just a giant ad?The Falcon Heavy launch was more than just spectacle – it set the stage for a future Mars mission. Now we need to think about who's in the driver's seat
20h
New Scientist - News
Oceans on alien worlds may form when the air explodes in flamesWhen hydrogen and oxygen combine in a planet’s atmosphere, they can ignite into a ball of fire and then leave behind liquid water oceans that would be good for life
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study links fox domestication to gene activity in the pituitary glandA study of foxes offers new insights into the brain changes that occur in wild canids as they become more tame, researchers report. The study links fox domestication to changes in gene activity in the pituitary gland, a brain center that kicks out hormones to regulate various bodily functions, including the stress response.
20h
Big Think
Transgender woman becomes the world’s first to breastfeed babyA transgender woman was able to breastfeed her baby after completing an experimental treatment regimen, but it’s still not clear what the effects of the breastmilk might have on the child. Read More
20h
Big Think
Could déjà vu and Nelson Mandela prove that alternate dimensions exist?Are déjà vu and the Mandela Effect related? A theory by physicist Michio Kaku may help explain. Read More
20h
New on MIT Technology Review
Don’t get too excited about Western Union testing a cryptocurrency
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Big Think
Why ecstasy in the U.S. is getting more dangerous by the dayNew infographics present the latest data on ecstasy impurity in the United States. Read More
20h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Quantum computers go siliconScientists performed the first quantum algorithms in silicon, and probed quantum bits with light.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists fill in a piece of the copper transport puzzleResearchers have identified the protein that carries copper into mitochondria, where copper is required for the functioning of the cell's energy conversion machinery. The discovery, published in the Feb. 9 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, fills in a piece of the puzzle of how copper is distributed and used in the cell.
20h
Feed: All Latest
Michael B. Jordan Is a 'Black Panther' EncyclopediaThe actor who plays Erik Killmonger in the new Marvel movie knows a lot of T'Challa trivia.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A theory of physics explains the fragmentation of tropical forestsTropical forests around the world play a key role in the global carbon cycle and harbour more than half of the species worldwide. However, increases in land use in recent decades caused unprecedented losses of tropical forest. Scientists at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) have adapted a method from physics to describe the fragmentation of tropical forests mathematically. In t
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists directly observe electron dynamics of the Northern LightsThe shower of electrons bouncing across Earth's magnetosphere, commonly known as the Northern Lights, has been directly observed for the first time by an international team of scientists. While the cause of these colorful auroras has long been hypothesized, researchers had never directly observed the underlying mechanism until now. The results have been published in Nature.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers develop smart material that changes stiffness when twisted or bentA new smart and responsive material can stiffen up like a worked-out muscle, say the Iowa State University engineers who developed it.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thermal blankets melt snow quicklyRemoving snow piled high in parking lots and along roadsides could soon be a far less tedious task. In a study appearing in ACS' journal Langmuir, scientists report that they have tested sunlight-absorbing thermal blankets capable of melting snow three times faster than it would on its own. They say the blankets could slash snow-removal costs and reduce the risk of environmental contamination caus
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NGC 3344 galaxy: A lonely beautyBeauty, grace, mystery—this magnificent spiral galaxy has all the qualities of a perfect galactic Valentine. Captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, the galaxy NGC 3344 presents itself face-on, allowing astronomers a detailed look at its intricate and elegant structure. And Hubble's ability to observe objects over a wide range of different wavelengths reveals features that would otherwise
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Coffee threatened by climate change, disease, pestsAccording to connoisseurs, the tastiest of coffee beans come from the Coffea arabica shrub, a fragile weakling that is susceptible to diseases and pests. And climate change isn't making things any easier for the plant. An article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, reports that although coffee producers and scientists agree that C. arabi
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
All-terrain microbot moves by tumbling over complex topographyA new type of all-terrain microbot that moves by tumbling could help usher in tiny machines for various applications.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tissue paper sensors show promise for health care, entertainment, roboticsUniversity of Washington engineers have turned tissue paper -- similar to toilet tissue -- into a new kind of wearable sensor that can detect a pulse, a blink of an eye and other human movement. The sensor is light, flexible and inexpensive, with potential applications in health care, entertainment and robotics.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scalable two-dimensional materials advance future-gen electronicsSince the discovery of the remarkable properties of graphene, scientists have increasingly focused research on the many other two-dimensional materials possible, both those found in nature and those concocted in the lab. However, growing high-quality, crystalline 2-D materials at scale has proven a significant challenge.
20h
Popular Science
Climate change revealed this U.S. military secretNexus Media News Toxic chemicals from hidden military bases now risk leaking. The melting Greenland ice sheet could leaking chemicals that the Army thought would stay frozen in perpetuity.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cells 'walk' on liquids a bit like geckosResearchers at Queen Mary University of London have discovered that cells can 'walk' on liquids a bit like the way geckos stick to other surfaces.
20h
The Atlantic
What It’s Like to Finally Meet After Dating Online for MonthsSeventy years ago, the Yale sociologist John Ellsworth Jr. was researching marriage patterns in small towns and concluded: “People will go as far as they have to to find a mate, but no farther.” This still seems to be the case in 2018. Though the internet allows us to connect with people across the globe near-instantly , dating apps like Tinder prioritize showing us nearby matches, the assumption
21h
The Atlantic
Conservatives Must Save the Republican Party From Itself“The Trump Republican party shames itself every day,” argues The Atlantic writer and David Frum. “Some people think we’d be better off if the GOP just went out of business. That’s dangerous advice.” In this video, which highlights key points from Frum’s article, “An Exit from Trumpocracy,” the self-identifying conservative explains why the Republican party has become “radicalized” and continues t
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment
AI does grunt work on China's pig farmsAlibaba rolls out a system that analyses pig squeals and coughs to improve pork production.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Crypto-currency craze 'hinders search for alien life'A scientist says the search for alien intelligence has been hit by a shortage of computer hardware.
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Science | The Guardian
Marine scientists urge protection for endangered shellfish reefsShellfish reefs, formed by oysters or mussels in or near estuaries, have declined by up 99% since British colonisation Marine scientists are lobbying the federal government to ensure protection for Australia’s most endangered – but least known – ocean ecosystem. Shellfish reefs, formed by millions of oysters or mussels clustering together in or near the mouths of estuaries, have declined by up 99
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Back-and-forth exchanges boost children's brain response to languageMIT cognitive scientists have now found that conversation between an adult and a child appears to change the child's brain, and that this back-and-forth conversation is actually more critical to language development than the '30-million-word gap.'
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cells 'walk' on liquids a bit like geckosResearchers at Queen Mary University of London have discovered that cells can 'walk' on liquids a bit like the way geckos stick to other surfaces.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Engineers develop smart material that changes stiffness when twisted or bentIowa State's Martin Thuo and Michael Bartlett led development of a rubbery material that transforms itself into a hard composite when bent, twisted or squeezed. The new material could be used in medicine to support delicate tissues or in industry to protect valuable sensors.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neural networks everywhereSpecial-purpose chip that performs some simple, analog computations in memory reduces the energy consumption of binary-weight neural networks by up to 95 percent while speeding them up as much as sevenfold.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Personality: Where does it come from and how does it work?How do our personalities develop? What do we come with and what is built from our experiences? Once developed, how does personality work? These questions have been steeped in controversy for almost as long as psychology has existed.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Countries with greater gender equality have a lower percentage of female STEM graduatesCountries with greater gender equality see a smaller proportion of women taking degrees in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), a new study has found. Policymakers could use the findings to reconsider initiatives to increase women's participation in STEM, say the researchers.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Model of fecal transplantation predicts which bacteria will flourishIn a paper in Cell Host & Microbe, scientists provide a statistical model predicting which bacterial strains will engraft after a fecal transplant. It is the first predictive strategy for developing a synthetic probiotic. The researchers also found that recipients acquired new bacteria that were previously undetected in both the donor and the recipient, suggesting that the post-fecal transplant mi
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What fluffy bunnies can tell us about domestication: It didn't go the way you thinkIt turns out that nobody knows when rabbits were domesticated. Despite a well-cited story of the domestic bunny's origins, a review published on Feb. 14 in Trends in Ecology and Evolution finds that historical and archaeological records and genetic methods all suggest different timeframes for its domestication. But the researchers involved in the study don't think this puzzle is a dead end. Instea
21h
The Atlantic
People Have Believed a Lie About Rabbit Domestication for DecadesIt is often said, in both popular articles and scientific papers, that rabbits were first domesticated by French monks in 600 AD. Back then, Pope Gregory the Great had allegedly decreed that laurices—newborn or fetal rabbits—didn’t count as meat. Christians could therefore eat them during Lent. They became a popular delicacy, and hungry monks started breeding them. Their work transformed the wild
21h
Live Science
Sea Slime Can Trigger 65-Foot Mega-TsunamisThe corpses of these tiny creatures ooze out a slimy layer that may explain catastrophic undersea landslides and tsunamis.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What fluffy bunnies can tell us about domestication: It didn't go the way you thinkIt turns out that nobody knows when rabbits were domesticated. Despite a well-cited story of the domestic bunny's origins, a review published on February 14 in Trends in Ecology and Evolution finds that historical and archaeological records and genetic methods all suggest different timeframes for its domestication. But the researchers involved in the study don't think this puzzle is a dead end. In
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Countries with greater gender equality have a lower percentage of female STEM graduatesCountries with greater gender equality see a smaller proportion of women taking degrees in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), a new study has found. Policymakers could use the findings to reconsider initiatives to increase women's participation in STEM, say the researchers.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Suiker's equations prevent 3-D-printed walls from collapsing or falling over3-D-printed materials commonly are soft and flexible during printing, leaving printed walls susceptible to collapse or falling over. Scientists have now seen a solution to this structural problem. They developed a model with which engineers can now easily determine the dimensions and printing speeds for which printed wall structures remain stable. The formulae are so elementary that they can becom
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cover crops in nitrogen's circle of lifeA circle of life-and nitrogen-is playing out in farms across the United States. And researchers are trying to get the timing right. The goal is to time nutrient release from cover crops to better match the nutrient needs of specific cash crops.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Excess emissions' make significant contribution to air pollutionA study shows that excess emissions -- which occur with plant shut-downs, start-ups and malfunctions, and not just in connection with natural disasters -- can make serious contributions to overall air pollution.
21h
Big Think
Scientists reveal how much money it takes to be truly happyMoney can’t buy you love? Well, it does buy happiness... up to a certain salary cap Read More
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The Atlantic
The Two Things That Will Determine Netanyahu's FateBenjamin Netanyahu IsraeliIsraeli politics generally follow Ecclesiastes: Nothing is terribly new under the sun. Twenty-one years ago, in early 1997, the Israeli police announced its recommendation that Benjamin Netanyahu, then a 47-year-old first-term prime minister, be criminally indicted for breach of public trust. That case involved the appointment of an attorney general who, police suspected, Netanyahu believed would
21h
The Atlantic
The Provocation and Power of Black PantherThis article contains light spoilers. Blackness invites speculation. The very idea of a global African diaspora creates the most fertile of grounds for a field of what-ifs . What if European enslavers and colonizers had never ventured into the African continent? More intriguing yet: What if African nations and peoples had successfully rebuffed generations of plunder and theft? What if the Zulu ha
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Would-be social entrepreneurs need more than a kind heartTo want to be a social entrepreneur, empathy is not enough for millennials. They need to feel confident in their ability to solve social problems and feel valued by the people they want to help, according to new research published in the Journal of Business Venturing.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A lonely beautyBeauty, grace, mystery -- this magnificent spiral galaxy has all the qualities of a perfect galactic Valentine. Captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, the galaxy NGC 3344 presents itself face-on, allowing astronomers a detailed look at its intricate and elegant structure. And Hubble's ability to observe objects over a wide range of different wavelengths reveals features that would otherw
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mass. public safety, public health agencies collaborate to address the opioid epidemicA new study shows that public health and public safety agencies established local, collaborative programs in Massachusetts to connect overdose survivors and their personal networks with addiction treatment, harm reduction, and other community support services following a non-fatal overdose.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The search for dark matter: Axions have ever fewer places to hideIf they existed, axions -- one of the candidates for particles of the mysterious dark matter -- could interact with the matter forming our world, but they would have to do this to a much, much weaker extent than it has seemed up to now. New, rigorous constraints on the properties of axions have been imposed by an international team of scientists responsible for the nEDM experiment.
21h
Live Science
This Underwater WWII 'Cemetery' Is Haunting and AmazingA sunken WWII vessel inspired the photographer who snapped a haunting underwater image.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Opioid addiction treatment behind bars reduced post-incarceration overdose deaths in Rhode IslandA new study suggests that treating people for opioid addiction in jails and prisons is a promising strategy to address high rates of overdose and opioid use disorder.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Carefully managed fire can promote rare savanna speciesIn the first continent-wide study of the effects of fire on bird and mammal diversity in the African savanna environment, researchers have found that increasing 'pyrodiversity' boosts the variety of species of mammals by around 20 percent and of birds by 30 percent in savannas with high rainfall.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Surgical infections linked to drug-resistant bugs, study suggestsPeople having surgery in low income countries are more likely to develop an infection than those in wealthier nations, which may be linked to drug-resistant bacteria, research suggests.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
TV's influence on pregnancy, childbirth more powerful than many women admitSociology research may reveal a surprisingly stronger-than-expected influence from TV reality shows and other media on pregnant women's perception and management of their pregnancy and childbirth -- possibly impacting more highly educated consumers.
21h
Popular Science
The HTTPS in your browser's address bar is important for staying safe on the webTechnology Google Chrome will soon clearly indicate that sites without encryption are "not secure." Starting in July 2018, Google Chrome will indicate sites using unencrypted HTTP as "not secure."…
21h
The Atlantic
A New Call to End Legacy AdmissionsUp until now, most of the legal and political fights over college-admissions policies have centered around the use of race as a factor in admissions at selective colleges. But that may be changing. On Wednesday, student groups at 13 elite colleges announced that they are mobilizing against a different type of affirmative-action program: that which privileges the children of alumni. About three-qu
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Muscle more important than fat in regulating heat loss from the handsNew study suggests that people with more muscle mass are less susceptible to heat loss and heat up faster after cold exposure than non-muscular individuals.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Understanding brain functions using upconversion nanoparticlesScientists have developed a novel approach for deep brain stimulation. The new method utilizes upconversion nanoparticles to allow delivery of visible light deep into the brain to stimulate neural activities in a less-invasive manner. This innovation marks a significant breakthrough in optogenetics, empowering researchers to uncover valuable insights about the brain.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Organ-on-chip technology enters next stage as experts test hepatitis B virusScientists are testing how pathogens interact with artificial human organs.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Problems with herbicide-resistant weeds become crystal clearHerbicide-resistant weeds are threatening food security, but researchers are one step closer to a solution after a new discovery. They have now uncovered how penoxsulam, the active ingredient in the world's largest-selling rice herbicide, works.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Heroin vaccine blocks lethal overdoseScientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have achieved a major milestone toward designing a safe and effective vaccine to both treat heroin addiction and block lethal overdose of the drug.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Recreating outer space in the labThermodynamics provides insight into the internal energy of a system and the energy interaction with its surroundings. This relies on the local thermal equilibrium of a system.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fracking tied to reduced songbird nesting successThe central Appalachian region is experiencing the country's most rapid growth in shale gas development, or 'fracking,' but we've known almost nothing about how this is affecting the region's songbird populations -- until now. A new study demonstrates that the nesting success of the Louisiana waterthrush -- a habitat specialist that nests along forested streams, where the potential for habitat deg
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Rigorous hand hygiene-intervention practices can lower mortality, antibiotic prescription rates in nursing homesInfection prevention practices centered on hand hygiene (HH) protocols can save lives across all healthcare facilities, not just hospital settings. This includes nursing homes, according to a new study published in the February issue of the American Journal of Infection Control (AJIC), the journal of the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC).
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cardiac macrophages found to contribute to a currently untreatable type of heart failureA team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has discovered, for the first time, that the immune cells called macrophages contribute to a type of heart failure for which there currently is no effective treatment.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study links fox domestication to gene activity in the pituitary glandA study of foxes offers new insights into the brain changes that occur in wild canids as they become more tame, researchers report. The study links fox domestication to changes in gene activity in the pituitary gland, a brain center that kicks out hormones to regulate various bodily functions, including the stress response.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hydrogen transfer: One thing after the otherHydride transfer is an important reaction for chemistry (e.g., fuel cells), as well as biology (e.g., respiratory chain and photosynthesis). Often, one partial reaction involves the transfer of a hydride ion (H(-)). But does this hydride transfer involve one step or several individual steps? In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now provided the first proof of stepwise hydride transfer
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover new link between bone cells and blood sugar levelBone cells do not just form new bone, they also influence the blood sugar level. Leuven scientists have now discovered a new mechanism that controls this link. The metabolism of bone cells determines how much sugar they use; if the bone cells consume more sugar than normal, this can lower the glucose level in the blood. This research may contribute to future therapies for conditions such as osteop
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hip hop meets health in a campaign against type 2 diabetesThe Center for Vulnerable Populations (CVP), at UC San Francisco, and Youth Speaks, a San Francisco youth development and arts education organization, are releasing four new spoken word videos by young poets from across California as part of a social media-based public health campaign to end type 2 diabetes in youth and young adults.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Opioid addiction treatment behind bars reduced post-incarceration overdose deaths in RIA new study in JAMA Psychiatry suggests that treating people for opioid addiction in jails and prisons is a promising strategy to address high rates of overdose and opioid use disorder.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Examination of postincarceration fatal overdoses after addiction treatment medications in correctional systemThere were fewer postincarceration deaths from overdose among recently released inmates after a program was started to provide medications for addiction treatment (including methadone, buprenorphine or naltrexone) in a state correctional system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Perspective on fuel cellsResearchers are aiming to tackle a fundamental debate in key reactions behind fuel cells and hydrogen production, which, if solved, could significantly bolster clean energy technologies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Small lakes and temporary ponds release CO2 into the atmosphere even when they are dryTemporary lakes and ponds emit CO2 all year –- even when they are dry -- and dry areas actually emit a larger amount of carbon into the atmosphere. This phenomenon, described now for the first time, could have an impact on the global carbon cycle that controls Earth’s climate, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stress-induced changes in genetic information: New details discovered about the function of a mysterious proteinScientists have researched the function of an enigmatic protein. The biological necessity of this protein, which can chemically alter certain building blocks of the genetic information, has been debated for quite a while. The new study now links the enzymatic action of this protein on small RNA molecules which are important for protein synthesis, to potentially far-reaching consequences for the in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Video games to improve mobility after a strokeNew research reveals that, after a cerebral infarction, injuries in areas that control attention also cause motility problems. The authors propose to complement physiotherapy with another type of cognitive training, such as video games.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Medical care for wounded antsAnts dress the wounds their mates have suffered in battle. Such behavior is believed to be unique among animals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New lead-free perovskite material for solar cellsPerovskite solar cells are a promising new low-cost photovoltaic technology, but most contain toxic lead. Researchers have introduced solar cells with a new titanium-perovskite material that gets the lead out.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New insights into human evolutionThe evolution of human biology should be considered part and parcel with the evolution of humanity itself, proposes an assistant professor of biological sciences. She explores an interdisciplinary approach to human evolution.
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Korean DMZ: A Rare Look Inside the 'Scariest Place on Earth'Just 40 miles north of Pyeongchang lies one the world's most dangerous places—and it's also home to an astonishing breadth of wildlife.
22h
New on MIT Technology Review
China’s AI startups scored more funding than America’s last year
22h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Why I train grandmothers to treat depression | Dixon ChibandaDixon Chibanda is one of 12 psychiatrists in Zimbabwe -- for a population of more than 16 million. Realizing that his country would never be able to scale traditional methods of treating those with mental health issues, Chibanda helped to develop a beautiful solution powered by a limitless resource: grandmothers. In this extraordinary, inspirational talk, learn more about the friendship bench prog
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Watching myelin patterns form: Evidence for sheath remodeling revealed by in vivo imagingNerve fibers are surrounded by a myelin sheath. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now made the first-ever "live" observations of how this protective layer is formed. The team discovered that the characteristic patterns of the myelin layer are determined at an early stage. However, these patterns can be adjusted as needed in a process apparently controlled by the nerve cel
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Practical work-related tasks may reduce burnout in new employeesA new Tel Aviv University study suggests that immediately charging new employees with simple, direct and meaningful tasks may be more effective in preventing newcomer burnout in the workplace than providing 'emotional' assistance.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Could sugar chains be the answer to bone growth in osteoporosis?Scientists at the University of York have shown that altering the structure of sugar chains on the surface of stem cells could help promote bone growth in the body.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More than a well-balanced breakfast: Scientists use egg whites for clean energy productionEggs may soon fuel more than people in the morning. Researchers from the Osaka City University in Japan have developed a way to potentially use egg whites as a substrate to produce a carbon-free fuel.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanotechnology could redefine oral surgeryA trip to the dentist or orthodontist usually instills a sense of dread in most patients, and that's before the exam even begins. Add to that the fear of oral surgery with a painful recovery, and many people will avoid these visits at all costs. Now, one group reports a pre-clinical study in ACS Nano showing that they could potentially reduce pain and recovery time with the aid of specialized nano
22h
The Atlantic
Who Is Weev, and Why Did He Derail a Journalist's Career?In the span of about six hours yesterday, The New York Times announced the hiring of Quinn Norton as a tech columnist and then apparently fired her. The Times claims that their decision to “go their separate ways” was guided by “ new information ,” revealed through a social-media maelstrom, about slurs Norton had used on Twitter and about her friendship with someone called weev. In October, Norto
22h
New Scientist - News
Drone dogfight crowns a winner in the battle against rogue UAVsIllegal or unwanted drones put air travellers at risk, so a competition called DroneClash is calling for new ways to tackle them
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Futurity.org
Titanium gets the lead out of perovskite solar cellsResearchers have developed a new titanium-based material that is a good candidate for making lead-free, inorganic perovskite solar cells. In a new paper, which appears in the journal Joule , the researchers show that the material is especially good for making tandem solar cells—arrangements in which a perovskite cells are placed on top of silicon or another established material to boost the overa
22h
Live Science
Chocolate Facts, Effects & HistoryChocolate, the most popular sweet treat in the world, makes you feel good and it may be good for you, too.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Thermal blankets melt snow quicklyRemoving snow piled high in parking lots and along roadsides could soon be a far less tedious task. In a study appearing in ACS' journal Langmuir, scientists report that they have tested sunlight-absorbing thermal blankets capable of melting snow three times faster than it would on its own. They say the blankets could slash snow-removal costs and reduce the risk of environmental contamination caus
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A surprise stimulus helps people stop an actionA new study finds that an unexpected sound causes people to stop an action more often than when they heard no sound at all. The finding could lead to new treatments for patients with motor-control disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and ADHD, as well as address the decline in motor control that accompanies aging.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Love and fear are visible across the brain instead of being restricted to any brain regionThe brain mechanisms of basic emotions such as anger and happiness are fairly similar across people. Differences are greater in social emotions, such as gratitude and contempt.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rotating dusty gaseous donut around an active supermassive black holeHigh resolution observations show a rotating dusty gas torus around an active supermassive black hole. The existence of such rotating donuts-shape structures was first suggested decades ago, but this is the first time one has been confirmed so clearly. This is an important step in understanding the co-evolution of supermassive black holes and their host galaxies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Alzheimer's disease reversed in mouse modelResearchers have found that gradually depleting an enzyme called BACE1 completely reverses the formation of amyloid plaques in the brains of mice with Alzheimer's disease, thereby improving the animals' cognitive function. The study raises hopes that drugs targeting this enzyme will be able to successfully treat Alzheimer's disease in humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Safe-sleep recommendations for infants have not reduced sudden deaths in newbornsAn analysis of trends in sudden unexpected infant death finds that the drop in such deaths that took place following release of the 1992 American Academy of Pediatrics 'back to sleep' recommendations, did not occur in infants in the first month of life.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
ESO's VLT working as 16-meter telescope for first timeThe ESPRESSO instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope in Chile has used the combined light of all four of the 8.2-meter Unit Telescopes for the first time. Combining light from the Unit Telescopes in this way makes the VLT the largest optical telescope in existence in terms of collecting area.
22h
Ingeniøren
Baggrund: Sådan skal Miljøstyrelsen finkæmme drikkevandet for mikroplastEn national undersøgelse skal kortlægge omfanget af mikroplast i det danske drikkevand. Resultaterne fra screeningen er klar til sommer, men kan ikke med sikkerhed sige noget om, hvor plaststykkerne kommer fra.
22h
The Atlantic
The Anti-Trump Recoil Goes Too FarIn the winter of 1858, Abraham Lincoln answered an admirer seeking advice on the study of law. Where should a beginner start? Lincoln replied by citing a basic library of works by four authors. Two were American; two were English. Lincoln did not assert an “Anglo-American legal tradition.” He took it for granted, as has every American lawyer and judge before and since. Such basic concepts as “tor
23h
Futurity.org
5 science-based tips for happy long-term loveThe authors of a new book on long-term relationships have some science-based advice for maintaining a solid partnership. Happy Together: Using the Science of Positive Psychology to Build Love That Lasts (Tarcher Books, 2018), from husband-and-wife team James Pawelski, a philosopher and professor of practice in the University of Pennsylvania’s Positive Psychology Center, and science writer Suzann
23h
New on MIT Technology Review
"Crypto is decentralizing, AI is centralizing. Or, if you want to frame it more ideologically, crypto is libertarian and AI is communist."
23h
Big Think
Depression, schizophrenia, autism and other psychiatric disorders show common genetic linkA new study of over 700 human brains has shown a genetic "signature" for common psychiatric disorders. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds that a surprise stimulus helps people stop an actionA new study from the University of Iowa finds that an unexpected sound causes people to stop an action more often than when they heard no sound at all. The finding could lead to new treatments for patients with motor-control disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and ADHD, as well as address the decline in motor control that accompanies aging. Results published in the Journal of Neuroscience.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rapid evolution of a calcareous microalgaeWhen simulating future environmental conditions researchers face a problem: laboratory experiments are easy to control and to reproduce, but are insufficient to mimic the complexity of natural ecosystems. In contrast, experiments under real conditions in nature are much more complicated and difficult to control. Scientist of the GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have combined both ap
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Love on the rocks: Penguins celebrating Valentine's DayPenguins are looking for love with big red hearts at a San Francisco aquarium.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fracking tied to reduced songbird nesting successThe central Appalachian region is experiencing the country's most rapid growth in shale gas development, or "fracking," but we've known almost nothing about how this is affecting the region's songbird populations—until now. A new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications demonstrates that the nesting success of the Louisiana Waterthrush—a habitat specialist that nests along forested strea
23h
The Atlantic
Why Amazon Pays Some of Its Workers to QuitOn Monday, Amazon reportedly began a series of rare layoffs at its headquarters in Seattle, cutting several hundred corporate employees. But this week, something quite different is happening at the company’s warehouses and customer-service centers across the country: Amazon will politely ask its “associates”—full-time and part-time hourly employees—if they’d prefer to quit. And if they do, Amazon
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Problems with herbicide-resistant weeds become crystal clearHerbicide-resistant weeds are threatening food security, but University of Queensland researchers are one step closer to a solution after a new discovery.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Green' catalysis technique aims to boost pharmaceutical manufacturing efficiencyAbout 70 percent of pharmaceuticals are manufactured using palladium-driven catalytic processes that are either fast or efficient - but not both. Researchers at North Carolina State University have now developed a green chemistry method that combines aspects of both processes to improve efficiency at a minimal cost of processing time.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Satellites helping to preserve the health and beauty of coral reefsCoral reefs are some of the most diverse ecosystems on Earth. Known as the "rainforests of the sea," they are home to more than a quarter of all marine species. Yet the beauty and vitality of the coral reef environments are threatened—and the reasons are numerous. Rising water temperatures due to climate change, land-based pollution, and indiscriminate fishing practices are the primary threats to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Enabling energy efficiency in urban planningA training network has enabled young Europeans to develop urban decision-making tools capable of minimising non-renewable energy use in cities.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Farewell to a pioneering pollution sensorOn Jan. 31, NASA ended the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer's (TES) almost 14-year career of discovery. Launched in 2004 on NASA's Aura spacecraft, TES was the first instrument designed to monitor ozone in the lowest layers of the atmosphere directly from space. Its high-resolution observations led to new measurements of atmospheric gases that have altered our understanding of the Earth system.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Absence of warm temperature spikes revealed as driver for vernalisationA new study has uncovered multiple new factors that contribute to the important phenomenon of vernalisation in plants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover missing ingredient from Earth's continental crustResearchers from Curtin University have identified a missing ingredient in the composition of the continental crust, opening up a new chapter in the Earth's geological history.
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How Bright are LED Flashlights? And What the Heck is a Lumen?Some lights claim they max out at 900 lumens, but you can use a light sensor to make sure for yourself.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Low-cost way to build gene sequencesA new method enables an average biochemistry laboratory to make its own gene sequences for only about $2 per gene, a process that previously would require its researchers to pay a commercial vendor $50 to $100 per gene. The approach will make it possible for scientists to mass produce thousands of genes and screen for their roles in diseases.
23h
Ingeniøren
Minister afviser solcellebranchens kritik: Vindmøllefabrikanternes behov var vigtigereBåde energiministeren og aftale-partneren Dansk Folkeparti forsvarer udhuling af den fælles udbudspulje til sol og vind med hensynet til at sikre et eksporterhverv som vindmøllebranchen gode vilkår.
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Dagens Medicin
FAPS-formand afviser kritik af ørelægers dobbeltrolleFormanden for Private Audiologiske Klinikkers Sammenslutning har kritiseret en stor del af landets ørelæger for at være på kant med etikken. Nu afviser formand for Foreningen af Praktiserende Speciallæger.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
No, artificial intelligence won't steal your children's jobs—it will make them more creative and productive"Whatever your job is the chances are that one of these machines can do it faster or better than you can."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Female horse riders want better bra supportThree quarters of female horse riders want bras that better support them, partly for the sake of their health and partly to avoid embarrassment, according to new research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How urban farmers are learning to grow food without soil or natural lightGrowing food in cities became popular in Europe and North America during and immediately after World War II. Urban farming provided citizens with food, at a time when resources were desperately scarce. In the decades that followed, parcels of land which had been given over to allotments and city farms were gradually taken up for urban development. But recently, there has been a renewed interest in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers quantify nutritional value of soil fungi to the Serengeti food webThe complex Serengeti ecosystem, which spans 12,000 square miles extending from northern Tanzania into southwestern Kenya, is home to millions of animals, including 70 species of large mammals. It is a hotspot for mammal diversity—including herbivores such as wildebeest, zebra and gazelles that graze on grasses and trees, as well as lions, crocodiles, leopards and hyenas that survive by preying on
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The Atlantic
These Crickets Can’t Sing Anymore—But They’re Still TryingIt took several years for the crickets of Kauai to fall silent. When Marlene Zuk first visited the Hawaiian island in 1991, she heard the insects chirping away, loudly and repeatedly. But every time she went back, the chirping diminished. In 2001, she only heard a single male, apparently singing into the void. The crickets had disappeared from sight, too. But when Zuk returned to Kauai in 2003, s
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Universities Are Tackling Society's Grand ChallengesA new report documents the ways nearly 20 institutions of higher learning are rallying research communities to take action -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Green' catalysis technique aims to boost pharmaceutical manufacturing efficiencyAbout 70 percent of pharmaceuticals are manufactured using palladium-driven catalytic processes that are either fast or efficient -- but not both. Researchers have now developed a green chemistry method that combines aspects of both processes to improve efficiency at a minimal cost of processing time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Remote jets are clearer nowThe hypothesis that was put to the test in the study states that jet power depends on the magnetic flux and the rotation rate of the black hole. Scientists have come up with the model that can estimate the amount of energy lost by the black hole due to the slowing down of its rotation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Workplace environment influences outcomes of an audit, study findsA more positive workplace environment at large companies can likely reduce the cost and length of an audit, according to a study that includes University of Kansas School of Business researchers.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Delivery drones could reduce emissions—if they’re used properly
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Turning background room temperature heat into energyUniversity of Tsukuba-based researchers developed a way to recover environmental heat with a new type of thin-film thermoelectric cell, based on two different materials that show changes in their redox potential on cycling of temperature.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Patients with chagas disease are often infected with an intestinal parasiteIn patients with Chagas Disease, the odds of being infected by the intestinal worm Strongyloides stercoralis increases by two-fold, according to a study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal). The study, published in Plos Neglected Tropical Diseases, underlines the potential benefits of performing a combined screening for both infections among Latin American adults living in E
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Organ-on-chip technology enters next stage as experts test hepatitis B virusScientists at Imperial College London have become the first in the world to test how pathogens interact with artificial human organs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Muscle more important than fat in regulating heat loss from the handsNew study suggests that people with more muscle mass are less susceptible to heat loss and heat up faster after cold exposure than non-muscular individuals.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The reasons that university students do sportThe research shows that female students do it for health reason and male students do it for social relationships that are involved in doing sport. Among those who had stopped doing or never done sport, a lack of time was the main reason.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Video games to improve mobility after a strokeA joint research by the Basque research center BCBL and the London Imperial College reveals that, after a cerebral infarction, injuries in areas that control attention also cause motility problems. The authors propose to complement physiotherapy with another type of cognitive training, such as video games.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Understanding brain functions using upconversion nanoparticlesScientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have worked with an international research team to jointly develop a novel approach for deep brain stimulation. The new method utilises upconversion nanoparticles developed by Professor Liu Xiaogang from the Department of Chemistry at NUS Faculty of Science to allow delivery of visible light deep into the brain to stimulate neural activiti
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Recreating outer space in the labThermodynamics provides insight into the internal energy of a system and the energy interaction with its surroundings. This relies on the local thermal equilibrium of a system.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Heroin vaccine blocks lethal overdoseScientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have achieved a major milestone toward designing a safe and effective vaccine to both treat heroin addiction and block lethal overdose of the drug.
23h
Popular Science
How to block web pop-ups, alerts, and autoplaying videoDIY Restore the peace and quiet in any web browser. Pestered by sounds, videos, pop-ups and other distractions you don't want? Here's how to quieten down the web.
23h
Scientific American Content: Global
Trump's Science Advisor, Age 31, Has a Political Science DegreeBecause Trump has not nominated someone to head the Office of Science and Technology Policy, Michael Kratsios is the de facto leader -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
China's Dystopian Tech Could Be ContagiousFor all the particularities of life in China, its big cities offer a familiar cosmopolitanism. Teenagers giggle over K-Pop videos in a Chengdu Starbucks. Strollers and dog walkers compete with an almighty clutter of dockless share bikes on the sidewalks of downtown Shenzhen. In Beijing’s trendy Sanlitun district, weekend shoppers size up Uniqlo parkas like bargain hunters anywhere. Here are all t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stock market forces can be modeled with a quantum harmonic oscillatorTraditionally, a quantum harmonic oscillator model is used to describe the tiny vibrations in a diatomic molecule, but the description is also universal in the sense that it can be extended to a variety of other situations in physics and beyond. One example of this is illustrated in a new study, in which researchers show that the restoring force in a vibrating quantum harmonic oscillator provides
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New on MIT Technology Review
Here are the big tech threats worrying US intelligence officials
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rotating dusty gaseous donut around an active supermassive black holeHigh resolution observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) imaged a rotating dusty gas torus around an active supermassive black hole. The existence of such rotating donuts-shape structures was first suggested decades ago, but this is the first time one has been confirmed so clearly. This is an important step in understanding the co-evolution of supermassive black ho
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fracking tied to reduced songbird nesting successThe central Appalachian region is experiencing the country's most rapid growth in shale gas development, or 'fracking,' but we've known almost nothing about how this is affecting the region's songbird populations -- until now. A new study demonstrates that the nesting success of the Louisiana waterthrush -- a habitat specialist that nests along forested streams, where the potential for habitat deg
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers successfully reverse Alzheimer's disease in mouse modelA team of researchers from the Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute have found that gradually depleting an enzyme called BACE1 completely reverses the formation of amyloid plaques in the brains of mice with Alzheimer's disease, thereby improving the animals' cognitive function. The study, which will be published Feb. 14 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, raises hopes that drugs targeti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Problems with herbicide-resistant weeds become crystal clearHerbicide-resistant weeds are threatening food security, but University of Queensland researchers are one step closer to a solution after a new discovery.A UQ School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences study led by Associate Professor Luke Guddat uncovered how penoxsulam, the active ingredient in the world's largest-selling rice herbicide, works.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A map app to track stem cellsResearchers who work with stem cells have ambitious goals. Some want to cure cancer or treat heart disease. Others want to grow the tissues and organs that patients need for transplants. Some groups are even working to develop highly personalized medicines, tailored to an individual's genetics. All of these ideas face a similar hurdle, however: The development of measurement tools for stem cell pr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stress-induced changes of genetic information—new details discovered about the function of a mysterious proteinIn a recent study, a research group at MedUni Vienna has published further details about the function of an enigmatic protein. The biological necessity of this protein, which can chemically alter certain building blocks of the genetic information, has been debated for quite a while. The new study now links the enzymatic action of this protein on small RNA molecules which are important for protein
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Feed: All Latest
Trump's Infrastructure Plan Threatens to Leave Little Cities BehindThe White House's proposal might work for wealthier urban areas, but offers little help for cash-poor locales.
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Feed: All Latest
Pinterest Now Lets You Reorder the Pins on Your BoardsToday’s update makes the image-saving service an even more capable productivity tool.
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Ingeniøren
Eksperter: Her er de ti største udfordringer for robotterHvad der skal til, hvis robotter skal nå væsentlige fremskridt inden for de næste 5-10 år? Et panel af eksperter har udpeget 10 områder, hvoraf de syv er rent teknologiske, mens de tre sidste handler om sociale, medicinske og etiske udfordringer.
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The Scientist RSS
Romeo the FrogWhen forlorn mating calls went unanswered, biologists set him up with an online dating profile.
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The Scientist RSS
Primitive Human Eggs Grown to Full Maturity in the LabThe technique could combat infertility, but it's still not clear whether these eggs are normal and functional.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Observing a changing platinum electrodeThe surface of platinum electrodes changes much more during use than was previously thought. In a collaboration between the Leiden Institutes of Chemistry and Physics, chemists Leon Jacobse, Yi-Fan Huang and Marc Koper, and physicist Marcel Rost have been able to show this for the first time. Publication in Nature Materials.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More light shines on Pleistocene extinction event with possible discovery of new genus of horseA group of North American Pleistocene horses was previously identified as different species. Now, mitochondrial and partial nuclear genomic studies support the idea that there is only one species, which belongs to a new genus.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tracking ocean salinity from space using colourMeasuring salinity at the ocean's surface is important for tracking global ocean circulation as well as local ecosystem health. A research team from Universiti Malaysia Terengganu have proposed a new method to measure sea surface salinity using ocean colour as a proxy. Reported in the Pertanika Journal of Science & Technology, this method could improve monitoring frequency and resolution, particul
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Scientific American Content: Global
A Compendium of AI-Composed Pop Songs-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rotating gaseous donut around an active supermassive black holeHigh-resolution observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) imaged a rotating dusty gas torus around an active supermassive black hole. The existence of such rotating donuts-shape structures was first suggested decades ago, but this is the first time one has been confirmed so clearly. This is an important step in understanding the co-evolution of supermassive black ho
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Power grid fluctuations hidden in audio recordings proved a powerful tool for police forensicsAudio and video recordings are important sources of evidence in criminal investigations, especially as more electronic devices are in use now than ever before. However, for recordings to be admissible, investigators often need to determine the time they were made, which can be difficult. Now, a team led by Vrizlynn Thing at the A*STAR Institute for Infocomm Research (I2R), in collaboration with th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Secrets of a little-known cancer ally revealedHuman cancers often have a little recognized ally— the increased size and number of a cell's organelles called the nucleolus. The nucleolus is where ribosomes, the cellular protein factories, are made. Ribosomes can also be hijacked by cancer to produce proteins that fuel its growth.
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Futurity.org
Graphene on toast could lead to edible electronicsScientists who introduced laser-induced graphene (LIG) enhanced their technique to produce what may become a new class of edible electronics. The chemists, who once turned Girl Scout cookies into graphene , are investigating ways to write graphene patterns onto food and other materials to quickly embed conductive identification tags and sensors into the products themselves. “This is not ink. This
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The Atlantic
The Necessity of 'Willful Blindness' in WritingBy Heart is a series in which authors share and discuss their all-time favorite passages in literature. See entries from Colum McCann, George Saunders, Emma Donoghue, Michael Chabon, and more. Doug McLean There’s nothing conventional about Heart Berries , Terese Marie Mailhot’s debut. A little over 100 pages, it’s far short of the 80,000 words most memoirs need to be deemed viable. There’s barely
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study says deforested areas in the Amazon vulnerable to loss of legal protectionsA study published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) finds that protected areas that are deforested are more likely to subsequently lose legal protections.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find gene that may greatly increase strawberry productionResearchers at the University of Maryland have identified and isolated a gene that is directly involved in the way strawberry plants grow, spread and produce fruit.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: NASA astronaut Stephanie Wilson preparing for spaceIn this image from 2009, NASA astronaut Stephanie Wilson is attired in a training version of her shuttle launch and entry suit, as she participates in a training session in the Space Vehicle Mock-up Facility at the Johnson Space Center in preparation for the STS-131 mission.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers create predictable patterns from unpredictable carbon nanotubesIntegrating nanoscale fibers such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into commercial applications, from coatings for aircraft wings to heat sinks for mobile computing, requires them to be produced in large scale and at low cost. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is a promising approach to manufacture CNTs in the needed scales, but it produces CNTs that are too sparse and compliant for most applications.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Silent singing crickets still going through the motionsA team of researchers with the University of St Andrews and the University of Cambridge, both in the U.K., has found that singing crickets in Hawaii have evolved to silence their singing apparatus but continue to sing inaudibly. In their paper published in the journal Biology Letters, the group describes their study of field crickets living on the island of Kauai and suggest some possibilities for
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Ingeniøren
Nu kan du få lokal vejrudsigt for 10.000 steder i Danmark – DMI forklarer hvordanFremover dækker DMI Danmark med lokale vejrudsigter for 10.000 steder i landet. De vejrdata, der bruges til at lave prognoserne er de samme som før, men visningen skal give brugerne en mere præcis oplevelse af vejrudsigten.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Projecting the impacts of climate changeHow might climate change affect the acidification of the world's oceans or air quality in China and India in the coming decades, and what climate policies could be effective in minimizing such impacts? To answer such questions, decision makers routinely rely on science-based projections of physical and economic impacts of climate change on selected regions and economic sectors. But the projections
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A single magnetic skyrmion detected at room temperature for the first timeA team of researchers from CNRS, Thales and the Université Paris-Saclay, all in France has for the first time detected a single skyrmion at room temperature. In their paper published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, the group describes their efforts, what they achieved and future avenues of research efforts.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Is Art Created by AI Really Art?When AI creates compelling art, the meaning of creativity gets blurred -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian
What fossils reveal about the spider family tree is far from horrifying | Susannah LydonRecent fossils in amber tell us how spiders evolved into their modern groups, but the fossil record for arachnids goes much deeper The discovery of a 100m-year-old spider ancestor with a whip-like tail , bearing a more than slight resemblance to everyone’s favourite parasitoid alien – the facehugger – gained a lot of media interest last week. Some arachnologists were upset by both the language of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can't get an image out of your head? Your eyes are helping to keep it there.Through brain imaging, Baycrest scientists have found evidence that the brain uses eye movements to help people recall vivid moments from the past, paving the way for the development of visual tests that could alert doctors earlier about those at risk for neurodegenerative illnesses.
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Science-Based Medicine
MoveFor most people, common health goals are best approached with as simple a strategy as possible. This avoids cognitive overload and non-compliance. Get the basics right, as there are diminishing returns from increasingly arcane details.
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Popular Science
Six animals having worse sex than you this Valentine’s DayAnimals Sex is terrible for almost all female animals. Sexual pleasure and passion aren’t priorities when a hermaphroditic snail impales its mate with a love dart. Their goals are to make babies and die.
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The Atlantic
19th-Century Paleontology Was at the Forefront of Big DataIn 1981, when I was 9 years old, my father took me to see Raiders of the Lost Ark . Although I had to squint my eyes during some of the scary scenes, I loved it in particular because I was fairly sure that Harrison Ford’s character was based on my dad. My father was a paleontologist at the University of Chicago, and I’d gone on several field trips with him to the Rocky Mountains, where he seemed
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Feed: All Latest
How the Internal Combustion Engine Keeps Getting BetterAfter more than a century, engineers are still finding ways to squeeze more power from less fuel.
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Dagens Medicin
Alle med kræft i underlivet bliver tilbudt gentestFor første gang får alle patienter med en bestemt sygdom tilbud om en genanalyse. Det gælder kvinder med kræft i underlivet. Formålet er bedre behandling og rådgivning af pårørende.
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Dana Foundation
The Romantic BrainGuest post by Kayt Sukel Image: Seimi Rurup Leading up to Valentine’s Day, you can’t help being inundated with advertisements for cards, chocolates and jewelry–those “perfect” gifts to show that one special person how much you love them. The world has love on the brain. But what are the latest findings regarding the brain in love? Over the past decade, several studies have investigated the neural
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Fast Can a Marathon Be Run?Is there an absolute minimum time to run a marathon? Will humans ever break the 2 hour mark? What does it take to set a world record marathon time? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global
Decoding the Overlap between Autism and ADHDThe two conditions often coincide, but the search for common biological roots turns up conflicting evidence -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic
The Precedent for Trump's Administration Isn't Nixon—It's ClintonHistory is at least as much about the structures of power as it is about the personalities of “great men”—or terrible ones. Of course, a president’s idiosyncrasies matter, and the outsized and outrageous personality of the current president of the United States has riveted the public and press. But most condemnations of President Donald Trump are also, if only implicitly, accusations that his adm
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Micromotors made easyResearchers of the ICN2 Nanobioelectronics and Biosensors Group led by Prof. Arben Merkoçi have devised a simple manufacturing method for versatile graphene oxide-based micromotors. Requiring no special equipment, it can be used to produce a range of micromotors that can be further tuned for different purposes. Luis Baptista-Pires explains the process in the paper published in Small.
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Science | The Guardian
Share your questions for scientists aboard an Antarctic expeditionThe Guardian is aboard a Greenpeace ship in the Antarctic. We want to know what questions you’d like to ask experts on the expedition Antarctic exploration brings challenges, but also surprises that can often seem out of this world – according to those lucky enough to experience the adventure. We’d like you to share your thoughts, and questions, as Guardian journalists report direct from the regi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers clarify dynamics of black hole rotational energyAstrophysicists at MIPT have developed a model for testing a hypothesis about supermassive black holes at the centers of galaxies. The new model enables scientists to predict how much rotational energy a black hole loses when it emits beams of ionized matter known as astrophysical jets. The energy loss is estimated based on measurements of a jet's magnetic field. The paper was published in the jou
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Science : NPR
These Citizen-Regulators In Arkansas Defied Monsanto. Now They're Under AttackIn Arkansas, a regulatory committee of farmers and small-business owners banned the latest weed-killing technology from the giant agrichemical company. Monsanto is taking them to court. (Image credit: Dan Charles/NPR)
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Ny årgangs-øl skal understøtte gastronomienForskere og kokke fra Nordic Food Lab ved Institut for Fødevarevidenskab (FOOD) på Københavns...
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