Dagens Medicin

Folketinget vil ændre tandplejesystemet for voksneRegeringen og Folketingets partier er enige om, at voksentandplejen skal gentænkes. Det sker efter sammenbruddet i forhandlingerne på tandlægeområdet mellem Tandlægeforeningen og Danske Regioner.
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Ingeniøren

Forretningsmand vil glemmes på nettet: Nu slæber han Google i rettenEn forretningsmand slæber Google i Londons Landsret, for at få fjernet en tidligere dom, fra søgemaskinens søgeresultater
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Science | The Guardian

Babies' sleep patterns can be challenging – here's why you shouldn't despairOn Baby Sleep Day, here are some insights that might help get you through the long, broken nights Pairing the words “baby” and “sleep” can evoke strong emotions. Those who have had limited contact with little ones might interpret this word-combination as implying deep and prolonged slumber. For others, this union of words may elicit memories of prolonged periods of chaotic sleep (or what can feel
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Futurity.org

Giant moon crater could be great landing spotA detailed study of a giant impact crater on the Moon’s far side could provide a roadmap for future lunar explorers. The study maps the mineralogy of the South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin, a gash in the lunar surface with a diameter of approximately 2,500 kilometers (1,550 miles). SPA is thought to be the oldest and largest impact basin on the Moon, and scientists have long had their eyes on it as a
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Futurity.org

After 6 months, co-sleeping moms more likely to feel depressedMothers who are still co-sleeping—sharing either a room or bed—with their infants after six months may be more likely to feel depressed, worried about their babies’ sleep, and think their decisions were being criticized, according to a new study analyzing moms’ sleeping patterns and feelings about sleep for the first year of their babies’ lives Regardless of current parenting trends, it’s importa
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Futurity.org

Engineered bacteria could make sunscreen less toxicThere’s a new way to harvest a key ingredient responsible for making sunscreen more environmentally friendly. By pushing the discovery to commercialization, researchers hope to make “green” sunscreens more available, reducing dependence on oxybenzone- and octinoxate-based sunscreens. These harmful chemicals accumulate in aquatic environments; they’re toxic to marine life and potentially disrupt t
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Ingeniøren

Spørg Scientariet: Hvor meget energi giver en storm?En læser vil gerne vide, hvor meget energi der kan trækkes ud af en storm. Energinet har givet et svar.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Blood test could quickly predict if the drug palbociclib will help breast cancer patientsA new study has found a blood test for cancer DNA could predict if a woman is responding to the breast cancer drug palbociclib, months earlier than current tests. Scientists from The Institute of Cancer Research, London, say the test could detect in two to three weeks whether the drug is working, although they caution the results need replicating before they are used clinically. The research was f
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Ingeniøren

Claus Hjort om cyberangreb: Der er store mørketalCyberangreb udgør en af vor tids allerstørste udfordringer, beretter forsvarsministeren.
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Ingeniøren

Katamaran skulle vise vejen til VE-fremtid – det gik ikke helt efter planenDa katamaranen Energy Observer skulle søsættes, fungerede to ud af fire systemer ikke.
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The Atlantic

Whatever Happened to Trump's Counterterrorism Strategy?Last May, reports surfaced that the Trump administration had drafted a new counterterrorism strategy that would be released to the public. Although the strategy’s publication was expected this winter, it is now unclear whether the document will ever be made public and, if so, when. This is despite Donald Trump’s noisy rhetoric about terrorist threats and the pace of U.S. counterterrorism operatio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Robotic spiders and bees: The rise of bioinspired microrobotsJumping robot spiders and swarms of robotic bees sounds like the stuff of science fiction, but researchers at The University of Manchester are already working on such projects and aiming to lead the world in micro robotics.
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Ingeniøren

Kinesiske forskere tester hypersonisk flydesign med to vingeplanerMed to vingeplaner kan hypersoniske fly bære langt større last, viser kinesisk vindtunneltest. Flytypen kan teoretisk nå fra Beijing til New York på to timer med passagerer – eller bomber.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

EliteForsk-pris til banebrydende forskning i cellehukommelseUddannelses- og Forskningsministeriet hædrer hvert år nogle af Danmarks dygtigste forskere...
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The Atlantic

'I Brought a Gun to School'Darrynun Mabry lives in an apartment paid for by the state of Virginia — part of a series of diversion efforts the state has unrolled to keep youth out of detention and curtail the high recidivism rate. Mabry was sent here instead of a detention center after being charged with bringing a gun to his high school. “It’s like a second chance,” Mabry says. “If it weren’t for this program, I would have
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The Atlantic

'How Do You Help a 16-Year-Old Who Only Knows Violence?'Zhacori Bates served a two-and-a-half year sentence in a Virginia juvenile-corrections center for a crime she committed when she was 17. Now, she’s returning to her neighborhood, where she faces challenges reintegrating with the community and getting back on her feet. This new VR series from The Atlantic explores the experiences of young people in the system. For an optimal viewing experience, wa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Pakistan aims to revive glory of ancient Mughal city LahorePerched on scaffolding, restoration experts chip away at decades of grime and repair broken mosaic tiles in a bid to save the colossal murals depicting historic battles and regal ceremonies on the walls of Lahore fort.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

Rejsestipendium fra EliteForsk går til celle-atlasPascal Nordgren Timshel fra Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Basic Metabolic Research modtager i år...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Mexican troops partner with activists to save vaquita porpoiseArmed Mexican navy and federal police officers have begun riding aboard patrol boats operated by US environmental group Sea Shepherd in a bid to save the critically endangered vaquita marina porpoise, the group said Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Antarctica: a laboratory for climate changeA decade ago, a thick layer of ice covered the Collins Glacier on Antarctica's King George Island.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Television titans bulk up to battle internet rivalsTraditional television titans are bulking up in a battle with online streaming giants Netflix and Amazon as viewers take to binging on shows when and where they want.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers use recycled carbon fiber to improve permeable pavementA Washington State University research team is solving a high-tech waste problem while addressing the environmental challenge of stormwater run-off.
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Ingeniøren

Matematisk model guider københavnske bilister til ledige parkeringspladserEn matematisk model er bedre til at finde en ledig parkeringsplads i København end sensorer, der realtidsovervåger parkeringspladser. Ny parkeringsalgoritme er udviklet i samarbejde med DTU Compute og et israelsk start-up.
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Viden

Danske kvanteforskere får pris for arbejde med verdens mindste byggestenTo forskere får Eliteforsk-priser for deres arbejde med kvantefysik.
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Science-Based Medicine

Congress can easily end Medicare waste, fraud and abuse by chiropractors, saving billionsYet another government report finds chiropractors are bilking Medicare billions for unnecessary services. A simple amendment to the Medicare law could end this, but will Congress act?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Diversity of cortical neurons captured in comprehensive computer modelsThe Allen Institute for Brain Science has produced the first comprehensive, publicly available database of predictive neuron models, along with their corresponding data. The generalized leaky integrate-and-fire (GLIF) and biophysically detailed models are described in two articles published in the journal Nature Communications.
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The Scientist RSS

The Child Hatchery, 1896The incubator exhibitions of the late 19th and early 20th centuries publicized the care of premature babies.
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The Scientist RSS

The Forgotten History of World War IEra Female ScientistsAs millions of men headed off to fight in the Great War, women researchers stayed behind to further science. Their struggle for equality rages on today.
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The Scientist RSS

How to Successfully Collaborate with IndustryIn efforts to translate basic-science results into pharmaceuticals and other technologies, success cannot be taken for granted.
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The Scientist RSS

New methods to detect CRISPR off-target mutationsResearchers have developed a variety of techniques to detect when CRISPR misses the mark
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The Scientist RSS

Jermaine Jones Seeks to Untangle the Genetics Behind Substance AbuseStudying pharmacogenetics in lab rodents prepared the Columbia University professor to investigate the biological underpinnings of substance use disorders in humans.
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The Scientist RSS

Parasitologist, Reprogrammed: A Profile of David RoosAfter discovering a novel organelle found in protozoan parasites, the University of Pennsylvania's Roos created a widely used eukaryotic pathogen database.
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The Scientist RSS

Circulating Mitochondrial DNA Alerts Immune System to DangerIn response to short DNA fragments, lymphocytes release mitochondrial DNA that helps trigger an immune response.
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The Scientist RSS

A Systematic Approach to Finding Unannotated ProteinsA study suggests that there is more to the eukaryotic genome than was previously suspected.
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The Scientist RSS

Bacterial Cell Envelope Size is Key to Membrane Stress ResponseTransmission of stress signals in E. coli is dependent on the distance between its inner and outer membranes.
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The Scientist RSS

Here Comes Single-Cell OptogeneticsA new protein may allow researchers to home in on individual neurons, determining their activity minute by minute.
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The Scientist RSS

Stressed Rodents Make Different ChoicesChronic stress tweaks a circuit in the brain that influences how lab rodents make tough decisions.
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The Scientist RSS

Could Rapamycin Help Humans Live Longer?From extending lifespan to bolstering the immune system, the drug's effects are only just beginning to be understood.
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The Scientist RSS

UK Judges Receive Primers on Forensic ScienceScientists in the U.K., in collaboration with members of the judiciary, have launched the first in a series of explanatory documents designed to help integrate science into the courtroom.
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The Scientist RSS

Eat Yourself to Live: Autophagys Role in Health and DiseaseNew details of the molecular process by which our cells consume themselves point to therapeutic potential.
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The Scientist RSS

Infographic: From Sediments to SequencesHow to analyze ancient proteins
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The Scientist RSS

Paleoproteomics Opens a Window into the PastResearchers are looking to proteins to explore the biology of ancient organisms, from medieval humans all the way back to dinosaurs.
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The Scientist RSS

Are the Brains of Transgender People Different from Those of Cisgender People?Research into the biological basis of gender identity is in its infancy, but clues are beginning to emerge.
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The Scientist RSS

Infographic: Searching for the Neural Basis of GenderBrain studies have yielded a mixed picture of the neural similarities and differences between people of different genders.
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The Scientist RSS

Infographic: How Autophagy WorksSelf-digestion is critical to freeing up nutrients and guiding development, among other functions.
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The Scientist RSS

Infographic: Selective AutophagyXenophagy targets bacterial pathogens for destruction, while mitophagy aids red blood cell maturation.
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The Scientist RSS

Rapping About RapamycinRelive the Lasker Award speech from University of Basel biologist Michael Hall.
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The Scientist RSS

Point of OrderWatch Niamh Nic Daéid's TedX talk about forensic evidence in the courtroom.
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The Scientist RSS

Pestilent SpreadSee the University of Pennsylvania's David Roos explain the process of parasite replication.
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The Scientist RSS

The Skin Were InHow can science inform the debate on gender?
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The Scientist RSS

Ten-Minute SabbaticalTake a break from the bench to puzzle and peruse.
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The Scientist RSS

Study Finds Epigenetic Differences Between Hatchery-Raised and Wild-Born SalmonThe variation may help explain why stocked salmon don't fare as well in the ocean.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers use recycled carbon fiber to improve permeable pavementA Washington State University research team is solving a high-tech waste problem while addressing the environmental challenge of stormwater run-off. The researchers have shown they can greatly strengthen permeable pavements by adding waste carbon fiber composite material. Their recycling method, described in the March issue of the Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering, doesn't require using mu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New statistics reveal the shape of plastic surgeryThe American Society of Plastic Surgeons released new data which shows continued growth in cosmetic procedures over the last year.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Most health providers in New York not ready to care for veterans, study findsThe Department of Veterans Affairs has been expanding a program to allow veterans to use their health benefits in the community rather than relying upon the VA health system. However, a new study finds that only about 2 percent of the physicians and other health care providers in New York state are equipped to provide timely and quality care to veterans in the community.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Latino parents report high levels of psychological distress due to US immigration policiesA new study says frequent worries/changes in behavior associated with a 300 percent increase in the odds of severe psychological distress including symptoms of clinical anxiety and depression.
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Viden

Truet hvalart er holdt op med at få ungerDen nordatlantiske rethval har været beskyttet siden 1930’erne. Alligevel falder den i antal.
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NYT > Science

Parts Suppliers Call for Cleaner Cars, Splitting With Their Main Customers: AutomakersCar-parts makers spoke out against a Trump administration plan to review and potentially weaken tailpipe pollution rules.
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Ingeniøren

Dansk cyberkaptajn: Hackere starter med at være greyhats ...For kaptajnen på det danske Cyberlandshold, Morten Eskildsen, er it-sikkerhed og hacking rykket helt tæt på. Mød ham på Version2s konference Infosecurity til maj
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Ingeniøren

Budgetproblem i vejen for dansk missilindkøbDet skal gå stærkt, hvis forsvaret skal nå at købe de langtrækkende SM2-missiler til de danske fregatter, der er aftalt i forsvarsforliget. Vinduet for at købe den sidste planlagte produktion af missilerne lukker i år, men det kan blive vanskeligt at nå at finde pengene.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

'Oldest tattoo' found on 5,000-year-old Egyptian mummiesResearchers discover the oldest figurative tattoos in the world on two mummies from Egypt.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Africa 'set to miss UN development goal on malnutrition'At current rates of progress no African country will meet the UN goal set for 2030, a study reveals.
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Live Science

'Lost' City of Atlantis: Fact & FableThe legend of a sunken civilization has captivated imaginations for centuries.
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Live Science

A Bus-Size Asteroid Will Whiz by Earth FridayA small asteroid will zip safely by Earth on Friday (March 2) and you have a chance to see it as a pinprick of light in the sky in a live webcast.
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Feed: All Latest

What Is Net Neutrality? The Complete WIRED GuideEverything you need to know about the struggle to treat information on the internet the same—ISPs shouldn't be able to block some sorts of data and prioritize others.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Botox' improves appearance of facial scars in reconstructive surgeryIn patients undergoing reconstructive surgery of the face, treatment with botulinum toxin A (BTX-A, or 'Botox') can improve the final appearance of surgical scars.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Brain mechanisms that give The Iceman unusual resistance to coldDutch adventurer Wim Hof is known as 'The Iceman' for good reason. Hof established several world records for prolonged resistance to cold exposure, an ability he attributes to a self-developed set of techniques of breathing and meditation -- known as the Wim Hof Method. Yet, how his brain responds during cold exposure and what brain mechanisms may endow him with this resistance have not been studi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The fine-tuning of two-dimensional materialsScientists have a new understanding of why synthetic 2-D materials often perform orders of magnitude worse than predicted. They searched for ways to improve these materials' performance in future electronics, photonics, and memory storage applications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lithium treatment for bipolar disorder linked to lowest risk of rehospitalizationIndividuals with bipolar disorder have the lowest risk of rehospitalization if treated with lithium, according to a new study. Long-acting injections of antipsychotics were also effective, reducing the risk of rehospitalization by 30 per cent compared with their oral counterparts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Understanding freshwater toxic algal bloomsUsing two different measurement methods, researchers have conducted a two-year study of North Carolina's Jordan Lake in which they monitored toxic algal blooms. The researchers found that multiple cyanotoxins from toxic algal blooms are present year-round, albeit in very low concentrations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Patients may live longer after hip replacement, study suggestsHip replacement surgery not only improves quality of life but is also associated with increased life expectancy, compared to people of similar age and sex, according to a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Obesity not a risk factor for acute respiratory illnesses, study findsAlthough obesity has been considered a risk factor for more-severe cases of the flu, a new study found that it is not a risk factor for severe acute respiratory illnesses, including the flu, in children or adults.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New mathematical framework establishes the risk of dramatic collapses of real networksA theoretical framework explaining the risk of rare events causing major disruptions in complex networks, such as a blackout in a power grid, has been proposed by a mathematician in a new paper.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Blizzard survival skills: Building a snow holeIn the Cairngorms National Park Jo Whalley learns what to do if you become lost in a blizzard.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Scarcer snow?In the UK, there is evidence to suggest that snowfall has decreased over the past few decades. Worldwide, it's a more complicated picture.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lake Montcortès in Spain reveals the ecological footprint of climate change from the last 500 yearsOxygen decline in water masses is an environmental problem in lakes and ponds around the world. This phenomenon, which alters the conditions of continental water ecosystems, seems to be linked to global warming.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Glowing molecule can reveal live tuberculosis bacteriaA new technique may one day allow fast, simple detection of the bacteria that causes TB, as well as a way to monitor whether drugs are working.
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Futurity.org

Why the flu shot doesn’t always workImmune history with the flu influences a person’s response to the flu shot, according to a new study examining why the influenza vaccine was only modestly effective in recent years. Vaccine design and production often take the blame for the flu vaccine’s low effectiveness. Sometimes the flu strains chosen for the vaccine are a poor match for those that end up circulating in the public, especially
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Experts call for more evidence to test impact of GP video consultationsIn a paper published in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, the team from the Department of Primary Care and Public Health at Imperial College London said that while there is evidence that video consulting is acceptable to patients and offers many potential benefits, at least to those of younger age, its safety and efficacy in primary care currently remains largely untested.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Children's use of non-dental services for oral pain could be costing the NHS £2.3 million a yearThousands of children with oral pain are being taken by parents to pharmacies and non-dental health services, including A&E, instead of their dentist, and could be costing NHS England £2.3 million a year, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London.
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Futurity.org

To kill invasive ants, feed them what they wantPoison bait is meant to smell and taste like foods that pest insects like invasive ants like to eat. But giving them the real thing instead of a knockoff might be a better option, researchers report. When researchers coated termites with poison and set them free near colonies of invasive ants in South Africa, nearly every ant died within three weeks—using far less insecticide than traditional con
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Futurity.org

Malaria parasite packs bags to travel from host to hostThe parasite that causes malaria has not one, but two, specialized proteins that protect its messenger RNA—genetic material that encodes for proteins—until the parasite takes up residence in a new mosquito or a human host, researchers report. A new study describes the two proteins and reveals an additional role that one may play to facilitate RNA-based interactions between the parasite, its mosqu
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Science | The Guardian

World's earliest figural tattoos discovered on Gebelein mummiesNewly discovered marks push back evidence for tattooing in Africa by a millennium A wild bull, a Barbary sheep and S-shaped motifs discovered on two mummies in the British Museum have been revealed as the world’s earliest known figural tattoos. Researchers say the discoveries on two naturally mummified bodies that date from between 3351 and 3017BC mean they will have to rewrite the story of tatto
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Futurity.org

U.S. forests could be storing tons and tons more carbonA new study estimates the total amount of carbon currently accumulating in the topsoil of US forests undergoing two types of reforestation: actively replanting trees after distances like wildfires, or allowing forests to retake marginal croplands. Forests across the United States—and especially forest soils—store massive amounts of carbon, offsetting about 10 percent of the country’s annual green
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Scientific American Content: Global

Blockchain beyond Bitcoin: The Energy SectorFreelance science journalist Kevin Begos reports from the U.S. Power and Renewable Summit in Austin, Texas, on the use of blockchain technology to make more efficient energy markets and... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global

To See Gun Injury Drop, Hold an NRA MeetingWhen the National Rifle Association holds its national convention, gun injuries drop 20 percent—perhaps because fewer gun owners are around their guns. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science

Why Do Firearm Injuries Drop During NRA Conventions?People are injured by firearms every day, but a lower rate of gun-related injuries happen during a certain yearly event: the National Rifle Association (NRA) Annual Meetings and Exhibits, according to a new study that looked at eight years' worth of data.
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The Atlantic

Life Inside Maximum-Security Juvenile DetentionMarquez Jackson is serving a juvenile life sentence at Bon Air Corrections Center in Virginia for second-degree murder. Jackson lives in the maximum security side of Bon Air. “I get locked in my room every night,” he says. “Everything is about security here. I get searched every time I move.” Jackson will be at Bon Air until he turns 21. “The thing that makes me happy is just visualizing what I c
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: A Conflicted HistoryWhat We’re Following Trump’s Troubles: Hope Hicks, one of President Trump’s longest-serving aides, announced that she is stepping down as the White House communications director. The decision is one that she reportedly had been considering for a long time, but comes just a day after she testified to the House Intelligence Committee that she had sometimes been required to tell “white lies” on the
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Feed: All Latest

Porsche’s Electric Mission E Gets Its Own SuperchargersThe Tesla-fighting sports car will be able to charge its battery using a network of 800-volt fast chargers Porsche is installing around the country.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Risso's dolphins plan their divesSlipping beneath the surface of the water in pursuit of food sets the timer ticking for hungry dolphins; the pressure is on to locate food and make it back to the surface before they run out of oxygen.
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Science : NPR

LISTEN: Dolphins Use Targeted Echolocation To Plan Their Hunting DivesOxygen is a precious resource for dolphins. A new study suggests they use it efficiently by remembering what they learn during a dive, then applying that information to future foraging expeditions. (Image credit: Elizabeth Haslam/Flickr)
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The Atlantic

The Sharp Rise and Sudden Departure of Hope HicksWhite House H. HicksWhite House Communications Director Hope Hicks, one of President Trump’s closest and longest-serving aides, is resigning, she announced Wednesday. The news was first reported by The New York Times . The departure comes as a surprise. While there has been a great deal of turnover at the White House, and in the communications director’s job in particular, Hicks had not been among the most anticipat
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Live Science

This Woman Is Her Own Twin: What Is Chimerism?Twins often feel like they have a special connection, but for one California woman, the connection is particularly visceral — she is her own twin.
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Inside Science

February's Stellar Space PicturesFebruary's Stellar Space Pictures Peer into the most massive black holes in the universe and marvel at extreme solar flares this month. 3_crop_heic1803a.jpg This is a breathtaking composite image of NGC 3344, a spiral galaxy 20 million light-years from home. Image credits: NASA/ESA Space Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 17:15 Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator (Inside Science) – In the February slid
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The Scientist RSS

Russian Sites Promote Anti-GMO Articles, Study FindsRT and Sputnik publish stories about GMOs more often than US outlets, and typically portray them in a negative light.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

A new species of tardigrade lays eggs covered with doodads and streamersThese elegant eggs hint that a tardigrade found in a Japanese parking lot is a new species.
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Big Think

Human brains can recover after flatlining, study suggestsThe findings could help medical professionals better determine the official time of brain death, and might have implications on the protocols for organ donation. Read More
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Signal detected from 'cosmic dawn'Scientists observe a signature on the sky from the very first stars to shine in the Universe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers create more complete picture of freshwater toxic algal bloomsUsing two different measurement methods, researchers from North Carolina State University conducted a two-year study of North Carolina's Jordan Lake in which they monitored toxic algal blooms. The researchers found that multiple cyanotoxins from toxic algal blooms are present year-round, albeit in very low concentrations. Their findings could improve the ability to predict toxic blooms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More than just a cosmetic procedure -- 'tummy tuck' reduces back pain and incontinenceIn addition to restoring the pre-pregnancy shape of the abdomen, abdominoplasty ('tummy tuck') surgery with muscle repair can improve back pain and urinary incontinence after childbearing, reports a study in the March issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Facebook jobs service spreading to more countriesFacebook on Wednesday announced that its year-old job-hunting service is expanding to dozens more countries, aiming to connect members with local work.
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New Scientist - News

NASA’s huge planet-hunting space telescope likely delayed againThe James Webb Space Telescope, currently slated for launch in 2019, is facing technical difficulties and budget overruns that might push back its launch date
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Californians bash Trump for bid to end climate change planCalifornia stands in "complete opposition" to a Trump administration plan to scrap a policy slashing climate-changing emissions from power plants, its top air official said Wednesday at a U.S. hearing in a state helping lead the fight against global warming.
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Without a HopeToday in 5 Lines During a meeting with lawmakers, President Trump accused some Republicans of being “petrified of the NRA” and said that authorities should “take the guns first, go through due process second.” Hope Hicks said she’s resigning as White House communications director. Attorney General Jeff Sessions pushed back after Trump rebuked him on Twitter for calling on the inspector general to
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Scientific American Content: Global

All Talk, No Bolt-Action: Gun Injuries Drop During NRA ConventionsA study pokes holes in the idea that experienced firearm users are less likely to injure themselves -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Opioid crisis affects children and teens too -- Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics outlines strategies to reduce opioid prescribingChildren and adolescents undergoing surgery can be swept up in the ongoing opioid epidemic, according to a review and update in the Journal of Pediatric Orthopaedics, official journal of the Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America (POSNA). The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Getting a GRiP on chemoresistance: A review of GRP78 as a therapeutic target in cancerThe review article shows that elevated GRP78 expression is predictive of resistance to chemotherapy and tumor resurgence in many cancers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nut consumption may aid colon cancer survivalPeople with stage III colon cancer who regularly eat nuts are at significantly lower risk of cancer recurrence and mortality than those who don't, according to a new, large study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Can our eyes help predict who will develop memory loss?People whose eyes show signs of small changes in blood vessels at age 60 may be more likely to develop thinking and memory problems by the time they are 80 than people with healthy eyes, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Fish oil and probiotic supplements in pregnancy may reduce risk of childhood allergiesWomen who take fish oil supplements and probiotics in later pregnancy may reduce their child's risk of food allergy and eczema, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Six decades of cosmologyAn expert shares his personal reminiscences of the evolution of the subject of cosmology over six decades. He tells of the increase in our confidence in the standard model of cosmology to the extent that it has become a dogma.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Bitcoin billionaire? Don't forget the IRSCryptocurrencies like bitcoin may not be regulated by the government, but they're still subject to being taxed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Spotify's music service seeks to drum up $1 billion in IPOMusic-streaming pioneer Spotify is hoping to attract a new crowd of fans on Wall Street to help fend off a growing competitive threat posed by Apple.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Botox' improves appearance of facial scars in reconstructive surgeryIn patients undergoing reconstructive surgery of the face, treatment with botulinum toxin A (BTX-A, or 'Botox') can improve the final appearance of surgical scars, reports a clinical trial in the March issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study first to demonstrate brain mechanisms that give The Iceman unusual resistance to coldDutch adventurer Wim Hof is known as 'The Iceman' for good reason. Hof established several world records for prolonged resistance to cold exposure, an ability he attributes to a self-developed set of techniques of breathing and meditation -- known as the Wim Hof Method. Yet, how his brain responds during cold exposure and what brain mechanisms may endow him with this resistance have not been studi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

ALS-linked protein's journey into nervous system cells more complex than we thoughtScientists have developed a better understanding of a key protein associated with brain diseases including ALS (motor neuron disease) and dementia by studying how it enters central nervous system cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Water in the chest: New findings on pleural effusionLung cancer patients are particularly susceptible to malignant pleural effusion, when fluid collects in the space between the lungs and the chest wall. Researchers have discovered a novel mechanism that causes this to happen. Their study now refines the mechanistic picture.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Allergen chip: Allergies can even be identified in horsesAn allergen microchip can be used to identify allergic sensitization in horses. "Our best friends are more like us than we perhaps thought – even in terms of their immune system," explains lead author of the study.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Pesticides put bees at risk, European watchdog confirmsMost uses of insecticides known as neonicotinoids represent a risk to wild bees and honeybees, say European experts.
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Live Science

Cosmic Dawn: Astronomers Find Fingerprints of Universe's First StarsStars were lighting up the universe by just 180 million years after the Big Bang, a new study reports.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Researchers create tool to manage urban cat population crisisAccurate numbers are the cat's pyjamas when it comes to solving the current cat population crisis. But measuring the feline population has been difficult, until now.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

The fine-tuning of two-dimensional materialsA new understanding of why synthetic 2-D materials often perform orders of magnitude worse than predicted was reached by teams of researchers led by Penn State. They searched for ways to improve these materials' performance in future electronics, photonics, and memory storage applications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers create more complete picture of freshwater toxic algal bloomsUsing two different measurement methods, researchers from North Carolina State University conducted a two-year study of North Carolina's Jordan Lake in which they monitored toxic algal blooms. The researchers found that multiple cyanotoxins from toxic algal blooms are present year-round, albeit in very low concentrations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The fine-tuning of two-dimensional materialsA new understanding of why synthetic 2-D materials often perform orders of magnitude worse than predicted was reached by teams of researchers led by Penn State. They searched for ways to improve these materials' performance in future electronics, photonics, and memory storage applications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Nut consumption may aid colon cancer survivalPeople with stage III colon cancer who regularly eat nuts are at significantly lower risk of cancer recurrence and mortality than those who don't, according to a new, large study led by researchers at Yale Cancer Center.
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The Atlantic

Are Mexico's Elections Russia's Next Target?Amid the political firestorm over Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential elections here in the United States, it may have been easy to overlook the steady drip of warnings about a possible replay of Russian mischief-making right next door in Mexico. Back in December, National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster spoke ominously about “initial signs” of a trademark campaign of subversion, disinformat
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Watch NOAA's New GOES-S Weather Satellite Launch LiveAssuming the 11,500-pound spacecraft makes it into geostationary orbit safely, it'll go by GOES-17.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Disappearing act: Biologists document the secondary extinction of a disease-carrying mosquitoThe Asian tiger mosquito—carrier of such diseases as dengue, yellow fever, Rift Valley fever, Chikungunya and Zika—appears to have vanished from Palmyra.
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Feed: All Latest

You Can Find the Gravitational Constant with String and a MountainCalculating fundamental constants used to be a much harder job.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New mathematical framework establishes the risk of dramatic collapses of real networksA theoretical framework explaining the risk of rare events causing major disruptions in complex networks, such as a blackout in a power grid, has been proposed by a mathematician at Queen Mary University of London.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Land partnerships have high potential to preserve biodiversity as climate shiftsConservation partnerships between protected lands and their non-protected neighbors could significantly improve a region's ability to accommodate species migration in response to shifting climates, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New tardigrade species Macrobiotus shonaicus sp. nov. identified in JapanA new tardigrade species has been identified in Japan. Tardigrades are microscopic metazoans that are found all over the world.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New data helps explain recent fluctuations in Earth's magnetic fieldUsing new data gathered from sites in southern Africa, researchers have extended their record of Earth's magnetic field back thousands of years to the first millennium. The new data also provides more evidence that the region may play a unique role in magnetic pole reversals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Dressing atoms in an ultracold soupUsing lasers, US and Austrian physicists have coaxed atoms in an ultracold strontium gas into complex structures unlike any previously seen in nature. Researchers created 'Rydberg polarons' in a gas at least 1 million times colder than deep space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study offers blueprint for community-based public history researchA new paper on fieldwork in rural Belize serves as a case study for how an established anthropology fieldwork model can be used to both develop site-specific cultural and historical exhibits and train a new generation of public history scholars. The paper also highlights the importance of diversity to research teams when engaging in research - especially community-based scholarship.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Research details mineralogy of potential lunar exploration siteA detailed study of a giant impact crater on the Moon's far side could provide a roadmap for future lunar explorers.
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The Atlantic

West Virginia's Teachers Are Not SatisfiedUpdated on March 1, 2018 at 10:23 a.m. MARTINSBURG, W. Va.—Although West Virginia governor Jim Justice on Tuesday at last signaled an end to the standoff that has kept all the state’s public-school employees and students out of classrooms for a week, teachers remain on strike and schools are still closed. After a town-hall circuit throughout the state, the Republican governor at a press conferenc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NASA space laser completes 2,000-mile road tripOnce in orbit after it launches this fall, NASA's ICESat-2 satellite will travel at speeds faster than 15,000 miles per hour. Last week, the satellite's instrument began its journey toward space riding a truck from Maryland to Arizona, never exceeding 65 mph.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

What happens in the brain during unconsciousness?Researchers are shining a light on the darkness of the unconscious brain. Three new studies add to the body of knowledge.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mineralogy of potential lunar exploration siteScientists have long wanted to retrieve rock samples from the Moon's South Pole-Aitken basin, and a new study could be helpful in locating an ideal landing site.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new way to combine soft materialsResearchers have developed a new method to chemically bond multiple soft materials independent of the manufacturing process. In principle, the method can be applied in any manufacturing processes, including but 3D printing and coating. This technique opens door to manufacturing more complex soft machines.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sample storage method could improve health care in resource-limited regionsBlood and urine tests play vital roles in modern medicine. Yet in vast regions of the world where refrigeration is not available, preserving samples for testing is virtually impossible. Now scientists report that encapsulating indicators of disease from samples in tiny metal-organic hybrid structures could help. They say finding could lead to better health care in resource-limited countries.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Accelerating studies on carbohydrate biologyThe breakthrough may expand research on the roles of glycans in human diseases, including cancers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Home-based blood pressure monitoring should be commonplaceGeneral Practitioners should encourage patients with hypertension to monitor their blood pressure at home and use those readings in their day-to-day care, recommend a team of experts.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Human skin bacteria have cancer-fighting powersStrains of a bacteria that live on human skin make a compound that suppressed tumor growth in mice.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Soil cannot halt climate changeUnique soils data from long-term experiments, stretching back to the middle of the nineteenth century, confirm the practical implausibility of burying carbon in the ground to halt climate change, an option once heralded as a breakthrough.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Black holes from small galaxies might emit gamma raysAs a general rule of thumb, if there is a puzzling phenomenon occurring somewhere deep in outer space, a black hole is often the culprit behind it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A new way to combine soft materialsEvery complex human tool, from the first spear to latest smartphone, has contained multiple materials wedged, tied, screwed, glued or soldered together. But the next generation of tools, from autonomous squishy robots to flexible wearables, will be soft. Combining multiple soft materials into a complex machine requires an entirely new toolbox—after all, there's no such thing as a soft screw.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Startup commercializes MRI device that could enhance medical diagnosticsA Purdue-affiliated startup, MR-Link LLC, is developing a coin-sized, affordable device that once inserted into existing MRI machines could allow researchers and medical professionals to perform multiple imaging scans at once and more efficiently and effectively understand a patient's physiology.
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Popular Science

We shouldn't disregard the ideas that come from teens' developing brainsScience Teens may be works in progress, but they help society evolve. Adolescents are certainly in a state of emotional and physical flux, but we should still listen to their hard-earned reflections.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Biologists document the secondary extinction of a disease-carrying mosquito following rat eradication on Palmyra AtollThe Asian tiger mosquito -- carrier of such diseases as dengue, yellow fever, Rift Valley fever, Chikungunya and Zika -- appears to have vanished from Palmyra.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Black holes from small galaxies might emit gamma raysResearchers have discovered seven galaxies that could shake up what astrophysicists thought they knew about how the size of a galaxy -- and the black hole at its center -- can affect its behavior.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Soil cannot halt climate changeUnique soils data from long-term experiments, stretching back to the middle of the nineteenth century, confirm the practical implausibility of burying carbon in the ground to halt climate change. The idea of using crops to collect more atmospheric carbon and locking it into soil's organic matter to offset fossil fuel emissions was launched at COP21, the 21st annual Conference of Parties to review
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

As summers get warmer, more rain may not be better than lessWarm, wet summers are historically unusual and could bring unexpected disruptions to ecosystems and society, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

For girls who mature early, psychological problems last into adulthoodTracking nearly 8,000 girls from adolescence through their late 20s - far longer than other studies have - a researcher says girls who get their periods earlier than peers are likely to experience depression and antisocial behavior well into adulthood.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Anxiety as a protective factor after a heart attackFear protects people from danger. A team has discovered that this applies even to pathological anxiety disorders. Patients who generally suffer from severe anxiety are likely to heed the symptoms of a heart attack earlier and seek medical treatment sooner, thus improving their chance of survival.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

As summers get warmer, more rain may not be better than lessWarm, wet summers are historically unusual and could bring unexpected disruptions to ecosystems and society, according to new research from the University of British Columbia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

What happens in the brain during unconsciousness?Researchers at Michigan Medicine are shining a light on the darkness of the unconscious brain. Three new studies add to the body of knowledge.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Research details mineralogy of potential lunar exploration siteScientists have long wanted to retrieve rock samples from the Moon's South Pole-Aitken basin, and a new study by researchers from Brown University could be helpful in locating an ideal landing site.
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Big Think

New technique brings us one step closer to mind readingCanadian researchers have successfully reconstructed faces from data in brain scans. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Personalizing wearable devicesWhen it comes to soft, assistive devices the wearer and the robot need to be in sync. But every human moves a bit differently and tailoring the robot's parameters for an individual user is a time-consuming and inefficient process. Now, researchers have developed an efficient machine learning algorithm that can quickly tailor personalized control strategies for soft, wearable exosuits.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Moms who co-sleep beyond six months may feel more depressed, judgedMoms who continue to co-sleep -- by sharing either a room or bed -- with their infants past six months were more likely to feel depressed, worried about their babies' sleep and think their decisions were being criticized, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Search for first stars uncovers 'dark matter'New research offers the first direct proof that dark matter exists and that it is composed of low-mass particles.
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How to Turn Off Facebook's Face Recognition FeaturesFacebook Job PeopleFacebook recently expanded its face recognition features—and you may have opted in without even realizing it.
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Big Think

We need the singular ‘they’ – and it won’t seem wrong for long"Enforcing language norms is a way of enforcing power structures." Read More
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Big Think

Astronomers detect earliest evidence yet of hydrogen in the universeThe scientists have traced the signals to just 180 million years after the Big Bang, making the detection the earliest evidence of hydrogen yet observed. Read More
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The Atlantic

Photos: The "Beast From the East" Freezes EuropeA blast of freezing weather called the “Beast from the East” has gripped most of Europe this week, causing more than 24 deaths and bringing snowstorms and icy conditions as far south as the Mediterranean—in fact, parts of the Arctic were warmer than Europe this week. While temperatures are expected to return to normal by the end of the week, people are still struggling to cope with weather condit
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Moms who co-sleep beyond six months may feel more depressed, judgedMoms who continue to co-sleep -- by sharing either a room or bed -- with their infants past six months were more likely to feel depressed, worried about their babies' sleep and think their decisions were being criticized, according to Penn State researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Patients may live longer after hip replacement, study suggestsHip replacement surgery not only improves quality of life but is also associated with increased life expectancy, compared to people of similar age and sex, reports a study in Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research® (CORR®), a publication of The Association of Bone and Joint Surgeons®. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
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Live Science

World's Biggest Plane Taxis Closer to TakeoffA new milestone for the world's biggest plane rolls it closer to leaving the ground.
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Live Science

America's Tallest Mountain Has a Serious Human Poop ProblemDenali, the United States' tallest mountain, has issued new regulations to stop the accumulating mountain of human poop from contaminating local water sources.
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Big Think

Are humans domesticated animals?If the neural crest hypothesis is correct, humans are the first domesticated animals. But who, or what, tamed us? Read More
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Popular Science

Kids can be citizen scientists, too—here's howScience You might even make a major discovery. Set up your citizen science laboratory. All it takes is a smartphone and some curiosity.
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Live Science

An Even-Weirder-Than-Usual Tardigrade Just Turned Up in a Parking LotThe world's newest species of water bear has eight legs and eggs covered with tentacles.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Personalizing wearable devicesWhen it comes to soft, assistive devices the wearer and the robot need to be in sync. But every human moves a bit differently and tailoring the robot's parameters for an individual user is a time-consuming and inefficient process. Now, Harvard researchers have developed an efficient machine learning algorithm that can quickly tailor personalized control strategies for soft, wearable exosuits.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

University of Guelph researchers create tool to manage urban cat population crisisGuelph researchers have developed a unique model that accurately calculates urban cat populations. It's the first to account for overall cat population dynamics and include calculations for the three subpopulations -- owned cats, stray cats, and cats in the shelter system.There are about 10 million to 120 million free-roaming and feral cats in North America. This model will give cities the accurat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Fish oil and probiotic supplements in pregnancy may reduce risk of childhood allergiesWomen who take fish oil supplements and probiotics in later pregnancy may reduce their child's risk of food allergy and eczema, according to new research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers find new target on lethal brain tumor that can be hunted by immune cellsUNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers and collaborators report they modified immune cells to hunt brain tumors displaying a new molecular target, which they determined is highly prevalent on brain cancer cells. They believe their approach holds promise for a new immunotherapy treatment for glioblastoma, which is the most lethal primary brain tumor.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Implantable machines measure heart functionScientists have devised a method to obtain critical information about cardiac function -- using machines that help failing hearts circulate blood.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Are government controls on indigenous caribou hunting warranted?Although governance has restricted indigenous hunting of caribou in northern Canada and Alaska, a new study finds that there is no evidence that indigenous harvesting practices have had a negative impact on caribou populations. Rather, their subsistence harvesting has had a positive association with caribou populations, and the greater problem contributing to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Beneficial skin bacteria protect against skin cancerScience continues to peel away layers of the skin microbiome to reveal its protective properties. In a study published in Science Advances on Feb. 28, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers report a potential new role for some bacteria on the skin: protecting against cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Glowing molecule can reveal live tuberculosis bacteriaA new technique may one day allow fast, simple detection of the bacteria that causes TB, as well as a way to monitor whether drugs are working.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Land partnerships have high potential to preserve biodiversity as climate shiftsConservation partnerships between protected lands and their non-protected neighbors could significantly improve a region's ability to accommodate species migration in response to shifting climates, according to a study published Feb. 28, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by William Monahan of the US National Park Service and David Theobald of Conservation Science Partners, Inc., US.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New tardigrade species Macrobiotus shonaicus sp. nov. identified in JapanA new tardigrade species has been identified in Japan, according to a study published February 28, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Daniel Stec from the Jagiellonian University, Poland, and colleagues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New tardigrade species Macrobiotus shonaicus sp. nov. identified in JapanA new tardigrade species has been identified in Japan, according to a study published February 28, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Daniel Stec from the Jagiellonian University, Poland, and colleagues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Land partnerships have high potential to preserve biodiversity as climate shiftsConservation partnerships between protected lands and their non-protected neighbors could significantly improve a region's ability to accommodate species migration in response to shifting climates, according to a study published February 28, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by William Monahan of the U.S. National Park Service and David Theobald of Conservation Science Partners, Inc., U.S.
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New Scientist - News

Bacteria on our bodies may be protecting us from skin cancerWe are covered in bacteria, but some of it is good for us. One strain makes a molecule that protects against skin cancer and shrinks tumours in mice
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New Scientist - News

Genetically engineered cells can seek and destroy brain cancerBrain cancers are particularly difficult to treat, but at last there’s hope that a technique that has worked for some other cancers could treat glioblastoma
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New Scientist - News

Probiotics and fish oil in pregnancy may reduce child allergiesProbiotic and fish oil supplements have been linked to a lower likelihood of eczema and some food allergies, but pregnant women should still avoid cod liver oil
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Science | The Guardian

Common human skin bacteria could protect against cancer, say researchersStaphylococcus epidermidis may help to protect against skin cancer, and could lead to preventive treatments, scientists reveal A type of bacteria commonly found on human skin produces a substance that may help protect against skin cancer , researchers have revealed. The scientists say the surprise discovery regarding a strain of Staphylococcus epidermidis highlights the importance of the communit
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Latest Headlines | Science News

A new way to make bacteria glow could simplify TB screeningA new dye to stain tuberculosis bacteria in coughed-up mucus and saliva could expedite TB diagnoses and drug-resistance tests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

'Obesity paradox' debunkedA new study debunks the 'obesity paradox,' a counterintuitive finding that showed people who have been diagnosed with cardiovascular disease live longer if they are overweight or obese compared with people who are normal weight at the time of diagnosis. Obese people live shorter lives and have a greater proportion of life with cardiovascular disease, the study reports.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Aspirin lowers risk of early death for patients with diabetes, heart failureFor people living with both Type 2 diabetes and heart failure, taking an aspirin each day appears to lower the risk of dying or being hospitalized for heart failure, according to new research. But the data also reveal aspirin use may increase the risk of nonfatal heart attack or stroke, a somewhat contradictory finding that surprised researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Breastfeeding may have long-term heart health benefits for some momsWomen with normal blood pressure during pregnancy and who breastfed their babies for at least six months following birth had better markers of cardiovascular health years later compared to women who never breastfed. The same benefits were not observed in women who had high blood pressure during pregnancy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Getting flu vaccine cuts risk of early death by half in people with heart failureFor people with heart failure, getting a seasonal influenza (flu) vaccine in a given year was associated with a 50 percent drop in the risk of death during flu season and a 20 percent drop in the risk of death during the rest of the year, according to new research.
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The Atlantic

Is Eastern Ghouta Worse Than Aleppo?The guns didn’t fall silent in Eastern Ghouta on Wednesday—despite a five-hour pause ordered by the Russian government to allow medical and humanitarian-aid deliveries into the rebel-held area outside Damascus, the Syrian capital. It was the second day the besieged area was supposed to experience such a brief pause, but the continuing violence and the condition of the roads means that little to n
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The Atlantic

Why is Nigeria Experiencing a Record-High Outbreak of Lassa Fever?In 1969, an American missionary nurse named Laura Wine came down with a troubling fever while working in the Nigerian town of Lassa. The local doctors thought it was probably malaria, but Wine didn’t respond to the usual treatments. She eventually died. Shortly after, two more nurses contracted the same mysterious disease. One also died. The other, Lily Pinneo , was evacuated to Columbia-Presbyte
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Scientific American Content: Global

Astronomers Glimpse Signposts of Universe's First StarsA simple signal confirms the existence of stars just 180 million years after the big bang, and reveals new hints about the nature of dark matter -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dressing atoms in an ultracold soupUsing lasers, US and Austrian physicists have coaxed atoms in an ultracold strontium gas into complex structures unlike any previously seen in nature. Researchers from Rice University, Harvard and the Vienna University of Technology created 'Rydberg polarons' in a gas at least 1 million times colder than deep space.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Search for first stars uncovers 'dark matter'New research from a Tel Aviv University astrophysicist, published today in Nature, offers the first direct proof that dark matter exists and that it is composed of low-mass particles.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New data helps explain recent fluctuations in Earth's magnetic fieldUsing new data gathered from sites in southern Africa, researchers have extended their record of Earth's magnetic field back thousands of years to the first millennium. The new data also provides more evidence that the region may play a unique role in magnetic pole reversals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NASA space laser completes 2,000-mile road tripOnce in orbit after it launches this fall, NASA's ICESat-2 satellite will travel at speeds faster than 15,000 miles per hour. Last week, the satellite's instrument began its journey toward space riding a truck from Maryland to Arizona, never exceeding 65 mph.
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Science : NPR

Did Dark Matter Make The Early Universe Chill Out?A new study suggests that the early universe got an unexpectedly cold start, and that dark matter may be to blame. (Image credit: N.R.Fuller/National Science Foundation/Nature)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A lithium battery that operates at -70 degrees Celsius, a record lowResearchers in China have developed a battery with organic compound electrodes that can function at -70 degrees Celsius -- far colder than the temperature at which lithium-ion batteries lose most of their ability to conduct and store energy. The findings could aid engineers in developing technology suited to withstand the coldest reaches of outer space or the most frigid regions on Earth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Modern volcanism tied to events occurring soon after Earth's birthPlumes of hot magma from the volcanic hotspot that formed Réunion Island in the Indian Ocean rise from an unusually primitive source deep beneath the Earth's surface. The mantle differentiation event preserved in these hotspot plumes can both teach scientists about early Earth geochemical processes and explain the mysterious seismic signatures created by dense deep-mantle zones.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genomic analysis underscores need for precision therapies that target pediatric cancerNew research offers the most comprehensive analysis yet of the genomic alterations leading to cancer in children and affirms the need for pediatric-specific precision therapies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New-found stem cell helps regenerate lung tissue after acute injuryResearchers have identified a lung stem cell that repairs the organ's gas exchange compartment. They isolated and characterized these progenitor cells from mouse and human lungs and demonstrated they are essential to repairing lung tissue damaged by severe influenza and other respiratory ailments.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Why premature cell division promotes cancersThe accumulation of mutations in the human genome is at the origin of cancers, as well as the development of resistance to treatments. The Cyclin E and Myc genes are active in the control of cell division. Biologists show that precocious entry of the genome into the replication phase leads to molecular collisions occurring on the DNA and induces new mutations.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

3-D simulations reveal synergistic mechanisms of the human heartScientists have introduced a new model that examines the mutual interaction of the blood flow with the individual components of the heart. Their work stands out by offering a more holistic and accurate picture of the dynamics of blow flow in the left ventricle, which could give clues to better prevention of cardiac conditions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Negative childhood experiences can lead people to believe in conspiracy theoriesBelief in conspiracy theories stems -- in part -- from negative early childhood experiences with caregivers, new research has shown.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Genetics or lifestyle: What is it that shapes our microbiome?Some microbiome researchers had suggested that this variation begins with differences in our genes; but a large-scale study challenges this idea and provides evidence that the connection between microbiome and health may be even more important than we thought.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flipside of a dinosaur mystery: 'Bloat-and-float' explains belly-up ankylosaur fossilsWhy are fossil remains of ankylosaurs -- armored 'tanks of the Cretaceaous' -- usually found belly-up? A paleontologist proposes the explanation is 'bloat-and-float', where the dead dinos would float downstream, bloat, flip upside down, and be fossilized that way.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Mapping the neural circuit governing thirstThere are few feelings more satisfying than gulping down water when you are thirsty. But how does your brain know when you are dehydrated or satiated, and how does it use this information to initiate or terminate drinking?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Number of people killed by animals each year in the US remains unchangedA new study released in the latest issue of Wilderness & Environmental Medicine shows that animal encounters remain a considerable cause of human harm and death. Researchers analyzed fatalities in the United States from venomous and nonvenomous animals from 2008-2015. They found that while many deaths from animal encounters are potentially avoidable, mortality rates did not decrease from 2008-2015
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New Scientist - News

The moon may have formed in a vaporised, doughnut-shaped EarthEarly Earth may have been smashed into a vapour by a Mars-sized object. Our moon may have formed at the edges of the leftover doughnut-shaped cloud of debris
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Hidde Ploegh (Boston Children’s Hospital) 2: Unusual Antibody Fragments: The Camelid NanobodiesDr. Ploegh describes how antibody diversity lets us resist the multitude of infectious agents we encounter every day. He also explains how camelid antibody fragments are changing medicine. https://www.ibiology.org/immunology/antibody-diversity/ Talk Overview: How does our immune system protect us against all of the infectious agents and foreign substances we encounter? Much of the answer lies in
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube

Hidde Ploegh (Boston Children’s Hospital) 1: Immunology: The Basics of Antibody DiversityDr. Ploegh describes how antibody diversity lets us resist the multitude of infectious agents we encounter every day. He also explains how camelid antibody fragments are changing medicine. https://www.ibiology.org/immunology/antibody-diversity/ Talk Overview: How does our immune system protect us against all of the infectious agents and foreign substances we encounter? Much of the answer lies in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Black holes from small galaxies might emit gamma raysResearchers from Clemson University have discovered seven galaxies that could shake up what astrophysicists thought they knew about how the size of a galaxy -- and the black hole at its center -- can affect its behavior.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A new way to combine soft materialsResearchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) have developed a new method to chemically bond multiple soft materials independent of the manufacturing process. In principle, the method can be applied in any manufacturing processes, including but 3D printing and coating. This technique opens door to manufacturing more complex soft machines.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Disappearing actThe Asian tiger mosquito -- carrier of such diseases as dengue, yellow fever, Rift Valley fever, Chikungunya and Zika -- appears to have vanished from Palmyra.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

As summers get warmer, more rain may not be better than lessWarm, wet summers are historically unusual and could bring unexpected disruptions to ecosystems and society, according to new research from the University of British Columbia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study offers blueprint for community-based public history researchA new paper on fieldwork in rural Belize serves as a case study for how an established anthropology fieldwork model can be used to both develop site-specific cultural and historical exhibits and train a new generation of public history scholars. The paper also highlights the importance of diversity to research teams when engaging in research - especially community-based scholarship.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New mathematical framework establishes the risk of dramatic collapses of real networksA theoretical framework explaining the risk of rare events causing major disruptions in complex networks, such as a blackout in a power grid, has been proposed by a mathematician at Queen Mary University of London.
1d

EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Soil cannot halt climate changeUnique soils data from long-term experiments, stretching back to the middle of the nineteenth century, confirm the practical implausibility of burying carbon in the ground to halt climate change. The idea of using crops to collect more atmospheric carbon and locking it into soil's organic matter to offset fossil fuel emissions was launched at COP21, the 21st annual Conference of Parties to review
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Live Science

Black People Were Enslaved in the US Until as Recently as 1963White landowners enslaved black Americans for at least a century after the Civil War.
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Science | The Guardian

Howard Rees obituaryMy former colleague Howard Rees, who has died aged 89, was the chief veterinary officer who dealt with the problem of salmonella in eggs in the 1980s and introduced the measures that eventually saw off the problem of BSE in cattle . He was widely regarded as the most able veterinary public servant of his generation. On retirement in 1988 he became president of the World Organisation for Animal He
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

NIST sharpens the 'Charpy' test for more precise impacts on industrial materialsA decade before an iceberg shattered the hull plates of the Titanic and half a century before a plague of brittle fractures started sinking Liberty ships during World War II, scientists in the United States and France had devised a novel, and strikingly simple, method for measuring the way metal reacts to impact.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Don't want to lose a finger? Let a robot give a handIn an effort to minimize injury and let carpenters focus on design and other bigger-picture tasks, a team has created AutoSaw, a system that lets you customize different items that can then be constructed with the help of robots.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Within 180 million years of the Big Bang, stars were bornAfter 12 years of experimental effort, a team of scientists, led by Arizona State University astronomer Judd Bowman, has detected the fingerprints of the earliest stars in the universe. Using radio signals, the detection provides the first evidence for the oldest ancestors in our cosmic family tree, born by a mere 180 million years after the universe began.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Missing link found between pathways involved in cell developmentA new mechanism that coordinates human development in response to signals from outside the cell has been discovered. The study revealed that the SMAD2/3 proteins link and coordinate many different pathways in the cell that were previously believed to be separate and fine-tune the processes needed for embryo development and growth.
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The Scientist RSS

Environment, Not Genetics, Primarily Shapes Microbiome CompositionIncluding microbiome composition in predictions of whether a person is obese can significantly improve their accuracy, according to an analysis.
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The Scientist RSS

Paradise Regained: How the Palmyra Atoll Got Rid of Invasive MosquitoesThe elimination of the biting pests was an added bonus after researchers unleashed a rat-eradication endeavor on the tiny islands.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New TSRI method accelerates studies on carbohydrate biologyFeb. 28, 2018—Nearly every living cell is studded with branching chains of carbohydrates called glycans. Glycans play diverse roles in shaping how a cell interacts with its environment.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Obesity not a risk factor for acute respiratory illnesses, study findsAlthough obesity has been considered a risk factor for more-severe cases of the flu, a new study found that it is not a risk factor for severe acute respiratory illnesses, including the flu, in children or adults.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Mapping the neural circuit governing thirstCaltech researchers discover the wiring of the circuit in the mouse brain that drives and quenches thirst.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genetics or lifestyle: What is it that shapes our microbiome?Some microbiome researchers had suggested that this variation begins with differences in our genes; but a large-scale study conducted at the Weizmann Institute of Science challenges this idea and provides evidence that the connection between microbiome and health may be even more important than we thought.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astronomers detect ancient signal from first stars in universe.For the first time, astronomers have detected a signal from stars emerging in the early universe. Using a radio antenna not much larger than a refrigerator, the researchers discovered that ancient suns were active within 180 million years of the Big Bang.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New-found stem cell helps regenerate lung tissue after acute injury, finds Penn studyResearchers have identified a lung stem cell that repairs the organ's gas exchange compartment. They isolated and characterized these progenitor cells from mouse and human lungs and demonstrated they are essential to repairing lung tissue damaged by severe influenza and other respiratory ailments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New stem cell found in lung, may offer target for regenerative medicineNewly identified stem cells in the lung that multiply rapidly after a pulmonary injury may offer an opportunity for innovative future treatments that harness the body's ability to regenerate. Scientists describe cells that could become a new tool to treat lung diseases across the lifespan, from premature infants to the elderly.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Missing link found between pathways involved in cell developmentA new mechanism that coordinates human development in response to signals from outside the cell has been discovered by researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the Wellcome -- MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute. Reported in Nature, the study revealed that the SMAD2/3 proteins link and coordinate many different pathways in the cell that were previously believed to be separate and fine-tune t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Unlocking the secrets of the universeAfter 12 years of experimental effort, a team of scientists, led by Arizona State University astronomer Judd Bowman, has detected the fingerprints of the earliest stars in the universe. Using radio signals, the detection provides the first evidence for the oldest ancestors in our cosmic family tree, born by a mere 180 million years after the universe began.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Precision maps reveal significant health and education disparities within African nationsA new scientific study finds that while nearly all nations in Africa have at least one region where children's health is improving, not a single country is expected to end childhood malnutrition by 2030, an objective of the relevant United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (SDG).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Astronomers detect earliest evidence yet of hydrogen in the universeMIT and ASU astronomers have detected the earliest signs of hydrogen in the universe, suggesting first stars appeared around 180 million years after the Big Bang.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Modern volcanism tied to events occurring soon after Earth's birthPlumes of hot magma from the volcanic hotspot that formed Réunion Island in the Indian Ocean rise from an unusually primitive source deep beneath the Earth's surface. The mantle differentiation event preserved in these hotspot plumes can both teach scientists about early Earth geochemical processes and explain the mysterious seismic signatures created by dense deep-mantle zones.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genomic analysis underscores need for precision therapies that target pediatric cancerResearch led by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital offers the most comprehensive analysis yet of the genomic alterations leading to cancer in children and affirms the need for pediatric-specific precision therapies
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

EU food agency says three pesticides harm bees as ban calls growThe European food safety watchdog said Wednesday that three pesticides currently partly banned in the EU pose a risk to wild bees and honey bees, in a long-awaited report.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Physicists build bizarre molecules called 'Rydberg polarons'Using lasers, U.S. and Austrian physicists have coaxed ultracold strontium atoms into complex structures unlike any previously seen in nature.
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Inside Science

Astronomers Catch Faint Message from Universe’s First StarsAstronomers Catch Faint Message from Universe’s First Stars Signal hints at possible interactions between ordinary hydrogen and dark matter in the early universe, but some scientists remain skeptical. FirstStars_topNteaser.jpg Artist's rendering of how the first stars in the universe may have looked. Image credits: N.R. Fuller, National Science Foundation Space Wednesday, February 28, 2018 - 13:0
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New Scientist - News

Rich-poor divide in past flu pandemics must guide strategy todayWe ignore the social factors that have shaped death rates in flu pandemics over the past century at our peril, warns Laura Spinney
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New Scientist - News

Unsafe sex and STIs are rising when they really shouldn’t beDating apps, fading fears of HIV and poor education have all been blamed for a rise in sexually transmitted infections. How do we get people to keep it clean?
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New Scientist - News

DeepMind AI is learning to understand the ‘thoughts’ of othersThe firm’s new artificial intelligence has developed a theory of mind, passing an important psychological assessment that most children only develop around age 4
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New Scientist - News

We have found traces of the universe’s first ever starsThe earliest stars left their mark on the hydrogen gas that drifts in deep space, and the same traces could also hint at the true nature of dark matter
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Google still under fire over EU anti-trust violationsRivals to Google urged the EU on Wednesday to keep up its fight against the search engine giant, saying proposals by the firm to avoid more EU mega-fines fell short.
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Science | The Guardian

Cosmic dawn: astronomers detect signals from first stars in the universe‘Revolutionary’ observations suggest the first stars appeared 180m years after the big bang – and may hold information on dark matter Astronomers have detected a signal from the first stars as they appeared and illuminated the universe, in observations that have been hailed as “revolutionary”. The faint radio signals suggest the universe was lifted out of total darkness 180m years after the big b
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Popular Science

The world's largest aircraft is lumbering toward its first flightAviation Recent taxi tests ramp up the speed of the world’s largest aircraft. The dual-fuselage, six-engine jet reached speeds up to 40 knots while cruising down Mojave Air and Space Port’s runway 30.
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NYT > Science

When Stars Were Born: Earliest Starlight’s Effects Are DetectedUsing a telescope in Australia, astronomers say they have glimpsed farther back in time than the Hubble Telescope to see what was happening when the first stars were forming.
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NYT > Science

Paul Allen Wants to Teach Machines Common SenseThe Microsoft co-founder will give $125 million to his nonprofit research lab to help develop technology that adds common sense to artificial intelligence.
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: You Get Thirsty and Drink. How Does Your Brain Signal You’ve Had Enough?Researchers have identified a set of neurons in mice that may explain the swift sensation of satisfaction that comes after a drink of water.
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NYT > Science

Arthur J. Moss, Who Pioneered Heart Treatments, Dies at 86He successfully conducted research into fatal cardiac disorders, including a rare genetic malfunction called long QT syndrome.
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Live Science

Ancient Greenland Shark Reveals Its Age in Eerie Underwater VideoScientists capture amazing underwater video of the biggest sharks, and some of the oldest, in the Arctic.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Modern volcanism tied to events occurring soon after Earth's birthPlumes of hot magma from the volcanic hotspot that formed Réunion Island in the Indian Ocean rise from an unusually primitive source deep beneath the Earth's surface, according to new work in Nature from Carnegie's Bradley Peters, Richard Carlson, and Mary Horan along with James Day of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Precision maps reveal significant health and education disparities within African nationsA new scientific study finds that while nearly all nations in Africa have at least one region where children's health is improving, not a single country is expected to end childhood malnutrition by 2030, an objective of the relevant United Nations Sustainable Development Goal (SDG).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Unlocking the secrets of the universeRadio Matter SignalLong ago, about 400,000 years after the beginning of the universe (the Big Bang), the universe was dark. There were no stars or galaxies, and the universe was filled primarily with neutral hydrogen gas.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Missing link found between pathways involved in cell developmentA new mechanism that coordinates human development in response to signals from outside the cell has been discovered by researchers at the Wellcome Sanger Institute and the Wellcome - MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute. Reported in Nature, the study revealed that the SMAD2 and SMAD3 proteins (SMAD2/3) link and coordinate many different pathways in the cell that were previously believed to be separat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Snapchat challenging Facebook among US youth: surveyFacebook remains the most popular social network among Americans but is facing a growing challenge from Snapchat for young audiences, a survey showed Wednesday.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Flood risk from American rivers is greatly underestimatedA groundbreaking new study has found that 41 million Americans are at risk from flooding rivers, which is more than three times the current estimate --- based on regulatory flood maps --- of 13 million people.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Growing severity of US firearm injuries requiring hospital admission since early 90sNew data show an annual increase in severity of non-fatal firearm injuries needing hospital admission across the United States since the early 1990s.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Newly discovered CRISPR mechanism may help prevent dangerous errorsResearchers report that they've figured out the mechanism by which the CRISPR gene-editing enzyme Cas9 determines where and when to cut DNA strands -- a discovery that could help prevent gene-cutting errors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Trapping multidrug-resistant bacteria in molecular glueResearchers have devised a novel approach to develop antibacterial drugs. With antibiotic resistance on the rise worldwide, such new drugs are urgently needed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Immune system activation in pregnant women can shape brain development in their babiesA landmark study reveals that activation of a pregnant mother's immune system can affect her baby's brain development. A team of researchers found that short- and long-term brain functioning can be influenced by immune system activity during the third trimester of gestation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

New evidence of nuclear fuel releases found at FukushimaUranium and other radioactive materials, such as caesium and technetium, have been found in tiny particles released from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

RNA-based therapy can reduce lung cancer in mouse models, study findsBy turning down the activity of a specific RNA molecule, researchers have reduced lung tumors in mice by 40-50 percent. The results represent the tip of the iceberg in an extensive research project in which 633 new biomarkers for 14 types of cancer have been identified.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

Here’s when the universe’s first stars may have been bornThe first stars lit the cosmos by 180 million years after the Big Bang, radio observations suggest.
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Science : NPR

Still Thirsty? It's Up To Your Brain, Not Your BodyThirst is what compels us to start hydrating. Now scientists have found a brain circuit in mice that seems to switch off thirst when they've taken in enough fluid and before it gets dangerous. (Image credit: Guido Mieth/Getty Images)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New TSRI method accelerates studies on carbohydrate biologyThe breakthrough may expand research on the roles of glycans in human diseases, including cancers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Number of people killed by animals each year in the US remains unchangedA new study released in the latest issue of Wilderness & Environmental Medicine shows that animal encounters remain a considerable cause of human harm and death. Researchers analyzed fatalities in the United States from venomous and nonvenomous animals from 2008-2015. They found that while many deaths from animal encounters are potentially avoidable, mortality rates did not decrease from 2008-2015
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lithium treatment for bipolar disorder linked to lowest risk of rehospitalisationIndividuals with bipolar disorder have the lowest risk of rehospitalisation if treated with lithium, according to a study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden published in JAMA Psychiatry. Long-acting injections of antipsychotics were also effective, reducing the risk of rehospitalisation by 30 per cent compared with their oral counterparts.
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Scientific American Content: Global

A Potentially Game-Changing Message from the Dawn of TimeAstronomers may have spotted, albeit indirectly, the very first starlight in the universe—plus some new evidence about the properties of dark matter -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

A Tantalizing Signal From the Early UniverseNear the beginning, not long after the Big Bang, the universe was a cold and dark place swirling with invisible gas, mostly hydrogen and helium. Over millions of years, gravity pulled some of this primordial gas into pockets. The pockets eventually became so dense they collapsed under their own weight and ignited, flooding the darkness with ultraviolet radiation. These were the very first stars i
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The Atlantic

They're Here to Fix Climate Change! They’re College Republicans.Consider the life of a current college sophomore, a 20-year-old. She was born in 1998, at the time the warmest year ever measured, when a monster El Niño pattern spawned floods and droughts around the world. Seven years later, as she started first grade, Hurricane Katrina inundated New Orleans, and 2005 set a new record as the warmest year ever measured. That record fell again as she started fift
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The Atlantic

The City of Coordinated LeisureEditor’s Note: In this short fiction, the science-fiction author Cory Doctorow imagines an urban future where technology helps citizens reorganize their daily habits from the ground up, to everyone’s benefit. When the parrots of Burbank, California, started screaming before the sun rose, you knew it was gonna be a hot one. Today was Wednesday, and for three mornings in a row, the parrots had roos
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Big Think

4G WiFi on the Moon? It’s coming as soon as next year“Earth to lunar surface… my, you’re looking very high definition today!” Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

'Near-religious' marketing fervour grips smartphone worldWith "near-religious" fervour, mobile phone industry players gathered this week at their annual trade fair in Barcelona are vaunting their positive impact on the world even if they are also timidly starting to address fears over the dark side of new technology.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Naked-eye detection of solvent vaporResearchers have developed a sensor based on porous crystalline fibers of a fluorescent dendrimer. The high porosity of the fibers increased their adsorption capacity, making their emission behavior highly sensitive to the presence of solvent vapor. Films of the dendrimer fibers displayed different emission colors depending on the polarity of the solvent vapors they were exposed to. Naked-eye sens
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The factors that most affect our immune systemWhy do we respond differently to infections or vaccines? Medical researchers have recently described immune variation on a large scale within the French population. To achieve this, the consortium studied an expansive collection of biological specimens from 1,000 French volunteers aged 20 to 69.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Maize fields entice geese to winter in DenmarkMore and more geese remain in Denmark for the winter. They forage in the growing number of maize fields all over the country. Researchers warn that, in the long term, the many geese may cause problems for agriculture.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Lightweight hyperspectral imagers bring sophisticated imaging capability to dronesIn a new study, researchers used 3-D printing and low-cost parts to create an inexpensive hyperspectral imager that is light enough to use onboard drones. They offer a recipe for creating these imagers, which could make the traditionally expensive analytical technique more widely accessible.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

No art or wood paneling—some law firms work in the cloudThere's no wood paneling or plush carpet at Culhane Meadows—the law firm's 52 attorneys practice out of their homes or rented work spaces.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sample storage method could improve health care in resource-limited regionsBlood and urine tests play vital roles in modern medicine. Yet in vast regions of the world where refrigeration is not available, preserving samples for testing is virtually impossible. Now in a study appearing in ACS' journal Chemistry of Materials, scientists report that encapsulating indicators of disease from samples in tiny metal-organic hybrid structures could help. They say finding could le
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Quanta Magazine

Elusive Higgs-Like State Created in Exotic MaterialsIf you want to understand the personality of a material, study its electrons. Table salt forms cubic crystals because its atoms share electrons in that configuration; silver shines because its electrons absorb visible light and reradiate it back. Electron behavior causes nearly all material properties: hardness, conductivity, melting temperature. Of late, physicists are intrigued by the way huge
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The Atlantic

Trump Thought the Rules Didn’t Apply—and Now He’s Paying the PriceSoon after Donald Trump became president, he began running into a whole set of rules about how government works, like demands that he divest assets or put them in a blind trust, and rules about whether he could hire family members for top jobs. For Trump, who had just won the election while disregarding most of the rules of political campaigning, these rules seemed antiquated at best and punitive
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New on MIT Technology Review

There’s a new way to have robots learn from their mistakes
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Number of people killed by animals each year in the US remains unchangedBites, kicks, and stings from farm animals, bees, wasps, hornets, and dogs continue to represent the most danger to humans, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Aqueous storage device needs only 20 seconds to goA research team developed a new hybrid energy storage device that can be charged in less than half a minute. It employs aqueous electrolytes instead of flammable organic solvents, so it is both environmentally friendly and safe. It also facilitates a boosting charge with high energy density, which makes it suitable for portable electronic devices.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Flipside of a dinosaur mystery: 'Bloat-and-float' explains belly-up ankylosaur fossilsA scientist with the Canadian Museum of Nature has answered a long-standing mystery about why fossils of ankylosaurs—the "armoured tanks" of the dinosaur world—are mainly found belly-side up. In doing so, he has ruled out three other competing theories involving clumsiness, predation, and the effects of bloating as seen in armadillo roadkills.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Popular Alaska peak weighs new rules for climbers' poopClimbers on North America's tallest mountain may have to start packing out more of their poop after a researcher determined a glacier in which much of it has been dumped over the past decade probably is not decomposing the human waste.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Six decades of cosmology"Cosmologists are often wrong but never in doubt," Russian physicist Lev Landau once said. In the early days, astronomers began by observing and modelling stars in different stages of evolution and comparing their findings with theoretical predictions. Stellar modelling uses well-tested physics, with concepts such as hydrostatic equilibrium, law of gravitation, thermodynamics, nuclear reactions et
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lacoste swaps its crocodile for logos of endangered speciesFrench fashion brand Lacoste on Wednesday swapped the crocodile logo on its shirts for the first time in its history for 10 of the most endangered species on the planet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Report: Russian group hacked German government networkGermany's dpa news agency reports that a Russian-backed hacker group has infiltrated the German government's secure computer networks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

For girls who mature early, psychological problems last into adulthoodTracking nearly 8,000 girls from adolescence through their late 20s - far longer than other studies have - a Cornell University researcher says girls who get their periods earlier than peers are likely to experience depression and antisocial behavior well into adulthood. The study, "Age at Menarche, Depression and Antisocial Behavior in Adulthood," was published Dec. 26, 2017, in Pediatrics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Flipside of a dinosaur mystery: 'Bloat-and-float' explains belly-up ankylosaur fossilsWhy are fossil remains of ankylosaurs -- armored 'tanks of the Cretaceaous' -- usually found belly-up? A Canadian Musuem of Nature paleontologist proposes the explanation is 'bloat-and-float', where the dead dinos would float downstream, bloat, flip upside down, and be fossilized that way. He rules out three other competing theories involving clumsiness, predation, and the effects of bloating as s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Six decades of cosmologyIn a recent paper published in EPJ H, Jayant V. Narlikar, professor emeritus at the Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Pune, India, shares his personal reminiscences of the evolution of the subject of cosmology over six decades. He tells of the increase in our confidence in the standard model of cosmology to the extent that it has become a dogma.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A lithium battery that operates at -70 degrees Celsius, a record lowResearchers in China have developed a battery with organic compound electrodes that can function at ?70 degrees Celsius -- far colder than the temperature at which lithium-ion batteries lose most of their ability to conduct and store energy. The findings, published February 28 in the journal Joule, could aid engineers in developing technology suited to withstand the coldest reaches of outer space
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Don't want to lose a finger? Let a robot give a handIn an effort to minimize injury and let carpenters focus on design and other bigger-picture tasks, a team from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have created AutoSaw, a system that lets you customize different items that can then be constructed with the help of robots.
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The Atlantic

'There Is No Place For Fear, Panic, or Mistakes'“At first, I did not like it,” says Johanna Nordblad, who holds the Guinness World Record for 50-meter free-diving, in a new short film from Ian Derry . “The cold was agony. But slowly, I got used to the feeling.” As Nordblad descends into the unforgiving subterranean world of the Arctic Ocean, she reveals the wherewithal necessary for free-diving under the ice. “There is no place for fear,” she
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Viden

Hader du lugten af sved? Så foretrækker du måske en autoritær lederFolk, der har svært ved at klare andres kropslugte, har en bestemt politisk holdning, viser ny undersøgelse. Forklaringen ligger i biologien, mener forskere.
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New Scientist - News

Surprise! Having a big brain really does mean having less muscleIt’s an evolutionary mystery how humans and other primates found the energy to support their large brains, but now it seems sacrificing some muscle might have helped
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Smart heat control of microchipsTechnological progress in the electronics sector, such as higher speeds, reduced costs, and smaller sizes, result in entirely new possibilities of automation and industrial production, without which “Industry 4.0” would not be feasible. In particular, miniaturization advanced considerably in the last years. Meanwhile, physical flow of a few electrons is sufficient to execute a software. But this p
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Our reactions to odor reveal our political attitudes, survey suggestsPeople who are easily disgusted by body odors are also drawn to authoritarian political leaders. A survey showed a strong connection between supporting a society led by a despotic leader and being sensitive to body odors like sweat or urine. It might come from a deep-seated instinct to avoid infectious diseases.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Negative childhood experiences can lead people to believe in conspiracy theoriesNegative childhood experiences can lead people to believe in conspiracy theories
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ALS-linked protein's journey into nervous system cells more complex than we thoughtUniversity of Bath scientists have developed a better understanding of a key protein associated with brain diseases including ALS (motor neurone disease) and dementia by studying how it enters central nervous system cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Sample storage method could improve health care in resource-limited regionsBlood and urine tests play vital roles in modern medicine. Yet in vast regions of the world where refrigeration is not available, preserving samples for testing is virtually impossible. Now in a study appearing in ACS' journal Chemistry of Materials, scientists report that encapsulating indicators of disease from samples in tiny metal-organic hybrid structures could help. They say finding could le
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The Atlantic

Letters: The Toll of High-Velocity BulletsAR-15 Ceremony PennsylvaniaWhat I Saw Treating the Victims From Parkland Should Change the Debate on Guns Heather Sher, a Florida radiologist, wrote last week about her experience in the emergency room after the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. “As a doctor,” she said, “I feel I have a duty to inform the public of what I have learned ... It’s clear to me that AR-15 or other high-velocity weapons, especiall
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The Atlantic

What Chadwick Boseman and Lupita Nyong'o Learned About WakandaThe following article contains major spoilers for Black Panther. Chadwick Boseman knows what many viewers have been thinking as they watch Black Panther —that maybe Erik Killmonger (Michael B. Jordan), the film’s ostensible villain, isn’t such a villain after all. That maybe Killmonger’s stated aim, to use the powerful technology and weaponry of the secluded African nation of Wakanda to liberate
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NYT > Science

Trilobites: No Sign of Newborn North Atlantic Whales This Breeding SeasonResearchers tracking the endangered species grounds for birthing calves haven’t seen one baby this season, further raising the specter of extinction for the whales.
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NYT > Science

Dutch Supermarket Introduces Plastic-Free AisleThe initiative, part of a global push to fight waste, saw about 700 products packaged in compostable materials or in glass, metal or cardboard.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Picasso's plans to build the world's tallest concrete sculpture uncovered in FloridaIt's been 50 years since world renowned artist Pablo Picasso (1881-1973) announced his vision to create the world's tallest and one of his final sculptures on the campus of the University of South Florida (USF) in Tampa. For the first time, a key researcher at USF has pieced together the project's historical significance with the discovery of a now obsolete audio reel (¼"x1200' 7'), which included
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BBC News - Science & Environment

England sees funding fall for energy-efficient homesIn the last five years, there has been an average of 32,000 excess winter deaths in the UK.
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New Scientist - News

Don’t hate all processed foods – they make modern life possibleThere's a danger that if society condemns all processed food as bad then research into its many potential benefits will be hampered, warns Nicola Temple
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Human dispersion through southern Europe took place less than one million years ago
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Science : NPR

Biometric Data And The Rise Of Digital DictatorshipAs historian and author Yuval Harari suggests, market forces and investor greed will keep moving the data revolution forward. But there are balancing forces to this onslaught, says Marcelo Gleiser. (Image credit: Getty Images/Hero Images)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lightweight hyperspectral imagers bring sophisticated imaging capability to dronesIn a new study, researchers used 3D printing and low-cost parts to create an inexpensive hyperspectral imager that is light enough to use onboard drones. They offer a recipe for creating these imagers, which could make the traditionally expensive analytical technique more widely accessible.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists confirm century-old speculation on the chemistry of a high-performance batteryScientists have discovered a novel chemical state of the element manganese. This chemical state, first proposed about 90 years ago, enables a high-performance, low-cost sodium-ion battery that could quickly and efficiently store and distribute energy produced by solar panels and wind turbines across the electrical grid.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers identify the types of genetic mutations associated with nephrotic syndromeBy analyzing the most common genetic variants, Brazilian scientists aim at improving diagnosis nad treatment for the disease, which presents high resistance to drugs as well as relapse in post-transplant scenario. The work made possible an in-depth study of the proteins involved in the glomerular filtration barrier, a structure which is damaged by the syndrome.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

RNA-based therapy cures lung cancer in mouse modelsBy turning down the activity of a specific RNA molecule researchers at Sahlgrenska Academy, Sweden, have cured lung tumors in mice by 40-50 percent. The results, published in Nature Communications, represent the tip of the iceberg in an extensive research project in which 633 new biomarkers for 14 types of cancer have been identified.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Dyes for 'live' extremophile labeling will help discover life on MarsScientists could not find a substance that would help them to observe halophiles 'live'. Instead, bacteria had to undergo harmful preparation before the study. Researchers described a solution to this issue. The experiments demonstrated that the new method helps not only to shot clear photos and count the cells but also to observe the transformation of halophiles. This method even can be used to e
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New graphene laser technique opens door for edible electronicsElectronics, the lifeblood of the modern world, could soon be part of our daily diet. In a study appearing in ACS Nano, scientists report that they have developed a way to write graphene patterns onto virtually any surface including food. They say the new technique could lay the groundwork for the edible electronics capable of tracing the progression of foods from farm to table, as well as detecti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New evidence of nuclear fuel releases found at FukushimaUranium and other radioactive materials, such as caesium and technetium, have been found in tiny particles released from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors.This could mean the environmental impact from the fallout may last much longer than previously expected according to a new study by a team of international researchers, including scientists from The University of Manchester.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Picasso's plans to build the world's tallest concrete sculpture uncovered in FloridaPablo Picasso's plans to build a 100-foot sculpture for the University of South Florida in Tampa are uncovered along with a recorded interview with famed collaborator Carl Nesjar and architectural drawings by world famous architect Paul Rudolph.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists pinpoint single letter of genetic code that makes African Salmonella so dangerousScientists have identified a single genetic change in Salmonella that is playing a key role in the devastating epidemic of bloodstream infections.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Pesticides are accumulated in the fat tissuePesticides are accumulated in bodies with high fat content. This conclusion was made by the scientists from the Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU) that have been studying seabirds and marine mammals of the Sea of Okhotsk and the Bering Sea for several years. The cycle of studies is supported by the Russian Science Foundation (No. 14-50-00034).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Negative childhood experiences can lead people to believe in conspiracy theoriesBelief in conspiracy theories stems -- in part -- from negative early childhood experiences with caregivers, new research has shown.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Water in the chest -- New findings on pleural effusionLung cancer patients are particularly susceptible to malignant pleural effusion, when fluid collects in the space between the lungs and the chest wall. Researchers at the Helmholtz Zentrum München, in partnership with the German Center for Lung Research (DZL), have discovered a novel mechanism that causes this to happen. Their study, published in 'Nature Communications', now refines the mechanisti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Newly discovered CRISPR mechanism may help prevent dangerous errorsresearchers at The Ohio State University report that they've figured out the mechanism by which the CRISPR gene-editing enzyme Cas9 determines where and when to cut DNA strands -- a discovery that could help prevent gene-cutting errors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making the moon: Study details new story for how the moon formedSimon Lock wants to change the way you think about the Moon.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A small pay increase can have big health benefits for lower-wage workersLower-wage workers who receive a $1 raise call in sick less and consider themselves healthier than those who do not, new UC Davis research on minimum-wage policies shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Landscape genetics branches out to help conserve riverside forestsScientists have examined gene flow in the endangered maple, Acer miyabei, using landscape genetics, a powerful and increasingly popular tool in conservation projects. It involves the integration of population genetics and landscape ecology, in order to examine how recent landscape changes, for example, habitat fragmentation, have affected the genetic diversity of species.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A small pay increase can have big health benefits for lower-wage workersLower-wage workers who receive a $1 raise call in sick less and consider themselves healthier than those who do not, new research on minimum-wage policies shows.
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Latest Headlines | Science News

When it comes to baby’s growth, early pregnancy weight may matter more than later gainsWomen’s weight before and during the first half of pregnancy may be most important indicators of baby’s birth weight.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Study reveals growing severity of US firearm injuries requiring hospital admission since early 90sNew data published in the journal Trauma Surgery & Acute Care Open today show an annual increase in severity of non-fatal firearm injuries needing hospital admission across the United States since the early 1990s.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Maize fields entice geese to winter in DenmarkMore and more geese remain in Denmark for the winter. They forage in the growing number of maize fields all over the country. Researchers warn that, in the long term, the many geese may cause problems for agriculture.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Common knee operation in elderly constitutes low value care, new study concludesA new Medicare records study by Johns Hopkins researchers has added to mounting evidence that a common surgery designed to remove damaged, worn ends of the thin rubbery cartilage in the knee joint brings little or no benefit to people over the age of 65.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Obesity paradox' debunkedA new study debunks the 'obesity paradox,' a counterintuitive finding that showed people who have been diagnosed with cardiovascular disease live longer if they are overweight or obese compared with people who are normal weight at the time of diagnosis. Obese people live shorter lives and have a greater proportion of life with cardiovascular disease, the study reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Genital surgery increases among transgender patients seeking gender-affirming surgeriesGenital surgery increased among transgender patients seeking gender-affirming surgeries and most patients paid out of pocket for the procedures.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Is obesity associated with having a shorter life?Obesity was associated with a shorter lifespan and an increased risk of illness and death from cardiovascular disease, and being overweight was associated with a lifespan similar to be being normal weight but a higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease younger.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Records study suggests gender affirming surgeries on the rise along with insurance coverageIn a national medical records analysis, researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine say there is evidence that the number of gender affirming surgeries performed in hospitals for transgender individuals is on the rise, along with increased access made possible by Medicare, Medicaid or private insurance coverage for the procedures.
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Popular Science

The right kind of pessimism can have a positive effect on your lifeHealth It's not all bad. Some people tend to see the glass as half empty rather than half full. Is being pessimistic always such a bad thing?
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Strategic plan for developing a universal influenza vaccineDeveloping a universal influenza vaccine -- a vaccine that can provide durable protection for all age groups against multiple strains, including those that might cause a pandemic -- is a public health priority.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists confirm century-old speculation on the chemistry of a high-performance batteryScientists have discovered a novel chemical state, first proposed about 90 years ago, that enables a high-performance, low-cost sodium-ion battery. The battery could quickly and efficiently store and distribute energy produced by solar panels and wind turbines across the electrical grid.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How the temperature of your nose shows how much strain you are underResearchers have demonstrated that facial temperatures, which can be easily measured using a non-invasive thermal camera, are strongly correlated to mental workload.
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The Atlantic

The GOP's Tax-Cut Narrative Is Already UnravelingThe big Republican tax cut isn’t even three months old yet. But it’s already confounding. For months, critics (like me) predicted that the new law would be a handout for large corporations, which would drive up their stock prices and enrich wealthy investors. Instead, the stock market has been a riot of volatility since Trump signed the tax cut into law. Many (myself included) predicted that comp
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New Scientist - News

Most people re-use old passwords (but you don’t, right?)The largest ever study of its kind has found that more than half of us reuse or only slightly modify our passwords for different accounts - and that's bad.
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Ingeniøren

Grønlandske isalger sætter verdensrekord: Gror stort set uden lysDansk forskning viser, at temperaturstigning i sne gavner fødekæden i Arktis.
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Futurity.org

Fewer Americans think smoking a pack a day is bad for youWhile about 3 out of 4 Americans agree that smoking cigarettes causes health problems, public perception of the risks posed by smoking may be declining, a new study suggests. From 2006 to 2015, the number of Americans who said smoking a pack or more per day posed a great health risk dropped by 1 percent. “That’s 3 million people who might be more likely to start smoking, go back to smoking, or wh
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The factors that most affect our immune systemWhy do we respond differently to infections or vaccines? The Milieu Intérieur Laboratory of Excellence coordinated at the Institut Pasteur by CNRS research director, Dr. Lluis Quintana-Murci, has recently described immune variation on a large scale within the French population. To achieve this, the consortium studied an expansive collection of biological specimens from 1,000 French volunteers aged
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Lightweight hyperspectral imagers bring sophisticated imaging capability to dronesIn a new study, researchers used 3-D printing and low-cost parts to create an inexpensive hyperspectral imager that is light enough to use onboard drones. They offer a recipe for creating these imagers, which could make the traditionally expensive analytical technique more widely accessible.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Anxiety as a protective factor after a heart attackFear protects people from danger. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Helmholtz Zentrum München has discovered that this applies even to pathological anxiety disorders. Patients who generally suffer from severe anxiety are likely to heed the symptoms of a heart attack earlier and seek medical treatment sooner, thus improving their chance of survival.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Home-based blood pressure monitoring should be commonplace in NHS, say researchersGeneral practitioners should encourage patients with hypertension to monitor their blood pressure at home and use those readings in their day-to-day care, recommend a team of experts.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Aqueous storage device needs only 20 seconds to goA KAIST research team developed a new hybrid energy storage device that can be charged in less than half a minute. It employs aqueous electrolytes instead of flammable organic solvents, so it is both environmentally friendly and safe. It also facilitates a boosting charge with high energy density, which makes it suitable for portable electronic devices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Naked-eye detection of solvent vaporResearchers at the University of Tsukuba developed a sensor based on porous crystalline fibers of a fluorescent dendrimer. The high porosity of the fibers increased their adsorption capacity, making their emission behavior highly sensitive to the presence of solvent vapor. Films of the dendrimer fibers displayed different emission colors depending on the polarity of the solvent vapors they were ex
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why the institution of fatherhood is taking so long to changeMen in blue-collar occupations tend to spend limited time with their children, leaving childrearing almost entirely to the child's mother, according to researchers at the Higher School of Economics (HSE University).
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Self-driving cars with no in-vehicle backup driver get OK for California public roadsSelf-driving cars with no human backup behind the wheel will be legal on California roads for testing and transporting the public starting April 2.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Superflare Wallops Nearest Exoplanet, Proxima bSuch flares dim hopes for life on the Earth-mass world -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Atlantic

Why I'm Writing Captain AmericaTwo years ago I began taking up the childhood dream of writing comics. To say it is more difficult than it looks is to commit oneself to criminal understatement. Writers don’t write comics so much as they draw them with words. Everything has to be shown, a fact I knew going into the work, but could not truly know until I had actually done it. For two years I’ve lived in the world of Wakanda, writ
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Apple offers new wellness program for headquarters employeesAre you a doctor? Want to work with Apple employees? Here's your shot.
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New Scientist - News

Start-up aims to catapult stuff to space without using rocketsA company called SpinLaunch says it wants to use a centrifuge to slingshot cargo into space, avoiding the need for heavy, pricey rocket fuel
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The moon formed inside a vaporized Earth synestiaA new explanation for the Moon's origin has it forming inside the Earth when our planet was a seething, spinning cloud of vaporized rock, called a synestia. The new model resolves several problems in lunar formation.
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Futurity.org

Survey: Americans think lawmakers ignore public opinionIn an era of sharp disagreements between Democrats and Republicans, there is one thing Americans can agree on: They believe that elected officials are not paying enough attention to the general public. This finding comes from a study about how Americans think legislators should and do decide to vote. “Americans are startlingly unhappy with Congress, and this is importantly because of what they pe
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Futurity.org

Toddlers like fairness until there’s a cookie shortageNew research provides an explanation for how infants and toddlers perceive playground disputes over fairness, like how to divvy up toys or cookies. A new study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences examines how infants and toddlers rank fairness versus supporting their own social group, which the researchers call ingroup support. “Our work provides new evidence that infants’ reas
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Researchers: Participants' freedom made Restaurant Day world's largest food carnivalThe world's largest food carnival, Restaurant Day, spread to more than 70 countries because it operated in a completely different way than popular consumer movements in general. Usually, the leaders of a movement determine what the movement does and then try to inspire others to join their vision. Restaurant Day, however, gave everyone an opportunity to be as creative as they wanted, say researche
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

3-D simulations reveal synergistic mechanisms of the human heartIn a new study published in EPJ E, Valentina Meschini from the Gran Sasso Science Institute, L'Aquila, Italy and colleagues introduce a new model that examines the mutual interaction of the blood flow with the individual components of the heart. Their work stands out by offering a more holistic and accurate picture of the dynamics of blow flow in the left ventricle, which could give clues to bette
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Why premature cell division promotes cancersThe accumulation of mutations in the human genome is at the origin of cancers, as well as the development of resistance to treatments. The Cyclin E and Myc genes are active in the control of cell division. Biologists from the University of Geneva show that precocious entry of the genome into the replication phase leads to molecular collisions occurring on the DNA and induces new mutations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Explaining the increasing temperature of cooling granular gasesResearchers shed light on scientific phenomenon which helps to understand better evolution of interstellar dust and planetary rings in space.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Trapping multidrug-resistant bacteria in molecular glueResearchers at VIB, KU Leuven and UZ Leuven devised a novel approach to develop antibacterial drugs. With antibiotic resistance on the rise worldwide, such new drugs are urgently needed. The Flemish biotech spin-off Aelin Therapeutics will exploit the technology to produce new antibiotics for the clinic.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Storm waves can move boulders we thought only tsunamis had the power to shiftIn a new paper in Earth Science Reviews, researchers from Williams College in the US show that four years ago, storms moved huge boulders along the west coast of Ireland. The same storms shifted smaller ones as high as 26 meters above high water and 222 meters inland. Many of the boulders moved were heavier than 100 tons, and the largest moved was 620 tons -- the equivalent of six blue whales or f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Chinese scientists decipher origins of repopulated microglia in brain and retinaA research team led by Bo Peng at Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology successfully deciphered the origin of repopulated microglia in the brain by a series of fate mapping approaches. The results provided solid evidences that repopulated microglia were solely derived from residual microglia rather than de novo progenitors, indicating the absence of microglial progenitor cells in the adult br
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WIRED's Top Stories in February: Facebook, Facebook, FacebookPlus, the Mueller investigation, Russian bots, and Olympic drones.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Sensors help smartphones keep eye on solo seniorsLooking after an elderly relative who lives alone can be a huge source of worry. But what if your smartphone could automatically alert you if your mother has stayed in bed all morning or suffered a fall?
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)

The brain-changing benefits of exercise | Wendy SuzukiWhat's the most transformative thing that you can do for your brain today? Exercise! says neuroscientist Wendy Suzuki. Get inspired to go to the gym as Suzuki discusses the science of how working out boosts your mood and memory -- and protects your brain against neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How a nuclear attack on North Korea would add to global cancer epidemicWith tensions high between the United States and North Korea, there is the possibility that the U.S. would launch a "tactical" nuclear strike in the Korean peninsula. There would be consequences far beyond damage to military sites proposed in such an attack.
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Scientific American Content: Global

How to Recognize 5 Tactics of Gaslighting"Gaslighting" is a form of manipulation that goes beyond invalidation to make you question your sanity. This week, Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen reveals 5 tactics of gaslighters -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Forage-based diets on dairy farms produce nutritionally enhanced milkResearchers have found that cows fed a 100 percent organic grass and legume-based diet produce milk with elevated levels of omega-3 and CLA, and thus provides a markedly healthier balance of fatty acids. The improved fatty acid profile in grass-fed organic milk and dairy products (hereafter, 'grassmilk') brings the omega-6/omega-3 ratio to a near 1 to 1, compared to 5.7 to 1 in conventional whole
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

DNA study of cow stomachs could aid meat and dairy productionMeat and milk production from cattle could one day be boosted, thanks to analysis of microbes in cows' stomachs. The study paves the way for research to understand which types of microbe - such as bacteria - are best at helping cattle to extract energy from their food, experts say.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Understanding the smallest brain circuitsResearchers have found a previously unseen pattern among the rapid-firing neurons inside the brain, one that reveals how distinct networks located in specific areas compete and even suppress each other.
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New on MIT Technology Review

AI can beat us at games—but sometimes, that’s by cheating
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The Atlantic

The Cute Robot That Follows You Around the CityItalians Silvio Berlusconi“T his is Gita.” Jeffrey Schnapp pronounces the “T” in the crisp, Italian way—near the teeth rather than the soft palate—which makes me feel like I should have worn more expensive shoes to the meeting. Gita is a bulbous lozenge of a robot, about two feet tall, with rubber tires at its edges so it can spin around within its own footprint. Gita means a jaunt or an outing. The little robot goes on q
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Solar-to-hydrogen conversion: Nanostructuring increases efficiency of metal-free photocatalysts by factor 11Polymeric carbon nitrides exhibit a catalytic effect in sunlight that can be used for the production of hydrogen from solar energy. However, the efficiency of these metal-free catalysts is extremely low. A team at the Tianjin University in China, in collaboration with a group at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, has increased the catalytic efficiency of these polymeric carbon nitrides by a factor 11 t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Scientists confirm century-old speculation on the chemistry of a high-performance batteryScientists have discovered a novel chemical state, first proposed about 90 years ago, that enables a high-performance, low-cost sodium-ion battery. The battery could quickly and efficiently store and distribute energy produced by solar panels and wind turbines across the electrical grid.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

The moon formed inside a vaporized Earth synestiaA new explanation for the Moon's origin has it forming inside the Earth when our planet was a seething, spinning cloud of vaporized rock, called a synestia. The new model led by researchers at UC Davis and Harvard University resolves several problems in lunar formation and is published Feb. 28 in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Making the moonSimon Lock, a graduate student in Harvard's Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, is the lead author of a study that suggests the Moon -- rather than being spun out of the aftermath of a massive collision between planet-sized objects -- actually emerged from a massive, donut-shaped cloud of vaporized rock called a synestia.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

A small pay increase can have big health benefits for lower-wage workersLower-wage workers who receive a $1 raise call in sick less and consider themselves healthier than those who do not, new UC Davis research on minimum-wage policies shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Newly discovered CRISPR mechanism may prevent dangerous errorsEven as CRISPR gene-editing technology is offering insights into genetic diseases, researchers are discovering new things about how it actually works.
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Ingeniøren

Folketinget overvejer forbud mod dieselhakkereMens tyske byer nu har fået grønt lys til at oprette miljøzoner med forbud mod dieselbiler, der ikke lever op til de nyeste Euro-nomer, vil flere oppositionspartier herhjemme have udvidede miljøzoner med tilsvarende krav til lastbiler og busser.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When ‘colder’ means ‘hotter’: Explaining the increasing temperature of cooling granular gasesA mathematician has developed a theory to explain ‘heating by cooling’, where the temperature of a granular gas increases while the total energy drops down - a peculiar phenomenon which can be observed both on Earth and in space.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Species make comeback 30 years after rainforest devastationRainforest loss is fueling a tsunami of tropical species extinctions. However, not all is doom and gloom.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Storm waves can move boulders we thought only tsunamis had the power to shiftIt's not just tsunamis that can change the landscape: storms shifted giant boulders four times the size of a house on the coast of Ireland in the winter of 2013-14, leading researchers to rethink the maximum energy storm waves can have - and the damage they can do. Four years ago, storms moved huge boulders along the west coast of Ireland. The same storms shifted smaller ones as high as 26 meters
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Military personnel seeking mental health care outside of the militaryA new article indicates that military personnel are making extensive use of outside mental health services, suggesting that military health and mental health services do not meet the needs of active duty service members.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Extraordinary boulder transport by storm wavesIt's not just tsunamis that can change the landscape: storms shifted giant boulders four times the size of a house on the coast of Ireland in the winter of 2013-14, leading researchers to rethink the maximum energy storm waves can have—and the damage they can do.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Encrypted smartphones secure your identity, not just your dataSmartphones store your email, your photos and your calendar. They provide access to online social media sites like Facebook and Twitter, and even your bank and credit card accounts. And they're keys to something even more private and precious – your digital identity.
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Live Science

Earth Was Vaporized 4.5 Billion Years Ago, and (Maybe) That's Why We Have a MoonLong ago, Earth was an unformed doughnut of molten rock called a synestia, and the moon was part of its filling.
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Dana Foundation

Memory as a Creative ActDaphna Shohamy , Ph.D., is more comfortable in her lab at Columbia University than on stage in front of an audience. So why did she agree to participate in the 2018 Brainwave series for a live discussion? Because art and science are more alike than they seem, she said, and she wanted to help explain that. The series pairs accomplished professionals with neuroscientists for a themed discussion at
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

NIAID unveils strategic plan for developing a universal influenza vaccineDeveloping a universal influenza vaccine -- a vaccine that can provide durable protection for all age groups against multiple strains, including those that might cause a pandemic -- is a priority for the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. Writing in the Journal of Infectious Diseases, NIAID officials detail the Institute's new strategic plan for addressing the research areas es
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Immune system activation in pregnant women can shape brain development in their babiesA landmark study published in the Journal of Neuroscience on February 26 reveals that activation of a pregnant mother's immune system can affect her baby's brain development. A team of researchers led by Bradley Peterson, MD, director of the Institute for the Developing Mind in the Department of Pediatrics at Children's Hospital Los Angeles, found that short- and long-term brain functioning can be
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Scientific American Content: Global

Passionate Moms Take On Scott Pruitt, Air Pollution and Climate“Moms Clean Air Force” has mobilized more than 1 million parents to press lawmakers at all levels of government -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New on MIT Technology Review

A simple robo-carpenter can make you some flat-pack furniture
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Race across the tundra—white spruce vs. snowshoe hareThe tale of the tortoise and the hare is being retold. In Alaska's far north, it's become the race of the white spruce tree and the snowshoe hare.
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Dagens Medicin

Flere kræftpatienter bliver behandlet til tidenAldrig før er så mange kræftpatienter blevet behandlet til tiden som det skete i sidste kvartal af 2017. Der er dog stadig plads til forbedringer, siger sundhedsudvalgsformand i Region Hovedstaden.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Heart failure more likely for some breast cancer and lymphoma survivorsPatients who were treated for breast cancer or lymphoma are more than three times at risk for developing congestive heart failure, compared with patients who did not have cancer. Congestive heart failure is when the heart muscle does not pump blood as well as it should. This research is being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Experimentally demonstrated a toffoli gate in a semiconductor three-qubit systemA new progress in the scaling of semiconductor quantum dot based qubit has been achieved at Key Laboratory of Quantum Information and Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information & Quantum Physics of USTC.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Landscape genetics branches out to help conserve riverside forestsA team of scientists lead by Dr Ikuyo Saeki of the University of Tsukuba, Japan, examined gene flow in the endangered maple, Acer miyabei, using landscape genetics, a powerful and increasingly popular tool in conservation projects. It involves the integration of population genetics and landscape ecology, in order to examine how recent landscape changes, for example, habitat fragmentation, have aff
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NYT > Science

Barbra Streisand Cloned Her Dog. For $50,000, You Can Clone Yours.Ms. Streisand made the revelation in an interview with Variety. Before you get any ideas, let us tell you a little bit more about the process.
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The Atlantic

Is School Desegregation Coming to an End?Judge William Pryor is likely not accustomed to being praised by civil-rights advocates. The judge is not a liberal lion. A Bush appointee currently sitting on the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals, which serves much of the deep South, Judge Pryor’s writings have been critical of gay rights and abortion protections. His conservative bona fides have, reputedly , helped earn him a spot on President Tru
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Trapping multidrug-resistant bacteria in molecular glueResearchers at VIB, KU Leuven and UZ Leuven have devised a novel approach to develop antibacterial drugs. With antibiotic resistance on the rise worldwide, such new drugs are urgently needed. The Flemish biotech spin-off Aelin Therapeutics will exploit the technology to produce new antibiotics for the clinic.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Lightning mapping sensor will provide scientists with unique stereo viewWith the scheduled March 1 launch of a new weather satellite, scientists at The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) are looking forward to getting a unique stereo view of lightning in storms over the United States.
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Popular Science

Health-tracking apps to get your New Year's resolutions back on trackDIY Let your phone keep you healthy. Your phone can help you follow your diet, keep moving, sleep better, and generally improve your health. And you don't even need a separate fitness tracker.
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New on MIT Technology Review

You can apply to your next job on FacebookFacebook Job People
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New evidence of nuclear fuel releases found at FukushimaUranium and other radioactive materials, such as caesium and technetium, have been found in tiny particles released from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Species make comeback 30 years after rainforest devastationRainforest loss is fuelling a tsunami of tropical species extinctions. However, not all is doom and gloom.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Explaining the increasing temperature of cooling granular gasesA Leicester mathematician has developed a theory to explain 'heating by cooling', where the temperature of a granular gas increases while the total energy drops down—a peculiar phenomenon which can be observed both on Earth and in space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Archaeologist uncovers hidden history of conquistadors in American SouthChris Rodning, the Paul and Debra Gibbons Professor in the Tulane School of Liberal Arts' Department of Anthropology, unravels early entanglements between Native Americans and European explorers, revealing how their interactions shaped the history of the American South.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cancer metastasis: Cell polarity mattersNot only the number of migrating cancer cells determines the risk for metastasis but also their characteristics. For circulating cancer cells to be able to invade tissues and settle at other sites in the body, they have to exhibit a specific polarity. This discovery might in future help to better predict individual risk for metastasis and find appropriate therapies that can reduce it.
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The Scientist RSS

Fat Cells Travel to Heal Wounds in FliesPreviously considered immobile, these cells swoop in to seal epithelial holes and clean up cellular detritus.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

'Random walk' of heat carriers in amorphous polymersModeling heat conduction in amorphous polymers has been a challenging problem due to their complex structures. A team consists of researchers from Tongji University, Fudan University, Shanghai University of Electric Power, and University of Colorado Boulder, has studied the thermal conductivity of polyimide nanofibers experimentally and proposed a theoretical model to explain the diameter dependen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Effective pediatric cancer treatment is possible in the midst of a refugee crisisSix years into Lebanon's refugee crisis, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital and the Children's Cancer Center of Lebanon at the American University of Beirut Medical Center offer a blueprint for effective childhood cancer treatment during turmoil.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Simulating molecular spectroscopy with circuit quantum electrodynamicsIn a normal laboratory, molecular spectra are generated through the absorption or emission of electromagnetic radiation shined on the molecules. Recently, a team led by M.-H. Yung at SUSTech and L. Sun at Tsinghua University has performed an experimental demonstration on how these spectra can be simulated through circuit quantum electrodynamics in a superconducting device, providing a new tool for
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

New insight on the formation of East Asian floraThe East Asian flora (EAF) is a key biodiversity hotspot for understanding the origin and evolution of Northern Hemisphere floras. The research from Prof. Sun Hang's Group from Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences (KIB/CAS) suggest that the East Asian might be relatively young, with most of its clades originating since the Miocene.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

High-resolution image of the core of the Milky Way reveals surprisingly low star formationCompared to some other galaxies in our Universe, the Milky Way is a rather subtle character. In fact, there are galaxies that are a thousands times as luminous as the Milky Way, owing to the presence of warm gas in the galaxy's Central Molecular Zone (CMZ). This gas is heated by massive bursts of star formation that surround the Supermassive Black Hole (SMBH) at the nucleus of the galaxy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Familial breast cancer not only inherited genetically, finds new studyDoctors will be better able to predict breast cancer risk thanks to pioneering work by researchers, who have identified heritable but non-genetic markers for breast cancer susceptibility.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Stunning footage shows how drones can boost turtle conservationDrones are changing the face of turtle research and conservation, a new study shows.
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Dagens Medicin

Ledende overlæge roser plan for udflytning af kronikeropgaverDet er positivt, at praktiserende læger får et større ansvar for patienter med diabetes type 2- og KOL-området, mener ledende overlæge på lungemedicinsk afdeling. Især er det vigtigt med fokus på spirometri.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Infectious disease in hoverflies linked to honeybee healthIn research published on 28 February, 2018 in Biology Letters, scientists from Royal Holloway, University of London, Oxford University and Cornell University have shown for the first time that viruses that are harmful to honeybees are also present in hoverfly pollinators.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How researchers achieved the first long-distance reconstruction of a cultural artefactThe epic of Atrahasis is one of the most significant pieces of ancient Babylonian literature. It describes a creation myth, a great flood and the building of an ark, that significantly pre-dates a similar account in the Bible. The epic has survived millennia on clay tablets inscribed with cuneiform script. But the third tablet of one of the most complete surviving copies is broken.
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Feed: All Latest

Volvo Launches a VC Fund to Keep Up With the FutureEager for fresh ideas in a rapidly changing industry, Volvo joins the many automakers writing big checks for little startups.
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Futurity.org

Wildfires will likely get worse in the western U.S.In many cases, the massive wildfires that burned in California, Oregon, Montana, Idaho, British Columbia, and other parts of North America in 2017 exhibited a disturbing trend: a marked increase in the amount of area burned. That trend will continue in coming decades across the western US and northwestern Canada, though not uniformly, a new study suggests. “…the large fire seasons of recent years
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Landscape genetics branches out to help conserve riverside forestsThe conservation of river floodplain ecosystems is one of the greatest challenges of the 21st century. Forests on the banks of rivers or along streams often support a rich and unique array of plant and animal life, due, in part, to the high soil moisture. These areas are important in maintaining water quality, preventing erosion and provide important habitat for wildlife. Many of these so-called r
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Science : NPR

Researchers Haven't Found A Single Endangered Right Whale Calf Yet This Season"The right whales are at a point where more are dying than are being born," biologist Clay George says. "That's just not sustainable long-term." (Image credit: Molly Samuel/WABE)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Chasing a stellar flash with assistance from GaiaLast year, ESA's Gaia mission helped astronomers make unique observations of Neptune's largest moon, Triton, as it passed in front of a distant star. This is a preview of the superb quality and versatility of the Gaia data that will be released in April.
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Dagens Medicin

Praktiserende læger i Midtjylland melder sig klar til kronikereKun 18 praksis i Midtjylland mangler at melde sig klar til at overtage ansvaret for flere KOL- og diabetes type 2-patienter, oplyser regional PLO-formand.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

A marriage of light-manipulation technologiesResearchers have, for the first time, integrated two technologies widely used in applications such as optical communications, bio-imaging and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) systems that scan the surroundings of self-driving cars and trucks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Italy, China propose solution to Lake Chad's water problemIt sounds like something from Wakanda, the futuristic African kingdom of the hit movie "Black Panther".
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New data helps explain recent fluctuations in Earth's magnetic fieldUsing new data gathered from sites in southern Africa, University of Rochester researchers have extended their record of Earth's magnetic field back thousands of years to the first millennium.
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The Scientist RSS

Image of the Day: Giant VirusThe Tupanvirus is named for the South American Guarani God of Thunder.
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Ingeniøren

Kritik af klimarapport: Biler frikendes på forkert grundlagVismænd vil frede privatbilerne for at levere CO2-reduktioner frem mod 2030, fordi det koster for meget. Organisationer mener, vismændene ser alt for snævert på sagen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Japan firm seeks to spawn salmon farm revolutionJapan may be an island nation surrounded by the bounty of the sea, but businessman Tetsuro Sogo is looking inland to raise one of the country's most loved sushi fish: salmon.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Past sea level changes may provide clues for the futureSea level variations on the Great Barrier Reef linked to global temperature changes thousands of years ago may help predict future changes, a new University of Queensland study has revealed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

DNA study of cow stomachs could aid meat and dairy productionMeat and milk production from cattle could one day be boosted, thanks to analysis of microbes in cows' stomachs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cracking the mysteries of the elusive, majestic whale sharkIt's the biggest shark—and the biggest fish—in the sea, often found roaming in warm waters around the globe with its huge mouth agape in search of dinner.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Internet search trends mirror heart disease patternsSearch engine queries related to common heart disease symptoms track closely with geographic and seasonal trends for coronary heart disease hospitalizations, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Football associated with heart changes, increased cardiovascular riskFootball players show structural changes in the heart and face an elevated risk of heart rhythm disorders later in life, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Machine learning techniques show promise for supporting medical decisionsSeveral studies being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session demonstrate how the computer science technique known as machine learning can be used to accurately predict clinical outcomes in patients with known or potential heart problems. Collectively, the findings suggest that machine learning may usher in a new era in digital health care tools capable of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breast cancer and lymphoma treatments save lives, but may make heart failure more likely for somePatients with a history of breast cancer or lymphoma were more than three times as likely to develop heart failure--a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs -- compared with a similar group of patients who did not have cancer, according to data being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Marked increase in cardiovascular risk factors in women after preeclampsiaWomen diagnosed with preeclampsia during pregnancy were significantly more likely to develop high blood pressure, diabetes or high cholesterol within five years compared with women who did not have preeclampsia, in a study being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Getting flu vaccine cuts risk of death by half in people with heart failureFor people with heart failure, getting a seasonal influenza (flu) vaccine in a given year was associated with a 50 percent drop in the risk of death during flu season and a 20 percent drop in the risk of death during the rest of the year, according to research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Breastfeeding may have long-term heart health benefits for some momsWomen with normal blood pressure during pregnancy and who breastfed their babies for at least six months following birth had better markers of cardiovascular health years later compared to women who never breastfed, based on research presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session. The same benefits were not observed in women who had high blood pressure during preg
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

ECG on smartwatch accurately detects AFibA newly-designed wristband and corresponding app that works with a smartwatch can accurately display the heart's electrical activity and notify people with atrial fibrillation (AFib) if their heart is beating normally or not, according to data being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session. In one-third of cases, the rhythm picked up by the wearable device w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Aspirin lowers risk of death for patients with diabetes, heart failureFor people living with both Type 2 diabetes and heart failure, taking an aspirin each day appears to lower the risk of dying or being hospitalized for heart failure, according to research being presented at the American College of Cardiology's 67th Annual Scientific Session. But the data also reveal aspirin use may increase the risk of nonfatal heart attack or stroke, a somewhat contradictory find
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Popular Science

The flu season isn't over yet, but the FDA is already working on next year’s vaccineHealth Preparations for the 2018-19 season have to begin now. This may feel early to you, but it’s actually the normal time of year to make this decision. But this year we’re facing the growing realization that we need a better flu…
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The Atlantic

Here’s How The Scientists Running for Office Are DoingLast November was a pivotal moment for the Democrats, who scored a surprisingly large slew of electoral victories in Virginia, New Jersey, and elsewhere. But it was also somewhat of a victory for science, as at least 17 candidates with backgrounds in science, technology, engineering and mathematics ( STEM ) also won. Ralph Northam, who became Virginia’s governor, is a pediatric neurologist. Chery
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

KU skal uddanne fremtidens IT- og sundhedsspecialister i et omfattende tværeuropæisk forskningsprojektPå Datalogisk Institut på KU tæller man i disse dage ned til 1. april 2018, hvor projektet...
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Dagens Medicin

Kræftens Bekæmpelse mystificeret over kuldsejlet hpv-aftaleDirektør i Kræftens Bekæmpelse er ærgerlig og forundret over, at aftalen om hpv-vaccination af unge drenge hos egen læge er faldet på gulvet. Det havde været en »helt vildt naturlig« opgave for de praktiserende læger, mener han.
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Science-Based Medicine

Where Are We With the Replication “Crisis”The replication problem is not as bad as the sensational reporting has suggested. But it is still a legitimate issue that needs to be addressed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

New research illustrates how birds help to produce rare wild chili peppersIf you've enjoyed some spicy food lately, you might have a bird to thank.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Naked-eye detection of solvent vaporSensors are important for detecting contaminants and monitoring environmental conditions. Fluorescent sensors can reveal the presence of a contaminant according to the change of the intensity and/or wavelength of light that they emit. In particular, fluorescent sensors that display changes in emission color are attractive because such changes may be readily observed with the naked eye, making them
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

How algae change their internal solar panels to stay aliveA collaboration between the Benning and Kramer labs is revealing how nature's solar panels, found inside algae, constantly grow and shrink in size to adjust to changes in their environments, a crucial system that ensures their hosts stay healthy and alive.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Alibaba sets up AI research centre in SingaporeChinese e-commerce giant Alibaba on Wednesday opened an artificial intelligence research institute in Singapore in partnership with a local university, as the battle to develop AI technology heats up.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Parts pulled from Japan bullet trains over crack fearsThe Japanese company behind the country's iconic bullet trains said Wednesday it had supplied nearly 150 faulty wheel parts that could crack and potentially cause a derailment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Cosmonaut, two US astronauts return to Earth from ISSTwo NASA astronauts and a Russian cosmonaut returned to Earth on Wednesday, rounding off a mission of more than five months aboard the International Space Station.
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Science : NPR

The Rise Of Yeast: How Civilization Was Shaped By Sugar FungiWithout yeast, bread wouldn't rise and beer wouldn't foam. As Nicholas Money's new book, The Rise of Yeast , points out, it leaves its mark on other foods, too, including coffee, and even chocolate. (Image credit: Maximilian Stock Ltd./Getty Images)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Making smokestack emissions tests better, faster, cheaperSmokestacks at coal-fired power plants have sensors that continuously monitor their emissions by measuring the flow of gases such as carbon dioxide, mercury, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxides. By federal law, these sensors need to be calibrated every year. They are calibrated with small, portable flow-measurement devices called pitot tubes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Echolocation in humans found to be more sensitive than thoughtA team of researchers from the U.K., the Netherlands and the U.S. has found that echolocation in blind people is more sensitive than previously thought. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes experiments they conducted with blind echolocation experts and what they learned from them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Black hole blasts may transform 'mini-Neptunes' into rocky worldsA team of astrophysicists and planetary scientists has predicted that Neptune-like planets located near the center of the Milky Way were transformed into rocky planets by outbursts generated by the nearby supermassive black hole.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Miniscule flightless birds have lived in New Zealand's wetlands for millions of yearsFossilized bones of two new species of tiny, flightless extinct birds have been discovered by Australasian scientists in 19 to 16-million-year-old sediments of an ancient lake on the South Island of New Zealand.
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Futurity.org

What happens just before your consciousness clicks onResearchers have captured what happens in the split second before the emergence of consciousness, a fundamental state of human life. “Without consciousness, nothing else matters…” At the precise moment we become aware of stimuli, a wave of electrical activity flows from the visual cortex in the rear of the brain to the frontal lobes, the researchers report. “There is a very tight window of a few
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Feed: All Latest

'The Looming Tower' Proves Hulu's Political Dramas Are Winning the Streaming GameThe streaming service's 'The Looming Tower' smartly follows in the footsteps of 'The Handmaid's Tale'.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Jigsaw puzzle configuration helps plant epidermal cells withstand high pressurePlant cells are under tremendous pressure. To prevent themselves from bursting, plants had to come up with something unique: According to scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research in Cologne, epidermal cells with an irregular shape can withstand their internal pressure better than round and other uniformly shaped cells.
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Ingeniøren

Pensionskasser vil åbne TDC's netværkDe tre danske pensionskasser og det australske kapitalfond vil udvikle den digitale infrastruktur ved at åbne TDC's netværk for andre teleselskaber, men måske er det ikke så imponerende som det lyder.
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Dagens Medicin

OK-forhandlingerne er brudt totalt sammenOverenskomstforhandlinger for alle offentlige ansatte er brudt sammen, efter forhandlinger på det regionale område også brød sammen i går eftermiddags.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Team discovers E. Coli is more resilient than previously knownA team of Russian scientists led by Skoltech Professor Mikhail Gelfand has discovered a new process by which the bacteria E. Coli (Escherichia Coli) processes lactose, thus enabling its survival. Most bacteria are able to survive under a broad variety of ecological circumstances. Often, they are able to adapt their nutritional intake to their surroundings.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Basic password guidance can dramatically improve account security, study showsTechnology users should be offered more detailed support and guidance when creating account passwords in order to make them more secure and harder to crack, a study suggests.
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Scientific American Content: Global

Arming Teachers Is Not a Good OptionThe president’s suggestion is not being informed by the existing data on both mass shootings and what terminates them -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Professor uses big data to research history of gender in fictionThe number of women writing works of fiction dropped dramatically from the middle of the 19th century to the middle of the 20th century, and the prominence of female characters in works of fiction declined as well.
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New Scientist - News

Why 2018 is looking like it will be the year of the black holePowerful telescopes are ready to reveal the vast black hole at the heart of our galaxy in all its glory. This is a big moment for astronomy, says Geraint Lewis
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The Scientist RSS

FDA Report on BPAs Health Effects Raises ConcernsThe pre-peer review assessment finds the compound has 'minimal effects,' but endocrinologists and others say key data have yet to come out.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

More isn't always better when it comes to health care, older Americans sayDoctors and older patients may disagree more often than either of them suspects about whether a particular medical test or medicine is truly necessary, according to findings from a new poll of Americans over age 50. Improving communication about that mismatch of opinions, the poll suggests, might reduce the use of unneeded scans, screenings, medications and procedures - and health care costs as we
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Viden

Amazon køber ringeklokke-firma for milliardbeløbRingeklokke med indbygget videokamera bringer den amerikanske techgigant endnu længere ind i folks hjem.
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Live Science

Black Holes Shape Some Alien Planets' DestiniesSupermassive black holes near the center of our Milky Way galaxy may have transformed "mini-Neptune" exoplanets into rocky "super-Earths," new research shows.
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Live Science

Skull of 'Oldest Dutchwoman' Found Beneath the North SeaThe skull belonged to a middle-age woman who lived during the last ice age, 13,000 years ago.
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Live Science

Photos: Ancient Human Remains from Beneath the North SeaDutch fishing boats have dredged up 13,000-year-old human remains and hand-made bone artifacts in the North Sea. Here's a look at what they found.
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Feed: All Latest

Ride-Hailing Is Now So Much Bigger Than Uber and LyftThe ride-hailing game isn't just big, it's important—which is why companies like Sony and Bosch are joining the fray.
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Feed: All Latest

How New York Got Screwed Out of the Internet of the FutureNew York was supposed to be a model for big-city high-speed internet. Here’s how its deal with Verizon became a cautionary tale for uneven connectivity.
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Feed: All Latest

With DNA Dating App Pheramor, You Swab, Then Swipe For LoveBut the science of genetic compatibility is dubious at best.
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Feed: All Latest

Congress Takes On Sexual Harassment in the SciencesNew rules could make it easier to remove faculty members who harass or assault grad students and postdocs.
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Feed: All Latest

Artificial Intelligence Can Help Stroke Victims When ‘Time Is Brain’The FDA is approving artificial-intelligence software to help diagnose diseases and help treat patients.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Study suggests active restoration of damaged ecosystems not always better than natureAn international team of researchers has found evidence that suggests human efforts to restore damaged ecosystems are not always better than simply letting nature take its course. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes analyzing over 400 studies documenting ecosystem recovery efforts and reports their findings.
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Live Science

Possible Crusader Ring Depicting St. Nicholas Unearthed in IsraelThe bronze ring may have slipped off the finger of a pilgrim long ago in Galilee.
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Science | The Guardian

Artist resurrects obscure fossils in gorgeous living colourNormally depicted as lunch for other animals, illustrator Franz Anthony brings a diverse range of fossil cephalopods to life Although the coiled shells of ammonites are a familiar fossil when it comes to reconstructing past environments through art, invertebrates like cephalopods (the group that includes octopuses, nautiluses, “squids” and their relatives, as well as fossil forms ammonites, belem
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Scientific American Content: Global

Lone Star Long Shot: Science Runs for CongressIn next week’s Texas primary science-backed Democrat Joseph Kopser looks strong. But he's not talking science to voters -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science : NPR

Send In The Clones: Barbra Streisand Reveals Fluffy Canine CopiesIn an interview with Variety magazine, the legendary singer/filmmaker dropped a bombshell: Two of her three coton de tulears are clones of a favorite canine who died last year. (Image credit: Philippe Wojazer/Reuters)
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Nile conflictA new dam on the river Nile could trigger the world's first war about water, writes Alastair Leithead.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Scientists discover how to distinguish beams of entangled photonsA team from the Faculty of Physics, MSU, has developed a method for creating two beams of entangled photons to measure the delay between them. In the future the results of the study may be used in high-precision measurements, material studies, and informational technologies. The article was published in Optics Letters journal.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Optical emission of two-dimensional arsenic sulfide prepared in plasmaSince the discovery of graphene in 2004, there has been a rapidly growing interest among scientists in the study of 2-D materials beyond graphene. In the family of chalcogenide materials, 2-D-layered transition-metal dichalcogenides demonstrate excellent electronic and optical properties, outstanding mechanical flexibility, and exceptional catalytic performance. At the same time, chalcogenides lik
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Our reactions to odor reveal our political attitudesPeople who are easily disgusted by body odours are also drawn to authoritarian political leaders. A survey showed a strong connection between supporting a society led by a despotic leader and being sensitive to body odours like sweat or urine. It might come from a deep-seated instinct to avoid infectious diseases. "There was a solid connection between how strongly someone was disgusted by smells a
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Ingeniøren

Fiskekutter fanget i isen: I fare for at kollidere med broEn fiskekutter er kommet på kollisionskurs med Aggersundbroen i Limfjorden. Tre fiskere blev til formiddag reddet af Forsvarets redningshelikopter.
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The Atlantic

How Parkland Students Changed the Gun DebateThe email that landed in my inbox Thursday morning from Sabrina Fernandez was brief, polite, and painful. Hi Ms. Cottle, I’ve just been back to back funerals which is why I haven’t been able to get back to you. Is there any way I can answer all your questions via email by tonight or do you need it immediately? Eighteen-year-old Fernandez is the student-body president of Marjory Stoneman Douglas H
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The Atlantic

Trump's EPA Concludes Environmental Racism Is Real“Poison is the wind that blows from the north and south and east.” Marvin Gaye wasn’t an environmental scientist, but his 1971 single “Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology)” provides a stark and useful environmental analysis, complete with warnings of overcrowding and climate change. The song doesn’t explicitly mention race, but its place in Gaye’s What’s Going On album portrays a black Vietnam veteran, c
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The Atlantic

The Kind of Courage America Demands of Its PoliceIn Parkland, Florida, where 17 people were killed in a mass shooting, a sheriff’s deputy faced widespread criticism last week amid reports that he heard AR-15 fire yet failed to rush into the high school he was assigned to protect. Critics say he should’ve risked his life to confront the gunman with his service weapon. “When it came time to get in there and do something, he didn’t have the courag
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Is the UK winning the graphene race?The scientist who won the Nobel Prize for his work with graphene worries about research funding.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Moon to get 4G mobile networkVodafone and Nokia lay out plans to put a 4G mobile network on the Moon in 2019.
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Viden

Bakteriefund i knastør ørken giver håb om liv på MarsDe hårdføre bakterier tilbringer årtier i dvale, mens de venter på regn i den chilenske Atacamaørken.
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Ingeniøren

Energistyrelsen forventer flere ulovlige solcelleanlæg i kommunerneEt endnu ukendt antal ulovlige solcelleanlæg pryder de kommunale bygninger. Kommunerne kan have spildt millioner på anlæg, der ikke længere bliver rentable.
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Futurity.org

Why exercise on social media makes some of us self-consciousThe more exercise-related posts we see on social media, the more concern we feel about our own weight, which may lead to unhealthy body image, according to new research. “When people received more posts about exercise, it made them more concerned about their weight—more self-conscious—and that’s not a good thing,” says Stephen Rains, a communication professor at the University of Arizona and coau
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New on MIT Technology Review

Russia wants you to hate GMOsRussian US V. Putin
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Ingeniøren

Køleproblemer fastfryser Vejdirektoratets hjemmesideFejl med kølesystemet i Vejdirektoratets serverrum har lagt dets it-systemer ned. Fejlen forventes udbedret i løbet af dagen.
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Futurity.org

Failed arthritis drug may prevent opioid addictionA drug already proven safe for use in people may prevent opioid tolerance and physical dependence when used in combination with opioid-based pain medications, according to a new study in mice. Researchers have discovered that a compound previously tested to treat osteoarthritis pain appears to block neuropathic pain and decrease signs of opioid dependence. When drug manufacturer Eli Lilly and Co.
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Dagens Medicin

Vejle Sygehus får ny ledende overlægeI morgen torsdag starter Mette Warming Jørgensen som ledende over på Klinisk Genetik på Vejle Sygehus.
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Ingeniøren

Månen skal have eget 4G-netværk i 2019Vodafone og Nokia skal sammen bygge og etablere et 4G-netværk på månen til næste år. Netværket skal kunne sende video i HD fra månens overflade
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Futurity.org

Alzheimer’s risk climbs close to parent’s age of onsetIf you’re about to turn 60 and know your mother has had Alzheimer’s disease since 65, at what age will the disease strike you? A new study in JAMA Neurology shows that the closer a person get to the age at which their parent exhibited the first signs of Alzheimer’s, the more likely they are to have amyloid plaques in the brain, the cause of the cognitive decline associated with the disease. In th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

DNA study of cow stomachs could aid meat and dairy productionMeat and milk production from cattle could one day be boosted, thanks to analysis of microbes in cows' stomachs by researchers led by the University of Edinburgh and Scotland's Rural College (SRUC). The study paves the way for research to understand which types of microbe - such as bacteria - are best at helping cattle to extract energy from their food, experts say.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Cancer metastasis: Cell polarity mattersNot only the number of migrating cancer cells determines the risk for metastasis but also their characteristics, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) have now reported in Nature Communications. For circulating cancer cells to be able to invade tissues and settle at other sites in the body, they have to exhibit a specific polarity. This discovery might in future help to better p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Familial breast cancer not only inherited genetically, finds new studyDoctors will be better able to predict breast cancer risk thanks to pioneering work led by University of Melbourne researchers, who have identified heritable but non-genetic markers for breast cancer susceptibility.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Higher waist and hip measures may add up to greater risk for heart attack among womenHigher waist and hip size are more strongly associated with heart attack risk than overall obesity, especially among women, according to research in Journal of the American Heart Association, the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.
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Science : NPR

Though Prices Aren't As High As Before, West Texas Enjoys Oil RevivalRussian US V. PutinThe U.S. is on track to surpass Saudi Arabia and Russia next year to become the world's biggest oil producer — pumping out more crude than at its peak nearly half a century ago.
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The Atlantic

Why Is Silvio Berlusconi Back (Again)?MILAN—Silvio Berlusconi had been talking for nearly two hours straight—a series of long, rambling tangents—when an associate walked onto the stage and placed a piece of paper on the lectern. He’d just gotten a big round of applause for one of his classic lines—“We governed for nine years and we never, ever, ever put our hands in the pockets of Italians!”—when he paused. “They gave me a note that
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Dagens Medicin

Forsimplede udtalelser om rusmidlerBeklagelig mangel på faglig objektivitet fra sundhedspersoner og sundhedsmyndigheder i rusmiddeldebat.
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The Atlantic

What Are Active-Shooter Drills Doing to Kids?There’s always at least one kid in tears, as they huddle under their desks in the dark. Still Beth Manias, an early-elementary literacy teacher outside of Seattle, tries to act upbeat and relaxed. “I have them whisper about their favorite candy, dinner, books, movies—whatever, as a distraction,” Manias told me. She tells the kids they’re practicing to stay safe in case there’s ever a bear on camp
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Ingeniøren

Første tyske by varsler dieselforbud få timer efter domHamborg har som den første by reageret på tirsdagens dom, der tillader tyske byer at indføre forbudszoner for dieselbiler. Dommen ved den øverste tyske forvaltningsdomstol ventes at ramme landets bilproducenter hårdt.
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Dagens Medicin

AUH får ny professor med bloddonation som specialeChristian Erikstrup er netop blevet ansat som professor på Aarhus Universitet og Aarhus Universitetshospital.
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Ingeniøren

Digital pioner: »Det bekymrer mig, når forfængelige ejerledere blokerer for teknologi«Hos Dansand passer tørreovne og sorteringsanlæg sig selv over halvdelen af tiden. Det har de gjort siden 2002. Den automatiserede fabrik er alfa og omega for virksomheden, der har svært ved at tiltrække arbejdskraft.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Basic password guidance can dramatically improve account security, study showsTechnology users who receive guidance when setting passwords -- including how likely it is that hackers could break into their accounts -- are significantly more likely to make their choices secure, according to research by the University of Plymouth, McGill University and Purdue University.
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Science | The Guardian

Barbra Streisand reveals she cloned her dog twiceSinger and actor tells Variety she made clones of 14-year-old Samantha before it died last year Barbra Streisand has revealed she successfully made two clones of her pet dog after it died last year. The singer and actor told the Hollywood trade publication Variety that cells were taken from the mouth and stomach of her 14-year-old Coton de Tulear dog, Samantha. Continue reading...
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab

DNA-test kan nu afsløre forbudte hunderacerEn lang række rene racehunde og blandingshunde kan racebestemmes med stor sikkerhed med en DNA-test...
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Science | The Guardian

Work the room: a psychologist's tips for the reluctant networkerMany people hate the idea of networking, despite appreciating its potential value to their careers. Here’s an expert’s guide Do you want to advance your career or business and make more money? Silly question probably. Widening your network might be the answer. A study led by North Carolina State University’s Jeffrey Pollack found a link between entrepreneurs’ networking activities and how much mo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Icy Europe, balmy North Pole: the world upside downNot for the first time in recent years, Europe has descended into a deep freeze while the Arctic experiences record high temperatures, leaving scientists to ponder the role global warming may play in turning winter weather upside down.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Novel 3-D printing method embeds sensing capabilities within robotic actuatorsResearchers at Harvard University have built soft robots inspired by nature that can crawl, swim, grasp delicate objects and even assist a beating heart, but none of these devices has been able to sense and respond to the world around them.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Video: Footage shows how drones can boost turtle conservationDrones are changing the face of turtle research and conservation, a new study shows.
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Ingeniøren

Amazon, Google og Sonos taler - bevidst? - forbi hinandenDet er ikke helt lige til at være smarthome-bruger, når leverandørerne ser ud til at være ligeglade med interoperabilitet.
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Science | The Guardian

Why treating your depression is like learning your times tables | Rhiannon Lucy CosslettWe can say with certainty that antidepressants are effective drugs. But don’t be disheartened if they’re not for you In my first year of university, just after I had been prescribed fluoxetine for depression, I had an argument about it with a close friend. He told me that taking antidepressants would make my feelings false, my emotions manufactured. I wouldn’t be able to tell if what I was feelin
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Science | The Guardian

Satellite Eye on Earth: January 2018 - in picturesSahara snow and volcanic colours are among the images captured by Nasa and the ESA last month Rare snowfall in north-west Algeria, on the edge of the Sahara desert. Despite the desert at times being one of the hottest places on Earth, the snow was reported to be up to 40cm thick in some places. Although temperatures plummet during the night, snowfall is very unusual in the Sahara because the air
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Novel 3-D printing method embeds sensing capabilities within robotic actuatorsInspired by our bodies' sensory capabilities, Harvard University researchers have developed a platform for creating soft robots with embedded sensors that can sense movement, pressure, touch, and even temperature.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Understanding the smallest brain circuitsResearchers at Case Western Reserve University have found a previously unseen pattern among the rapid-firing neurons inside the brain, one that reveals how distinct networks located in specific areas compete and even suppress each other.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Stunning footage shows how drones can boost turtle conservationDrones are changing the face of turtle research and conservation, a new study shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Forage-based diets on dairy farms produce nutritionally enhanced milkIn a collaborative research project, researchers have found that cows fed a 100 percent organic grass and legume-based diet produce milk with elevated levels of omega-3 and CLA, and thus provides a markedly healthier balance of fatty acids. The improved fatty acid profile in grass-fed organic milk and dairy products (hereafter, 'grassmilk') brings the omega-6/omega-3 ratio to a near 1 to 1, compar
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New Scientist - News

Robots armed with saws make custom flat-pack furnitureTeams of carpentry robots and Roomba's with jigsaws can make customised tables and chairs
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Human-made earthquake risk reduced if fracking is 895m from faultsThe risk of human-made earthquakes due to fracking is greatly reduced if high-pressure fluid injection used to crack underground rocks is 895m away from faults in the Earth's crust, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A marriage of light-manipulation technologiesResearchers have built a metasurface-based lens atop a Micro-Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS) platform. The result is a new, infrared light-focusing system that combines the best features of both technologies while reducing the size of the optical system.
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Ingeniøren

Danske universiteter udnyttet til at udvinde kryptopenge: Det er den nye ransomwareEn sårbarhed i Oracles WebLogic-Server har givet malware adgang til universiteters testsystemer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Helium ions open whole new world of materialsScientists have found an exciting new way to manipulate and design materials of the future at the atomic level and change the way they behave at a larger scale that opens the way to new applications such as early cancer biomarkers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Identification of brain's painkilling region could lead to opioid alternativesResearchers have identified how the brain's natural painkilling system could be used as a possible alternative to opioids for the effective relief of chronic pain, which affects as many as one in three people at some point in their lives.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists use forensic technology to genetically document infanticide in brown bearsScientists used a technology designed for human forensics, to provide the first genetically documented observation of infanticide in brown bears, following the murder of a female and her cubs in Italy, where a small population has been genetically monitored for already 20 years. Despite being a common reproductive strategy in social mammals, infanticide could threaten the long-term conservation of
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Ingeniøren

Vejviser til ledige p-pladser skal mindske trafikken i KøbenhavnNy funktion i parkerings-app skal halvere bilisternes søgetid efter et sted at parkere. Funktionen, der bygger på åbne offentlige parkeringsdata fra Københavns Kommune, viser, hvor i området der er størst sandsynlighed for at finde en ledig p-plads.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Scientists seeking rare river crayfish aren't just kicking rocksAs far as anyone can tell, the cold-water crayfish Faxonius eupunctus makes its home in a 30-mile stretch of the Eleven Point River and nowhere else in the world. Because the animal is being considered for endangered species status, researchers are comparing old and new techniques to get a thorough accounting of its population and distribution.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Nicotine extracted from ancient dental plaque for the first timeA team of scientists has shown for the first time that nicotine residue can be extracted from dental plaque on the teeth of ancient tobacco users. Their research provides a new method for determining who was consuming tobacco in the ancient world and could help trace the use of tobacco and other intoxicating plants further back into prehistory.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Ancient DNA reveals genetic replacement despite language continuity in the South PacificNew genetic research reveals the complex demographic history of Vanuatu, explaining how Austronesian languages were retained throughout its history despite near-total replacement of early Austronesian-Lapita with Papuan ancestry.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Wood fuels key to easing food insecurity situation in sub-Saharan AfricaAccess to wood fuels for cooking must be considered when formulating policy to deal with food insecurity in sub-Saharan Africa, according to researchers who advocate expanding the effort to improve wood-fuel systems and make them more sustainable.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Smallest monkey's evolutionary secretEvolutionary biologists have now discovered that the Pygmy Marmoset -- the world's smallest monkey -- is not one species but two.
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Ingeniøren

Fire løgne du aldrig må fortælle chefenLøgne kan være fristende til at bortforklare fravær eller personlige brølere, men fanges du i en løgn, kan konsekvensen være en fyring. Jobfinder giver dig fire løgne, som du især skal holde dig fra.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Unpacking asymmetric cell divisionScientists have found a new role for proteins that play important roles in asymmetric division, which may play a role in tumor formation or neurodevelopmental disorders.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Squid skin could be the solution to camouflage materialSquids and octopuses are masters of disguise and humans have long envied their camouflage capabilities. A chemistry professor teamed up with the U.S. Army to find out how these colorful creatures do it. She turned the animal's pigment particles into spools of fiber that can be used for a number of things.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Obesity could be linked to early childhood behaviorNew research has found that it is generally a combination of unhealthy behaviors among youth that could be the greatest predictors of whether or not young people will experience obesity issues in adulthood.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Gene-editing reduces triglycerides, cholesterol by up to 50 percentUsing a variation of CRISPR gene editing may be a potential strategy for mimicking the protective effects of a genetic mutation linked to lower cholesterol levels and heart disease risks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A protein that self-replicatesScientists have been able to prove that a protein structure widespread in nature -- the amyloid -- is theoretically capable of multiplying itself. This makes it a potential predecessor to molecules that are regarded as the building blocks of life.
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Live Science

Pollution Facts & Types of PollutionThe different ways that the environment gets contaminated.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

New clues to decline of bees and other pollinatorsBee viruses have been found in hoverflies for the first time, raising new concerns about disease threats.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

How humans echolocate 'like bats'Blind people who use sound to navigate their environment adjust their clicks very similarly to bats, research reveals.
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BBC News - Science & Environment

Seal pups rescued in winter storms released back to wildThe pups were separated from their mother during storms at the end of last year.
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Futurity.org

Effects of early first period can persist into 20sA new study suggests that the psychological vulnerability that accompanies an earlier start to menstruation may persist for years. Girls who get their periods earlier than their peers have more frequent and severe mental health problems, from depression to anxiety, eating disorders, delinquency, substance abuse, and failing or dropping out of school. Having tracked nearly 8,000 girls from adolesc
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Live Science

How We Might Harness the Brain's Pain-Control System for Drug-free ReliefYour body has its own natural pain-relief system, and scientists may be one step closer to learning how to use it for controlling chronic pain.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Levels of inappropriate antibiotic prescribing in England estimated to be 20%Research published by Public Health England (PHE) estimates that at least 20% of all antibiotic prescriptions written in primary care in England are inappropriate. This implies that antibiotic prescribing nationally should be reduced by 10% by 2020, in accordance with the national ambition to cut levels of inappropriate prescribing in half. These data are published in five articles in a supplement
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Man-made earthquake risk reduced if fracking is 895m from faultsThe risk of man-made earthquakes due to fracking is greatly reduced if high-pressure fluid injection used to crack underground rocks is 895m away from faults in the Earth's crust, according to new research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Our reactions to odor reveal our political attitudesPeople who are easily disgusted by body odors are also drawn to authoritarian political leaders. A survey showed a strong connection between supporting a society led by a despotic leader and being sensitive to body odors like sweat or urine. It might come from a deep-seated instinct to avoid infectious diseases.
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Science | The Guardian

Hate body odour? You're more likely to have rightwing viewsScientists suggest authoritarian attitudes may be partly rooted in biological urge to avoid catching diseases from unfamiliar people People who have a greater tendency to turn their nose up at the whiff of urine, sweat and other body odours are more likely to have rightwing authoritarian attitudes, research suggests. The study also found having a greater disgust for body odours was linked, albeit
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Science | The Guardian

Echolocation could help blind people learn to navigate like batsStudy confirms accuracy of using mouth clicks to identify location of objects, and uncovers insights which could help teach the skill Some people who are blind learn the extraordinary skill of echolocation, using mouth clicks to explore their environment in a way comparable to how bats navigate. Now scientists have uncovered new insights into how this feat is performed, which could help others to
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New Scientist - News

If you hate bad body odour, you’re more likely to support TrumpA person’s response to badly-smelling body odours is linked to whether they hold right-wing authoritarian views, and can predict if they like President Trump
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories

Man-made earthquake risk reduced if fracking is 895m from faultsThe risk of man-made earthquakes due to fracking is greatly reduced if high-pressure fluid injection used to crack underground rocks is 895m away from faults in the Earth's crust, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Microfluidic device captures, allows analysis of tumor-specific extracellular vesiclesA new microfluidic device may help realize the potential of tumor-derived extracellular vesicles -- tiny lipid particles that carry molecules through the bloodstream -- as biomarkers that could monitor a tumor's response to therapy and provide detailed information to guide treatment choice.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Jekyll and Hyde and seekResearchers have described how a signaling protein that normally suppresses tumors can be manipulated (or re-programmed) by growth factors, turning it into a driver of malignant growth and metastasis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

When treating athletes for heat stroke, 'cool first, transport second'Athletes who suffer life-threatening heat stroke should be cooled on site before they are taken to the hospital, according to a new article. The principle of 'cool first, transport second' differs from the usual practice of calling 911 and getting to the hospital as soon as possible.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

How do teachers integrate STEM into K-12 classrooms?Although the call for improving STEM education is widespread, there is little guidance for teachers on how to do so. A team set out to outline challenges and find best practices for teachers to better integrate science, technology, engineering and math in their classrooms.
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Futurity.org

How bird guts give rare chili peppers a boostNew research looks at how a mutually beneficial relationship between birds and chili peppers in the Mariana Islands helps the plants grow in the wild. The study shows biodiversity can lead to indirect benefits for humans, says study coauthor Haldre Rogers, an assistant professor of ecology, evolution, and organismal biology at Iowa State University. Organisms depend on each other in intricate and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News

Regular monitoring rather than immediate treatment justified for some cervical lesionsRegular monitoring ('active surveillance') rather than immediate treatment is justified for moderate cervical lesions -- abnormal cells on the surface of the cervix, often called cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia grade 2 or CIN2 -- suggests a review of the evidence published by The BMJ today.
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Futurity.org

Move over RNA, amyloids may be first ‘building blocks of life’A protein structure that is widespread in nature—the amyloid—is theoretically capable of multiplying itself, researchers report. This makes it a potential predecessor to molecules that scientists currently regard as the building blocks of life. Long thought of as biological aberrations, amyloids are fibrous aggregates of short protein fragments. Amyloids have a bad reputation because they are bel
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Science : NPR

German Court Will Let Cities Ban Some Diesel Cars To Decrease PollutionA German court has ruled that cities may bans diesel cars in order to bring down emissions levels. (Image credit: Andreas Gebert/Getty Images)
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Feed: All Latest

What Facebook Isn't Saying About Trump and Clinton's Campaign AdsAfter an uproar over how much Trump and Clinton paid for Facebook ads during the 2016 presidential campaign, the social network has shared some—but not all—numbers.
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Science : NPR

Pregnancy Rate Might Predict Future Recessions, Researchers SuggestConventional wisdom holds that fertility rates go down in response to an economic downturn. But a new study found that conception rates begin to drop before a recession actually begins. (Image credit: SKXE/Flickr)
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Carpe DMToday in 5 Lines Private Twitter messages obtained by The Atlantic show that Roger Stone, a longtime confidante and informal adviser to President Trump, corresponded with WikiLeaks during the 2016 presidential campaign. Trump hired former digital adviser Brad Parscale to run his 2020 reelection campaign. Trump son-in-law and adviser Jared Kushner was reportedly informed on Friday that his securit
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The Atlantic

The Atlantic Daily: Identify the PurposeWhat We’re Following Messaging Strategy: Roger Stone, President Trump’s longtime friend and confidant, told the House Intelligence Committee last year that he never communicated directly with WikiLeaks. But screenshots obtained by The Atlantic reveal that Stone exchanged private Twitter messages with the radical-transparency group on October 13, 2016. Here’s what the messages said. China’s Path:
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Popular Science

Our closest neighboring star system sounds like a terrible place to liveSpace Instead of hosting planet-friendly dust, Proxima Centauri spews radiation. We'd hoped to find life on our closest exoplanet, but the massive stellar flares might pose a bit of a problem.
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Popular Science

Google's Clips camera uses AI to try to spot your important family momentsTechnology The little camera looks for faces and records short videos. Google’s new camera, called Clips, is a small, intriguing device that feels experimental.
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