NYT > Science

Doctors Said Immunotherapy Would Not Cure Her Cancer. They Were Wrong.Scientists are racing to understand why immunotherapy drugs have worked for a few cancer patients when the medicines should have had no effect.
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NYT > Science

There’s a Persistent Hum in This Canadian City, and No One Knows WhyResidents affected by the “Windsor Hum” complain of sleeplessness, depression and headaches. It is one of many mysterious sounds reported throughout the world.
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Live Science

1st Video of Dumbo Octopus Hatchling Is AdorbsDeep-sea researchers captured an adorable video of a baby 'Dumbo' octopus swimming for the first time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Computers aid discovery of new, inexpensive material to make LEDs with high color qualityComputers have helped researchers develop a new phosphor that can make LEDs cheaper and render colors more accurately. Researchers predicted the new phosphor using supercomputers and data mining algorithms, then developed a simple recipe to make it in the lab. Unlike many phosphors, this one is made of inexpensive, earth-abundant elements and can easily be made using industrial methods. As compute
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

First video of 'Dumbo' octopod hatchling shows that they look like mini-adultsResearchers who've gotten the first look at a deep-sea 'dumbo' octopod hatchling report in Current Biology on Feb. 19 that the young octopods look and act much like adults from the moment they emerge from an egg capsule. Dumbo octopods are so named because their fins resemble Dumbo the elephant's ears.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Earthquakes follow wastewater disposal patterns in southern KansasWastewater created during oil and gas production and disposed of by deep injection into underlying rock layers is the probable cause for a surge in earthquakes in southern Kansas since 2013, a new report in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America concludes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Electric eel-inspired device reaches 110 voltsIn an effort to create a power source for future implantable technologies, a team of researchers developed an electric eel-inspired device that produced 110 volts from gels filled with water, called hydrogels. Their results show potential for a soft power source to draw on a biological system's chemical energy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

College roommates underestimate each other's distress, new psychology research showsCollege roommates are sensitive to their roommates' distress but tend to underestimate the level of distress being experienced by others.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

An enzyme's evolution from changing electric fields and resisting antibioticsBacteria can produce enzymes that make them resistant to antibiotics; one example is the TEM beta-lactamase enzyme, which enables bacteria to develop a resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, such as penicillin and cephalosporins. Researchers are now studying how an enzyme changes and becomes antibiotic-resistant.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Gates says billionaires should pay 'significantly' more taxesBill Gates says he has paid more than $10 billion in taxes over a lifetime but billionaires like him should pay "significantly" more because they benefit more from the system.
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Big Think

Diet has more impact on climate change than transportation. Here's how to fix that.A new quiz by the University of California reveals just how much carbon your diet is creating. Read More
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Feed: All Latest

Could Scientists Use Silver Iodide to Make Snow for the Olympics?You can theoretically "seed" snow in the atmosphere, but it's really hard to tell if it actually works.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Earthquakes follow wastewater disposal patterns in southern KansasWastewater created during oil and gas production and disposed of by deep injection into underlying rock layers is the probable cause for a surge in earthquakes in southern Kansas since 2013, a new report in the Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America concludes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

First video of 'dumbo' octopod hatchling shows that they look like mini-adultsResearchers who've gotten the first look at a deep-sea "dumbo" octopod hatchling report in Current Biology on February 19 that the young octopods look and act much like adults from the moment they emerge from an egg capsule. Dumbo octopods are so named because their fins resemble Dumbo the elephant's ears.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Fake Mushroom Lures Pollinators into Floral TrapUnassuming houseplant uses alter ego to get lucky at insects' expense -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

Brian Sissons obituaryBrian Sissons, who has died aged 91, mapped and interpreted the effects of the Ice Age on the Scottish landscape. From the late 1950s until his retirement in 1982, Brian transformed the understanding of the evolution of Scotland’s scenery. As a fieldworker, Brian surveyed the ways in which the landscape had evolved under glacial and post-glacial conditions. His two books, The Evolution of Scotlan
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Computers aid discovery of new, inexpensive material to make LEDs with high color qualityA team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego has used data mining and computational tools to discover a new phosphor material for white LEDs that is inexpensive and easy to make. Researchers built prototype white LED light bulbs using the new phosphor. The prototypes exhibited better color quality than many commercial LEDs currently on the market.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

DNA secrets of how vampire bats became bloodthirstyNew research shows how vampire bats evolved to survive on a diet of blood alone.
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Popular Science

Last week in tech: President’s Day sale on fresh contentTechnology HomePod has a problem, robots are adorable, and Bitcoin is just doing what it does. Take a break from cruising mattress sales to catch up on last week's biggest tech stories.
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New Scientist - News

We’re evolving a gene that may stop us from drinking alcoholHumans are still evolving and producing new gene variants, and one of them may give protection against becoming addicted to alcohol - by stopping us drinking altogether
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A Matter of DynamicsMost ion channels are very selective about the ions, which may or may not pass through them. They may be conductive for potassium ions and non-conductive for sodium ions or vice versa. However, a number of ion channels allows for the efficient passage of both kinds of ions. How do these channel proteins accomplish this?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dispersal of fish eggs by water birds – just a myth?How do fish end up in isolated bodies of water when they can't swim there themselves? For centuries, researchers have assumed that water birds transfer fish eggs into these waters -- however, a systematic literature review by researchers at the University of Basel has shown that there is no evidence of this to date.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How the insulin receptor worksAs we are approaching the 100th anniversary of the discovery of insulin, a wide array of its signaling pathways has been defined. However, the initial step in insulin action, i.e. the engagement with its cell-surface receptor and the resulting conformational change, which propagates across the plasma membrane to the intracellular module, remains poorly understood.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cellular recycling caught in the actResearchers have observed a normal physiological process, called "self-eating", that cells use to recycle their components. They developed an accurate technique that visualizes how mitochondria, cells' energy factories, are fused with lysosomes, cells' recycling machines, in order to get material destroyed and recycled. Since irregularities in this mechanism can lead to Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Is social media to blame for poor grades?Do teenagers who frequent Snapchat, Facebook, Instagram and other social media sites perform worse academically? Scientists have taken a look at these concerns.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Many colors from a single dotPhysicists have shown how even a separate single nanoparticle can be used to emit different colors of light. Their results show that the particles under consideration may be a very efficient and versatile tool to produce light of all colors at tiny scales.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Microanalysis of biological samples for early disease detectionResearchers have developed a sensing method with the potential to significantly contribute to early detection of cancer and diabetes.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Undersea Recordings Reveal a Whale's TaleBy eavesdropping on the calls of blue whales, researchers hope to get a more accurate picture of the massive mammals' distribution and abundance. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review

Elon Musk’s Boring Company will start digging a tunnel in Washington DC
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The Atlantic

Russia's Troll Operation Was Not That SophisticatedIt might be nice for Democrats and #NeverTrumpers to believe that Russia’s troll factory brought Donald Trump the 2016 Presidential Election. But no. Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s indictment of 13 Russians associated with the Internet Research Agency definitively shows, given current evidence, that while a small team in St. Petersburg ran a successful audience-development campaign mostly on be
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Blood and urine tests developed to indicate autism in childrenNew blood and urine tests which search for damage to proteins could lead to earlier detection of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and consequently children with autism could be given appropriate treatment much earlier in their lives. ASDs are defined as developmental disorders mainly affecting social interaction and they can include a wide spectrum of behavioral problems. These include speech distu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flexible warped nanographene developed for bioimagingAn international team of scientists has developed a water-soluble "warped nanographene," a flexible molecule that is biocompatible and shows promise for fluorescent cell imaging. The new nanographene molecule also induces cell death when exposed to blue laser light. Further investigation is required to determine how nanocarbons could be used for a range of biological applications, such as photodyn
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Spatial perception of odorants in cockroachesA recent study has described the first neural architecture capable of encoding the spatial location of odorants.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The starry sky shows nocturnal animals the wayNocturnal animals can use the stars and the Milky Way to find their way during the darkest hours.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

D-galactose affects ageing male and female brains differentlyA research study demonstrates in mice the biological relevance of sex in the effects of accelerated ageing caused by a chronic treatment of D-galactose, a sugar found abundantly in milk and to a lesser extent in fruits and vegetables. At high doses, this substance accelerates ageing in males, affecting them at sensory and motor level and in their neuro-immuno-endocrine system, while females experi
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Futurity.org

How WWII and a wife shaped Picasso’s bronzesResearchers have non-invasively analyzed a priceless group of 39 bronzes and 11 painted sheet metal sculptures by Pablo Picasso. “We now can begin to write a new chapter in the history of this prolific giant of modern art,” says Francesca Casadio, the Grainger Executive Director of Conservation and Science at the Art Institute and co-director of the Northwestern University/Art Institute of Chicag
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Futurity.org

Stretchy ‘Band-aid’ tracks stroke recovery in real timeA stretchable wearable sensor designed to be worn on the throat can help monitor and treat stroke patients. The sensor adds to the portfolio of stretchable electronics that are precise enough for use in advanced medical care and portable enough to be worn outside the hospital, even during extreme exercise, researchers say. “Stretchable electronics allow us to see what is going on inside patients’
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fifteen new genes identified that shape our faceResearchers from KU Leuven (Belgium) and the universities of Pittsburgh, Stanford, and Penn State (US) have identified fifteen genes that determine our facial features. The findings were published in Nature Genetics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Global grazing lands increasingly vulnerable to a changing climateA new study shows precipitation variability has increased significantly on 49 percent of the world's grazing lands.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Electrical implant reduces 'invisible' symptoms of man's spinal cord injuryAn experimental treatment that sends electrical currents through the spinal cord has improved 'invisible' yet debilitating side effects for a Canadian man with a spinal cord injury.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Farming crops with rocks to reduce CO2 and improve global food securityFarming crops with crushed rocks could help to improve global food security and reduce the amount of CO2 entering the atmosphere, a new study has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Association of risk of death and cigar, pipe and cigarette useContemporary population estimates suggest that like cigarette-only smokers, current cigar-only and pipe-only smokers have a higher risk of dying from cancers known to be caused by tobacco, and cigarette and cigar smokers have a higher risk of death from any cause compared with people who never used tobacco.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Duplicate genes help animals resolve sexual conflictDuplicate copies of a gene shared by male and female fruit flies have evolved to resolve competing demands between the sexes. New genetic analysis by researchers at the University of Chicago describes how these copies have evolved separate male- and female-specific functions that are crucial to reproduction and fertility.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pattern formation: The paradoxical role of turbulenceThe formation of self-organizing molecular patterns in cells is a critical component of many biological processes. Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have proposed a new theory to explain how such patterns emerge in complex natural systems.
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The Atlantic

The Song of KillmongerBlack Panther MovieDuring “Fuck Your Ethnicity,” the very first song on Kendrick Lamar’s very first album, a robotic voice beamed in with this: “Reporting live from Planet Terminator X, I am Martin Luther King with an AK-47.” That moment feels prescient after the release of Black Panther , the Marvel superhero story soundtracked by Lamar. There’s the line’s sci-fi, futuristic concept. There’s the nod to black natio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

France to let wolf packs grow despite angry farmersThe French government announced Monday it will allow the wolf population to grow 40 percent despite pressure from farmers in mountain regions who are worried about their sheep flocks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Duplicate genes help animals resolve sexual conflictDuplicate copies of a gene shared by male and female fruit flies have evolved to resolve competing demands between the sexes. New genetic analysis by researchers at the University of Chicago describes how these copies have evolved separate male- and female-specific functions that are crucial to reproduction and fertility. These changes occurred in just 200,000 years since the genes duplicated, mea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Farming crops with rocks to reduce CO2 and improve global food securityFarming crops with crushed rocks could help to improve global food security and reduce the amount of CO2 entering the atmosphere, a new study has found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Global grazing lands increasingly vulnerable to a changing climateSome 800 million people around the world depend on livestock that graze on natural vegetation for their livelihoods and food security. In a good season, grasses and other plants flourish, supporting robust herds. In a bad season, the system suffers - as do the people who rely on it. The difference between a good and bad year? One significant and increasingly volatile factor is precipitation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pattern formation—the paradoxical role of turbulenceThe formation of self-organizing molecular patterns in cells is a critical component of many biological processes. Researchers from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have proposed a new theory to explain how such patterns emerge in complex natural systems.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

How (and why) Russia hacked the US election | Laura GalanteHacking, fake news, information bubbles ... all these and more have become part of the vernacular in recent years. But as cyberspace analyst Laura Galante describes in this alarming talk, the real target of anyone looking to influence geopolitics is dastardly simple: it's you.
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Ingeniøren

Kobber-coatede kitler kan stoppe smitte på hospitalerMaterialeforskere vil udnytte metallets antibakterielle egenskaber til at hæmme bakterieudbrud.
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Ingeniøren

Mødeskærm fra Google på vej til Danmark: Udfordrer konkurrenter på godt og ondtNy skærm til møderum er 'overraskende sjov'.
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Blog » Languages » English

Eyewire Winter Games 2018: Skiing vs. SnowboardingHit the slopes! There are many among us who believe the best way to enjoy a winter day is up in the mountains. But there are two rather distinctive sports for racing down a snowy peak. There’s skiing, which has been a 5000 year old Scandinavian tradition, or snowboarding, invented in the US during the 1960s. Millennia apart, and each sport has its own subculture and special styles— however, they’
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The Atlantic

The Burden of Trump's National-Security StaffWhat a contrast. I woke up on Sunday morning and first read the news accounts of National-Security Adviser H.R. McMaster’s cogent speech to the Munich Security Conference. I then read the president’s tweets. And some more tweets. And, just when I thought he was done, some more tweets. As I have written before , you have to give this administration some credit for having assembled some pretty good
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Science | The Guardian

Life after death: how we hatched live shark pups from dead parentsSix years ago, researchers asked a radical question: could eggcases taken from trawler-caught sharks still hatch live, healthy young? Back in December 2012, I met up with Greg Nowell, co-founder of Sharklab-Malta , a non-profit NGO founded in 2008. Sharklab collaborates with shark researchers on a global and local scale, with an overall mission to highlight the current plight of sharks in our oce
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The Atlantic

The Excesses of Call-Out CultureOne of America’s best attributes wasn’t fully real to me until I studied abroad in Seville, Spain, with Asian American classmates. Their answers to the question “Where are you from?” were often met with confusion by locals, who had trouble even conceiving of a nation without an ethnic conception of citizenship. As a Californian, I knew not only that people of Asian descent were as American as whi
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Dagens Medicin

Kommuner er skeptiske over for genoptræningsgarantiKL ser mange udfordringer i indførelsen af frit valg af genoptræning inden for syv dage. Blandt andet er kvaliteten af genoptræning truet, vurderer foreningen.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

College roommates underestimate each other's distress, new psychology research showsCollege roommates are sensitive to their roommates' distress but tend to underestimate the level of distress being experienced by others.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Were Team GB's skeleton suits responsible for fantastic three medal haul?Team GB skeleton rider Lizzie Yarnold won a stunning Winter Olympic gold on February 17, backed up by bronzes for Laura Deas and Dom Parsons. Thanks to drag-resistant ridges, 3-D laser scanning and topnotch material, Team GB's skeleton suits are said to have provided up to a one-second advantage per run over the rest of the field and have been a hot topic of controversy.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Russian meddling charges stoke fear that midterms will bring more of the same
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Ex-Googlers strike startup gold—again—with $1.9 billion sale to drugs giantA two-man entrepreneurial team who attended an elite college together where they founded a startup they sold to Google for a reported $81 million have just sold a second company they founded together for nearly $2 billion.
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Feed: All Latest

Mechanical Keyboards: Aukey, Logitech Orion, Das KeyboardSerious typists deserve a responsive keyboard. Here are three steps to tactile heaven.
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Futurity.org

New tests show promise for spotting autism soonerResearchers report the development of new tests for indicating autism in children. They believe that their new blood and urine tests, which search for damage to proteins, are the first of their kind. The tests could lead to earlier detection of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and consequently children with autism could receive appropriate treatment much earlier in their lives. Since there is a wi
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Science : NPR

Seismic Surveys Planned Off U.S. Coast Pose Risk To Marine LifeThe Trump administration could give companies permission to set off sonic explosions to explore for oil and gas deposits. Scientists say this could seriously harm marine life. (Image credit: Barcroft Media/Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
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Ingeniøren

Ing-læsere om speed pedelec: Andre trafikanter tager ikke højde for fartenFlere af Ingeniørens læsere byder ind med erfaringer, idéer og god baggrundsviden i debatten om speed pedelecs. Det gælder både batterirækkevidde, hastigheder, priser og komponenter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google's firing of Damore in 'monoculture' case found legalGoogle's firing of an engineer over his controversial memo criticizing its diversity policies and "politically correct monoculture" didn't violate U.S. labor law, a federal agency lawyer concluded.
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Science | The Guardian

World’s most controversial fruit may depend on giant bats for pollinationWhile we debate whether the durian is the best or worst food on the planet, it turns out this wonderful oddity may require healthy populations of flying fox for survival. Durian. Depending on whom you talk to it’s either the most beloved or the most despised fruit on the planet. It suffers no moderation, no wishy-washiness. It is the king of fruits or the worst thing you’ve ever tasted. Due to it
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Dagens Medicin

Danmark får sin første professor i tobaksforebyggelseOverlæge på Forskningscenter for Forebyggelse og Sundhed i Region Hovedstaden Charlotta Pisinger er udnævnt til klinisk professor i tobaksforebyggelse.
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Dagens Medicin

Professor får Hagedorn Prisen for forskning i mave- og tarmsmerterDansk Selskab for Intern Medicin og Novo Nordisk Fonden hædrer professor Asbjørn Mohr Drewes for banebrydende forskning.
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Dagens Medicin

Nitrat i drikkevand kan øge kræftrisikoForskere fra Aarhus påviser, at nitrat i drikkevandet kan øge risikoen for at udvikle kræft i tyk- og endetarm.
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Popular Science

You can (and should) train yourself to sleep on your backDIY Get back to basics. Changing your sleep position can reduce pain and help you wake up ready to tackle the day.
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Futurity.org

Wriggly baby worms hint at roots of individualityPut 50 newborn worms in 50 separate containers, and they’ll all start looking for food at roughly the same time. Like members of other species, microscopic C. elegans roundworms tend to act like other individuals their own age. It turns out that the innate system that controls age-appropriate behavior in a developing worm is not entirely dependable, however. Despite sharing identical genes and gr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Five ways India must help its farmers face the threat of climate changeClimate change could hurt farmers' income by up to 20-25% in the medium term, according to the Indian government's latest annual economic survey. Extreme weather events, temperature rise and lower rainfall all threaten to derail the Indian government's agenda of doubling farmers' income across the country.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Hybrid mountain pine beetles set to spread more easilyA hybrid population of mountain pine beetles is set to do further damage to one of Canada's most iconic regions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Image: Saturn's B ring peaksWhile the Winter Olympics is in full swing in PyeongChang, South Korea, and many winter sport fanatics head to snow-clad mountains to get their thrills on the slopes this ski-season, this dramatic mountain scene is somewhat off-piste – in Saturn's rings to be precise.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Loneliest tree in the world marks new age for our planetAn international research team, including Professor Christopher Fogwill from Keele University, has pinpointed a new geological age, the Anthropocene.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astrophotographer captures Musk's Tesla Roadster moving through spaceAn astrophotographer in California has captured images of Elon Musk's Tesla Roadster on its journey around our sun. In the early morning of February 9th, Rogelio Bernal Andreo captured images of the Roadster as it appeared just above the horizon. To get the images, Andreo made use of an impressive arsenal of technological tools.
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Futurity.org

These fish are 100% female—and thrivingIt’s long been thought that the very rare animals that reproduce asexually—only about one in 1,000 of all living vertebrate species—are at an evolutionary disadvantage compared with their sexually reproducing counterparts. But that doesn’t hold true for the Amazon molly, an all-female fish species that has thrived for millennia in the fresh waters along the Mexico-Texas border. (Credit: Manfred S
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Discovery of how humans experience the smell of death could save lives"And the sky was watching that superb cadaver Blossom like a flower. So frightful was the stench that you believed You'd faint away upon the grass. The blow-flies were buzzing round that putrid belly, From which came forth black battalions Of maggots, which oozed out like a heavy liquid All along those living tatters."
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Dagens Medicin

Tillidsmand: Visionsmøde i Risskov bliver til krisemøde om arbejdsmiljø og sikkerhedPsykiatri- og socialudvalget i Region Midt har indkaldt alle ansatte ved Psykiatrisk Hospital Risskov til et visionsmøde. Men de ansatte insisterer på at snakke om problemer med arbejdsmiljø og sikkerhed, siger overlægernes tillidsmand.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Structural and dynamic differences between selective and non-selective ion channelsMost ion channels are very selective about the ions that may or may not pass through them. They may be conductive for potassium ions and non-conductive for sodium ions, or vice versa. However, a number of ion channels allow for the efficient passage of both kinds of ions. How do these channel proteins accomplish this? A team of scientists around Dr. Han Sun and the research group of Professor Adam
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The surprising benefits of oysters (and no, it's not what you're thinking)Think of oysters, and what comes to mind? You'll probably picture a plate of seafood with a generous squeeze of lemon, or you might think of oysters' reputation as an aphrodisiac. But oysters have many talents beyond their famed gastronomic (and other) qualities.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New species of shark discovered through genetic testingA team of scientists led by Florida Institute of Technology's Toby Daly-Engel has confirmed after decades of uncertainty that sixgill sharks residing in the Atlantic Ocean are a different species than their counterparts in the Indian and Pacific oceans.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Toxic emissions down, but people still dying from air pollution – it's time for something radicalThe UK has made much progress in its efforts to clean the air of toxic pollutants, but while the thick, dirty haze of the 1952 great London smog no longer fills the city streets, air pollution remains a silent killer. In the UK, poor air quality is responsible for some 40,000 deaths each year. It has been linked to diseases such as cancer, asthma, stroke and heart disease, diabetes, obesity and de
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New on MIT Technology Review

Human-sheep chimeras won’t grow us replacement organs just yet
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Improving the shopping experience on mobilesProduct sales on mobiles continue to grow, but conventional photographs of products often fail to provide key information to shoppers. In response, the Inclusive Design Group at the Department's Cambridge Engineering Design Centre has developed a proof of concept for improved Mobile Ready Hero Images, in collaboration with Unilever.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

As a water crisis looms in Cape Town, could it happen in Canada?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Microplastics found inside fish from Lake WinnipegA recent study by an undergraduate student in the Clayton H. Riddell Faculty of Environment, Earth, and Resources has found disturbing levels of microplastics in Manitoba waters and in fish from Lake Winnipeg.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Investing in Aussie winesFor the first time in over 300 years, wine is getting an update. Here's how the CSIRO are future-proofing our industry and making wine even more delicious (if that's even possible?).
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Feed: All Latest

Apple’s Move to Bring Health Care Records to the iPhone Is Great NewsOpinion: The company’s decision to include an open API in its mobile phone OS has great promise for electronic health records.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What will we do without plastic bags?Many will welcome the government's mid-year ban on single-use plastic bags, but how do we transition? And what do we transition to?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

People in African cities are taking charge of their water supplies—and it's workingThe world has made tremendous progress in bridging the gap between water supply and demand. But there's a long way still to go. In a 2017 joint monitoring report UNICEF and the World Health Organisation noted that more than 844 million people – many of them in sub-Saharan Africa – still don't have access to improved and safely managed drinking water sources.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A switch to plant-based protein could help tackle climate change and hungerAgriculture – both victim and cause of climate change. New research shows moving away from animal protein towards legumes makes sense nutritionally and environmentally.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Astronomers conduct a multi-frequency study of the Milky Way-like spiral galaxy NGC 6744An international team of astronomers has conducted a multi-frequency study of NGC 6744, one of the most Milky Way-like spiral galaxies. The new research, published February 8 in a paper on arXiv.org, identifies radio and X-ray sources in NGC 6744 and estimates its star formation rate.
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Scientific American Content: Global

How to Fight Bias with Predictive PolicingThe data-driven technique can perpetuate inequality, but if done right, it also presents an unprecedented opportunity to advance social justice -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Why Lemurs Have Such Strange DietsLemurs consume far less fruit than other primates -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

High-altitude birds evolve similar traits via different mutationsOn the Himalayan-enveloped Tibetan Plateau and the Altiplano plateau of South America – the world's two highest tabletops – a select few bird species survive on 35 to 40 percent less oxygen than at sea level.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using ultrasound to predict return to form for injured racehorsesA new technique that uses ultrasound to predict a racehorse's likelihood of a return to racing after a tendon injury has been developed by researchers at the University of Nottingham, Oakham Equine Hospital and the world-famous Hong Kong Jockey Club.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

8000-year old underwater burial site reveals human skulls mounted on polesA team of researchers with Stockholm University and the Cultural Heritage Foundation has uncovered the remains of a number of Mesolithic people in an underwater grave in a part of what is now Sweden. In their paper published in the journal Antiquity, the group describes the site where the remains were found, the condition of the remains and also offer some possible explanations for the means by wh
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Big Think

Why Nikola Tesla's greatest achievement may be in Niagara FallsInventor Nikola Tesla's work at Niagara Falls may be his most direct and lasting contribution to our lives. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Higher income level linked to police use of force against black womenBlack women with higher incomes are more likely to experience a forceful police interaction during a street stop, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Meet the new 'renewable superpowers'—nations that boss the materials used for wind and solarImagine a world where every country has not only complied with the Paris climate agreement but has moved away from fossil fuels entirely. How would such a change affect global politics?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researcher discusses stalking in the age of social mediaWhether in person or on the internet, being stalked is a terrifying and isolating experience. Victims may be afraid to report their stalker out of fear of retaliation or be unsure where the dividing line falls between innocent behavior and obsessive, potentially dangerous tendencies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cellular recycling caught in the actA team of researchers at the Center for Self-assembly and Complexity, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) have observed a normal physiological process, called "self-eating", that cells use to recycle their components. They developed an accurate technique that visualizes how mitochondria, cells' energy factories, are fused with lysosomes, cells' recycling machines, in order to get material
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New Scientist - News

Electric eel-inspired batteries could power life-long pacemakersA new battery made of fleshy hydrogel layers generates and stores power like electric eels do. It could power pacemakers without ever needing to be replaced
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New Scientist - News

Flu is evolving in new and unpredictable ways in China’s poultryA woman in China has been infected by a new type of flu. With thousands of people travelling after Chinese new year, the risk of new strains spreading is high
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Live Science

Secret to Great Pyramid's Near-Perfect Alignment Possibly FoundThough slightly lopsided, the towering, Great Pyramid of Giza is an ancient feat of engineering. Here's one of its secrets.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Many colours from a single dotPhysicists Bart van Dam and Katerina Newell (Dohnalova) from the UvA Institute of Physics, in collaboration with Emanuele Marino and Peter Schall as well as colleagues from the University of Twente and Jiljin University in China, have shown that a single nanoparticle can be used to emit different colours of light. Their results, which were published in the nano- and microphysics journal Small, sho
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on precautionary standby statusNASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), at Mars since 2006, put itself into a precautionary standby mode on Feb. 15 in response to sensing an unexpectedly low battery voltage.
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Ingeniøren

Kollaps i kinesisk metrobyggeri koster ti livetTi personer har mistet livet på et kinesisk metrobyggeri, fordi en tunnel pludselig blev oversvømmet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The 11th species of an endemic Australian wasp genusAs well as an interest in all insects, Flinders biological sciences Ph.D. Ben Parslow has a fascination for wasps.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New moth species discovered in DenmarkScientists have discovered a new species of moth in northern Europe, which was previously unknown to science.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Feather MitesResearchers used scanning electron microscopy to peer at bugs on several hummingbird species.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

An enzyme's evolution from changing electric fields and resisting antibioticsBacteria can produce enzymes that make them resistant to antibiotics; one example is the TEM beta-lactamase enzyme, which enables bacteria to develop a resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, such as penicillin and cephalosporins. Researchers at Stanford University are studying this area -- how an enzyme changes and becomes antibiotic-resistant -- and will present their work during the Biophysical
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Electric eel-inspired device reaches 110 voltsIn an effort to create a power source for future implantable technologies, a team of researchers developed an electric eel-inspired device that produced 110 volts from gels filled with water, called hydrogels. Their results show potential for a soft power source to draw on a biological system's chemical energy. Anirvan Guha will present the research during the 62nd Biophysical Society Annual Meeti
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Futurity.org

‘Blue Period’ Picasso hides this other (sideways) paintingResearchers used multiple modes of light to uncover details beneath the visible surface of Pablo Picasso’s painting La Miséreuse accroupie (The Crouching Woman), a major work from the artist’s Blue Period. The 1902 oil painting, owned by the Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto, Canada, depicts a crouching and cloaked woman, painted in white, blues, grays, and greens. Pablo Picasso. La Miséreuse acc
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Feed: All Latest

The Ongoing Battle Between Quantum and Classical ComputersThe quest for "quantum supremacy"—unambiguous proof that a quantum computer does something faster than an ordinary computer—has paradoxically led to a boom in quasi-quantum classical algorithms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Earth holds the key to detecting life beyond our solar systemNew research in to how Earth's atmosphere evolved over time could hold the key to detecting life on exoplanets, according to scientists from the University of St Andrews and Cornell University.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Did humans domesticate themselves?Human self-domestication posits that among the driving forces of human evolution, humans selected their companions depending on who exhibited more pro-social behavior. Researchers from a team of the UB led by Cedric Boeckx, ICREA professor at the Department of Catalan Philology and General Linguistics and member of the Institute of Complex Systems of the University of Barcelona (UBICS), report new
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Jupiter's swirling cloud formationsSee swirling cloud formations in the northern area of Jupiter's north temperate belt in this new view taken by NASA's Juno spacecraft.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Singapore to impose carbon tax from 2019Singapore said Monday it would impose a carbon tax from next year to cut its greenhouse gas emissions and make companies more competitive as global agreements on climate change take effect.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Electric eel-inspired device reaches 110 voltsIn an effort to create a power source for future implantable technologies, a team led by Michael Mayer from the University of Fribourg, along with researchers from the University of Michigan and UC San Diego, developed an electric eel-inspired device that produced 110 volts from gels filled with water, called hydrogels. Their results show potential for a soft power source to draw on a biological s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

An enzyme's evolution from changing electric fields and resisting antibioticsEnzymes are proteins that speed up or catalyze a reaction in living organisms. Bacteria can produce enzymes that make them resistant to antibiotics. Specifically, the TEM beta-lactamase enzyme enables bacteria to develop a resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, such as penicillin and cephalosporins. Researchers at Stanford University are studying how an enzyme changes and becomes antibiotic-resist
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Modern tech unravels mysteries of Egyptian mummy portraitsA museum exhibit showcases what modern analytical tools can reveal about ancient Egyptian funerary portraits and mummies.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Mars Rock Hitches Ride on NASA's Next RoverThe Curiosity rover will return a Martian meteorite to the Red Planet -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Skin bacteria may predict vulnerability of amphibians to killer chytrid fungusBacterial communities that live on the skin of frogs and toads could provide vital clues to species' vulnerability to the lethal chytrid fungus.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals mechanism in spruce tree that causes growthWhile it's common knowledge that trees grow when days start to become longer in the springtime and stop growing when days become shorter in the fall, exactly how this happens has not been well understood.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers invent light-emitting nanoantennasScientists from ITMO University have developed effective nanoscale light sources based on halide perovskite. Such nanosources are based on subwavelength nanoparticles serving both as emitters and nanoantennas and allow enhancing light emission inherently without additional devices. Moreover, perovskite enables tuning of emission spectra throughout the visible range by varying the composition of th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team develos new process for manufacturing SWCNT filmsIn a finding that could accelerate the development of next-generation wearable and flexible electronics, a team of Skoltech scientists led by Professor Albert Nasibulin has discovered a revolutionary means of improving the optical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Will the X3 ion thruster propel us to Mars?X3 is a powerful ion thruster that could one day propel humans beyond Earth. The thruster was successfully tested few months ago, and could be selected by NASA as a crucial component of propulsion system for future Mars missions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study reveals links between youth victimization, beliefs about government, and political participationYoung people's views about the government and their level of political involvement are shaped by their life experiences and start developing during adolescence. While most research on this topic focuses on the impacts of positive life experiences, in a paper published in American Psychologist, researchers from Baylor College of Medicine explore the links between negative experiences during adolesc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Charged oxygen in ionosphere may offer biomarker for exoplanetsOn January 9, 1992, astronomers announced a momentous discovery: two planets orbiting a pulsar 2,300 light years from our sun. The two planets, later named Poltergeist and Draugr, were the first confirmed "exoplanets"—worlds outside our solar system, circling a distant star. Scientists now know of 3,728 (confirmed) exoplanets in 2,794 systems, each one begging the question: "Is anyone else out the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Finches from remote corners of New Guinea help solve an evolutionary puzzleTucked away in an unassuming gray metal file cabinet in a graduate student office at Boston University is an evolutionary puzzle that would leave even Charles Darwin scratching his head. Inside the cabinet, 18 clear Tupperware containers house 301 estrildid finch specimens from New Guinea, carefully laid out in rows by population and species. Each of the 11 species' plumage is splashed with its ow
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Calcium may play a role in the development of Parkinson's diseaseResearchers have found that excess levels of calcium in brain cells may lead to the formation of toxic clusters that are the hallmark of Parkinson's disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unconventional superconductor may be used to create quantum computers of the futureWith their insensitivity to decoherence what are known as Majorana particles could become stable building blocks of a quantum computer. The problem is that they only occur under very special circumstances. Now researchers have succeeded in manufacturing a component that is able to host the sought-after particles.
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Scientific American Content: Global

This Is What the Race Gap in Academia Looks LikeData visualization highlights a problematic pattern in fields associated with intrinsic genius -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dagens Medicin

Frifindelse af Odense-læge ankes ikkeStatsadvokat har afsluttet sag mod overlæge fra Odense Universitetshospital, der var tiltalt for grov forsømmelse eller skødesløshed i forbindelse med en patients død.
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The Atlantic

Ban the OlympicsEditor’s Note: Read all of The Atlantic’s Winter Olympics coverage . Other than fuel corruption, make countries spend pointlessly and profligately, inflame nationalist sentiment, act as onanistic stand-ins for geopolitical tensions, and cloak authoritarian leaders in legitimacy, what have the Olympics ever done for us? It is my real and very honest question every two years: What are the Olympics
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Feed: All Latest

What Wannabe Smart Cities Can Learn From Ski ResortsWhy the Winter Olympics should inspire more than your next vacation.
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Science : NPR

Scientists Develop A Way To Use A Smartphone To Prevent Food PoisoningA microscope that clips on to your phone's camera can detect bacteria, such as salmonella or E. coli, even in tiny amounts. But the technology can't yet distinguish between good and bad bacteria. (Image credit: Karen Brown/New England Public Radio)
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Ingeniøren

Grønne certifikater sætter turbo på svensk vindkraftSvenske politikere besluttede sidste år at udvide støtten til vindkraft, som består af et el-certifikatsystem. Nu forventer branchen, at produktionen af vindmøllestrøm stiger 60 pct. på blot fire år.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Road Trip!: Elon Musk's Tesla Won't Strike Earth Anytime SoonPlotting the spacefaring car’s interplanetary trajectory helps test forecasts for potentially Earth-threatening asteroids -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

WHO warns over measles immunisation rates as cases rise 300% across Europe2017 saw more than 21,000 cases and 35 deaths, with large outbreaks in one in four countries, says World Health Organisation Measles cases have soared across Europe over the last year, with large outbreaks affecting one in four countries, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO) which is concerned by low rates of immunisation against the disease. WHO Europe says there has been a four-fold
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unconventional superconductor may be used to create quantum computers of the futureWith their insensitivity to decoherence, Majorana particles could become stable building blocks of quantum computers. The problem is that they only occur under very special circumstances. Now, researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have succeeded in manufacturing a component that is able to host the sought-after particles.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Tech Dealers Now Trying to Save the Tech "Addicts" They've CreatedThe new Center for Humane Technology aims to lead the fight against society’s obsession with the Web, apps and social media—but it may just add to the confusion -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian

Why don’t the Carillion bosses seem embarrassed?My father warned me about scoundrels in business. Now bad behaviour can be called out online, but international shame still doesn’t stop rogues As my father had been seriously ripped off three times during his life in business by people he trusted, he often warned me about the surprising number of rogues and scoundrels swanning around, ready to use any vile trick to relieve me of my money. Just m
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Ingeniøren

Tysk forsvarsminister: Cyberangreb er den største trussel mod global stabilitetUanset om det er Nordkorea, Rusland, Kina, terrororganisationer eller nogle helt femte, der står bag, så er cyberangreb et våben, der skal have højere fokus, mener den tyske forsvarsminister.
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Ingeniøren

Techtopia #40: 3D-print af reservedele til mennesker og maskinerPodcast: 3D-print har mistet terræn som en af tidens mest omtalte teknologier, men det betyder ikke, at teknologien er væk. Tværtimod arbejdes der hårdt på nye anvendelsesmuligheder.
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Ingeniøren

Kopivarer skal stoppes med sandkorn og unikke mønstreDansk forskning: Et lille, unikt mønster på størrelse med et komma skal sættes på hver eneste vare og skåne både industri og forbrugere mod kopivarer for milliarder.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

TB vaccine trial results offer potential for BCG Revaccination, hope for subunit vaccinesAeras, a nonprofit organization dedicated to developing vaccines against tuberculosis (TB), today announced results from an innovative clinical trial that provides encouraging new evidence that TB vaccines could prevent sustained infections in high-risk adolescents. In a prevention-of-infection Phase 2 trial conducted in South Africa, revaccination with the Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine si
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NYT > Science

Out There: Astronomers’ Dark Energy Hopes Fade to GrayThe Wfirst project, which would have investigated the force of dark energy in the universe and searched for more planets, has been cut from NASA’s proposed budget.
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NYT > Science

Animals Are Losing Their Vagility, or Ability to Roam FreelyA study of 57 species shows that human encroachment and development not only harm an animal’s habitat, but may affect their migration patterns and food sources.
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The Atlantic

The FBI's War on Black-Owned BookstoresIn the spring of 1968, FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover announced to his agents that COINTELPRO, the counter-intelligence program established in 1956 to combat communists, should focus on preventing the rise of a “Black ‘messiah’” who sought to “unify and electrify the militant black nationalist movement.” The program, Hoover insisted, should target figures as ideologically diverse as the Black Power
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The Atlantic

Selfishness Is Killing LiberalismThe death of liberalism constitutes the publishing world’s biggest mass funeral since the death of God half a century ago. Some authors, like conservative philosopher Patrick Deneen, of Why Liberalism Failed , have come to bury yesterday’s dogma. Others, like Edward Luce ( The Retreat of Western Liberalism ), Mark Lilla ( The Once and Future Liberal ), and Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt ( How
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Mix of metals in this Picasso sculpture provides clues to its mysterious originsThe alloys used to cast Picasso’s bronze sculptures provide a valuable piece of the puzzle in reconstructing the histories of the works of art.
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Ingeniøren

Replik: 10 år med svine-MRSA – fortsat ringe viden om smitteforhold
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Converting heat into electricity with pencil and paperThermoelectric materials can use thermal differences to generate electricity. Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest tools: a pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint. These are sufficient to convert a temperature difference into electricity via the thermoelectric effect, which has now been demonstrated by a team at the Helmholtz-Zentr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Contacting the molecular world through graphene nanoribbonsA single molecule can behave as the smallest electronic component of an electronic system. Researchers in the field of molecular electronics have endeavoured in recent years to develop new approaches to using molecules as electronic logic components.
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Ingeniøren

Teleselskab bryder netneutralitet: Nu ændres abonnementetTeleselskabet Oister var lidt for hurtige, da de i sidste uge lancerede et abonnement med såkaldt 'fri data'. Der var nemlig sat en begrænsning på brugen af datadeling, og det er i strid med de europæiske regler for netneutralitet
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Viden

Belgisk kæberasler: Facebooks dataindsamling er ulovligDet sociale medie risikerer bøde på 745 millioner kroner, hvis de fortsætter med at følge brugerens færden på alle hjemmesider.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Calcium may play a role in the development of Parkinson's diseaseResearchers have found that excess levels of calcium in brain cells may lead to the formation of toxic clusters that are the hallmark of Parkinson's disease.
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New Scientist - News

Should we revisit ethically dubious experiments from the past?From deadly Nazi medical experiments to sociological studies on children, past science has taken paths we wouldn't tread today, but the results still have value
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Science : NPR

She Survived Breast Cancer, But Says A Treatment Side Effect 'Almost Killed' HerWhen many lymph nodes are removed along with a tumor, some patients develop painful and debilitating swelling — lymphedema. More doctors should recognize and help prevent the problem, surgeons say. (Image credit: Luke Sharrett for NPR)
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Science : NPR

This Vaccine Can Prevent Cancer, But Many Teenagers Still Don't Get ItThe HPV vaccine can prevent cervical cancer in women and some cancers in men. It's most effective when given early in adolescence. But a new analysis finds only 29 percent of teens get it by age 13. (Image credit: The Washington Post/The Washington Post/Getty Images)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Siemens plans to float Healthineers in first half of 2018Industrial giant Siemens on Monday said it plans to list its Healthineers medical unit in the first half of 2018, in what is expected to be Germany's largest initial public offering in over two decades.
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New Scientist - News

Mute crickets can’t chirp but rub their wings together anywayMale Hawaiian crickets that have lost the ability to chirp still go through the motion of “singing”, even though females can’t hear them
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Ingeniøren

Ugens job: Sweco, Moe og Rambøll har flere ledige jobsPå dagens liste finder du job for ingeniører og naturvidenskabelige kandidater i flere forskellige firmaer. Blandt andet som specialist, projektleder, konsulent og mere endnu.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

In Kenya, anti-poaching dogs are wildlife's best friendsFive-month-old bloodhound Shakaria gambols through the long savannah grasses of Kenya's Maasai Mara reserve, her playful mood swiftly turning to keen determination as she is ordered to track a human scent.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Was pirate Black Sam Bellamy found? DNA test could tellResearchers are working to use DNA to identify whether a human bone recovered from a Cape Cod shipwreck belongs to the infamous pirate Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Indonesia's Sinabung volcano unleashes towering ash columnRumbling Mount Sinabung on the Indonesian island of Sumatra shot billowing columns of ash more than 5,000 meters (16,400 feet) into the atmosphere and hot clouds down its slopes on Monday.
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Science-Based Medicine

True believers, entrepreneurs, and scammers in alternative medicineIn the online echo chamber promoting alternative medicine, there are varying degrees of deception. There are true believers (who are often victims), entrepreneurs (who are often true believers who found a profitable business), and scammers. The categories are not mutually exclusive.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Why bees soared and slime flopped as inspirations for systems engineeringBees? Great. Ants? Hit or miss. Slime mold amoebas? Fail. Though nature offers excellent design inspirations in some information technology systems, in other systems, it can bomb.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How companies can restore trust after CEO misconductA new study published today in the Journal of Trust Research reveals how boards of directors can proactively address CEO misconduct to increase public trust towards an organization.
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Ingeniøren

Erhvervsstyrelsen undersøger TDC's salg af lokationsdataTDC skal redegøre for, om deres videresalg af lokationsdata fra udenlandske turister til VisitAarhus er i overensstemmelse med udbudsbekendtgørelsen.
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Science | The Guardian

Are we poisoning our children with plastic?The chemical BPA is widely added to food and drink packaging, and more than 80% of teenagers have it in their bodies. But how dangerous is it? Can exposure to plastics harm your health? It’s a question currently being explored by researchers after a recent study suggested that traces of a synthetic chemical called Bisphenol A (BPA) can be found in more than 80% of teenagers . BPA is added to plas
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Ingeniøren

Ny undersøgelse: Hvert femte stykke legetøj indeholder hormonforstyrrende stofferEn ny europæisk undersøgelse viser for høje værdier af sundhedsskadelige phthalater i hvert femte stykke legetøj. Netop børn er ellers mest modtagelige over for de hormonforstyrrende virkninger, siger dansk professor.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unconventional superconductor may be used to create quantum computers of the futureWith their insensitivity to decoherence what are known as Majorana particles could become stable building blocks of a quantum computer. The problem is that they only occur under very special circumstances. Now researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have succeeded in manufacturing a component that is able to host the sought-after particles.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lack of guidance may delay a child's first trip to the dentistWithout a doctor or dentist's guidance, some parents don't follow national recommendations for early dental care for their children, a new national poll finds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

How companies can restore trust after CEO misconductA new study published today in the Journal of Trust Research reveals how boards of directors can proactively address CEO misconduct to increase public trust towards an organization.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unconventional superconductor may be used to create quantum computers of the futureWith their insensitivity to decoherence what are known as Majorana particles could become stable building blocks of a quantum computer. The problem is that they only occur under very special circumstances. Now researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have succeeded in manufacturing a component that is able to host the sought-after particles.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Why even a moth’s brain is smarter than an AIA neural network that simulates the way moths recognize odors also shows how they learn so much faster than machines.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Terrible people have learned to exploit the internet. Yasmin Green is fighting back.The Jigsaw team at Alphabet brings people who were radicalized online back from the brink, one video at a time.
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Ingeniøren

De skadelige, de ligegyldige og de værdiskabende - hvilken kollegatype tilhører du?Dansk ekspert vil løfte produktiviteten på danske arbejdspladser ved at dele medarbejdere op i tre forskellige grupperinger. Find ud af, hvilken kategori du hører under og læs, hvad du kan bruge det til.
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Science | The Guardian

Doctors warn against rush to prescribe medicinal cannabisEvidence of effectiveness remains ‘limited’, says Medical Journal of Australia editorial Doctors have been warned against rushing to prescribe medical cannabis despite Australians’ acceptance of its use. To date, the evidence on the effectiveness of medical cannabis remains “limited”, say Jennifer Martin and Associate Professor Yvonne Bonomo in an editorial for the Royal Australasian College of P
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blood and urine tests developed to indicate autism in childrenNew tests which can indicate autism in children have been developed by researchers at the University of Warwick.The academic team who conducted the international research believe that their new blood and urine tests which search for damage to proteins are the first of their kind.
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Science | The Guardian

New test can detect autism in children, scientists sayBlood and urine test, believed to be first of its kind, could lead to earlier diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders Scientists in Britain say they have developed a blood and urine test that can detect autism in children. Researchers at the University of Warwick said the test, believed to be the first of its kind, could lead to earlier diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in children who
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why bees soared and slime flopped as inspirations for systems engineeringHoneybees gathering nectar inspired an algorithm that eased the burden of host servers handling unpredictable traffic by about 25 percent. Nature can inspire some great engineering, but it can also lead to some flops. Take slime mold: Standard algorithms beat it hands down to model connectivity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Studying mitosis' structure to understand the inside of cancer cellsCell division is an intricately choreographed ballet of proteins and molecules that divide the cell. During mitosis, microtubule-organizing centers assemble the spindle fibers that separate the copying chromosomes of DNA. While scientists are familiar with MTOCs' existence and the role they play in cell division, their actual physical structure remains poorly understood. Researchers are now trying
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What makes circadian clocks tick?Circadian clocks arose as an adaptation to dramatic swings in daylight hours and temperature caused by the Earth's rotation, but we still don't fully understand how they work. Scientists studying the circadian clock of blue-green colored cyanobacteria. The group discovered that how the proteins move hour by hour is central to cyanobacteria's circadian clock function.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ras protein's role in spreading cancerProtein systems make up the complex signaling pathways that control whether a cell divides or, in some cases, metastasizes. Ras proteins have long been the focus of cancer research because of their role as 'on/off switch' signaling pathways that control cell division and failure to die like healthy cells do. Now, a team of researchers has been able to study precisely how Ras proteins interact with
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Using mutant bacteria to study how changes in membrane proteins affect cell functions
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Futurity.org

Crisis looms for chocolate due to mysterious blightAbout 70 percent of the world’s production of cocoa—chocolate’s main ingredient—comes from just six small countries of West Africa, where a blight disease that kills cacao trees is spreading rapidly. The disease is causing decline and death in some trees in less than one year after infection occurs. In its wake, the livelihood of farmers is at stake and rainforest is lost as growers expand their
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Futurity.org

What 124 sets of twins teach us about negotiationIndividuality matters in negotiation, research conducted at an annual national twins festival suggests. Historically, negotiators have been seen as economically rational individuals acting in ways meant simply to maximize their outcomes, but the new research challenges this view. The researchers also found that it takes at least two at the negotiating table to tango; the nature of their relations
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Science | The Guardian

Scientists seek drug to ‘rewire’ adult brain after strokeTherapies may one day enable healthy part of brain to take over tasks from damaged areas Adults who have experienced a stroke may one day be able to take a drug to help their brain “rewire” itself, so that tasks once carried out by now-damaged areas can be taken over by other regions, researchers have claimed. The ability for the brain to rewire, so-called “brain plasticity”, is thought to occur
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Science | The Guardian

Scientists unravel secrets of ‘superagers’Researchers find elderly people with high cognitive function have more of a certain type of brain cell “Superagers” have long puzzled scientists, but now researchers say they are unpicking why some people live beyond 80 – and still appear to be in fine fettle, with cognitive capacities on a par with adults decades younger. Researchers have spent years studying superagers in an attempt to understa
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Futurity.org

See the crazy way octopus and cuttlefish get spikyA new study clarifies an amazing defense tactic of octopus and cuttlefish: the ability to erect 3D spikes out of their skin, hold them for an hour, then quickly retract them and swim away. New information about the neural and muscular mechanisms that underlie this extraordinary defense tactic appears in the journal iScience . “The biggest surprise for us was to see that these skin spikes, called
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why bees soared and slime flopped as inspirations for systems engineeringHoneybees gathering nectar inspired an algorithm that eased the burden of host servers handling unpredictable traffic by about 25 percent. Nature can inspire some great engineering, but it can also lead to some flops. Take slime mold: Standard algorithms beat it hands down to model connectivity. AAAS annual meeting presentation by systems researcher Craig Tovey.
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The Atlantic

There's Still Time to Act Against Russian InterferenceThis past Friday, Special Counsel Robert Mueller presented an indictment against 13 Russians and three Russian companies for illegally interfering with the U.S. political process, including during the 2016 presidential elections. The indictment gave a vivid look into an extensive political disinformation campaign, but did not address the Russian hacking of the Democratic National Committee. Nor d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The new bioenergy research center: building on ten years of successThe Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC), led by the University of Wisconsin-Madison, recently embarked on a new mission: to develop sustainable alternatives to transportation fuels and products currently derived from petroleum.
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Science | The Guardian

Starwatch: a chance to bask in earthshineA lunar phenomenon that is sometimes called the old moon in the new moon’s arms may be visible on Monday This evening’s crescent moon brings with it a good chance of seeing earthshine. This is the faint glow that appears on the unlit portion of the moon’s disc. It is sometimes referred to as the old moon in the new moon’s arms because of the way the sunlit crescent appears to cradle the dimmer ci
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Big Think

Children prefer reality-based playtime to fantasyWorldwide studies are suggesting that children would much rather pretend to be grown-ups than pretend to be fantasy figures like Elsa or Spider-Man. Read More
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Babies can recover language skills after a left-side strokeVery young babies who have strokes in the language centers of their brain can recover normal language function — in the other side of their brain.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook to verify ads with postcards after Russian meddling (Update)Facebook will soon rely on centuries-old technology to try to prevent foreign meddling in U.S. elections: the post office.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Artificial intelligence poses questions for nature of war: MattisArtificial intelligence and its impact on weapons of the future has made US Defense Secretary Jim Mattis doubt his own theories on warfare.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Personalized curriculum captures students' imagination, interestFocusing on their personal DNA and genealogies, middle school students appear to have learned as much as their peers who used case studies, according to a researcher.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Blockchain revolution comes to world of humanitarian aidBlockchain, the technology behind the cryptocurrency bitcoin, is taking root in a sector far from finance: the world of humanitarian aid.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stretchable electronics a 'game changer' for stroke recovery treatmentA first-of-its-kind sensor that sticks to the throat and measures speech and swallowing patterns could be a game-changer in the field of stroke rehabilitation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Newborn babies who suffered stroke regain language function in opposite side of brainA stroke in a baby -- even a big one -- does not have the same lasting impact as a stroke in an adult. A study found that a decade or two after a 'perinatal' stroke damaged the left 'language' side of the brain, affected teenagers and young adults used the right sides of their brain for language.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ultrathin, highly elastic skin display developedA new ultrathin, elastic display that fits snugly on the skin can show the moving waveform of an electrocardiogram recorded by a breathable, on-skin electrode sensor. Combined with a wireless communication module, this integrated biomedical sensor system -- called 'skin electronics' -- can transmit biometric data to the cloud.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

To sleep, perchance to forgetPeople and other animals sicken and die if they are deprived of sleep, but why is sleep so essential? Psychiatrists proposed the 'synaptic homeostasis hypothesis' (SHY) in 2003. This hypothesis holds that sleep is the price we pay for brains that are plastic and able to keep learning new things. A few years ago, they started research that could show direct evidence for their theory. The result off
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Asteroid 'time capsules' may help explain how life started on EarthIn popular culture, asteroids play the role of apocalyptic threat, get blamed for wiping out the dinosaurs -- and offer an extraterrestrial source for mineral mining. But for one researcher, asteroids play an entirely different role: that of time capsules showing what molecules originally existed in our solar system. Having that information gives scientists the starting point they need to reconstr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Thai officials smell clue with faeces find in tycoon poaching caseThai officials will test human faeces found at a campsite in a wildlife sanctuary to try to prove their case against a tycoon accused of poaching a leopard.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

After stunning growth streak, Amazon ambitions seem boundlessTriumphant in online retail, cloud computing, organic groceries, and streaming television, Amazon founder and chief disruptor Jeff Bezos is turning his seemingly limitless ambition to health care.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Myanmar farmers going against the grain with appsA free app on farmer San San Hla's smartphone is her new weapon in the war against the dreaded stem borer moth that blighted her rice paddy in southern Myanmar for the last two years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Palmreaders? Japan team builds second skin message displayPalmreading could take on a whole new meaning thanks to a new invention from Japan: an ultra-thin display and monitor that can be stuck directly to the body.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

UK church spires used to boost phone, wi-fi signalChurch spires across Britain will be used to boost broadband, mobile phone and WiFi connectivity in rural areas, under a deal struck between the government and the Church of England, it was announced Sunday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Amazon: from online book seller to market shakerAmazon has grown from a humble beginning as an online bookseller to a colossus of the internet. It recently devoured Whole Foods Market, and is now biting into health care.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Satellite launch from California is delayedA SpaceX satellite launch from California that could create a spectacular aerial display has been delayed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Studying mitosis' structure to understand the inside of cancer cellsCell division is an intricately choreographed ballet of proteins and molecules that divide the cell. During mitosis, microtubule-organizing centers (MTOCs) assemble the spindle fibers that separate the copying chromosomes of DNA. While scientists are familiar with MTOCs' existence and the role they play in cell division, their actual physical structure remains poorly understood.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Using mutant bacteria to study how changes in membrane proteins affect cell functionsPhospholipids are water insoluble "building blocks" that define the membrane barrier surrounding cells and provide the structural scaffold and environment where membrane proteins reside. During the 62nd Biophysical Society Annual Meeting, held Feb. 17-21, in San Francisco, California, William Dowhan from the University of Texas-Houston McGovern Medical School will present his group's work explorin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What makes circadian clocks tick?Circadian clocks are found within microbes and bacteria, plants and insects, animals and humans. These clocks arose as an adaptation to dramatic swings in daylight hours and temperature caused by the Earth's rotation. But we still don't fully understand how these tiny biological clocks work.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New study sheds light on illegal global trade of pangolinsAnimal traffickers are taking advantage of remote ivory trade routes to smuggle pangolins - one of the world's most endangered animals - out of Central Africa, a new study has found.
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Popular Science

China's J-20 stealth fighter jet has officially entered serviceEastern Arsenal Ready to "safeguard China's sovereignty, security and territorial integrity." China's J-20 stealth fighter is ready to take to the skies, thought it's waiting for new engines.
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Big Think

This week in comments: February 12th—February 18th, 2018What do Finland, religious animals, the American economy, fish, and Walmart have in common? They were all part of our comments of the week. Did you make the cut? Read More
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Live Science

Beneath Biblical Prophet's Tomb, an Archaeological SurpriseDeep inside looters' tunnels dug in the ancient Iraq city of Nineveh, archaeologists have uncovered 2,700-year-old inscriptions that describe the rule of an Assyrian king.
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Viden

Forskere: Ultraviolette lamper kan dræbe influenza i luftenSundhedsfremmende lamper kan måske være fremtidens middel mod influenza-epidemier, viser ny forskning
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The Atlantic

The Democrats Keep Capitulating on Defense SpendingSince earlier this month, when Congress passed a budget deal that massively boosts both defense and non-defense spending, liberal commentators —and even some Republican politicians —have accused the GOP of hypocrisy. Republicans, they noted, are supposed to loathe debt. They’re supposed to loathe government spending. Yet, in large numbers, they voted for much more of both. Fair enough. But what a
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Big Think

Just 3% of Americans own more than half the country's gunsStudies indicate that most guns are owned by a small amount of Americans, while the majority's views on gun control issues are ignored by lawmakers. Read More
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Big Think

Physicists leverage quantum tunneling to collect energy from Earth’s heat80% of solar radiation is absorbed by the atmosphere. This team has found a way to tap into the rest. Read More
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cognitive science

Scientists Explore Ties Between Alzheimer's And Brain's Ancient Immune Systemsubmitted by /u/SophiaDevetzi [link] [comments]
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Scientific American Content: Global

States Are Advancing Bills Designed to Lower Drug Costs with Importation PlansThe legislation seeks federal permission to buy drugs from Canada -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

Trump's Furious Tweetstorm BackfiresDonald Trump didn’t have any control over the decision by Russia’s Internet Research Agency to mount what it called “information warfare against the United States of America.” As the indictment released on Friday stated, the effort began in 2014, long before Trump was a declared candidate—much less a serious one—for office. But by refusing to take information warfare seriously—in an attempt to di
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The Atlantic

America Is Under Attack and the President Doesn't CareAs the rest of America mourns the victims of the Parkland, Florida, massacre, President Trump took to Twitter. Not for him the rituals of grief. He is too consumed by rage and resentment. He interrupted his holidaying schedule at Mar-a-Lago only briefly, for a visit to a hospital where some of the shooting victims were treated. He posed afterward for a grinning thumbs-up photo op . Pain for anoth
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Ingeniøren

Frygt for prestigetab låser ingeniører fast i lederrollenAndres anseelse kan gøre det svært at vende tilbage til jobbet som specialist, ­mener civilingeniør, som selv har taget turen.
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Gear for Remote Workers: Pixelbook, Chrome Vega, Hydro FlaskWhen you’ve had more than enough of your coworkers, grab this gear and escape to a café.
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Twitter's Reaction to McDonald's Changing the Happy Meal Tops This Week's Internet NewsBut the disappearing cheeseburger wasn't the only thing the internet was talking about last week. Catch up here.
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Want to Stop Climate Change? Educate Girls and Give Them Birth ControlOpinion: When women aren’t educated or empowered to make their own family planning decisions, the effects can lead to higher carbon emissions.
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Scientific American Content: Global

FDA Okays First Concussion Blood Test--but Some Experts Are WaryThe screening tool may not pick up minor concussions -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Viden

Er iPad'en godt legetøj eller "digital narko" for småbørn?Hvordan skal vi forældre forholde os til børns brug af moderne teknologi? Vi har spurgt en lang række af landet førende forskere.
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Live Science

Are Supermassive Black Holes Going to Eat the Universe?Uh-oh, black holes often grow faster than the galaxies they anchor.
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Ingeniøren

Nu skal myonens mærkelige snurren måles utrapræcistElektronens storebror, myonen, bliver til en snurretop i et magnetfelt, hvor den opfører sig anderledes, end teorien tilsiger.
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Viden

Danske forskere: Bomber måske skyld i tilfælde af lungekræft på tropeøI flere år har syge beboere på øen Vieques været et omstridt emne i USA. Danske forskere har nu fundet bevis for en sammenhæng mellem krigsøvelser og lungekræft på øen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Using mutant bacteria to study how changes in membrane proteins affect cell functionsPhospholipids are water insoluble "building blocks" that define the membrane barrier surrounding cells and provide the structural scaffold and environment where membrane proteins reside. During the 62nd Biophysical Society Annual Meeting, held Feb. 17-21, William Dowhan from the University of Texas-Houston McGovern Medical School will present his group's work exploring how the membrane protein pho
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Ras protein's role in spreading cancerProtein systems make up the complex signaling pathways that control whether a cell divides or, in some cases, metastasizes. Ras proteins have long been the focus of cancer research because of their role as 'on/off switch' signaling pathways that control cell division and failure to die like healthy cells do. Now, a team of researchers has been able to study precisely how Ras proteins interact with
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What makes circadian clocks tick?Circadian clocks arose as an adaptation to dramatic swings in daylight hours and temperature caused by the Earth's rotation, but we still don't fully understand how they work. During the 62nd Biophysical Society Meeting, held Feb. 17-21, Andy LiWang, University of California, Merced, will present his lab's work studying the circadian clock of blue-green colored cyanobacteria. LiWang's group discov
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Studying mitosis' structure to understand the inside of cancer cellsCell division is an intricately choreographed ballet of proteins and molecules that divide the cell. During mitosis, microtubule-organizing centers assemble the spindle fibers that separate the copying chromosomes of DNA. While scientists are familiar with MTOCs' existence and the role they play in cell division, their actual physical structure remains poorly understood. Researchers are now trying
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The Atlantic

The More Gender Equality, the Fewer Women in STEMThough their numbers are growing, only 27 percent of all students taking the AP Computer Science exam in the United States are female. The gender gap only grows worse from there: Just 18 percent of American computer-science college degrees go to women. This is in the United States, where many college men proudly describe themselves as “male feminists” and girls are taught they can be anything the
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Olympics 2018: Commentators Should Cut the Chit-Chat and Just Explain the SportHere’s an idea: Maybe just tell me what makes the Olympics a superhuman challenge.
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How Long Can a Neutron Live? Depends on Who You AskTwo methods of measuring the neutron's longevity give different answers, creating uncertainty in cosmological models. But no one has a clue what the problem is.
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Scientific American Content: Global

"Smarticle" Robot Swarms Turn Random Behavior into Collective IntelligenceNew algorithms show how very simple robots can be made to work together as a group -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

Asymmetry: A Mentorship Tale, With SurprisesEven if you had never heard a word about Asymmetry or its author, Lisa Halliday, before you started reading the book, it wouldn’t take long to realize that the figure at the center of the story is a version of Philip Roth. After all, Halliday’s Ezra Blazer is an elderly, very famous writer, Jewish, living on the Upper West Side, perpetually passed over for the Nobel Prize. Halliday changes a few
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The Quest to Recreate the Olympics with Mechanical TurkWhy one Texas professor pays Turkers to post themselves doing Olympic events on YouTube.
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SpaceX Will Launch the First of Its Global Internet SatellitesThey're just two in what will be thousands of orbiting routers.
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Sam Cossman’s Crazy-Fun, World-Improving, Somewhat Improbable UniverseHow an idealistic entrepreneur turns wild experiences into viral videos into actual science into a going business concern.
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Ingeniøren

Nyt rumkapløb kræver gigantiske raketter – og de er på vejUSA, Rusland og Kina er på vej med rumraketter i super heavy-klassen. De nye kæmper skal især bruges til at bringe mennesker tilbage til Månen – og ud til Mars.
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The Atlantic

It's Not Illegal Immigration That Worries Republicans AnymoreA few weeks ago, the contours of an immigration compromise looked clear: Republicans would let the “Dreamers” stay. Democrats would let Trump build his wall. Both sides would swallow something their bases found distasteful in order to get the thing their bases cared about most. Since then, Trump has blown up the deal. He announced on Wednesday that he would legalize the “Dreamers,” undocumented i
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The Atlantic

President Trump's Hunger GamesThis week, as part of its 2019 budget request , the Trump administration put forward a radical new policy proposal. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program—SNAP, commonly known as food stamps—would reduce the amount of money given to lower-income families to help them buy groceries and would instead send food directly to them. Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney described
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Science : NPR

Scientists Explore Ties Between Alzheimer's And Brain's Ancient Immune SystemTheir first epiphanies came during musings over beer, and evolved into a decade of teamwork. Two Harvard researchers explain why they think Alzheimer's disease may be traced to an immunity glitch. (Image credit: Martin M. Rotker/Science Source)
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Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Hvor mange exoplaneter kan man se foran stjernerne?En læser vil gerne vide, hvor mange planeter uden for vores solsystem astronomerne kan spotte ved at observere deres formørkelse af stjernerne. Forsker fra DTU Space giver et svar.
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Science | The Guardian

China’s great leap forward in scienceChinese investment is paying off with serious advances in biotech, computing and space. Are they edging ahead of the west? I first met Xiaogang Peng in the summer of 1992 at Jilin University in Changchun, in the remote north-east of China, where he was a postgraduate student in the department of chemistry. He told me that his dream was to get a place at a top American lab. Now, Xiaogang was eviden
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Science | The Guardian

George Church: "Genome sequencing is like the internet back in the late 1980s."The pioneering geneticist on why he wants us to earn money by sharing our genomic data, his plans to resurrect the woolly mammoth and how narcolepsy helps him generate ideas • How can I make money from my DNA? A new genetic testing company called Nebula Genomics wants to help people profit from their own genomes. The Observer talks to Harvard University DNA sequencing pioneer George Church about
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Science | The Guardian

How can I make money from my DNA?If you have your DNA sequenced, someone somewhere will be making money from the data. A new start-up aims to make sure that you get your share • A share in the future of DNA: Prof George Church Q&A If you unlock the secrets of your DNA by paying a company to read your genes, behind the scenes it is probably making money by selling on your data for research. Companies like 23andMe and AncestryDNA c
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Science | The Guardian

Elon Musk’s dream ideasFrom superfast trains to colonising Mars – a selection of Elon Musk’s extraordinary ideas Musk’s SpaceX enterprise was founded with the intention of making space travel affordable. By extension, Musk has stated that he hopes human beings will one day become a “multi-planetary species”. At the 68th International Astronautical Congress in Adelaide last September, Musk said he hopes to send cargo shi
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Science | The Guardian

Are you eager to please? Personality quizDo you tend to work to put another person at their ease, or are you happy to let things get awkward? Take these simple questions to find out Choose which statement, a) or b), best applies to you. Asked to give an impromptu speech, you: Continue reading...
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What Trump Still Gets Wrong About How Russia Played FacebookThe president's quote tweet of Facebook executive Rob Goldman misses how the Russians really influenced the election online.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New study sheds light on illegal global trade of pangolinsAnimal traffickers are taking advantage of remote ivory trade routes to smuggle pangolins -- one of the world's most endangered animals -- out of Central Africa, a new study has found.
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Science | The Guardian

Is the answer that we have run out of good questions? | Kenan MalikWe are supposed to be inquisitive and yet … John Brockman has run out of questions. Brockman, a literary agent, runs the science and philosophy site Edge.org . Every year for 20 years, he has asked leading thinkers to answer a particular question, such as: “What questions have disappeared?” or: “What do you believe is true even though you cannot prove it?” This year, though, Brockman announced th
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Science | The Guardian

How long can we treat the suffering of animals as an inconvenient truth? | Michael BrooksA revolution is coming in our relationship with ‘lower’ creatures, provoked by a greater knowledge of their cognition. Labour’s new plans for animal welfare are just a start Scientific insight is a powerful thing, but will it ever override the human lust for health, prosperity and, saddest of all, convenience? This question entered my head as I read of the Labour party’s newly announced policies f
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Airport Controllers Trade the Tower for a Screen-Filled RoomAt the newly expanded Fort Lauderdale airport in Florida, controllers watch their planes through radar and video, not line-of-sight.
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Big Think

Mercury making its way into global drinking water thanks to global warmingOnce the permafrost thaws, it's the beginning of the end for the aquatic food chain. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Romeo the lonesome frog is feelin' the loveIn the end, Romeo the lonesome Bolivian frog found more love than he could have imagined.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Light pollution threatens Chile's dark skiesIt seems nothing can escape the inexorable spread of light pollution—not even the giant telescopes probing the heavens above northern Chile, a region whose pristine dark skies, long considered a paradise for astronomers, are under increasing threat.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

What does a bear do in the Alaska woods? Disperse seedsDoes a bear leave scat in the woods? The answer is obvious but the effects on an ecosystem may not be.
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Popular Science

The Little Rover That CouldSpace We think you can, Opportunity. On Saturday, February 17, Opportunity will experience its 5,000th Martian sunrise.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

To sleep, perchance to forgetPeople and other animals sicken and die if they are deprived of sleep, but why is sleep so essential? Psychiatrists Chiara Cirelli and Giulio Tononi proposed the 'synaptic homeostasis hypothesis' (SHY) in 2003. This hypothesis holds that sleep is the price we pay for brains that are plastic and able to keep learning new things. A few years ago, they started research that could show direct evidence
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Personalized curriculum captures students' imagination, interestFocusing on their personal DNA and genealogies, middle school students appear to have learned as much as their peers who used case studies, according to a Penn State researcher.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Understanding roots opens students to science, diversityFocusing science education on students through genetic and genealogical studies may be the way to increase minorities in the pipeline and engage students who would otherwise deem science too hard or too uninteresting, according to a Penn State anthropologist.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Understanding roots opens students to science, diversityFocusing science education on students through genetic and genealogical studies may be the way to increase minorities in the pipeline and engage students who would otherwise deem science too hard or too uninteresting, according to a Penn State anthropologist.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Personalized curriculum captures students' imagination, interestFocusing on their personal DNA and genealogies, middle school students appear to have learned as much as their peers who used case studies, according to a Penn State researcher.
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Science | The Guardian

Breakthrough as scientists grow sheep embryos containing human cellsAdvance brings us closer to growing transplant organs inside animals or being able to genetically tailor compatible organs, say researchers Growing human organs inside other animals has taken another step away from science-fiction, with researchers announcing they have grown sheep embryos containing human cells. Scientists say growing human organs inside animals could not only increase supply, bu
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Latest Headlines | Science News

This stick-on patch could keep tabs on stroke patients at homeNew wearable electronics that monitor swallowing and speech could aid rehabilitation therapy for stroke patients.
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Big Think

Figure skating physics for normal humansFigure skating has a lot to do with physics, and here’s what we mean. Also, what’s the difference between all those figure-skating jumps? Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Asteroid 'time capsules' may help explain how life started on EarthIn popular culture, asteroids play the role of apocalyptic threat, get blamed for wiping out the dinosaurs -- and offer an extraterrestrial source for mineral mining. But for Georgia Tech researcher Nicholas Hud, asteroids play an entirely different role: that of time capsules showing what molecules originally existed in our solar system. Having that information gives scientists the starting point
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Asteroid 'time capsules' may help explain how life started on EarthIn popular culture, asteroids play the role of apocalyptic threat, get blamed for wiping out the dinosaurs - and offer an extraterrestrial source for mineral mining.
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Popular Science

The best ways to preserve your flowersDIY Save your Valentine’s Day blossoms. To preserve your Valentine's Day flowers, you need to remove their moisture with a process like air-drying, pressing, or nuking them in the microwave.
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Popular Science

Five rad and random products I found this weekGadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 37. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Newborn babies who suffered stroke regain language function in opposite side of brainA stroke in a baby -- even a big one -- does not have the same lasting impact as a stroke in an adult. A study led by Georgetown University Medical Center investigators found that a decade or two after a 'perinatal' stroke damaged the left 'language' side of the brain, affected teenagers and young adults used the right sides of their brain for language.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unprecedented study of Picasso's bronzes uncovers new detailsScientists have completed the first major material survey and study of the Musee national Picasso-Paris' Pablo Picasso bronzes using portable instruments. They used the instruments and a database of alloy 'fingerprints' to non-invasively analyze a group of 39 bronzes and 11 painted sheet metal sculptures, revealing new details about the modern master's art.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Research team uncovers hidden details in Picasso Blue Period paintingScientists have used multiple modes of light to uncover details hidden beneath the visible surface of Pablo Picasso's painting 'La Miséreuse accroupie', a major work from the artist's Blue Period. The researchers found images connected to other works by Picasso as well as a landscape -- likely by another Barcelona painter -- underneath Picasso's painting.
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New Scientist - News

Electronic skin animates heartbeat on the back of your handA flexible e-skin containing a few hundred micro LEDs can display your vital signs or messages from your doctor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Japanese researchers develop ultrathin, highly elastic skin displayA new ultrathin, elastic display that fits snugly on the skin can show the moving waveform of an electrocardiogram recorded by a breathable, on-skin electrode sensor. Combined with a wireless communication module, this integrated biomedical sensor system -- called 'skin electronics' -- can transmit biometric data to the cloud.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stretchable electronics a 'game changer' for stroke recovery treatmentA first-of-its-kind sensor that sticks to the throat and measures speech and swallowing patterns could be a game-changer in the field of stroke rehabilitation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Stretchable electronics a 'game changer' for stroke recovery treatmentA groundbreaking new wearable designed to be worn on the throat could be a game-changer in the field of stroke rehabilitation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Illegal global trade of pangolinsAnimal traffickers are taking advantage of remote ivory trade routes to smuggle pangolins – one of the world’s most endangered animals – out of Central Africa, a new study has found.
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Viden

Fordomstjekkeren: Elbiler sviner, koster og kører ikke langt nok - eller hvad?Eksperterne fra Klimatestamentet kigger 3 af de mest gængse fordomme om elbiler efter i sømmene.
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Ingeniøren

Ugens debat: Skal drænrør som kystsikring testes igen?Opfinderen Poul Jacobsens drænrør skal endnu en gang testes som middel til kyst- beskyttelse, efter at alle Folketingets partier, undtagen Enhedslisten og Alternativet, har sat 10 mio. kr. af til formålet. På ing.dk fremkaldte den nye bevilling til de omdiskuterede drænrør heftig debat – læs ...
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research team uncovers hidden details in Picasso Blue Period paintingA partnership of the Northwestern University/Art Institute of Chicago Center for Scientific Studies in the Arts, the Art Gallery of Ontario and the National Gallery of Art has used multiple modes of light to uncover details hidden beneath the visible surface of Pablo Picasso's painting 'La Miséreuse accroupie', a major work from the artist's Blue Period. The researchers found images connected to o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unprecedented study of Picasso's bronzes uncovers new detailsMusee national Picasso-Paris and the Northwestern University/Art Institute of Chicago Center for Scientific Studies in the Arts have completed the first major material survey and study of the Musee national Picasso-Paris' Pablo Picasso bronzes using portable instruments. The international research team of scientists, art conservators and curators used the instruments and a database of alloy 'finge
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Live Science

Hidden Artwork Found Beneath Picasso 'Blue Period' MasterpiecePicasso flipped the painted canvas 90 degrees and used what was once a cliff top as the line of the cloaked woman's back.
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Blog » Languages » English

Eyewire Winter Games 2018: TriviaFigure skating! Always an audience favorite. Jackson Haines, a 19th century American who began his career as a ballet dancer, is generally considered the father of the modern sport, and Olympic TV broadcasters have probably thanked him ever since. In fact, figure skating is such a mainstay of the Olympics that it even started off during the 1908 Summer Olympics, before a Winter Olympics existed!
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Science | The Guardian

Artwork hidden under Picasso painting revealed by x-rayNon-invasive imaging reveals landscape painting beneath Pablo Picasso’s The Crouching Beggar but who created it remains a mystery Wrapped in a mustard coloured blanket with a white scarf and her head on one side, Pablo Picasso’s La Misereuse Accroupie (The Crouching Beggar) is a study of forlorn resignation. But researchers say that there is more to desolate character than meets the eye. Beneath
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The Atlantic

Only in AmericaWhat does the dissenting mail look like, when I publish an item like this one , arguing that Mitch McConnell illustrates the pious hypocrisy of those who are “deeply saddened” by gun massacres but obstruct efforts to prevent them, or round-ups of reader responses like this? Here is a representative sample. Draconian controls . I said in my McConnell item that the NRA had successfully equated any
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unprecedented study of Picasso's bronzes uncovers new detailsMusee national Picasso-Paris and the Northwestern University/Art Institute of Chicago Center for Scientific Studies in the Arts (NU-ACCESS) have completed the first major material survey and study of the Musee national Picasso-Paris' world-renowned Pablo Picasso bronzes using cutting-edge, portable instruments.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research team uncovers hidden details in Picasso Blue Period paintingAn international partnership of the Northwestern University/Art Institute of Chicago Center for Scientific Studies in the Arts (NU-ACCESS), the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, has used multiple modes of light to uncover details hidden beneath the visible surface of Pablo Picasso's painting "La Miséreuse accroupie" (The Crouching Woman), a major work from t
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The Etch Clock Makes the Time Appear Out of NowhereThe timepiece displays the time by pulling its thermoelastic membrane into the cavities beneath the clock's face.
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The Atlantic

Why Don't More Female Figure Skaters Wear Pants?Last weekend, one of the buzzier stories out of the Olympic ladies’ figure skating short program competition was one you might call … surprisingly surprising. The French figure skater Maé-Bérénice Méité made headlines: for the fact that she skated to a Beyoncé medley, and even more so, for the fact that she did it in pants. More accurately, she did it in a bedazzled black unitard, but that didn’t
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The Atlantic

'Show Us the Carnage'After a previous horrific massacre via AR-15, the one in Las Vegas last winter in which a single murderer killed or injured more than 900 people , readers wrote about that weapon and its history. For reference, those items were: “ Why the AR-15 Is So Lethal ” “ The Nature of the AR-15 ” “ Why the AR-15 Was Never Meant to be in Civilian Hands ” “ More on the Military and Civilian History of the AR
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The Atlantic

Letter: Can Dogs Experience Regret?Your Dog Feels No Shame In The Atlantic ’s March issue, William Brennan explained that, according to scientific research, just because a dog looks guilty doesn’t mean it feels that way. William Brennan writes that it is a myth that our dogs can experience guilt. Okay, but how about regret? My wife and I made the mistake of placing a couple of bowls of dog treats on the floor for our Doberman and
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Netflix's 'Altered Carbon' Is Over the Top in Every WayIts worldbuilding is expansive and its detective is hard-boiled—it's sci-fi noir turned up to 11.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Increasing incidence of rare skin cancerWhile it may not be as common as other skin cancers, Merkel cell carcinoma is highly aggressive and often deadly — and according to new research, it’s also becoming more common.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Shot may help shield against shinglesTwo vaccines are available to help prevent shingles, which can affect anyone who has had chickenpox or the chickenpox vaccine; both diseases are caused by the same virus, which stays in the body after chickenpox clears.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists shed light on biological roots of individualityA new study illuminates the biology that guides behavior across different stages of life in worms, and suggests how variations in specific neuromodulators in the developing nervous system may lead to occasional variations.
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The Atlantic

Mueller's Message to AmericaWith yet another blockbuster indictment (why is it always on a Friday afternoon?), Special Counsel Robert Mueller has, once again, upended Washington. And this time, it is possible that his efforts may have a wider effect outside the Beltway. For those following the matter, there has been little doubt that Russian citizens attempted to interfere with the American presidential election. The Americ
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Ingeniøren

Tag på tur ind i big bangEn ny permanent udstilling på Tycho Brahe Planetarium tager os med ud i universet, hvor vi kan spejle os i altings begyndelse: big bang.
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Science : NPR

Did Pox Virus Research Put Potential Profits Ahead of Public Safety?Privately funded scientists made a virus related to smallpox from scratch, hoping their version might lead to a better smallpox vaccine. But critics question the need — and worry about repercussions. (Image credit: Chris Bjornberg/Science Source)
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Space Photos of the Week: Even Geriatric Mars Rovers Know How to Snap SelfiesThe Opportunity rover has been exploring Mars for 14 years. But that doesn't mean it can't put Curiosity's social media skills to shame.
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The Atlantic

When Malls Saved the Suburbs From Despair“Okay, we’ll see you in two-and-a-half hours,” the clerk tells me, taking the iPhone from my hand. I’m at the Apple Store, availing myself of a cheap smartphone battery replacement, an offer the company made after taking heat for deliberately slowing down devices. A test run by a young woman typing at a feverish, unnatural pace on an iPad confirms that mine desperately needed the swap. As she typ
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The Atlantic

The Mystery Behind Frederick Douglass's BirthdayA wealth of details was recorded about the day Frederick Douglass died as a free man in Washington, D.C. It was February 20, 1895. Douglass’s movements in the hours before his death were laid out in the New York Times obituary published the following day: He spent the morning at the Congressional library, then traveled to Metzerott Hall for sessions of the National Council of Women of the United
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New on MIT Technology Review

The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending February 17, 2018)This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Can Pesticides Affect Pregnancy?A recent study suggests pesticides in produce may interfere with your chances of getting pregnant. Let's explore its findings -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

Starfish Can See in the Dark (among Other Amazing Abilities)There’s a lot more going on beneath those spiny exteriors -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think

Historian Niall Ferguson – The Ghost of Future Past – Think Again - a Big Think Podcast #135A bracing splash of cold Laphroaig in the face of some of our biggest misconceptions, from historian Niall Ferguson. Read More
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The Atlantic

The Righteous Anger of the Parkland Shooting’s Teen SurvivorsSomething was different about the mass shooting this week in Parkland, Florida, in which 14 students and three adults were killed. It was not only the death toll. The mass murder at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High became the deadliest high-school shooting in American history ( edging out Columbine, which killed 13 in 1999). What made Parkland different were the people who stepped forward to describ
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The Atlantic

Airbnb and the Unintended Consequences of 'Disruption'The U.S economy is in the midst of a wrenching technological transformation that is fundamentally changing the way people sleep , work , eat , shop , love , read , and interact . At least, that’s one interpretation. A second story of this age of technological transformation says that it’s mostly a facade—that the last 30 years have been a productivity bust and little has changed in everyday life,
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What Is Up With Those Pentagon UFO Videos?The Department of Defense released two videos of so-called UFOs. Or did it?
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Mueller Indictment Shows Russia's Internet Research Agency Inner WorkingsThe most chilling aspect of that blockbuster Mueller indictment? The bureaucracy behind Russia's onslaught.
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Feed: All Latest

How Augmented Reality Is Shaping the Future of PlayLegacy toymakers like Disney, Lego, and Hasbro are all banking on AR to keep their toys relevant in 2018.
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Ingeniøren

Planteforædler: Med gensaksen kan vi vinde over plantesygdommeCrispr/Cas9 forkorter forædlingsprocessen med op mod 20 år, siger forædler, som kalder teknologien en game changer.
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Science : NPR

'Strong' Black Woman? 'Smart' Asian Man? The Downside To Positive StereotypesIt's not hard to spin a positive stereotype as a compliment. But making any generalization about a group is a slippery slope. (Image credit: Jamie Jones/Getty Images)
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The Atlantic

What If Voters Don't Care About Infidelity at All?Donald Trump M. TrumpRight up until 2016 or so, there was a clean narrative about political infidelity. Back in the day, the story went, politicians had affairs with abandon—John Kennedy, of course , but also Franklin Roosevelt, Dwight Eisenhower, Lyndon Johnson, and plenty others. (It’s a curiosity that Richard Nixon, the most famously unethical president, is one of the few without serious allegations of infidelity.
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The Atlantic

Bari Weiss and the Left-Wing Infatuation With Taking OffenseThe mob was unusually vociferous, even for Twitter. After the California-born ice skater Mirai Nagasu became the first American woman to land a triple axel at the Olympics, the New York Times writer Bari Weiss commented “Immigrants: They get the job done.” What followed that innocuous tweet was one of the sillier, manufactured controversies I have ever seen on Twitter. Twitter’s socially consciou
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BBC News - Science & Environment

New scanning technique reveals secrets behind great paintingsAn innovative scanning system is making it easier to find the hidden stories behind artworks.
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The Atlantic

The Fuzzy Math of Funding Iraq's ReconstructionAt first glance, a conference on Iraq that raised $30 billion this week may look like a success. But compared to the estimated $88 billion the Iraqi government said was needed to rebuild the country after the devastation wrought by ISIS and U.S.-led airstrikes, the amount sounds paltry. And like most things involving Iraq, its neighbors, and reconstruction, the true picture is far more complicate
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Ingeniøren

Kampsax bygger jernbane gennem Irans uvejsomme bjergeIngeniør Jørgen Saxild fra Kampsax berettede ved et foredrag i Ingeniørforeningen om de vanskelige forhold, under hvilke det danske konsortium var i færd med at anlægge ‘Den transiranske Jærnbane’.
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Science | The Guardian

The media exaggerates negative news. This distortion has consequences | Steven PinkerWhether or not the world really is getting worse, the nature of news will make us think that it is Every day the news is filled with stories about war, terrorism, crime, pollution, inequality, drug abuse and oppression. And it’s not just the headlines we’re talking about; it’s the op-eds and long-form stories as well. Magazine covers warn us of coming anarchies, plagues, epidemics, collapses, and
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New Scientist - News

Quantum computer could have predicted Trump’s surprise electionQuantum computers can improve election forecasts by taking into account how states affect one another, allowing one to predict Trump's slim 2016 election win
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New Scientist - News

Facebook may guess millions of people’s sexuality to sell adsThree-quarters of all EU users may have had sensitive data inferred about them by Facebook, including things like sexual orientation, religion and political leanings
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Science | The Guardian

Trump's moon shot might be steered by a woman, says Nasa chiefA third of America’s astronauts are women, says Dr Ellen Ochoa, a director at an agency that has come a long way on equality There is at least a one in three chance that the first human to set foot on the moon this century will be a woman, Dr Ellen Ochoa, the head of Nasa’s Johnson space center has said. In the early 1960s Nasa sent out rejection letters saying it had no plans to send women into
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Did Russia Affect the 2016 Election? It’s Now UndeniableIn the wake of the Mueller indictment of a Russian troll farm, any attempt to claim that the 2016 election wasn’t affected by Russian meddling is laughable.
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In the Russian Investigation, Clues Were Lost in TranslationTo troll effectively, Colonel Gant, you must think in Russian!
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How Parkland Students Are Setting and Keeping the Record StraightHow students are fighting lies, half-truths, and hypocrisy in the wake of the Florida school shooting
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Inside Science

Are You Dyslexic in Chinese?Are You Dyslexic in Chinese? Learn about the different ways dyslexia manifests itself in languages. Are You Dyslexic In Chinese? Video of Are You Dyslexic In Chinese? Human Friday, February 16, 2018 - 20:00 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer Can you be dyslexic in Chinese but totally fine when reading in English? Our staff writer Yuen Yiu explores the possibility for someone to be dyslexic in one language bu
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Labor Board Rules Google’s Firing of James Damore Was LegalGoogle released the former senior software engineer last August after he wrote a ten-page memo arguing that biological differences between men and women accounted for the gender disparity in software engineering.
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New on MIT Technology Review

Russians accused of information warfare used tech to whip up controversy and cover their tracks
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Inside Science

Global Warming's Frozen GiantEarth Scientists are braving Arctic winters to study carbon frozen in soil. They keep finding surprises -- all of them bad. 02/16/2018 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer https://www.insidescience.org/news/global-warmings-frozen-giant
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cyberattacks are costly, and things could get worse: US reportCyberattacks cost the United States between $57 billion and $109 billion in 2016, a White House report said Friday, warning of a "spillover" effect for the broader economy if the situation worsens.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists shed light on biological roots of individualityPut 50 newborn worms in 50 separate containers, and they'll all start looking for food at roughly the same time. Like members of other species, microscopic C. elegans roundworms tend to act like other individuals their own age.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA sees Tropical Storm 10S form along Western Australia CoastAfter days of lingering off the west Kimberley coast of Western Australia as a slowly organizing low pressure area, Tropical Storm 10S has formed about 50 miles west of Broome, Australia.
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Live Science

The Brutal Neuroscience of Figure Skating: How Spinning Athletes Overcome DizzinessThe mental preparations figure skaters must go through to spin at Olympic levels without dizzily toppling over are at least as intense as their physical workouts.
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Feed: All Latest

A Ruling Over Embedded Tweets Could Change Online PublishingA federal judge from New York ruled that embedding a tweet containing an image in a webpage could be considered copyright infringement.
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Popular Science

Fluctuating temperatures are causing massive river ice jamsScience These ice chunks are fascinating to look at, but can cause serious flooding. Warm weather, rain, and melting snow can cause havoc on ice-covered rivers.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Indict NightToday in 5 Lines Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein announced that Special Counsel Robert Mueller had indicte d 13 Russian nationals and three Russian entities for allegedly interfering in the 2016 presidential election. During a press conference, Rosenstein emphasized that “there is no allegation in this indictment that any American was a knowing participant” in the scheme, and that “there i
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The Atlantic

What Is the Internet Research Agency?The Internet Research Agency is a Russian troll farm in St. Petersburg—in essence a Kremlin-backed enterprise staffed with hundreds of people whose main job is to sow disinformation on the internet. The organization, which serves as a propaganda arm for Russian President Vladimir Putin, is at the heart of the indictments handed down Friday by Special Counsel Robert Mueller. The indictment alleges
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Hope Will Come NextWhat We’re Following The Russia Probe: Special Counsel Robert Mueller has indicted 13 Russian nationals and three Russian companies for allegedly interfering with the U.S. political system. The indictment describes a campaign to influence the 2016 presidential election by staging political rallies and posing as grassroots advocates for the candidates, among other activities. Here’s the full text
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Mueller Indictment: Russian Trolls Stole Real US Identities to Fool FacebookA new Justice Department indictment alleges Russia's disinformation operations created bank and social media accounts using the stolen identities of real US citizens.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New guideline warns pain benefits of medical cannabis overstatedA new medical guideline suggests Canada's family physicians should take a sober second thought before prescribing medical cannabis to most patients.
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Live Science

Strange Infection Strikes Wisconsin Dog Shelter: What Is 'Strep Zoo'?Two dogs at a Wisconsin animal shelter recently tested positive for "strep zoo," a potentially lethal respiratory infection in animals.
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