Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nature's smallest rainbows, created by peacock spiders, may inspire new optical technology A miniature peacock spider with rainbow-iridescence. a) An adult male Maratus robinsoni. b) A M. robinsoni resting on a human fingernail: the spider is only ~?2.5?mm in size. The iridescent abdomen of the spider is indicated by the black arrow. c) A zoom-in view (scale bar: 200?μm) of the same spider abdomen as shown in the dashed square of a, but with different viewing angle. Note the colours of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How alcohol damages DNA and increases cancer riskScientists have shown how alcohol damages DNA in stem cells, helping to explain why drinking increases your risk of cancer, according to new research.
59min
Ingeniøren
Statens Serum Institut sender patientdata til USA uden at fortælle borgerne om det Danske forskere sender person- og sundhedsdata til udlandet, uden at borgerne oplyses om det. Data havner hos såkaldte databehandlere i og uden for EU, der dermed kan få adgang til informationer om alt lige fra blodtype og arvemasse til religion, seksualitet og familieforhold. Det viser dokumenter fra Statens Serum Institut (SSI), som Version2 har fået indsigt i. SSI har på nuværende tidspunkt 13
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Engineers make wearable sensors for plants, enabling measurements of water use in crops IMAGE: Iowa State University researchers have developed these "plant tattoo sensors " to take real-time, direct measurements of water use in crops. view more Credit: Photo courtesy of Liang Dong/Iowa State University AMES, Iowa - Iowa State University plant scientist Patrick Schnable quickly described how he measured the time it takes for two kinds of corn plants to move water from their ro
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Get a Password Manager. Here's Where to Start You're sick of hearing this. The exhortations didn't work in 2013 and they're not going to work now. Sure. But the truth is that you need a password manager, and it's worth it to take the time to set one up. At this point, even their shortcomings prove how vital they are. Research published last week through Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy highlights a problematic feature in
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Live Science
Here's What You Say When You Talk in Your Sleep Worried you might say something you regret when talking in your sleep? Your concerns may be justified: According to a recent study from France, your midnight mumblings may be more negative and insulting than what you say while awake. In the study, researchers found that sleep talkers said the word "no" four times more often in their sleep than when awake. And the F-word popped up during sle
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Scientific American Content: Global
What Is This "Bomb Cyclone" Threatening the U.S.? New England is nervously awaiting heavy snow and strong winds as “Winter Storm Grayson” barrels up the U.S. Atlantic coast. Already, the storm has hit regions not accustomed to severe winter weather—Florida, Georgia, Virginia and the Carolinas—with a mixture of snow and rain, according to news reports . This is no typical winter storm—meteorologists have been predicting Grayson will soon turn int
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The Atlantic
The Quiet Exuberance of Winter “You have to be at peace with the fact that something might happen, and you might not make it through,” says Alexandra de Steiguer , the caretaker for the Oceanic Hotel, in Brian Bolster ’s short documentary, Winter’s Watch . De Steiguer has spent the past 19 winters tending to the 43-acre grounds of the hotel, on Star Island, which sits 10 miles off the coast of New England. In the long, wintry
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New on MIT Technology Review
The Science Linking Arctic Warming to This Crazy-Cold Winter The U.S. Is Blocking a Chinese Fintech Giant from Buying MoneyGram American authorities have decided that Alibaba's digital payment firm, Ant Financial, won't be allowed to acquire the cash transfer company Moneygram. Ant Financial, which was one of our 50 Smartest Companies in 2017 , is a Chinese tech company that handles… Read more American authorities have decided that Alibaba's digital paym
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tailoring cancer treatments to individual patientsResearchers have developed computer models to predict how cancer will progress in a specific individual, based on tissue, cellular and subcellular protein signaling responses. The models can predict how brain tumors (gliomas) will grow with much greater accuracy than previous models. Recently, the group began a clinical study to predict how an individual's cancer will progress after one cycle of t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Environmentally safe red glare rocket changes fireworks, soldier technologyResearchers have developed an environmentally friendly red light flare popular in fireworks displays and among Soldiers who use them in training and battlefield operations as signaling devices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Integrating two types of crop models to predict the effect of climate change on crop yieldsScientists now have a new tool to predict the future effects of climate change on crop yields. Researchers are attempting to bridge two types of computational crop models to become more reliable predictors of crop production in the U.S. Corn Belt.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In clinical trial, cream reduces squamous cell carcinoma riskResults of a new randomized, double-blinded, controlled clinical trial in veterans showed a 75 percent reduction in the risk of needing surgery to treat a squamous cell carcinoma for a year after applying a skin cream for up to four weeks.
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Science : NPR
Scientists Warn 'Bomb Cyclone' Will Bring Strong Winds, Cold Temperatures The storm spread snow and freezing rain across the Southeast on Wednesday. It's expected to intensify as it moves up the coast. Stephen B. Morton/AP hide caption toggle caption Stephen B. Morton/AP The storm spread snow and freezing rain across the Southeast on Wednesday. It's expected to intensify as it moves up the coast. Stephen B. Morton/AP The eastern United States is about to be hit by a re
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon muscles in on Google's and Facebook's advertising turf As Amazon.com keeps growing and expands into new lines of business, the company is turning its sights on the golden goose of two Silicon Valley rivals: digital advertising. Google and Facebook dominate the lucrative business of selling digital ads, but experts say Amazon is positioning itself to snatch market share. "They have made the determination to take the advertising business seriously,"
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Morris Animal Foundation-funded study shows importance of wildlife in controlling ticks DENVER/Jan. 3, 2018 - Morris Animal Foundation -funded researchers from the University of California, Santa Barbara , have found that a decrease in wildlife populations causes an upsurge in local tick populations, potentially increasing the threat of infectious diseases globally. The research team published their results in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences . Ticks trans
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Caffeine level in blood may help diagnose people with Parkinson's diseaseTesting the level of caffeine in the blood may provide a simple way to aid the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, according to a study published in the Jan. 3, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology.
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Big Think
Why Negative Thinking Works Positive thinking has long been championed in American culture. While optimism is part of our biological inheritance—when we’re not hopeful about the future, anxiety and depression can easily transform into suicidal tendencies—positive thinking and positive psychology grew into billion-dollar industries, beginning with Norman Vincent Peale’s 1952 book, The Power of Positive Thinking . Whereas
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Inside Science
BRIEF: Cheap Motion-Sensing Bracelets Decode Thousands of Nights of Sleep BRIEF: Cheap Motion-Sensing Bracelets Decode Thousands of Nights of Sleep Measuring sleep cycles no longer requires complex instruments and a lab. shutterstock_614861675_cropped.jpg Image credits: fizkes via Shutterstock Technology Wednesday, January 3, 2018 - 15:45 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- Motion sensors worn on the wrist have long been a staple of sleep research, tracking w
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gene fusion shifts cell activity into high gear, causing some cancerResearchers have discovered that a common fusion of two adjacent genes can cause cancer by kicking mitochondria into overdrive, increasing the amount of fuel available for rampant cell growth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovery brings stem cell therapy for eye disease closer to the clinicScientists report that tiny tube-like protrusions called primary cilia on cells of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) -- a layer of cells in the back of the eye -- are essential for the survival of the retina's light-sensing photoreceptors. The discovery has advanced efforts to make stem cell-derived RPE for transplantation into patients with geographic atrophy, otherwise known as dry age-relate
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers use 'global thermometer' to track temperature extremes, droughtsLarge areas of Earth's surface are experiencing rising maximum temperatures, which affect virtually every ecosystem on the planet, including ice sheets and tropical forests that play major roles in regulating the biosphere, scientists have reported.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intel says it's fixing security vulnerability in its chipsIntel says it's working to patch a security vulnerability in its products but says the average computer user won't experience significant slowdowns as the problem is fixed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The moon is about to do something it hasn't done in more than 150 years This is a composite image of the lunar nearside taken by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter in June 2009, note the presence of dark areas of maria on this side of the moon. Credit: NASA Call it whatever you like—a blue red moon, a purple moon, a blood moon—but the moon will be a special sight on Jan. 31. Three separate celestial events will occur simultaneously that night, resulting in what some ar
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Aliens ruled out for why Tabby’s star flickers The first observations of Tabby’s star flickering in real time have put the last nails in the “it’s-an-alien-megastructure” coffin. The star’s most recent winks show that the dimming is from small dust particles surrounding it, a team of more than 200 scientists and amateur astronomers reports in a paper posted at arXiv.org January 3. The oddball star, officially named KIC 8462852 , is best known
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Science : NPR
Ancient Human Remains Document Migration From Asia To America Here's what archeologists think the Upward Sun River camp in what is now central Alaska looked like 11,500 years ago. Eric S. Carlson and Ben A. Potter/Nature hide caption toggle caption Eric S. Carlson and Ben A. Potter/Nature Here's what archeologists think the Upward Sun River camp in what is now central Alaska looked like 11,500 years ago. Eric S. Carlson and Ben A. Potter/Nature In Alaska, s
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New Scientist - News
A daily blast of sound and electrical pulses may tame tinnitus The technique eased the symptoms in some of the participants MonthiraYodtiwong By Andy Coghlan Peace at last. A new treatment has shown promise for taming tinnitus , a ringing or grating sound which affects one in 10 people. Existing treatments are limited to behavioural programmes that help patients better tolerate the condition or to drastic and risky surgery involving electrical implants ,
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New Scientist - News
Your computer may run 30 per cent slower due to Intel chip bug The flaw is understood to affect millions of Intel chips Description:yorkfoto/Getty By Timothy Revell A massive security flaw may have been discovered with Intel processors, according to reports today. The flaw makes passwords and other personal details an easier target for hackers, and is thought to affect all Intel processors from the last decade. The good news is that there is a fix. But u
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Silent code' of nucleotides, not amino acids, determines functions of vital proteins Actin is an abundant protein, present in every cell. Penn Vet researchers showed that differences in the order of nucleotides -- not the amino acids -- governed the distinct functions of two forms of actin. Credit: University of Pennsylvania Humans possess six forms of the protein actin, which perform essential functions in the body. Two in particular, β-actin and γ-actin, are nearly identical, o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study identifies thermometer for global ocean A core from the WAIS Divide Ice Core borehole in West Antarctica drilled in 2012. Credit: Jay Johnson/IDDO There's a new way to measure the average temperature of the ocean thanks to researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego. In an article published in the Jan. 4, 2018, issue of the journal Nature , geoscientist Jeff Severinghaus and colleagues a
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Popular Science
What the heck is a bomb cyclone? Bomb cyclone : it sounds really cool, it’s actually kind of scary, and it’s headed your way. On Wednesday and Thursday, the intimidatingly-named winter storm is set to hit the East Coast with icy precipitation from Florida up into New England. But a name as apocalyptic as bomb cyclone begs explanation. How bad will this storm be, exactly? I mean, “bomb” is generally a qualifier you want attached
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Science | The Guardian
Patients in Africa twice as likely to die after an operation than global average, report shows Patients undergoing surgery in Africa are more than twice as likely to die following an operation than the global average, despite generally being younger, healthier and the surgery they are undergoing being more minor, research has revealed. The study, which covered 25 countries, revealed that just over 18% of in-patients developed complications following surgery, while 1% of elective in-patient
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physicists build muscle for shape-changing, cell-sized robots IMAGE: Graphene-glass bimorphs can be used to fabricate numerous micron-scale 3-D structures, including (top to bottom) tetrahedron, helices of controllable pitch, high-angle folds and clasps, basic origami motifs with bidirectional folding,... view more Credit: Cornell University ITHACA, N.Y. - An electricity-conducting, environment-sensing, shape-changing machine the size of a human cell? I
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists design bacteria to reflect 'sonar' signals for ultrasound imagingScientists have designed bacteria to reflect sound waves like submarines. The technology could eventually allow doctors to image therapeutic bacteria in the body using ultrasound.
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Live Science
Could 'Facial Yoga' Really Make You Look Younger? Regularly practicing facial "yoga," or exercises for your facial muscles, may actually make you look younger, early research suggests. In a small, new study, researchers taught 27 middle-age women (ages 40 to 65) how to perform 32 facial exercises, which included simple actions such as smiling and sucking in the cheeks. After this training, the participants performed these exercises at home for 3
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pediatricians screen more kids for mental health issues if they receive hands-on support IMAGE: Lee Beers, M.D., serves as medical director for Municipal and Regional Affairs at the Child Health Advocacy Institute, part of Children's National Health System. view more Credit: Children's National Health System WASHINGTON - A new study suggests many more pediatricians would make mental health screenings an integral part of a child's annual checkup if they received training and suppo
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Most Expensive U.S. Medicine Now has an Official Sticker Price The first gene therapy in the U.S., approved last month to treat a rare, inherited form of blindness, now has a price tag: $850,000. That makes the treatment, called Luxturna and made by Spark Therapeutics, the most expensive medicine sold in the U.S., ranked by sticker price. But Spark CEO Jeff Marrazzo says Luxturna’s ability to restore vision in a small number of people with a defect
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Live Science
Flaky Weather: Why Tallahassee Got Its 1st Measurable Snow in Decades It may not be much – just 0.1 inches (0.25 centimeters) – but it's the first measurable snowfall Tallahassee, Florida, has seen in 28 years. The coating of white stuff over some northern parts of the Sunshine State, as well as southern Georgia, came courtesy of a storm system that is expected to rapidly strengthen as it moves up the East Coast, bringing strong winds and potentially heavy sn
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A Critical Intel Flaw Breaks Basic Security for Most Computers One of the most basic premises of computer security is isolation: If you run somebody else's sketchy code as an untrusted process on your machine, you should restrict it to its own tightly sealed playpen. Otherwise, it might peer into other processes, or snoop around the computer as a whole. So when a security flaw in computers' most deep-seated hardware puts a crack in those walls, as one newly
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New lithium-rich battery could last much longerBy using iron and oxygen to simultaneously drive the electrochemical reaction, a novel battery is less expensive and has a higher capacity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers offer new evidence on 4-year-old children's knowledge about ecology Current research engages rural and urban Native American and non-Native children In addition to strong commonalities among all children, Native American children more likely than non-Native American children to take perspective of animals Most research on children's understanding of the natural world has come from middle-class, European American communities EVANSTON, Ill. --- What do young childr
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Popular Science
Why no one has died in a commercial passenger jet crash in over a year Not a single person perished in a commercial passenger jet crash in 2017, making the year an extraordinarily safe one for flying. New reports from two separate organizations in the Netherlands summarize just how incredibly safe it was to take to the skies commercially, and aviation experts say that the recent streak is simply a part of trend going back years (so feel free to ignore that tweet fro
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New on MIT Technology Review
Is $850,000 for a Blindness Treatment Worth It? The U.S. Is Blocking a Chinese Fintech Giant from Buying MoneyGram American authorities have decided that Alibaba's digital payment firm, Ant Financial, won't be allowed to acquire the cash transfer company Moneygram. Ant Financial, which was one of our 50 Smartest Companies in 2017 , is a Chinese tech company that handles… Read more American authorities have decided that Alibaba's digital paym
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Past falls can help predict an individual's risk of bone fracture independent of other factors Results from a new study in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research indicate that an individual's history of past falls can help predict their risk of bone fractures, independent of bone mineral density and other clinical factors. The findings were made in the large Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) cohort, comprising 4,365 men in United States, 1,823 in Sweden, and 1,669 in Hong Kong, with an av
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Malcolm Gladwell published in the Journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology San Francisco - Jan. 3, 2018 -- In his bestsellers The Tipping Point, Blink, and Out¬liers, Malcolm Gladwell writes about the unexpected implications of scientific research, urging readers to think different. In an editorial published this month in Ophthalmology , the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, Gladwell offers another example of his stock in trade: To make medical students
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Study provides new insights on bone loss in women A new study in Journal of Bone and Mineral Research looked at the relative contributions of the two types of bone--cortical, or compact bone, and trabecular, or spongy bone--to total bone loss. Contrary to the belief that most of the bone loss that occurs during the menopause is trabecular, more than 80 percent of bone loss was cortical. "Therefore, cortical bone loss is likely to contribute to t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study identifies thermometer for global ocean IMAGE: Ross Beaudette of the Severinghaus lab at Scripps Oceanography (right) and Jeremy Miner drill a shallow ice core during WAIS Divide project. view more Credit: Bradley Markle There's a new way to measure the average temperature of the ocean thanks to researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego. In an article published in the Jan. 4,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Silent code' of nucleotides, not amino acids, determines functions of vital proteins IMAGE: Actin is an abundant protein, present in every cell. Penn Vet researchers showed that differences in the order of nucleotides -- not the amino acids -- governed the distinct functions... view more Credit: University of Pennsylvania Humans possess six forms of the protein actin, which perform essential functions in the body. Two in particular, β-actin and γ-actin, are nearly ide
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Alaskan infant's DNA tells story of 'first Americans' Image copyright Ben Potter Image caption Excavations at the Upward Sun River archaeological site in Alaska The 11,500-year-old remains of an infant girl from Alaska have shed new light on the peopling of the Americas. Genetic analysis of the child, allied to other data, indicates she belonged to a previously unknown, ancient group. Scientists say what they have learnt from her DNA strongly suppor
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Taking your eyes off the motorway with VRFed up with motorway driving? Now you can switch to virtual reality thanks to a new driverless car from Renault.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Logan Paul’s Video Is a Cautionary Tale for Platforms That Hope AI Will Save Them from Offensive Content The U.S. Is Blocking a Chinese Fintech Giant from Buying MoneyGram American authorities have decided that Alibaba's digital payment firm, Ant Financial, won't be allowed to acquire the cash transfer company Moneygram. Ant Financial, which was one of our 50 Smartest Companies in 2017 , is a Chinese tech company that handles… Read more American authorities have decided that Alibaba's digital paym
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Agricultural parasite takes control of host plant's genesDodder, a parasitic plant that causes major damage to crops in the US and worldwide every year, can silence the expression of genes in the host plants from which it obtains water and nutrients. This cross-species gene regulation, which includes genes that contribute to the host plant's defense against parasites, has never before been seen from a parasitic plant.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Four-dimensional physics in two dimensionsFor the first time, physicists have built a two-dimensional experimental system that allows them to study the physical properties of materials theorized to exist only in four-dimensional space. An international team of researchers demonstrated that the behavior of particles of light can be made to match predictions about the four-dimensional version of the 'quantum Hall effect' -- a phenomenon at
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The Atlantic
It's Colder Than Hoth Out Here Mid-winter temperatures have gripped the Northern Hemisphere, and much of North America is currently caught in a deep freeze. Yesterday morning, parts of all 50 states were below freezing. Some are bundling up and making the most of the weather, skiing, fishing, or taking a polar bear plunge—while others are struggling to cope and working hard against the elements. As the East Coast of the United
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ford to fix coolant leaks in vehicles recalled for fire risk Ford says it will repair any coolant leaks that might be found in more than 200,000 recalled vehicles that are at risk of catching fire. The repairs, detailed in company documents posted by U.S. safety regulators in December, come 10 months after the company said it would only install a coolant level sensor "with supporting hardware and software." In March, the automaker announced that it would
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Live Science
Perfectionism on the Rise Among College Students The stress of college can affect students' health. Credit: ESB Professional/Shutterstock Today's college students have more perfectionistic traits than those of decades past, a new study suggests. The study is one of the first to examine generational differences in perfectionism , which is defined as having excessively high standards for oneself and being overly self-critical. In the st
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Evidence of previously unknown population of ancient Native Americans, research revealsGenetic analysis of ancient DNA from a 6-week-old infant found at an Interior Alaska archaeological site has revealed a previously unknown population of ancient people in North America. The findings represent a major shift in scientists' theories about how humans populated North America. The researchers have named the new group 'Ancient Beringians.'
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An unusual form of antibiotic resistance in pandemic cholera Image is an electron micrograph of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae , the causative agent of the cholera. Credit: M. Stephen Trent, University of Georgia Cholera is a devastating disease for millions worldwide, primarily in developing countries, and the dominant type of cholera today is naturally resistant to one type of antibiotic usually used as a treatment of last resort. Researchers at the Unive
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study uncovers key to preventing back pain in runners A new study from The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center examines what may cause chronic back pain in runners and the exercises to help prevent it. The study, published in the Journal of Biomechanics , suggests that runners with weak deep core muscles are at higher risk of developing low back pain. And, unfortunately, most people's deep core muscles aren't nearly as strong as they should
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel methodology increases resolution in oligodendrocyte proteomics One of the key challenges of proteomics, the study of all proteins expressed by a cell or organism, is managing to distinguish between molecules that are structurally different yet have the same mass. This is hard because a mass spectrometer, the main apparatus used in this type of study, works like a weighing scale, sorting the molecules analyzed according to their mass. One way to reduce co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rare forms of 'thunder' protein may be linked to schizophrenia Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine report they have identified rare genetic variations in a protein called Thorase, which is responsible for breaking down receptors at the connections between neurons in the brain. By targeting Thorase's function, the scientists say they have successfully reversed anti-social behavior in mice genetically modified to carry the variants by using the anti-epilepsy
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Facial exercises help middle-aged women appear more youthful Exercises enlarged facial muscles so face has more volume and looks firmer Non-toxic way to look younger or augment other antiaging treatments Women looked an average of three years younger after 20 weeks of exercises CHICAGO --- A 30-minute daily or alternate-day facial exercise program sustained over 20 weeks improved the facial appearance of middle-aged women, resulting in a younger appearance
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An unusual form of antibiotic resistance in pandemic cholera IMAGE: Image is an electron micrograph of the bacterium Vibrio cholerae , the causative agent of the cholera. view more Credit: M. Stephen Trent, University of Georgia Cholera is a devastating disease for millions worldwide, primarily in developing countries, and the dominant type of cholera today is naturally resistant to one type of antibiotic usually used as a treatment of last resort. R
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find surprising evidence of rapid changes in the ArcticScientists have found surprising evidence of rapid climate change in the Arctic: In the middle of the Arctic Ocean near the North Pole, they discovered that the levels of radium-228 have almost doubled over the last decade.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study investigates impact of lions living alongside giraffe populations IMAGE: These are giraffes and their calves in the wild. view more Credit: Zoe Muller - University of Bristol It is commonly accepted that lions are the only predators to pose a risk to giraffes on an individual basis but there has never been a study to investigate how the presence of lions impacts on the population as a whole. Now, in the first study of its kind, published today in th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Could viruses take cancer immunotherapy to the next level? IMAGE: This is a view of the Maraba Virus that was used an an oncolytic virus as part of cancer immunotherapy to treat breast cancer. view more Credit: The Ottawa Hospital The Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy (ACGT), a non-profit based in Stamford, Connecticut, dedicated to funding breakthrough cancer gene therapy treatments, has had its funding pay off with a promising study on bre
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Noninvasive tinnitus treatment turns volume down on phantom noisesScientists have devised a noninvasive approach to offer relief from tinnitus -- a persistent phantom perception of sound that afflicts as many as 15 percent of people in the United States.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Materials from arctic shelves are changing the water's composition Materials from Arctic Shelves are Changing the Water's Composition: Scientists say the input of shelf-derived materials to the central Arctic Ocean over the past decade appears to be increasing. They further note that this increase is altering the water's composition and could threaten biological productivity and species assemblages. Their results provide one of the first estimates of Arctic shel
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Virus could treat brain tumours by boosting immune system A virus injected directly into the bloodstream could be used to treat people with aggressive brain tumours, a major new study reports. Scientists have found that the naturally occurring virus could act as an effective immunotherapy in patients with brain cancer or other cancers that have spread to the brain. They showed that a type of virus called reovirus could cross the blood-brain barrier to r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Specially timed signals ease tinnitus symptoms in first test aimed at condition's root cause ANN ARBOR, MI - Millions of Americans hear ringing in their ears -- a condition called tinnitus -- but a new study shows an experimental device could help quiet the phantom sounds by targeting unruly nerve activity in the brain. In a new paper in Science Translational Medicine , a team from the University of Michigan reports the results of the first animal tests and clinical trial of the approach
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Could viruses take cancer immunotherapy to the next level? IMAGE: Dr. Marie-Claude Bourgeois-Daigneault (left) and Dr. John Bell (right) are hoping viruses will take cancer immunotherapy to the next level. view more Credit: The Ottawa Hospital Immunotherapy, which helps the body's immune system attack cancer, has revolutionized treatment for cancers such as melanoma and leukemia. However, many other kinds of cancer remain resistant. A new stu
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Live Science
The First Americans: Ancient DNA Rewrites Settlement Story A genetic analysis of a baby's remains dating back 11,500 years suggests that a previously unknown human population was among the first to settle in the Americas. Scientists recovered the DNA from an infant — only a few weeks old when she died — buried at the Upward Sun River archaeological site in the interior of Alaska. Their data indicated that the baby belonged to a group of people who
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Series of small quakes rattle area near Mount St. Helens In 1870, explorer Adolf Erik Nordenskiöld, trekking across the barren and remote ice cap of Greenland, saw something most people wouldn't expect in such an empty, inhospitable landscape: haze.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission locates elusive electron act The space high above Earth may seem empty, but it's a carnival packed with magnetic field lines and high-energy particles. This region is known as the magnetosphere and, every day, charged particles put on a show as they dart and dive through it. Like tiny tightrope walkers, the high-energy electrons follow the magnetic field lines. Sometimes, such as during an event called magnetic reconnection
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study investigates impact of lions living alongside giraffe populations Giraffes and their calves in the wild. Credit: Zoe Muller - University of Bristol It is commonly accepted that lions are the only predators to pose a risk to giraffes on an individual basis but there has never been a study to investigate how the presence of lions impacts on the population as a whole. Now, in the first study of its kind, published today in the journal PLOS One , Bristol PhD studen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists find surprising evidence of rapid changes in the Arctic Diminishing sea ice near the Arctic coast leaves more open water near the coast for winds to create waves. The increased wave action reaches down and stirs up sediments on shallow continental shelves, releasing radium and other chemicals that are carried up to the surface and swept away into the open ocean by currents such as the Transpolar Drift. A new study found surprising evidence that climat
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The Scientist RSS
All Native Americans Descended from One Ancestral PopulationThe genome of an infant who lived in Alaska thousands of years ago represents a previously unknown group of humans called Ancient Beringians, who share a common lineage with other Native Americans.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
What a woman with a bionic hand can feelScientists have unveiled the first bionic hand with a sense of touch that can be worn outside the laboratory.
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New Scientist - News
NHS is switching to cheaper mimics of expensive cancer drugs Biological drugs, like trastuzumab are tough to perfectly replicate Alfred Pasieka/Science Photo Library By Alice Klein BIOLOGICAL drugs are the new darlings of medicine. In recent years, they have doubled treatment rates for several cancers , arthritis and Crohn’s disease . But these medicines, which are large, complex molecules produced by living cells, carry hefty price tags, and now compr
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New Scientist - News
China’s plan to stop recycling the world’s rubbish may backfire Jie Zhao/Corbis via Getty Images By Andy Coghlan FORGETTING to put the bins out is one thing, but this is a whole other recycling disaster. Monday saw the notional start of China’s ban on waste imports, which is threatening to cause global panic, because the nation is the world’s largest recycler of scrap metals, plastic and paper. It’s not that we weren’t warned. Last July, China declared th
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New Scientist - News
Baby skeleton from Alaska reveals origins of Native Americans The excavation of the Upward Sun River infants Ben Potter By Andy Coghlan She probably died in her first year. But the skeleton of an infant girl who lived in Alaska 11,500 years ago has yielded tantalising new evidence for how and when people first colonised America . It reinforces a long-standing idea that the first settlers came from Siberia , across what was then a land bridge. The girl’s
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New Scientist - News
Weird dim star isn’t due to alien megastructure – it’s just dust It’s not aliens. It’s never aliens. MARK GARLICK/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY By Leah Crane If there ever was an alien megastructure orbiting Tabby’s Star, it has long since crumbled to dust. The dips in the weird star’s light are almost definitely caused by a ring of dust, not a huge opaque object between us and the star. In 2015, a team of astronomers led by Yale’s Tabetha Boyajian saw the light f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Revised suit faults Google for asking hires about prior pay Credit: CC0 Public Domain A revised gender-pay lawsuit seeking class-action status against Google faults the search giant for asking new hires about their prior salary, a practice now banned in California. The suit, filed Wednesday, also adds a fourth complainant, a preschool teacher with a master's degree. The four women allege they were underpaid by Google compared with their male counterparts.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: The Strange Origin of a Manakin’s Golden Crown Hybrids often look like an intermediate between their parent species, which made scientists skeptical that you’d get a golden-crowned manakin by crossing opal-crowned and snow-capped manakins. Video The Real Manakin Challenge Male manakins leap, flip and snap their wings to attract females. With a bit of testosterone the females perform some of the same difficult acrobatics. By JAMES GORMAN, FLOR
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Live Science
'Nature's Smallest Rainbow' Found on Australian Spider's Butt Nature's smallest rainbow can be found on the butt of the peacock spider Maratus robinsoni . Credit: Picture supplied by co-author Jungen Otto. When a male Australian peacock spider wags its bottom at you, it's impossible to look away. In the throes of courtship, the spider's glittering badonkadonk shimmers with all the colors of the rainbow, diffracting intense iridescent light like a living L
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cellular barcoding helps scientists understand the behavior of stem cells IMAGE: Landscape of the lineage fate (natural environment) of unperturbed haematopoiesis (the process of mature blood and immune cell production). view more Credit: Courtesy of the Stem Cell Program, Boston Children's Hospital. By tagging bone marrow cells of mice with a genetic label, or barcode, researchers were able to track and describe the family tree of individual blood cells as they fo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission locates elusive electron act The space high above Earth may seem empty, but it's a carnival packed with magnetic field lines and high-energy particles. This region is known as the magnetosphere and, every day, charged particles put on a show as they dart and dive through it. Like tiny tightrope walkers, the high-energy electrons follow the magnetic field lines. Sometimes, such as during an event called magnetic reconnection
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The sixth taste?UCSB biologists enhance the scientific understanding of calcium taste.
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New on MIT Technology Review
The Anatomy of the Urban Dictionary The Urban Dictionary is a crowdsourced website that records new words and their meanings. It began life in 1999 as a parody of Dictionary.com but has since become an important resource on the Web. Indeed, judges in the U.K. famously used the site in 2005 to help them understand slang used by two rappers involved in a dispute. Part of Urban Dictionary’s appeal is its informal approach, which allow
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How parasites hack victims to seize control of genes in plant-to-plant warfare IMAGE: Jim Westwood, professor of plant pathology, physiology, and weed science, examines dodder, a parasitic plant with a covert weaponry system. Understanding dodder's covert communications weaponry system, which operates much like... view more Credit: Virginia Tech Dodder, a parasitic plant that levies millions of dollars' worth of damage on crops each year is a stealthy invader with t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dietary sugar linked to increasing bacterial epidemics IMAGE: This photo shows Dr. James Collins (left) and Dr. Robert Britton (right). view more Credit: Baylor College of Medicine The increasing frequency and severity of healthcare-associated outbreaks caused by bacterium Clostridium difficile have been linked to the widely used food additive trehalose. A team of researchers discovered that in laboratory tests and animal models, trehalose enha
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Glucagon receptor structure offers new opportunities for type 2 diabetes drug discovery IMAGE: This is the The Crystal Structure of the Full-Length Human Glucagon Receptor (GCGR)crystal structure of the full-length human glucagon receptor (GCGR): orange (extracellular domain), blue (transmembrane domain), green (stalk), magenta... view more Credit: Dr. WU Beili Class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) exert essential action in hormonal homeostasis and are important therapeu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Which came first: Complex life or high atmospheric oxygen? IMAGE: By measuring the oxidation of iron in pillow basalts from undersea volcanic eruptions, UC Berkeley scientists have more precisely dated the oxygenation of the deep ocean, inferring from that when... view more Credit: Courtesy of National Science Foundation We and all other animals wouldn't be here today if our planet didn't have a lot of oxygen in its atmosphere and oceans. But how cru
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research shows how alcohol damages DNA and increases cancer riskScientists have shown how alcohol damages DNA in stem cells, helping to explain why drinking increases your risk of cancer, according to research part-funded by Cancer Research UK and published in Nature today.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research reveals evidence of new population of ancient Native Americans IMAGE: A scientific illustration of the Upward Sun River camp in what is now Interior Alaska. view more Credit: Illustration by Eric S. Carlson in collaboration with Ben A. Potter Genetic analysis of ancient DNA from a 6-week-old infant found at an Interior Alaska archaeological site has revealed a previously unknown population of ancient people in North America. The findings, published in the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists design bacteria to reflect 'sonar' signals for ultrasound imaging IMAGE: This image is a transmission electron micrograph (TEM) image of a single commensal bacterium, E. coli Nissle 1917, which has been genetically engineered to express gas-filled protein nanostructures known as... view more Credit: Anupama Lakshmanan/Caltech In the 1966 science fiction film Fantastic Voyage, a submarine is shrunken down and injected into a scientist's body to repair a bloo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Direct genetic evidence of founding population reveals story of first Native Americans IMAGE: Excavations at the Upward Sun River archaeological site in Alaska. The new study shows that the remains found there belonged to members of a previously unknown Native American population, whom... view more Credit: Ben Potter Direct genetic traces of the earliest Native Americans have been identified for the first time in a new study. The genetic evidence suggests that people may have
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gene fusion shifts cell activity into high gear, causing some cancer New York, NY (January 3, 2017)--The fusion of two adjacent genes can cause cancer by kicking mitochondria into overdrive and increasing the amount of fuel available for rampant cell growth, researchers at Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) have discovered. They also found that drugs that target this newly identified cancer pathway can prevent tumor growth, both in human cancer cell
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Yerkes researchers find clues to AIDS resistance in sooty mangabey genome Peaceful co-existence, rather than war: that's how sooty mangabeys, a monkey species found in West Africa, handle infection by SIV, a relative of HIV, and avoid developing AIDS-like disease. To learn how sooty mangabeys achieve this important health feat, a Yerkes National Primate Research Center-led team of scientists has sequenced the sooty mangabey genome. By comparing it with the genome of hu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Four-dimensional physics in two dimensions IMAGE: Illustration of light passing through a two-dimensional waveguide array. Each waveguide is essentially a tube, which behaves like a wire for light, inscribed through high-quality glass using a powerful laser.... view more Credit: Rechtsman laboratory, Penn State University For the first time, physicists have built a two-dimensional experimental system that allows them to study the phys
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Agricultural parasite takes control of host plant's genes Dodder, a parasitic plant that causes major damage to crops in the U.S. and worldwide every year, can silence the expression of genes in the host plants from which it obtains water and nutrients. This cross-species gene regulation, which includes genes that contribute to the host plant's defense against parasites, has never before been seen from a parasitic plant. Understanding this system could
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tuberculosis drugs work better with vitamin C Washington, DC - Jan, 3, 2018 - Studies in mice and in tissue cultures suggest that giving vitamin C with tuberculosis drugs could reduce the unusually long time it takes these drugs to eradicate this pathogen. The research is published in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy , a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. In the study, the investigators treated Mycobacterium tuberculosis-
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium - iBiology & Youreka Science Combining Darwinian Evolution and Mendelian Genetics to Study Population Genetics This Youreka Science video provides an overview of allele and genotype frequency, and explores the criteria that make a population be in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. https://www.ibiology.org/evolution/hardy-weinberg-equilibrium/ Talk Overview: Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium combines the concepts of Darwinian evolution an
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Science | The Guardian
Surprise as DNA reveals new group of Native Americans: the ancient Beringians A baby girl who lived and died in what is now Alaska at the end of the last ice age belonged to a previously unknown group of ancient Native Americans , according to DNA recovered from her bones. The child, a mere six weeks old when she died, was found in a burial pit next to the remains of a stillborn baby, perhaps a first cousin, during excavations of an 11,500-year-old residential camp in Tana
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Science | The Guardian
Alcohol can cause irreversible genetic damage to stem cells, says study Alcohol can cause irreversible genetic damage to the body’s reserve of stem cells, according to a study that helps explain the link between drinking and cancer. The research, using genetically modified mice, provides the most compelling evidence to date that alcohol causes cancer by scrambling the DNA in cells, eventually leading to deadly mutations. During the past decade, there has been mountin
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Science | The Guardian
What the ancient DNA discovery tells us about Native American ancestry A little over 11,000 years ago, a grieving family in Central Alaska laid to rest a six-week-old baby girl, a three-year-old child, and a preterm female fetus. According to their custom, the children were interred under a hearth inside their home and provisioned with the carefully crafted stone points and bone foreshafts of hunting lances. We don’t know their names, but the peoples who live in the
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The Atlantic
Ancient Infant's DNA Reveals New Clues to How the Americas Were Peopled Around 11,500 years ago, at a place that is now called the Upward Sun River, in the region that has since been named Alaska, two girls died. One was a late-term fetus; the other, probably her cousin, was six weeks old. They were both covered in red ochre and buried in a circular pit, along with hunting weapons made from bones and antlers. “There was intentionality in the burial ceremony,” says Be
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NYT > Science
Matter: In the Bones of a Buried Child, Signs of a Massive Human Migration to the Americas The girl’s remains were unearthed at the Upward Sun River archaeological site in the Tanana River Valley in central Alaska. Ben A. Potter, an archaeologist at the University of Alaska, discovered the site in 2006. It was apparently home to short-lived settlements that appeared and disappeared over thousands of years. Every now and then, people arrived to build tent-like structures, fish for salmo
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Ingeniøren
Dansk dna-analyse: Alle indfødte amerikanere har samme oprindelse Ud fra dna-analyser af gammelt arvemateriale har Eske Willerslevs forskningsgruppe ved Center for Geogenetik på Københavns Universitet i flere omgange søgt at udrede trådene omkring indvandringen til Amerika over den faste Bering-landbro mellem Asien og Alaska under den seneste istid. I en ny artikel i denne uges udgave af Nature viser Eske Willerslev og Co., at alle indfødte amerikanere kan føre
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New report calls for research to better understand, predict Gulf of Mexico's loop current system A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine calls for an international, multi-institutional comprehensive campaign of research, observation, and analysis activities that would help improve understanding and prediction of the Gulf of Mexico's Loop Current System (LCS). The position, strength, and structure of the LCS—the dominant ocean circulation feature in the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers use 'global thermometer' to track temperature extremes, droughts Earth's Maximum Temperature Profile: Histograms of global annual maximum land-surface temperature capture the unique influence of different land-cover types on the expression of maximum land-surface temperatures. Tracking shifts in the distribution of these annual histograms provides a new integrated measure of energy balance components and land-cover change, and a different means to monitor bios
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Aqua satellite sees Tropical Depression Bolaven battling wind shearNASA's Aqua satellite passed over the South China Sea and obtained a visible light image of the first depression of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean basin's 2018 tropical cyclone season. Vertical wind shear can be deadly to tropical cyclones and satellite data showed Tropical Depression Bolaven, formerly known as 01W, was being adversely affected by it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Direct genetic evidence of founding population reveals story of first Native Americans Excavations at the Upward Sun River archaeological site in Alaska. The new study shows that the remains found there belonged to members of a previously unknown Native American population, whom academics have named "Ancient Beringians". Credit: Ben Potter Direct genetic traces of the earliest Native Americans have been identified for the first time in a new study. The genetic evidence suggests tha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Agricultural parasite takes control of host plant's genes Dodder, a parasitic plant, attached to a host plant from which it obtains water and nutrients. The parasite inserts microRNAs into the host that can silence the expression of host genes. This is the first example of cross-species gene regulation observed in a parasitic plant. Credit: Penn State University Dodder, a parasitic plant that causes major damage to crops in the U.S. and worldwide every
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists design bacteria to reflect 'sonar' signals for ultrasound imaging Transmission electron micrograph (TEM) image of a single commensal bacterium, E. coli Nissle 1917, which has been genetically engineered to express gas-filled protein nanostructures known as gas vesicles. The cell is approximately 2 micrometers in length, and the lighter-colored structures contained inside of it are individual gas vesicles. Credit: Anupama Lakshmanan/Caltech In the 1966 science f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Four-dimensional physics in two dimensions Illustration of light passing through a two-dimensional waveguide array. Each waveguide is essentially a tube, which behaves like a wire for light, inscribed through high-quality glass using a powerful laser. Many of these waveguides are inscribed closely spaced through a single piece of glass to form the array. Light that flows through the device behaves precisely according to the predictions of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Which came first: Complex life or high atmospheric oxygen? By measuring the oxidation of iron in pillow basalts from undersea volcanic eruptions, UC Berkeley scientists have more precisely dated the oxygenation of the deep ocean, inferring from that when oxygen levels in the atmosphere rose to current high levels. Credit: National Science Foundation We and all other animals wouldn't be here today if our planet didn't have a lot of oxygen in its atmospher
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Latest Headlines | Science News
These disease-fighting bacteria produce echoes detectable by ultrasound Ultrasound can now track bacteria in the body like sonar detects submarines. For the first time, researchers have genetically modified microbes to form gas-filled pouches that scatter sound waves to produce ultrasound signals. When these bacteria are placed inside an animal, an ultrasound detector can pick up those signals and reveal the microbes’ location, much like sonar waves bouncing off ship
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Quanta Magazine
Physicists Aim to Classify All Possible Phases of Matter In the last three decades, condensed matter physicists have discovered a wonderland of exotic new phases of matter: emergent, collective states of interacting particles that are nothing like the solids, liquids and gases of common experience. The phases, some realized in the lab and others identified as theoretical possibilities, arise when matter is chilled almost to absolute-zero temperature, h
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Little wasp bodies mean little wasp brain regions, study shows A new Drexel University study comparing brain size to body size shows that just because you've evolved to have a big brain, some regions of your brain may not have kept up. Sean O'Donnell, PhD, professor in the College of Arts and Sciences at Drexel University, and his team studied a wide variety of Costa Rican paper wasps to shed some light on this subject. And what they found was that the wasp
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, January 2018 Biology--Telltale microbes A new process to identify certain microbes in women could be used to diagnose endometriosis without invasive surgery, even before symptoms start. A collaborative research team analyzed bacteria from a small sample of premenopausal women undergoing laparoscopic surgery for suspected endometriosis. Endometriosis occurs when the uterus' lining grows outside the uterus, res
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New on MIT Technology Review
Nissan Wants You to Control a Car With Your Brain The U.S. Is Blocking a Chinese Fintech Giant from Buying MoneyGram American authorities have decided that Alibaba's digital payment firm, Ant Financial, won't be allowed to acquire the cash transfer company Moneygram. Ant Financial, which was one of our 50 Smartest Companies in 2017 , is a Chinese tech company that handles… Read more American authorities have decided that Alibaba's digital paym
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Supercomputers help researchers design cancer models and predict treatments outcomes based on patient-specific condition Model of tumor growth in a rat brain before radiation treatment (left) and after one session of radiotherapy (right). The different colors represent tumor cell concentration, with red being the highest. The treatment reduced the tumor mass substantially. Credit: Lima et. al. 2017, Hormuth et. al. 2015 Attempts to eradicate cancer are often compared to a "moonshot"—the successful effort that sent
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Environmentally safe red glare rocket changes fireworks, soldier technology US and German researchers teamed to develop an environmentally-friendly red light flare. The formula is a lithium-based red-light-emitting pyrotechnic composition of high purity and color quality, and avoids a list of potentially toxic elements, namely strontium and chlorinated organic materials. Here, they captured a mid-burn image of the strontium- and halogen-free red flare burning. Credit: Dr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pioneering smart grid technology solves decades old problematic power grid phenomenon Sandia National Laboratories' control system is the first successful grid demonstration of feedback control, making it a game changer for the smart grid. Credit: Sandia National Laboratories Picture a teeter-totter gently rocking back and forth, one side going up while the other goes down. When electricity travels long distances, it starts to behave in a similar fashion: the standard frequency of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Suomi NPP Satellite sees Tropical Storm Ava near MadagascarNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP passed over newly formed Tropical Storm Ava and analyzed the storm in infrared light. Ava, the third tropical cyclone of the Southern Indian Ocean season formed off the coast of northeastern Madagascar on Jan. 3.
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Science : NPR
How Cold Is Too Cold For Pets? A man walks his dog during a snowstorm on Feb. 9, 2017 in Philadelphia. Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images A man walks his dog during a snowstorm on Feb. 9, 2017 in Philadelphia. Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images Many pet owners are aware of the dangers to dogs and cats in extreme heat, but the risks can be even greater during a cold snap. Wi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP Satellite sees Tropical Storm Ava near Madagascar IMAGE: On Jan. 3 at 4:12 a.m. EDT (0912 UTC) the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite provided this infrared image of Tropical Storm Ava near northeastern Madagascar. Coldest clouds... view more Credit: NOAA/NASA/NRL NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP passed over newly formed Tropical Storm Ava and analyzed the storm in infrared light. Ava, the third tropical cyclone of the Southern Ind
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Trastuzumab: No negative impact on cardiac function PITTSBURGH, PA -- Long-term follow-up results of the NRG Oncology trial NSABP B-31 have shown that the addition of trastuzumab to adjuvant chemotherapy does not negatively affect cardiac function in women with node-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive, early-stage breast cancer who survive without cancer recurrence. Both patients who received trastuzumab in addition
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
WPI and Stanford researchers develop sperm-sorting device that could improve IVF success Worcester, Mass. - Women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) may become pregnant with fewer treatment cycles, thanks to a new device developed by a team of researchers from Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) and Stanford University that uses an "obstacle course" to sort and select faster and healthier sperm cells for use in IVF treatment. This new device was created by a te
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tailoring cancer treatments to individual patients IMAGE: This is a model of tumor growth in a rat brain before radiation treatment (left) and after one session of radiotherapy (right). The different colors represent tumor cell concentration, with... view more Credit: Lima et. al. 2017, Hormuth et. al. 2015 Attempts to eradicate cancer are often compared to a "moonshot" -- the successful effort that sent the first astronauts to the moon
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hysterectomy alone associated with increased long-term health risksResearchers show that hysterectomy with ovarian conservation is associated with a significantly increased risk of several cardiovascular diseases and metabolic conditions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tabby's Star: Alien megastructure not the cause of dimming of the 'most mysterious star in the universe'Scientists are one step closer to solving the mystery behind the 'most mysterious star in the universe.'
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Female professors asked for favors more than male professorsWho do students turn to when they want to ask for an extended assignment deadline or an increase in their marks? Most likely their female professors according to a new study which investigated the added work demands often faced by women in academia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The making of biorelevant nanomaterialsThe interactions of biological macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins, and polysaccharide-protein conjugates can be mimicked by artificial polyelectrolytes. Such synthetic polyionic complexes are expected to serve as novel platforms to stabilize and deliver drugs, proteins, or nucleic acids. Investigators have now introduced a versatile, commercially applicable preparation strategy of such
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New behavioral science approach combines experiments, modelsResearchers are outlining a new approach to behavioral research that draws on experimental studies and computer models to offer new insights into organizational and group behavior.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
How plastic is harming India's holiest riverOver a billion tonnes of plastic each year is taking its toll on the Ganges.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's Aqua satellite sees Tropical Depression Bolaven battling wind shear IMAGE: On Jan. 3 at 1:10 a.m. EST (0610 UTC) NASA's Aqua satellite provided a visible look at the effect wind shear was having on Bolaven, pushing the bulk of clouds... view more Credit: Credits: NASA/NRL NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the South China Sea and obtained a visible light image of the first depression of the Northwestern Pacific Ocean basin's 2018 tropical cyclone season. Ver
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Environmentally safe red glare rocket changes fireworks, soldier technology IMAGE: US and German researchers teamed to develop an environmentally-friendly red light flare. The formula is a lithium-based red-light-emitting pyrotechnic composition of high purity and color quality, and avoids a... view more Credit: Dr. Jesse J. Sabatini, ARL Researchers at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich, Germany have developed an envir
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers use 'global thermometer' to track temperature extremes, droughts IMAGE: Earth's Maximum Temperature Profile: Histograms of global annual maximum land-surface temperature capture the unique influence of different land-cover types on the expression of maximum land-surface temperatures. Tracking shifts in the... view more Credit: David Mildrexler, Oregon State University CORVALLIS, Ore. -- Large areas of the Earth's surface are experiencing rising maximum tem
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Birds and dinosaurs: High-performance breathing in bonesDinosaurs are far from 'extinct', but dominate as birds still most regions of the globe. Part of this huge success is due to the evolution of air sacs, which are crucial for the high efficiency of their respiratory system. Scientists have analyzed the structure of bones that are in contact with air sacs and found both in extinct and extant species a hitherto unknown type of bony tissue.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using rank order to identify complex genetic interactionsGenome sequencing has revolutionized genetics. It also requires new mathematical tools to help life scientists make sense of enormous amounts of data. Applying new math, experts in the area of mathematical biology show how ranking pathogen mutants can help scientists understand how mutants evolve to resist drug treatments. This line of research could have implications for the treatment of diseases
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The Atlantic
The Essential Saga of Don Hertzfeldt's World of Tomorrow In Don Hertzfeldt’s films, the unconscious can be a grand, terrifying playground, a vast sci-fi landscape of swirling vortexes, rainbow-colored clouds, and shiny oblong rocks strewn beside a black sea. Early in World of Tomorrow Episode Two: The Burden of Other People’s Thoughts, Hertzfeldt’s dizzying sequel to his Oscar-nominated 2015 short film World of Tomorrow , a little girl and her adult cl
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Total-body PET: Maximizing sensitivity for clinical research and patient careThe new total-body PET/CT scanner could revolutionize our understanding and treatment of disease through analysis of better imaging data from the whole body. Scientists have outlined the development and benefits of this innovative diagnostic tool and explained how maximizing PET sensitivity will advance clinical research and patient care.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pong paddles and perception: Our actions influence what we seeMost people think of vision as simply a function of information the eye gathers. For cognitive psychologists vision is a little more complicated than that. One researcher now faces head-on the notion that her experimental subjects have been victims of a psychological phenomenon called response bias. She employed a classic, action-specific experiment involving a video game familiar to children of t
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists explore mysteries behind diversity of DNA composition among speciesDNA rules specify that G always pairs with C, and A with T. But, when it's all added up, the amount of G+C vs A+T content among species is not a simple fixed percentage or, standard one-to-one ratio. Biologists have now experimentally demonstrated that G+C composition is generally strongly favored by natural selection, regardless of the class of DNA, size of a species' genome, or where the species
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Arctic clouds highly sensitive to air pollutionA study by atmospheric scientists has found that the air in the Arctic is extraordinarily sensitive to air pollution, and that particulate matter may spur Arctic cloud formation. These clouds can act as a blanket, further warming an already-changing Arctic.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Automated bird identification system based on bird calls and songBirds play an important role in a wide variety of ecosystems as both predator and prey, in controlling insect populations, pollinating and seed dispersal for many plants, and in releasing nutrients on to land and sea in the form of guano. From a scientific perspective it is therefore crucial to monitor bird populations. Now, research could pave the way to an automated bird identification system ba
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
An adaptation 150 million years in the makingJust how do snapping shrimp snap? This was the question plaguing scientists who set out to uncover the mysterious mechanisms producing big biology in tiny crustaceans.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Dust, Not Aliens, Is Likely Cause of Star's Weird Dimming Well, we always knew the alien-megastructure idea was a long shot. E.T. has nothing to do with the bizarre dimming events of the mysterious object known as Tabby's star , a new study reports. "Dust is most likely the reason why the star's light appears to dim and brighten," study leader Tabetha Boyajian, an astronomer at Louisiana State University, said in a statement. "The new data shows
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cultural evolution has not freed hunter-gatherers from environmental forcingCultural evolution has made humans enormously potent ecosystem engineers and has enabled us to survive and flourish under a variety environmental conditions. Even hunter-gatherers, who obtain their food from wild plant and animal resources using seemingly simple technologies, have been able to extract energy in harsh arctic and desert conditions and compile vast knowledge on medical plants to figh
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New on MIT Technology Review
The Case Against Deep-Learning Hype The U.S. Is Blocking a Chinese Fintech Giant from Buying MoneyGram American authorities have decided that Albiba's digital payment firm, Ant Financial, won't be allowed to acquire the cash transfer company Moneygram. Ant Financial, which was one of our 50 Smartest Companies in 2017 , is a Chinese tech company that handles… Read more American authorities have decided that Albiba's digital paymen
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New on MIT Technology Review
Genetically Engineered Immune Cells Are Showing Promise in Fighting HIV The U.S. Is Blocking a Chinese Fintech Giant from Buying MoneyGram American authorities have decided that Albiba's digital payment firm, Ant Financial, won't be allowed to acquire the cash transfer company Moneygram. Ant Financial, which was one of our 50 Smartest Companies in 2017 , is a Chinese tech company that handles… Read more American authorities have decided that Albiba's digital paymen
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New on MIT Technology Review
Fixing a Pervasive Bug in Intel Chips Means Slowing Down Your Computer The U.S. Is Blocking a Chinese Fintech Giant from Buying MoneyGram American authorities have decided that Albiba's digital payment firm, Ant Financial, won't be allowed to acquire the cash transfer company Moneygram. Ant Financial, which was one of our 50 Smartest Companies in 2017 , is a Chinese tech company that handles… Read more American authorities have decided that Albiba's digital paymen
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Viden
Forskere vil følge vestjyske ulveunger: Dyrene skal have GPS-halsbånd De vestjyske ulveunger skal udstyres med GPS-halsbånd. Det er målet for et projekt, som en gruppe forskere har fået to millioner kroner til. Ulvene, der er tale om, er de seks-otte ulveunger, der tidligere er fotograferet i Stråsø Plantage i Vestjylland. Læs også: Familie havde ulve i baghaven: - De var lige på den anden side af havebordet De er snart så store, at de vil forlade forældrene, og hå
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New report calls for research to better understand, predict Gulf of Mexico's loop current system WASHINGTON - A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine calls for an international, multi-institutional comprehensive campaign of research, observation, and analysis activities that would help improve understanding and prediction of the Gulf of Mexico's Loop Current System (LCS). The position, strength, and structure of the LCS -- the dominant ocean circulatio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In clinical trial, cream reduces squamous cell carcinoma risk PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] -- New results from a clinical trial involving more than 900 military veterans at high risk for keratinocyte carcinoma skin cancer provides evidence that using the generic skin cream fluorouacil 5 percent for two to four weeks may reduce the risk of a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) needing surgery by 75 percent within a year. The finding that less than one month
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Outcomes and costs of coronary procedures performed at VA vs non-VA hospitalsCosts and risk of death after coronary procedures differed for veterans who underwent coronary procedures at non-VA hospitals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are vitamin supplements used before or during pregnancy associated with risk of autism spectrum disorder? Bottom Line: The use of folic acid and multivitamin supplements by women before and during pregnancy was associated with a lower likelihood of autism spectrum disorder in children but this finding needs to be interpreted with caution because other factors could explain it. Why The Research Is Interesting: Maternal vitamin deficiency during pregnancy is associated in some studies with deficits in
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The Physics of Plastic Sheets … and Their Invisible Force Fields? When you wander around the internet, sometimes you can find some crazy stuff. Check this out: It's an old account of a weird phenomena created by giant plastic sheets at 3M Corporation . In short, these fast-moving, electrically-charged plastic sheets created some type of effect that prevented humans from passing through an invisible wall. It sounds a lot like some type of force field, right? I'm
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
3 thoughtful ways to conserve water | Lana MazahrehAccording to the UN, nearly one in three people worldwide live in a country facing a water crisis, and less than five percent of the world lives in a country that has more water today than it did 20 years ago. Lana Mazahreh grew up in Jordan, a state that has experienced absolute water scarcity since 1973, where she learned how to conserve water as soon as she was old enough to learn how to write
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New on MIT Technology Review
Engineered Immune Cells Show Promise Fighting HIV The U.S. Is Blocking a Chinese Fintech Giant From Buying Moneygram American authorities have decided that Albiba's digital payment firm, Ant Financial, won't be allowed to acquire the cash transfer company Moneygram. Ant Financial, which was one of 50 Smartest Companies in 2017 , is a Chinese tech company that handles… Read more American authorities have decided that Albiba's digital payment fi
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Futurity.org
Method may reverse vision loss from diabetes Researchers have found a potential way of stalling or even reversing diabetes-related blindness. In experiments with mice, scientists found a protein that triggers vision loss caused by diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion, two diseases characterized by the closure of blood vessels in the retina. By suppressing levels in the eye of the protein called vascular endothelial growth factor,
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Viden
Computerstemmer lyder som rigtig tale. Kan du høre forskel? Kunstige stemmer forbinder de fleste nok med en noget besynderlig røst, som den fysikeren Stephen Hawking er udstyret med. Men den tid er forbi. I december måned udgav forskere fra Google en artikel , der beskriver hvordan den nye udgave af firmaets teknologi til talesyntese - computerskabt tale - fungerer. Læs også: Test en kunstig intelligens på din egen computer Tacotron 2, som teknologien kal
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Science | The Guardian
A Lab of One’s Own: Science and Suffrage in the First World War by Patricia Fara review – trailblazing feminists O ne hundred years ago next month, on 6 February 1918, women working in hospitals, laboratories and universities throughout Britain raised toasts and burst into triumphal song as they celebrated being given the vote. Before the first world war, many of these doctors, scientists and academics had been impassioned suffragists and even militant suffragettes who marched on parliament and smashed wind
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Science : NPR
UFO Investigations: The Science And The Will To Believe ElvisFontenot/Getty Images/iStockphoto ElvisFontenot/Getty Images/iStockphoto To close the door on 2017, the strangest year I can remember, there's nothing more appropriate than the revelation in December from the U.S. government that it, indeed, had an office dedicated to the investigation of UFO-related phenomena. It's enough to make X-Files and conspiracy-theory fans rejoice. Tucked in the fif
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Ingeniøren
Norsk 'skattejægerskib' stævner ud for at lede efter MH370 I aftes lettede det privatejede, norske forskningsskib Seabed Constructor anker i Durban i Sydafrika med kurs mod et havområde 1500 km vest for Australien. Skibet er leaset af det amerikanske selskab Ocean Infinity fra Houston i Texas. Selskabet er ekspert i kortlægning af havbunden, og det forhandler med Malaysias myndigheder om en aftale, der i givet fald den kommer i hus, genoptager eftersøgni
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Predicting the effect of climate change on crop yields Credit: SC Department of Agriculture Scientists now have a new tool to predict the future effects of climate change on crop yields. Researchers from University of Illinois are attempting to bridge two types of computational crop models to become more reliable predictors of crop production in the U.S. Corn Belt. "One class of crop models is agronomy-based and the other is embedded in climate mod
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New on MIT Technology Review
An Intel Chip Bug Could Slow Down Your Computer The U.S. Is Blocking a Chinese Fintech Giant From Buying Moneygram American authorities have decided that Albiba's digital payment firm, Ant Financial, won't be allowed to acquire the cash transfer company Moneygram. Ant Financial, which was one of 50 Smartest Companies in 2017 , is a Chinese tech company that handles… Read more American authorities have decided that Albiba's digital payment fi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine (AIUM) takes steps to improve the quality of ultrasound imaging in obstetrics and gynecology IMAGE: Biparietal diameter along with the list of criteria for competency. A teaching example from the curriculum that describes how an important measurement of a developing fetus is made. view more Credit: American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology Philadelphia, PA, and Hoboken, NJ, January 3, 2018 - While ultrasound imaging is a commonly used diagnostic tool in obstetrics and gynecology,
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The Atlantic
Articles and Stories We Do Not Want to Read or Edit Before memes, before the internet, there were just regular old cliches—text and imagery recycled and adapted across media. All cliches are memes, really, though not all memes are cliches. (Until they are, and then they die , the theory goes.) Who can remember pre-internet civilization, anyway? It’s enough of a stretch to recall what things were like before smartphones anymore, let alone life befo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dancing backwards in high heels Who do students turn to when they want to ask for an extended assignment deadline or an increase in their marks? Most likely their female professors, says Amani El-Alayli of the Eastern Washington University in the US. El-Alayli is lead author of an article in Springer's journal Sex Roles which investigates the added work demands often faced by women in academia. El-Alayli and her colleagues cond
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New Scientist - News
Can listening to a low hum destroy Alzheimer’s brain plaques? Juan Gaertner/Science Photo Library By Clare Wilson LISTENING to low-pitched noise seems to induce high-speed brainwaves that break down protein plaques in the brain linked with Alzheimer’s. The approach has had promising results in mice and is now being tested in people with the condition. Brainwaves are the result of large networks of brain cells firing rhythmically and in synchrony. Much a
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New Scientist - News
Blood test spots ovarian cancer years before it is usually found A blood test can spot the telltale signs of ovarian cancer before it is too late B. BOISSONNET / BSIP/Alamy By Alice Klein A blood test that detects ovarian cancer in its early stages may reduce the deadliness of the disease. Ovarian cancer is known as the “silent killer” because most patients don’t know they have it until it spreads to other organs and causes symptoms, at which point it is u
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High doses of vitamin D rapidly reduce arterial stiffness in overweight/obese, vitamin-deficient African-AmericansIn just four months, high-doses of vitamin D reduce arterial stiffness in young, overweight/obese, vitamin-deficient, but otherwise still healthy African-Americans, researchers say.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Carbon nanotubes devices may have a limit to how 'nano' they can be Bon nanotubes. Credit: Swansea University Carbon nanotubes bound for electronics not only need to be as clean as possible to maximize their utility in next-generation nanoscale devices, but contact effects may limit how small a nano device can be, according to researchers at the Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI) at Swansea University in collaboration with researchers at Rice University. ESR
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using rank order to identify complex genetic interactions Genome sequencing has revolutionized genetics. It also requires new mathematical tools to help life scientists make sense of enormous amounts of data. Applying new math, Kristina Crona, an American University assistant professor who researches in the area of mathematical biology, and her colleagues show how ranking pathogen mutants can help scientists understand how mutants evolve to resist drug
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Roku to chime in with voice-controlled assistantRoku plans to add a voice-controlled digital assistant to its streaming TV players in an attempt to catch up with Google, Apple and Amazon.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Arctic clouds highly sensitive to air pollution A rare case of forest fire smoke interacting with clouds in the Arctic in July 2012. Contour lines indicate carbon monoxide concentrations in the atmosphere. Credit: MODIS/NASA In 1870, explorer Adolf Erik Nordenskiöld, trekking across the barren and remote ice cap of Greenland, saw something most people wouldn't expect in such an empty, inhospitable landscape: haze. Nordenskiöld's record of the
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Futurity.org
Massive database lists one-third of the world’s plants Researchers have created the first complete list of all known vascular plant species in the Americas. The searchable database contains nearly 125,000 species representing one-third of all known vascular plants worldwide. Vascular plants are land plants with specialized internal-transport and vertical-support tissues. The vast majority of plant species on Earth are vascular plants, including trees
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Futurity.org
Maps link WWI anxieties to climate’s effect on kelp In the early 1900s, the US Department of Agriculture recognized a problem. The United States relied heavily on fertilizer to grow crops and support its burgeoning economy, yet a crucial ingredient for fertilizer—potash, a mixture of potassium and salts—came almost exclusively from German mines. German mines supplied nearly the entire world’s supply of potash, and at the time the US used about a f
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The Atlantic
Those ‘Alien Megastructures’ Are Probably Just Dust In 2015, The Atlantic first reported that astronomers had discovered some tantalizing information about a distant star in the Milky Way, located about 1,300 light-years from Earth in a swan-shaped constellation called Cygnus. The star itself, slightly bigger than our sun, seemed pretty ordinary as far as stars in the universe go. But every now and then, the light of the star appeared to dim and b
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The Atlantic
The Shadow Over Call Me by Your Name The masterful shot that closes Call Me by Your Name asks the viewer to do the same thing the character on screen is doing: think. Over seven minutes, Elio Perlman, the 17-year-old played by Timothée Chalamet, simply stares into a crackling fireplace as tears well in his eyes. He presumably is reflecting on his tryst with Oliver, Armie Hammer’s 24-year-old grad student who visited Elio’s Italian h
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Live Science
No Alien Megastructure: Star's Weird Dimming Likely Caused by Dust An artist's illustration depicting a hypothetical dust ring orbiting Tabby's star, more formally known as KIC 846. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech Well, we always knew the alien-megastructure idea was a long shot. E.T. has nothing to do with the bizarre dimming events of the mysterious object known as Tabby's star , a new study reports. "Dust is most likely the reason why the star's light appe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pong paddles and perception: Our actions influence what we seeMost people think of vision as simply a function of information the eye gathers. For cognitive psychologist Jessica Witt, vision is a little more complicated than that. She has a new paper that faces head-on the notion that her experimental subjects have been victims of a psychological phenomenon called response bias. She employed a classic, action-specific experiment involving a video game famili
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Total-body PET: Maximizing sensitivity for clinical research and patient care RESTON, Va. - The new total-body PET/CT scanner could revolutionize our understanding and treatment of disease through analysis of better imaging data from the whole body. In The Journal of Nuclear Medicine (JNM) featured January article, scientists at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis), outline the development and benefits of this innovative diagnostic tool and explain how maximizing
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Predicting the effect of climate change on crop yields URBANA, Ill. - Scientists now have a new tool to predict the future effects of climate change on crop yields. Researchers from University of Illinois are attempting to bridge two types of computational crop models to become more reliable predictors of crop production in the U.S. Corn Belt. "One class of crop models is agronomy-based and the other is embedded in climate models or earth system mode
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using rank order to identify complex genetic interactions Genome sequencing has revolutionized genetics. It also requires new mathematical tools to help life scientists make sense of enormous amounts of data. Applying new math, Kristina Crona, an American University assistant professor who researches in the area of mathematical biology, and her colleagues show how ranking pathogen mutants can help scientists understand how mutants evolve to resist drug
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Carbon nanotubes devices may have a limit to how 'nano' they can be IMAGE: These are carbon nanotubes. view more Credit: Swansea University Carbon nanotubes bound for electronics not only need to be as clean as possible to maximize their utility in next-generation nanoscale devices, but contact effects may limit how small a nano device can be, according to researchers at the Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI) at Swansea University in collaboration with
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Arctic clouds highly sensitive to air pollution IMAGE: A rare case of forest fire smoke interacting with clouds in the Arctic in July 2012. Contour lines indicate carbon monoxide concentrations in the atmosphere. view more Credit: MODIS/NASA In 1870, explorer Adolf Erik Nordenskiöld, trekking across the barren and remote ice cap of Greenland, saw something most people wouldn't expect in such an empty, inhospitable landscape: haze. Norden
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New data debunks alien megastructure theory on the 'most mysterious star in the universe' A team of more than 100 researchers, led by LSU Department of Physics & Astronomy Assistant Professor Tabetha Boyajian, is one step closer to solving the mystery behind the "most mysterious star in the universe." KIC 8462852, or "Tabby's Star," nicknamed after Boyajian, is otherwise an average star. It is about 50 percent bigger and 1,000 degrees hotter than the Sun. It is more than 1,000 light y
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sowing corals: A new approach paves the way for large-scale coral reef restoration A SECORE diver with a tray of Seeding Units that will be outplanted onto a reef in the waters of Curacao soon. Credit: SECORE International / Benjamin Mueller The troubling loss of coral reefs worldwide has prompted scientists and conservationists to assist the reefs' recovery through active restoration approaches. Transplanting corals on degraded reefs aims at increasing coral cover and subseque
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Science | The Guardian
No alien megastructure around mysterious 'Tabby's star', analysis shows As if a divisive Star Wars film wasn’t bad news enough this Christmas, now an analysis by more than 200 astronomers has been published that shows the mysterious dimming of star KIC 8462852 is not being produced by an alien megastructure. The evidence points most strongly to a giant cloud of dust occasionally obscuring the star. The cloud was most possibly produced by the collision of two comets o
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Science | The Guardian
How did scientists figure out the ages of the Earth and the universe? The long-running series in which readers answer other readers’ questions on subjects ranging from trivial flights of fancy to profound scientific concepts How are the estimates of the ages of a) the Earth and b) the universe derived? RJ Jarrett, London SE26 Continue reading...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Natural climate patterns create hot spots of rapid sea level rise Nearly every site measured has experienced an increase in coastal flooding since the 1950s. The rate is accelerating in many locations along the east and Gulf coasts. Credit: USEPA For Americans who live along the east and Gulf of Mexico coasts, the end of the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season on Nov. 30 was a relief. This year forecasters recorded 17 named storms, 10 of which became hurricanes. Six
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research reveals 'shocking' weakness of lab courses With the new emphasis on hands-on, active learning throughout higher education, lab courses would seem to have an advantage - what could be more active than doing experiments? But surprising new research reveals traditional labs fall far short of their pedagogical goals. In a paper published Jan. 2 in Physics Today , "Introductory Physics Labs: We Can Do Better," Natasha Holmes, Cornell assistant
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Scientific American Content: Global
Stop Searching for the Perfect Sweetener Stop Searching for the Perfect Sweetener 22% of Americans are trying to reduce their sugar intake and more than half are trying to avoid artificial sweeteners like Equal and Splenda. What's the upshot? Credit: Bill Boch Getty Images Advertisement Last week’s Wall Street Journal featured a special section on “The Future of Food” and the cover story by Annie Gasparro was on “ The Search for Sweet
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Laser evaporation technology to create new solar materials Inside look at the RIR-MAPLE technique that has the ability to build new solar cell crystal technology. The white circle at the center of the table is a frozen solution containing the molecular building blocks for the solar cell material, which is blasted by lasers, vaporizing the solution which carries the materials to coat the bottom of the target above. Credit: E. Tomas Barraza Materials scien
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The gig economy may strengthen the 'invisible advantage' men have at work Do women freelancers suffer the effects of ‘male privilege’? Credit: Ryan Morse, CC BY-SA Martin Schneider often got things done faster than a female colleague, Nicole Hallberg, who worked at the same small employment services agency. He figured this was because of his extra experience. One day, however, a client suddenly began acting "impossible," "rude" and "dismissive," as Schneider recalled i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify genetic factors that contribute to Alzheimer's disease (Boston)--Researchers have identified several new genes responsible for Alzheimer's disease (AD) including those leading to functional and structural changes in the brain and elevated levels of AD proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Unlike traditional AD research, this study focused on individual groups across specific on the cognitive spectrum [normal cognitive functioning or controls, mild c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study demonstrates increased risk of heart disease after hysterectomy CLEVELAND, Ohio (January 3, 2018)--In an effort to reduce the associated increased risk of heart disease after hysterectomy, more surgeons are opting to leave a woman's ovaries intact. However, a new study shows that women (especially those aged younger than 35 years) having a hysterectomy with ovarian conservation are still at increased risk. Study results are published online today in Menopause
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Laser evaporation technology to create new solar materials IMAGE: This is a closer look at the target of frozen solution that contains the building blocks for the solar cell material. view more Credit: E. Tomas Barraza DURHAM, N.C. -- Materials scientists at Duke University have developed a method to create hybrid thin-film materials that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to make. The technique could be the gateway to new generatio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research reveals 'shocking' weakness of lab courses ITHACA, N.Y. - With the new emphasis on hands-on, active learning throughout higher education, lab courses would seem to have an advantage - what could be more active than doing experiments? But surprising new research reveals traditional labs fall far short of their pedagogical goals. In a paper published Jan. 2 in Physics Today , "Introductory Physics Labs: We Can Do Better," Natasha Holmes, Co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New behavioral science approach combines experiments, models Researchers from North Carolina State University and Northwestern University are outlining a new approach to behavioral research that draws on experimental studies and computer models to offer new insights into organizational and group behavior. "Social research has a history of using both small-scale experiments and computer models to explore questions about human behavior - but there are very f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The making of biorelevant nanomaterialsThe interactions of biological macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins, and polysaccharide-protein conjugates can be mimicked by artificial polyelectrolytes. Such synthetic polyionic complexes are expected to serve as novel platforms to stabilize and deliver drugs, proteins, or nucleic acids. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Chinese investigators have introduced a versatile, commercially a
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Ingeniøren
Disse problemer pulveriserer vi i 2018 Et nyt år – og nye problemer, fristes man til at skrive – truer. Men, men lad os nu også bevare optimismen, bare et nøk endnu. Året er jo trods alt knapt begyndt her i en askegrå, silende GTX-jakke-januar. Løsningerne på mange problemer befinder sig faktisk ofte inden for rækkevidde – eller også er de pinedød nød til at blive hittet på inden for de næste 12 måneder. Derfor kommer her fem pressere
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New on MIT Technology Review
The U.S. Is Blocking a Chinese Fintech Giant from Buying MoneyGram The U.S. Is Blocking a Chinese Fintech Giant From Buying Moneygram American authorities have decided that Albiba's digital payment firm, Ant Financial, won't be allowed to acquire the cash transfer company Moneygram. Ant Financial, which was one of 50 Smartest Companies in 2017 , is a Chinese tech company that handles… Read more American authorities have decided that Albiba's digital payment fi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Studies investigate effectiveness of booster seats Booster seats, car seats and seat belts are equally effective at saving the lives of children, while booster seats top the others at reducing minor injuries specifically among children ages 8-12, according to Montana State University economist D. Mark Anderson. Anderson recently published two studies that investigated booster seats. One looked at their effectiveness relative to seat belts alone a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bird recognition Birds play an important role in a wide variety of ecosystems as both predator and prey, in controlling insect populations, pollinating and seed dispersal for many plants, and in releasing nutrients on to land and sea in the form of guano. From a scientific perspective it is therefore crucial to monitor bird populations. Now, research published in the International Journal of Computer Applications
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Frog Leaps Away from ExtinctionA once critically endangered species of leaf frog has made a comeback.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dancing backwards in high heels Who do students turn to when they want to ask for an extended assignment deadline or an increase in their marks? Most likely their female professors, says Amani El-Alayli of the Eastern Washington University in the US. El-Alayli is lead author of an article in Springer's journal Sex Roles which investigates the added work demands often faced by women in academia. El-Alayli and her colleagues cond
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cultural evolution has not freed hunter-gatherers from environmental forcing IMAGE: Blue, red, and gray arrows indicate positive, negative and statistically insignificant effect of a variable. Thickness of an arrow indicate the strength of the effect of a variable. Net primary... view more Credit: Miska Luoto Because of culture, humans are often considered to be divorced from the environment and not under the same ecological forcing as other species. However, in a n
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists explore mysteries behind diversity of DNA composition among species A depiction of the double helical structure of DNA. Its four coding units (A, T, C, G) are color-coded in pink, orange, purple and yellow. Credit: NHGRI To make the iconic, twisted double helix that accounts for the diversity of life, DNA rules specify that G always pairs with C, and A with T. But, when it's all added up, the amount of G+C vs A+T content among species is not a simple fixed percen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Overreliance on air conditioning is driving up power prices in Australia Credit: University of South Australia A UniSA researcher has called for a change in Australia's building codes in the wake of a study which shows new homes can be less resistant to heat than older, double-brick houses. In a paper published this week in the international journal Energy and Buildings , Dr. Gertrud Hatvani-Kovacs and colleagues also discuss Australians' over reliance on air conditio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Our cities are hidden power stations At this Rema supermarket in Trondheim, surplus heat generated by the refrigeration system is being stored temporarily in water tanks. The heat is then returned to the store via the ventilation and underfloor heating systems – when it is needed. This picture was taken on the day the supermarket opened. Credit: SINTEF Waste heat and locally-produced renewable energy can be generated by compact, "ur
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
If your New Year's resolution is to get fit, your dog may be your perfect training partner Stay fresh. Credit: Shutterstock January is the month of ambitious resolutions – and getting fit and losing weight tend to top the list. But how many people manage to maintain their exercise goals? Gyms are filled with enthusiastic people at the start of the month, but the numbers soon start to dwindle. All is not lost, however. If you own a dog, your perfect fitness coach and motivator is right
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novelty in science – real necessity or distracting obsession? It may take time for a tiny step forward to show its worth. Credit: ellissharp/Shutterstock.com In a recent survey of over 1,500 scientists , more than 70 percent of them reported having been unable to reproduce other scientists' findings at least once. Roughly half of the surveyed scientists ran into problems trying to reproduce their own results. No wonder people are talking about a "reproducib
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Futurity.org
These factors explain gap in black and white diabetes risk Black and white people have the same risk of developing diabetes when all biological factors for the disease are considered over time, according to a new study. “Obesity is driving these differences…” The finding flips long-held beliefs that there is an unexplained or genetic reason why blacks have double the rate of diabetes compared to whites by midlife, which is considered early onset. “Obesit
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Futurity.org
Spiders debunk the ‘Great Man Theory’ Spiders have helped scientists debunk the Great Man Theory, a 19th-century notion positing that highly influential individuals use their power—be it personal charisma, intelligence, wisdom, or political skill—to maximize their impact in shaping the course of history. “We wanted to see whether the presence of these particularly bold individuals changed how a society behaves collectively…” Working
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Magnetic fields discovered in two hot evolved stars The LSD Stokes I, N and Stokes V profiles of 19 Aur and HR 3042. Credit: Martin et al., 2017. Astronomers have presented the initial results of the Large Impact of Magnetic Fields on the Evolution of Hot Stars (LIFE) project. Among determining fundamental parameters of 15 stars, they found that two of them have magnetic fields. The finding is detailed in a paper published December 20 on arXiv.org
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bird recognition Birds play an important role in a wide variety of ecosystems as both predator and prey, in controlling insect populations, pollinating and seed dispersal for many plants, and in releasing nutrients on to land and sea in the form of guano. From a scientific perspective it is therefore crucial to monitor bird populations. Now, research published in the International Journal of Computer Applications
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sowing corals: A new approach paves the way for large-scale coral reef restoration IMAGE: A SECORE diver with a tray of Seeding Units that will be outplanted onto a reef in the waters of Curacao soon. view more Credit: SECORE International / Benjamin Mueller The troubling loss of coral reefs worldwide has prompted scientists and conservationists to assist the reefs' recovery through active restoration approaches. Transplanting corals on degraded reefs aims at incr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers show high-performance breathing in bones IMAGE: A bone trabecle of this vertebral cavity shows the fine fibers of the pneumosteum, which indicate the former presence of air sacs. view more Credit: (c) Modified from Lambertz et al. (2018) Biol. Lett. doi:10.1098/rsbl.2017.0514 "The respiratory organs of vertebrates exhibit a tremendous degree of diversity, but the lung-air sac system of birds is truly unique among extant specie
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alien megastructure not the cause of dimming of the 'most mysterious star in the universe' University Park PA -- A team of more than 200 researchers, including Penn State Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics Assistant Professor Jason Wright and led by Louisiana State University's Tabetha Boyajian, is one step closer to solving the mystery behind the "most mysterious star in the universe." KIC 8462852, or "Tabby's Star," nicknamed after Boyajian, is otherwise an ordinary star, about
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists explore mysteries behind diversity of DNA composition among species To make the iconic, twisted double helix that accounts for the diversity of life, DNA rules specify that G always pairs with C, and A with T. But, when it's all added up, the amount of G+C vs A+T content among species is not a simple fixed percentage or, standard one-to-one ratio. For example, within single-celled organisms, the amount of G+C content can vary from 72 percent in a bacteria like St
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An adaptation 150 million years in the making Graphical abstract of slip joints in snapping shrimp. Credit: Rich Palmer, University of Alberta Just how do snapping shrimp snap? This was the question plaguing scientists who set out to uncover the mysterious mechanisms producing big biology in tiny crustaceans. "All we've known until now is the endpoint of these super snapping claws," said Rich Palmer, biological science professor at the Unive
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Combining experiments, models boosts social behavior research Credit: Dan DeLuca Researchers from North Carolina State University and Northwestern University are outlining a new approach to behavioral research that draws on experimental studies and computer models to offer new insights into organizational and group behavior. "Social research has a history of using both small-scale experiments and computer models to explore questions about human behavior – b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A high price for policy failure: the 10-year story of spiralling electricity bills How your rising power bills stack up. Credit: ACCC Politicians are told never to waste a good crisis. Australia's electricity sector is in crisis, or something close to it. The nation's first-ever statewide blackout, in South Australia in September 2016, was followed by electricity shortages in several states last summer. More shortages are anticipated over coming summers. But for most Australian
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers show high-performance breathing in bones Part of a neck vertebra of the dwarf sauropod Europasaurus with deep cavities (asterisk) that presumably housed air sacs. Credit: Verändert nach Lambertz et al. Dinosaurs are far from extinct, but dominate as birds still most regions of the globe. Part of this huge success is due to the evolution of air sacs, which are crucial for the high efficiency of their respiratory system. Scientists at the
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Ask AI: How not to kill online conversations In the Dec. 23 & Jan. 6 SN : Our top stories of 2017, grounded pterosaur hatchlings, protectors of the Dead Sea Scrolls, a counterintuitive metamaterial, neutron star sizing, arrow of time reversed, E. coli in flour and more.
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Feed: All Latest
Students Redesign Ford's F-150 Pickup for the Age of Mobility Ford's F-Series pickups are not just America’s best-selling trucks—they are America's best-selling vehicle, and have been for decades. Every year, in the US alone, the automaker sells more than 800,000 F-150s (the smallest of the family), and they're a major profit driver. When Ford's new CEO announced major budget cuts last year, he also added extra investment into electric vehicles and pickups.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alien megastructure not the cause of dimming of the 'most mysterious star in the universe' Star KIC 8462852 in infrared (2MASS survey) and ultraviolet (GALEX). Credit: NASA A team of more than 200 researchers, including Penn State Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics Assistant Professor Jason Wright and led by Louisiana State University's Tabetha Boyajian, is one step closer to solving the mystery behind the "most mysterious star in the universe." KIC 8462852, or "Tabby's Star," ni
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Imaging engineers improve accuracy of satellite images New pseudo-invariant calibration sites in northern Africa were identified through a partnership with Google Earth Engine. Credit: South Dakota State University Scientists use satellite images to monitor the conditions of forests, crops and the environment, but their research relies on those images accurately measuring the light being reflected from Earth. Imaging engineers at South Dakota State U
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How Indigenous knowledge advances modern science and technology Throughout history, Indigenous peoples have been responsible for the development of many technologies and have substantially contributed to science. Science is the pursuit of the knowledge . Approaches to gathering that knowledge are culturally relative. Indigenous science incorporates traditional knowledge and Indigenous perspectives, while non-Indigenous scientific approaches are commonly recog
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nature signals SOS—long-term research, short-term extremes uncover clues to survival Credit: Florida International University When extreme weather strikes, nature endures devastation but also reveals secrets to its resiliency. Researchers in FIU's College of Arts, Sciences & Education are investigating the clues that plants, animals and ecosystems leave behind in moments of suffering and recovery. What they find could offer solutions to protecting nature from long-term changes ha
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An adaptation 150 million years in the making Just how do snapping shrimp snap? This was the question plaguing scientists who set out to uncover the mysterious mechanisms producing big biology in tiny crustaceans. "All we've known until now is the endpoint of these super snapping claws," said Rich Palmer, biological science professor at the University of Alberta and senior author on a new study on snapping shrimp claws. "What we now know is
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Scientific American Content: Global
Imagining the Sleek Car of the Future--in 1918 January 1968 The Weakness of Polls “A strong caution against attaching too much weight to polls of public opinion, particularly concerning political issues, has been expressed by Leo Bogart, president of the American Association for Public Opinion Research. ‘“Don't know” in response to a survey question,’ he writes, ‘often means “Don't want to know,” which is another way of saying, “I don
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Scientific American Content: Global
A Call to Make Schools Safe Zones, Not War Zones In October 2017 Joy Bishara recounted to United Nations Security Council members her experience of being one of nearly 300 girls abducted in 2014 from a boarding school in Nigeria by the Islamist group Boko Haram. She described to a hushed audience how, after her capture, she jumped from a moving truck and ran through the bush for hours to escape. More than 100 of her classmates remain in captivi
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Frog Leaps Away From ExtinctionA once critically endangered species of leaf frog has made a comeback.
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The Scientist RSS
Members of Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS FiredThe move follows mass resignations from the council in June.
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The Scientist RSS
Researchers Create Hair-Growing Skin OrganoidsThe mini-organs reproduce the two cell layers present in mouse skin and the development of hair follicles, providing a potential model for skin and hair research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA-led study solves a methane puzzle A reduction in global burned area in the 2000s had an unexpectedly large impact on methane emissions. Credit: NASA/GSFC/SVS A new NASA-led study has solved a puzzle involving the recent rise in atmospheric methane, a potent greenhouse gas, with a new calculation of emissions from global fires. The new study resolves what looked like irreconcilable differences in explanations for the increase. Met
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why we shouldn't be too quick to blame migratory animals for global disease The Red-necked stint is highly exposed to sediment microbes as it forages for the microscopic invertebrates that fuel its vast migrations. Author provided Have you ever got on a flight and the person next to you started sneezing? With 37 million scheduled flights transporting people around the world each year, you might think that the viruses and other germs carried by travellers would be getting
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Driverless cars are ready to hit the road—but are we ready for driverless cars? A fully self-driving Chrysler Pacifica hybrid minivan hits the road. Credit: Waymo We may continue to wait for those flying cars promised in science fiction, but who needs them when the car can drive itself? Congress is trying to fast-track legislation that speeds the removal of federal regulatory hurdles for driverless cars . The California Department of Motor Vehicles recently revised its own r
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Live Science
'Bomb Cyclone' Forecast to Hit East Coast Water vapor across the globe on Jan. 3, 2018. Credit: NASA Just when you thought the weather couldn't get worse, the Washington Post hits us with "bomb cyclone." That's right, forecasters suggest this "bomb" will make the U.S. East Coast unbearable for many. How does a system become bomb-cyclone status? Its atmospheric pressure must drop so rapidly, at least 24 millibars in 24 hours, accord
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bosses with mood swings make workers most anxious Managers who have mood swings cause more tension in the office than bosses who are nasty all the time. Credit: University of Exeter Bosses who have "Jekyll and Hyde" personalities cause their staff the highest levels of anxiety, a new study has shown. Managers who have mood swings cause more tension in the office than bosses who are nasty all the time, according to a new study. Not being able to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Virtual reality has added a new dimension to theme park rides—so what's next for thrill-seekers? The author on a VR waterslide in Germany. Because why not? Credit: Malcolm Burt, Author provided Roller coasters have come a long way since the theme park rides of old, as thrill-seekers and park operators look for the next big thing. The trend in the early 2000s was for higher, faster and loopier rides that arguably peaked with the 206km per hour Kingda Ka rollercoaster at Six Flags, New Jersey,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How unveiling zeolite's structural development will benefit future synthetic designs Credit: Shutterstock Expanding the zeolite 'window of flexibility' offers materials science more control over the design and designation of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for their catalytic properties, introducing new applications. Researchers drawing on work conducted by the EU-funded project, GROWMOF (Modelling of MOF self-assembly, crystal growth and thin film formation), have successfully u
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bias creeps into reference checks, so is it time to ditch them? Research shows gender bias even invades in the content of recommendations. Credit: Connie/Flickr, CC BY-SA As much as we'd like to think we've refined the hiring process over the years to carefully select the best candidate for the job, bias still creeps in. Candidates who come from privileged backgrounds are more able to source impressive, well-connected referrers and this perpetuates the cycle
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New scanning technique allows researchers to read words on mummy waste wrap Credit: CC0 Public Domain A team of researchers with University College London has found a noninvasive way to read writing on ancient papyrus used to construct boxes that held mummies inside their tombs. Team lead Adam Gibson spoke to the press about the new development and why he believes archaeologists and historians will find it useful. Researchers have known for many years that workers in anc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Flight testing validates waveform capability MIT Lincoln Laboratory personnel Joseph Zurkus, left, and Jacob Huang, right, operate a protected tactical waveform modem and collect data while Ted O’Connell, also from Lincoln Lab, monitors terminal equipment to ensure everything is working properly during flight testing Oct. 5. A team from Hanscom AFB, MIT Lincoln Laboratory and the MITRE Corp. are working to ensure that the PTW, a government-
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Ingeniøren
Hjertekarsygdomme fra biler og brændeovne dræber 1400 danskere årligt Trafikken på de danske veje er steget, og når vinteren sætter ind, fyres der op i brændeovnene. Begge dele er med til at øge luftforureningen, og Hjerteforeningen har derfor fået Institut for Folkesundhed til at udregne, hvor mange af de årligt 3.750 tidlige dødsfald i Danmark på grund af luftforurening, der skyldes hjertekarsygdomme. Den nye rapport , baserer sig, altså primært på kendt viden, m
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Popular Science
Why is it more dangerous to have belly fat? Every January, fat's in the crosshairs of health columnists, fitness magazines, and desperate Americans. This year, PopSci looks at the macronutrient beyond its most negative associations. What’s fat good for? How do we get it to go where we want it to? Where does it wander when it’s lost? This, my friends, is Fat Month . Belly flab has long been used to body-shame people into joining various wei
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sensor the size of a nitrogen atom investigates hard drives The special ellipsoid form of the plasma reactor developed at Fraunhofer IAF allows for large-scale diamond separation. Credit: Fraunhofer IAF To connect components with each other, gluing is preferred today instead of welding, riveting or using screws. That makes cars, planes and agricultural machines lighter. The requirements placed on the adhesive are high, though: it has to be flexible enough
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The Atlantic
How to Take a Picture of a Stealth Bomber Over the Rose Bowl The first thought that comes to mind staring at the photograph above is: This has got to be fake. The B-2 stealth bomber looks practically pasted onto the field. The flag is unfurled just so. The angle feels almost impossible, shot directly down from above. And yet, it’s real, the product of lots of planning, some tricky flying, and the luck of the moment. The photographer, Mark Holtzman, has bee
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The Atlantic
Why Do We Need to Sleep? TSUKUBA, Japan — Outside the International Institute for Integrative Sleep Medicine, the heavy fragrance of sweet Osmanthus trees fills the air, and big golden spiders string their webs among the bushes. Two men in hard hats next to the main doors mutter quietly as they measure a space and apply adhesive to the slate-colored wall. The building is so new that they are still putting up the signs. T
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Why Symmetry Continues to Beguile Mathematicians You could forgive mathematicians for being drawn to the monster group, an algebraic object so enormous and mysterious that it took them nearly a decade to prove it exists. Now, 30 years later, string theorists—physicists studying how all fundamental forces and particles might be explained by tiny strings vibrating in hidden dimensions—are looking to connect the monster to their physical questions
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Why Artificial Intelligence Is Not Like Your Brain—Yet Here’s a fun drinking game: Every time someone compares AI to the human brain, take a shot. It’ll dull the pain of such mindless metaphorizing—and serve as a reminder that you, an at-least-semiconscious being, have an actual brain that can make real decisions like “Drink!” in the first place. Contra the hype of marketers (as regurgitated by credulous journalists—for shame!), AI resembles the gray
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Paints and varnishes based on potato starch In future, indoor aluminum surfaces should also be cost-effectively coated with paints based on potato starch. Credit: Fraunhofer IAP If a surface has to be protected against corrosion, in 80 percent of all cases this takes place through coating it with paints or varnishes. When doing so, the proportion of bio-based, environmentally-friendly solutions is extremely small. Researchers at the Fraunh
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Science-Based Medicine
Indian Doctors Fight Against Quackery There has been an ongoing internal debate among those of use promoting science in medicine – how fragile vs robust is the dedication to science in the medical profession? In other words, how much of an existential threat does movements such as “alternative medicine” really present to the culture of science that dominates medical practice? There are those who think that science has a critical adva
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Scientific American Content: Global
When Science Fiction Meets Social Science In 1980, Robert A. Heinlein wrote, “The most difficult speculation for a science fiction writer to undertake is to imagine correctly the *secondary* implications of a new factor. Many people correctly anticipated the coming of the horseless carriage... but I know of no writer, fiction or non-fiction, who saw ahead of time the vast change in the courting and mating habits of Americans which would
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Futurity.org
Most can skip fasting before new cholesterol test A new way to calculate so-called “bad cholesterol” levels in the blood could eliminate inconvenient pre-test fasting for most people, a new study shows. The method of estimating a patient’s LDL, or low-density lipoprotein, is significantly more accurate than the old one in people who eat before blood is drawn, researchers say. “Although the new LDL calculation method is a bit more complex, the be
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Under the midnight sunIn September 2017, a new iceberg calved from Pine Island Glacier—one of the main outlets where the West Antarctic Ice Sheet flows into the ocean. Just weeks later, the berg named B-44 shattered into more than 20 fragments. On December 15, 2017, the Landsat 8 Earth-orbiting satellite took this image of the broken berg. An area of relatively warm water, known as a polyna, has kept the water ice free
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's flying observatory SOFIA to explore magnetic universe and beyondNASA's Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, SOFIA, is preparing for its 2018 observing campaign, which will include observations of celestial magnetic fields, star-forming regions, comets, Saturn's giant moon Titan and more.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Fire reductions 'make methane numbers add up' Image copyright EPA Image caption Fires globally are in sharp decline Scientists think they can now better explain the recent surge in methane levels seen in the Earth's atmosphere. Although only a trace component in the air, CH4 is a greenhouse gas and has been rising rapidly since about 2006. Tropical wetlands and fossil fuels are suspected as major sources - but the sums do not add up. Only if
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unraveling the mechanisms that control cell growth and size A protein that controls cell growth (PIP kinase) is marked with a fluorescent green tag in these growing yeast cells. Credit: Rafael Lucena All living cells, from simple yeasts to human brain cells, regulate their rate of growth and their ultimate size and shape. How they do this, however, is one of the fundamental mysteries of biology. A new study, published December 28 in Current Biology , reve
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Digitization in motor vehicle manufacturing A variety of options in motor vehicle manufacturing: Outwardly, many parts are virtually indistinguishable to workers. Credit: Fraunhofer IFF, Andreas Süss Pressure to optimize is intense on the floors of motor vehicle manufacturers' factories: Variance is steadily increasing. Costs have to be contained. Fraunhofer researchers are now using RFID technology to introduce more transparency in motor
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Flexible bonding—hard and soft at the same time MetAK enables scoliosis corsets in new, modern designs with a high level of wearing comfort. Credit: Fraunhofer LBF To connect components with each other, gluing is preferred today instead of welding, riveting or using screws. That makes cars, planes and agricultural machines lighter. The requirements placed on the adhesive are high, though: it has to be flexible enough to compensate for stress p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: From the Earth, moon and beyondThe purpose of NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft—Origins, Spectral Interpretation, Resource Identification, and Security–Regolith Explorer—is to map and return samples from asteroid Bennu, a carbon-rich hunk of rock that might contain organic materials or molecular precursors to life. It is also an asteroid that could someday make a close pass or even a collision with Earth, though not for several cent
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Off-road vehicle restriction benefits outweigh costs for national seashore Credit: Steve Walker An economic analysis by North Carolina State University, Oregon State University and RTI International finds that the economic benefits of biodiversity and habitat preservation significantly outweigh the costs of off-road vehicle (ORV) restrictions at Cape Hatteras National Seashore. The study sheds light on the relative economic value of efforts to balance environmental prot
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Little wasp bodies means little wasp brain regions, study shows Apoica pallens. Credit: Sean O'Donnell A new Drexel University study comparing brain size to body size shows that just because you've evolved to have a big brain, some regions of your brain may not have kept up. Sean O'Donnell, Ph.D., professor in the College of Arts and Sciences at Drexel University, and his team studied a wide variety of Costa Rican paper wasps to shed some light on this subjec
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Live Science
Why People Are Drinking 'Raw Water' (But Probably Shouldn't) Would you like your water sparkling, from the tap or hauled out of an unsterilized river upstate? For proponents of the expensive new drinking trend known as "raw water," the choice is as clear as a Poland spring. According to a New York Times article published last week, a growing number of American hydration connoisseurs are turning off their taps and switching to unfiltered, untreated wa
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Live Science
Common Ancestor of Sharks and Humans Lived 440 Million Years Ago Humans and sharks shared a common ancestor about 440 million years ago. Credit: Diego Azubel/Epa/REX/Shutterstock Humans and sharks are incredibly different creatures, but the two shared a common ancestor 440 million years ago, a new study finds. Researchers made the discovery by studying the fossilized bones of a shark that lived during the Devonian, a period lasting from 416 million to 35
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Science : NPR
Winter Storm Could Bring Snow And Sleet To U.S. East Coast Obdulio Arenas takes a selfie at the partially frozen waterfall at the Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park, on Tuesday in Paterson, N.J. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption toggle caption Julio Cortez/AP Obdulio Arenas takes a selfie at the partially frozen waterfall at the Paterson Great Falls National Historical Park, on Tuesday in Paterson, N.J. Julio Cortez/AP If you live anywhere along th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The environmental costs of fast fashion No more make do and mend. Credit: wwww.shutterstock.com It's tough to love our clothes and keep wearing them for longer when we are faced with a tempting array of newness on offer in the shops. But before you head out into the January sales for those irresistible deals, spare a thought for the impact of fast fashion on the environment. Fast fashion focuses on speed and low cost in order to delive
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Synchrotron study reveals oxygen's influence on the chemistry of atmospheric pollution A representative fuel molecule showing oxygen molecules (right, red) and 2-methylheptane (right, grey and white) meet in a jet-stirred reactor. The highly oxygenated molecules that result (left) are detected by advanced mass spectrometry. Credit: Zhandong Wang Chemical reactions that produce pollutants in the atmosphere, and the chemistry of fuel combustion inside a vehicle engine, have some stri
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nursing homes should require flu shots for all staff and patients, most older adults say IMAGE: Key findings about what adults over 50 say regarding flu vaccination for residents and staff of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities view more Credit: University of Michigan ANN ARBOR, MI - As flu season swings into high gear, a new poll suggests that nursing homes and other long-term care facilities should be doing more to get their staff and patients vaccinated before it's t
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Science : NPR
Winter Storm Could Bring Snow And Sleet To U.S. East Coast A layer of ice is broken into pieces floating along the banks of the Hudson River at the Palisades Interstate Park with the George Washington Bridge in the background on Tuesday, in Fort Lee, N.J. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption toggle caption Julio Cortez/AP A layer of ice is broken into pieces floating along the banks of the Hudson River at the Palisades Interstate Park with the George Washington
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Robot fish shows how the deepest vertebrate in the sea takes the pressure It’s like having “an elephant stand on your thumb.” That’s how deep-sea physiologist and ecologist Mackenzie Gerringer describes the pressure squeezing down on the deepest known living fish, some 8 kilometers down. What may help these small, pale Mariana snailfish survive elephantine squashing, says Gerringer of the University of Washington’s Friday Harbor Labs, is a body bulked up, especially at
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I Believe in Intelligent Design ... for Robots The beauty of evolution lies in two complementary forces: simplicity and complexity. From a simple rule—survival of the fittest—comes the astonishing array of critters that populate Earth. It doesn’t matter if you’ve got two legs or four legs or no legs at all, there’s no one right way to be on this planet. Same goes, as it happens, for robotics . You and I are living on the verge of what you mig
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cognitive science
Study on Reddit user habits reflects behavior across internet. Study linked this behavior to cognitive fatigue. People are so overstimulated by the flow of info they no longer think or read, they just vote. Whether an upvote or downvote, it doesn't matter. From the article: "A recent study by researchers at the University of Notre Dame found that more than 70 percent of content recommended on the popular social news website, Reddit, is voted on by users who have not actually read the posts." Only 70%!? That seems low for Reddit, in general.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Water, and Maybe Life, in Places We Never Expected Earth exists in that sweet spot in distance from the sun, often referred to as the “Goldilocks Zone,” where water is a liquid on the surface. Much closer and you can get a runaway greenhouse effect, which makes Venus hellishly hot. Too far away, and you freeze into an ice ball. But there’s another place in our solar system where liquid water exists in abundance. The icy moons of the outer pla
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers measure the inner structure of distant suns from their pulsations A glimpse into the heart: Artist's impression of the interior of the star, which was studied through its surface oscillations. Credit: Earl Bellinger / ESA At first glance, it would seem to be impossible to look inside a star. An international team of astronomers, under the leadership of Earl Bellinger and Saskia Hekker of the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Göttingen, has, for
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Scientific American Content: Global
Satellites Predict a Cholera Outbreak Weeks in Advance Orbiting satellites can warn us of bad weather and help us navigate to that new taco joint. Scientists are also using data satellites to solve a worldwide problem: predicting cholera outbreaks. Cholera infects millions of people each year, leading to thousands of deaths. Often communities do not realize an epidemic is underway until infected individuals swarm hospitals. Advanced warning for i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Technology and nature are historically interconnected Stanford historian Mikael Wolfe argues that technology and nature are usually thought of as opposites, but he advocates for what is known as an envirotech approach to the historical relationship between the two – technology and the environment should be seen as interconnected. In his recently published book, Watering the Revolution: An Environmental and Technological History of Agrarian Reform in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst in the ISS European Columbus laboratoryESA astronaut Alexander Gerst floats inside the International Space Station's European Columbus laboratory. The image was taken during his first flight in 2014.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Dwarf galaxy Kiso 5639 NASA, ESA, D. Elmegreen (Vassar College), B. Elmegreen (IBM’s Thomas J. Watson Research Center), J. Sánchez Almeida, C. Munoz-Tunon & M. Filho (Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias), J. Mendez-Abreu (University of St Andrews), J. Gallagher (University of Wisconsin-Madison), M. Rafelski (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center) & D. Ceverino (Center for Astronomy at Heidelberg University) In this NASA/ES
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
the geometry of nuclear black hole accretion disksSupermassive black holes with millions or even billions of solar-masses of material are found at the nuclei of most galaxies, including our Milky Way. A torus of dust and gas orbits around the black hole (at least according to most theories) and radiates in ultraviolet light when material falling toward the black hole heats the disk to millions of degrees. The accretion process can also power the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Multiphoton interference observed beyond coherence time For the first time, scientists have experimentally demonstrated how multiphoton interference with thermal light can be observed beyond the coherence time, paving the way to a possible new range of applications in high-precision sensing. The team of researchers from Pohang University of Science and Technology, Korea, and the University of Portsmouth, UK, describe their observation as a counter-int
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NYT > Science
Made in China: New and Potentially Lifesaving Drugs Chi-Med is awaiting more data. But if further tests get positive results, the company will apply for what is known as breakthrough therapy designation from the United States Food and Drug Administration. It still needs to run Phase 3 trials, the last step before seeking full approval from the F.D.A., but breakthrough therapy status would allow the final stage to be sped up. The trials involve dru
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Ingeniøren
2017 var rekordår for dansk vindenergi Det var et godt år for vindmølleejerne i 2017. Efter et 2016, hvor vinden helt konkret løjede af og kun dækkede 38 procent af elforbruget, kom der i 2017 virkelig gang i møllerne. Hele 43 procent af danskernes elforbrug kom fra vindkraften, og det er endog mere end rekordåret i 2015, hvor vindkraften stod for 42 procent. Samtidig kunne vindmøllejerne glæde sig over en højere afregningspris. Det f
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Ingeniøren
AI kan reparere og gøre slørede billeder skarpe Et dybt helisk neuralt netværk kan gøre uskarpe billeder skarpe udelukkende ved at bruge information fra selve billedet. Effekten er dog mindre synlig her på grund af Version2's CMS-system. Foto: Dmitry Ulyanov Det er fup og fidus, men det virker: Kunstig intelligens kan genskabe billedinformation, så resultatet til forveksling ligner originalen. Teknologien har været fremme i et stykke tid, men
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Multidrug resistant genetic factors in malaria parasites Malaria, an infectious disease, is caused by a parasite which is spread by mosquitoes. When the mosquito bites a person, the parasites are introduced from the mosquito’s saliva into a person’s blood. The parasites then travel to the liver where they mature and reproduce. Credit: National University of Singapore NUS scientists in collaboration with researchers from Norvatis have discovered two gen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The making of biorelevant nanomaterials Credit: Wiley The interactions of biological macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins, and polysaccharide–protein conjugates can be mimicked by artificial polyelectrolytes. Such synthetic polyionic complexes are expected to serve as novel platforms to stabilize and deliver drugs, proteins, or nucleic acids. In the journal Angewandte Chemie , Chinese investigators have introduced a versatile
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bright light allows researchers to see bone as well as tissue A sample computer model derived from synchrotron radiation phase-contrast (SR-PC) images of the human middle ear. (a) Illustrates 3D model of the middle ear including the tympanic membrane (TM), middle-ear ossicles (malleus, incus and stapes) and soft tissue structures [tensor tympani muscle (TTM), incudostapedial joint (ISJ), stapedial annular ligament (SAL), stapedius muscle (SM), posterior inc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists take first step toward cell-sized robots An electricity-conducting, environment-sensing, shape-changing machine the size of a human cell? Is that even possible? Cornell physicists Paul McEuen and Itai Cohen not only say yes, but they've actually built the "muscle" for one. With postdoctoral researcher Marc Miskin at the helm, the team has made a robot exoskeleton that can rapidly change its shape upon sensing chemical or thermal chang
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop hybrid meta-biomaterial that can prolong lifespan of hip implants 3D printed hip implant developed using the new hybrid meta-biomaterial. Credit: TU Delft A hybrid meta-biomaterial that promotes bone growth is not something you will find in nature, but it can be created using a 3-D printer and existing biomaterials. TU Delft researchers have developed a meta-implant that combines a conventional meta-biomaterial with an auxetic meta-biomaterial. Unlike natural m
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The Atlantic
How Ella Mae Wray Seized the Opportunities of 1968 In response to “ 1968 and the Making of Modern America ,” a year-long project here at The Atlantic , Jeffrey C. Wray, a professor at Michigan State University, shares a story about his mother, Ella Mae Wray, who would never be the same after that year: Our family’s life was altered by tragedy in 1968. On a late May night, a month after the assassination of Martin Luther King, my own father was mu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Exploring environmental and technological effects on culture evolution at different spatial scales Past human-environmental interaction. Credit: Science China Press Many famous ancient civilizations such as ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Maya, Angkor, and the Han and Tang Dynasties in ancient China have emerged and flourished around the world. These highly developed civilizations in prehistoric and historical periods eventually declined, and then fell into oblivion in human history. Researchers h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Exploring electrolysis for energy storage A Kyushu University research team realized continuous electrochemical synthesis of an alcoholic compound from a carboxylic acid using a polymer electrolyte alcohol electrosynthesis cell, which enables direct power charge into alcoholic compound. Credit: Masaaki Sadakiyo / International Institute for Carbon-Neutral Energy Research, Kyushu University Interest in renewable energy continues to grow.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Selenium protects specific interneurons in the brain Selenium protects a specific type of interneurons in the brain. Credit: Ingold et al., Cell , 2017 Exactly 200 years ago, the Swedish scientist Jöns Jacob Berzelius discovered the trace element selenium, which he named after the goddess of the moon, Selene. Besides its industrial applications, selenium is an essential trace element and indispensable for humans, many animals and some bacteria. A t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fitness system creates virtual avatars in 10 minutes In order to test the new process, doctoral student Jascha Achenbach had 40 cameras photograph him simultaneously (left). Ten minutes later, the virtual version of the researcher was finished (right). Credit: CITEC/Bielefeld University Avatars—virtual persons—are a core element of ICSpace, a virtual fitness and movement environment at Bielefeld University's Cluster of Excellence Cognitive Interact
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unlocking the mystery of pollen tube guidance The LURE peptide, which is secreted by the synergid cells within the ovule acts as a key to bind to the lock, which is the PRK6 receptor found on the tip of the pollen tube. Figure taken and adapted from the webpage of "The birth of new plant species", a project supported by the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas. Credit: ITbM, Nagoya University Fertilization in flowering pl
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Ingeniøren
Verdens koldeste flydende vand har en temperatur på -42,55 grader celsius At vand kan underafkøles til meget langt under det normale frysepunkt er velkendt, og med relativt enkle metoder kan man underafkøle vand til omkring -38 grader celsius. En international forskergruppe ledet af Robert Grisenti fra J.W. Goethe-Universität Frankfurt har ved det tyske forskningscenter GSI - Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung ved Darmstadt nu udført et eksperiment, der har sat
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Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Hvad er det for 'vægte', der sidder på højspændingsmaster? Vores læser Søren Marqvorsen har spurgt: Ved hvert ophæng af ledningerne på højspændingsmaster er der monteret nogle 'vægte'. Hvilken funktion har de? Jeg forestiller mig, at de er svingningsdæmpere, men er det rigtigt? Henrik Roland Hansen , driftsleder i Energinet.dk’s afdeling for Vedligehold Fyn og Sjælland, svarer: Ja, det er tale om svingningsdæmpere. Når en faseleder på et luftledningssyst
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Record dry raises fears of drought's return in California It's been almost a year since Los Angeles residents felt any real rain, and precious little snow is in the Sierras, but water managers say it's too early for fears that California is sliding back into drought as abruptly as the state fell out of it. Water officials carry out the first of their regular ritual winter snow measurements before news cameras on Wednesday. Plunging rods into snowpacks t
11h
Ingeniøren
Ensomhed, drilleri og smerter: Undervisningsministeriet politianmeldt for at gemme oplysninger om børn Forældre til skoleelever er så forargede over Undervisningsministeriets dårlige håndtering af elevernes data i forbindelse med en trivselsundersøgelse , at det nu har ført til at mindst to borgere har politianmeldt ministeriet. Det sker efter det kom frem, at ministeriet gemte svar fra børn helt ned til børnehaveklassen, der svarede på en række meget personlige ting som ensomhed, drilleri og smer
12h
Ingeniøren
Cobots med følsomme fingre skal fremtidssikre dansk krydderurtegartneri »Her står dyret så.« Henning Jørgensen nikker hen mod den simple robotinstallation. Ligesom det meste andet inventar hos gartneriet Rosborg i Bellinge lige syd for Odense er robotten begunstiget af drivhuseffekt og masser af lys på en ellers noget grå decemberdag. Den kunstige LED-belysning er nødvendig, når man som Rosborg producerer i omegnen af 29 millioner krydderurter og 12 millioner miniblo
12h
Ingeniøren
Store konsulenthuse fra hele landet søger ingeniører Stærke bygherrerådgivere med pondus og gode samarbejdsevner Sweco Engageret og nysgerrig markedsudvikler med flair for at udnytte den stigende digitaliserings i energisektoren Energinet Ingeniør med erfaring inden for vejteknik Vejdirektoratet Ingeniør med interesse for vejbefæstelser Vejdirektoratet Det Økologiske Råd søger en ildsjæl som ny direktør Det Økologiske Råd Senior Advise Mercuri Urva
13h
Ingeniøren
Podcast-special: Tech-giganter spinder guld på dine data Transformator Ingeniørens fredagspodcast sætter strøm til ugens største nyheder inden for teknologi, forskning og naturvidenskab og analyserer de svingninger, der på godt og ondt transformerer verden og vores samfund. Anders Høeg Nissen er vært på Transformator Foto: PodLAB Abonnér på Transformator: Følg i iTunes På mobilen: Søg på Ingeniøren i din podcast-app. På iPhone er podcast-appen indbygge
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Blue tarantula Image copyright Andrew Snyder Image caption Andrew Snyder came across an electric blue tarantula in the rainforest of Guyana When herpetologist Andrew Snyder's flashlight landed on something bright blue in the rainforests of Guyana, South America, he stopped and took a closer look. It turned out to be a blue tarantula of the Ischnocolinae subfamily, a species most likely unknown to science. "It w
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Back from the brink Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption With the rangers' protection, Zakouma's 500-strong herd is growing strong Prince Harry is the new president of a conservation group called African Parks, which takes over national parks and gives rangers military-style training to take on poachers and protect wildlife. The BBC visited one of the parks it manages, at Zakouma in Chad. A dis
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Penguin tourism Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Heading to Antarctica by plane is the exception, not the rule According to Chinese media, the country's first commercial flight to Antarctica brought 22 lucky tourists to the exotic destination this weekend. The trip is hailed as a milestone - but is it really? And what does it tell us about China's geopolitical ambitions in the region? I
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Whale people Kiliii Yuyan is an indigenous Nanai photographer who documents native cultures and wilderness conservation issues. He spent time with the Inupiat, an indigenous community from North Slope Alaska, whose lifestyle and culture is dependent on subsistence harvest of marine mammals. Members of the community are allowed to catch limited number of bowhead whales a year from stable populations. The first
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Winter storm forecast to dump snow from Florida to Carolinas Water squirts from a frozen fountain near downtown in Charlotte, N.C., Tuesday, Jan. 2, 2018. Temperatures plummeted overnight to 2 degrees in the north Georgia mountains, 14 in Atlanta and 26 as far south as New Orleans as the Gulf Coast felt more like Green Bay. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton) Brutal winter weather that's brought subzero temperatures to parts of the U.S. is threatening to dump snow and
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Legal cannabis to generate $40bln, 400,000 jobs: study Credit: CC0 Public Domain The legal cannabis sector is expected to generate $40 billion and more than 400,000 jobs by 2021 in the United States, according to a study released Tuesday. The estimate by consulting firm Arcview includes direct purchases by consumers of $20.8 billion and indirect revenue for growers and various subcontractors as well as money spent with businesses not affiliated with
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How Facebook could stop a disease outbreak Credit: National Cancer Institute Facebook accounts and telephone records can be used to pinpoint the best individuals to vaccinate to stop a disease outbreak in its tracks, researchers said Wednesday. Such people would be "central" in their social networks, and thus likelier to spread disease-causing germs from one group to another. Assuming there is an outbreak, and not enough vaccines for ev
13h
New Scientist - News
Californians can now buy marijuana for recreational use A customer buys cannabis products at the Green Pearl Organics dispensary on the first day of legal recreational marijuana sales in California ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty By Andy Coghlan On 1 January, California became the sixth US state to make marijuana legally available for recreational use. Because the state is the nation’s most populous, the move could hasten cannabis’s legalisation across the U
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Science Says: Why there's a big chill in a warmer world Water is frozen on a tree in Fort Walton Beach, Fla., on Tuesday Jan. 2, 2018 after a resident left his sprinklers on. Temperatures are expected to stay below freezing at night for the Panhandle through Thursday morning. (Nick Tomecek/Northwest Florida Daily News via AP) Anchorage, Alaska, was warmer Tuesday than Jacksonville, Florida. The weather in the U.S. is that upside down. That's because t
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alfalfa loss? Annual ryegrass is a win Italian ryegrass (left), sorghum-Sudangrass (center), and annual ryegrass + red clover (right) in test plots. Credit: Reagan Noland Meet alfalfa, a perennial legume used mainly as high-quality feed for dairy cattle. Alfalfa is also used as feed for beef cattle, horses, sheep, and goats. It's high in protein (16-20% crude protein). It contains a lot of calcium and other minerals and vitamins. It c
13h
Science | The Guardian
'Try not to offer kids sugar as a treat': readers on reducing children's sugary snacks Public Health England has warned parents that children’s snacking habits need to change , with many of them eating three unhealthy snacks and drinks every day. In an attempt to prevent children from developing poor health and becoming obese, parents have been advised to be more strict with their eating habits. We asked you to share your tips on how you are trying to manage your children’s snack i
14h
Viden
Ny dansk forskning forbedrer fertilitetsbehandling Der er godt nyt til par, der kæmper med at få børn. Forskere fra Rigshospitalet har i samarbejde med det danske firma ChemoMetec nemlig udviklet en ny måde at analysere sædprøver på. Det betyder, at man kan målrette fertilitetsbehandling i endnu højere grad end tidligere. Forskerne fra Rigshospitalets Klinik for Vækst og Reproduktion har været på udkig efter en anden metode til at vurdere, hvor g
15h
Feed: All Latest
The Logan Paul "Suicide Forest" Video Should Be a Reckoning For YouTube By the time Logan Paul arrived at Aokigahara forest, colloquially known as Japan’s “suicide forest,” the YouTube star had already confused Mount Fuji with the country Fiji. His over 15 million (mostly underage) subscribers like this sort of comedic aloofness—it serves to make Paul more relatable. After hiking only a couple hundred yards into Aokigahara—where over 247 people attempted to take thei
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alfalfa loss? Annual ryegrass is a winIn the US, alfalfa is grown mainly in western and northern states. The cold winters and other factors can lead to losses for farmers and forage shortages. Researchers have identified annual forage crops that can be cultivated in fields with winter-killed or terminated alfalfa.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research finds hysterectomy alone associated with increased long-term health risks ROCHESTER, Minn. -- Mayo Clinic researchers show that hysterectomy with ovarian conservation is associated with a significantly increased risk of several cardiovascular diseases and metabolic conditions. The findings are published in Menopause . "This is the best data to date that shows women undergoing hysterectomy have a risk of long-term disease -- even when both ovaries are conserved," says S
16h
New on MIT Technology Review
Net Neutrality’s Dead. The Battle to Resurrect It Is Just Beginning. An epic power struggle over the future of the Internet will play out in the United States this year. Its outcome will determine just how much control broadband companies like Verizon, Comcast, and AT&T have over the online content they pipe into homes and offices. The struggle has been triggered by last month’s vote by the Federal Communications Commission to scrap Obama-era net neutrality rules
17h
New on MIT Technology Review
2017 Was the Year of Gene-Therapy Breakthroughs It was a notable year for gene therapy. The first such treatments in the U.S. came to market this year after winning approval from the Food and Drug Administration. Meanwhile, researchers announced more miraculous cures of patients with rare and life-threatening diseases who were treated with experimental therapies. Decades in the making, gene therapy—the concept of modifying a person’s DNA to tr
17h
Ingeniøren
Amazon om privatlivsbekymringer: »Vi kigger aldrig på individuelle data« En far står og rører i en wokgryde. Han standser naget af tvivl. »Alexa! Hvor mange teskefulde svarer en spiseskefuld til?« råber han ud i sit mennesketomme køkken. Ved hans røst og lyden af sit navn lyser Amazons stemme-aktiverede digitale assistent op. Tilstedeværelsen og aktiveringen af assistenten Alexa illustreres af en turkis cirkel på den sorte gadget kaldet Echo. »En spiseskefuld svarer t
17h
Ingeniøren
Firmaforsøg: Tvungen ferie hver 7. uge fører til bedre præstationer Forestil dig et scenarie, hvor din chef tvinger dig til at tage fri hver syvende uge for at gå på betalt ferie. Det lyder uhørt, men for en mindre amerikansk virksomhed har det været realiteten siden april. Reglerne for ferie er ligetil: Du må ikke besvare opkald på firmamobilen. Du må ikke reagere på mails. Og du må slet ikke sætte benene på din arbejdsplads. Bryder du et af principperne, ryger
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New desalination method offers low energy alternative to purify salty waterProviding safer drinking water to those in need may be a little easier. A new desalination technique is able to remove salt from water using less energy than previous methods.
18h
Scientific American Content: Global
You Traveled Far Last Year You Traveled Far Last Year Getting around the sun in 2017 was a memorable trip. Happy New Year! And if you’ve been away from work for a few days, you deserve some time off . After all, you’ve traveled far. Even if you just stayed at home. According to NASA, just by being on the planet Earth in the last year, you’ve zipped about 584 million miles around the sun. At an average speed of about 67,000
20h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Weather: What to expect in 2018More hurricanes? Rising temperatures? BBC meteorologist Tomasz Schafernaker looks ahead to the year.
21h
Science | The Guardian
Humans can spot small signs of sickness at a glance, research suggests Coughing, sneezing and clutching the stomach might be obvious signs of sickness, but humans can also spot if someone is healthy simply from a glance at their face, new research suggests. Scientists have found that signs of a person being acutely unwell – such as pale lips, a downward turn of the mouth and droopy eyelids – are visible just hours after an infection begins. “We use a number of facia
21h
cognitive science
Can “Smart Drugs” Enhance Mental Clarity and Stamina, While Making a Person Smarter? A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Math for midges that pull 10g Midges move with ferocious randomness, frequently subjecting themselves to accelerations of more than 10g, well beyond the limit of fighter pilots, as they duck and dive in swarms that still retain an almost paradoxical cohesiveness despite blustery wind or powerful updrafts. Collectively, midges move very differently from flocks of birds, shoals of fish or animal herds; there is no order to th
21h
NYT > Science
It’s So Cold That ... It’s So Cold That ... A deeply frigid cold spell has North America in its grips, setting record temperatures, creating striking scenes and, in some cases, threatening the lives of humans and animals alike. Commuters braved subzero temperatures as they made their way to work in Chicago on Tuesday. Credit Scott Olson/Getty Images Zoo penguins were taken inside, sharks have washed up dead and record
22h
NYT > Science
Lawrence Stager, Creative Biblical Archaeologist, Dies at 74 Dr. Stager believed that by condemning the worship of calf deities, the early Israelites were seeking to purge their forebears’ Canaanite influence and establish themselves as a separate people. In 2016, Dr. Stager and Daniel M. Master, a former student of his who is an archaeology professor at Wheaton College in Illinois and was a director of the Ashkelon dig for a decade, made what they describ
22h
Big Think
Engineers Create Plants That Glow Illumination from nanobionic plants might one day replace some electrical lighting. Anne Trafton | MIT News Office Imagine that instead of switching on a lamp when it gets dark, you could read by the light of a glowing plant on your desk. MIT engineers have taken a critical first step toward making that vision a reality. By embedding specialized nanoparticles into the leaves of a watercress
22h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Maths for midges that pull 10g A cecidomyiid laying eggs on grass. Credit: Sarefo/GFDL Midges move with ferocious randomness, frequently subjecting themselves to accelerations of more than 10g, well beyond the limit of fighter pilots, as they duck and dive in swarms that still retain an almost paradoxical cohesiveness despite blustery wind or powerful updrafts. Collectively, midges move very differently from flocks of birds, s
22h
Popular Science
Last week in tech: Happy 2018! Here's your new iPhone battery January second is like a mega-Monday. Most of us are coming off a longer weekend than usual and it’s tricky to get back into the swing of things. If you want to procrastinate at work, be sure to check out our wrap-up of last year in tech, then scroll down for all the tech stories you probably missed last week while you were out spreading cheer. Assault on batteries After years of speculation, App
22h
Futurity.org
Are strict rules the key to keeping weight off? People who structure their own systematic rules for eating—and stick to them regardless of feelings of hunger and fullness—are markedly better at keeping weight off compared to those who follow special diets or eat for pleasure and satiety, a small study suggests. “We see that people who are good at keeping weight off after losing it don’t eat to accommodate desire, hunger, and satiety, or as the
22h
Big Think
Should You Marry a Passionate Lover or Your Best Friend? Here’s What Science Says We’ve known for a long time that married people experience better physical and mental health, just so long as they’re happily married. Last year, a study out of Carnegie Mellon University found that marriage may have stress relieving properties, as those ensconced in marital bliss carry less of the stress hormone cortisol in their bloodstream , than singles or the divorced. Chronically elevated l
23h
The Atlantic
The Social-Media Star and the Suicide Here is the news: Logan Paul, a social-media star with more than 16 million Instagram followers , recently visited Aokigahara, a dense forest known as the “Sea of Trees” on the northwestern side of Mount Fuji. Aokigahara is beautiful, but also infamous; for at least a half-century, it has been a popular destination for people to attempt suicide . Soon after entering the forest, Paul encountered a
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
State-of-the-art MRI technology bypasses need for biopsyThe most common type of tumor found in the kidney is generally quite small (less than 1.5 in). These tumors are usually found by accident when CAT scans are performed for other reasons and the serendipitous finding poses a problem for doctors.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Quantum radio' may aid communications and mapping indoors, underground and underwaterResearchers have demonstrated that quantum physics might enable communications and mapping in locations where GPS and ordinary cellphones and radios don't work reliably or even at all, such as indoors, in urban canyons, underwater and underground.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Spider's web inspires removable implant that may control type 1 diabetesFor the more than 1 million Americans who live with type 1 diabetes, daily insulin injections are literally a matter of life and death. And while there is no cure, a team has developed a device that could revolutionize management of the disease.
23h
Science | The Guardian
The Real T. rex with Chris Packham: an attempt at a truthful Tyrannosaurus Tyrannosaurus rex is probably the most famous extinct animal, but thanks to Hollywood and various out-of-date books, there are a lot of misconceptions out there about this incredible dinosaur. There is too much hype and not enough good science surrounding dinosaurs generally – and Tyrannosaurus in particular. A new BBC documentary, The Real T. rex with Chris Packham , has attempted to bring our k
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
State-of-the-art MRI technology bypasses need for biopsy IMAGE: Dr. Ivan Pedrosa, left, and Dr. Jeffrey Cadeddu, right, are co-authors of a study highlighted on the cover of The Journal of Urology on multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) protocols that tell... view more Credit: UT Southwestern DALLAS - Jan. 02, 2018 - The most common type of tumor found in the kidney is generally quite small (less than 1.5 in). These tumors are usually found by accident when C
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lethal fungus that causes white-nose syndrome may have an Achilles' heelIn the course of genomic analyses of the fungus behind white-nose-syndrome, a devastating disease that has killed millions of bats in North America, US Forest Service scientists discovered something very surprising: brief exposure to UV-light kills Pseudogymnoascus destructans.
1d
Science | The Guardian
Weatherwatch: scientists develop 'speed breeding' to feed rising population Scientists are engaged in a race against time to breed staple crops that can both survive climate change and yield bigger harvests. Their aim is to feed a growing population in a warming world. The method used for centuries of growing one crop a year in variable weather conditions and then selecting the seeds from the best plants is no longer viable in fast-changing climatic conditions. Scientist
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