Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tweaking quantum dots powers-up double-pane solar windows Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboraotry are creating double-pane solar windows that generate electricity with greater efficiency and also create shading and insulation. It's all made possible by a new window architecture which utilizes two different layers of low-cost quantum dots tuned to absorb different parts of the solar spectrum. The approach complements existing photovoltaic technolog
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Ingeniøren
USA’s miljøagentur: Glyphosat er uskadeligt for mennesker USA’s miljøagentur EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) fastslår i en nyligt udsendt meddelelse , at det vurderer sprøjtemidlet glyphosat som uskadeligt for mennesker. Glyphosat Glyphosat er et pesticid, der benyttes til at bekæmpe ukrudt – f.eks. i ukrudtsmidlet Roundup. Landbruget tegner sig for størstedelen af det danske forbrug. Stoffet er godkendt som pesticid i EU, og Miljøstyrelsen har vu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A changing climate, changing wine Cambridge, MA (January 2, 2018) -- If you want to buy good wine, Elizabeth Wolkovich says stop looking at labels and listen to your taste buds. An Assistant Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Wolkovich is among the co-authors of a new study, which suggests that, though vineyards might be able to counteract some of the effects of climate change by planting lesser-known grape varie
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Can eating mostly fat help you lose weight? Every January, fat's in the crosshairs of health columnists, fitness magazines, and desperate Americans. This year, PopSci looks at the macronutrient beyond its most negative associations. What’s fat good for? How do we get it to go where we want it to? Where does it wander when it’s lost? This, my friends, is Fat Month . The ketogenic diet didn’t start as a weight-loss method. It was a treatment
14min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nature's smallest rainbows, created by peacock spiders, may inspire new optical technologyThe mechanism behind these tiny rainbows may inspire new color technology, but wouldn't have been discovered without research combining basic natural history with physics and engineering. These super iridescent spider scales can be used to overcome current limitations in spectral manipulation, and to reduce the size of optical spectrometers for applications where fine-scale spectral resolution is
18min
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
You aren't at the mercy of your emotions -- your brain creates them | Lisa Feldman BarrettCan you look at someone's face and know what they're feeling? Does everyone experience happiness, sadness or anxiety the same way? What are emotions anyway? For the past 25 years, psychology professor Lisa Feldman Barrett has mapped facial expressions, scanned brains and analyzed hundreds of physiology studies to understand what emotions really are. Here she shares the results of her exhaustive re
23min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A virus-bacteria coevolutionary 'arms race' solves diversity by 'killing the winner'Researchers have shed new light on a fundamental question in ecology, by improving a popular proposed scenario for diversity known as 'Kill the Winner.' Scientists approached the diversity paradox from the perspective of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics.
28min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic changes help mosquitoes survive pesticide attacksThe fascinating array of genetic changes that confer pesticide resistance in Anopheles mosquitoes has been reviewed. Findings highlight the interplay between human interventions, mosquito evolution, and disease outcomes, and will help scientists develop new strategies to overcome pesticide resistance.
28min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
ADHD medications may reduce the risk of sexually transmitted infectionAttention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) increases the risk of subsequent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among adolescent and young adult populations by about three times, reports a new study.
28min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A virus-bacteria coevolutionary 'arms race' solves diversity by 'killing the winner' University of Illinois Swanlund Professor of Physics Nigel Goldenfeld (left) works with colleague Chi Xue (right) at the Carle R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology. Credit: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign There is remarkable biodiversity in all but the most extreme ecosystems on Earth. When many species are competing for the same finite resource, a theory called competitive exclusion
36min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A virus-bacteria coevolutionary 'arms race' solves diversity by 'killing the winner' IMAGE: University of Illinois Swanlund Professor of Physics Nigel Goldenfeld (left) works with colleague Chi Xue (right) at the Carle R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology. view more Credit: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign There is remarkable biodiversity in all but the most extreme ecosystems on Earth. When many species are competing for the same finite resource, a theory called
39min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Migraine surgery produces 'dramatic improvements' in functioning, study findsIn addition to reducing headache frequency and severity, surgical treatment for migraine leads to significant improvements in everyday functioning and coping ability, according to a new study.
42min
Science : NPR
Encore: Testing For A Marijuana High KELLY MCEVERS, HOST: And as of today, Californians can legally buy recreational marijuana. But in California and the handful of other states where recreational pot is legal, it is still illegal to drive while under the drug's influence. NPR's Rae Ellen Bichell reported last August that law enforcement and scientists were struggling to find better ways to determine who is impaired. And she started
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Randomness a key in spread of disease, other 'evil'Working with a simple mathematical model in which chance plays a key role, researchers calculated how long it would take a bacterial infection or cancer cell to take over a network of healthy cells. The distribution of incubation times in most cases, they contend, is close to 'lognormal' -- meaning that the logarithms of the incubation periods, rather than the incubation periods themselves, are no
56min
Live Science
Frozen Family Fun: Try These Cold-Weather Science Experiments Record-cold temperatures sweeping across parts of the Midwest, East Coast and Southeast likely have many shuttered indoors with the heat cranked up. Lengthy stints inside can be a recipe for cabin fever. For those looking to keep their kiddos occupied and have chill family time, there's a way to use the extreme cold for some entertainment (and sneak in a little science education, too). Here
57min
Big Think
How Does Money Affect Happiness? "If only I had more money, I’d be happy” is a common sentiment. The notion fuels lottery contestants, even though research shows in the long term your new tax bracket doesn’t actually make you happier. If you weren’t happy before, chances are once the adrenaline and dopamine wears off you’ll return to baseline. michael-norton-understanding-the-complex-relationship-between-money-and-happiness
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genetic changes help mosquitoes survive pesticide attacks A woman hangs up the mosquito net she received at the health center in Mwanza, Tanzania. Wide deployment of long-lasting insecticidal nets is a major driver of insecticide resistance. Credit: 2016 Riccardo Gangale/Vectorworks, Phoroshare. For decades, chemical pesticides have been the most important way of controlling insects like the Anopheles mosquito species that spreads malaria to humans. Unf
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Live Science
News Flash: Lightning Deaths Hit a Record Low in 2017 Lightning strikes One World Trade Center in lower Manhattan. Credit: Hernán Seoane Death from lightning strike hit a record low in 2017 in the United States, according to a new report. There were 16 lightning-related fatalities in 2017, breaking the previous low of 23 deaths in 2013, according to the National Weather Service (NWS). The records go back to the 1940s, when farmers using tracto
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees Tropical Depression 01W come togetherThe first tropical depression of the northwestern Pacific Ocean 2018 tropical cyclone season didn't waste any time forming after the first of the new year. Tropical Depression 1W formed just west of the Philippines in the Sulu Sea as NASA's Terra satellite passed overhead early on Jan. 2, 2018.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lethal fungus that causes white-nose syndrome may have an Achilles' heel, study reveals Scientists with the USDA Forest Service and the University of New Hampshire have found what may be an Achilles' heel in the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome: UV-light. White-nose syndrome has killed millions of bats in North America over the past decade. Credit: Daniel Lindner, USDA Forest Service The fungus behind white-nose syndrome, a disease that has ravaged bat populations in North Ame
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Quantum radio' may aid communications and mapping indoors, underground and underwater NIST physicist Dave Howe aligns a laser beam to pass through a tiny glass cell of rubidium atoms inside the cylindrical magnetic shield. The atoms are the heart of an atomic magnetometer demonstrated as a receiver for magnetic radio. These very low frequency (VLF) digitally modulated magnetic signals can travel farther through building materials, water, and soil than conventional communications s
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Scientific American Content: Global
Ben Barres (1955–2017) Ben Barres (born Barbara Barres) was a passionate researcher of the role of glia, the most numerous type of brain cell, in development and disease. He was also an ardent campaigner for equal opportunity in science . He died of cancer aged 63, on 27 December 2017. As Barbara and as Ben (he transitioned genders in 1997), Barres made numerous landmark discoveries. These include the identificatio
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Popular Science
How to keep your skin from falling off this winter After spending the weekend in sub-zero weather, my lips are so chapped I can’t even think of a joke about how chapped they are. The state of my lip skin is frankly no laughing matter at this time. But luckily, there are ways to avoid losing your skin to a brutal winter. Why does my skin give up on being skin every winter? In theory, your skin—your largest organ—serves to keep water sealed within
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The Atlantic
How Do Animals See the World? Animal eyes come in the most spectacular range of styles, shapes, and sizes. There are eyes with lenses made of rock, eyes that can look up and down at the same time, and eyes that can spot prey from a mile away. But one animal has the most incredible—and certainly the strangest—eyes of them all. Watch more episodes of The Atlantic’s Animalism .
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spider's web inspires removable implant that may control type 1 diabetesFor the more than 1 million Americans who live with type 1 diabetes, daily insulin injections are literally a matter of life and death. And while there is no cure, a Cornell University-led research team has developed a device that could revolutionize management of the disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Americans' attitudes about science in 2017: High confidence, low visibility ARLINGTON, Va. - Jan. 2, 2018 - Scientists and the nation's scientific enterprise remain largely invisible to the public, according to national public opinion surveys commissioned by Research!America in 2017. Yet public perception of science is positive with a majority (67%) in agreement that public policies should be based on the best available science. More than half of Americans agree that sci
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Quantum radio' may aid communications and mapping indoors, underground and underwater IMAGE: NIST physicist Dave Howe aligns a laser beam to pass through a tiny glass cell of rubidium atoms inside the cylindrical magnetic shield. The atoms are the heart of an... view more Credit: Burrus/NIST Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated that quantum physics might enable communications and mapping in locations where GPS and ordinary
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lethal fungus that causes white-nose syndrome may have an Achilles' heel, study reveals IMAGE: Scientists with the USDA Forest Service and the University of New Hampshire have found what may be an Achilles' heel in the fungus that causes white-nose syndrome: UV-light. White-nose syndrome... view more Credit: Daniel Lindner, USDA Forest Service MADISON, Wis. (Jan. 2, 2018) - The fungus behind white-nose syndrome, a disease that has ravaged bat populations in North America, may ha
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tweaking quantum dots powers-up double-pane solar windowsResearchers are creating double-pane solar windows that generate electricity with greater efficiency and also create shading and insulation. It's all made possible by a new window architecture which utilizes two different layers of low-cost quantum dots tuned to absorb different parts of the solar spectrum. The approach complements existing photovoltaic technology by adding high-efficiency sunligh
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A fossil fuel technology that doesn't polluteEngineers are developing technologies that have the potential to economically convert fossil fuels and biomass into useful products including electricity without emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Blacks' high diabetes risk driven by obesity, not mysteryIn a surprising finding, blacks and whites have the same risk of developing diabetes when all biological factors for the disease are considered over time, reports a study. The finding flips long-held beliefs that there is an unexplained reason why blacks have double the rate of diabetes compared to whites by midlife, which is considered early onset.
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Science : NPR
Rated PG: Profoundly Gifted Stories about geniuses seem to fascinate us. From “Rain Man” and “Temple Grandin” to “House” and “S-town,” people with extraordinarily high intelligence make for great characters. But what is life really like if you’re profoundly gifted , with an IQ of at least 160? And what’s it like living among the rest of us? In the first installment of our series of audience-requested discussions, we examine
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The Atlantic
Israel Enters a Fifth Year of Drought Four consecutive years of drought have put several biblical bodies of water at risk: the Sea of Galilee, the Jordan River, and the Dead Sea. The AP photographer Oded Balilty spent much of last year documenting these bodies of water and the ways locals and tourists play and worship there. The AP reports that “the Sea of Galilee stands at a century low, much of the Jordan River is a fetid trickle a
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The Atlantic
Talking The Post and Lady Bird With Tracy Letts Tracy Letts was a celebrated playwright long before he became one of Hollywood’s most in-demand character actors. He won the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for August: Osage County in 2008 and wrote numerous other hits like Bug, Man From Nebraska, and Superior Donuts, many of which premiered at the Steppenwolf Theatre Company in Chicago. But 2017 was a banner year for Letts on the film-acting front, gi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How the midshipman fish sustains its hour-long mating callResearchers have discovered how the Pacific midshipman fish can hum continuously for up to an hour in order to attract potential mates. The study explains how the muscle fibers surrounding the fish's swimbladder can sustain the high rates of contraction -- up to 100 times per second -- that are needed to produce the animal's distinctive call.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ADHD medications may reduce the risk of sexually transmitted infection Washington, DC, Jan. 2, 2018 - Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) increases the risk of subsequent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among adolescent and young adult populations by about three times, reports a study published in the January 2018 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP) . The authors also found that short- and lon
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic changes help mosquitoes survive pesticide attacks IMAGE: A rice field in northern Cameroon. In addition to long-lasting insecticidal nets, urbanization, chemical pollutants, and agriculture play a key role in selecting insecticide-resistant mosquitoes. view more Credit: Caroline Fouet, UC Riverside. RIVERSIDE, Calif. -- For decades, chemical pesticides have been the most important way of controlling insects like the Anopheles mosquito sp
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees Tropical Depression 01W come together IMAGE: NASA's Terra satellite captured a visible-light image of Tropical Depression 01W on Jan. 2, 2018. The image showed strong thunderstorm development northwest of the center. view more Credit: NASA Rapid Response Team The first tropical depression of the northwestern Pacific Ocean 2018 tropical cyclone season didn't waste any time forming after the first of the new year. Tropical Depressi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Educational video may increase public willingness to become face transplant donorsAfter watching a brief educational video, members of the public are more likely to say they would be willing to donate a facial transplant to a severely disfigured patient, reports a study in the January issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Link between alcohol consumption and cardiovascular death depends on socioeconomics Very frequent consumption of alcohol is associated with an increased risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, but only among people in the lowest socioeconomic position, according to a new research study published in PLOS Medicine by Eirik Degerud from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health in Oslo, and colleagues. Individuals with low socioeconomic position are known to consume alcohol les
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS] In This Issue Generating complex 3D structures in soft materials Biomimetics of plant and animal tissue morphogenesis. In plants and animals, soft living tissues routinely adopt complex 3D structures to perform or enhance critical functions. Although such structures have applications in biomedical engineering, robotics, and flexible electronics, most efforts to synthesize them in soft materials d
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Implantation in eutherians: Which came first, the inflammatory reaction or attachment? [Biological Sciences] Implantation in eutherians: Which came first, the inflammatory reaction or attachment? Ji-Long Liu a , 1 a College of Veterinary Medicine, South China Agricultural University , 510642 Guangzhou, China In PNAS, Griffith et al. ( 1 ) examine the transcriptome changes in the opossum uterus during pregnancy. The authors find that term pregnancy, which is correlated with the loss of the eggshell in th
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Liu: Inflammation before implantation both in evolution and development [Biological Sciences] Reply to Liu: Inflammation before implantation both in evolution and development Oliver W. Griffith a , b , 1 , Arun R. Chavan a , b , Stella Protopapas a , b , Jamie Maziarz a , b , Roberto Romero c , d , e , f , and Günter P. Wagner a , b , g , h a Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University , New Haven, CT 06520; b Yale Systems Biology Institute, Yale University , New Haven
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Phosphorus redox reactions as pinch hitters in microbial metabolism [Microbiology] Phosphorus redox reactions as pinch hitters in microbial metabolism Oscar A. Sosa a , 1 a Daniel K. Inouye Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education, University of Hawaii at Manoa , Honolulu, HI 96822 Phosphorus (P) is required by all living organisms for the synthesis of genetic and cellular components, metabolism, and energy transfer. The phosphate ion (PO 4 3- , P valence +5),
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Nuclear option prevents hyperinfection in the Strongyloides worm war [Pharmacology] Nuclear option prevents hyperinfection in the Strongyloides worm war Richard John Martin a , 1 a Department of Biomedical Sciences, Iowa State University , Ames, IA 50011 Humans are fighting a grinding war against parasitic nematodes. More than 100 species of nematode parasites are known to infect humans. Additionally, 1.5 billion people are infected by soil-transmitted helminths worldwide that c
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
State-space multitaper time-frequency analysis [Applied Mathematics] State-space multitaper time-frequency analysis Seong-Eun Kim a , b , 1 , Michael K. Behr c , 1 , Demba Ba d , 1 , and Emery N. Brown a , c , e , f , 2 a Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology , Cambridge, MA 02139; b Department of Electronics and Control Engineering, Hanbat National University , Daejeon 34158, Korea; c Department of Brain and Cognitive Sc
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Initial elevation bias in subjective reports [Social Sciences] Initial elevation bias in subjective reports Patrick E. Shrout a , 1 , Gertraud Stadler b , Sean P. Lane c , M. Joy McClure d , Grace L. Jackson e , Frederick D. Clavél f , Masumi Iida g , Marci E. J. Gleason h , Joy H. Xu a , and Niall Bolger i a Department of Psychology, New York University , New York, NY 10003; b Aberdeen Health Psychology Group, Department of Applied Health Sciences, Universi
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Functions of maize genes encoding pyruvate phosphate dikinase in developing endosperm [Agricultural Sciences] Functions of maize genes encoding pyruvate phosphate dikinase in developing endosperm Ryan R. Lappe a , John W. Baier b , Susan K. Boehlein b , Ryan Huffman c , Qiaohui Lin a , Fabrice Wattebled d , A. Mark Settles b , L. Curtis Hannah b , Ljudmilla Borisjuk e , Hardy Rolletschek e , Jon D. Stewart f , M. Paul Scott c , g , Tracie A. Hennen-Bierwagen a , and Alan M. Myers a , 1 a Roy J. Carver De
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Artificial antibody created by conformational reconstruction of the complementary-determining region on gold nanoparticles [Biophysics and Computational Biology] Artificial antibody created by conformational reconstruction of the complementary-determining region on gold nanoparticles Gui-Hua Yan a , 1 , Kun Wang a , 1 , Zhuxue Shao a , 1 , Lei Luo a , 1 , Zheng-Mei Song a , Jingqi Chen a , Rong Jin a , Xiaoyong Deng a , Haifang Wang a , 2 , Zhonglian Cao b , Yuanfang Liu a , c , and Aoneng Cao a , 2 a Institute of Nanochemistry and Nanobiology, Shanghai U
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structure of the chlorovirus PBCV-1 major capsid glycoprotein determined by combining crystallographic and carbohydrate molecular modeling approaches [Biophysics and Computational Biology] Structure of the chlorovirus PBCV-1 major capsid glycoprotein determined by combining crystallographic and carbohydrate molecular modeling approaches Cristina De Castro a , 1 , Thomas Klose b , Immacolata Speciale c , Rosa Lanzetta c , Antonio Molinaro c , James L. Van Etten d , 1 , and Michael G. Rossmann b , 1 a Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Napoli , 80055 Portici, Italy; b
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structure of sexual networks determines the operation of sexual selection [Evolution] Structure of sexual networks determines the operation of sexual selection Grant C. McDonald a , 1 and Tommaso Pizzari a a Edward Grey Institute, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford , Oxford OX1 3PS, United Kingdom Edited by Scott V. Edwards, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, and approved November 27, 2017 (received for review June 12, 2017) Significance Sexual selection is a powerful evo
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In vivo inhibition of tryptophan catabolism reorganizes the tuberculoma and augments immune-mediated control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis [Immunology and Inflammation] In vivo inhibition of tryptophan catabolism reorganizes the tuberculoma and augments immune-mediated control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Uma S. Gautam a , Taylor W. Foreman a , b , 1 , Allison N. Bucsan a , b , Ashley V. Veatch a , Xavier Alvarez a , Toidi Adekambi c , Nadia A. Golden a , Kaylee M. Gentry a , Lara A. Doyle-Meyers a , Kasi E. Russell-Lodrigue a , Peter J. Didier a , James L. Bla
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Affimer proteins inhibit immune complex binding to Fc{gamma}RIIIa with high specificity through competitive and allosteric modes of action [Immunology and Inflammation]Protein–protein interactions are essential for the control of cellular functions and are critical for regulation of the immune system. One example is the binding of Fc regions of IgG to the Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs). High sequence identity (98%) between the genes encoding FcγRIIIa (expressed on macrophages and natural killer...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Synergistic anti-HCV broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies with independent mechanisms [Medical Sciences] Synergistic anti-HCV broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies with independent mechanisms Madeleine C. Mankowski a , Valerie J. Kinchen a , Lisa N. Wasilewski a , Andrew I. Flyak b , Stuart C. Ray a , c , James E. Crowe, Jr. d , e , f , and Justin R. Bailey a , 1 a Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine , Baltimore, MD 21205; b Division of Biology and Biologic
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Metagenomics-guided analysis of microbial chemolithoautotrophic phosphite oxidation yields evidence of a seventh natural CO2 fixation pathway [Microbiology] Metagenomics-guided analysis of microbial chemolithoautotrophic phosphite oxidation yields evidence of a seventh natural CO 2 fixation pathway Israel A. Figueroa a , Tyler P. Barnum a , Pranav Y. Somasekhar a , Charlotte I. Carlström a , 1 , Anna L. Engelbrektson a , and John D. Coates a , 2 a Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of California, Berkeley , CA 94720 Edited by David
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Behavioral state modulates the ON visual motion pathway of Drosophila [Neuroscience] Behavioral state modulates the ON visual motion pathway of Drosophila James A. Strother a , 1 , 2 , Shiuan-Tze Wu a , 1 , 3 , Edward M. Rogers a , Jessica L. M. Eliason a , Allan M. Wong a , Aljoscha Nern a , and Michael B. Reiser a , 4 a Janelia Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute , Ashburn, VA 20147 Edited by S. Lawrence Zipursky, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, and appr
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
News Feature: Can microbes keep time for forensic investigators? [Applied Biological Sciences] News Feature: Can microbes keep time for forensic investigators? Forensic scientists are building a “clock” from the bacteria and other microscopic scavengers that make up the postmortem microbiome. But how reliably will it tick? On a small hill outside of Grand Junction, CO, the sun beats on dry earth, and human bodies lie face up amid low sagebrush. Inside each corpse, on it, and beneath it, a
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Controlled molecular self-assembly of complex three-dimensional structures in soft materials [Applied Biological Sciences] Controlled molecular self-assembly of complex three-dimensional structures in soft materials Changjin Huang a , David Quinn b , Subra Suresh c , 1 , and K. Jimmy Hsia a , b , 1 a Department of Biomedical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University , Pittsburgh, PA 15213; b Department of Mechanical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University , Pittsburgh, PA 15213; c Nanyang Technological University , Sin
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Size-driven quantum phase transitions [Applied Mathematics] Size-driven quantum phase transitions Johannes Bausch a , 1 , 2 , Toby S. Cubitt b , 1 , Angelo Lucia c , d , e , 1 , David Perez-Garcia c , f , g , 1 , and Michael M. Wolf h , 1 a Centre for Quantum Information and Foundations, Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge , Cambridge CB3 0WA, United Kingdom; b Department of Computer Science, University Colle
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Computation of extreme heat waves in climate models using a large deviation algorithm [Applied Mathematics] Computation of extreme heat waves in climate models using a large deviation algorithm Francesco Ragone a , b , Jeroen Wouters a , c , d , and Freddy Bouchet a , 1 a Laboratoire de Physique, Ens de Lyon, Université Claude Bernard, Université Lyon, CNRS, F-69342 Lyon, France; b Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Milano–Bicocca , 20126 Milan, Italy; c School of Mathematics
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Enzyme leaps fuel antichemotaxis [Biophysics and Computational Biology] Enzyme leaps fuel antichemotaxis Ah-Young Jee a , Sandipan Dutta a , Yoon-Kyoung Cho a , b , Tsvi Tlusty a , c , and Steve Granick a , d , 1 a Center for Soft and Living Matter, Institute for Basic Science , Ulsan 44919, South Korea; b Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology , Ulsan 44919, South Korea; c Department of Physics, Ulsan National Instit
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Three-dimensional forces exerted by leukocytes and vascular endothelial cells dynamically facilitate diapedesis [Biophysics and Computational Biology] Three-dimensional forces exerted by leukocytes and vascular endothelial cells dynamically facilitate diapedesis Yi-Ting Yeh a , b , c , 1 , Ricardo Serrano a , 1 , Joshua François b , Jeng-Jiann Chiu d , Yi-Shuan Julie Li b , c , Juan C. del Álamo a , 2 , Shu Chien b , c , 2 , and Juan C. Lasheras a , b , c , 2 a Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, San Di
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Toward a unified theory of efficient, predictive, and sparse coding [Biophysics and Computational Biology] Toward a unified theory of efficient, predictive, and sparse coding Matthew Chalk a , b , 1 , Olivier Marre b , and Gašper Tkačik a a Department of Physical Sciences, Institute of Science and Technology Austria, 3400 Klosterneuburg, Austria; b Sorbonne Universités, Université de Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 06, INSERM, CNRS, Institut de la Vision, 75012 Paris, France Edited by Charles F. Stevens,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Nonequilibrium internal energy distributions during dissociation [Chemistry] Nonequilibrium internal energy distributions during dissociation Narendra Singh a , 1 and Thomas Schwartzentruber a a Department of Aerospace Engineering and Mechanics, University of Minnesota , Minneapolis, MN 55455 Edited by R. D. Levine, The Fritz Haber Research Center, Jerusalem, Israel, and approved November 17, 2017 (received for review August 8, 2017) Significance Predicting the extent of
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Antagonistic actions of juvenile hormone and 20-hydroxyecdysone within the ring gland determine developmental transitions in Drosophila [Developmental Biology] Antagonistic actions of juvenile hormone and 20-hydroxyecdysone within the ring gland determine developmental transitions in Drosophila Suning Liu a , b , c , Kang Li a , b , c , Yue Gao a , b , Xi Liu c , Weiting Chen d , Wei Ge d , Qili Feng a , b , Subba R. Palli e , and Sheng Li a , b , c , 1 a Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Insect Development Regulation and Application Research, School of Life
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Observational evidence of European summer weather patterns predictable from spring [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences] Observational evidence of European summer weather patterns predictable from spring Albert Ossó a , 1 , Rowan Sutton a , Len Shaffrey a , and Buwen Dong a a Department of Meteorology, National Centre for Atmospheric Science, University of Reading , Reading RG6 6BB, United Kingdom Edited by Ben Kirtman, University of Miami, Miami, FL and accepted by Editorial Board Member Robert E. Dickinson Novemb
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Atmospheric autoxidation is increasingly important in urban and suburban North America [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences] Atmospheric autoxidation is increasingly important in urban and suburban North America Eric Praske a , Rasmus V. Otkjær b , John D. Crounse c , J. Caleb Hethcox a , Brian M. Stoltz a , Henrik G. Kjaergaard b , 1 , and Paul O. Wennberg c , d , 1 a Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology , Pasadena, CA 91125; b Department of Chemistry, University of Copenh
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Form finding in elastic gridshells [Engineering] Form finding in elastic gridshells Changyeob Baek a , 1 , Andrew O. Sageman-Furnas b , 1 , Mohammad K. Jawed a , and Pedro M. Reis a , c , d , 2 a Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology , Cambridge, MA 02139; b Institute for Numerical and Applied Mathematics, University of Goettingen , 37073 Goettingen, Germany; c Department of Civil and Environmental Engineer
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Effect of oil palm sustainability certification on deforestation and fire in Indonesia [Environmental Sciences] Effect of oil palm sustainability certification on deforestation and fire in Indonesia Kimberly M. Carlson a , b , 1 , 2 , Robert Heilmayr a , c , 1 , Holly K. Gibbs d , e , f , Praveen Noojipady g , h , i , David N. Burns g , Douglas C. Morton h , Nathalie F. Walker g , Gary D. Paoli j , and Claire Kremen k a Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, University of Hawaii , Ho
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Basal resistance enhances warming tolerance of alien over indigenous species across latitude [Environmental Sciences] Basal resistance enhances warming tolerance of alien over indigenous species across latitude Charlene Janion-Scheepers a , 1 , Laura Phillips a , Carla M. Sgrò a , Grant A. Duffy a , Rebecca Hallas a , and Steven L. Chown a a School of Biological Sciences, Monash University , Melbourne, VIC 3800, Australia Edited by David L. Denlinger, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, and approved November 21
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Abiotic synthesis of purine and pyrimidine ribonucleosides in aqueous microdroplets [Evolution] Abiotic synthesis of purine and pyrimidine ribonucleosides in aqueous microdroplets Inho Nam a , b , Hong Gil Nam a , c , 1 , and Richard N. Zare b , 1 a Center for Plant Aging Research, Institute for Basic Science , Daegu 42988, Republic of Korea; b Department of Chemistry, Stanford University , Stanford, CA 94305; c Department of New Biology, Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Modern diversification of the amino acid repertoire driven by oxygen [Evolution] Modern diversification of the amino acid repertoire driven by oxygen Matthias Granold a , Parvana Hajieva b , Monica Ioana Toşa c , Florin-Dan Irimie c , and Bernd Moosmann a , 1 a Evolutionary Biochemistry and Redox Medicine, Institute for Pathobiochemistry, University Medical Center of the Johannes Gutenberg University , 55128 Mainz, Germany; b Cellular Adaptation Group, Institute for Pathobioc
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
SIMS analyses of the oldest known assemblage of microfossils document their taxon-correlated carbon isotope compositions [Evolution] SIMS analyses of the oldest known assemblage of microfossils document their taxon-correlated carbon isotope compositions J. William Schopf a , b , c , d , 1 , Kouki Kitajima d , Michael J. Spicuzza d , Anatoliy B. Kudryavtsev b , and John W. Valley d a Department of Earth, Planetary, and Space Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles , CA 90095; b Center for the Study of Evolution and the
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Evidence of directional and stabilizing selection in contemporary humans [Evolution] Evidence of directional and stabilizing selection in contemporary humans Jaleal S. Sanjak a , b , Julia Sidorenko c , d , Matthew R. Robinson c , d , e , Kevin R. Thornton a , b , and Peter M. Visscher c , d , 1 a Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of California , Irvine, CA 92697; b Center for Complex Biological Systems, University of California , Irvine, CA 92697; c Quee
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Bifidobacterium can mitigate intestinal immunopathology in the context of CTLA-4 blockade [Immunology and Inflammation] Bifidobacterium can mitigate intestinal immunopathology in the context of CTLA-4 blockade Feng Wang a , b , 1 , Qian Yin c , Liang Chen c , and Mark M. Davis b , c , d , 1 a Center for Microbiota and Immunological Diseases, Shanghai General Hospital, Shanghai Institute of Immunology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine , Shanghai 200025, China; b Howard Hughes Medical Institute , Sta
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
C-terminal modification of the insulin B:11-23 peptide creates superagonists in mouse and human type 1 diabetes [Immunology and Inflammation] C-terminal modification of the insulin B:11–23 peptide creates superagonists in mouse and human type 1 diabetes Yang Wang a , Tomasz Sosinowski b , Andrey Novikov a , Frances Crawford a , David B. Neau c , Junbao Yang d , William W. Kwok d , Philippa Marrack a , e , f , John W. Kappler a , b , e , g , 1 , and Shaodong Dai a , e , g , 1 a Department of Biomedical Research, National Jewish Health ,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Conserved epitope on influenza-virus hemagglutinin head defined by a vaccine-induced antibody [Immunology and Inflammation] Conserved epitope on influenza-virus hemagglutinin head defined by a vaccine-induced antibody Donald D. Raymond a , 1 , 2 , Goran Bajic a , 1 , Jack Ferdman b , Pirada Suphaphiphat b , Ethan C. Settembre b , M. Anthony Moody c , d , Aaron G. Schmidt a , and Stephen C. Harrison a , e , 3 a Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Boston Children’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School , Boston, MA 02115; b Se
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mathematical picture language program [Mathematics] Mathematical picture language program Arthur M. Jaffe a , 1 , 2 and Zhengwei Liu a , 1 , 2 a Harvard University , Cambridge, MA 02138 Contributed by Arthur M. Jaffe, August 9, 2017 (sent for review June 18, 2017; reviewed by Jacob D. Biamonte, John Ewing, and Alina Vdovina) Significance We reevaluate ways that one can use pictures, not only to gain mathematical insights, but also to prove mathema
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Accurate quantification of brown adipose tissue mass by xenon-enhanced computed tomography [Medical Sciences] Accurate quantification of brown adipose tissue mass by xenon-enhanced computed tomography Rosa T. Branca a , b , 1 , Andrew McCallister a , b , Hong Yuan b , c , Amir Aghajanian d , James E. Faber d , Nicholas Weimer a , Riley Buchanan a , Carlos S. Floyd a , Michael Antonacci a , b , Le Zhang b , e , and Alex Burant a , b a Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Ch
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
MicroRNA-351 promotes schistosomiasis-induced hepatic fibrosis by targeting the vitamin D receptor [Microbiology] MicroRNA-351 promotes schistosomiasis-induced hepatic fibrosis by targeting the vitamin D receptor Xing He a , 1 , Yue Sun a , b , 1 , Nanhang Lei a , Xiaobin Fan a , Cheng Zhang a , Yange Wang a , Kuiyang Zheng b , Dongmei Zhang a , 2 , and Weiqing Pan a , 2 a Department of Tropical Infectious Diseases, Second Military Medical University , Shanghai 200433, China; b Department of Pathogen Biology
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Direct electrical stimulation of the amygdala enhances declarative memory in humans [Neuroscience] Direct electrical stimulation of the amygdala enhances declarative memory in humans Cory S. Inman a , 1 , Joseph R. Manns b , 1 , Kelly R. Bijanki a , David I. Bass c , Stephan Hamann b , Daniel L. Drane d , Rebecca E. Fasano d , Christopher K. Kovach e , Robert E. Gross a , d , f , and Jon T. Willie a , d , 2 a Department of Neurosurgery, Emory University , Atlanta, GA 30322; b Department of Psy
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Closing the loop on impulsivity via nucleus accumbens delta-band activity in mice and man [Neuroscience] Closing the loop on impulsivity via nucleus accumbens delta-band activity in mice and man Hemmings Wu a , 1 , Kai J. Miller a , 1 , Zack Blumenfeld b , Nolan R. Williams c , Vinod K. Ravikumar a , Karen E. Lee a , Bina Kakusa a , Matthew D. Sacchet c , Max Wintermark d , Daniel J. Christoffel e , Brian K. Rutt d , Helen Bronte-Stewart a , b , Brian Knutson f , Robert C. Malenka e , 2 , and Casey
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Differential regulation of striatal motor behavior and related cellular responses by dopamine D2L and D2S isoforms [Neuroscience] Differential regulation of striatal motor behavior and related cellular responses by dopamine D2L and D2S isoforms Daniela Radl a , b , c , 1 , Martina Chiacchiaretta a , b , c , 1 , Robert G. Lewis a , b , c , 1 , Karen Brami-Cherrier a , b , c , Ludovico Arcuri a , b , c , and Emiliana Borrelli a , b , c , 2 a Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of California, Irvine ,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Methylprednisolone acetate induces, and {Delta}7-dafachronic acid suppresses, Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection in NSG mice [Pharmacology] Methylprednisolone acetate induces, and Δ7-dafachronic acid suppresses, Strongyloides stercoralis hyperinfection in NSG mice John B. Patton a , 1 , Sandra Bonne-Année a , 1 , Jessica Deckman a , Jessica A. Hess a , April Torigian a , Thomas J. Nolan b , Zhu Wang c , d , Steven A. Kliewer c , e , Amy C. Durham b , James J. Lee f , Mark L. Eberhard g , David J. Mangelsdorf c , d , 2 , James B. Lok
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural predictor for nonlinear sheared dynamics in simple glass-forming liquids [Physics] Structural predictor for nonlinear sheared dynamics in simple glass-forming liquids Trond S. Ingebrigtsen a , 1 and Hajime Tanaka a , 1 a Department of Fundamental Engineering, Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo , Tokyo 153-8505, Japan Edited by David A. Weitz, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, and approved November 13, 2017 (received for review June 28, 2017) Significance Flui
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Weyl-Kondo semimetal in heavy-fermion systems [Physics] Weyl–Kondo semimetal in heavy-fermion systems Hsin-Hua Lai a , b , 1 , 2 , Sarah E. Grefe a , b , 1 , Silke Paschen c , and Qimiao Si a , b , 2 a Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University , Houston, TX 77005; b Rice Center for Quantum Materials, Rice University , Houston, TX 77005; c Institute of Solid State Physics, Vienna University of Technology , 1040 Vienna, Austria Edited by Zach
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Fungal-induced protein hyperacetylation in maize identified by acetylome profiling [Plant Biology] Fungal-induced protein hyperacetylation in maize identified by acetylome profiling Justin W. Walley a , 1 , Zhouxin Shen b , Maxwell R. McReynolds a , Eric A. Schmelz b , and Steven P. Briggs b , 1 a Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology, Iowa State University , Ames, IA 50011; b Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, San Diego , La Jolla, CA 92093 Contributed by Stev
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Vocal similarity predicts the relative attraction of musical chords [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences] Vocal similarity predicts the relative attraction of musical chords Daniel L. Bowling a , 1 , Dale Purves b , 1 , and Kamraan Z. Gill c a Department of Cognitive Biology, University of Vienna , Vienna 1090, Austria; b Duke Institute for Brain Sciences, Duke University , Durham, NC 27708; c Department of Pathology, CBLPath , Rye Brook, NY 10573 Contributed by D. Purves, November 21, 2017 (sent for
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Punishment diminishes the benefits of network reciprocity in social dilemma experiments [Social Sciences] Punishment diminishes the benefits of network reciprocity in social dilemma experiments Xuelong Li a , 1 , Marko Jusup b , 1 , 2 , Zhen Wang c , 1 , 2 , Huijia Li d , Lei Shi e , 2 , Boris Podobnik f , g , h , i , j , H. Eugene Stanley f , 2 , Shlomo Havlin k , l , and Stefano Boccaletti m , n a Xi’an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences , Xi’an 710119, Shaanxi
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
College completion predicts lower depression but higher metabolic syndrome among disadvantaged minorities in young adulthood [Social Sciences] College completion predicts lower depression but higher metabolic syndrome among disadvantaged minorities in young adulthood Lauren Gaydosh a , Kristen M. Schorpp b , Edith Chen c , d , Gregory E. Miller c , d , and Kathleen Mullan Harris a , e , 1 a Carolina Population Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill, NC 27516; b Department of Sociology, Roanoke College , Salem,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dynamic and heterogeneous effects of sibling death on children’s outcomes [Social Sciences] Dynamic and heterogeneous effects of sibling death on children’s outcomes Jason Fletcher a , b , Marian Vidal-Fernandez c , d , e , 1 , and Barbara Wolfe f , g , h a Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs, University of Wisconsin–Madison , Madison, WI 53706 ; b Department of Sociology, University of Wisconsin–Madison , Madison, WI 53706 ; c School of Economics, University of Sydney , 2006
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dietary species richness as a measure of food biodiversity and nutritional quality of diets [Sustainability Science] Dietary species richness as a measure of food biodiversity and nutritional quality of diets Carl Lachat a , 1 , 2 , Jessica E. Raneri a , b , 1 , Katherine Walker Smith a , Patrick Kolsteren a , Patrick Van Damme c , d , Kaat Verzelen c , Daniela Penafiel c , e , Wouter Vanhove c , Gina Kennedy b , Danny Hunter b , Francis Oduor Odhiambo b , Gervais Ntandou-Bouzitou b , Bernard De Baets f , Disna
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dissecting the genetic and metabolic mechanisms of adaptation to the knockout of a major metabolic enzyme in Escherichia coli [Systems Biology] Dissecting the genetic and metabolic mechanisms of adaptation to the knockout of a major metabolic enzyme in Escherichia coli Christopher P. Long a , Jacqueline E. Gonzalez a , Adam M. Feist b , c , Bernhard O. Palsson b , c , and Maciek R. Antoniewicz a , 1 a Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Metabolic Engineering and Systems Biology Laboratory, University of Delaware , Newark
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Larsen and Noack, Identifying the landscape drivers of agricultural insecticide use leveraging evidence from 100,000 fields [Correction]ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES, SUSTAINABILITY SCIENCE Correction for “Identifying the landscape drivers of agricultural insecticide use leveraging evidence from 100,000 fields,” by Ashley E. Larsen and Frederik Noack, which was first published May 8, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1620674114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:5473–5478). The authors note that on page 5477, right column, second...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Isik et al., Perceiving social interactions in the posterior superior temporal sulcus [Correction] Correction for Isik et al., Perceiving social interactions in the posterior superior temporal sulcus NEUROSCIENCE Correction for “Perceiving social interactions in the posterior superior temporal sulcus,” by Leyla Isik, Kami Koldewyn, David Beeler, and Nancy Kanwisher, which was first published October 9, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1714471114 ( Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:E9145–E9152). The authors note th
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Big Think
Norway Voted to Decriminalize All Drugs. Should America Follow Suit? The question of whether to punish criminals or attempt to reform them is not new. While some are for maximum enforcement, including solitary confinement and the death penalty, others take the more humane route of trying to rehabilitate criminals to integrate back into society. This question is especially heated when discussing drugs. America’s war has been a continual failure, from crack in t
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Big Think
Why Socrates Was Wrong About Democracy, John Stuart Mill and Why Freedom Is Good. We have explained before that some of the greatest thinkers in history found reasons to reject democracy. Their critiques were many, and often very well thought out. Even for the most ardent supporter of democratic ideals, their arguments must give us pause and lead us to reflect on our notions of government and society. Socrates had several issues with democracy, most of them stemming from eve
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study reveals how the midshipman fish sustains its hour-long mating call The cover of the January 2018 issue of the Journal of General Physiology shows a large, type I male midshipman fish and its smaller, female mate. Credit: Margaret Marchaterre, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, Cornell University. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have discovered how the Pacific midshipman fish can hum continuously for up to an hour in order to attract potential
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BBC News - Science & Environment
AI early diagnosis could save heart and cancer patients Image copyright BBC News Image caption Sir John Bell believes that artificial intelligence can save the NHS Researchers at an Oxford hospital have developed artificial intelligence (AI) that can diagnose scans for heart disease and lung cancer. The systems will save billions of pounds by enabling the diseases to be picked up much earlier. The heart disease technology will start to be available to
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Blog » Languages » English
Monthly Stats for Eyewire: December 2017 It was a good month for hitting Eyewire’s 5-year anniversary! We completed 31 cells, finished a 9 hour 27 minute marathon, and had a fun time with our Visit From St. Grim competition. We also hope everyone had a nice holiday season and that you’re all as stoked for 2018 as we are! Check out the rest of December’s stats below. New Scouts: CYWan123 Antemmasia New Scythes: blabbermouth ggreminder Ne
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The Atlantic
Beyond #MeToo: Can Time’s Up Effect Real Change? For the most part, powerful women. For the most part, wealthy women. For the most part, white women. #MeToo, for all the progress it has made in exposing sexual harassment and abuse—and in exposing the contours of systemic sexism more broadly—has been, from the outset, largely limited in its scope : A movement started, in this iteration , by the famous and the familiar, a movement unsure of how t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals how the midshipman fish sustains its hour-long mating call IMAGE: The cover of the January 2018 issue of the Journal of General Physiology shows a large, type I male midshipman fish and its smaller, female mate. view more Credit: Margaret Marchaterre, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, Cornell University. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have discovered how the Pacific midshipman fish can hum continuously for up to an hour in order
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Live Science
Why Is Losing Weight So Tough? Gyms across the country will be packed in the new year with people sticking, however briefly, to their New Year's resolution to lose weight. Most of them do not know that the cards are stacked against them and that weight loss is much more complicated than working out and not eating dessert. Years into the obesity epidemic, millions of Americans have tried to lose weight, and millions of th
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The Atlantic
Supermassive Black Holes Stop Galaxies From Making New Stars The galaxies of the universe grow up kind of like we do. When they’re young, they’re very active, producing new stars out of clouds of dust at a rapid rate. As they age, the churning slows down and eventually stops. No more new stars. The galaxies settle into some relative peace and quiet. Astronomers have long sought to figure out what exactly leads to this halt in star formation, a phenomenon k
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January 2018 TS CrosswordTry your hand at a sciency brain teaser.
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January 2018 TS Crossword Puzzle AnswersSee how well you did.
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Science : NPR
Neuroscientist Predicts 'Much Better Treatment' For Alzheimer's Is 10 Years Away Neuroscientist Joseph Jebelli says that while a certain amount of memory loss is a natural part of aging, what Alzheimer's patients experience is different. Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Roy Scott/Ikon Images/Getty Images Neuroscientist Joseph Jebelli says that while a certain amount of memory loss is a natural part of aging, what Alzheimer's patients experience i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Danger changes how rat brain stores information The male rat brain changes how it stores information depending on whether the environment in which it learns is safe or dangerous, according to new research published in eNeuro . Emotionally charged information, such as danger, is processed by the amygdala. Although this brain region is typically not involved in the acquisition of harmless information, Nathan Holmes and colleagues previously show
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stress gene regulates brain cell power and connections in rodents A gene activated by stress adjusts energy output and synapse number of prefrontal cortex neurons, finds a study of male mice and rats published in JNeurosci . The results were validated in brain tissue of deceased patients with Alzheimer's disease and depression, two disorders known to be aggravated by stress. Margarita Arango-Lievano, Freddy Jeanneteau and colleagues found that the gene NR4A1 is
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Zebrafish brain repair following concussion IMAGE: The mild traumatic brain injury weight drop model for adult zebrafish allows administration of a non-penetrating, diffuse injury to the brain of an adult zebrafish. The fish are anesthetized, placed... view more Credit: Maheras et al., eNeuro (2018) A simple and inexpensive zebrafish model of concussion, reported in eNeuro , reveals the genetic pathways underlying the animal's remarkab
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scheduled feeding improves neurodegenerative symptoms in miceRestricting meals to the same time each day improves motor activity and sleep quality in a mouse model of Huntington's disease, according to new research published in eNeuro. These findings suggest that eating on a strict schedule could improve quality of life for patients with neurodegenerative diseases for which there are no known cures.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blacks' high diabetes risk driven by obesity, not mystery Obesity is the primary cause of early onset diabetes in blacks Tracking 30 years of risk behaviors solves the "mystery" of the cause Black women develop diabetes at triple the rate of white women Disparity in diabetes between black and white youth is growing CHICAGO --- In a surprising finding, blacks and whites have the same risk of developing diabetes when all biological factors f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A fossil fuel technology that doesn't polluteEngineers at The Ohio State University are developing technologies that have the potential to economically convert fossil fuels and biomass into useful products including electricity without emitting carbon dioxide to the atmosphere.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Hopeful Monsters and the Snapping Shrimp Imagine losing your thumb in an accident and being able to regrow it: manufacturing muscle and bone, threading new blood vessels through developing flesh, and regaining grasp in a rudimentary appendage that gradually grows to its former size. Such physiological feats are beyond us but not unfamiliar. Crabs replace lost claws and salamanders grow new tails. Now, instead of just regeneration, i
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Live Science
Wafer-Thin 'Metalens' Uses Nanotech to Blow Glass Out of the Water This flat metalens can focus nearly the entire visible spectrum of light in the same spot and in high resolution. Credit: Jared Sisler/Harvard SEAS Physics could soon make it possible to replace those bulky, heavy, glass lenses on cameras with wafer-thin "metalenses" — materials microscopically engineered to focus light at a fraction of the weight and size of traditional lensing. A team fro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Randomness a key in spread of disease, other 'evil' Credit: CC0 Public Domain An unfortunate church dinner more than 100 years ago did more than just spread typhoid fever to scores of Californians. It led theorists on a quest to understand why many diseases - including typhoid, measles, polio, malaria, even cancer - take so much longer to develop in some affected people than in others. It's been known for more than 60 years that the incubation per
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New diagnostic criteria and treatment guidelines proposed for thyroid storm IMAGE: Thyroid, the official journal of the American Thyroid Association, publishes original articles and timely reviews that reflect the rapidly advancing changes in our understanding of thyroid physiology and pathology, from... view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, December 27, 2017--With a mortality rate estimated at 10%, the life-threatening condition kn
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Modifying baby formula doesn't prevent type 1 diabetes in childrenThe long-awaited results from the first large international trial to try to prevent type 1 diabetes shows that modified baby formula in which cow's milk proteins have been split does not prevent type 1 diabetes in children with genetic risk factors for the condition.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Call for improvement in post-sepsis outcomesDespite improvement in the rates of people dying of sepsis in the hospital, the condition is still a leading cause of hospital readmissions and costs, as well as long-term disabilities and impairments, prompting medical scientists to develop thorough recommendations for post-hospital recovery care and future clinical trials.
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Big Think
A Ukrainian Robot Can Print This $64,000 House In Just 8 Hours It takes an average of 7.5 months to build a new home. Even the smallest of domiciles—cabins, micro homes—usually take months to construct. But the Ukrainian startup PassivDom has cut that time down to as few as 8 hours by using a 3D-printing robot to print autonomous, mobile homes for $64,000 each. The robot only prints the walls, floor and roof of the 410-square-foot homes, while human worker
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Silver nanoparticles take spectroscopy to new dimension Detection of a low concentration analyte molecule using silicon nanowires decorated with silver nanoparticles and surface enhanced Raman scattering measurements. Credit: V.S. Vendamani As medicine and pharmacology investigate nanoscale processes, it has become increasingly important to identify and characterize different molecules. Raman spectroscopy, a technique that leverages the scattering of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel nanomedicine inhibits progression of pancreatic cancer in miceA new study pinpoints the inverse correlation between a known oncogene -- a gene that promotes the development of cancer -- and the expression of an oncosuppressor microRNA as the reason for extended pancreatic cancer survival. The study may serve as a basis for the development of an effective cocktail of drugs for this deadly disease and other cancers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Silver nanoparticles take spectroscopy to new dimensionAs medicine and pharmacology investigate nanoscale processes, it has become increasingly important to identify and characterize different molecules. Raman spectroscopy, which leverages the scattering of laser light to identify molecules, has a limited capacity to detect molecules in diluted samples because of low signal yield, but researchers in India have improved molecular detection at low conce
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Locating the precise reaction path: Methane dissociation on platinumSo far, the search for catalysts even better than transition metals has been largely based on trial and error, and on the assumption that catalyzed reactions take place on step edges and other atomic defect sites of the metal crystals. An international research team has combined experiments using advanced infrared techniques with quantum theory to explore methane dissociation reactions in minute d
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
An organ-on-a-chip device that models heart diseaseRecently, researchers have been studying diseases with a new approach: small, organ-on-a-chip devices that mimic the functions of human organs, serving as potentially cheaper and more effective tools. Now researchers have built a device that's especially good for modeling atherosclerosis. Researchers illustrate how the new device can be used to study important inflammatory responses in cells that
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A changing climate, changing wineA new study suggests that, though vineyards might be able to counteract some of the effects of climate change by planting lesser-known grape varieties, scientists and vintners need to better understand the wide diversity of grapes and their adaptions to different climates.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover higher environmental impact from cookstove emissions Cookstoves are a central part of millions of homes throughout Asia: families often use readily available and cheap biofuels—such as crop chaff or dung—to prepare the food needed to survive. Previously, numerous research groups worldwide have shown, mostly based on laboratory experiments, smoke emitted from stoves used for both cooking and heating have a definite, detrimental environmental impact,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Get Started: IRS warns that tax season brings security risks While cybersecurity should be a year-round concern for small business owners, income tax filing season can bring some particular risks, according to the IRS. The agency says it has gotten an increase in reports of attempts to obtain employees' W-2 forms in hopes of stealing people's personal information and identities. The scams often go after employees in companies' human resources and payroll d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Social susceptibility: Leader-follower dynamics of influential individuals in a social group Stegodyphus dumicola were hand-painted to enable researchers to keep track of individuals. Credit: Jonathan Pruitt This is the story of a spider, small but bold. This particular arachnid, in fact, has helped to debunk the Great Man Theory, a 19th-century notion positing that highly influential individuals use their power—be it personal charisma, intelligence, wisdom or political skill—to maximize
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Locating the precise reaction path: Methane dissociation on platinum The Pt(211) surface has three-atom-wide terraces and one-atom-high steps. The researchers labeled the row of atoms on the step edge as "step" (red), the middle row as "terrace" (black) and the final row as "corner" (gray). Credit: Han Guo Transition-metal catalysts, such as nickel and cobalt, are widely used in industry to produce hydrogen and other useful compounds from natural gas. Researchers
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Restasis: Why US consumers paid billions for drug deemed ineffective in other countriesRestasis, a blockbuster drug sold by Allergan to treat chronic dry eye, has done $8.8 billion in US sales between 2009 and 2015, including over $2.9 billion in public monies through Medicare Part D. In an article in JAMA Internal Medicine, 'A Clear-Eyed View of Restasis and Chronic Dry Eye Disease,' Dartmouth physician-researchers Lisa Schwartz and Steven Woloshin argue that a more fundamental que
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Randomness a key in spread of disease, other 'evil' ITHACA, N.Y. - An unfortunate church dinner more than 100 years ago did more than just spread typhoid fever to scores of Californians. It led theorists on a quest to understand why many diseases - including typhoid, measles, polio, malaria, even cancer - take so much longer to develop in some affected people than in others. It's been known for more than 60 years that the incubation periods of n
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Migraine surgery produces 'dramatic improvements' in functioning, study finds January 2, 2018 - In addition to reducing headache frequency and severity, surgical treatment for migraine leads to significant improvements in everyday functioning and coping ability, according to a study in the January issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery® , the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). "Our study demonstrates the high functional disa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Revealing snapshots: Advanced imaging uncovers how the brain responds to vascular injury IMAGE: The long arms of pericytes (shown in red) appear draped over capillaries in the brain (shown in blue). view more Credit: Image courtesy of Dr. Andy Shih, Medical University of South Carolina. Pericytes, a little-understood type of cell on the brain's blood vessels, grow into the empty space left when neighboring pericytes die, report researchers at the Medical University of South Carol
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hairy skin grown from mouse stem cellsIndiana University School of Medicine researchers have cultured the first lab-grown skin tissue complete with hair follicles. This skin model, developed using stem cells from mice, more closely resembles natural hair than existing models and may prove useful for testing drugs, understanding hair growth, and reducing the practice of animal testing. The work appears Jan. 2 in the journal Cell Report
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NIH discovery brings stem cell therapy for eye disease closer to the clinic IMAGE: Mature iPSC-derived RPE cells are visible by super resolution confocal microscopy. One primary cilium resides in the center of each cell. RPE cell borders are stained showing tight junction markers.... view more Credit: Ruchi Sharma, Ph.D., NEI Scientists at the National Eye Institute (NEI), part of the National Institutes of Health, report that tiny tube-like protrusions called primar
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Big Think
Why Pickle Brine On Icy Roads Could Be Smarter Than Salt Rock salt is one of the most effective substances for deicing roads when winter weather strikes. But while it makes roads safer, tons of salt end up in lakes, rivers and marshes where it poses dangers to aquatic life and the potability of water sources. In some cases, it’s been building up, layer by layer, since the 1930s. Currently, the U.S. dumps about 15 million tons each year. It doesn't
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A changing climate, changing wine Credit: CC0 Public Domain If you want to buy good wine, Elizabeth Wolkovich says stop looking at labels and listen to your taste buds. An Assistant Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Wolkovich is among the co-authors of a new study, which suggests that, though vineyards might be able to counteract some of the effects of climate change by planting lesser-known grape varieties , scie
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Braun MultiQuick 9: This High-Powered Immersion Blender Is One Cool WhipBraun's latest hand blender blows through foodstuffs that lesser sticks can’t crack.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Zooming in on protein to prevent kidney stones Researchers have applied Nobel prize-winning microscope technology to uncover an ion channel structure that could lead to new treatments for kidney stones. In a recent study published in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology , researchers revealed atomic-level details of the protein that serves as a passageway for calcium across kidney cell membranes. Approximately 80 percent of kidney stones a
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The Atlantic
Mark Twain, Tech Prophet Mark Twain’s reputation for spotting trends in technology is not great. His most famous foray ended poorly, after the great man of letters fancied himself a man of letterpress as well, and invested heavily in the Paige Compositor, a typesetting machine that bankrupted him . But what if Twain was, in fact, a prescient scout for new innovations? The Times Literary Supplement ’s always amusing NB co
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Jazz improvisers score high on creativity In the Dec. 23 & Jan. 6 SN : Our top stories of 2017, grounded pterosaur hatchlings, protectors of the Dead Sea Scrolls, a counterintuitive metamaterial, neutron star sizing, arrow of time reversed, E. coli in flour and more.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Zooming in on protein to prevent kidney stones Researchers have applied Nobel prize-winning microscope technology to uncover an ion channel structure that could lead to new treatments for kidney stones. In a recent study published in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology , researchers revealed atomic-level details of the protein that serves as a passageway for calcium across kidney cell membranes. Approximately 80 percent of kidney stones a
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tweaking quantum dots powers-up double-pane solar windows LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Jan. 2, 2018--Using two types of "designer" quantum dots, researchers are creating double-pane solar windows that generate electricity with greater efficiency and create shading and insulation for good measure. It's all made possible by a new window architecture which utilizes two different layers of low-cost quantum dots tuned to absorb different parts of the solar spectrum. "B
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Scientific American Content: Global
Crab Fishing in California: Risky Business Dungeness crab, buttery and served steaming hot, is a Christmas tradition on many central California tables. But two years ago families had to forgo their holiday treat, and they were not the only ones to suffer. California fishermen were crippled by an unprecedented algal bloom that contaminated crabs with a neurotoxin called domoic acid, which is deadly to humans. That shut business down throug
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Social susceptibility: Leader-follower dynamics of influential individuals in a social groupThis is the story of a spider, small but bold. This particular arachnid, in fact, has helped to debunk the Great Man Theory, a 19th-century notion positing that highly influential individuals use their power -- be it personal charisma, intelligence, wisdom or political skill -- to maximize their impact in shaping the course of history.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Higher environmental impact from cookstove emissionsMillions of Asian families use cookstoves and often fuel them with cheap biofuels to prepare food. But the smoke emitted from these cookstoves has a definite, detrimental environmental impact, particularly in India. New research offers a clearer picture of the topic's true scope.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Exploring electrolysis for energy storageA research team developed a flow-type polymer electrolyte cell for power storage. The cell reduces oxalic acid (OX) to glycolic acid, which has a higher volumetric energy-storage capacity than hydrogen gas. Newly fabricated TiO2 cathode enhanced the speed and efficiency of OX reduction. This competitive energy-storage device could be used to balance out the fluctuations in renewable power supplies
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Medication to prevent osteoporotic fractures may hinder the repair of damaged tissueA study has found that one of the most common medications to prevent osteoporitic fractures gives rise to previously unknown mineralization of bone cells. The discovery may be important for understanding the effect of medication on bone quality.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Virtual twin in ten minutesAvatars -- virtual persons: A new system makes it possible to practice and improve motion sequences by providing individualized feedback in real time. The system is embodied by a virtual person acting as a coach. In addition, users see themselves as avatars -- virtual copies of themselves in the mirror of the virtual room. The creation of such personalized avatars used to take several days, but re
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Food cues undermine healthy eating choicesObesity has become a major health issue due to the current ‘obesogenic’ environment in which unhealthy food is both easy and cheap to purchase. As a result, many (government) organisations encourage healthy eating habits among the general public by providing information on healthy diets. Nevertheless, when people encounter stimuli that they have learned to associate with certain snacks, they tend
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exploring electrolysis for energy storage IMAGE: A Kyushu University research team realized continuous electrochemical synthesis of an alcoholic compound from a carboxylic acid using a polymer electrolyte alcohol electrosynthesis cell, which enables direct power charge into... view more Credit: Masaaki Sadakiyo / International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research, Kyushu University Fukuoka - Interest in renewable energy conti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel diabetes drugs sensitize cancer cells to chemotherapy agents Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have shown that experimental diabetes drugs can make cancer cells more vulnerable to traditional chemotherapy agents, and they say such combinations should be explored to potentially improve outcomes for cancer patients. Reporting in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , investigators demonstrated in cancer cell lines and animal models th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Immune cells play key role in early breast cancer metastasis even before a tumor developsResearchers have discovered that normal immune cells called macrophages, which reside in healthy breast tissue surrounding milk ducts, play a major role in helping early breast cancer cells leave the breast for other parts of the body, potentially creating metastasis before a tumor has even developed, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New cholesterol calculation may avoid need to fast before testing, study suggestsIn a direct comparison study, researchers have added to evidence that a newer method of calculating so-called 'bad cholesterol' levels in the blood is more accurate than the older method in people who did not fast before blood was drawn.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Perfectionism among young people significantly increased since 1980s, study findsThe drive to be perfect in body, mind and career among today's college students has significantly increased compared with prior generations, which may be taking a toll on young people's mental health, according to research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Possible biomarker for Huntington's diseaseA new discovery of a potential biomarker for Huntington's disease (HD) could mean a more effective way of evaluating the effectiveness of treatments for this neurological disease. The findings may provide insight into treatments that could postpone the death of neurons in people who carry the HD gene mutation, but who do not yet show symptoms of the disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Increased risk of uterine fibroids in African-American women with a common form of hair lossIn a study of medical records gathered on hundreds of thousands of African-American women, researchers say they have evidence that women with a common form of hair loss have an increased chance of developing uterine leiomyomas, or fibroids.
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Quanta Magazine
Is a Bigger Genetic Code Better? Get Ready to Find Out With recent innovations in gene editing, it may seem as if the field of synthetic biology is just starting to make strides into science-fiction territory. But for several decades, scientists have been cultivating ways to create novel forms of life with basic biochemical components and properties far removed from anything found in nature. In particular, they’re working to expand the number of amin
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Solving a problem like waste recyclingThe BBC's Dan Johnson visited a plant in Southwark to see how they're dealing with recycling build-up.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
The gene editing tech that uses 'molecular scissors'In 2012 a form of gene editing was discovered, it is called CRISPR Cas9. It uses "molecular scissors" to alter a very specific strand of DNA.
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Live Science
UFO Watch: 8 Times the Government Looked for Flying SaucersA secret Pentagon UFO program is only the most recent in decades of work by the U.S. government looking into the unexplained. Below is a list of many of the government's programs, as well as a mention of countries that also had their own investigations.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Genetically Modified T Cells Might Help Fight HIV The same kind of DNA tinkering that produced the first FDA-approved gene therapy for cancer has shown hints of suppressing and even eradicating HIV infection in lab animals, scientists have reported . Although the study was small—it tested the genetically engineered “CAR” cells on only two monkeys as well as on cells growing in lab dishes—it suggests that after 30 years of fruitless efforts to
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The Scientist RSS
Linoleic Acid Derivatives Potentially Mediate Pain and Itch in the SkinResearchers uncover a family of compounds that may be involved in pain transmission.
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The Atlantic
The Transgender Scientist Who Changed How We See the Brain Right until the end of his life last Wednesday, Ben Barres made it his business to champion the unsung. While most of his fellow neuroscientists studied neurons, the branching cells that carry electrical signals through the brain, Barres focused his attention on another group of cells called glia. Even though they outnumber neurons by almost a factor of 10, glia were long dismissed as the brain’s
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diabetic blindness caused and reversed 'trapped' immune cells in rodent retinasResearchers have discovered a cell signaling pathway in mice that triggers vision loss in patients with diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion – diseases characterized by the closure of blood vessels in the retina, leading to blindness. In experiments that suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in the eye, researchers were able to re-establish normal blood flow in the retina
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Standardizing perovskite aging measurementsScientists have produced a data-driven proposal for standardizing the measurements of perovskite solar cell stability and degradation. The work aims to create consensus in the field and overcome one of the major hurdles on the way to commercializing perovskite photovoltaics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New brain mapping technique highlights relationship between connectivity and IQA new and relatively simple technique for mapping the wiring of the brain has shown a correlation between how well connected an individual's brain regions are and their intelligence, say researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A safer route to ultrasonic therapyA new system designed to study how cavitation bubbles created by ultrasound therapy affect nearby cells shows that attaching microbeads to the cellular membrane could make techniques like sonogenetics or ultrasonic modulation safer and more effective.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bifidobacterium or fiber protect against deterioration of the inner colonic mucus layerIf you are concerned about your health, you should also think about what your gut bacteria consume. Dietary fiber is a key source for their nutrition. Thus the quantity of fiber in your diet influences your weight, blood glucose level and sensitivty to insulin is well-established. The latest research shows that colonic health is also affected.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study predicts a significantly drier world at 2ºCNew research predicts a significantly drier world if global warming reaches 2ºC. Over a quarter of the world's land could become significantly drier and the change would cause an increased threat of drought and wildfires. Limiting warming to under 1.5ºC would dramatically reduce the fraction of the Earth's surface that undergoes such changes. Areas which would most benefit from keeping warming bel
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Futurity.org
‘Primitive and weird’ fossil looks like a tulip A new study details the only fossilized specimen of a species previously unknown to science—an “obscure” stalked filter feeder. To the untrained eye, it looks like a flower crudely etched into rock—as if a child had scratched a picture of a bloom. But to the late fossil hunter Lloyd Gunther, the tulip shape he unearthed at Antimony Canyon in northern Utah looked like the remnant of an ancient mar
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel nanomedicine inhibits progression of pancreatic cancer in mice A new Tel Aviv University study pinpoints the inverse correlation between a known oncogene -- a gene that promotes the development of cancer -- and the expression of an oncosuppressor microRNA as the reason for extended pancreatic cancer survival. The study may serve as a basis for the development of an effective cocktail of drugs for this deadly disease and other cancers. The study, which was pu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover higher environmental impact from cookstove emissions Cookstoves are a central part of millions of homes throughout Asia: families often use readily available and cheap biofuels -- such as crop chaff or dung -- to prepare the food needed to survive. Previously, numerous research groups worldwide have shown, mostly based on laboratory experiments, smoke emitted from stoves used for both cooking and heating have a definite, detrimental environmental i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Social susceptibility This is the story of a spider, small but bold. This particular arachnid, in fact, has helped to debunk the Great Man Theory, a 19th-century notion positing that highly influential individuals use their power -- be it personal charisma, intelligence, wisdom or political skill -- to maximize their impact in shaping the course of history. How better to test that theory than with Stegodyphus dumi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Call for improvement in post-sepsis outcomes PITTSBURGH, Jan 2, 2018 - Despite improvement in the rates of people dying of sepsis in the hospital, the condition is still a leading cause of hospital readmissions and costs, as well as long-term disabilities and impairments, prompting University of Pittsburgh and University of Michigan medical scientists to develop thorough recommendations for post-hospital recovery care and future clinical tr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Modifying baby formula doesn't prevent type 1 diabetes in children PITTSBURGH, Jan. 2, 2018 - The long-awaited results from the first large international trial to try to prevent type 1 diabetes shows that modified baby formula in which cow's milk proteins have been split does not prevent type 1 diabetes in children with genetic risk factors for the condition, according to researchers at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, the coordinating center for the U
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Frequency of autism spectrum disorder in US stable in recent years Bottom Line: The frequency of autism spectrum disorder among U.S. children and adolescents was stable from 2014-2016 based on data from a nationally representative annual survey. Why The Research Is Interesting: Previous surveys have reported a steady increase in the frequency of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in U.S. children over the past two decades but a recent estimate suggested a plateau
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Racial, ethnic disparities persist for patients in receiving kidney transplants from live donors Bottom Line: Black and Hispanic patients are less likely than white patients to receive a live donor kidney after two years on a waiting list, with an increase in disparity over the last two decades. Why The Research Is Interesting: Transplantation with a kidney from a live donor is associated with better medical outcomes and quality of life for patients with end-stage kidney disease compared t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find differences in infant morbidity-mortality rates in NYC hospitals Topic: Do differences in where very preterm infants are born contribute to racial and ethnic disparities in morbidity and mortality among blacks, whites, and Hispanics? Corresponding Author: Elizabeth Howell, MD, Director of the Women's Health Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, and other coauthors. To watch a media release of Dr. Howell discussing her important research
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Do young users of noncigarette tobacco products progress to conventional cigarettes?The use of electronic cigarettes, hookahs, noncigarette combustible tobacco or smokeless tobacco by adolescents were each associated with starting to smoke conventional cigarettes within a year.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An organ-on-a-chip device that models heart disease IMAGE: Atherosclerosis-on-a-chip microdevice for modeling stenosis and assessing blood health. view more Credit: Han Wei Hou WASHINGTON, D.C., Jan. 2, 2018 -- When studying diseases or testing potential drug therapies, researchers usually turn to cultured cells on Petri dishes or experiments with lab animals, but recently, researchers have been developing a different approach: small, orga
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Locating the precise reaction path: Methane dissociation on platinum IMAGE: The Pt(211) surface has three-atom-wide terraces and one-atom-high steps. The researchers labeled the row of atoms on the step edge as "step " (red), the middle row as "terrace " (black) and... view more Credit: Han Guo WASHINGTON, D.C., Jan. 2, 2018 -- Transition-metal catalysts, such as nickel and cobalt, are widely used in industry to produce hydrogen and other useful compounds
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Silver nanoparticles take spectroscopy to new dimension IMAGE: Detection of a low concentration analyte molecule using silicon nanowires decorated with silver nanoparticles and surface enhanced Raman scattering measurements. view more Credit: V.S. Vendamani WASHINGTON, D.C., Jan. 2, 2018 -- As medicine and pharmacology investigate nanoscale processes, it has become increasingly important to identify and characterize different molecules. Raman
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is it possible to prevent type 1 diabetes by avoiding cow's milk? The long-awaited result of the TRIGR Study published this week shows that baby formula in which the cow's milk proteins have been split does not prevent type 1 diabetes in children with genetic risk for type 1 diabetes. Previous studies have indicated that early exposure to complex foreign proteins, such as cow's milk proteins, increases the risk of type 1 diabetes in individuals with genetic r
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Science | The Guardian
Keep global warming under 1.5C or 'quarter of planet could become arid' More than a quarter of the planet’s surface could become significantly drier if global temperatures rise 2C above pre-industrial levels, scientists predict. The study, which is one of the most detailed assessments to date of future aridity, suggests that many regions could face an increased threat of drought and wildfires. Hurricanes and heatwaves: stark signs of climate change 'new normal' Limit
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High doses of vitamin D rapidly reduce arterial stiffnessIn just four months, high-doses of vitamin D reduce arterial stiffness in young, overweight/obese, vitamin-deficient, but otherwise still healthy African-Americans, researchers say.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Invasive tree species: Call for action to tackle threat to a global biodiversity hotspotAn invasive Australian tree is now posing a serious threat to a global diversity 'hotspot' in the natural forests of Jamaica's Blue and John Crow Mountains National Park. The tree species, Pittosporum undulatum, known locally as 'mock orange', is threatening many rare and endangered species, some of which are found nowhere else in the world. Scientists are urging the relevant institutions to prior
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Science | The Guardian
Of macaques and men: do bereaved monkeys need space to grieve? Name: Macaques. Age: Older than man, and a good deal less irritating. How much older? Old-world monkeys, of which macaques are a genus, developed about 25 million years ago, taking a different evolutionary path from apes. Humans descend from the ape line, but still have a lot in common with macaques, sharing around 93% of their DNA. Fascinating. Well, fascinating-ish. You haven’t mentioned their
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Scientific American Content: Global
Scientists Can Now Blame Individual Natural Disasters on Climate Change As floodwaters from the swollen River Thames crept closer to the walls of Myles Allen's south Oxford home in the United Kingdom, he was thinking about climate change—and if scientists could figure out if it was affecting the climbing water outside. It was January 2003, and as Allen—a climate expert at the University of Oxford—monitored the rising waters from the safety of his house, a voice o
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The Atlantic
Finding Love on the Dance Floor in Call Me by Your Name About half an hour into Call Me by Your Name , Luca Guadagnino’s film adaptation of André Aciman’s 2007 novel of the same name, a precocious 17-year-old named Elio (Timothée Chalamet) sits at an outdoor club. He’s surrounded by some friends who are gabbing about a duo on the dance floor: Oliver (Armie Hammer) and Chiara (Victoire Du Bois). “Who wouldn’t love to be in her shoes?” one of Elio’s fri
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hidden threat to health Micronutritients first need to be in soil, and then to make it through to the foodchain. Credit: Rothamsted Research One of the most ambitious programmes to provide lasting improvements in nutrition in sub-Saharan Africa begins today when a diverse multinational team of experts from agriculture to ethics start looking for ways to end dietary deficiencies in essential micronutrients. Rothamsted Re
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microbeads allow ultrasonic waves to stimulate cells more safely Researchers at Duke University have discovered a way to enhance the effectiveness and safety of sonogenetics or ultrasonic modulation, emerging techniques that use sound waves to control the behavior of individual neurons or to promote tissue growth and wound healing in other cells. Ultrasonic therapy often uses targeted ultrasound waves to create cavitation bubbles—tiny balloons of rapidly oscil
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How adoption worked for me | Christopher AtegekaTalent is universal, but opportunity isn't, says TED Fellow Christopher Ategeka. In this charming, hopeful talk, Ategeka tells his story of being orphaned at a young age -- and how being adopted gave him the chance to experience a new culture, acquire an education and live up to his full potential. "We may not be able to solve the bigotry and the racism of this world today," Ategeka says, "But cer
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sensor to monitor orbital debris outside space station Mounted on the exterior of the International Space Station, the Space Debris Sensor (SDS) collects information on small orbital debris. Credit: NASA The International Space Station isn't the only spacecraft orbiting the Earth. In fact, it is accompanied by the Hubble Space Telescope, satellites within the Earth Observing System, and more than 1,000 other operational spacecraft and CubeSats. In ad
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Standardizing perovskite aging measurements Perovskite solar cells are an alternative to conventional silicon solar cells, and are poised to overtake the market with their high power-conversion efficiencies (over 22% now) and lower capital expenditure and manufacturing costs. But one of the greatest obstacles on this road is stability: to be commercially viable, perovskite solar cells must also be able to maintain their efficiency over tim
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Viden
Facebook undskylder for racistisk indhold Onlinemediet ProPublica har siden slutningen af august i år indsamlet eksempler på indhold, der er blevet anmeldt for hadtale. Det er sket gennem en kampagne , hvor læsere af det journalistiske website indsendte de Facebook-indlæg, som de har anmeldt for stødende indhold. Som opfølgning på kampagnen har ProPublica bedt Facebook uddybe og genoverveje 49 af de indlæg, som de har modtaget. Gennemgan
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Ingeniøren
Kritisk syge spædbørn skal undersøges for alkohol-bivirkninger Danmarks to største neonatalafdelinger på henholdsvis Rigshospitalet og Aarhus Universitetshospital vil undersøge et større antal kritisk syge spædbørn for at afdække, hvilke konsekvenser der kan være af langtidssmertebehandling med intravenøs paracetamol. Det skriver Berlingske . Medicinen, som i mange tilfælde er livsnødvendig for spædbarnet, har ikke været systematisk undersøgt til brug for sp
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Live Science
Roman Temple of Mithras May Align with Sun on 'Jesus' Birthday' This 1,800-year-old temple was dedicated to the god Mithras. Credit: De Agostini/S. Vannini/REX/Shutterstock An 1,800-year-old temple in northern England that is dedicated to the god Mithras was built to align with the rising sun on Dec. 25, a physics professor has found. The temple is located beside a Roman fort in Carrawburgh, near Hadrian's Wall , which served as the most northerly front
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
BU researchers identify possible biomarker for Huntington's disease (Boston)--A new discovery of a potential biomarker for Huntington's disease (HD) could mean a more effective way of evaluating the effectiveness of treatments for this neurological disease. The findings may provide insight into treatments that could postpone the death of neurons in people who carry the HD gene mutation, but who do not yet show symptoms of the disease. The study, led by researcher
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Perfectionism among young people significantly increased since 1980s, study findsThe drive to be perfect in body, mind and career among today's college students has significantly increased compared with prior generations, which may be taking a toll on young people's mental health, according to research published by the American Psychological Association.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bifidobacterium or fiber protect against deterioration of the inner colonic mucus layer IMAGE: This is professor Fredrik Bäckhed, Sahlgrenska Academy, Sweden. view more Credit: Johan Wingborg, University of Gothenburg. If you are concerned about your health, you should also think about what your gut bacteria consume. Dietary fiber is a key source for their nutrition. Thus the quantity of fiber in your diet influences your weight, blood glucose level and sensitivty to insul
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A safer route to ultrasonic therapy DURHAM, N.C. -- Researchers at Duke University have discovered a way to enhance the effectiveness and safety of sonogenetics or ultrasonic modulation, emerging techniques that use sound waves to control the behavior of individual neurons or to promote tissue growth and wound healing in other cells. Ultrasonic therapy often uses targeted ultrasound waves to create cavitation bubbles -- tiny balloo
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Futurity.org
Trauma history may raise women’s heart disease risk New research links traumatic experiences and later vascular health issues that place women at risk for heart disease. “When we consider the determinants of women’s cardiovascular health, we need to think beyond biology alone,” says Rebecca Thurston, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh’s School of Medicine. The results show that women reporting a higher number of traumatic ex
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Futurity.org
Going ‘shuntless’ can be better for babies with hydrocephalus Implanting a shunt or endoscopically reducing intracranial pressure and reducing fluid production are equally effective in treating infants with hydrocephalus caused by brain infections, a new study shows. But endoscopy may have fewer down-the-line complications. “This clinical trial asked if we could do a version of shuntless surgery, without the need to implant a plastic tube,” says first autho
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Science | The Guardian
Universities are under attack – time to drag the fight to a higher level | Stephen Curry Y esterday there appeared the latest in a long series of articles that, through the medium of superficial analysis, mounts a damaging attack on Britain’s universities. The piece , published by the BBC, rehearses the debates over tuition fees, student satisfaction, sky-high vice-chancellor salaries, and the universities minister’s recent criticism of free speech at our institutions of higher educa
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These Abandoned Theme Parks Are Guaranteed To Make You Nostalgic Joyland Amusement Park, Wichita, Kansas Land of Oz, Beech Mountain, North Carolina Chippewa Lake Park, Chippewa Lake, Ohio Dogpatch USA, Marble Falls Township, Arkansas Enchanted Forest Playland, Toledo, Ohio Geauga Lake, Bainbridge Township, Ohio Disney's River Country, Lake Buena Vista, Florida Six Flags, New Orleans, Louisiana Lake Shawnee Amusement Park, Mercer County, West Virginia Prehistor
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Futurity.org
Endangered birds get bigger beaks to eat invasive snails In about 10 years, birds called snail kites evolved larger beaks as their new prey, the island apple snail, proliferated and became invasive. “Beak size had been increasing every year since the invasion of the snail from about 2007,” says Robert Fletcher, associate professor in the department of wildlife ecology and conservation, part of the University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New brain mapping technique highlights relationship between connectivity and IQ A new and relatively simple technique for mapping the wiring of the brain has shown a correlation between how well connected an individual's brain regions are and their intelligence, say researchers at the University of Cambridge. In recent years, there has been a concerted effort among scientists to map the connections in the brain - the so-called 'connectome' - and to understand how this relate
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New cholesterol calculation may avoid need to fast before testing, study suggests In a direct comparison study, Johns Hopkins researchers have added to evidence that a newer method of calculating so-called "bad cholesterol" levels in the blood is more accurate than the older method in people who did not fast before blood was drawn. The research results, published in print on Jan. 2 in Circulation , suggest that routine fasting for cholesterol tests could be eliminated for most
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Historical development of teacher education studied in a cross-country collaboration The paper, titled "A tale of two countries - forty years on: politics and teacher education in Russia and England", came out in European Journal of Teacher Education . Professor Valeeva commented, "We chose England of the four countries of the United Kingdom because it has a peculiar system of teacher education. The last 40 years in the two compared nations have been somewhat alike in policy chan
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Scientific American Content: Global
Building the Ultimate Ultimate Disc For almost half my life, I have played the sport of ultimate—previously called ultimate Frisbee—across several states and even internationally, in all types of conditions. On one extreme, the snowy outdoor February tournament in New Hampshire called Live Freeze or Die takes pride in the toughness of its competitors (the name is a takeoff on the state motto,“Live Free or Die”). On the other end, t
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Live Science
Do Animals Get Jealous? Turns out, Fido really does get jealous. Credit: Shutterstock Anyone with pets would likely be quick to claim that animals experience jealousy. After all, Kitty's need for attention only started with the arrival of the new baby, and Rover doesn't act the same way around other people as he does around your new significant other. Despite the anecdotal evidence, scientists have long struggled
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Science : NPR
Clean Meat, Via Lab, Is On The Way Ryzhkov/Getty Images/iStockphoto Ryzhkov/Getty Images/iStockphoto A year ago this month, animal activist Paul Shapiro sat in the offices of the Hampton Creek food technology company in San Francisco and put a forkful of foie gras in his mouth. This small act was a big deal. Shapiro, at the time the vice president of farm animal protection at the Humane Society of the United States , hadn't eaten
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic changes caused by environmental factors linked to suicide risk IMAGE: This is Jussi Jokinen, professor in psychiatry at the Department of Clinical Studies at Umeå University in Sweden. view more Credit: Maurits Persson Researchers have linked genetic changes in the so-called CRH gene, which affects the regulation of the body's stress system, to suicide risk and psychiatric illness. The study of epigenetic changes in the body's hormone-based stress syst
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Cellular division strategy shared across all domains of life IMAGE: SEAS researchers have found that these pink-hued archaea -- called Halobacterium salinarum -- use the same mechanisms to maintain size as bacteria and eukaryotic life, indicting that cellular division strategy... view more Credit: Image courtesy of Alexandre Bison/ Harvard University The three domains of life -- archaea, bacteria, and eukarya -- may have more in common than previou
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Standardizing perovskite aging measurements Perovskite solar cells are an alternative to conventional silicon solar cells, and are poised to overtake the market with their high power-conversion efficiencies (over 22% now) and lower capital expenditure and manufacturing costs. But one of the greatest obstacles on this road is stability: to be commercially viable, perovskite solar cells must also be able to maintain their efficiency over tim
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Glucose SensorScientists build a biosensor skin patch for noninvasive glucose monitoring.
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The Scientist RSS
Former Wayne State Cancer Researcher Lodges 19th RetractionFazlul Sarkar had unsuccessfully sued PubPeer to reveal the identity of a commenter who accused him of research misconduct.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immune cells play key role in early breast cancer metastasis even before a tumor develops (New York, NY - January 2, 2018) --Mount Sinai researchers have discovered that normal immune cells called macrophages, which reside in healthy breast tissue surrounding milk ducts, play a major role in helping early breast cancer cells leave the breast for other parts of the body, potentially creating metastasis before a tumor has even developed, according to a study published in Nature Communic
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Science : NPR
Top Fitness Trends For 2018: Back To Basics Fitness routines that require little equipment, such as yoga and high-intensity interval training, are predicted to be more popular in 2018. Ryan J. Lane/Getty Images/iStockphoto hide caption toggle caption Ryan J. Lane/Getty Images/iStockphoto Fitness routines that require little equipment, such as yoga and high-intensity interval training, are predicted to be more popular in 2018. Ryan J. Lane/
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Latest Headlines | Science News
86 stars get official names In December, astronomers and space enthusiasts received an early present: 86 newly official star names. Such designations are often derived from Arabic, Greek or Latin origins. But the new monikers also draw inspiration from ancient mythologies and historical star names from indigenous cultures around the world, including in China, Australia and southern Africa. The star names were officially rec
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Scientific American Content: Global
My Year on "Mars" The wind sweeps quietly across the barren, dry landscape. There is not a shrub in sight, not a tree, not a single blade of grass that the wind might disturb. Only barren grayish-red rocks. The wind never touched us as we peered out of our only window, which was more of a porthole than a real window. We did hear it though as it swept across our white dome perched on the slope of the volcano.
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Ingeniøren
Sundhedsminister om SSI's manglende tilsyn: »Ikke godt nok og stærkt kritisabelt« Sundhedsminister Ellen Trane Nørby (V) går nu ind i sagen om Statens Serum Institut (SSI), som har forsømt at føre tilsyn med, om danskeres person- og sundhedsdata er blevet behandlet korrekt. Ministeren kræver, at SSI udarbejder en redegørelse for, hvordan de vil håndtere danskernes data lovligt i fremtiden. Reaktionen kommer efter, at Version2 tidligere i dag kunne afsløre, at SSI ikke har ført
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Ingeniøren
Spansk entreprenør afkræves 625 mio. kr for fejl i Niels Bohr Bygningen Et krav om at betale 625 millioner kroner var formentlig ikke den julegave, som den spanske entreprenørkoncern Inabensa havde håbet på. Det var ikke desto mindre det, virksomheden fik fra Bygningsstyrelsen. Det fremgår af en pressemeddelelse fra styrelsen. Inabensa vandt i sin tid opgaven med at installere VVS, køl, varme, CTS, kloak, konstruktioner, sprinkler og gas i Niels Bohr Bygningen – et g
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Futurity.org
Streams can be ‘sensors’ for sustainable watersheds Streams can be diagnostic “sensors” for a watershed’s sensitivity to changes in land use practices, such as the long-term use of fertilizers, according a new study. “The manipulation of phosphorous and nitrogen in the landscape is one of the greatest threats to the fate of humanity and the rest of life on this planet…” Using streams as sensors—specifically, near the headwaters—can allow scientist
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Snakes Lost Their Legs A Chinese riddle invites on to guess the identity of runners without a leg, swimmers without a flipper, gliders without a wing. The answer, of course, is snakes. Today more than 3,000 species share a long, limbless body that can negotiate land, water and even the air between trees. Their ancient ancestors, however, had limbs of various shapes. How, scientists have wondered, did snakes lose their
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Live Science
Pioneers of the American West: The Harvey Girls (Photos) Moving across the land Credit: Library of Congress Dangers everywhere Credit: NPS Feeding the travelers Credit: NPS In search of servers Credit: NPS Working women Credit: NPS High expectations Credit: NPS On the job Credit: Linda & Dr. Dick Buscher Attention to detail Credit: NPS Finding love Credit: Linda & Dr. Dick Buscher Sharing a culture Credit: University of Arizona Library Serving the troo
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The Scientist RSS
Former Wayne State Cancer Researcher Lodges Nineteenth RetractionFazlul Sarkar had unsuccessfully sued PubPeer to reveal the identity of a commenter who accused him of research misconduct.
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Futurity.org
These compounds starve blood cancer to death Newly synthesized compounds can starve multiple myeloma—a rare form of blood cancer—to death, according to a series of studies using patient samples. The new compounds offer “a new strategy for attacking multiple myeloma…” Tumor cells, including those of the largely fatal plasma cell malignancy multiple myeloma, thrive on glucose. In this cancer, the tumor co-opts the GLUT4 protein, a vital gluco
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Feed: All Latest
Navigating the Uncanny Valley of Food A quarter century ago, Steven Spielberg created velociraptors that were viscerally compelling enough to toe-claw tap dance straight into our nightmares. Last year, the VFX team behind Rogue One gave us a posthumously CGI-reanimated Peter Cushing as Grand Moff Tarkin , and that inspired a different and unintended kind of unease. Japanese roboticist Masahiro Mori’s famous Uncanny Valley hypothesis
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Scientific American Content: Global
A Neuroscientist Explores the "Sanskrit Effect" A hundred dhoti-clad young men sat cross-legged on the floor in facing rows, chatting amongst themselves. At a sign from their teacher the hall went quiet. Then they began the recitation. Without pause or error, entirely from memory, one side of the room intoned one line of the text, then the other side of the room answered with the next line. Bass and baritone voices filled the hall with sonorou
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Ingeniøren
Forskere: Fortællingen om Fimbulvinteren holder stik Det er ikke kun i den populære tv-serie Game of Thrones, at årstidernes længde varierer. Ifølge den nordiske mytologi varer Fimbulvinteren tre år, og varsler begyndelsen på Ragnarok – Jordens undergang, hvor alt liv dør. Men mytologien har formentlig rod i virkeligheden. De seneste år har forskere i Norge og Sverige nemlig fundet stadig flere spor, der tyder på, at der indtraf en klimakatastrofe
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Mussel power: Bid to save rare shellfish in WalesYoung freshwater pearl mussels are being grown at a fishery in Powys
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Feed: All Latest
This App Collects Spare Change to Bail People Out of Jail “An app that converts your daily change into bail money to free black people.” That’s what Kortney Ryan Ziegler, a social engineer with a PhD in African-American studies, tweeted in July. The response was instantaneous—and overwhelming. Nearly 200 people replied with offers to help. That was the start of Appolition, which converts users’ spare change into bail money. The idea behind Appolition, w
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Feed: All Latest
Hacker Lexicon: What Is Sinkholing? When you have tons of leftovers you put them in Tupperware. When you have an excess of phone calls, you send them to voicemail. And when you have a deluge of junk from a botnet attacking your network, you put all that malicious traffic into a sinkhole. Sinkholing is a technique for manipulating data flow in a network; you redirect traffic from its intended destination to the server of your choosi
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Science | The Guardian
How 'smart ice' is helping to save lives on Canada's thinning sea ice T he four men were napping in their Bombardier snow vehicle when disaster struck. They had stopped for a break on an overnight cargo run down the west coast of Hudson Bay when the ice beneath them gave way. Normally thick enough to take the load, the sea ice in northern Canada formed late last season. As the vehicle plunged into the freezing water, only one man escaped. The accident in January 20
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Science | The Guardian
Fertility and canapés: why egg freezing parties are a hot item on Wall St A bout two dozen women ate cheese and canapés in a swanky Midtown Manhattan building in early December. It could have been mistaken for a networking event if it weren’t for the women’s singular focus – egg freezing. Hope or hype? The chilling truth about freezing your eggs Formally called “oocyte cryopreservation”, egg freezing has boomed over the last decade. Since 2009, there has been an 11-fol
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Latest Headlines | Science News
A sinking, melting ancient tectonic plate may fuel Yellowstone’s supervolcano The driving force behind Yellowstone’s long and explosive volcanic history may not be as deep as once thought. A new study suggests that instead of a plume of hot mantle that extends down to Earth’s core, the real culprit is a subducting tectonic plate that began sinking beneath North America hundreds of millions of years ago. Computer simulations show that movement of broken-up remnants of the a
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New Scientist - News
Japan launches super-low-orbit satellite to test ion engines The rocket carrying TSUBAME blasts off JAXA By Alice Klein A satellite designed to orbit the earth at the lowest altitude ever has been successfully launched by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The 400-kilogram satellite – known as Tsubame – will be used to take high-resolution images of Earth and measure oxygen levels. If successful, it may pave the way for more super-low-orbit
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