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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists tackle the aberrant epigenetic programming underlying childhood cancersResearchers at UFRGS and the US NIH have targeted proteins that regulate chromatin in Ewing sarcoma cells, hindering malignant tumor growth. They induced chromatic relaxation by treating the cells with histone deacetylase inhibitors, reducing expression of the EWSR1-FLI-1 oncogene and other pluripotency/cell viability genes, while impairing sarcoma cell survival and growth. Decreased survival of s
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Add-on clip turns smartphone into fully operational microscopeAustralian researchers from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Nanoscale BioPhotonics (CNBP) have developed a 3D printable 'clip-on' that can turn any smartphone into a fully functional microscope.
14h
Ingeniøren
Første gang i 14 år: Danmark bliver igen klar til ubådsjagtI lang tid har vi ikke vidst, om fremmede ubåde sniger sig rundt i danske farvande. Det slutter nu, hvor de danske fregatter og helikoptere skal udstyres til ubådsjagt. Ingeniøren ser fra i dag nærmere på det nye forsvarsforlig.
17h

LATEST

Live Science
This Giant, Goopy, Floating Blob Is a Whale PlacentaThe boaters, cruising off the coast of Hawaii, came across something that looked like a giant, used tissue floating in the water.
6min
cognitive science
The classic sociology book "The Social Meaning of Money" had lots of interesting implications. This blog entry focuses on charitable giving from a book of essays inspired by it called Money Talks.submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
14min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Latest palliative care findings on caregiver depression, LGBT partners, moral distressCaregivers of patients surviving a prolonged critical illness experience high and persistent rates of depression. Losing a partner can be especially stressful for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people. Resident physicians experience moral distress when they administer futile treatments to patients at the end of life. These are among nine major findings from the latest research on ho
20min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers achieve 'Olympic ring' molecule breakthrough just in time for Winter GamesMore than 7,000 miles away from the snowcapped peaks of PyeongChang, scientists in Florida have unlocked a novel strategy for synthesizing a highly versatile molecule called olympicene -- a compound of carbon and hydrogen atoms named for its familiar Olympic ring shape.
24min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unprecedented single-digit-nanometer magnetic tunnel junction demonstratedResearchers have developed ultra-small magnetic tunnel junctions with high retention properties for use in semiconductor technologies.
24min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reshaping drug testsResearchers have improved on the currently available methods for screening drugs for heart-related side effects. The method involves fabricating a tiny hole in a silicon chip over which lipid membranes, similar to those that surround cells, are encouraged to grow.
24min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nitrate in drinking water increases the risk of colorectal cancer, study findsNitrate in groundwater and drinking water, which primarily comes from fertilisers used in the agricultural production, has not only been subject to decades of environmental awareness -- it has also been suspected of increasing the risk of cancer. The largest epidemiological study ever carried out in this area now shows that there is a correlation -- also when the amount of nitrate in the drinking
24min
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Looking for a job? Highlight your ability, not your experience | Jason ShenVery few of us hold jobs that line up directly with our past experience or what we studied in college. Take TED Resident Jason Shen, for instance; he studied biology, but now he's a program manager at a tech company. In this quick, insightful talk about human potential, he shares some new thinking on how looking for ability over credentials can lead to hiring great employees.
29min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find tweeting in cities lower than expectedStudying data from Twitter, University of Illinois researchers found that less people tweet per capita from larger cities than in smaller ones, indicating an unexpected trend that has implications in understanding urban pace of life.
36min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reaching new heights in laser-accelerated ion energyA laser-driven ion acceleration scheme, developed in research led at the University of Strathclyde, could lead to compact ion sources for established and innovative applications in science, medicine and industry.
42min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Helping in spite of risk: Ants perform risk-averse sanitary care of infectious nest matesAnts care for their sick nest mates in different ways, depending on their own immune status. When they themselves are susceptible to dangerous superinfections, they use a different method to care for sick colony members compared to ants that are not susceptible, thus protecting themselves from infection. This is the result of a study of Professor Sylvia Cremer's research group at IST Austria, with
42min
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What the Record-Setting Success of 'Black Panther' Means for the Future of MoviesBlack Panther MovieAfter this weekend, everything is different.
42min
Live Science
This Google AI (Sort of) Knows When You'll Have a Heart AttackYour eyes are the windows to your heart — and Google wants in.
45min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Designing microbial communities to help plants battle nutritional stressPlants and microbes engage in a diverse array of symbiotic relationships, but identifying the specific microbes or groups of microbes that contribute to plant health is extremely difficult. Researchers have devised a general experimental scheme to identify and predict which small groups of bacterial species can help plants respond to phosphate starvation, a form of nutritional stress.
45min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Spare parts from small parts: Novel scaffolds to grow muscleAustralian biomedical engineers have developed a 3-D material that successfully mimics nature to transform cells into muscle.
45min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Land use change has warmed Earth's surfaceRecent changes to vegetation cover are causing Earth's surface to heat up. Activities like cutting down evergreen forests for agricultural expansion in the tropics create energy imbalances that lead to higher local surface temperatures and contribute to global warming.
45min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can you eat cells? Computer model predicts which organisms are capable of phagocytosisResearchers have created a computational model capable of predicting whether or not organisms have the ability to 'eat' other cells through a process known as phagocytosis. The model may be a useful tool for large-scale microbe surveys and provides valuable insight into the evolution of complex life on Earth, challenging ideas put forward in recent studies.
45min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Noise from ships scares porpoisesPorpoises communicate with each other using sounds. Therefore, they are highly sensitive to noise, such as ship noise. A new study shows that porpoises flee from and stop feeding when disturbed by heavy ship noise.
45min
The Atlantic
Mueller’s Latest Plea Deal Puts Pressure on Paul ManafortRobert Mueller R. GatesAlex Van Der Zwaan, a former attorney at an international law firm, pleaded guilty to lying to federal agents about the last time he communicated with Paul Manafort’s longtime business partner, Rick Gates. Van Der Zwaan is the latest figure swept up in Robert Mueller’s expansive probe of Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election to admit to the charges against him. Mueller’s interest
45min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Innuendo and pointing suspicion in news coverage can fuel conspiracy theoriesInnuendo and hinting at fake information in news coverage is enough to fuel belief in conspiracy theories, new research shows.
54min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Land use change has warmed the Earth's surfaceRecent changes to vegetation cover are causing the Earth's surface to heat up. Activities like cutting down evergreen forests for agricultural expansion in the tropics create energy imbalances that lead to higher local surface temperatures and contribute to global warming.
54min
Latest Headlines | Science News
How to build a human brainOrganoids, made from human stem cells, are growing into brains and other miniorgans to help researchers study development
55min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Alexa, how do word senses evolve?A new paper is the first to look at 1,000 years of English development and detect the kinds of algorithms that human minds have used to extend existing words to new senses of meaning. This kind of 'reverse engineering' of how human language has developed could have implications for natural language processing by machines.
59min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Beluga whales dive deeper, longer to find food in ArcticReductions in sea ice in the Arctic have a clear impact on animals such as polar bears that rely on frozen surfaces for feeding, mating and migrating. But sea ice loss is changing Arctic habitat and affecting other species in more indirect ways, new research finds.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Demographic compensation' may not save plants facing changing climateAn in-depth look at how plants respond to climate change shows mixed results for the phenomenon of "demographic compensation" as a way for plants to avoid severe population declines.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
As climate changes, so could the genes of the Eastern tiger swallowtail butterflyThe reality of climate change poses a significant threat to global biodiversity. As temperatures rise, the survival of individual species will ultimately depend on their ability to adapt to changes in habitat and their interactions with other species.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Governance of emerging technologies: Aligning policy analysis with social valuesEmerging biotechnologies hold great promise but could pose great risks. However, the benefits and costs are often difficult to anticipate and hard to quantify, and they can vary widely among the populations and environments.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stable gas hydrates can trigger landslidesLike avalanches onshore, there are different processes that cause submarine landslides. One very widespread assumption is that they are associated with dissociating gas hydrates in the seafloor. However, scientists at GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel have now found evidence that the context could be quite different. Their study has been published in the international journal Nature
1h
The Atlantic
The Game-Changing Success of Black PantherBlack Panther MovieOver the last few years, a lot of pernicious Hollywood myths about what movies are “marketable” have been shattered. Old excuses about how blockbusters featuring actors of color don’t appeal to worldwide audiences have been swept away by the success of franchises like the Fast & Furious series and the Star Wars sequels . Time and again, American audiences have responded to films with black leads
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Corporations can benefit from altruism during a crisis, study saysNew research finds that altruism - and social media - can help corporations cultivate trust with consumers on mobile devices during and after natural disasters, such as hurricanes.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists find new antimalarial drug targetsResearchers have discovered crucial new processes that allow malaria parasites to escape red blood cells and infect other cells, offering potential new treatment targets. The team are already working with pharmaceutical companies to use this knowledge to develop new antimalarial drugs - a critical step in the battle against drug-resistant malaria.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees ex-tropical cyclone Gita affecting New ZealandNASA's Terra satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean and saw the low pressure area previously known as Tropical Cyclone Gita, affecting New Zealand.
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Van Meerbeek and Svenning, Emery, and Springmann et al.: Clarifying assumptions and objectives in evaluating effects of food system shifts on human diets [Biological Sciences]Letters by Van Meerbeek and Svenning (1), Emery (2), and Springmann et al. (3), regarding the study by White and Hall (4), express concerns regarding assumptions of land allocation and proposed dietary characteristics. The authors (1–3) also present individual, diverse concerns. We attempt to address each concern below. Land Allocation...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Effective games and the confusion over spatial structure [Biological Sciences]A typical study of space in evolutionary game theory starts with a specification of how local interactions impact fitness, and then simulates that interaction over a model of space to show a surprising difference in dynamics between the spatial model and its nonspatial counterpart. Usually, this difference is revealed at...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
15N detection harnesses the slow relaxation property of nitrogen: Delivering enhanced resolution for intrinsically disordered proteins [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Studies over the past decade have highlighted the functional significance of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs). Due to conformational heterogeneity and inherent dynamics, structural studies of IDPs have relied mostly on NMR spectroscopy, despite IDPs having characteristics that make them challenging to study using traditional 1H-detected biomolecular NMR techniques. Here, we...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Maturity of nearby faults influences seismic hazard from hydraulic fracturing [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Understanding the causes of human-induced earthquakes is paramount to reducing societal risk. We investigated five cases of seismicity associated with hydraulic fracturing (HF) in Ohio since 2013 that, because of their isolation from other injection activities, provide an ideal setting for studying the relations between high-pressure injection and earthquakes. Our...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Assessment of the Legionnaires’ disease outbreak in Flint, Michigan [Environmental Sciences]The 2014–2015 Legionnaires’ disease (LD) outbreak in Genesee County, MI, and the outbreak resolution in 2016 coincided with changes in the source of drinking water to Flint’s municipal water system. Following the switch in water supply from Detroit to Flint River water, the odds of a Flint resident presenting with...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
A big data analysis of the relationship between future thinking and decision-making [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]We use big data methods to investigate how decision-making might depend on future sightedness (that is, on how far into the future people’s thoughts about the future extend). In study 1, we establish a link between future thinking and decision-making at the population level in showing that US states with...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Uterine influences on conceptus development in fertility-classified animals [Agricultural Sciences]A major unresolved issue is how the uterus influences infertility and subfertility in cattle. Serial embryo transfer was previously used to classify heifers as high-fertile (HF), subfertile (SF), or infertile (IF). To assess pregnancy loss, two in vivo-produced embryos were transferred into HF, SF, and IF heifers on day 7,...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
PARP-1-dependent recruitment of cold-inducible RNA-binding protein promotes double-strand break repair and genome stability [Biochemistry]Maintenance of genome integrity is critical for both faithful propagation of genetic information and prevention of mutagenesis induced by various DNA damage events. Here we report cold-inducible RNA-binding protein (CIRBP) as a newly identified key regulator in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. On DNA damage, CIRBP temporarily accumulates at the...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
SLC39A14 deficiency alters manganese homeostasis and excretion resulting in brain manganese accumulation and motor deficits in mice [Biochemistry]Solute carrier family 39, member 14 (SLC39A14) is a transmembrane transporter that can mediate the cellular uptake of zinc, iron, and manganese (Mn). Studies of Slc39a14 knockout (Slc39a14−/−) mice have documented that SLC39A14 is required for systemic growth, hepatic zinc uptake during inflammation, and iron loading of the liver in...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
A posttranslational modification of the mitotic kinesin Eg5 that enhances its mechanochemical coupling and alters its mitotic function [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Numerous posttranslational modifications have been described in kinesins, but their consequences on motor mechanics are largely unknown. We investigated one of these—acetylation of lysine 146 in Eg5—by creating an acetylation mimetic lysine to glutamine substitution (K146Q). Lysine 146 is located in the α2 helix of the motor domain, where it...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Single-channel recordings of RyR1 at microsecond resolution in CMOS-suspended membranes [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Single-channel recordings are widely used to explore functional properties of ion channels. Typically, such recordings are performed at bandwidths of less than 10 kHz because of signal-to-noise considerations, limiting the temporal resolution available for studying fast gating dynamics to greater than 100 µs. Here we present experimental methods that directly...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Lipid bilayer composition modulates the unfolding free energy of a knotted {alpha}-helical membrane protein [Biophysics and Computational Biology]α-Helical membrane proteins have eluded investigation of their thermodynamic stability in lipid bilayers. Reversible denaturation curves have enabled some headway in determining unfolding free energies. However, these parameters have been limited to detergent micelles or lipid bicelles, which do not possess the same mechanical properties as lipid bilayers that comprise...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Molecular model of the mitochondrial genome segregation machinery in Trypanosoma brucei [Cell Biology]In almost all eukaryotes, mitochondria maintain their own genome. Despite the discovery more than 50 y ago, still very little is known about how the genome is correctly segregated during cell division. The protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei contains a single mitochondrion with a singular genome, the kinetoplast DNA (kDNA). Electron...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Bacteriocyte cell death in the pea aphid/Buchnera symbiotic system [Evolution]Symbiotic associations play a pivotal role in multicellular life by facilitating acquisition of new traits and expanding the ecological capabilities of organisms. In insects that are obligatorily dependent on intracellular bacterial symbionts, novel host cells (bacteriocytes) or organs (bacteriomes) have evolved for harboring beneficial microbial partners. The processes regulating the...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
General amino acid control in fission yeast is regulated by a nonconserved transcription factor, with functions analogous to Gcn4/Atf4 [Genetics]Eukaryotes respond to amino acid starvation by enhancing the translation of mRNAs encoding b-ZIP family transcription factors (GCN4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and ATF4 in mammals), which launch transcriptional programs to counter this stress. This pathway involves phosphorylation of the eIF2 translation factor by Gcn2-protein kinases and is regulated by upstream...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Global changes of H3K27me3 domains and Polycomb group protein distribution in the absence of recruiters Spps or Pho [Genetics]Polycomb group (PcG) proteins maintain the silenced state of key developmental genes in animals, but how these proteins are recruited to specific regions of the genome is still poorly understood. In Drosophila, PcG proteins are recruited to Polycomb response elements (PREs) that include combinations of sites for sequence specific DNA...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
16p11.2 transcription factor MAZ is a dosage-sensitive regulator of genitourinary development [Genetics]Genitourinary (GU) birth defects are among the most common yet least studied congenital malformations. Congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUTs) have high morbidity and mortality rates and account for ∼30% of structural birth defects. Copy number variation (CNV) mapping revealed that 16p11.2 is a hotspot for GU...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Damaging de novo mutations diminish motor skills in children on the autism spectrum [Genetics]In individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), de novo mutations have previously been shown to be significantly correlated with lower IQ but not with the core characteristics of ASD: deficits in social communication and interaction and restricted interests and repetitive patterns of behavior. We extend these findings by demonstrating in...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
5-Azacytidine prevents relapse and produces long-term complete remissions in leukemia xenografts treated with Moxetumomab pasudotox [Medical Sciences]Moxetumomab pasudotox (Moxe) is a chimeric protein composed of an anti-CD22 Fv fused to a portion of Pseudomonas exotoxin A and kills CD22-expressing leukemia cells. It is very active in hairy-cell leukemia, but many children with relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) either respond transiently or are initially resistant. Resistance to...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
NAD+ supplementation normalizes key Alzheimer’s features and DNA damage responses in a new AD mouse model with introduced DNA repair deficiency [Neuroscience]Emerging findings suggest that compromised cellular bioenergetics and DNA repair contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), but their role in disease-defining pathology is unclear. We developed a DNA repair-deficient 3xTgAD/Polβ+/− mouse that exacerbates major features of human AD including phosphorylated Tau (pTau) pathologies, synaptic dysfunction, neuronal death, and...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Septal cholinergic neurons gate hippocampal output to entorhinal cortex via oriens lacunosum moleculare interneurons [Neuroscience]Neuromodulation of neural networks, whereby a selected circuit is regulated by a particular modulator, plays a critical role in learning and memory. Among neuromodulators, acetylcholine (ACh) plays a critical role in hippocampus-dependent memory and has been shown to modulate neuronal circuits in the hippocampus. However, it has remained unknown how...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Normal aging induces A1-like astrocyte reactivity [Neuroscience]The decline of cognitive function occurs with aging, but the mechanisms responsible are unknown. Astrocytes instruct the formation, maturation, and elimination of synapses, and impairment of these functions has been implicated in many diseases. These findings raise the question of whether astrocyte dysfunction could contribute to cognitive decline in aging....
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Regulation of Arabidopsis brassinosteroid receptor BRI1 endocytosis and degradation by plant U-box PUB12/PUB13-mediated ubiquitination [Plant Biology]Plants largely rely on plasma membrane (PM)-resident receptor-like kinases (RLKs) to sense extracellular and intracellular stimuli and coordinate cell differentiation, growth, and immunity. Several RLKs have been shown to undergo internalization through the endocytic pathway with a poorly understood mechanism. Here, we show that endocytosis and protein abundance of the...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Circadian clock-dependent and -independent posttranscriptional regulation underlies temporal mRNA accumulation in mouse liver [Systems Biology]The mammalian circadian clock coordinates physiology with environmental cycles through the regulation of daily oscillations of gene expression. Thousands of transcripts exhibit rhythmic accumulations across mouse tissues, as determined by the balance of their synthesis and degradation. While diurnally rhythmic transcription regulation is well studied and often thought to be...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Endocytosis as a stabilizing mechanism for tissue homeostasis [Systems Biology]Cells in tissues communicate by secreted growth factors (GF) and other signals. An important function of cell circuits is tissue homeostasis: maintaining proper balance between the amounts of different cell types. Homeostasis requires negative feedback on the GFs, to avoid a runaway situation in which cells stimulate each other and...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Mano et al., Optimal run-and-tumble-based transportation of a Janus particle with active steering [Corrections]PHYSICS Correction for “Optimal run-and-tumble–based transportation of a Janus particle with active steering,” by Tomoyuki Mano, Jean-Baptiste Delfau, Junichiro Iwasawa, and Masaki Sano, which was first published March 14, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1616013114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:E2580–E2589). The authors wish to note the following: “We wish to acknowledge that during...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Ocean acidification and coral skeletal density Porites corals are dominant reef builders on most Indo-Pacific Reefs. Coral reefs are among the most diverse ecosystems on Earth, and ocean acidification is considered a major threat to their future survival. However, field and laboratory studies examining the effect of acidification on corals...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Causing confusion in the debate about the transition toward a more plant-based diet [Biological Sciences]White and Hall (1) recently assessed the contribution of animal-based agriculture to greenhouse gas emissions (GHGE) and nutrient provision of the United States society. Unfortunately, their study provides a misleading message. Reducing animal-based food is needed to meet climate goals and future global food demands (2). Hence, it is important...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Without animals, US farmers would reduce feed crop production [Biological Sciences]In “Nutritional and greenhouse gas impacts of removing animals from US agriculture,” White and Hall (1) imagine a future without animal agriculture but fail to address perhaps the single most influential aspect of livestock on US agriculture: land use for feed crops. The authors unrealistically assume that without livestock, Americans...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Feedlot diet for Americans that results from a misspecified optimization algorithm [Biological Sciences]White and Hall (1) suggest that removing animals from US agriculture would create a food supply incapable of supporting the United States population’s nutritional requirements and increase nutritional deficiencies compared with the current food system. However, their analysis suffers from an uncritical use of nutritional values and optimization algorithms, and...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
QnAs with Martin Head-Gordon [QnAs]Introductory chemistry courses characterize chemical bonds as one of several types, such as ionic and covalent bonds. Bonds differ in their strength and mechanism of joining atoms together. However, bonds form through multiple mechanisms, each contributing to the bond’s strength and character. Martin Head-Gordon is a theoretical chemist at the...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Profile of Natasha V. Raikhel [Profile]A plane crash galvanized Natasha Raikhel and her family into leaving the Soviet Union for the United States. At the time, Raikhel was studying invertebrates while living in Leningrad. Raikhel’s husband and son had joined her on a field expedition to gather samples in Baku, Azerbaijan, and on the return...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Profile of Nancy Ip [Profile]Elected in 2015 as a foreign associate of the National Academy of Sciences, neuroscientist Nancy Ip has made seminal discoveries concerning neurotrophic factors and the molecular mechanisms underlying brain development and synaptic plasticity, as well as their dysregulation in neurodegenerative disorders. Bridging traditional Chinese and modern medicine, Ip, the Morningside...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Throwing back the big ones saves a fishery from hot water [Sustainability Science]In Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, the Mock Turtle and the Gryphon teach Alice a dance in which everyone partners with a lobster and then throws it “as far out to sea as you can” (1). While the “porpoise” (as the Mock Turtle pronounces “purpose”) of throwing lobsters never becomes...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Biodiversity may wax or wane depending on metrics or taxa [Ecology]Biodiversity changes have proven surprisingly complex to estimate and understand. While there are negative trends at a global scale such as the substantial losses of vertebrate species (1), changes at local scales may show large variation, with no clear overall trend (2, 3). Because assessing and improving the status of...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cooperative breeding and the evolutionary coexistence of helper and nonhelper strategies [Evolution]In some species individuals altruistically delay their chance of reproducing to help others raise their young. This is commonly referred to as cooperative breeding and is widespread across the animal kingdom, occurring in insects, crustaceans, fish, birds, and mammals, including humans (1, 2). This behavior has puzzled biologists for decades...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Stepping into the genetics of biological motion processing [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Person perception (1) and action understanding (2) are complex, interrelated skills at the very heart of our social world. The ability to process biological motion (BM)—to extract information by observing the movement of others (3)—provides one crucial link between these skills, and research into how we perceive moving bodies has...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Classification and interaction in random forests [Systems Biology]Suppose you are a physician with a patient whose complaint could arise from multiple diseases. To attain a specific diagnosis, you might ask yourself a series of yes/no questions depending on observed features describing the patient, such as clinical test results and reported symptoms. As some questions rule out certain...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Science and Culture: Quantum games aim to demystify heady science [Applied Physical Sciences]In a video game called Quantum Moves, the players’ goal is straightforward: Move an atom from one place to another as quickly and efficiently as possible while a timer counts down the seconds. Atoms in the game aren’t represented as mini solar systems with electron “planets” moving around them, like...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Diamond anvil cell behavior up to 4 Mbar [Applied Physical Sciences]The diamond anvil cell (DAC) is considered one of the dominant devices to generate ultrahigh static pressure. The development of the DAC technique has enabled researchers to explore rich high-pressure science in the multimegabar pressure range. Here, we investigated the behavior of the DAC up to 400 GPa, which is...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Role of ubiquitylation of components of mitotic checkpoint complex in their dissociation from anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome [Biochemistry]The mitotic checkpoint system ensures the fidelity of chromosome segregation in mitosis by preventing premature initiation of anaphase until correct bipolar attachment of chromosomes to the mitotic spindle is reached. It promotes the assembly of a mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), composed of BubR1, Bub3, Cdc20, and Mad2, which inhibits the...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mechanism of ubiquitin transfer promoted by TRAF6 [Biochemistry]Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) plays a vital role in immune signal transduction pathways by acting as a ubiquitin ligase (E3) for Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chain synthesis. However, the detailed mechanism by which the TRAF6 RING dimer promotes ubiquitin transfer was unknown. Through structural modeling and biochemical analysis,...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Poldip2 is an oxygen-sensitive protein that controls PDH and {alpha}KGDH lipoylation and activation to support metabolic adaptation in hypoxia and cancer [Biochemistry]Although the addition of the prosthetic group lipoate is essential to the activity of critical mitochondrial catabolic enzymes, its regulation is unknown. Here, we show that lipoylation of the pyruvate dehydrogenase and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (αKDH) complexes is a dynamically regulated process that is inhibited under hypoxia and in cancer cells...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Elucidating the structural basis for differing enzyme inhibitor potency by cryo-EM [Biochemistry]Histidine biosynthesis is an essential process in plants and microorganisms, making it an attractive target for the development of herbicides and antibacterial agents. Imidazoleglycerol-phosphate dehydratase (IGPD), a key enzyme within this pathway, has been biochemically characterized in both Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Sc_IGPD) and Arabidopsis thaliana (At_IGPD). The plant enzyme, having been...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Changes in the flagellar bundling time account for variations in swimming behavior of flagellated bacteria in viscous media [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Although the motility of the flagellated bacteria, Escherichia coli, has been widely studied, the effect of viscosity on swimming speed remains controversial. The swimming mode of wild-type E. coli is often idealized as a run-and-tumble sequence in which periods of swimming at a constant speed are randomly interrupted by a...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Naked mole rats can undergo developmental, oncogene-induced and DNA damage-induced cellular senescence [Cell Biology]Cellular senescence is an important anticancer mechanism that restricts proliferation of damaged or premalignant cells. Cellular senescence also plays an important role in tissue remodeling during development. However, there is a trade-off associated with cellular senescence as senescent cells contribute to aging pathologies. The naked mole rat (NMR) (Heterocephalus glaber)...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Fast and accurate quantum Monte Carlo for molecular crystals [Chemistry]Computer simulation plays a central role in modern-day materials science. The utility of a given computational approach depends largely on the balance it provides between accuracy and computational cost. Molecular crystals are a class of materials of great technological importance which are challenging for even the most sophisticated ab initio...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Control of chemoselectivity in asymmetric tandem reactions: Direct synthesis of chiral amines bearing nonadjacent stereocenters [Chemistry]This paper describes the mechanistic insight-guided development of a catalyst system, employing a phenolic proton donor catalyst in addition to a cinchonium-derived phase-transfer catalyst, to control the chemoselectivity of two distinct intermediates, thereby enabling the desired asymmetric tandem conjugate addition–protonation pathway to dominate over a number of side-reaction pathways to...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Capicua controls Toll/IL-1 signaling targets independently of RTK regulation [Developmental Biology]The HMG-box protein Capicua (Cic) is a conserved transcriptional repressor that functions downstream of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathways in a relatively simple switch: In the absence of signaling, Cic represses RTK-responsive genes by binding to nearly invariant sites in DNA, whereas activation of RTK signaling down-regulates Cic activity,...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Germ-layer commitment and axis formation in sea anemone embryonic cell aggregates [Developmental Biology]Robust morphogenetic events are pivotal for animal embryogenesis. However, comparison of the modes of development of different members of a phylum suggests that the spectrum of developmental trajectories accessible for a species might be far broader than can be concluded from the observation of normal development. Here, by using a...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Double abdomen in a short-germ insect: Zygotic control of axis formation revealed in the beetle Tribolium castaneum [Developmental Biology]The distinction of anterior versus posterior is a crucial first step in animal embryogenesis. In the fly Drosophila, this axis is established by morphogenetic gradients contributed by the mother that regulate zygotic target genes. This principle has been considered to hold true for insects in general but is fundamentally different...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Identification and paleoclimatic significance of magnetite nanoparticles in soils [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]In the world-famous sediments of the Chinese Loess Plateau, fossil soils alternate with windblown dust layers to record monsoonal variations over the last ∼3 My. The less-weathered, weakly magnetic dust layers reflect drier, colder glaciations. The fossil soils (paleosols) contain variable concentrations of nanoscale, strongly magnetic iron oxides, formed in...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Pressure-induced structural change in MgSiO3 glass at pressures near the Earth’s core-mantle boundary [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Knowledge of the structure and properties of silicate magma under extreme pressure plays an important role in understanding the nature and evolution of Earth’s deep interior. Here we report the structure of MgSiO3 glass, considered an analog of silicate melts, up to 111 GPa. The first (r1) and second (r2)...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Ocean acidification affects coral growth by reducing skeletal density [Ecology]Ocean acidification (OA) is considered an important threat to coral reef ecosystems, because it reduces the availability of carbonate ions that reef-building corals need to produce their skeletons. However, while theory predicts that coral calcification rates decline as carbonate ion concentrations decrease, this prediction is not consistently borne out in...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Phylogenetic classification of the world’s tropical forests [Ecology]Knowledge about the biogeographic affinities of the world’s tropical forests helps to better understand regional differences in forest structure, diversity, composition, and dynamics. Such understanding will enable anticipation of region-specific responses to global environmental change. Modern phylogenies, in combination with broad coverage of species inventory data, now allow for global...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Divergent biodiversity change within ecosystems [Ecology]The Earth’s ecosystems are under unprecedented pressure, yet the nature of contemporary biodiversity change is not well understood. Growing evidence that community size is regulated highlights the need for improved understanding of community dynamics. As stability in community size could be underpinned by marked temporal turnover, a key question is...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Range dynamics of mountain plants decrease with elevation [Ecology]Many studies report that mountain plant species are shifting upward in elevation. However, the majority of these reports focus on shifts of upper limits. Here, we expand the focus and simultaneously analyze changes of both range limits, optima, and abundances of 183 mountain plant species. We therefore resurveyed 1,576 vegetation...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Field study of charitable giving reveals that reciprocity decays over time [Economic Sciences]We examine how reciprocity changes over time by studying a large quasiexperiment in the field. Specifically, we analyze administrative data from a university hospital system. The data include information about over 18,000 donation requests made by the hospital system via mail to a set of its former patients in the...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Geometrical control of dissipation during the spreading of liquids on soft solids [Engineering]Gel layers bound to a rigid substrate are used in cell culture to control differentiation and migration and to lower the friction and tailor the wetting of solids. Their thickness, often considered a negligible parameter, affects cell mechanosensing or the shape of sessile droplets. Here, we show that the adjustment...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Hamilton's inclusive fitness maintains heritable altruism polymorphism through rb = c [Evolution]How can altruism evolve or be maintained in a selfish world? Hamilton’s rule shows that the former process will occur when rb > c—the benefits to the recipients of an altruistic act b, weighted by the relatedness between the social partners r, exceed the costs to the altruists c—drives altruistic...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Divergent and parallel routes of biochemical adaptation in high-altitude passerine birds from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau [Evolution]When different species experience similar selection pressures, the probability of evolving similar adaptive solutions may be influenced by legacies of evolutionary history, such as lineage-specific changes in genetic background. Here we test for adaptive convergence in hemoglobin (Hb) function among high-altitude passerine birds that are native to the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau,...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Detection of aneuploidy in patients with cancer through amplification of long interspersed nucleotide elements (LINEs) [Genetics]Aneuploidy is a feature of most cancer cells, and a myriad of approaches have been developed to detect it in clinical samples. We previously described primers that could be used to amplify ∼38,000 unique long interspersed nucleotide elements (LINEs) from throughout the genome. Here we have developed an approach to...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
T cell receptors for the HIV KK10 epitope from patients with differential immunologic control are functionally indistinguishable [Immunology and Inflammation]HIV controllers (HCs) are individuals who can naturally control HIV infection, partially due to potent HIV-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Here, we examined the hypothesis that superior function of CD8+ T cells from HCs is encoded by their T cell receptors (TCRs). We compared the functional properties of immunodominant HIV-specific...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Thymic involution and rising disease incidence with age [Immunology and Inflammation]For many cancer types, incidence rises rapidly with age as an apparent power law, supporting the idea that cancer is caused by a gradual accumulation of genetic mutations. Similarly, the incidence of many infectious diseases strongly increases with age. Here, combining data from immunology and epidemiology, we show that many...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Role of a selecting ligand in shaping the murine {gamma}{delta}-TCR repertoire [Immunology and Inflammation]Unlike αβ-T lineage cells, where the role of ligand in intrathymic selection is well established, the role of ligand in the development of γδ-T cells remains controversial. Here we provide evidence for the role of a bona fide selecting ligand in shaping the γδ-T cell-receptor (TCR) repertoire. Reactivity of the...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Accelerated wound healing in mice by on-site production and delivery of CXCL12 by transformed lactic acid bacteria [Immunology and Inflammation]Impaired wound closure is a growing medical problem associated with metabolic diseases and aging. Immune cells play important roles in wound healing by following instructions from the microenvironment. Here, we developed a technology to bioengineer the wound microenvironment and enhance healing abilities of the immune cells. This resulted in strongly...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Adaptive antibody diversification through N-linked glycosylation of the immunoglobulin variable region [Immunology and Inflammation]A hallmark of B-cell immunity is the generation of a diverse repertoire of antibodies from a limited set of germline V(D)J genes. This repertoire is usually defined in terms of amino acid composition. However, variable domains may also acquire N-linked glycans, a process conditional on the introduction of consensus amino...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cysteinyl leukotriene receptor 1 antagonism prevents experimental abdominal aortic aneurysm [Medical Sciences]Cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cys-LTs) are 5-lipoxygenase-derived lipid mediators involved in the pathogenesis and progression of inflammatory disorders, in particular asthma. We have previously found evidence linking these mediators to increased levels of proteolytic enzymes in tissue specimens of human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Here we show that antagonism of the CysLT1 receptor...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Polo-like kinase 4 inhibition produces polyploidy and apoptotic death of lung cancers [Medical Sciences]Polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4) is a serine/threonine kinase regulating centriole duplication. CFI-400945 is a highly selective PLK4 inhibitor that deregulates centriole duplication, causing mitotic defects and death of aneuploid cancers. Prior work was substantially extended by showing CFI-400945 causes polyploidy, growth inhibition, and apoptotic death of murine and human lung...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Single-bacterial genomics validates rich and varied specialized metabolism of uncultivated Entotheonella sponge symbionts [Microbiology]Marine sponges are prolific sources of unique bioactive natural products. The sponge Theonella swinhoei is represented by several distinct variants with largely nonoverlapping chemistry. For the Japanese chemotype Y harboring diverse complex polyketides and peptides, we previously provided genomic and functional evidence that a single symbiont, the filamentous, multicellular organism...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Identification of genetic risk factors in the Chinese population implicates a role of immune system in Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis [Neuroscience]Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a leading cause of mortality among the elderly. We performed a whole-genome sequencing study of AD in the Chinese population. In addition to the variants identified in or around the APOE locus (sentinel variant rs73052335, P = 1.44 × 10−14), two common variants, GCH1 (rs72713460, P...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Three classes of recurrent DNA break clusters in brain progenitors identified by 3D proximity-based break joining assay [Neuroscience]We recently discovered 27 recurrent DNA double-strand break (DSB) clusters (RDCs) in mouse neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs). Most RDCs occurred across long, late-replicating RDC genes and were found only after mild inhibition of DNA replication. RDC genes share intriguing characteristics, including encoding surface proteins that organize brain architecture and neuronal...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Maximizing the information learned from finite data selects a simple model [Physics]We use the language of uninformative Bayesian prior choice to study the selection of appropriately simple effective models. We advocate for the prior which maximizes the mutual information between parameters and predictions, learning as much as possible from limited data. When many parameters are poorly constrained by the available data,...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Spatial patterns of tree yield explained by endogenous forces through a correspondence between the Ising model and ecology [Physics]Spatial patterning of periodic dynamics is a dramatic and ubiquitous ecological phenomenon arising in systems ranging from diseases to plants to mammals. The degree to which spatial correlations in cyclic dynamics are the result of endogenous factors related to local dynamics vs. exogenous forcing has been one of the central...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Piezo2 channel regulates RhoA and actin cytoskeleton to promote cell mechanobiological responses [Physiology]Actin polymerization and assembly into stress fibers (SFs) is central to many cellular processes. However, how SFs form in response to the mechanical interaction of cells with their environment is not fully understood. Here we have identified Piezo2 mechanosensitive cationic channel as a transducer of environmental physical cues into mechanobiological...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Ancient duons may underpin spatial patterning of gene expression in C4 leaves [Plant Biology]If the highly efficient C4 photosynthesis pathway could be transferred to crops with the C3 pathway there could be yield gains of up to 50%. It has been proposed that the multiple metabolic and developmental modifications associated with C4 photosynthesis are underpinned by relatively few master regulators that have allowed...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Personal bests as reference points [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Personal bests act as reference points. Examining 133 million chess games, we find that players exert effort to set new personal best ratings and quit once they have done so. Although specific and difficult goals have been shown to inspire greater motivation than vague pronouncements to “do your best,” doing...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Heritable aspects of biological motion perception and its covariation with autistic traits [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]The ability to detect biological motion (BM) and decipher the meaning therein is essential to human survival and social interaction. However, at the individual level, we are not equally equipped with this ability. In particular, impaired BM perception and abnormal neural responses to BM have been observed in autism spectrum...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Bayesian selection of misspecified models is overconfident and may cause spurious posterior probabilities for phylogenetic trees [Statistics]The Bayesian method is noted to produce spuriously high posterior probabilities for phylogenetic trees in analysis of large datasets, but the precise reasons for this overconfidence are unknown. In general, the performance of Bayesian selection of misspecified models is poorly understood, even though this is of great scientific interest since...
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Iterative random forests to discover predictive and stable high-order interactions [Statistics]Genomics has revolutionized biology, enabling the interrogation of whole transcriptomes, genome-wide binding sites for proteins, and many other molecular processes. However, individual genomic assays measure elements that interact in vivo as components of larger molecular machines. Understanding how these high-order interactions drive gene expression presents a substantial statistical challenge. B
1h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Climate vulnerability and resilience in the most valuable North American fishery [Sustainability Science]Managing natural resources in an era of increasing climate impacts requires accounting for the synergistic effects of climate, ecosystem changes, and harvesting on resource productivity. Coincident with recent exceptional warming of the northwest Atlantic Ocean and removal of large predatory fish, the American lobster has become the most valuable fishery...
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists deliver high-resolution glimpse of enzyme structureUsing a state-of-the-art type of electron microscopy, an MIT-led team has discovered the structure of an enzyme that is crucial for maintaining an adequate supply of DNA building blocks in human cells.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Video: How chemistry can improve bargain hot cocoaNobody really likes bargain hot cocoa powder. It's lumpy, it's too thin and it leaves scummy residue behind.
1h
Quanta Magazine
Physicists Mourn Joe Polchinski, Developer of Deep Ideas and ParadoxesIn physics, we sometimes make progress through conflict. Thought experiments uncover apparent contradictions that sharpen our theories. In addition, there’s often a trade-off between the precision of a calculation and its relevance to an ultimate goal. The physicist Joe Polchinski was the rare exception who often managed to avoid such trade-offs. He developed concrete methods relevant to major pr
1h
Live Science
A Salmonella Outbreak in… Kratom? How This Germ Could Get into SupplementsHealth officials are again warning Americans not to consume kratom, but this time it's because the substance could be contaminated with Salmonella.
1h
Live Science
Swarm of 200 Earthquakes Hits Yellowstone - Here's What That MeansA swarm of 200 earthquakes hit Yellowstone National Park, but seismologists still aren't sure what that means.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Open data help scientists to unravel Earth systemsUnderstanding nature and its processes has greatly benefitted from open data. Open remotely sensed data make hard-to-reach wilderness areas more accessible -- at least from above. These advances provide new opportunities for Earth system research, such as in a recent soil moisture study by BioGeoClimate Modelling Lab from the Department of Geosciences and Geography at the University of Helsinki.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MicroRNA could help treat cancer and asthmaMiR-223 shows promise for treating inflammatory disease.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The superionic form of waterA recent study confirms the predictions made by a group of SISSA and ICTP scientists in a study published in Science in 1999. Liquid and solid at the same time, superionic water could be found on Uranus and Neptune.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Illinois researchers researchers find tweeting in cities lower than expectedStudying data from Twitter, University of Illinois researchers found that less people tweet per capita from larger cities than in smaller ones, indicating an unexpected trend that has implications in understanding urban pace of life.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reaching new heights in laser-accelerated ion energyA laser-driven ion acceleration scheme, developed in research led at the University of Strathclyde, could lead to compact ion sources for established and innovative applications in science, medicine and industry.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Green toads with multiple genomes have ancestors that are only distantly relatedDr. Matthias Stoeck from the Leibniz-Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries (IGB) and researchers from the University of Lausanne (Switzerland) and the Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) have just published an extensive phylogenetic tree for the Eurasian green toads. This phylogenetic tree shows that polyploid species are hybrids and only descend from parental species
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When it comes to our brains, there's no such thing as normalThere's nothing wrong with being a little weird. Because we think of psychological disorders on a continuum, we may worry when our own ways of thinking and behaving don't match up with our idealized notion of health. But some variability can be healthy and even adaptive, say researchers, even though it can also complicate attempts to identify standardized markers of pathology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How political parties influence our beliefs, and what we can do about itFake news is everywhere, but why we believe it is still unclear. Psychologists suggest that valuing our identity more than our accuracy is what leads us to accept incorrect information that aligns with our political party's beliefs. This value discrepancy can explain why high-quality news sources are no longer enough--and understanding it can help us find strategies to bridge the political divide.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Low-fat or low-carb? It's a draw, study findsNew evidence might dismay those who have chosen sides in the low-fat versus low-carb diet debate. Cutting either carbs or fats shaves off excess weight in about the same proportion, according to the study.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using a laser to wirelessly charge a smartphone safely across a roomAlthough mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones let us communicate, work and access information wirelessly, their batteries must still be charged by plugging them in to an outlet. But engineers at the University of Washington have for the first time developed a method to safely charge a smartphone wirelessly using a laser.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Click chemistry' reactions may boost cancer-fighting drug potencyResearchers at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed a quick and easy way to simultaneously modify dozens of drugs or molecules to improve their disease-fighting properties. Using the approach, scientists exchanged one chemical group for another in 39 cancer drugs—and discovered under lab conditions that the chemically altered versions of three of the drugs had more potent anti-canc
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pulsating aurora mysteries uncovered with help from NASA's THEMIS missionSometimes on a dark night near the poles, the sky pulses a diffuse glow of green, purple and red. Unlike the long, shimmering veils of typical auroral displays, these pulsating auroras are much dimmer and less common. While scientists have long known auroras to be associated with solar activity, the precise mechanism of pulsating auroras was unknown. Now, new research, using data from NASA's Time
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
MEMS chips get metatlensesLens technologies have advanced across all scales, from digital cameras and high bandwidth in fiber optics to the LIGO lab instruments. Now, a new lens technology that could be produced using standard computer-chip technology is emerging and could replace the bulky layers and complex geometries of traditional curved lenses.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU nations should seize chance to boost renewable energy: studyEU member states should take advantage of falling costs for renewable energy to invest more in the sector and make it account for a third of total energy output by 2030, an new report said Tuesday.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artificial Intelligence to fight the spread of infectious diseasesPublic outreach campaigns can prevent the spread of devastating yet treatable diseases such as tuberculosis (TB), malaria and gonorrhea. But ensuring these campaigns effectively reach undiagnosed patients, who may unknowingly spread the disease to others, is a major challenge for cash-strapped public health agencies. Now, a team of USC Viterbi School of Engineering researchers has created an algor
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Atomic structure of ultrasound material not what anyone expectedLead magnesium niobate (PMN) is a prototypical "relaxor" material, used in a wide variety of applications, from ultrasound to sonar. Researchers have now used state-of-the-art microscopy techniques to see exactly how atoms are arranged in PMN - and it's not what anyone expected.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Invasive bloody red shrimp discovered in Lake SuperiorAn invasive species with a jarring name has turned up in Lake Superior: the bloody red shrimp.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Coldilocks, the oldest captive polar bear in the US, diesThe oldest captive polar bear in the U.S. has died.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Countries investing in well-being allocate resources to child and adolescent psychiatryA new research report shows that a high ranking in the Human Development Index is connected with the availability of mental health services. In a comparison between 17 European and Asian countries, Norway, Switzerland and Finland had the highest ratio of child and adolescent psychiatrists. The report was compiled by the Eurasian Child & Adolescent Mental Health Study (EACMHS) network established b
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Corporations can benefit from altruism during a crisisResearch finds that altruism -- and social media -- can help corporations cultivate trust with consumers on mobile devices during and after natural disasters, such as hurricanes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Governance of emerging technologies: Aligning policy analysis with social valuesA new special report examines how we can make wise policy decisions about emerging technologies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
As climate changes, so could the genes of the Eastern tiger swallowtail butterflyResearchers warn climate change can not only influence the geographic distribution of a species in response to changing conditions -- it could also affect the evolutionary trajectories of interbreeding species.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Demographic compensation' may not save plants facing changing climateA large-scale study shows mixed results for hypothesis on how plants deal with climate change.
1h
Popular Science
Athletes with asthma tend to do better at the Winter OlympicsHealth But it's not really clear where the advantage comes from. Up to one in four winter Olympians have asthma—and they actually tend to do better than competitors without the condition.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain aging may begin earlier than expectedPhysicists have devised a new method of investigating brain function, opening a new frontier in the diagnoses of neurodegenerative and aging related diseases.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Industry is leaking huge amounts of microplastics, Swedish study showsMillions of plastic pellets are leaking out into the environment from a manufacturing site in Stenungsund, according to a new Swedish study. Despite several international and national sets of regulatory frameworks, the leaking continues.
1h
Live Science
World's Loneliest Tree Records Fallout from HumanityA lone tree on a subantarctic island bears the marks of human activity.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees ex-Tropical Cyclone Gita affecting New ZealandNASA's Terra satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean and saw the low pressure area previously known as Tropical Cyclone Gita, affecting New Zealand.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Robo-picker grasps and packsA new MIT-Princeton robotic arm could lend a hand in warehouse sorting and other picking tasks.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MEMS chips get metatlensesLens technologies have advanced across all scales, from digital cameras and high bandwidth in fiber optics to the LIGO instruments. Now, a new lens technology that could be produced using standard computer-chip technology is emerging and could replace the bulky layers and complex geometries of traditional curved lenses. Researchers at Harvard and Argonne National Laboratory have developed a device
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Beluga whales dive deeper, longer to find food in ArcticBeluga whales that spend summers feeding in the Arctic are diving deeper and longer to find food than in earlier years, when sea ice covered more of the ocean for longer periods, according to a new analysis led by University of Washington researchers
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UA study: Brain liquefaction after stroke is toxic to surviving brainResearchers at the University of Arizona College of Medicine-Tucson suggest liquefied brain fluid may be one cause of dementia after stroke.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Safety-net hospital reports it achieved better esophagectomy outcomes than national cohortStandardized clinical pathway helped 'hospital of last resort' achieve consistently superior outcomes for an esophageal procedure in the first study to look at outcomes on an institutional level.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists deliver high-resolution glimpse of enzyme structureUsing a state-of-the-art type of electron microscopy, an MIT-led team has discovered the structure of the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), which is crucial for maintaining an adequate supply of DNA building blocks in human cells
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MRI stroke data set released by USC research teamA USC-led team has compiled, archived and shared one of the largest open-source data sets of brain scans from stroke patients. The data set, known as ATLAS, is available for download. Researchers globally are using the scans to develop and test algorithms that can automatically process MRI images from stroke patients. In the long run, scientists hope to identify biological markers that forecast wh
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Land use change has warmed the Earth's surfaceRecent changes to vegetation cover are causing the Earth's surface to heat up. Activities like cutting down evergreen forests for agricultural expansion in the tropics create energy imbalances that lead to higher local surface temperatures and contribute to global warming.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spare parts from small parts: Novel scaffolds to grow muscleAustralian biomedical engineers have developed a 3-D material that successfully mimics nature to transform cells into muscle.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Social media as good a barometer of public health attitudes as traditional phone pollingSocial media data can be used as an additional source of information to gauge public opinion about health issues alongside traditional data sources like phone-based polling, says new research co-written by U. of I. psychology professor Dolores Albarracin.
2h
Science : NPR
Michio Kaku Predicts "The Future of Humanity"The futurist and physicist talks about mankind's next giant leap. (Image credit: YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Atomic structure of ultrasound material not what anyone expectedLead magnesium niobate (PMN) is a prototypical "relaxor" material, used in a wide variety of applications, from ultrasound to sonar. Researchers have now used state-of-the-art microscopy techniques to see exactly how atoms are arranged in PMN - and it's not what anyone expected.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers use data to look 'upstream' to see what makes patients sickResearchers at IUPUI and the Regenstrief Institute have successfully used data to predict primary care patients' needs for social service referrals, a finding that may potentially help shift the focus of health care from caring for ill people to preventing patients from getting sick.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using a laser to wirelessly charge a smartphone safely across a roomEngineers at the University of Washington have for the first time developed a method to safely charge a smartphone wirelessly using a laser.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Medicine alone does not completely suppress testosterone levels among transgender womenThe majority of transgender women who follow the usual approach prescribed in the United States are unable to reliably lower their testosterone levels into the typical female physiologic range with medicine alone.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers invent tiny, light-powered wires to modulate brain's electrical signalsA new University of Chicago study shows how tiny, light-powered wires could be fashioned out of silicon to manipulate electrical signaling between neurons. Published Feb. 19 in Nature Nanotechnology, the study offers a new avenue to shed light on -- and perhaps someday treat -- brain disorders.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find new antimalarial drug targetsResearchers have discovered crucial new processes that allow malaria parasites to escape red blood cells and infect other cells, offering potential new treatment targets. The team are already working with pharmaceutical companies to use this knowledge to develop new antimalarial drugs - a critical step in the battle against drug-resistant malaria.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Housing problems found to be common at safety-net community health centersA new study led by investigators from Massachusetts General Hospital and Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program finds that more than 40 percent of patients treated at US community health centers have a history of housing problems.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
TSRI stroke drug demonstrates safety in clinical trial'These results lay the groundwork for the next steps toward FDA approval,' says John Griffin, PhD, professor at TSRI, whose team invented 3K3A-APC.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pulsating Aurora mysteries uncovered with help from NASA's THEMIS missionThe precise mechanism driving pulsating auroras, long unknown, has now been identified with help from NASA's THEMIS mission.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
AI to fight the spread of infectious diseasesPublic outreach campaigns can prevent the spread of devastating yet treatable diseases such as tuberculosis (TB), malaria and gonorrhea. But ensuring these campaigns effectively reach undiagnosed patients, who may unknowingly spread the disease to others, is a major challenge for cash-strapped public health agencies. Now, a team of USC Viterbi School of Engineering researchers has created an algor
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Click chemistry' reactions may boost cancer-fighting drug potencyResearchers at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed a quick and easy way to simultaneously modify dozens of drugs or molecules to improve their disease-fighting properties.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women once considered low risk for heart disease show evidence of previous heart attack scarsWomen who complain about chest pain often are reassured by their doctors that there is no reason to worry because their angiograms show that the women don't have blockages in the major heart arteries, a primary cause of heart attacks in men. But a National Institutes of Health study shows that about 8% of those women actually have scars on their heart that indicate they experienced a heart attack.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can your cardiac device be hacked?Medical devices, including cardiovascular implantable electronic devices could be at risk for hacking. In a paper publishing online today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, the American College of Cardiology's Electrophysiology Council examines the potential risk to patients and outlines how to improve cybersecurity in these devices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Survivors of blood or marrow transplantation are likely to experience cognitive impairmentAllogeneic blood or marrow transplantation recipients are at a significantly higher risk of cognitive impairment in the years post-transplantation, according to a new study. The research helps add a missing piece to a long-unsolved puzzle about post-transplant effects on recipients, specifically that vulnerable subpopulations of similar transplants can benefit from targeted interventions in the ye
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers invent tiny, light-powered wires to modulate brain's electrical signalsA new study shows how tiny, light-powered wires could be fashioned out of silicon to manipulate electrical signaling between neurons. The research offers a new avenue to shed light on--and perhaps someday treat--brain disorders.
2h
The Atlantic
'No Words' Left to Describe Syria's CarnageEastern Ghouta Syrian BasharRecent events in Syria have prompted screaming headlines about chemical-weapons attacks, a looming U.S.-Russia confrontation, and the risks of an even bigger, regional war. But the underlying reality of the war — lives being lost, day after day — is so constant nearly seven years in as to effectively cease being “news.” One powerful reflection of this, in contrast to the many thousands of words s
2h
Big Think
Why Hitler and other Nazis thought the world was really made of iceHitler and other Nazis were fond of a strange theory that the world was made of ice. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Designing microbial communities to help plants battle nutritional stressPlants and microbes engage in a diverse array of symbiotic relationships, but identifying the specific microbes or groups of microbes that contribute to plant health is extremely difficult. In work published on February 20th in the open access journal PLOS Biology, researchers devised a general experimental scheme to identify and predict which small groups of bacterial species can help plants resp
2h
Viden
Miljøforsker: Vores plastik-forskrækkelse er ude af proportionMikroplastik kan være skadeligt for os, men indholdet i fødevarer og drikkevarer overdrives i forhold til vores enorme forbrug af plastik i øvrigt.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bacteria-eaters to prevent food poisoning?Bacteria-killing viruses could be employed not just in health care, but also in the food industry, a study conducted at the University of Helsinki indicates. The researchers have been investigating the possibility of utilising phages in eradicating foodborne pathogens and preventing food poisoning
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Icebreaker' protein opens genome for t cell development, Penn researchers findResearchers describe the role of a transcription factor called TCF-1 in targeting the condensed chromatin and regulating the availability of genome sequences in T-cell development. The new connection between TCF-1 and chromatin will aid in developing new therapies using epigenetic drugs to alter T-cell fate in cancer, autoimmune disorders, and infectious diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More awareness, research needed on abuse risk of non-opioid painkillerGabapentin, a nerve pain medication and anticonvulsant sold under the brand name Neurontin and others, increasingly is being misused, necessitating prescribers to understand its abuse potential and risk profile, said Rachel Vickers Smith, Ph.D., M.P.H., assistant professor in the University of Louisville School of Nursing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain immune system is key to recovery from motor neuron degenerationResearchers engineered mice in which the damage caused by a mutant human TDP-43 protein could be reversed by one type of brain immune cell. TDP-43 is a protein that misfolds and accumulates in the motor areas of the brains of ALS patients. They found that microglia, the first and primary immune response cells in the brain and spinal cord, are essential for dealing with TDP-43-associated neuron dea
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Guidelines for fluoride intake -- Are they appropriate?The appropriate use of fluoride has transformed oral health over the past 70 years, in part due to the guidelines created for fluoride intake. Recently, researchers are questioning these longstanding guidelines which served as advisory recommendations for decades. This issue of Advances in Dental Research, an e-Supplement to the Journal of Dental Research (JDR), presents the proceedings of a sympo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Astronomers reveal secrets of most distant supernova ever detectedAn international team of astronomers, including researchers from the University of Pennsylvania, has confirmed the discovery of the most distant supernova ever detected, a huge cosmic explosion that took place 10.5 billion years ago when the universe was only a quarter of its current age.
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The Atlantic
Trump Is Right to Warn About Calling Elections IllegitimateBarack Obama ElectionAt the start of the weekend, President Trump was buoyant, exulting that Robert Mueller’s latest round of indictments had not shown any evidence that the Trump campaign colluded with Russia. (Never mind that the troll-farm attacks are just one of several spheres Mueller is investigating, and that far more evidence to suggest collusion has turned up in others.) But by the mid-weekend, the president
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The Atlantic
'We Care Just as Much': A Republican Reflects on the Parkland ShootingJoe Barton didn’t see the shooter until the end. For 10 minutes he lay face down behind the dugout, tasting the dirt, listening to the gunfire. Then, for several seconds, all would go quiet. “I thought it was over, but then it wasn’t,” Barton says. The shooter had two weapons, and he’d cease fire to reload or switch from his pistol to his semi-automatic rifle. In those silent seconds, Barton’s th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
NASA's James Webb Space Telescope to reveal secrets of the Red PlanetMars rovers and orbiters have found signs that Mars once hosted liquid water on its surface. Much of that water escaped over time. How much water was lost, and how does the water that’s left move from ice to atmosphere to soil? During its first year of operations, NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope will seek answers. Webb also will study mysterious methane plumes that hint at possible geological or
2h
Live Science
NASA's New Spacesuit Has a Built-In ToiletNASA is developing a spacesuit with a built-in toilet system, something the agency hasn't used regularly since the Apollo era.
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The Scientist RSS
University of North Texas Health Science Center to Repay Government $13 MillionThe research center and medical school admittedly violated the rules in spending grants from the National Institutes of Health.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improving family-based comm. Key to enhancing sexual health outcomes of GBQ adolescentsStudies have shown that talking with teens about sex-related topics is a positive parenting practice that facilitates important sexual health outcomes with heterosexual adolescents. But for LGBTQ youth, the topic of sexuality and sexual health is often ineffectively addressed at home.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antibodies protect nerve-muscle connections in a mouse model of Lou Gehrig's diseaseA new study led by NYU School of Medicine researchers identifies a novel treatment strategy that preserved neuromuscular synapses in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How chemistry can improve bargain hot cocoa (video)Nobody really likes bargain hot cocoa powder. It's lumpy, it's too thin and it leaves scummy residue behind. But premium hot cocoa mix is too expensive for some imbibers. Fortunately, Reactions is here with some easy kitchen chemistry hacks to turn cheap cocoa mix into a satisfying cold weather pick-me-up.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How to get the most out of foreign investmentResearchers at the Higher School of Economics (HSE University) have revealed that Russian companies need to invest in the development of intellectual resources in order to maximize the benefits from partners in developed countries. Results of the study have been published in the journal, Knowledge Management Research & Practice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Noise from ships scares porpoisesPorpoises communicate with each other using sounds. Therefore, they are highly sensitive to noise, such as ship noise. A new study shows, for the first time, that porpoises flee from and stop feeding when disturbed by heavy ship noise.
3h
Big Think
Florida shooting survivors plan nationwide marches for gun controlSurvivors of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida are demanding that lawmakers in Washington take action on gun control measures. Read More
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Big Think
Chemicals in non-stick pans could be making you fatThese chemicals are also widely used in products like clothing, shoes, wrappers and furniture, to make them more stain-resistant, waterproof and/or nonstick. Read More
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Big Think
Elon Musk gets permit to build a hyperloop between New York and D.C. Next up, Chicagoland!The construction, if and when it happens, could take five or more years. Read More
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Viden
Teknologisk Institut: Under én procent mikroplast ender i dansk naturMed en ny lasermetode har Teknologisk Institut påvist, at størstedelen af spildevandet ikke indeholder mikroplast fra tøjvask og karklude.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Innuendo and pointing suspicion in news coverage can fuel conspiracy theoriesInnuendo and hinting at fake information in news coverage is enough to fuel belief in conspiracy theories, new research shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows higher risk of Dementia for adults with congenital heart diseaseA new study is believed to be the first to show a higher risk of dementia in adults who were born with heart disease. The study of more than 10,000 adult with congenital heart disease (CHD) in Denmark discovered a particularly increased risk for early dementia in middle-age adults.
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Popular Science
China is building the world's largest facility for robot ship researchEastern Arsenal Wanshan covers more than 225 square nautical miles of ocean. Moving on from drone taxis and armed robots, China is now looking to take a lead in building unmanned ships.
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The Atlantic
The Controversial Theory That Explains the Structure of the InternetA paper posted online last month has reignited a debate about one of the oldest, most startling claims in the modern era of network science: the proposition that most complex networks in the real world—from the World Wide Web to interacting proteins in a cell—are “scale-free.” Roughly speaking, that means that a few of their nodes should have many more connections than others, following a mathema
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Roman boxing gloves unearthed by Vindolanda digThe bands of leather are "probably the only known surviving examples" of their kind.
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New Scientist - News
How you speak predicts if psychedelic therapy will help youPsilocybin, a compound in magic mushrooms, may help treat depression in some people. Now speech analysis can indicate who would benefit the most
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gut reactions to improve probioticsWhen bacteria enter the body, they have a great deal to overcome to colonize the colon. First, they must survive harsh environments with very few salts without bursting (unlike human blood cells within water). Then, they navigate through saliva enzymes and stomach acid, bypass our immune systems within the small intestine, switch from being exposed to oxygen to having none at all, and hang on so t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The plastics industry is leaking huge amounts of microplasticsThe problem of plastic pellets in marine environments has been reported since the 1970s and the first recommendations for legislation were introduced in the USA back in the 1990s. However, in Sweden, these spills have only received attention in recent years.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why the boss always gets the blameAn employee receives significantly more praise if his actions result in positive consequences than his superior. An experiment conducted by a team of researchers from Bochum and Cologne has demonstrated that, unlike previously assumed, the acting person's social status plays an important role when it comes to the distribution of praise and blame - rather than the extent to which an individual has
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Can you eat cells? Computer model predicts which organisms are capable of phagocytosisA team of American Museum of Natural History researchers has created a computational model capable of predicting whether or not organisms have the ability to "eat" other cells through a process known as phagocytosis. The model may be a useful tool for large-scale microbe surveys and provides valuable insight into the evolution of complex life on Earth, challenging ideas put forward in recent studi
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The Atlantic
This Average Joe Is the Most Quoted Man in NewsMeet Greg Packer, a retired highway maintenance worker who has been interviewed by American media outlets over a thousand times. Since his name first appeared in a newspaper in 1995, Packer’s penchant for media appearances has led him to meet four former presidents and two popes. He has spoken to reporters on subjects ranging from the war in Iraq to the release of the first iPhone. Ultimately, Pa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can you eat cells? Computer model predicts which organisms are capable of phagocytosisA team of American Museum of Natural History researchers has created a computational model capable of predicting whether or not organisms have the ability to 'eat' other cells through a process known as phagocytosis. The model may be a useful tool for large-scale microbe surveys and provides valuable insight into the evolution of complex life on Earth, challenging ideas put forward in recent studi
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New structure discovered in human sperm tailsA highly effective tail is needed in order for a sperm to be able to swim, and for a baby to be conceived. By using cryo-electron tomography, researchers at the University of Gothenburg -- working in partnership with researchers in the USA -- have identified a completely new nanostructure inside sperm tails.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sexual orientation discordance puts adolescents at greater risk for nonfatal suicidal behaviorsResearchers have now identified sexual orientation discordance -- sexual contact that is inconsistent with the individual's sexual orientation -- as a potential risk factor for adolescent suicidal ideation and/or attempts. They found that discordant students were 70 percent more likely to have had suicidal ideas or to have made suicide attempts compared with concordant students, reports the Americ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stigma increases risk of depression for people with Multiple SclerosisPeople with Multiple Sclerosis -- MS -- who feel stigmatized are more likely to suffer from depression, according to researchers, who add that having a support system of friends and family and a sense of autonomy may help reduce the harmful effects of stigma.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain aging may begin earlier than expectedPhysicists have devised a new method of investigating brain function, opening a new frontier in the diagnoses of neurodegenerative and aging-related diseases.This new noninvasive technique could potentially be used for any diagnosis based on cardiovascular and metabolic-related diseases of the brain.Preliminary results showed evidence of a decline in the coherence between these oscillations in par
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why the boss always gets the blameAn employee receives significantly more praise if his actions result in positive consequences than his superior. An experiment conducted by a team of researchers from Bochum and Cologne has demonstrated that, unlike previously assumed, the acting person's social status plays an important role when it comes to the distribution of praise and blame -- rather than the extent to which an individual has
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The plastics industry is leaking huge amounts of microplasticsMillions of plastic pellets are leaking out into the environment from a manufacturing site in Stenungsund. This has been shown by a new study conducted by researchers at the University of Gothenburg. Despite several international and national sets of regulatory frameworks, the leaking continues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gut reactions to improve probioticsResearchers at Stanford are studying how bacteria living in the gut respond to common changes within their habitat, working with mice. They change the gut environment within the mice, and then measure which bacterial species survive the change and how the gut environment itself has changed. They also study the physiological response of the bacteria -- if they grow faster or slower, or produce diff
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pillars of academic innovationHighlights from the Sixth Annual Conference of the National Academy of Inventors, including high-tech solutions to combat child pornography and radicalization materials; groundbreaking programs to promote STEM major retention; and new materials for wearable technology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What Americans are asking Google about gunsThe devastating deaths of 17 Florida high school at the hands of a troubled teen armed with an AR-15-style rifle have brought the ever-simmering debate over gun control to a boil not seen since Sandy Hook.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Walmart takes bruises from Amazon battle in fourth quarterWalmart is taking some bruises from its battle with online leader Amazon.
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New Scientist - News
Why big pharma might pay cryptocurrency for your DNAMore people are getting their genome sequenced than ever before, so start-ups are offering to help people make money from their genomic data
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The Motorola Moto X4 Is Almost Half-Off Right NowMoto X4 is a fantastic phone at $400, and it's a steal at $250.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Civil engineers devise a cost-saving solution for citiesWhy fix a road today if it's slated to be ripped up for new sewers next summer?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What's new in the field of microbiota and bone health?These invited reviews, published in Calcified Tissue International by experts in the field, provide a comprehensive overview of the latest knowledge and research developments related to the gut-musculoskeletal axis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are bots a danger for political election campaigns?Normally, autonomous computer programs known as bots are used to trawl the Internet. However, there are also programs known as social bots which interfere in social media, automatically generating replies or sharing content. They are currently suspected of being used to spread political propaganda. Scientists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have investigated the extent t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New safety data for the most commonly used drug to treat Chagas diseaseThe frequency of adverse reactions to benznidazole is high when treating chronic Chagas patients, although they were mostly mild effects, according to a study led by ISGlobal, in collaboration with the Hospital Clinic of Barcelona. The results point to the need of finding drug combinations or dosages in order to maintain efficacy but decrease its toxicity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Architecture of cellular control center mTORC2 elucidatedThe protein complex mTORC2 controls cellular lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Researchers from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel and the ETH Zurich have now succeeded in deciphering the 3-D structure of this important protein complex. The results have recently been published in eLife.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improving low-income residents' utilization of farmers marketsA pair of studies conducted at LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health found reasons and possible solutions to improve low-income residents' access to fresh, local produce at farmers markets.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Civil engineers at Concordia University devise a cost-saving solution for citiesWhy fix a road today if it's slated to be ripped up for new sewers next summer?This kind of question is at the heart of research from Tarek Zayed, and Amin Hammad, professors in Concordia's Department of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering (BCEE), and PhD candidates Soliman A. Abu-Samra and Mahmoud Ahmed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genes activated in metastasis also drive the first stages of tumor growthResearchers have demonstrated that genes activated during metastasis are also able to initiate primary tumor development, and they explain the molecular mechanism involved.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nitrate flux in the Arctic not following the decreasing NOx emissions in neighboring countriesNitrate deposits in the Arctic remains high even after the turn of the century, despite environmental policies adopted by neighboring countries in the late 20th century to cut nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Earthquakes follow wastewater disposal patterns in southern KansasWastewater created during oil and gas production and disposed of by deep injection into underlying rock layers is the probable cause for a surge in earthquakes in southern Kansas since 2013, a new report concludes.
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The Atlantic
A Biohacker Regrets Publicly Injecting Himself With CRISPRWhen Josiah Zayner watched a biotech CEO drop his pants at a biohacking conference and inject himself with an untested herpes treatment , he realized things had gone off the rails . Zayner is no stranger to stunts in biohacking —loosely defined as experiments, often on the self, that take place outside of traditional lab spaces. You might say he invented their latest incarnation: He’s sterilized
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Whirlpool recalls 310,000 kettles over safety fearsUS appliance giant Whirlpool announced Tuesday it was recalling 310,000 kettles worldwide that are potentially dangerous because of faulty handles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Workplace alcohol not always a perk for recent college grads seeking jobsOffering alcohol to employees in the workplace may be a trendy perk of employment, but it doesn't appear to be an enticement for recent college graduates just entering the workforce, research published this week from Oregon State University shows.
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Live Science
Why You Probably Shouldn't Waste Your Money on DNA-Based DietsSure, it seems like a good idea: Lose weight following a diet that's tailored to your own unique genetic makeup instead of trying a one-size-fits-all approach.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cluedo in the cell: Enzyme location controls enzyme activityMost proteins in the cell are not produced "ready to go". Instead, they are first synthesized with chains of amino acids that block their activity until they are removed by enzymes called "proprotein convertases" (PCs). This family of enzymes plays significant but very different roles in various cancers, and regulating the activity of PCs could help develop cancer treatments. But PCs overlap in te
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New on MIT Technology Review
Facebook has been sharing user data with Stanford to study US inequality
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unique chemistry—which one day might help fight serious disease—found in the New Zealand glowwormUniversity of Otago researchers in New Zealand have helped uncover how New Zealand glowworms produce their glow. A multi-year study of the bioluminescence produced by the glowworms has been published today in the highly respected online science journal, Scientific Reports.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Infection site affects how a virus spreads through the bodyA person is more likely to get infected by HIV through anal intercourse than vaginal, but no one knows quite why. A new study shows that infection sites could affect the immune system's response to a virus and the way the virus spreads through the body.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When proteins shake handsProtein nanofibers often have outstanding properties such as a high stability, biodegradability, or antibacterial effect. Artificially creating these fibers is not easy, much less assigning them specific functions. That and how fibers with new properties can be successfully created is now being reported by materials scientists in a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Nobody poaches here': Study exposes misperception of poaching on the Great Barrier Reef and its remedyNew research has revealed the tiny minority of fishers who poach on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) think the illegal practice is justified, because they believe 'everyone else is doing it.'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study of mollusk epidemic could help save endangered sea snailOverfishing and environmental change have pushed abalone species on the US west coast to the edge of extinction. Now a fatal disease threatens their recovery. But new research shows that some abalone species may be less susceptible to the disease than others, providing initial data that could help map where abalone could survive and thrive despite the disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Very long-chain lipids could help prevent dry eye diseaseVery long-chain lipids in the most superficial layer of the tear film cause severe dry eye disease when they were shortened in mice -- a result that could help develop new drugs for the disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Postnatal depression has life-long impact on mother-child relationsPostnatal depression (PND) can impact the quality of relationships between mother and child into adult life, and have a negative influence on the quality of relationships between grandmothers and grandchildren, new research at the University of Kent has discovered.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
FEFU-based scientists studied the exhaust gases of motorcycles, scooters, and ATVsAn analytical article based on the study of morphologic and chemical composition of particulate matter in motorcycle engine exhaust was published in the respected scientific journal Toxicology Reports. The group of authors was supervised by Aristidis Tsatsakis, a foreign member of the Russian Academy of Sciences and Doctor Honoris Causa of the Far Eastern Federal University, and Kirill Golokhvast,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cluedo in the cell: Enzyme location controls enzyme activityEPFL scientists have found that the activity of proprotein covertases, the enzymes that turn-on proteins, is regulated by the location of the enzyme inside the cell. Published in Cell Reports, the study uses a novel biosensor, CLIP, and has significant implications for cancer treatment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diabetes did not increase early retirementA Finnish study examined diabetes and work loss due to early retirement during the work careers of approximately 13,000 people.The findings were exciting -- and somewhat surprising. Those with a diagnosis of diabetes had fewer work-loss years than those without such a diagnosis. Among those who retired early, the ones with diabetes worked, on average, two years longer than did the ones without dia
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A delivery platform for gene-editing technologyA nanomaterial coating enables efficient delivery of CRISPR-Cas9 machinery into the cell.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Splitting crystals for 2-D metallic conductivityAdding oxygen atoms to a perovskite-like crystal material splits it into layers, giving it unique electrical properties.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breast cancer: How advanced imaging technologies will help avoid unnecessary biopsiesEnhancing the diagnosis of breast cancer is the stated goal of a research team at the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg. The scientists have combined an advanced method of diffusion-weighted MR imaging with intelligent image analysis methods to detect malignant changes in tissues. This method may help avoid many control biopsies following suspicious findings from mammography scree
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How political parties influence our beliefs, and what we can do about itFake news is everywhere, but why we believe it is still unclear. Drawing on neuroeconomics research in an Opinion published in Trends in Cognitive Sciences, psychologists suggest that valuing our identity more than our accuracy is what leads us to accept incorrect information that aligns with our political party's beliefs. This value discrepancy can explain why high-quality news sources are no lon
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When it comes to our brains, there's no such thing as normalThere's nothing wrong with being a little weird. Because we think of psychological disorders on a continuum, we may worry when our own ways of thinking and behaving don't match up with our idealized notion of health. But some variability can be healthy and even adaptive, say researchers in a review published February 20th in Trends in Cognitive Sciences, even though it can also complicate attempts
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The Atlantic
The Rise of Anti-LiberalismA man named François is a professor in Paris. He is a scholar of Joris-Karl Huysmans, an obscure 19th-century author who, in his later years, converted to Catholicism in an epiphany. François is the hero, or rather anti-hero, of French novelist Michel Houellebecq’s Submission . François is listless—even his attitude toward sex is uninspired, as if it’s an activity like any other, perhaps like pla
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New Scientist - News
Bunnies draped in fake polar bear fur are both cosy and stealthyA warm fabric made of freeze-dried liquid silk mimics polar bear fur, making rabbits invisible to infrared cameras. It could do the same for humans
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Ingeniøren
Politikere: Kontrol med hormonforstyrrende stoffer i legetøj skal skærpesDe seneste fund af phthalater i legetøj i EU er alvorlige og stærkt bekymrende, lyder det fra miljøordfører fra både Venstre og Enhedslisten. Der er brug for mere kontrol af virksomhederne, mener de.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study: Involving the public in water policies is key to successful municipal water systemsInforming residents about local water issues and involving them in local water policies are the keys to building healthy and resilient city water systems, according to a Portland State University study.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How political parties influence our beliefs, and what we can do about itFake news is everywhere, but why we believe it is still unclear. Drawing on neuroeconomics research in an Opinion published February 20th in the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences, psychologists suggest that valuing our identity more than our accuracy is what leads us to accept incorrect information that aligns with our political party's beliefs. This value discrepancy, they say, can explain why
4h
Viden
Arkæologer finder mayaernes indgang til underverdenenMenneskeknogler, helligdomme og knogler fra forhistoriske dyr kaster nyt lys over mayaerne.
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Blog » Languages » English
Eyewire Winter Games 2018: Speed Skating MarathonCan you imagine an actual winter marathon? People do run them, but besides the usual challenges of running 26 miles nonstop, there’s that whole “subzero temperature” thing (Celsius or Fahrenheit, take your pick). Hard to say whether we’ll see such an event at the Winter Olympics in the future. Meanwhile, there’s certainly one highly watchable winter racing sport that might have been on your TV th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
e-Health can support healthy aging and help prevent cardiovascular disease and dementia in elderlyAn innovative e-Health solution, based on an interactive Internet platform, has been developed to support senior citizens in improving their lifestyle to prevent cardiovascular disease, cognitive decline and dementia. Researchers from the HATICE trial presented the solution in a pre-press article published in Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shedding (high-power laser) light on the plasma density limitResearchers theoretically proposed the existence of density limit for hole boring by laser light on matter. They derived the maximum plasma density as a function of laser intensity, where hole boring stops and plasma blowout occurs. Theory and simulation of an ultra-high-pressure plasma state, wherein plasma's density pushes light back in the direction of the laser source, contribute to fundamenta
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A drug long used to treat gout may help adult heart failure patientsResearchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine have shown that probenecid, a drug long used to treat gout, may be able to improve heart function in adult patients who experience heart failure.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New shark species confirmedUsing 1,310 base pairs of two mitochondrial genes, Toby Daly-Engel, an assistant professor of biological sciences at Florida Tech, and colleagues identified a new species, the Atlantic sixgill shark.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Computer models allow farmers to diversify pest management methodsA technology developed by Brazilian researchers can help fighting highly resistant agricultural pests by analyzing the connections between the pests' patterns of dispersal in crops and different configurations in diversified intercropping systems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PNAS study: Extreme-altitude birds evolved same trait via different mutationsAll extreme-altitude birds have evolved especially efficient systems for delivering scarce oxygen to their tissues. But a new study led by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln has found that these birds often evolved different blueprints for assembling the proteins -- hemoglobins -- that actually capture oxygen in the Himalayas and Andes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Data detectives shift suspicions in Alzheimer's from usual suspect to inside villainThe pursuit of the usual suspect in Alzheimer's research may be distracting from a more direct culprit in the disease, according to a study that analyzed data from 51 published experiments. P-tau looked a good bit more culpable than amyloid-beta plaque.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Workplace alcohol not always a perk for recent college grads seeking jobsOffering alcohol to employees in the workplace may be a trendy perk of employment, but it doesn't appear to be an enticement for recent college graduates just entering the workforce, new research published today from Oregon State University shows.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Robotic crystals that walk n' rollScientists at Waseda University have developed robotic crystals that walk slowly like an inchworm and roll 20,000 times faster than its walking speed. These autonomously moving, organic crystals have great potential as material for soft robots in the future.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unique chemistry that could help fight disease, found in NZ glowwormUniversity of Otago researchers in New Zealand have helped uncover how New Zealand glowworms produce their glow. A multi-year study of the bioluminescence produced by the glowworms has been published today in the highly respected online science journal, Scientific Reports.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New software helps detect adaptive genetic mutationsBrown University researchers have developed a new machine learning technique that can track down beneficial mutations in population genetic datasets.
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The Atlantic
A Quiet, Ancestral Farm Life in Western FranceOver the course of several recent months, Reuters photographer Stéphane Mahé visited and photographed a farmer named Jean-Bernard Huon on his farm in western France. Huon, now 70, grew up here, and deliberately lives a traditional, non-mechanized farm life, favoring ox teams over tractors. From a Reuters article : “When farm machinery revolutionized French agriculture in the years after World War
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The Atlantic
The Chasm Between Racial Optimism and RealityIn 1868, the abolitionist and orator Anna E. Dickinson published What Answer? , a novel that explored, in a manner revolutionary for its time, the subject of interracial marriage. The Atlantic assigned its assistant editor, William Dean Howells, to review the book. Howells, who would later become the magazine’s editor in chief, was, in the years following the Civil War, something of a racial opti
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Astronomers reveal secrets of most distant supernova ever detectedAstronomers have confirmed the discovery of the most distant supernova ever detected -- a huge cosmic explosion that took place 10.5 billion years ago, or three-quarters the age of the Universe itself.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Removing globally used anxiety drug from recycled and wastewater at low costResearchers can now remove a common anxiety drug from recycled water and wastewater, using low-cost titanium dioxide nanofibers. In cities running out of water, removing pharmaceuticals from wastewater in a simple, low cost way is becoming a priority.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers achieve 'Olympic ring' molecule breakthrough just in time for Winter GamesAs the world's premier winter athletes were preparing to take to the slopes, rinks and tracks for the 2018 Olympic Winter Games, Florida State University researchers were hard at work making a gold-medal discovery of their own.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Phase-transition cubic Gallium Nitride doubles ultraviolet emission efficiencyNovel photonics materials are becoming pivotal for energy conversion, communications, and sensing, largely because there is a global desire to enhance energy efficiency, and reduce electricity consumption. As Dr. Can Bayram, assistant professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, notes, "Who doesn't want to consume less electr
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Academics Protest Chinas Censorship RequestsScholars have formed a peer-review boycott to encourage journals to take a firm stance against requests to cull sensitive articles.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quintillionths of a second in slow motionMany chemical processes run so fast that they are only roughly understood. To clarify these processes, researchers have now developed a methodology with a resolution of quintillionths of a second. The new technology stands to help better understand processes like photosynthesis and develop faster computer chips.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
North Korea's Growing Criminal CyberthreatThe country’s cybercrime efforts are all seemingly state-sponsored and steal money that is then used to fund its cash-strapped government -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cracking the genetic code for complex traits in cattleThe global 1000 Bull Genomes Consortium identified the genetic basis for accurately predicting the complex trait of height across cattle and dairy breeds by pooling large genomic datasets and phenotypes collected from 58,000 cattle. The team validated their findings using the DNA of a wild auroch, the ancient ancestor to all cattle and dairy breeds, and, in a world first, demonstrated the genes in
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers achieve 'Olympic ring' molecule breakthrough just in time for Winter GamesMore than 7,000 miles away from the snowcapped peaks of PyeongChang, scientists from FSU's Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry unlocked a novel strategy for synthesizing a highly versatile molecule called olympicene -- a compound of carbon and hydrogen atoms named for its familiar Olympic ring shape.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Involving the public in water policies is key to successful municipal water systemsInforming residents about local water issues and involving them in local water policies are the keys to building healthy and resilient city water systems, according to a Portland State University study.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Phase-transition cubic gallium nitride doubles ultraviolet emission efficiencyThe Innovative COmpound semiconductoR Laboratory team led by Professor Can Bayram, of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has published a well-received paper titled 'High internal quantum efficiency ultraviolet emission from phase-transition cubic GaN integrated on nanopatterned Si(100).'
5h
The Atlantic
The Shape of Ancient Dice Suggests Shifting Beliefs in Fate and ChanceDice, in their standard six-sided form, seem like the simplest kind of device—almost a classic embodiment of chance. But a new study of more than 100 examples from the last 2,000 years or so unearthed in the Netherlands shows that they have not always looked exactly the way they do now. What’s more, the shifts in dice’s appearance may reflect people’s changing sense of what exactly is behind a ro
5h
Big Think
Lunar New Year: Why the solar calendar actually rules our livesHave you ever stopped to think about how we keep time? Ever wonder why Easter changes dates every year? Well, let us tell you a little story about the Gregorian Calendar. Read More
5h
Dagens Medicin
Fatal medicinfejl på plejehjem fører til analyse af medicinhåndteringBeboer på plejehjem i Hørsholm fik gigtmedicin dagligt istedet for den korrekte ugentlige dosering. Kerneårsagsanalyse skal afdække årsagerne til fejlen.
5h
Dagens Medicin
Middel mod epilepsi kan give børn problemer i skolenMødres brug epilepsimidlet valproat under graviditet kan give børnene dårligere resultater i skolen.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Typhoid outbreak: Genetic cause of extensive drug-resistance foundThe genetic cause behind a strain of typhoid's resistance to five classes of antibiotics has been uncovered by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators. There is currently a major outbreak of typhoid fever in Pakistan. This study shows the typhoid strain causing the outbreak acquired an additional piece of DNA to become resistant to multiple antibiotics, including a thir
5h
Feed: All Latest
The Math Behind Pennsylvania's Gerrymandered Map Getting OverturnedPennsylvania's Supreme Court issued a new congressional map on Monday. These are the experts who helped make it happen.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why polymer solar cells deserve their place in the sunOrganic polymer solar cells show potential to provide solar power to remote microwatt sensors, wearable technology and the Wi-Fi-connected appliances constituting the 'internet of things.' While PSCs cannot match the durability or efficiency of inorganic solar cells, the potential to mass-produce nontoxic, disposable solar panels using roll-to-roll production makes them attractive for additional a
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sea-level legacy: more rise for each delay in peaking emissionsPeaking global CO2 emissions as soon as possible is crucial for limiting the risks of sea-level rise, even if global warming is limited to well below 2 degrees C. A study now published in the journal Nature Communications analyzes for the first time the sea-level legacy until 2300 within the constraints of the Paris Agreement.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Findings do not support suggestion that certain diets may be better for adults with certain genetic makeupWeight loss over a year was not significantly different for overweight adults who followed a low-fat or low-carbohydrate diet, and neither a person's genetic makeup nor their insulin secretion level was associated with how much weight they lost.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Low-fat or low-carb? It's a draw, Stanford study findsNew evidence from a study at the Stanford University School of Medicine might dismay those who have chosen sides in the low-fat versus low-carb diet debate.
5h
Popular Science
You might be inhaling bits of toxic algaeEnvironment Breaking waves can send algal blooms airborne. The mischief caused by algal blooms does not end at the water’s edge.
5h
New on MIT Technology Review
North Korea’s hacking abilities are even stronger than we thought
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Fluctuating Rainfall Could Hurt Grazing RegionsGreater swings in dry and wet spells makes grass growth difficult, a challenge for pasturelands around the world -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
The Atlantic
A Weekend for Ignoring Signs of DoomOn the last day of the Munich Security Conference, Republican Senator James Risch of Idaho was in a bit of a bind. He needed to leave the Bayerischer Hof Hotel by 9:30 a.m. to catch a flight, but also wanted to appear on a 9 a.m. panel of U.S. senators and members of congress to discuss U.S. foreign policy. While it may have made sense for Senator Risch to cede the spot to someone else, he had so
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Laser-ranged satellite measurement now accurately reflects Earth's tidal perturbationsTides on Earth have a far-reaching influence, including disturbing satellites' measurements by affecting their motion. This disturbance can be studied using a model for the gravitational potential of the Earth, taking into account the fact that Earth's shape is not spherical. The LAser RElativity Satellite (LARES), is the best ever relevant test particle to move in the Earth's gravitational field.
5h
New Scientist - News
Cyclone Gita hits New Zealand after hammering TongaNew Zealand has declared a state of emergency as Cyclone Gita struck the city of Christchurch, just days after causing devastation on the island nation of Tonga
5h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How we can build AI to help humans, not hurt us | Margaret MitchellAs a research scientist at Google, Margaret Mitchell helps develop computers that can communicate about what they see and understand. She tells a cautionary tale about the gaps, blind spots and biases we subconsciously encode into AI -- and asks us to consider what the technology we create today will mean for tomorrow. "All that we see now is a snapshot in the evolution of artificial intelligence,
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Approximate quantum cloning: The new way of eavesdropping in quantum cryptographyCloning of quantum states is used for eavesdropping in quantum cryptography. It also has applications in quantum computation based on quantum information distribution. Uncertainty at the quantum scale makes exact cloning of quantum states impossible. Yet, they may be copied in an approximate way—with a certain level of probability—using a method called probabilistic quantum cloning, or PQC. In a n
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More predicted sea-level rise for each delay in peaking emissionsPeaking global CO2 emissions as soon as possible is crucial for limiting the risks of sea-level rise, even if global warming is limited to well below 2 degrees C. A study now published in the journal Nature Communications analyzes for the first time the sea-level legacy until 2300 within the constraints of the Paris Agreement.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No relation between a supermassive black hole and its host galaxy!?Using ALMA to observe an active galaxy with a strong ionized gas outflow from the galactic center, a team led by Dr. Toba of ASIAA (Taiwan) has obtained a result making astronomers even more puzzled -- the team clearly detected CO gas associated with the galactic disk, yet they have also found that the CO gas which settles in the galaxy is not affected by the strong ionized gas outflow launched fr
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Laser-ranged satellite measurement now accurately reflects Earth's tidal perturbationsTides on Earth have a far-reaching influence, including disturbing satellites' measurements by affecting their motion. This disturbance can be studied using a model for the gravitational potential of the Earth, taking into account the fact that Earth's shape is not spherical. The LAser RElativity Satellite (LARES), is the best ever relevant test particle to move in the Earth's gravitational field.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Approximate quantum cloning: The new way of eavesdropping in quantum cryptographyCloning of quantum states is used for eavesdropping in the context of quantum cryptography or for quantum computation. Uncertainty at the quantum scale makes exact cloning of quantum states impossible. Yet, they may be copied in an approximate way using a method called probabilistic quantum cloning, or PQC. In a new study published in EPJ D, Pinshu Rui from Anhui Xinhua and Anhui Universities, Hef
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reshaping drug testsResearchers have improved on the currently available methods for screening drugs for heart-related side effects.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Continental interiors may not be as tectonically stable as geologists thinkA University of Illinois-led team has identified unexpected geophysical signals underneath tectonically stable interiors of South America and Africa. The data suggest that geologic activity within stable portions of Earth's uppermost layer may have occurred more recently than previously believed. The findings, published in Nature Geoscience, challenge some of today's leading theories regarding pla
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sleep problems in menopause linked to hot flashes, depression -- and may not lastA new study of middle-aged women found that sleep problems vary across the stages of menopause, yet are consistently correlated with hot flashes and depression. The findings suggest that addressing those risk factors may also address sleep disruptions, as well as give women hope that their sleep symptoms may not last past the menopausal transition.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Declines of specific animal species in tropical forests affect lowland western Amazonian tree communitiesHuman hunting of large Amazon rain forest animals -- such as spider monkeys, capuchin monkeys, tapirs and white-lipped peccaries, as well as some bird species such as guans and trumpeters -- is having an impact on the spatial distribution of seeds needed to produce future generations of trees, a new study shows. Ultimately, this could affect the capacity of these forests to serve as 'carbon sinks'
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unprecedented single-digit-nanometer magnetic tunnel junction demonstratedResearchers have developed ultra-small magnetic tunnel junctions with high retention properties for use in semiconductor technologies.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Highly mutated protein in skin cancer plays central role in skin cell renewalResearchers have shown for the first time that a key protein called KMT2D (and is often mutated in skin cancer) is involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression that guide skin cell turnover.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chemical waves guide scientists to catalysts of the futureWaves are known in many very different forms; as water waves, light waves or sound waves. But studying polycrystalline catalysts, scientists have now found something quite different -- chemical waves. A chemical reaction takes place on the surface of a crystal, which returns periodically to its original state. Fascinating spiral structures form, the movement of which allows to collect information
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
C'mon electrons, let's do the twist!Identifying right-handed and left-handed molecules is a crucial step for many applications in chemistry and pharmaceutics. An international research team (CELIA-CNRS/INRS/ Berlin Max Born Institute /SOLEIL) has now presented a new original and very sensitive method. The researchers use laser pulses of extremely short duration to excite electrons in molecules into twisting motion, the direction of
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
You are what you eat: Diet-specific adaptations in vampire batsVampire bats feed exclusively on blood. It has therefore been long suspected that they have highly specific evolutionary adaptations and most likely also an unusual microbiome. An international group of scientists analyzed the genome of vampire bats and the microorganisms that live in their gut and asked how much the viruses contained in the blood may affect the vampire bats. Their findings have n
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
James Webb Space Telescope to reveal secrets of the Red PlanetThe planet Mars has fascinated scientists for over a century. Today, it is a frigid desert world with a carbon dioxide atmosphere 100 times thinner than Earth's. But evidence suggests that in the early history of our solar system, Mars had an ocean's worth of water. NASA's James Webb Space Telescope will study Mars to learn more about the planet's transition from wet to dry, and what that means ab
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows autonomous vehicles can help improve traffic flowImprovements in traffic flow and fuel consumption are boosted when even a few autonomous vehicles are immersed in bulk traffic, according to research by a Rutgers University-Camden scholar, Benedetto Piccoli, and a team of researchers who recently presented their findings to policymakers in Washington, D.C.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clues to obesity's roots found in brain's quality control processAround the clock, cells deep in the brain produces a 'grandfather' form of several hormones that help us regulate our appetite and eating. Now, a new discovery sheds new light on how that grandfather molecule gets produced -- and more important, what can go wrong and raise the risk of overeating and obesity. The findings could pave the way for new approaches to treating forms of obesity, especiall
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Typhoid outbreak: Genetic cause of extensive drug-resistance foundThe genetic cause behind a strain of typhoid's resistance to five classes of antibiotics has been uncovered by scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and their collaborators. There is currently a major outbreak of typhoid fever in Pakistan. This study shows the typhoid strain causing the outbreak acquired an additional piece of DNA to become resistant to multiple antibiotics, including a thir
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alexa, how do word senses evolve?A paper called 'Algorithms in the historical emergence of word senses'--that appears online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS)--is the first to look at 1,000 years of English development and detect the kinds of algorithms that human minds have used to extend existing words to new senses of meaning. This kind of 'reverse engineering' of how human language has develo
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A quadrillionth of a second in slow motionMany chemical processes run so fast that they are only roughly understood. To clarify these processes, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now developed a methodology with a resolution of quintillionths of a second. The new technology stands to help better understand processes like photosynthesis and develop faster computer chips.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Oil-eating microbes are challenged in the ArcticBacteria play a major role in cleaning up oil spills and mitigating its environmental impacts. In a review published in Science of the Total Environment, researchers from Aarhus University, Denmark, examine the major limiting factors for microbial degradation in Arctic environments.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rare find from the deep seaDumbo octopuses live at a depth of thousands of meters in the oceans. A rare spectacle now provides further insight: a scientist filmed a dumbo octopus hatching from its egg. Based on these video and MRI scans of the internal organs, researchers from the Delaware Museum of Natural History, the University of Bonn, the University Hospital Münster, and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution documen
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
One in four emergency staff abused by patientsThe experience of hospital A&E staff reveals that they have resigned themselves to patient violence and aggression.In the UK, there were over 1.3 million total reported assaults on NHS staff in 2016. Around the world, one in four hospital staff has experienced physical abuse.A review co-authored by Dr. Ian Smith and Dr. Rebecca Ashton looked at the experiences of staff in 18 countries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover novel mechanism linking changes in mitochondria to cancer cell deathResearchers at the University of Notre Dame discovered that the activation of a specific enzyme may help suppress the spread of tumors.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Infection site affects how a virus spreads through the bodyA person is more likely to get infected by HIV through anal intercourse than vaginal, but no one knows quite why. A new study by scientists at the Gladstone Institutes shows that infection sites could affect the immune system's response to a virus and the way the virus spreads through the body.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Jymmin: How a combination of exercise and music helps us feel less painPain is essential for survival. However, it could also slow rehabilitation, or could become a distinct disorder. How strongly we feel it depends on our individual pain threshold. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig discovered that this threshold can be increased by a new fitness method called Jymmin. It combines working out on gym machines with
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Autonomous vehicles improve traffic flowImprovements in traffic flow and fuel consumption are boosted when even a few autonomous vehicles are immersed in bulk traffic, according to research by Rutgers University-Camden mathematics scholar Benedetto Piccoli.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flexible warped nanographene developed for bioimagingAn international team of scientists has developed a water-soluble 'warped nanographene', a flexible molecule that is biocompatible and shows promise for fluorescent cell imaging. The new nanographene molecule also induces cell death when exposed to blue laser light. Further investigation is required to determine how nanocarbons could be used for a range of biological applications, such as photodyn
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Astronomers reveal secrets of most distant supernova ever detectedAn international team of astronomers led by the University of Southampton has confirmed the discovery of the most distant supernova ever detected -- a huge cosmic explosion that took place 10.5 billion years ago, or three-quarters the age of the Universe itself.
6h
Live Science
Photos: Royal Statue with Egyptian HieroglyphicsParts of a 2,600-year-old statue engraved with an Egyptian hieroglyphic inscription were discovered recently at the site of Dangeil in Sudan.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A trip to the mountains despite a heart condition?Cardiologists are in agreement that generally exercise in the mountains is a very good way to prevent or reduce the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. Nevertheless what about those people who have a pre-existing cardiovascular condition? Under what circumstances is it safe for them to reside or holiday in high mountainous regions, and what rules should they apply to their conduct whilst there?
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Grey squirrels beat reds in 'battle of wits'Problem-solving powers may help to explain why grey squirrels have taken over from native red squirrels in the United Kingdom, according to new research.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Moderate and severe exacerbations accelerate physical activity decline in COPD patientsA new study shows that both moderate and severe exacerbations in COPD patients are associated with a decline in their physical activity level. Researchers observed that the acute drop in physical activity during a COPD exacerbation has an important and lasting effect.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thin films of perovskite oxides hold promise for writing data at terahertz frequencyElectronics could work faster if they could read and write data at terahertz frequency, rather than at a few gigahertz. Creating such devices would be eased with materials that can undergo a huge change in how easily they conducted electricity in response to a magnetic field at room temperature. Scientists believe thin films of perovskite oxides hold promise for such uses. However, such behavior h
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Ingeniøren
DTU-forskere omdanner biogas direkte til naturgasMed et nyt patent er det muligt at omdanne CO2 i biogas direkte til metan med et energiforbrug som er 10-20 procent lavere og hurtigere end hidtil kendte metoder. Nu skal processen opskaleres og udvikles i samarbejde med industrien.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
As the Trump administration retreats on climate change, US cities are moving forwardDespite almost universal scientific consensus that climate change poses a growing threat, President Donald Trump's recent infrastructure plan makes no mention of the need to build resilience to rising global temperatures. Instead, it actually seeks to weaken environmental reviews as a way of speeding up the infrastructure permitting process.
6h
New on MIT Technology Review
The carbon-capture era may finally be startingAnalysis of a newly approved tax credit shows it could make an immediate dent in industrial emissions and narrow the financial gap for power plants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hitting rock bottom after job loss can be beneficial, study showsWe've all heard it said, "When you hit rock bottom, there's nowhere to go but up." This can prove especially true in business, where bottoming out as a result of job loss can be necessary before finding the radical solution that will lead to a new work identity, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Grey squirrels beat reds in 'battle of wits'Problem-solving powers may help to explain why grey squirrels have taken over from native red squirrels in the UK, new research says.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genes activated in metastasis also drive the first stages of tumour growthResearchers headed by Jordi Casanova at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) now demonstrate that genes activated during metastasis are also able to initiate primary tumour development, and they explain the molecular mechanism involved. Made using the fly model Drosophila melanogaster, this finding has been published in PloS Genetics this week.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When proteins shake handsProtein nanofibres often have outstanding properties such as a high stability, biodegradability, or antibacterial effect. Artificially creating these fibres is not easy, much less assigning them specific functions. That and how fibres with new properties can be successfully created is now being reported by materials scientists from Jena (Germany) in the latest issue of the renowned journal 'ACS NA
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Removing globally-used anxiety drug from recycled and wastewater at low costResearchers can now remove the anxiety drug Diazepam from recycled water and wastewater, using low-cost titanium dioxide nanofibers. First marketed as Valium, Diazepam is available in hundreds of brands. The drug is one of three benzodiapezines in the World Health Organisation list of essential medicines, but is also widely abused as an addictive prescription drug. In cities running out of water,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The effect of the GDNF on the activity of neural networks during hypoxic damage has been studiedSearching for ways to reduce losses from ischemic stroke, a major problem worldwide, is an extremely important task for many areas of public health and economy. So far, no effective and safe methods have been developed for treating ischemic brain damage.One of the most promising approaches to the development of treatment methods is to use endogenous molecules.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mobile health applications put the personal data of millions of users at riskThis is the finding of a European study started in 2016 and involving Agustí Solanas, head of the Smart Health research group at the URV's Department of Computer Engineering and Mathematics, and researchers from the University of Piraeus (Greece) headed by Constantinos Patsakis.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spatial perception of odorants in cockroachesA recent study involving researchers from the University of Konstanz has described the first neural architecture capable of encoding the spatial location of odorants.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physical exercise reduces risk of developing diabetes -- studyExercising more reduces the risk of diabetes and could see seven million fewer diabetic patients across mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan, according to new research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Now there's a game you can play to 'vaccinate' yourself against fake newsThe term "fake news" is everywhere these days. After gaining steam during the 2016 US election, it's become a catch-all phrase used by people from across the political spectrum. Yet "fake" stories – or stories that have been entirely made up – have been around since the dawn of man. And on top of that, stories don't have to be completely fake to be misleading. Terms such as "propaganda", "disinfor
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Futurity.org
Microbots could deliver drugs by flip-flopping through your bodyA new type of all-terrain microbot that moves by tumbling could help usher in tiny machines for various applications, including super-focused drug delivery, researchers report. The “microscale magnetic tumbling robot,” or μTUM (microTUM), is about 400 by 800 microns, or millionths of a meter, smaller than the head of a pin. A continuously rotating magnetic field propels the microbot in an end-ove
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New on MIT Technology Review
Our love of batteries is helping exploitative cobalt mines turn more profit
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New on MIT Technology Review
Our demand for batteries is boosting production at shady cobalt mines
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate projections show a warmer future for the Pacific northwestIn the midst of an unseasonably warm winter in the Pacific Northwest, a comparison of four publicly available climate projections has shown broad agreement that the region will become considerably warmer in the next century if greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere rise to the highest levels projected in the the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) "business-as-usual" scenario
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why your tourist toilet habits are bad for locals – and the environment,While many prospective holidaymakers actively seek a change in cuisine or climate when choosing their destination, standardised sanitation usually remains a must.
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New Scientist - News
Mystery honeycombs in rock may be created by water and saltMany rocks are covered with circular hollows that look like honeycomb, and now we may finally understand how these strange formations come into existence
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Feed: All Latest
In Los Angeles, Dreamscape Immersive's Location-Based VR Brings You Into a New WorldThere’s far more immersive potential in a dedicated VR facility than what’s currently possible in your living room.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Origami' diagnostics breakthrough set to benefit developing-world farmersSheets of folded paper, printed with wax, could be the key to developing very low cost diagnostics to improve the health of livestock in in low- to middle-income countries.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Trump's energy dominance and the future of fossil fuelsThe Trump Administration is doing everything it can to encourage drilling for fossil fuels on federal lands and everywhere else. They are reversing regulations on methane release, deep-sea drilling rigs and anything else they can think of to lower the cost of drilling and decrease its occupational and environmental safety. Trump and his folks want to achieve the global macho goal of being the bigg
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Technology to improve the resilience of bridgesBridges change shape, which is why they are usually built with expansion joints. At TU Wien, a technology has been developed that makes it possible to forego these joints, thus saving time and money.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Aerial surveys highlight beisa oryx hotspotAerial surveys in northern Kenya have confirmed the existence of a large population of beisa oryx, otherwise known as the East African oryx. The surveys, which took place in 2016 and 2017, covered the south-eastern parts of the area occupied by conservancies within the Northern Rangelands Trust (NRT) – a community-led NGO whose mission is to develop resilient community conservancies that transform
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study exposes misperception of poaching on the GBR and its remedyNew research has revealed the tiny minority of fishers who poach on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) think the illegal practice is justified, because they believe "everyone else is doing it."
6h
Ingeniøren
Færdige elbiler og nye koncepter i GeneveBiludstillinger bruges altid til at lufte nye koncepter. Men på årets udstilling i Geneve er flere af de store producenter klar med færdige modeller, som kører på ren el.
6h
Live Science
Elon Musk's Company Gets OK to Dig Washington, DC, Hyperloop TunnelThe preliminary permit issued by the district's Department of Transportation is still vague on details.
6h
Dagens Medicin
Lægeforeningen skal drøfte initiativer om tillid med ministerenLægeforeningen skal til et møde i sundhedsministeriet drøfte de otte initiativer om tillid. Forventningerne går på at få sundhedsfaglig ekspertise ind i initiativerne.
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Dagens Medicin
Underskrifter skal bane vej for dansk forbud mod omskæring af drengeIslandsk lovforslag om forbud mod omskæring af drengeomskæring skaber initiativ i Danmark, hvor 19.000 har skrevet under på borgerforslag.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
D-galactose affects ageing male and female brains differentlyA research study by the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB) in collaboration with the University of La Laguna (ULL) demonstrates in mice the biological relevance of sex in the effects of accelerated ageing caused by a chronic treatment of D-galactose.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hitting rock bottom after job loss can be beneficial, study showsBottoming out as a result of job loss can be necessary before finding the radical solution that will lead to a new work identity, according to new research from the University of Notre Dame.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research shows that parental care is associated with mate value in adult offspringAdults, who report having received higher levels of parental care in childhood, perceive themselves as more attractive mates. In particular, maternal care is associated with experienced mate value in adulthood.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Grey squirrels beat reds in 'battle of wits'Problem-solving powers may help to explain why grey squirrels have taken over from native red squirrels in the UK, new research says.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The starry sky shows nocturnal animals the wayNocturnal animals can use the stars and the Milky Way to find their way during the darkest hours. While animal navigation is studied all over the world, some of the leading researchers are based at Lund University in Sweden. In a recent article they sum up the research so far and give their thoughts on challenges to come.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Team identify genetic targets for autism spectrum disorderEarly detection of autism in children is key to producing the best outcomes; however, searching for the genetic causes of autism is complicated by various symptoms found within the spectrum. Now, a multi-disciplinary team of researchers at the University of Missouri created a new computational method that has connected several target genes to autism. Discoveries could lead to screening tools for y
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Laboratory study shows that father's age can affect offspring lifespanHow does the father's age at conception affect his children? DZNE researchers have studied this question in mice. Their findings show that the offspring of elderly mouse-fathers had a shorter lifespan than those of young fathers and featured an exacerbation of a number of histopathological and molecular aging traits. Moreover, sperm of old males as well as the tissue from old father offspring feat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dispersal of fish eggs by water birds -- just a myth?How do fish end up in isolated bodies of water when they can't swim there themselves? For centuries, researchers have assumed that water birds transfer fish eggs into these waters -- however, a systematic literature review by researchers at the University of Basel has shown that there is no evidence of this to date.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Social media to blame for poor grades?Do teenagers who frequent Snapchat, Facebook, Instagram and other social media sites perform worse academically? Scientists from Germany have looked into these worries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cellular recycling caught in the actScientists at the Center for Self-assembly and Complexity, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS, South Korea), have observed a normal physiological process, called 'self-eating', that cells use to recycle their components. They developed an accurate technique that visualizes how mitochondria, cells' energy factories, are fused with lysosomes, cells' recycling machines, in order to get mater
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The Atlantic
A Mentor's Advice to UCLA's Campus RepublicansEarlier this month, the Bruin Republicans at UCLA invited the performance artist Milo Yiannopoulos to speak at an event tilted “Ten Things I Hate About Mexico.” Days later, they thought better of their decision, cancelling their event with a vacuous, nihilistic enabler of bigots, to the credit of a faction in their leadership. “The decision to host Milo has polarized the leadership of the organiz
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study of mollusk epidemic could help save endangered sea snailAbalone, large single-shelled mollusks, are an unusual sight these days off the coast of Washington, California, and Oregon. Of seven species of abalone on the west coast, two are endangered and three are considered species of concern. And one of the two species that is not considered threatened, the red abalone, saw a population crash last year that led fisheries managers to close the recreationa
6h
Popular Science
How to test your smartphone's speedDIY And improve its performance. Is your phone performing as well as it can? These tools and apps will help you check your device's speed. Then you can decide how to fix any slow-downs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lasers revolutionise mapping of forestsNew laser scanning technologies developed at the University of Salford are being used to map forests in more detail than ever before.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Venom research could yield gastrointestinal disease treatmentTherapeutics inspired by venoms could provide the key to treatment for a common gastrointestinal disease if a collaboration between researchers from The University of Queensland and Danish biotech company Zealand Pharma A/S is successful.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Second successful human-animal hybrid: sheep embryo with human cellsCarrying forward the results of a team that created a pig/human hybrid last year, a team led by researchers at Stanford University has created a sheep/human hybrid. The team has not published a paper on their efforts as yet, but recently gave a presentation outlining their work at this year's American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in Texas.
7h
Big Think
Ten-year study links cognitive decline to high blood sugar levelsThis is the first study to link blood sugar levels, even among prediabetics, with cognitive decline. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A matter of dynamicsMost ion channels are very selective about the ions, which may or may not pass through them. They may be conductive for potassium ions and non-conductive for sodium ions or vice versa. However, a number of ion channels allows for the efficient passage of both kinds of ions. Scientists at the Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut fuer Molekulare Pharmakologie found the answer to this question. Their study rev
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A trip to the mountains despite a heart condition?Cardiologists are in agreement that generally exercise in the mountains is a very good way to prevent or reduce the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. Nevertheless what about those people who have a pre-existing cardiovascular condition? Under what circumstances is it safe for them to reside or holiday in high mountainous regions, and what rules should they apply to their conduct whilst there?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study exposes misperception of poaching on the GBR and its remedyNew research has revealed the tiny minority of fishers who poach on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR) think the illegal practice is justified, because they believe 'everyone else is doing it.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Moderate and severe exacerbations accelerate physical activity decline in COPD patientsA study published in the European Respiratory Journal has shown that both moderate and severe exacerbations in COPD patients are associated with a decline in their physical activity level. Researchers observed tha the acute drop in physical activity during a COPD exacerbation has an important and lasting effect.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How the insulin receptor worksResearchers from the Helmholtz Zentrum München at the University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus of TU Dresden together with colleagues from Rockefeller University New York succeeded for the first time in the visualization of the insulin receptor activation. The results of this collaborative work have now been published in the 'Journal of Cell Biology'.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ensuring fresh air for allA start-up company from an ESA business incubator is offering affordable air-quality monitors for homes, schools and businesses using technology it developed for the International Space Station.
7h
Live Science
These Bacteria Eat Toxic Metal, 'Poop' Gold NuggetsResearchers discover how a weird bacteria survive their toxic environment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemical waves guide to catalysts of the futureSpectacular electron microscope images at TU Wien lead to important findings: Chemical reactions can produce spiral-like multi-frequency waves and thus provide local information about catalysts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Incivility at work: is 'queen bee syndrome' getting worse?The phenomenon of women discriminating against other women in the workplace—particularly as they rise in seniority—has long been documented as the "queen bee syndrome." As women have increased their ranks in the workplace, most will admit to experiencing rude behavior and incivility.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Burn or burySince China refused last month to accept any more foreign waste for recycling, the UK is facing a challenge disposing of its plastic waste.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ties that bind, and can be untiedLMU researchers have developed a method that enables cell-surface receptors to be switched on and off at will. The technique promises to provide new insights into receptor functions and their effects on intracellular signaling pathways.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Australian eggs under reviewEggs sold in Australia come with different labels and with different promises of chicken welfare. But what's real, what's hype and what can you do about it?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Now you see us: how casting an eerie glow on fish can help count and conserve themNews stories about fish often focus either on large fish like sharks, or on tasty seafood. So it might come as a surprise that more than half of the fish on coral reefs are tiny and well camouflaged.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microanalysis of biological samples for early disease detectionOsaka University researchers developed a microanalysis device that uses terahertz waves, showing high sensitivity for detecting ultra-trace amounts of analyte. The single microchannel system with a few arrays of split ring resonators showed femtomole sensitivity for minerals in picoliter volumes of water. They extrapolated this success to potential detection in clinical and research applications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study of mollusk epidemic could help save endangered sea snailOverfishing and environmental change have pushed abalone species on the US west coast to the edge of extinction. Now a fatal disease threatens their recovery. But new research shows that some abalone species may be less susceptible to the disease than others, providing initial data that could help map where abalone could survive and thrive despite the disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nitrate flux in the Arctic not following the decreasing NOx emissions in neighboring countriesNitrate deposits in the Arctic remains high even after the turn of the century, despite environmental policies adopted by neighboring countries in the late 20th century to cut nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diet or Regular? Decoding behavioral variation in ant clonesClonal ants appear to be diverse in responding to sweetened water, suggesting epigenetic regulation in behavioral variation and colony survival.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Number of obese years not -- just obesity -- a distinct risk factor for heart damageIn an analysis of clinical data collected on more than 9,000 people, Johns Hopkins researchers have shown that the number of years spent overweight or obese appear to 'add up' to a distinct risk factor that makes those with a longer history of heaviness more likely to test positive for a chemical marker of so-called 'silent' heart damage than those with a shorter history.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate projections show a warmer future for the Pacific northwestIn the midst of an unseasonably warm winter in the Pacific Northwest, a comparison of four publicly available climate projections has shown broad agreement that the region will become considerably warmer in the next century if greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere rise to the highest levels projected in the the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 'business-as-usual' scenario
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Brain on a chip' reveals how the brain foldsOur brains are already wrinkled like walnuts by the time we are born. Babies born without these wrinkles - smooth brain syndrome - suffer from severe developmental deficiencies and their life expectancy is markedly reduced. The gene that causes this syndrome recently helped Weizmann Institute of Science researchers to probe the physical forces that cause the brain's wrinkles to form.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nitrate in drinking water increases the risk of colorectal cancerNitrate in groundwater and drinking water, which primarily comes from fertilisers used in the agricultural production, has not only been subject to decades of environmental awareness -- it has also been suspected of increasing the risk of cancer. The largest epidemiological study ever carried out in this area now shows that there is a correlation - also when the amount of nitrate in the drinking w
7h
New Scientist - News
Technology firms must develop new ways to jam Russia’s fake newsThe FBI has revealed the lengths Russia's fake news operators will go to – now the likes of Facebook and Twitter must come up with a fix, says Paul Marks
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New on MIT Technology Review
This video game wants to be a fake news vaccine
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Scientific American Content: Global
Intelligent Machines That Learn Like ChildrenMachines that learn like children provide deep insights into how the mind and body act together to bootstrap knowledge and skills -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Feed: All Latest
Work From Home Tips: Videoconferencing, Standing DeskNASA Mars OpportunityWhether you’re Zooming it in or not sitting down on the job, here’s how to do it right.
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Futurity.org
Young women who value their desire have less unwanted sexYoung women who value their own desires as much as their partner’s are less likely to engage in unwanted sexual activity, new research finds. “Young women who presume sex is primarily for the man’s benefit are less likely to see their indecisiveness around sex or lack of desire as a reason to refuse sexual activity,” says Heather Hensman Kettrey, associate at the Vanderbilt Peabody Research Insti
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Ingeniøren
Norges skiløbere kører suverænt på avanceret sensor-teknologiNy teknologi kan gøre brugen af video overflødig, fordi målingerne er så præcise. Og sensorerne virker ude på løjperne - ikke kun i laboratoriet.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Very long-chain lipids could help prevent dry eye diseaseVery long-chain lipids in the most superficial layer of the tear film cause severe dry eye disease when they were shortened in mice -- a result that could help develop new drugs for the disease.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers invent light-emitting nanoantennasScientists from ITMO University developed new effective nanoscale light sources based on halide perovskite. Such nanosources are based on subwavelength nanoparticles serving both as emitters and nanoantennas and allow enhancing light emission inherently without additional devices. Moreover, perovskite enables tuning of emission spectra throughout the visible range by varying the composition of the
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New algorithm can pinpoint mutations in large sections of the human genA team of scientists has developed an algorithm that can accurately pinpoint, in large regions of the human genome, mutations favored by natural selection. The finding provides deeper insight into how evolution works, and ultimately could lead to better treatments for genetic disorders. For example, adaptation to chronic hypoxia at high altitude can suggest targets for cardiovascular and other isc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pesticide traces in three-quarters of French fruit: reportAlmost three- quarters of fruit and more than two-fifths of non-organic vegetables contain traces of pesticide in France, with grapes and celery the most affected, a report said Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Qualcomm raises bid for NXP to about $43.22BQualcomm is raising its takeover bid for NXP Semiconductors by nearly 16 percent to about $43.22 billion, citing in part NXP's strong results since the companies first announced their merger in October 2016.
7h
Dagens Medicin
Bonus til direktør bag udskældt sundhedsplatform vækker røreDirektør, der har stået i spidsen for implementeringen af Sundhedsplatformen, har modtaget en bonus på 100.000 kr. for sit arbejde. Det skaber hovedrysten blandt politikere.
7h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Are computers better than people at predicting who will commit another crime?If crime-predicting computer programs aren’t any more accurate than human guesswork, do they still have a place in the criminal justice system?
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Scientific American Content: Global
Child's Play: Learning Like Infants May Boost Artificial Intelligence-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Deposit schemes reduce drink containers in the ocean by 40 percentPlastic waste in the ocean is a global problem; some eight million metric tonnes of plastic ends up in the ocean every year.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lyman-alpha emission detected around quasar J1605-0112Using the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) instrument astronomers have discovered an extended and broad Lyman-alpha emission in the form of a nebula around the quasar J1605-0112. The finding is reported February 9 in a paper published on the arXiv pre-print repository.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Putting primates on screen is fuelling the illegal pet tradeWhy would animal rights organisation PETA praise a film in which a group of apes are brutally attacked by humans? The answer is that War for the Planet of the Apes, the most recent movie in the franchise, used no real primates in its filming.
7h
Live Science
Who Created These Strange, Ancient Sculptures Hidden in the Saudi Desert?There's a place in the desert where the ghosts of camels seem to loom out of ancient rocks.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Calcium SignalingResearchers used light-sheet microscopy to form 3-D images of the process in primary cortical neurons from embryonic rats.
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The Scientist RSS
Sci-Hub Loses Domains and Access to Some Web ServicesA few months after the American Chemical Society won its lawsuit against the pirate site, the game of virtual whack-a-mole continues.
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The Scientist RSS
Nobel PrizeWinning Biologist DiesGünter Blobel, known for his work on the signal hypothesis of protein targeting, has died from cancer at age 81.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Forced disappearances are on the rise as human rights violators cover their tracksIt seems the global campaign to protect human rights has had an unexpected side-effect: governments are changing their preferred methods of getting rid of political opponents.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers map high levels of drugs in the Hudson RiverIn a new study, researchers have mapped out a stew of discarded pharmaceuticals dissolved throughout the Hudson River. They say that in some places, levels may be high enough to affect aquatic life. The research appears in the early online edition of the journal Water Research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shedding high-power laser light on the plasma density limitThe interaction of high-power laser light sources with matter has given rise to numerous applications including; fast ion acceleration; intense X-ray, gamma-ray, positron and neutron generation; and fast-ignition-based laser fusion. These applications require an understanding of energy absorption and momentum transfer from the high-intensity lasers to plasma particles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Food scientists create novel magnetic nanoparticles for rapid screening of pesticide residue in vegetablesFood scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) developed a rapid and highly sensitive screening technique capable of detecting minute amounts of pyrethroids in vegetables, a common type of synthetic pesticide applied on agricultural crops. The innovative strategy makes use of magnetic nanoparticles to simplify pyrethorid extraction, reducing the screening process to under two hour
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Ultramassive' black holes discovered in far-off galaxiesThanks to data collected by NASA's Chandra X-ray telescope on galaxies up to 3.5 billion light years away from Earth, an international team of astrophysicists has detected what are likely to be the most massive black holes ever discovered in the universe. The team's calculations showed that these ultramassive black holes are growing faster than the stars in their respective galaxies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New method to determine molecule chiralityIdentifying right-handed and left-handed molecules is a crucial step for many applications in chemistry and pharmaceutics. An international research team (CELIA-CNRS/INRS/Berlin Max Born Institute/SOLEIL) has now presented a new original and very sensitive method. The researchers use laser pulses of extremely short duration to excite electrons in molecules into twisting motion, the direction of wh
8h
Live Science
Ancient Statue of Nubian King Found in Nile River TempleRemains of the 2,600-year-old statue with an inscription written in Egyptian hieroglyphics turned up in a temple at Dangeil.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using organoids to understand how the brain wrinklesA team of researchers working at the Weizmann Institute of Science has found that organoids can be used to better understand how the human brain wrinkles as it develops. In their paper published in the journal Nature Physics, the team describes how they used a modified form of organoid development to study the development of brain wrinkles. Larry Taber with Washington University offers a News & Vi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
No, you can't tap your hand to get on the train - where biohacktivists stand under the lawA brave step forward for cyborg rights? A media stunt? Or just indifference to contract law? Those are the questions raised by news that biohacker Meow-Ludo Disco Gamma Meow-Meow plans to take Transport for NSW (TfNSW) to court after it cancelled his digital travel card.
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Dana Foundation
#Brainweek Partner Interview: Rebeca Toledo CárdenasThis is the third and final interview in a series of Brain Awareness Week partner Q&As, in which partners share their experiences and tips for planning successful events. Dra. Ma. Rebeca Toledo Cárdenas is a professor and researcher at the Centro de Investigaciones Cerebrales at the Universidad Veracruzana in Mexico. Last year, the Centro de Investigaciones Cerebrales of the Universidad Veracruza
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hospital charges for outpatient cancer care highly variable, Medicare billing records showAn analysis of recent Medicare billing records for more than 3,000 hospitals across the United States shows that charges for outpatient oncology services such as chemo infusion or radiation treatment vary widely and exceed what Medicare will pay by twofold to sixfold.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Lipid asymmetry' plays key role in activating immune cellsA cell's membrane is composed of a bilayer of lipids, and the inside-facing layer is made of different lipids than the outside-facing layer. Because different lipids create membranes with different physical properties, researchers wondered whether different lipid compositions in the bilayer could also lead to different physical properties. They will present their work exploring this 'lipid asymmet
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fancy a jellyfish chip?Mathias Clausen, a Danish researcher, became intrigued by jellyfish when he bit into the marine delicacy and experienced an unexpected crunch; he decided he wanted to 'understand the transformation from soft gel to this crunchy thing.' Clausen and other scientists combined their expertise in biophysics and biochemistry to gain a better understanding of how food preparation affects jellyfish from t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers engineer a winning strategy for the Rottnest Channel SwimTraining regularly and vigorously in the lead up to the Rottnest Channel Swim (this Saturday 24 February) may sound like the main key to success, but a group of researchers from The University of Western Australia has a strategy it says will maximise performance on the day.
8h
Popular Science
This year’s flu vaccine is only 36 percent effective—and that’s great newsHealth Yes, you should still get your flu shot. In a season as severe as this one, any outcome that’s better than expected is cause for celebration. And that’s not even the best part.
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The Atlantic
City Noise Might Be Making You SickWhat are your ears hearing right now? Maybe the bustling sounds of a busy office, or your partner cooking dinner in the next room. Whatever the texture of the sonic landscape of your life may be, beneath it all is the same omnipresent din: the sound of cars. That might seem benign, or perhaps even endearing—the sound of the bustle of the big city. But the din of vehicles, along with transit and i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First 3-D morphometric study of the molars of Sima de los HuesosThe Dental Anthropology Group of CENIEH has just published a paper in American Journal of Physical Anthropology on the morphological analysis of the dentin in the lower molars of the population of the archaeological site of Sima de los Huesos (Atapuerca, Burgos).The researchers used three-dimensional geometric morphometry to study the origin of the Neanderthals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Venezuela's digital coin makes debutVenezuela on Tuesday will become the first country to launch its own version of bitcoin, a move it hopes will provide a much-needed boost to its credit-stricken economy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Poland illegally logged in ancient forest: EU court advisorPoland's rightwing government broke the law by logging in one of Europe's last primeval forests, the legal advisor to the EU's top court said Tuesday, setting up a new clash between Brussels and Warsaw.
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Feed: All Latest
Winter Olympics 2018: The Physics of Blazing Fast Bobsled RunsFour-person bobsled teams go faster than two-person teams—but why?
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Big Think
Bitcoin’s price: Who decides the value of cryptocurrencies?Why are the prices of cryptocurrencies so volatile? Are initial coin offerings (ICOs) worth your investment? Bitcoin and other digital currencies created an entirely new market with its own rules. Read More
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Live Science
The Real Way Ancient Priests Sacrificed Animals at the Roman 'Gate to Hell'Turns out, the supernatural force that suffocated the animals was not from well-meaning gods but rather Mother Nature.
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Science | The Guardian
Pre-bunking: can you be ‘brainwashed’ into spotting fake news?Cambridge University is recruiting thousands of people to play a fake-news simulator, in the hope they will learn to identify the real thing Name: Pre-bunking. Age: A modern malaise/cure, still in its early infancy. Continue reading...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Emancipated blacks often targeted for relocation to the tropicsThe narratives of black emancipation and white settlement are usually separated in U.S. and Canadian history, but they are actually intertwined, says a University of Illinois history professor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Continental interiors may not be as tectonically stable as geologists thinkA University of Illinois-led team has identified unexpected geophysical signals underneath tectonically stable interiors of South America and Africa. The data suggest that geologic activity within stable portions of Earth's uppermost layer may have occurred more recently than previously believed. The findings, published in Nature Geoscience, challenge some of today's leading theories regarding pla
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Identifying super corals through DNA analysisA Ph.D. student from EPFL will spend three months in New Caledonia for a research project supported by the International Coral Reef Initiative. He will share his experience on the EPFL Out There blog.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New method rapidly transforms the soft umbrella-shaped jellyfish body into a crunchy treatOur brains weave together inputs from sight, taste and smell to determine whether food is safe and enjoyable to eat. Though it is often overlooked, texture also has a powerful effect on how we perceive and enjoy food. Mathias P. Clausen, a postdoctoral fellow at University of Southern Denmark in Odense, Denmark, became intrigued by jellyfish when he bit into the marine delicacy and experienced an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Lipid asymmetry' plays key role in activating immune cellsA cell's membrane is its natural barrier between the inside of a cell and the outside world—composed of a double layer (bilayer) of lipids (such as fats, waxes, sterols, or fat-soluble vitamins). Intriguingly, it's been known for decades that the layer facing the inside of cells is made of different lipids than the outside-facing layer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows gully wildlife refuges have high bushfire riskThe first evidence showing important landscape differences in the flammability of plant leaves, as fuels available for bushfires, indicates that gully plant communities are likely to be at increased risk under climate change and increasing bushfire frequency and intensity.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
A Trip to "the Poopy Lab" In the Interest of Drug DevelopmentIn one small, Canadian city there is now a model of a mechanical human colon -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Activating the dark side reveals brighter nano 'building blocks'Scientists working to make nanoparticles even smaller, whilst retaining their useful optical properties, believe they have discovered a way to overcome a fundamental physical restraint known as "thermal quenching".
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nitrate flux in the Arctic not following the decreasing NOx emissions in neighboring countriesNitrate deposits in the Arctic remains high even after the turn of the century, despite environmental policies adopted by neighboring countries in the late 20th century to cut nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drug trafficking can support terrorist activity, but not in ways most believeDrug trafficking does help facilitate terrorist activity, but it is more often linked to local militant groups instead of well-known international terrorist organizations, according to a new study that includes a University of Kansas political science researcher.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Augmented reality takes 3-D printing to next levelCornell researchers are taking 3-D printing and 3-D modeling to a new level by using augmented reality (AR) to allow designers to design in physical space while a robotic arm rapidly prints the work.
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Feed: All Latest
APT37: Inside the Toolset of an Elite North Korean Hacker GroupSecurity researcher at FireEye break down the arsenal of APT37, a North Korean hacker team coming into focus as a rising threat.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cracking the genetic code for complex traits in cattleA massive global study involving 58,000 cattle has pinpointed the genes that influence the complex genetic trait of height in cattle, opening the door for researchers to use the same approach to map high-value traits including those important for beef and milk production.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
What Makes Us Vibe?We like other people in part because they think the way we do—but we may also think alike as a result of being friends -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers invent tiny, light-powered wires to modulate brain's electrical signalsThe human brain largely remains a black box: How the network of fast-moving electrical signals turns into thought, movement and disease remains poorly understood. But it is electrical, so it can be hacked—the question is finding a precise, easy way to manipulate electrical signaling between neurons.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Remote technologies help biologists predict disease outbreaks, vaccinate kids in AfricaEach autumn in the Sahel, a vast band of grasslands just south of the Sahara desert, seasonal farmers and their families move from their farms when the long dry season begins. Many travel long distances to large towns and cities where they squeeze into already crowded districts, finding spaces in extended family compounds or temporary sites on the city's edges.
9h
The Atlantic
The Prowess of Nina Simone’s Early RecordsSixty years ago, Nina Simone was not yet quite an icon. The legendary singer, pianist, songwriter, and civil-rights activist—who will be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in April—turned 25 in 1958. Her debut album, Little Girl Blue , had just been released on Bethlehem Records, an up-and-coming jazz label. Among Bethlehem’s alumni were Duke Ellington, Charles Mingus, and a promising y
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Anthropocene began in 1965, according to signs in the world's 'loneliest tree'On Campbell Island in the Southern Ocean, some 400 miles south of New Zealand, is a single Sitka spruce. More than 170 miles from any other tree, it is often credited as the "world's loneliest tree". Planted in the early 20th century by Lord Ranfurly, governor of New Zealand, the tree's wood has recorded the radiocarbon produced by above ground atomic bomb tests – and its annual layers show a peak
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New robotic system could lend a hand with warehouse sorting and other picking or clearing tasksUnpacking groceries is a straightforward albeit tedious task: You reach into a bag, feel around for an item, and pull it out. A quick glance will tell you what the item is and where it should be stored.
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Ingeniøren
Unge ingeniører samler stærkstrømskabler nemmere og billigereRetningen er klar for Europas energisystem: mere vedvarende, mere elektrisk og mere kobber. Dansk virksomhed vil hjælpe kablerne på vej med en ny løsning.
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Ingeniøren
Atari skaber egen digital valutaFor 30 år siden var Atari stor inden for spiludvikling. Nu vil selskabet satse på egen kryptovaluta.
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Ingeniøren
Indisk skrifttegn får iPhones til at crasheEndnu en gang kan iPhones sendes til tælling af snedig tekststreng.
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Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Kan man høre lyd fra rummet?To læsere vil gerne høre mere om lyd fra rummet. Kan man høre et stjerneskud? Eller en eksplosion, hvis man er tæt på i sit rumskib? Forsker fra Niels Bohr Insitutet svarer.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
The flowers that give us chocolate are ridiculously hard to pollinateCacao trees are really fussy about pollination.
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Feed: All Latest
Inside the Mueller Indictment: A Russian Novel of IntrigueThe cast of characters revealed in the special counsel's epic indictment is drawn from the overlapping circles of oligarchs, spooks, and mob figures.
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Feed: All Latest
Thank Maps for the Cadillac CT6's Super Cruise Self-DrivingCadillac's answer to Tesla Autopilot uses a massive mapping database to rein in badly behaving drivers.
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Feed: All Latest
Big Data Suggests Big Potential for Urban FarmingA global analysis finds that urban agriculture could yield up to 10 percent of many food crops—good news for its future as a force for sustainability.
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Science : NPR
Hidden Brain: A Study Of Airline DelaysFlight delays and late arrivals have gone down since 1990. At the same time, airlines have increased scheduled flight times because flights are taking longer, and more time is spent taxiing.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
When AI Steers Us AstrayA new debugging tool can pinpoint errors that cause neural networks to make mistakes -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Germany seeks to fine scientists over monkey experimentsGerman prosecutors said Tuesday they have asked judges to fine three scientists at the prestigious Max Planck Institutes for animal cruelty over experiments on monkeys' brains.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cape Town now faces dry taps by July 9Residents of drought-stricken Cape Town received good news Tuesday when city officials said they now face losing piped water to their homes by July 9—a month later than last forecast.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers reveal secrets of most distant supernova ever detectedAn international team of astronomers, including Professor Bob Nichol from the University of Portsmouth, has confirmed the discovery of the most distant supernova ever detected – a huge cosmic explosion that took place 10.5 billion years ago, or three-quarters the age of the Universe itself.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microanalysis of biological samples for early disease detectionThe use of terahertz (THz) waves for biosensing is currently receiving considerable attention. THz waves are able to detect molecular vibrations and rotations, without using labels that can affect the properties of the substances of interest.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find no correlation between social media use and school performanceScientists from Germany have studied whether teenagers who frequent Snapchat, Facebook, Instagram and other social media sites perform worse academically and concluded that there is no such connection.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the insulin receptor worksAs we are approaching the 100th anniversary of the discovery of insulin, a wide array of its signaling pathways has been defined. However, the initial step in insulin action, i.e. the engagement with its cell-surface receptor and the resulting conformational change, which propagates across the plasma membrane to the intracellular module, remains poorly understood. Addressing this problem, research
10h
The Atlantic
The Flawed Nationalism of Donald TrumpThe astonishing thing about Donald Trump’s response to Robert Mueller’s recent indictments is his inability to recognize that Russia’s interference in the 2016 election is about something bigger than him. Look closely at Trump’s tweets. February 16 : “Russia started their anti-US campaign in 2014, long before I announced that I would run for President. The results of the election were not impacte
10h
The Atlantic
Gun Control Is Not ImpossibleAs the United States tries to recover from the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, a feeling of pessimism is setting in among liberal politicians and pundits about whether gun control legislation is possible. Many Americans who have been following politics have seen this movie before and the ending is usually bleak. The scenes are as predictable as a third-rate
10h
The Atlantic
Devin Nunes's Fake OversightWatching the Senate Intelligence Committee’s world-threat hearing last week, it felt like the adults were finally back in town. Republicans and Democrats sat next to each other and spoke politely, in front of the cameras. They agreed that intelligence agencies are vital to America’s national security, not some deep state cabal bent on destroying the Trump administration. Nobody used the word “hoa
10h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Danmarks svar på Indiana Jones satte mayakulturen på landkortetMeget få danskere kender ham i dag, men arkæolog Frans Blom, der i 1920’erne gjorde...
10h
Feed: All Latest
This Computer Uses Light—Not Electricity—To Train AI AlgorithmsStartup Fathom Computing thinks optical computing can extend the gains of Moore's Law and light the way to the future of artificial intelligence.
10h
Feed: All Latest
For Women in Cryptocurrency, a New Effort to Grow Their RanksSigners of the Blockchain Inclusive and Diversity Pledge commit to seek out underrepresented groups for investment, hiring, and mentorship opportunities.
10h
Feed: All Latest
How Podcasts and Voice Technology Are Changing How We Navigate the WorldWIRED columnist Antonio García Martínez on how podcasts and smart speakers like Google Home and Alexa are revolutionizing communications.
10h
Feed: All Latest
Crispr Gene Editing Will Transform How We Eradicate Invasive SpeciesA conservationist wants to use Crispr to eliminate island predators. It's not brutal like poison, but it could transform our power over nature.
10h
Science | The Guardian
Scientists race to explore Antarctic marine life revealed by giant icebergBritish Antarctic Survey is trying to reach a newly revealed ecosystem that had been hidden for 120,000 years below the Larsen C ice shelf A team of international scientists is due to set off for the world’s biggest iceberg on Wednesday, fighting huge waves and the encroaching Antarctic winter, in a mission aiming to answer fundamental questions about the impact of climate change in the polar reg
11h
Ingeniøren
Filosof: Folkelig modstand mod genmodificering fylder for megetNår politikerne skal træffe beslutninger om genmodificerede fødevarer, skal det hvile på sagligt grundlag. Ikke forudfattede meninger, mener filosof, som har fået 10 mio. kroner til at dykke ned i problemet.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Raising ocean literacy levels could protect marine environmentHundreds of kilometres away from any sea, ocean or sandy beach, students from countries such as the Czech Republic have been discovering their connection with the marine world.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sony jumps into Japan taxi market with AI app plansElectronics giant Sony announced a plan Tuesday to provide an AI-based ride-hailing system to Japanese cab companies, while another taxi firm said they were in talks with Uber on a tie-up.
11h
Ingeniøren
Robotproducent: Ingeniører har pligt til at give noget tilbage til samfundetPreben Hjørnet er bedre til at lede ildsjæle end lønmodtagere. For han har en mission med sin robotvirksomhed og går ikke op i, om han er leder eller specialist.
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Health: Are the dice rolled before ten years of age?Researchers at UNIGE found that socio-economically disadvantaged individuals in childhood are a greater risk of low muscle strength at an older age. Moreover, this risk is not offset by an improvement in their socio-economic status as adults. This means that inequalities in childhood are biologically embodied to literally 'get into the skin'. Why? They suggest that a physiological deregulation cau
12h
New Scientist - News
We all need to take our heads out of the sandThe fact we are running out of something so seemingly limitless as sand is a potent symbol of humanity's destructiveness. We must all strive to do better
12h
Viden
Mænd har større hjerner end kvinder, men......størrelsen betyder ikke noget for intelligensen.
12h
Science-Based Medicine
A Cornucopia of CrislipMark Crislip has written three books. They are full of wisdom, science-based thinking, and hilarious humor. Highly recommended.
13h
Science | The Guardian
How much mass does the W boson have?And why it matters Whenever I describe the fundamental forces to an audience that does not entirely consist of other particle physicists (happens more often that you might think), it is the weak force that causes trouble. Electromagnetism holds atoms together (amongst other fun stuff), the strong force holds atomic nuclei together, and gravity holds the planet together. But what does the weak for
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Neutrons reveal the wild Weyl world of semimetalsThe observation of an abnormal state of matter in a two-dimensional magnetic material is the latest development in the race to harness novel electronic properties for more robust and efficient next-generation devices.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New chapter: a landmark move for Greece's national libraryWearing masks and gloves, specialised staff gingerly place their treasured cargo inside wheeled, shock-absorbing boxes for a historic trip to the other end of Athens in the biggest book move in Greek history.
14h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Origins of land plants pushed back in timePlants appeared on land 100 million years earlier than previously thought, according to new research.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
German court could open way to bans on diesel carsOne of Germany's top courts will decide Thursday whether some diesel vehicles can be banned from parts of cities like Stuttgart and Duesseldorf to reduce air pollution, a possible landmark judgement for the "car nation".
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vampire bat's blood-only diet 'a big evolutionary win'At first glance, the cost-benefit ratio of a blood-only diet suggests that vampire bats—the only mammals to feed exclusively on the viscous, ruby-red elixir—flew down an evolutionary blind alley.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Archaeologists find fossils, Mayan relics in giant underwater cave in MexicoArchaeologists who have been exploring the world's largest underwater cave—recently discovered in Mexico—presented their findings Monday, including fossils of giant sloths and an elaborate shrine to the Mayan god of commerce.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Volcanic blast reshaped summit of Indonesia's Mount SinabungThe eruption of Indonesia's Mount Sinabung that shot ash 5 kilometers (3 miles) high also blew away much of the mountain's summit.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Assassination of political leaders connected to increase in social conflictAn increase in social conflict increases the likelihood of assassinations of political leaders, according to new research co-conducted by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.
14h
Ingeniøren
MacOS: Backup-data risikerer at forsvinde ud i ingentingEn løjerlighed i MacOS betyder, at data under visse omstændigheder risikerer ikke at blive backet up, selvom det ser sådan ud.
14h
Viden
VIDEO Gaaaaab: Derfor smitter et gabAlle gaber. Endda flere gange om dagen. Men faktisk ved forskerne kun meget lidt om fænomenet.
15h
Science | The Guardian
Conservators race against time to save film cels of classic Disney charactersResearchers are analysing material on which early Disney cartoons were inked to find best way to save and store the animations Hands clasped, silver slippers together and with an air of gentle condescension, Snow White looks like the epitome of a Disney princess. Except there’s a hitch: across her face and dress run unmistakable cracks. While Disney’s cartoon characters have an indelible place in
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Self-esteem key to treating mental healthImproving how mental health patients perceive themselves could be critical in treating them, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Assassination of political leaders connected to increase in social conflictAn increase in social conflict increases the likelihood of assassinations of political leaders, according to new research co-conducted by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blacks with atrial fibrillation have significantly higher risk of stroke than whitesBlacks have a higher incidence of stroke and stroke-associated disability than whites. However, few studies have evaluated racial differences in stroke before a diagnosis of atrial fibrillation (AF). A new report published in HeartRhythm examined stroke risk in the short term prior to a diagnosis of AF. Investigators determined that, although blacks have a lower risk of developing AF, blacks with
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
African Americans with atrial fibrillation at significantly higher risk for stroke compared to Caucasians with the diseaseAfrican Americans with atrial fibrillation (AF) -- a quivering or irregular heartbeat that can lead to a host of dangerous complications -- have a significantly higher risk of stroke than Caucasians with the condition, according to new research published today in HeartRhythm by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Past encounters with the flu shape vaccine responseResearchers from the University of Chicago, Harvard University and others show that poor immune responses, not egg adaptions, may explain the low effectiveness of the vaccine that year.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Identifying frailty in older patients can predict adverse outcomes after surgeryIdentifying frailty in surgical patients, especially those without apparent disability, will help predict risk of adverse events and repeat hospitalizations, according to research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Parenting behavior in adoptive familiesA new longitudinal study of adoptive families looked at whether symptoms of depression in adoptive fathers is also related to over-reactive parenting and behavior problems in children; the study also examined how social support networks affect parenting. It found that fathers' symptoms of depression were related to harsh, over-reactive parenting, but not to children's subsequent behavior problems.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MRI technique differentiates benign breast lesions from malignanciesAn MRI breast imaging technique that requires no contrast agent, combined with sophisticated data analysis, could reduce the number of unnecessary breast biopsies, according to a new study.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Younger and older siblings contribute positively to each other's developing empathyA new longitudinal study looked at whether younger siblings also contribute to their older sisters' and brothers' empathy in early childhood, when empathic tendencies begin to develop. The research found that beyond the influence of parents, both older and younger siblings positively influence each other's empathic concern over time.
16h
The Atlantic
Radio Atlantic: Who Killed Jeffrey Young?In part one of our three-part series "No Way Out," Barbara Bradley Hagerty told the story of how Benjamine Spencer was convicted for the murder of Jeffrey Young, and how much of the evidence that led to that conviction has fallen apart under scrutiny. But if Spencer did not kill him, who else could have? And if the evidence does point to another assailant, is that enough to free Spencer? In this
16h
New on MIT Technology Review
Can’t get new lungs? Try refurbished ones instead.Spruced up human and animal organs could someday be the solution for people needing transplants.
16h
Feed: All Latest
Facebook Executive Rob Goldman Apologizes After Russia TweetsWhen Facebook ad executive Rob Goldman sounded off about Russia's use of the platform, he went against the company line—and Robert Mueller's indictment.
16h
Ingeniøren
Data skal skåne virksomheder for fejlansættelserPersonlighedstest vil få større betydning på arbejdsmarkedet fremover. Massiv data fra disse test kan skåne firmaer for dårlige beslutninger i rekrutteringsprocessen, som især mindre virksomheder er sårbare overfor.
17h
The Atlantic
‘Show Us the Carnage,’ ContinuedFor recent items about gun massacres, and the public response, please see (starting with most recent): “ Only in America ” “ Show Us the Carnage ” “ The Empty Rituals of an American Massacre ” and before that: “ Why the AR-15 Is So Lethal ” “ The Nature of the AR-15 ” “ Why the AR-15 Was Never Meant to be in Civilian Hands ” “ More on the Military and Civilian History of the AR-15 ” and “ The Cer
17h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Ocean plastic tide 'violates the law'Campaigners may want new laws to fight pollution but the remedies already exist, a new report argues.
20h
Futurity.org
Scientists connect 15 genes with our facial featuresResearchers have identified 15 genes that determine our facial features. Our DNA determines what we look like, including our facial features. That appeals to the popular imagination, as the potential applications are obvious: Doctors could use DNA for skull and facial reconstructive surgery, forensic examiners could sketch a perpetrator’s face on the basis of DNA retrieved from a crime scene, and
21h
Futurity.org
Unlike CRISPR-Cas9, this protein can cut RNAResearchers have discovered a single protein that can perform CRISPR-style, precise programmable cutting on both DNA and RNA. This protein is among the first few Cas9 proteins to work on both types of genetic material without artificial helper components. CRISPR-Cas9 acts as molecular scissors that can cut DNA at exactly the spot they’re asked to. The technique has transformed research in just fi
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fake news 'vaccine': Online game may 'inoculate' by simulating propaganda tacticsA new experiment, launching today online, aims to help 'inoculate' against disinformation by providing a small dose of perspective from a "fake news tycoon". A pilot study has shown some early success in building resistance to fake news among teenagers.
21h
Futurity.org
Enormous blood pressure study yields surprisesAn analysis of the genetics and smoking habits of more than half a million people sheds new light on the complexities of controlling blood pressure. Researchers plumbed vast amounts of participant data to uncover how genes interact with lifestyle and influence measures of heart health. The investigators studied blood pressure because it’s a strong indicator of cardiovascular health. While simple
21h
Science | The Guardian
Homo erectus may have been a sailor – and able to speakA new theory suggests that Homo erectus was able to create seagoing vessels – and must have used language to sail successfully They had bodies similar to modern humans, could make tools, and were possibly the first to cook. Now one expert is arguing that Homo erectus might have been a mariner – complete with sailing lingo. Homo erectus first appeared in Africa more than 1.8m years ago and is thou
21h
Science | The Guardian
Bad News: the game researchers hope will 'vaccinate' public against fake newsAim is for players to build a fake news empire, which researchers hope will expose propaganda tactics Fake news is already an entire industry, an anti-democratic weapon, a movie , a play , an insult and a cliche. Now it is being turned into a game – to help people understand its wiles and deceptions. Continue reading...
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fake news 'vaccine': Online game may 'inoculate' by simulating propaganda tacticsA new online game puts players in the shoes of an aspiring propagandist to give the public a taste of the techniques and motivations behind the spread of disinformation—potentially "inoculating" them against the influence of so-called fake news in the process.
21h
Futurity.org
If play is good for kids, does Minecraft count?Parents worry that their children are spending too much time playing games on screens, but maybe they’re just playing, writes researcher Jane Mavoa below. Mavoa is a PhD candidate in the Microsoft Research Centre for Social Natural User Interfaces in the School of Computing and Information Systems of the University of Melbourne’s Faculty of Engineering. If you worry that your child has too much s
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Just a few minutes of light intensity exercise linked to lower death risk in older menClocking up just a few minutes at a time of any level of physical activity, including of light intensity, is linked to a lower risk of death in older men, suggests research published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Grey's Anatomy TV drama may be distorting public expectations of trauma careThe television drama, Grey's Anatomy, may be giving viewers a false impression of the realities of trauma care, including the speed at which patients recover after sustaining serious injuries, finds research published in the online journal Trauma Surgery & Acute Care Open.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
2016 junior doctor strikes in England had 'significant impact' on healthcare provisionThe 2016 junior doctors strikes in England had a 'significant' impact on the provision of healthcare, with thousands of appointments cancelled, and significantly fewer admissions and A&E attendances than expected, reveals research published in the online journal BMJ Open.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Some viruses produce insulin-like hormones that can stimulate human cells -- and have potential to cause diseaseScientists have identified four viruses that can produce insulin-like hormones that are active on human cells. The discovery brings new possibilities for revealing biological mechanisms that may cause diabetes or cancer.
22h
BBC News - Science & Environment
France to let wolf population grow despite farmers' fearsThe government wants the number to rise from 360 to 500 by 2023 but farmers are unhappy.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pausing evolution makes bioproduction of chemicals affordable and efficientCircumventing evolution in cell factories can pave the way for commercializing new biobased chemicals to large-scale.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How newly discovered gene helps grow blood vesselsA new study found that a newly discovered gene helps grow blood vessels when it senses inadequate blood flow to tissues.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In living color: Brightly-colored bacteria could be used to 'grow' paints and coatingsResearchers have unlocked the genetic code behind some of the brightest and most vibrant colors in nature. The article is the first study of the genetics of structural color -- as seen in butterfly wings and peacock feathers -- and paves the way for genetic research in a variety of structurally colored organisms.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Plants colonized Earth 100 million years earlier than previously thoughtA new study on the timescale of plant evolution has concluded that the first plants to colonize the Earth originated around 500 million years ago -- 100 million years earlier than previously thought.
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Traces of indigenous 'Taíno' in present-day Caribbean populationsA thousand-year-old tooth has provided the first clear genetic evidence that the Taíno -- the indigenous people whom Columbus first encountered on arriving in the New World -- still have living descendants today, despite erroneous claims in some historical narratives that these people are extinct. The findings are likely to have particular resonance for people in the Caribbean and the US who claim
22h
Big Think
Why you can never truly be an ex-CatholicThe Vatican puts the number of Catholics in the world at 1.2 billion. But is that number accurate? And who do they count among their ranks? Read More
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biodiversity loss raises risk of 'extinction cascades'New research shows that the loss of biodiversity can increase the risk of 'extinction cascades', where an initial species loss leads to a domino effect of further extinctions.
22h
Scientific American Content: Global
This Is What the Race Gap in Academia Looks LikeData visualization highlights a problematic pattern in fields associated with intrinsic genius -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
22h
Scientific American Content: Global
Enrico Fermi: The Last Man Who Knew EverythingDavid N. Schwartz talk about his latest book, The Last Man Who Knew Everything: The Life and Times of Enrico Fermi, Father of the Nuclear Age. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hydroxychloroquine no more effective than placebo for relieving osteoarthritis hand painHydroxychloroquine is no more effective than placebo for relieving moderate to severe hand pain and radiographic osteoarthritis. The findings of a randomized trial are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.
23h
Big Think
Revealed: Dutch are least hygienic EuropeansHalf of Holland does not wash hands after going to the bathroom. The Bosnians are the cleanest Europeans. Read More
23h
Viden
Faktatjek: Kan du få allergi af dit hysterisk rene hjem?Det afgøres allerede i dit første leveår om du får bakterier nok til at opbygge et stærkt immunforsvar. Men gør det en forskel om du vokser op i et sterilt hjem eller kan du ligeså godt rulle dig i skidtet?
1d
Viden
VR-video: Rejs gennem et helt liv på 7 minutterHvordan er det at miste sanserne i alderdommen? Tag en tur gennem et helt liv i VR.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experts: Vast underwater archeology site imperiled in MexicoMexican experts say the recently mapped Sac Actun cave system "is probably the most important underwater archaeological site in the world," but is threatened by pollution.
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Big Think
There are four types of drinker – which one are you?Generally people drink to either increase positive emotions or decrease negative ones. Read More
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The Scientist RSS
Genomic Particularities Hint at Vampire Bats Ability to Live Off BloodIn cooperation with its microbiome, the animal has genetic help in digesting blood and warding off pathogens.
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Feed: All Latest
'Black Panther' Discussion: This One's Gonna Be FunBlack Panther MovieWe've seen it. You've seen it. It's time we all talked it out.
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Big Think
5 American philosophers on the meaning of lifeTrying to figure out the meaning of life? Here are a few thoughts on the subject from some very famous American philosophers. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In living color: Brightly-colored bacteria could be used to 'grow' paints and coatingsResearchers have unlocked the genetic code behind some of the brightest and most vibrant colors in nature. The paper, published in the journal PNAS, is the first study of the genetics of structural color -- as seen in butterfly wings and peacock feathers -- and paves the way for genetic research in a variety of structurally colored organisms.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study looks at how newly discovered gene helps grow blood vesselsA new study published today found that a newly discovered gene helps grow blood vessels when it senses inadequate blood flow to tissues.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biodiversity loss raises risk of 'extinction cascades'New research shows that the loss of biodiversity can increase the risk of 'extinction cascades', where an initial species loss leads to a domino effect of further extinctions.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Plants colonized the earth 100 million years earlier than previously thoughtA new study on the timescale of plant evolution, led by the University of Bristol, has concluded that the first plants to colonise the Earth originated around 500 million years ago -- 100 million years earlier than previously thought.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pausing evolution makes bioproduction of chemicals affordable and efficientCircumventing evolution in cell factories can pave the way for commercializing new biobased chemicals to large-scale.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Insulin goes viralScientists at Joslin Diabetes Center have identified four viruses that can produce insulin-like hormones that are active on human cells. The discovery brings new possibilities for revealing biological mechanisms that may cause diabetes or cancer.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study identifies traces of indigenous 'Taíno' in present-day Caribbean populationsA thousand-year-old tooth has provided the first clear genetic evidence that the Taíno -- the indigenous people whom Columbus first encountered on arriving in the New World -- still have living descendants today, despite erroneous claims in some historical narratives that these people are extinct. The findings are likely to have particular resonance for people in the Caribbean and the US who claim
1d
NYT > Science
Günter Blobel, Nobel Laureate Who Found Cell ‘ZIP Codes,’ Dies at 81Dr. Blobel, at Rockefeller University, discovered that proteins in any given cell carry signals that guide them to where they can do their beneficial job.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study identifies traces of indigenous 'Taino' in present-day Caribbean populationsA thousand-year-old tooth has provided genetic evidence that the so-called "Taíno", the first indigenous Americans to feel the full impact of European colonisation after Columbus arrived in the New World, still have living descendants in the Caribbean today.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Plants colonized the Earth 100 million years earlier than previously thoughtFor the first four billion years of Earth's history, our planet's continents would have been devoid of all life except microbes.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biodiversity loss raises risk of 'extinction cascades'New research shows that the loss of biodiversity can increase the risk of "extinction cascades", where an initial species loss leads to a domino effect of further extinctions.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In living color: Brightly-colored bacteria could be used to 'grow' paints and coatingsResearchers have unlocked the genetic code behind some of the brightest and most vibrant colours in nature. The paper, published in the journal PNAS, is the first study of the genetics of structural colour - as seen in butterfly wings and peacock feathers - and paves the way for genetic research in a variety of structurally coloured organisms.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pausing evolution makes bioproduction of chemicals affordable and efficientBioproduction of chemicals using engineered microorganisms is routinely reported today, but only a few bioprocesses are functional in the large fermentation volumes that industry requires. For a longer period, the lack of successful scale-up has been one of the most important challenges for engineers to solve, in order to replace oil-derived production with bio-based production of chemicals.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Paleo Profile: The Chimera SpiderAn ancient arachnid related to early spiders shows a strange mix of features. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Viden
VIDEO Usund teenage-weekend får fedtindhold i blodet til at stige eksplosivtTo dage med fed og sukkerholdig mad eller alkohol får fedtindholdet i blodet til at stige med 60 procent, viser eksperiment med teenagere. Og det kan være usundt på sigt, siger fedmeforsker.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mouse model of intellectual disability isolates learning geneAdult male mice lacking a gene linked to intellectual disability have trouble completing and remembering mazes, with no changes in social or repetitive behavior, according to new research. This animal model provides a new way to study the role of this gene in learning and memory and provides a rodent model of pure intellectual disability.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Real-time Captcha technique improves biometric authenticationA new login authentication approach could improve the security of current biometric techniques that rely on video or images of users' faces. Known as Real-Time Captcha, the technique uses a unique 'challenge' that's easy for humans -- but difficult for attackers who may be using machine learning and image generation software to spoof legitimate users.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New algorithm can pinpoint mutations favored by natural selection in large sections of the human genomeA team of scientists has developed an algorithm that can accurately pinpoint, in large regions of the human genome, mutations favored by natural selection. The finding provides deeper insight into how evolution works, and ultimately could lead to better treatments for genetic disorders. For example, adaptation to chronic hypoxia at high altitude can suggest targets for cardiovascular and other isc
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
You are what you eat: Diet-specific adaptations in vampire batsVampire bats feed exclusively on blood, a mode of feeding unique amongst mammals. It has therefore been long suspected that vampire bats have highly specific evolutionary adaptations, which would be documented in their genome, and most likely also have an unusual microbiome, the community of micro-organisms assembled in their digestive tract which may help with the digestion of blood.
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Big Think
Scientists create new form of light that might just see quantum computing become a realityA new form of light has been discovered. Read More
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Big Think
Renewable energies are about to surpass nuclear power on U.S. electrical gridIn 2017, renewable energies accounted for 18 percent of the total power contributed to the electrical grid in the U.S. – the highest level ever. Read More
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Viden
Din liderlige hjerne snyder dig til kærlighedHvad sker der med os, når vi bliver tiltrukket af et andet menneske? Der er tre faser fra smaskliderlig til kærlighed.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Real-time Captcha technique improves biometric authenticationA new login authentication approach could improve the security of current biometric techniques that rely on video or images of users' faces. Known as Real-Time Captcha, the technique uses a unique 'challenge' that's easy for humans -- but difficult for attackers who may be using machine learning and image generation software to spoof legitimate users.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unique role of gender is featured in Circulation journal's Go Red For Women issue focused on women's heart healthThe second Go Red For Women issue of Circulation, a journal of the American Heart Association, features eleven original articles and research letters dedicated to women's heart health. Topics include cardiovascular aspects of pregnancy and its complications; risk factors; symptoms of heart attack and mental stress among others.
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The Atlantic
Russia's Election Interference Is Digital Marketing 101Last Friday, the Justice Department charged 13 Russians with attempting to subvert the 2016 U.S. presidential elections. The case presented by Special Counsel Robert Mueller laid out an elaborate scheme of information operations, carried out primarily via the social media websites Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Through the Internet Research Agency, a so-called “troll factory” in St. Petersburg
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Punishing a wrongdoer more rewarding to brain than supporting a victimPunishing a wrongdoer may be more rewarding to the brain than supporting a victim. That is one suggestion of new research which measured the brain activity of young men while they played a 'justice game.'
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Big Think
New developments in American embassy "sonic attack" in Havana point to audio weaponSymptoms ranging from chest pressure, nausea, irritability and restlessness still affect American embassy workers some 200+ days after the attack. Read More
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Viden
Google blokerer nu selv reklamer, så du ikke gør detGoogles Chrome-browser viser ikke længere støjende reklamer, da de får brugerne til at installere reklameblokkere, der fjerner alle annoncer.
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Science | The Guardian
Rare Roman boxing gloves found near Hadrian's WallLeather bands dating from AD120 are thought to be only known surviving examples Roman boxing gloves have been discovered near Hadrian’s Wall, thought to be the only known surviving examples, even though the sport was well- documented on Roman wall paintings, mosaics and sculptures. With a protective guard designed to fit snugly over the knuckles, the gloves were packed with natural material which
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Big Think
Bullying among siblings makes psychotic disorders three times more likelyA first-ever study looks at how sibling bullying leads to the development of psychotic disorders later in life. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How the brain responds to injusticePunishing a wrongdoer may be more rewarding to the brain than supporting a victim. That is one suggestion of new research published in JNeurosci, which measured the brain activity of young men while they played a 'justice game.'
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mouse model of intellectual disability isolates learning geneAdult male mice lacking a gene linked to intellectual disability have trouble completing and remembering mazes, with no changes in social or repetitive behavior, according to new research published in JNeurosci. This animal model provides a new way to study the role of this gene in learning and memory and provides a rodent model of pure intellectual disability.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Computers aid discovery of new, inexpensive material to make LEDs with high color qualityComputers have helped researchers develop a new phosphor that can make LEDs cheaper and render colors more accurately. Researchers predicted the new phosphor using supercomputers and data mining algorithms, then developed a simple recipe to make it in the lab. Unlike many phosphors, this one is made of inexpensive, earth-abundant elements and can easily be made using industrial methods. As compute
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First video of 'Dumbo' octopod hatchling shows that they look like mini-adultsResearchers who've gotten the first look at a deep-sea 'dumbo' octopod hatchling report that the young octopods look and act much like adults from the moment they emerge from an egg capsule. Dumbo octopods are so named because their fins resemble Dumbo the elephant's ears.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel mechanism linking changes in mitochondria to cancer cell deathResearchers have discovered that the activation of a specific enzyme may help suppress the spread of tumors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lack of guidance may delay a child's first trip to the dentistWithout a doctor or dentist's guidance, some parents don't follow national recommendations for early dental care for their children, a new national poll finds.
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The Atlantic
Witnessing the Collapse of the Global EliteEighty years ago in Munich, French and British politicians handed Czechoslovakia over to Adolf Hitler’s carving knife. Twenty-five years later, a German veteran of the ensuing war founded a conference in Munich that, in its own way, was designed to ensure that such a mistake would never reoccur. That veteran, Ewald von Kleist, came from a distinguished Prussian military family; he served as an of
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Popular Science
The botany in Obama's official portrait represents his historyScience Artist Kehinde Wiley employed the language of flowers. President Obama's official portrait uses flowers to tell his story.
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New on MIT Technology Review
SpaceX’s Falcon Heavy rocket could help humans mine more asteroids
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pattern formation: The paradoxical role of turbulenceThe formation of self-organizing molecular patterns in cells is a critical component of many biological processes. Researchers have proposed a new theory to explain how such patterns emerge in complex natural systems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Duplicate genes help animals resolve sexual conflictDuplicate copies of a gene shared by male and female fruit flies have evolved to resolve competing demands between the sexes. New genetic analysis describes how these copies have evolved separate male- and female-specific functions that are crucial to reproduction and fertility.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Farming crops with rocks to reduce CO2 and improve global food securityFarming crops with crushed rocks could help to improve global food security and reduce the amount of CO2 entering the atmosphere, a new study has found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Electrical implant reduces 'invisible' symptoms of man's spinal cord injuryAn experimental treatment that sends electrical currents through the spinal cord has improved 'invisible' yet debilitating side effects for a Canadian man with a spinal cord injury.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fifteen new genes identified that shape our faceResearchers have identified fifteen genes that determine our facial features.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Global grazing lands increasingly vulnerable to a changing climateA new study shows precipitation variability has increased significantly on 49 percent of the world's grazing lands.
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