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Deep learning methods used to identify novel genes implicated in tissue regeneration and cancer IMAGE: The Embryonic.AI system was developed by Biotime and Insilico Medicine, Inc. view more Credit: Insilico Medicine January 4, 2018, Baltimore, MD: Insilico Medicine, a Baltimore-based next-generation artificial intelligence company specializing in the application of deep learning for drug discovery announced the publication of a new peer-reviewed research paper titled "Use of deep neural
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Science current issue
Genomic signals of selection predict climate-driven population declines in a migratory bird The ongoing loss of biodiversity caused by rapid climatic shifts requires accurate models for predicting species’ responses. Despite evidence that evolutionary adaptation could mitigate climate change impacts, evolution is rarely integrated into predictive models. Integrating population genomics and environmental data, we identified genomic variation associated with climate across the breeding ra
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Ingeniøren
Ny sundhedsfarlig trend: Amerikanere vil have ubehandlet vand Ubehandlet og ufiltreret vand, også kaldet 'raw water', er vokset frem som ny fødevaretrend blandt amerikanske forbrugere. Firmaerne bag produkterne hævder, at vandet indeholder flere sunde, naturlige mineraler og mikrober, men en ekspert advarer om, at ubehandlet vand kan føre til akutte og kroniske sygdomme. Det skriver New York Times . Den nye trend er især vokset frem på den amerikanske vestk
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LATEST

EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Making solar energy more efficient IMAGE: This is Mohammed Alshayeb (left) and Afnan Barri. view more Credit: Rick Hellman / KU News Service LAWRENCE, Kan. - With global warming an ever-present worry, renewable energy - particularly solar power -- is a burgeoning field. Now, two doctoral students in the School of Architecture & Design (Arc/D) have demonstrated methods of optimizing the capture of sunlight in experiments at t
50min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Real world native biocrusts: Microbial metabolismSpecific compounds are transformed by and strongly associated with specific bacteria in native biological soil crust (biocrust) using a suite of tools called 'exometabolomics.' Understanding how microbial communities in biocrusts adapt to harsh environments could shed light on the roles of soil microbes in the global carbon cycle.
52min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New cancer model shows genomic link between early-stage and invasive breast cancer typesA new genetic-based model may explain how a common form of early-stage breast cancer known as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) progresses to a more invasive form of cancer, say researchers.
52min
Big Think
Unfollowing Friends with Different Political Views? Why You Really Should Keep Them in Your Feed. We've all done it, unfollowed that conspiracy spouting friend we have on Facebook rather than endure one more post about how the Earth is flat and Obama was born on Neptune. Sometimes we go a step further, removing those with opposing political views from our friend lists. After all, social media is for fun! Why should I have to see my nutty uncle's viewpoints when I am looking for pictures of cu
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Big Think
The FDA Is Finally Taking a Stance Against High-Risk Homeopathic Products Samuel Hahnemann discovered cinchona, Peruvian bark, while translating Scottish physician William Cullen’s book on malaria. The German doctor left a career in medicine because he objected to practices like bloodletting, which he considered ineffectual and barbaric. Upon leaving the establishment Hahnemann supported his family by translating medical textbooks—a linguist, he spoke nine languages.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tumor suppressor gene variants identified as cancer 'double whammy' for leukemia patientsA new study has found germline variations in a key tumor suppressor gene that may prompt changes in treatment and follow-up care for certain high-risk leukemia patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Advanced MRI can detect placental perfusion abnormalities in pregnancies complicated by fetal CHDIn pregnancies complicated by fetal congenital heart disease, global placental perfusion was significantly decreased and regional variation of placental perfusion significantly increased as pregnancies progressed, findings that point to non-invasive imaging providing an early warning of placental dysfunction.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One-step catalyst turns nitrates into water and airEngineers have found a catalyst the cleans toxic nitrates from drinking water by converting them into air and water.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dirt-dwelling microbe produces potential anti-melanoma weaponA type of soil-dwelling bacterium produces molecules that induce death in melanoma cells, new research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Girls' social camouflage skills may delay or prevent autism diagnosisOn parent-reporting measures, girls with autism seem to struggle more than boys with performing routine tasks like getting up and dressed or making small talk, even when the study group is normalized to meet similar basic clinical diagnostic criteria across sexes. The findings add to the growing evidence that girls with autism may show symptoms differently than boys, and that some of the social di
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Worm species lost 7,000 genes after evolving to fertilize itselfReproduction in most animal species requires breeding between two individuals. But some worms have evolved the ability to go it alone. In these species, a single individual can breed with itself to produce offspring. A new study found that gaining this ability, known as 'selfing,' may have caused a worm species to lose a quarter of its genome, including genes that give male sperm a competitive edg
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Precision editing of gut bacteria: Potential way to treat colitisResearchers have used precision editing of the bacterial populations in the gut to prevent or reduce the severity of inflammation in a mouse model of colitis.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Weighing massive stars in nearby galaxy reveals excess of heavyweightsAstronomers have revealed an 'astonishing' overabundance of massive stars in a neighboring galaxy. The discovery, made in the gigantic star-forming region 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy, has 'far-reaching' consequences for our understanding of how stars transformed the pristine Universe into the one we live in today.
1h
The Atlantic
How Evolution Can Make Sense of the Stock Market On December 17, 2014, then-President Barack Obama announced that the United States would restore its international relations with Cuba. In addition to many expected diplomatic consequences, the decision had an odd effect: boosting the popularity of a small, closed-end fund that trades as CUBA. CUBA is completely unrelated to Cuba. The fund doesn’t even invest in any stocks related to the country.
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Live Science
E. Coli Outbreak: Should You Really Avoid Romaine Lettuce? An E. coli outbreak has sickened more than a dozen Americans, and it's possible that romaine lettuce could be the source. But does this mean you should skip the romaine on your sandwich or in your salad? Consumer Reports is recommending that Americans avoid all romaine lettuce for now , but other food safety experts say it may be too soon to blame romaine for the outbreak. "[To] say 'av
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Live Science
Surf's Frozen? Slurpee Waves Spotted on Nantucket Beach The air was so cold on Jan. 2, 2018, that the waves froze on Nobadeer Beach in Nantucket, Massachusetts. Credit: Jonathan Nimerfroh/jdnphotography.com The cold that's gripping the U.S. East Coast has created a magical phenomenon in Nantucket, Massachusetts: Slurpee waves. The waves, seemingly freezing midbreak, are not just gorgeous — some of them are also surfable, according to photographe
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The Scientist RSS
Gene Therapy Temporarily Reverses Type 1 Diabetes in MicePancreatic cells engineered to produce insulin did not immediately provoke an immune response.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shakedown in Oklahoma: To cut the number of bigger earthquakes, inject less saltwater IMAGE: Figure 2 from Pollyea et al., Annual geographic centroid locations for the years 2011-2016 (the underlying fault map is by Marsh and Holland, 2016), including volume-weighted well centroids, the 1σ... view more Credit: Pollyea et al. and Geology Boulder, Colo., USA: In Oklahoma, reducing the amount of saltwater (highly brackish water produced during oil and gas recovery) pumped int
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rice U.'s one-step catalyst turns nitrates into water and air IMAGE: Rice University's indium-palladium nanoparticle catalysts clean nitrates from drinking water by converting the toxic molecules into air and water. view more Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University Engineers at Rice University's Nanotechnology Enabled Water Treatment (NEWT) Center have found a catalyst that cleans toxic nitrates from drinking water by converting them into air an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Advanced MRI can detect placental perfusion abnormalities in pregnancies complicated by fetal CHD IMAGE: This is Zungho "Wesley " Zun, Ph.D., the study's lead author. view more Credit: Children's National Health System WASHINGTON - (Jan. 4, 2018) - In pregnancies complicated by fetal congenital heart disease (CHD), global placental perfusion was significantly decreased and regional variation of placental perfusion significantly increased as pregnancies progressed, findings that poin
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tumor suppressor gene variants identified as cancer 'double whammy' for leukemia patients IMAGE: Jun J. Yang, Ph.D., identified 22 high-risk germline variations associated with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia that increases risk of relapse or development of second cancers. view more Credit: Seth Dixon / St. Jude Children's Research Hospital Newly identified germline variations in a key tumor suppressor gene predispose individuals to develop leukemia as children and leave
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The window for saving the world's coral reefs is rapidly closingFor the first time, an international team of researchers has measured the escalating rate of coral bleaching at locations throughout the tropics over the past four decades. The study documents a dramatic shortening of the gap between pairs of bleaching events, threatening the future existence of these iconic ecosystems and the livelihoods of many millions of people.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Soft, self-healing devices mimic biological musclesA new class of soft, electrically activated devices is capable of mimicking the expansion and contraction of natural muscles. These devices, which can be constructed from a wide range of low-cost materials, are able to self-sense their movements and self-heal from electrical damage, representing a major advance in soft robotics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bonobos prefer jerksNever trust anyone who is rude to a waiter, advice columnists say. But while humans generally prefer individuals who are nice to others, a Duke University study finds bonobos are more attracted to jerks. The fact that our closest primate relatives prefer bullies suggests that an aversion to creeps is one of the things that makes humans different from other species, and may underlie our unusually c
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
What we don't teach kids about sex | Sue Jaye JohnsonAs parents, it's our job to teach our kids about sex. But beyond "the talk," which covers biology and reproduction, there's so much more we can say about the human experience of being in our bodies. Introducing "The Talk 2.0," Sue Jaye Johnson shows us how we can teach our children to tune in to their sensations and provide them with the language to communicate their desires and emotions -- withou
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Coral reefs head for 'knock-out punch' Image copyright Andreas Dietzel Image caption A diver surveys bleached/dead corals on Zenith Reef, part of the Great Barrier Reef Repeat bouts of warmer seawater are posing a significant challenge to the world's tropical corals. A study of 100 reefs, published in Science Magazine , shows the interval between bleaching events in recent decades has shortened dramatically. It has gone from once ever
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
One-step catalyst turns nitrates into water and air Rice University's indium-palladium nanoparticle catalysts clean nitrates from drinking water by converting the toxic molecules into air and water. Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University Engineers at Rice University's Nanotechnology Enabled Water Treatment (NEWT) Center have found a catalyst that cleans toxic nitrates from drinking water by converting them into air and water. The research is availabl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dirt-dwelling microbe produces potential anti-melanoma weapon A type of soil-dwelling bacterium produces molecules that induce death in melanoma cells, research at Oregon State University shows. The molecule is a secondary metabolite, also known as a natural product, of Streptomyces bottropensis , and its properties are important because there are not many therapies that effectively manage melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer. In the U.S. alone,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Real world native biocrusts: Microbial metabolism Biocrust amongst one of its many natural habitats, taken about 20 miles from the sampling site (near the Corona Arch, Moab, UT). Credit: Tami Swenson Arid lands, which cover some 40 percent of the Earth's terrestrial surface, are too dry to sustain much in the way of vegetation. But far from being barren, they are home to diverse communities of microorganisms—including fungi, bacteria, and archae
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The ocean is losing its breath -- here's the global scopeIn the past 50 years, the amount of water in the open ocean with zero oxygen has gone up more than fourfold. In coastal water bodies, including estuaries and seas, low-oxygen sites have increased more than tenfold since 1950. Scientists expect oxygen to continue dropping even outside these zones as Earth warms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Real world native biocrusts: Microbial metabolism IMAGE: Biocrust amongst one of its many natural habitats, taken about 20 miles from the sampling site (near the Corona Arch, Moab, UT). view more Credit: Tami Swenson Arid lands, which cover some 40 percent of the Earth's terrestrial surface, are too dry to sustain much in the way of vegetation. But far from being barren, they are home to diverse communities of microorganisms--including fungi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Girls' social camouflage skills may delay or prevent autism diagnosisOn parent-reporting measures, girls with autism seem to struggle more than boys with performing routine tasks like getting up and dressed or making small talk, even when the study group is normalized to meet similar basic clinical diagnostic criteria across sexes. The findings add to the growing evidence that girls with autism may show symptoms differently than boys, and that some of the social di
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lymphedema after cancer treatment -- special issue of Rehabilitation Oncology presents research update Jan. 4, 2018 - Individuals who have been treated for cancer are at risk for a complication called lymphedema: swelling in the body region where lymph nodes were removed, causing pain and limited function. New research and insights on the management of cancer-related lymphedema are presented in the January special issue of Rehabilitation Oncology , official journal of the Oncology Section of the A
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dirt-dwelling microbe produces potential anti-melanoma weapon CORVALLIS, Ore. - A type of soil-dwelling bacterium produces molecules that induce death in melanoma cells, research at Oregon State University shows. The molecule is a secondary metabolite, also known as a natural product, of Streptomyces bottropensis , and its properties are important because there are not many therapies that effectively manage melanoma, the most dangerous form of skin cancer.
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Popular Science
Why winter is cold and flu season—and what you can do about it Being chilly doesn’t literally make you catch a cold, no matter what your parents said whenever you left the house with wet hair. But it certainly seems like the coldest season is, well, cold season. Not all kinds of illness are actually more common when it gets cold out, but we do see an uptick in things like colds and flus and respiratory ailments. Here’s why that is—and what you can do about i
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NYT > Science
Those Iguanas Falling From Trees in Florida? They Probably Aren’t Dead Photo A stunned iguana in Boca Raton, Fla., on Thursday. Credit Frank Cerabino/Palm Beach Post, via Associated Press Read the latest on the “bomb cyclone” winter storm hitting the East Coast with Thursday’s live updates. Beware the falling iguanas in South Florida. When temperatures dip into the 30s and 40s, people from West Palm Beach to Miami know to be on the lookout for reptiles stunned — but
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NYT > Science
2017 Set a Record for Losses From Natural Disasters. It Could Get Worse. The United States made up an unusually high share of global insured losses last year — about 50 percent, compared to just over 30 percent on average. Hurricane Harvey, which made landfall in Texas in August, was the most costly natural disaster of 2017, causing losses of $85 billion. Together with Hurricanes Irma and Maria, the 2017 hurricane season caused the most damage ever, with losses reachi
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NYT > Science
Global Warming’s Toll on Coral Reefs: As if They’re ‘Ravaged by War’ In theory, coral reefs can recover from even a severe bleaching event. Some of the coral will die off from increased disease susceptibility, but once ocean temperatures drop again, many of the corals will start growing back. But that’s only if they’re given enough time. Typically, it takes 10 to 15 years for the fastest-growing corals to recover after a severe bleaching event. Larger corals that
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NeuWrite San Diego
The Campus Tour – Let’s Spread the Science The Campus Tour – Let’s Spread the Science Posted by Elena Blanco-Suarez on January 4, 2018 in Science communication , Uncategorized | Leave a comment Are you a scientist? Are you interested in science communication? Then keep reading! Imagine a scene that might have taken place last week… You were sitting at the table with your relatives, stuffing your face with delicious home-cooked food and ch
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Live Science
Does It Snow In Space? This true-color image of Mars' north pole incorporates data from NASA's Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio; Mars Orbiter Camera data courtesy of NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems This week's winter storm leaves no doubt that snow feels right at home on planet Earth. But what are winter conditions like elsewhere in the uni
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA finds a stronger Ava now tracking along Madagascar's coast NASA satellites provided data that showed a more well-formed storm and strong thunderstorms with heavy rainfall potential over central Madagascar and off-shore. On Jan. 4 at 5:05 a.m. EST (1005 UTC), the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument that flies aboard NASA's Aqua satellite gathered temperature data on the storm using infrared light. Infrared imagery showed that strong
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Live Science
Why Does Cold Weather Drain Your Phone Battery? Chicago in the wintertime is an unforgiving place. Want to move around town? Don't own a car? Prepare to stand on a raised train platform for 10 minutes, and try to expose as little of your skin as possible to the raw, blasting wind. Is the temperature below zero again? Here's a weak outdoor heat lamp on the platform; be grateful for it. I found myself on one of those platforms, shivering under o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA finds a stronger Ava now tracking along Madagascar's coastNASA satellites provided data that showed a more well-formed storm and strong thunderstorms with heavy rainfall potential over central Madagascar and off-shore.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook CEO's 2018 challenge: Fix Facebook Energous, a San Jose, Calif., company, is the first firm to receive federal approval for a wireless charging system purported to power devices from up to 3 feet away, the company said.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Explainer: Who's affected by computer chip security flaw In this July 20, 2011 file photo, Intel corporate offices are seen in Santa Clara, Calif. Intel says it's working to patch a security vulnerability in its products but says the average computer user won't experience significant slowdowns as the problem is fixed. The chipmaker released a statement Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018, after a report by British technology site The Register caused Intel stocks t
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The Atlantic
Coral Reefs Are Bleaching Too Frequently to Recover From the Arctic to the Amazon, almost no part of the world has been left untouched by the human-caused warming of the Earth’s climate system. But one ecosystem seems to be disintegrating faster than almost anywhere else: coral reefs, the tropical rainforests of the undersea world. A new study, published Thursday in the journal Science , quantifies this discipline-wide impression of a vast and fas
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The Atlantic
The Biggest Sanctions-Evasion Scheme in Recent History Yesterday, Turkish banker Mehmet Hakan Atilla was found guilty in a Manhattan courtroom for a range of financial crimes. His dramatic trial revealed that tens of billions in dollars and gold moved from Turkey to Iran through a complex network of businesses, banks, and front companies. The trial was a long time coming. In late October of 2016, Justice Department officials paid a visit to the Found
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Popular Science
Hold onto your butts: Don’t let dogs get stoned on your leftover weed Each morning, podcaster Paul Bae tries to explore a new trail in his nature-rich community in Vancouver. He lets his three pups off leash and turns on a podcast for himself. As they walk, Bae listens to wild serialized stories and revels in strange experimental soundscapes—but only through one earbud. He has to keep one ear out for his furry friends, lest they get themselves into trouble. His hik
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists reveal the 'Lego pieces' that form complex zebrafish movementsMotor behavior could be formed from a range of continuous possible movements. But it could also be constituted by sequences of distinct, discrete movement types. New results suggest that the latter is the case, at least for zebrafish larvae.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA looks at rainfall intensity in Tropical Depression Bolaven The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite gathered data on rainfall rates occurring in Tropical Depression Bolaven as it moved toward Vietnam. Bolaven's final warning was issued early today, Jan. 4. Tropical depression Bolaven drenched the Philippines and is moving west through the South China Sea toward southern Vietnam. Bolaven is the third deadly tropical cyclone to hi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA looks at rainfall intensity in Tropical Depression Bolaven The GPM core satellite found rain in Bolaven was falling at a rate of almost 121 mm (4.8 inches) per hour in a band of convective storms northwest of the storm's center of circulation on Jan. 2. GPM found a few storm tops had heights exceeding 16 km (9.92 miles). Credit: NASA/JAXA, Hal Pierce The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM core satellite gathered data on rainfall rates occurr
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Science : NPR
Shellfish Industry, Scientists Wrestle With Potentially Deadly Toxic Algae Bloom Bangs Island Mussels worker Jon Gorman sets juvenile mussels onto a rope that will be their home for the next year as they grow to market size. Fred Bever/Maine Public Radio hide caption toggle caption Fred Bever/Maine Public Radio Bangs Island Mussels worker Jon Gorman sets juvenile mussels onto a rope that will be their home for the next year as they grow to market size. Fred Bever/Maine Public
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two heads are better than one: ICON and GOLD teaming up to explore earth's interface to space Charged particles in Earth's atmosphere, which make up the ionosphere, create bands of color above Earth's surface, known as airglow. ICON, depicted in this artist's concept, will study the ionosphere from a height of about 350 miles to understand how the combined effects of terrestrial weather and space weather influence this ionized layer of particles. Credit: NASA Goddard's Conceptual Image La
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Sleeping sickness not just a sleeping disorder IMAGE: Trypanosoma brucei , the parasite that causes the deadly sleeping sickness, is shown in brown feeding on the host tissue. Scientists have determined sleeping sickness is actually a circadian rhythm disorder... view more Credit: University of Lisbon DALLAS - Jan. 4, 2018 - Sleeping sickness could use a more encompassing moniker. An international study from the O'Donnell Brai
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Precision editing of gut bacteria: Potential way to treat colitis IMAGE: This is Dr. Sebastian Winter. view more Credit: UTSW DALLAS - Jan. 4, 2018 - UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have used precision editing of the bacterial populations in the gut to prevent or reduce the severity of inflammation in a mouse model of colitis. The potential strategy - which targets metabolic pathways that are active only during intestinal inflammation - preve
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Maternal mortality rates are on the rise, but more accurate estimates are needed A new Birth analysis has uncovered dramatic increases in the rates of maternal mortality--the death of a mother during pregnancy, childbirth, or post-partum--in Texas in recent years. There was an 87% increase when comparing 2011-2015 data with 2006-2010 data. Some of the increase is likely due to increased overreporting of maternal deaths due to errors in the data collection system, however. An
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Multiple sclerosis: Cholesterol crystals prevent regeneration in central nervous systemMultiple Sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, in which the immune cells attack myelin sheaths. Regeneration of myelin sheaths is necessary for patients to recover from MS relapses. Nevertheless, the ability to regenerate decreases with age. A team from Technical University Munich has published an explanation in "Science": Fat derived from myelin, which is not
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mechanism for resistance to immunotherapy treatment discoveredTwo research groups from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have independently discovered a genetic mechanism in cancer cells that influences whether they resist or respond to immunotherapy drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors. The scientists say the findings reveal potential new drug targets and might aid efforts to extend the benefits of immunotherapy treatment to more patients and additional types of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Specific microbes in digestive tract can boost success for cancer immunotherapy In the Jan. 5, 2018 issue of Science, researchers from the University of Chicago Medicine show that specific strains of commensal bacteria - the swarms of microorganisms naturally dwelling in the intestines - can improve the response rate to immunotherapy for patients being treated for advanced melanoma. Although these immune system boosting drugs have revolutionized treatment of certain cancers,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Weighing massive stars in nearby galaxy reveals excess of heavyweights Weighing massive stars in nearby galaxy reveals excess of heavyweights An international team of astronomers has revealed an 'astonishing' overabundance of massive stars in a neighbouring galaxy. The discovery, made in the gigantic star-forming region 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy, has 'far-reaching' consequences for our understanding of how stars transformed the pristine Univers
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
DNA analysis of ancient mummy, thought to have smallpox, points to Hepatitis B instead IMAGE: The mummified remains of a small child buried in the Basilica of Saint Domenico Maggiore in Naples, Italy. Previous analysis of the 16th century remains had suggested the child was... view more Credit: Gino Fornaciari, University of Pisa HAMILTON, ON, Jan. 4, 2018 - A team of scientists has sequenced the complete genome of an ancient strain of the Hepatitis B virus (HBV), shedd
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Worm species lost 7,000 genes after evolving to fertilize itself UMD-led study finds that worms that fertilize themselves lost one-fourth of their genome, including genes that make sperm competitive. Reproduction in most animal species requires breeding between two individuals. But some worms have evolved the ability to go it alone. In these species, a single individual can breed with itself to produce offspring. A new University of Maryland-led study found th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How cholesterol contributes to age-related neuron impairment A new study in mice sheds light on why neurons of older individuals are less able to repair their fatty, protective sheaths; excess cholesterol may be overburdening certain immune cells, resulting in lingering inflammation that interferes with the natural repair process. The results hint that drugs being developed to promote cholesterol clearance in humans may also be good candidates for neuro-re
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How genes will save or fail birds in the face of climate change A new study analyzing the genomes of yellow warblers in North America reveals how some subpopulations are more "genetically vulnerable" to changes associated with climate change; furthermore, it finds that genes linked to exploratory and migratory behavior may be important for successful climate adaptation. Climate change is having a dramatic impact on Earth's biodiversity, where rapid fluctuatio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Frequency of coral bleaching has increased nearly fivefold since the 1980s Globally, the frequency of severe coral bleaching events has increased nearly fivefold in the past four decades, from once every 25 to 30 years in the early 1980s to once every 5.9 years in 2016, a new study reports. Coral bleaching occurs when sudden spikes in temperature have a negative effect on the algae residing within corals, which provide nutrients for the bony organisms as part of a symbi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Big stars are more abundant than thoughtObservations of a nearby star-forming region reveal that large stars are more prevalent than models have predicted.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Common birth control shot linked to risk of HIV infectionTransitioning away from a popular contraceptive shot known as DMPA could help protect women in Sub-Saharan Africa and other high-risk regions from becoming infected with HIV, according to a research review published in the Endocrine Society's journal Endocrine Reviews.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Soft, self-healing devices mimic biological muscles IMAGE: HASEL actuators can be designed as soft grippers to handle and manipulate delicate objects. view more Credit: Keplinger Lab / University of Colorado Boulder In the basement of the Engineering Center at the University of Colorado Boulder, a group of researchers is working to create the next generation of robots. Instead of the metallic droids you may be imagining, they are developing
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The ocean is losing its breath -- here's the global scopeIn the past 50 years, the amount of water in the open ocean with zero oxygen has gone up more than fourfold. In coastal water bodies, including estuaries and seas, low-oxygen sites have increased more than tenfold since 1950. Scientists expect oxygen to continue dropping even outside these zones as Earth warms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The window for saving the world's coral reefs is rapidly closing IMAGE: A researcher from the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies surveys the bleached/dead corals at Zenith Reef, Nov 2016. view more Credit: Andreas Dietzel The world's reefs are under siege from global warming, according to a novel study published today in the prestigious journal Science . For the first time, an international team of researchers has measured the esca
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hijacker parasite blocked from infiltrating bloodA major international collaboration led by Melbourne researchers has discovered that the world's most widespread malaria parasite infects humans by hijacking a protein the body cannot live without. The researchers were then able to successfully develop antibodies that disabled the parasite from carrying out this activity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tick exosomes may aid transmission of viruses to vertebrates IMAGE: Cryo-electron microscopy image showing exosomes isolated from Langat virus (LGTV)-infected Ixodes scapularis tick cells. Scale bar 100 nm. view more Credit: Michael Woodson, Michael B. Sherman and Hameeda Sultana Scientists have shown for the first time that exosomes from tick cells can aid transmission of viral proteins and genetic material from arthropod to vertebrate host cells, accordi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Building stronger health systems could help prevent the next epidemic in MadagascarThe peak epidemic season for plague in Madagascar is fast approaching and the severity of these outbreaks could be significantly reduced with improvements to their public health system, argues Matthew Bonds from Harvard Medical School and the nongovernmental health care organization, PIVOT, in a new Viewpoint publishing Jan. 4, 2018, in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.
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New Scientist - News
‘Thrill-seeking’ genes could help birds escape climate change By Andy Coghlan Should I stay or should I go? That’s the question facing all wildlife when climate change makes home territory unsuitable. A study has now found that having variants of two novelty-seeking genes might help some warblers survive by making lifesaving migration more attractive to them than to peers who risk local extinction by staying put. Advertisement Both genes,
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New Scientist - News
The universe could be full of more huge stars than we thought Big stars are not so rare in some spots NASA By Leah Crane There may be more big stars out there than we thought. A study of part of the Large Magellanic Cloud found significantly more huge stars than we would expect to see, which could mean that there are more supernovae and black holes too. In our galactic neighbourhood, all newborn stars seem to follow the same distribution of masses. Ther
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Viden
Manden bag Google-bil skal gøre Volkswagen førerløs Mens en række bilfirmaer har meldt særdeles offensivt ud om, hvornår de regner med at have førerløse biler på gaden, så er Volkswagen gået noget mere stille med dørene. Men nu løfter det tyske bilfirma lidt af sløret for, hvordan de skal komme med på det førerløse beat. Volkswagen har netop meddelt, at de har indgået et samarbejde med firmaet Aurora om at udvikle en elektrisk førerløs bil. Målet
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Science current issue
Progress on reproducibility Summary Ideas supported by well-defined and clearly described methods and evidence are one of the cornerstones of science. After several publications indicated that a substantial number of scientific reports may not be readily reproducible, the scientific community and public began engaging in discussions about mechanisms to measure and enhance the reproducibility of scientific projects. In this
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Science current issue
What's coming up in 2018 AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Watching the teen brain grow AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Americas peopled in a single wave, ancient genome reveals AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Cancer institute head touts big data and basic research AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Mars methane rises and falls with the seasons AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Germany steps up to the plate in global health AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Earth-based planet finders power up AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Chemical martyrs Summary During the Iran-Iraq War of the 1980s, Iraq on scores of occasions shelled Iranian soldiers and villagers with sulfur mustard. And for the first time ever on a battlefield, nerve agents including sarin and tabun were unleashed by Iraqi forces. All told, the chemical onslaught killed nearly 5000 Iranians and sickened more than 100,000. Three decades later, about 56,000 Iranians are coping
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How to defeat a nerve agent AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Weapons in waiting AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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NextGen VOICES: Research resolutions A natural historian resolves to better explain the value of museum collections to the public. PHOTO: JOCHEN TACK/ALAMY STOCK PHOTO We asked young scientists this question: What is your New Year's resolution for your field? Describe one thing that your field's research community could do better in the coming year . We received responses from scientists around the world representing a variety of fi
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The genomics of climate change AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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A new mitotic activity comes into focus AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Precision medicine using microbiota AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Mind the seafloor AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Lung inflammation originating in the gut AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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The contact sport of rough surfaces AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Air pollution's hidden impacts AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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The art of space-time AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Social science, today AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Cassini enters Saturn's ionosphere AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Liquids show their strength AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Heating up the quantum spin Hall effect AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Good bacteria help fight cancer AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Mitosis-specific role of ATR AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Not enough time for recovery AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Global reciprocity drives cooperation AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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The sound of silence AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Beneath the waves, oxygen disappears AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Biophysical responses of proteins to stress AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Vivax malaria host receptor AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Examining the consequences of selfing AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Observing more massive stars AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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A healing squeeze AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Inhibiting natural killer cells in AIDS AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Yellow warblers already in decline AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Inflammatory ILC2s are itinerant sentinels AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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To mine or not to mine AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Taking aim at regulatory T cells AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Taking a look at lipid surveillance AAAS login provides access to Science for AAAS members, and access to other journals in the Science family to users who have purchased individual subscriptions.
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Single-cell sequencing of malarial genomes Single-cell sequencing of Plasmodium , here released from lysed red blood cells, allows for tracking of variation in the host. PHOTO: DENNIS KUNKEL MICROSCOPY/SCIENCE SOURCE Infection with the parasite Plasmodium falciparum causes malaria. Individuals may be infected with multiple strains of P. falciparum , some of which may be drug-resistant. Understanding the complexity of these infections may
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Unconventional thyroid hormone signals Thyroid hormone canonically signals through thyroid hormone receptors to enhance transcription of target genes. There is also evidence that thyroid hormone can activate nontranscriptional signaling mechanisms. To sort out the relative importance of canonical and noncanonical signaling, Hones et al. generated mice in which thyroid hormone receptors were altered to prevent DNA binding and transcrip
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Science current issue
Guiding an enzyme all around a ring Most compounds of interest for pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and cosmetics have many C–H bonds, interspersed with a few carbon bonds to heavier elements that give them their distinct properties. Chemists therefore prize methods that let them selectively modify a variety of C–H bonds. Gilbert et al. report a versatile strategy that relies on a tethered amine to steer an engineered cytochrome P45
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Science current issue
An object from beyond the solar system Gravitational interactions occasionally eject small bodies from the solar system, and this process is thought to have been particularly common while the system was first forming. The same thing should have occurred around other stars, casting comets and asteroids into interstellar space, but no such interstellar objects have been identified. Meech et al. discovered a small object, now formally de
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Science current issue
Eats leaves and grooms Social interaction among Verreaux's sifaka is responsible for transmission of gut microbes that are essential for digestion of their leaf-based diet. PHOTO: HAJAKELY/ SHUTTERSTOCK.COM The gut microbiota influences many aspects of mammalian development and physiology. Yet we have a poor understanding of how the gut microbiota is acquired and assembled. We know that social networks are important fo
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Science current issue
Cytoplasmic transfer to tumor cells Macrophages are innate immune cells that, when recruited to tumors, can promote tumor progression. Macrophage activity and phenotype can be influenced by molecules secreted by tumor cells. To monitor macrophage behavior, Roh-Johnson et al. used time-lapse imaging of a zebrafish model of melanoma. Unexpectedly, macrophages not only bound to but also transferred their cytoplasm into melanoma cells,
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Science current issue
Ribosomes ignore the stop sign Aminoglycoside antibiotics bind to bacterial ribosomes and inhibit protein synthesis. Eukaryotic ribosomes, in contrast, are not strongly inhibited by these molecules but show errors such as inaccurate translation and read-through of stop codons. Prokhorova et al. determined structures of the eukaryotic ribosome in complex with aminoglycoside antibiotics and investigated how these molecules alter
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Science current issue
Transferrin receptor 1 is a reticulocyte-specific receptor for Plasmodium vivax Plasmodium vivax shows a strict host tropism for reticulocytes. We identified transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) as the receptor for P. vivax reticulocyte-binding protein 2b (PvRBP2b). We determined the structure of the N-terminal domain of PvRBP2b involved in red blood cell binding, elucidating the molecular basis for TfR1 recognition. We validated TfR1 as the biological target of PvRBP2b engagement
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Science current issue
Rapid genome shrinkage in a self-fertile nematode reveals sperm competition proteins To reveal impacts of sexual mode on genome content, we compared chromosome-scale assemblies of the outcrossing nematode Caenorhabditis nigoni to its self-fertile sibling species, C. briggsae . C. nigoni ’s genome resembles that of outcrossing relatives but encodes 31% more protein-coding genes than C. briggsae . C. nigoni genes lacking C. briggsae orthologs were disproportionately small and male-
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Science current issue
Hydraulically amplified self-healing electrostatic actuators with muscle-like performance Existing soft actuators have persistent challenges that restrain the potential of soft robotics, highlighting a need for soft transducers that are powerful, high-speed, efficient, and robust. We describe a class of soft actuators, termed hydraulically amplified self-healing electrostatic (HASEL) actuators, which harness a mechanism that couples electrostatic and hydraulic forces to achieve a vari
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Science current issue
In situ measurements of Saturns ionosphere show that it is dynamic and interacts with the rings The ionized upper layer of Saturn’s atmosphere, its ionosphere, provides a closure of currents mediated by the magnetic field to other electrically charged regions (for example, rings) and hosts ion-molecule chemistry. In 2017, the Cassini spacecraft passed inside the planet’s rings, allowing in situ measurements of the ionosphere. The Radio and Plasma Wave Science instrument detected a cold, den
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Science current issue
An excess of massive stars in the local 30 Doradus starburst The 30 Doradus star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud is a nearby analog of large star-formation events in the distant universe. We determined the recent formation history and the initial mass function (IMF) of massive stars in 30 Doradus on the basis of spectroscopic observations of 247 stars more massive than 15 solar masses (). The main episode of massive star formation began about
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Science current issue
Mechanically robust, readily repairable polymers via tailored noncovalent cross-linking A healing squeeze The very long molecules found in synthetic polymers, and their tendency to entangle and partially crystallize, impart many of the polymers' useful properties. However, these same characteristics also mean that chain dynamics are slow, which impedes potential self-healing. Yanagisawa et al. developed a family of ether-thiourea linear polymers that form hydrogen-bonded networks an
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Science current issue
Observation of the quantum spin Hall effect up to 100 kelvin in a monolayer crystal A variety of monolayer crystals have been proposed to be two-dimensional topological insulators exhibiting the quantum spin Hall effect (QSHE), possibly even at high temperatures. Here we report the observation of the QSHE in monolayer tungsten ditelluride (WTe 2 ) at temperatures up to 100 kelvin. In the short-edge limit, the monolayer exhibits the hallmark transport conductance, ~ e 2 / h per e
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Science current issue
Spatial and temporal patterns of mass bleaching of corals in the Anthropocene Tropical reef systems are transitioning to a new era in which the interval between recurrent bouts of coral bleaching is too short for a full recovery of mature assemblages. We analyzed bleaching records at 100 globally distributed reef locations from 1980 to 2016. The median return time between pairs of severe bleaching events has diminished steadily since 1980 and is now only 6 years. As global
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Science current issue
Elevated HLA-A expression impairs HIV control through inhibition of NKG2A-expressing cells The highly polymorphic human leukocyte antigen ( HLA ) locus encodes cell surface proteins that are critical for immunity. HLA-A expression levels vary in an allele-dependent manner, diversifying allele-specific effects beyond peptide-binding preference. Analysis of 9763 HIV-infected individuals from 21 cohorts shows that higher HLA-A levels confer poorer control of HIV. Elevated HLA-A expression
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Science current issue
Gut microbiome influences efficacy of PD-1-based immunotherapy against epithelial tumors Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) targeting the PD-1/PD-L1 axis induce sustained clinical responses in a sizable minority of cancer patients. We found that primary resistance to ICIs can be attributed to abnormal gut microbiome composition. Antibiotics inhibited the clinical benefit of ICIs in patients with advanced cancer. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) from cancer patients who respond
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Science current issue
Gut microbiome modulates response to anti-PD-1 immunotherapy in melanoma patients Preclinical mouse models suggest that the gut microbiome modulates tumor response to checkpoint blockade immunotherapy; however, this has not been well-characterized in human cancer patients. Here we examined the oral and gut microbiome of melanoma patients undergoing anti–programmed cell death 1 protein (PD-1) immunotherapy ( n = 112). Significant differences were observed in the diversity and c
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Science current issue
The commensal microbiome is associated with anti-PD-1 efficacy in metastatic melanoma patients Anti–PD-1–based immunotherapy has had a major impact on cancer treatment but has only benefited a subset of patients. Among the variables that could contribute to interpatient heterogeneity is differential composition of the patients’ microbiome, which has been shown to affect antitumor immunity and immunotherapy efficacy in preclinical mouse models. We analyzed baseline stool samples from metast
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Science current issue
A mitosis-specific and R loop-driven ATR pathway promotes faithful chromosome segregation The ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase is crucial for DNA damage and replication stress responses. Here, we describe an unexpected role of ATR in mitosis. Acute inhibition or degradation of ATR in mitosis induces whole-chromosome missegregation. The effect of ATR ablation is not due to altered cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) activity, DNA damage responses, or unscheduled
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Science current issue
S1P-dependent interorgan trafficking of group 2 innate lymphoid cells supports host defense Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are innate counterparts of adaptive T lymphocytes, contributing to host defense, tissue repair, metabolic homeostasis, and inflammatory diseases. ILCs have been considered to be tissue-resident cells, but whether ILCs move between tissue sites during infection has been unclear. We show here that interleukin-25– or helminth-induced inflammatory ILC2s are circulating ce
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Science current issue
New Products Summary A weekly roundup of information on newly offered instrumentation, apparatus, and laboratory materials of potential interest to researchers.
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Science current issue
The harassment tax A senior faculty member asked me into his office. I assumed it was to talk about agricultural data. It was the fall of 1991 and I was untenured, 32 years old, and 7 months pregnant. He was in his 60s and one of many men who were going to vote on my tenure. He showed me the recent issue of Vanity Fair with Demi Moore on the cover, pregnant and nude. “She reminds me of you,” he said as he tried to
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Science current issue
Phase separation of a yeast prion protein promotes cellular fitness Biophysical responses of proteins to stress Much recent work has focused on liquid-liquid phase separation as a cellular response to changing physicochemical conditions. Because phase separation responds critically to small changes in conditions such as pH, temperature, or salt, it is in principle an ideal way for a cell to measure and respond to changes in the environment. Small pH changes could
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Science current issue
Declining oxygen in the global ocean and coastal waters Oxygen is fundamental to life. Not only is it essential for the survival of individual animals, but it regulates global cycles of major nutrients and carbon. The oxygen content of the open ocean and coastal waters has been declining for at least the past half-century, largely because of human activities that have increased global temperatures and nutrients discharged to coastal waters. These chan
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A Clever New Robotic 'Muscle' Seriously Lifts, Bro Oh, the poor humanoid robots. After decades of development, they're still less sprinty Terminator and more … octogenarian on sedatives . While these robots may look like us, they aren’t built like us—electric motors in their joints drive their herky-jerky movements, whereas our muscles give us more precise control over our bodies. Well, unless we’re on sedatives. But a burgeoning field called sof
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Live Science
'Bomb Cyclone' Swirls Across US East Coast in a Stunning View of Earth The GOES East satellite recorded this view of bomb cyclone Grayson as it battered the northeast U.S. on Thursday (Jan. 4). Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project/ Twitter As a powerful bomb cyclone winter storm curls across the U.S. East Coast this morning (Jan. 4), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) GOES-East satellite is snapping stunning images of the Earth's surface. T
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biologists uncovers a genetic mechanism that could enhance yield in cereal cropsSolving the world's food, feed and bioenergy challenges requires integration of multiple approaches and diverse skills. Scientists have identified a genetic mechanism that controls developmental traits related to grain production in cereals. The work was performed in Setaria viridis, an emerging model system for grasses that is closely related to economically important cereal crops and bioenergy f
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First direct proof of ozone hole recovery due to chemicals banFor the first time, scientists have shown through direct satellite observations of the ozone hole that levels of ozone-destroying chlorine are declining, resulting in less ozone depletion.
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Science : NPR
Astronomers Find Huge Stars More Common Than Previously Thought The Tarantula Nebula is home to many stars. Scientists were astonished by the number of super-massive stars they found inside the nebula. NASA, ESA, E. Sabbi (STScI) hide caption toggle caption NASA, ESA, E. Sabbi (STScI) The Tarantula Nebula is home to many stars. Scientists were astonished by the number of super-massive stars they found inside the nebula. NASA, ESA, E. Sabbi (STScI) A star-form
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The Atlantic
Why Do Cartoon Villains Speak in Foreign Accents? This is the first installment in an ongoing series examining kids’ worldviews and how they are shaped. When the sociolinguist Calvin Gidney saw The Lion King in theaters two decades ago, he was struck by the differences between Mufasa and Scar. The characters don’t have much in common: Mufasa is heroic and steadfast, while Scar is cynical and power-hungry. But what Gidney noticed most was how the
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Corals are severely bleaching five times as often as in 1980 Corals are in hot water. Severe bleaching events are hitting coral reefs five times as often as in 1980, researchers report in the Jan. 5 Science . Scientists surveyed 100 coral reef locations in tropical zones around the world, tracking each spot’s fate from 1980 to 2016. At first, only a few of the locations had experienced bleaching. But by 2016, all had been hit by at least one bleaching even
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Weighing massive stars in nearby galaxy reveals excess of heavyweights The Large Magellanic Cloud. Credit: NASA An international team of astronomers has revealed an 'astonishing' overabundance of massive stars in a neighbouring galaxy. The discovery, made in the gigantic star-forming region 30 Doradus in the Large Magellanic Cloud galaxy, has 'far-reaching' consequences for our understanding of how stars transformed the pristine Universe into the one we live in toda
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In broadest view yet of world's low oxygen, scientists reveal dangers and solutions Low-oxygen zones are spreading around the globe. Red dots mark places on the coast where oxygen has plummeted to 2 milligrams per liter or less, and blue areas mark zones with the same low-oxygen levels in the open ocean. Credit: GO2NE working group. Data from World Ocean Atlas 2013 and provided by R. J. Diaz In the past 50 years, the amount of water in the open ocean with zero oxygen has gone up
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Worm species lost 7,000 genes after evolving to fertilize itself UMD-led study finds that worms that fertilize themselves lost one-fourth of their genome, including genes that make sperm competitive. Reproduction in most animal species requires breeding between two individuals. But some worms have evolved the ability to go it alone. In these species, a single individual can breed with itself to produce offspring. A new University of Maryland-led study found
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DNA analysis of ancient mummy, thought to have smallpox, points to Hepatitis B instead The mummified remains of a small child buried in the Basilica of Saint Domenico Maggiore in Naples, Italy. Previous analysis of the 16th century remains had suggested the child was infected with smallpox, in what had been believed to be the earliest dated evidence of the virus. Advanced sequencing techniques, now suggest the child was actually infected by Hepatitis B. Credit: Gino Fornaciari, Uni
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The window for saving the world's coral reefs is rapidly closing Aerial survey images from Mossman-Lockhart River 23/03/2016. Credit: ARC CoE for Coral Reef Studies/ Terry Hughes The world's reefs are under siege from global warming, according to a novel study published today in the prestigious journal Science . For the first time, an international team of researchers has measured the escalating rate of coral bleaching at locations throughout the tropics over
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hijacker parasite blocked from infiltrating blood Still from WEHI.TV of malaria parasite infecting red blood cell. Credit: Dr Drew Berry, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute A major international collaboration led by Melbourne researchers has discovered that the world's most widespread malaria parasite infects humans by hijacking a protein the body cannot live without. The researchers were then able to successfully develop antibodies that disabled t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Will I look dumb?' When virtual assistants deter help-seeking Virtual assistants have become increasingly sophisticated--and more humanlike--since the days when Clippy asked if you needed help with your document. These assistants are intended to make programs and apps easier to use, but research published in Psychological Science suggests that humanlike virtual assistants may actually deter some people from seeking help on tasks that are supposed to measure
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People who sleep less than 8 hours a night more likely to suffer from depression, anxietySleeping less than the recommended eight hours a night is associated with intrusive, repetitive thoughts like those seen in anxiety or depression, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Newly published report outlines roadmap for modernizing inhalation toxicity testing Washington -- A report outlining the findings from an international expert workshop have been published in the journal Toxicology in Vitro . This comprehensive report recommends specific steps toward achieving global regulatory acceptance of non-animal testing approaches to acute inhalation toxicity. As a result of these recommendations, working groups have been formed to gather reference data, d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sedentary desk jockeys, stand up for your health: Western University study IMAGE: Wuyou (Yoah) Sui and Kinesiology Prof. Harry Prapavessis of Western University in London, Canada, co-authored a study showing how sedentary people can cue themselves to move more often. view more Credit: Western University Sit up, stand up, repeat often. Sedentary people can put their prolonged chair-sitting days behind them with a few simple, strategic behavioural changes,
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Big Think
5 Marijuana Infographics. Warning: Facepalming May Occur. In January 2018, Attorney General Jess Sessions announced that the U.S. will abandon the Obama-era principle of allowing states to determine the legal status of marijuana within their boundaries. From here on in, according to long-time marijuana opponent Sessions, it seems state laws don’t matter: It’s illegal, period. Sessions has a long history of being against pot, telling Newsweek that it’s o
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New Scientist - News
Opioids that hit different brain target could be less addictive Over 900 people died last year in Philadelphia from opioid overdoses, a 30 percent increase from 2015 Description:Spencer Platt/Getty By Sam Wong New opioid drugs with less addictive potential could be on the way thanks to a study revealing how morphine derivatives bind to a receptor. Opioid painkillers act on several receptors in the brain. Most of their effects are brought about through the
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New Scientist - News
Iconic tree from Twin Peaks threatened by climate change Tree time ABC Photo Archives/ABC via Getty By Jake Buehler In the Pacific Northwest, no tree is as important as the Douglas fir ( Pseudotsuga menziesii ). The conifer is the dominant tree of the region’s rainforests. It was the basis of the traditional timber-based economy and continues to be an important source of timber in plantations around the world. But now, research suggests the iconic
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New Scientist - News
Largest prime number ever found has over 23 million digits We’re going to need a bigger building ROBERT BROOK/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY By Timothy Revell Maths fans can’t get enough of numbers that are millions of digits long and can only be divided by themselves and one. Now, through a collaborative effort, utilising computers distributed around the world, they’ve discovered that the number 2 77,232,917 – 1 is prime. The discovery was initially made on
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Accessing your own genomic data is a civil right but requires strategies to manage safetyThe Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008 expanded individuals' access to genetic information by forcing changes to the HIPAA Privacy Rule. These amendments gave Americans a civil right to obtain copies of their own genetic test results stored at HIPAA-regulated laboratories. Researchers describe how civil rights and safety concerns collided after these changes and offers strategies to
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unlike people, bonobos don't 'look for the helpers'By the age of three months, human babies can already follow Mr. Rogers' advice to 'look for the helpers.' In fact, human infants naturally show a strong preference for individuals who help rather than hinder others. Now, a study finds that the same cannot be said of bonobos. While bonobos are similarly adept in discriminating helpers from hinderers, they show the opposite bias, consistently favori
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Aversion to holes driven by disgust, not fear, study findsClusters of holes may be evolutionarily indicative of contamination and disease -- visual cues for rotten or moldy food or skin marred by an infection.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
X chromosome reactivation could treat Rett syndrome, other X-linked disordersA new study points toward a potential strategy for treating X-linked disorders -- those caused by mutations in the X chromosome -- in females.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Eating more foods with choline during pregnancy could boost baby’s brainWhen expectant mothers consume sufficient amounts of the nutrient choline during pregnancy, their offspring gain enduring cognitive benefits, a new study suggests.
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Popular Science
Don't let snow shoveling give you a heart attack If exercise is good for you, why do we worry that shoveling snow will raise the risk of a heart attack ? Snow shoveling can be vigorous exercise Snow shoveling is a unique form of exertion. It can be vigorous and challenging to the cardiovascular system in general, and the heart in particular. When combined with the inherent environmental conditions of winter, snow shoveling during or after a bli
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UTMB develops promising anti-obesity drug that shrinks fat without suppressing appetite GALVESTON, Texas - Given the ever-increasing obesity epidemic, researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston have discovered a promising developing drug that has been shown to selectively shrink excess fat by increasing fat cell metabolism. The drug significantly reduces body weight and blood cholesterol levels without lowering food intake in obese mice, according to a rece
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The Atlantic
Does ‘Counting Your Blessings’ Work? Arianna Huffington, who once called gratitude a “gateway to grace,” was so invested in the idea that she created an entire gratitude section for the Huffington Post in 2015. Among the exercises she advocated for was the gratitude list—a record of appreciations used as a motivational tool. The list has become enormously popular. The motivational speaker Tony Robbins claims to start each day with o
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The Scientist RSS
Coriell Institute CEO DiesMichael Christman oversaw the organization's well-known biobank and pioneered a personalized medicine initiative.
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The Atlantic
Treating Disease by Nudging the Microbes Inside Us In the final decades of the 19th century, scientists showed in rapid succession that many of the worst diseases to afflict humanity were the work of bacteria—germs. Leprosy, gonorrhea, diphtheria, tuberculosis, plague, cholera, dysentery: Barely a year went by without assigning an infamous illness to a newly identified microbe. This concept, where one germ causes one disease, has influenced the w
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Leaving Flatland: Quantum Hall effect physics in 4-DResearchers have implemented a dynamical version of the four-dimensional quantum Hall effect with ultracold atoms in an optical superlattice potential.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Toys and gender: Pretty in pink and boisterous in blue?Researchers urge toymakers and parents avoid gender-labeling toys, remove color divides, and manufacture toys for both boys and girls in a wide range of colors. New research shows how easily preschoolers' ideas about what is appropriate for their gender is manipulated.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First direct proof of ozone hole recovery due to chemicals ban A view of Earth's atmosphere from space. Credit: NASA For the first time, scientists have shown through direct satellite observations of the ozone hole that levels of ozone-destroying chlorine are declining, resulting in less ozone depletion. Measurements show that the decline in chlorine , resulting from an international ban on chlorine-containing manmade chemicals called chlorofluorocarbons (CF
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Inside Science
On the Front Lines of the Opioid Epidemic Human A 12-year study of more than 1,000 people at one Boston hospital suggests a new way to alert emergency room doctors of underlying addiction. 12/29/2017 Jason Socrates Bardi, Editor https://www.insidescience.org/news/front-lines-opioid-epidemic
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA study: First direct proof of ozone hole recovery due to chemicals ban For the first time, scientists have shown through direct satellite observations of the ozone hole that levels of ozone-destroying chlorine are declining, resulting in less ozone depletion. Measurements show that the decline in chlorine, resulting from an international ban on chlorine-containing manmade chemicals called chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), has resulted in about 20 percent less ozone deplet
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Big Think
Nobody Lives Here: Mapping Emptiness in the U.S. and Beyond How do you map emptiness? Henry Holiday gave it a go in 1876, when he illustrated the Lewis Carroll poem ‘The Hunting of the Snark’ (see # 93 ). Nikolaus M. Freeman, a.k.a. ‘maps by nik’, gave it another go last year, and his example spawned a few noteworthy tributes. As he said this about his work – a stunning view of the United States, with the empty bits highlighted in green: “Human geographer
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Scientific American Content: Global
Bonobos Might Not Be So Laid-Back after All Given a choice, most humans would rather spend their time with nice people and avoid befriending jerks. Developmental psychologists have even found that by three months of age , human infants can tell the difference between the two—and seem to prefer those who help to those who hinder. According to a study published Thursday in Current Biology , the opposite seems to be true for bonobos. “Of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer mortality in the US continues decades-long dropThe cancer death rate dropped 1.7 percent from 2014 to 2015, continuing a drop that began in 1991 and has reached 26 percent, resulting in nearly 2.4 million fewer cancer deaths during that time.
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New on MIT Technology Review
An $850,000 Price Tag on Gene Therapy Shouldn’t Freak You Out—Yet The $850,000 price of a newly approved gene therapy for blindness stunned patient advocates, but the sticker shock could quickly wear off. Many costly drugs need to be purchased year after year. But gene therapies are given only once, with potentially permanent effects. Mark Trusheim, who directs MIT’s New Drug Development Paradigms program, says gene therapies are moving medicine from a model of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists uncover a genetic mechanism that could enhance yield potential in cereal crops Setaria viridis can be leveraged to gain fundamental insights into the mechanisms that govern seed production in the grasses. Credit: Donald Danforth Plant Science Center Solving the world's food, feed and bioenergy challenges requires integration of multiple approaches and diverse skills. Andrea Eveland, Ph.D., assistant member at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, and her team identified
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study uncovers potential key to preventing back pain in runnersA new study examines what may cause chronic back pain in runners and the exercises to help prevent it. The study suggests that runners with weak deep core muscles are at higher risk of developing low back pain. And, unfortunately, most people's deep core muscles aren't nearly as strong as they should be.
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Popular Science
Five snow-clearing tools to get you through winter Winter wonderlands you loved to frolic in as a kid look a little different now. They look like afternoons spent shoveling, or a day stuck at home. Reclaim a bit of that magic with the best snow clearers on offer. Free your inner child and enjoy snow again. During the holidays my family had an ergonomic shovel showdown. My stepfather and I were given two different shovels—this Snow Joe and another
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Science | The Guardian
Largest prime number discovered – with more than 23m digits At more than 23m digits long, the number is something of a beast. But for mathematicians, the latest discovery from a global gang of enthusiasts is a thing of beauty: the largest prime number ever found. Known simply as M77232917, the figure is arrived at by calculating two to the power of 77,232,917 and subtracting one, leaving a gargantuan string of 23,249,425 digits. The result is nearly one m
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovering the structure of RNA IMAGE: A new study develops an innovative simulation model able to efficiently predict the conformation of ribonucleic acid molecules, opening up interesting opportunities for application and research view more Credit: Simon Poblete It is the less known member of the nucleic acid family, superseded in popularity by its cousin DNA. And yet RNA, or ribonucleic acid, plays an essential role in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Danforth Center uncovers a genetic mechanism that could enhance yield in cereal cropsThe Eveland laboratory's research findings, 'Brassinosteroids modulate meristem fate and differentiation of unique inflorescence morphology in Setaria viridis', were recently published in the journal The Plant Cell.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
SNMMI publishes appropriate use criteria for somatostatin receptor PET imaging RESTON, Va. - The Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) has published appropriate use criteria (AUC) for somatostatin receptor PET imaging in neuroendocrine tumors . This AUC is part of a new series developed by SNMMI in its role as a qualified provider-led entity (PLE) under the Medicare Appropriate Use Criteria Program for Advanced Diagnostic Imaging. The society's other rec
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NRL improves optical efficiency in nanophotonic devices IMAGE: Image shows directly measured polaritons propagating through a flake of Hexagonal boron nitride (hBN). This material has been identified as an ideal substrate for two-dimensional materials research while also recently... view more Credit: (US Naval Research Laboratory) WASHINGTON -- A team of physicists, headed by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), have demonstrated the means to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Overweight children more likely to underestimate their body size Estimating your own body size and weight can be difficult. It turns out that this is true not only for adults, but also for children. It is well known that severely underweight individuals - such as those with anorexia - have a tendency to overestimate their own size and think they are fat even if they aren't. But overweight individuals have the opposite problem, in that they tend to underest
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New on MIT Technology Review
Minimum Wage Increases Could Speed Up Robot Adoption in the U.K. Is $850,000 for a Blindness Treatment Worth It? Spark Therapeutics, which makes the therapy, today announced the whopping price tag. Called Luxturna, it was approved by the FDA in December , but Spark didn’t disclose the price at the time. Now it has. And it’s a lot. In a class of its own. The only… Read more Spark Therapeutics, which makes the therapy, today announced the whopping price tag. Cal
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Latest Headlines | Science News
How the Dead Sea Scrolls survived a war in the 1960s In the Dec. 23 & Jan. 6 SN : Our top stories of 2017, grounded pterosaur hatchlings, protectors of the Dead Sea Scrolls, a counterintuitive metamaterial, neutron star sizing, arrow of time reversed, E. coli in flour and more.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
James Webb Telescope to investigate mysterious brown dwarfs Stellar cluster NGC 1333 is home to a large number of brown dwarfs. Astronomers will use Webb's powerful infrared instruments to learn more about these dim cousins to the cluster's bright newborn stars. Credit: NASA/CXC/JPL Twinkle, twinkle, little star, how I wonder what you are. Astronomers are hopeful that the powerful infrared capability of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope will resolve a puz
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New on MIT Technology Review
Lawmakers Think You Shouldn’t Drink and Drone Is $850,000 for a Blindness Treatment Worth It? Spark Therapeutics, which makes the therapy, today announced the whopping price tag. Called Luxturna, it was approved by the FDA in December , but Spark didn’t disclose the price at the time. Now it has. And it’s a lot. In a class of its own. The only… Read more Spark Therapeutics, which makes the therapy, today announced the whopping price tag.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New Atopic Dermatitis Yardstick provides practical guidance and management insights ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, IL (January 4, 2018) - Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) - also known as eczema - often face a tough, uphill battle for treatment. Symptoms include severe itching, scaly rashes, extreme dry skin and inflammation. Those who suffer from AD spend sleepless, itchy nights fearing they have nowhere to turn and their symptoms may never resolve. This creates therapeutic challenges f
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Eating more foods with choline during pregnancy could boost baby's brain ITHACA, N.Y. - When expectant mothers consume sufficient amounts of the nutrient choline during pregnancy, their offspring gain enduring cognitive benefits, a new Cornell University study suggests. Choline - found in egg yolks, lean red meat, fish, poultry, legumes, nuts and cruciferous vegetables - has many functions, but this study focused on its role in prenatal brain development. The research
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA's Webb Telescope to investigate mysterious brown dwarfs Twinkle, twinkle, little star, how I wonder what you are. Astronomers are hopeful that the powerful infrared capability of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope will resolve a puzzle as fundamental as stargazing itself -- what IS that dim light in the sky? Brown dwarfs muddy a clear distinction between stars and planets, throwing established understanding of those bodies, and theories of thei
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Children with chronic illness often show signs of mental health problems Children commonly show signs of a mental disorder soon after receiving a diagnosis involving a of a chronic physical condition, according to a recent study in BMJ Open . Researchers from the University of Waterloo surveyed children between the ages of six and 16, and all within a month of their diagnosis with asthma, food allergy, epilepsy, diabetes or juvenile arthritis. According to parents' re
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
X chromosome reactivation could treat Rett syndrome, other X-linked disorders A study from a team of Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators points toward a potential strategy for treating X-linked disorders - those caused by mutations in the X chromosome - in females. Their report published online in PNAS Early Edition , describes how a dual-modality approach was able to reactivate the inactive X chromosome in mouse cell lines, leading to increased expression o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Aversion to holes driven by disgust, not fear, study finds Trypophobia, commonly known as "fear of holes," is linked to a physiological response more associated with disgust than fear, finds a new study published in PeerJ . Trypophobia is not officially recognized in the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manuel of Mental Disorders (DSM). Many people, however, report feeling an aversion to clusters of holes -- such as those of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bonobos prefer jerks IMAGE: Fizi, an adult male bonobo at Lola ya Bonobo Sanctuary in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. A new study of these African apes hints at how human cooperation came... view more Credit: Photo by Christopher Krupenye, Duke University. DURHAM, N.C. -- Never trust anyone who is rude to a waiter, advice columnists say. For most people, acting nasty is a big turnoff. But while humans gen
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists take a big step toward building a better opioid IMAGE: This is an illustration of the active state kappa opioid receptor bound to a morphine derivative (purple). view more Credit: Tao Che and Daniel Wacker, Roth Lab, UNC School of Medicine CHAPEL HILL, NC - For the first time, scientists at the University of North Carolina School of Medicine and collaborators solved the crystal structure of the activated kappa opioid receptor bound to a mo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Accessing your own genomic data is a civil right but requires strategies to manage safety The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008, or GINA, expanded individuals' access to genetic information by forcing changes to the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Privacy Rule. These amendments, finalized in 2013 and 2014, gave Americans a civil right to obtain copies of their own genetic test results stored at HIPAA-regulated laboratories. In a commentary p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gene therapy restores normal blood glucose levels in mice with type 1 diabetesA study in Cell Stem Cell demonstrates that a gene therapy approach can lead to the long-term survival of functional beta cells as well as normal blood glucose levels for an extended period of time in mice with type 1 diabetes. The researchers used an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector to deliver to the mouse pancreas two proteins, Pdx1 and MafA, which reprogrammed plentiful alpha cells into func
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unlike people, bonobos don't 'look for the helpers' IMAGE: Fizi, an adult male bonobo at Lola ya Bonobo sanctuary. Credit: Christopher Krupenye view more Credit: Christopher Krupenye. By the age of three months, human babies can already follow Mr. Rogers' advice to "look for the helpers." In fact, human infants naturally show a strong preference for individuals who help rather than hinder others. Now, a study reported in Current Biology on J
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New cancer model shows genomic link between early-stage and invasive breast cancer types IMAGE: This is Nicholas Navin, Ph.D. view more Credit: MD Anderson Cancer Center HOUSTON -- new genetic-based model may explain how a common form of early-stage breast cancer known as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) progresses to a more invasive form of cancer say researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The study provides new insight into how DCIS leads to invasive
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nursing homes should require flu shots for all staff and patients, most older adults sayAs flu season swings into high gear, a new poll suggests nursing homes and other long-term care facilities should be doing more to get their staff and patients vaccinated before it's too late. Nearly three-quarters of people over age 50 surveyed in a new poll say all staff in such facilities should definitely be required to get the flu vaccine. More than 60 percent say that patients in such facili
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Alfalfa loss? Annual ryegrass is a winIn the U.S., alfalfa is grown mainly in western and northern states. The cold winters and other factors can lead to losses for farmers and forage shortages. Researchers have identified annual forage crops that can be cultivated in fields with winter-killed or terminated alfalfa.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Laser evaporation technology to create new solar materialsResearchers use lasers to blast solutions containing delicate organic compounds to grow new types of crystals for solar cells, light-emitting diodes and photodetectors.
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Science : NPR
Unlike Humans, Bonobos Shun Helpers And Befriend The Bullies Two bonobos play fight at the Lola Ya Bonobo sanctuary in Democratic Republic of Congo in 2012. Emilie Genty/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Emilie Genty/Barcroft Media via Getty Images Two bonobos play fight at the Lola Ya Bonobo sanctuary in Democratic Republic of Congo in 2012. Emilie Genty/Barcroft Media via Getty Images Even very young babies can tell the differen
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Research reveals 'shocking' weakness of lab coursesWith the new emphasis on hands-on, active learning throughout higher education, lab courses would seem to have an advantage -- what could be more active than doing experiments? But surprising new research reveals traditional labs fall far short of their pedagogical goals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Carbon nanotubes devices may have a limit to how 'nano' they can beCarbon nanotubes bound for electronics not only need to be as clean as possible to maximize their utility in next-generation nanoscale devices, but contact effects may limit how small a nano device can be, according to researchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
For bonobos, it pays to have powerful allies Fizi, an adult male bonobo at Lola ya Bonobo Sanctuary in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. A new study of these African apes hints at how human cooperation came to be. Credit: Christopher Krupenye, Duke University. Never trust anyone who is rude to a waiter, advice columnists say. For most people, acting nasty is a big turnoff. But while humans generally prefer individuals who are nice to ot
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exploring the realistic nature of the wave function in quantum mechanics IMAGE: Inserting the second BS when the two sub-waves have an encounter, as in (a), can produce two resultant sub-waves, as in (b), if two-sub waves inside the MZI are in-phase.... view more Credit: ©Science China Press Quantum mechanics is a pillar of modern science and technology, and has benefited the human society for a century. The wave function, also known as the quantum state, is the d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A thermometer for the oceans IMAGE: Air bubbles in an ice core from the Antarctic: the ice is up to 24'000 years old. view more Credit: Image: Bernhard Bereiter / Scripps Institution of Oceanography / Empa / University of Berne The oceans are the largest global heat reservoir. As a result of man-made global warming, the temperature in the global climate system increases; around 90% of the extra heat is absorbed by the oc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A look into the fourth dimension Ever since Albert Einstein developed the special theory of relativity in Zurich in 1905, by «fourth dimension» one usually means time. But how can one visualize a fourth spatial dimension - in addition to top-bottom, right-left and front-back? In the arts Salvador Dalí tried that: his crucifixion scene painted in 1954 shows as cross consisting of the three-dimensional unfolding of a hype
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Live Science
First Blue Moon Total Lunar Eclipse in 150 Years Coming This Month The first eclipse of 2018 will be a lunar one that comes at the very end of the month, on Jan. 31. It will be a total eclipse that involves the second full moon of the month, popularly referred to as a Blue Moon . Such a skywatching event hasn't happened for more than 150 years. The eclipse will take place during the middle of the night, and the Pacific Ocean will be turned toward the m
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Three new species of zoantharians described from coral reefs across the Indo-Pacific The zoantharian species Antipathozoanthus remengesaui, named after the president of Palau, Tommy Remengesau. This image shows a colony of open polyps on top of a black coral from Palau. Credit: James Davis Reimer Three new species of zoantharians were discovered by researchers from the University of the Ryukyus and Kagoshima University, Japan, and the Palau International Coral Reef Center. Despit
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Live Science
Can Gene Editing Save the World's Chocolate? A cocoa pod in Ecuador infected with the fungus Moniliophthora roreri , which causes frosty pod. Credit: Shutterstock Fungi and viruses are poised to doom chocolate, which is why scientists are racing to save cacao — the tree that sprouts the colorful, football-size pods containing beans used to make chocolate — with the gene-editing tool known as CRISPR-Cas9, according to a new report. Cac
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Popular Science
Everything you ever wanted to know about your double chin Every January, fat's in the crosshairs of health columnists, fitness magazines, and desperate Americans. This year, PopSci looks at the macronutrient beyond its most negative associations. What’s fat good for? How do we get it to go where we want it to? Where does it wander when it’s lost? This, my friends, is Fat Month . The camera pans down the staircase, gliding past sumptuous portraits of unn
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is Arctic warming influencing the UK's extreme weather?Severe snowy weather in winter or extreme rains in summer in the UK might be influenced by warming trends in the Arctic, according to climate scientists in the US and the UK.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study links asthma and allergic rhinitis with cataracts In a study that investigated the association between allergic diseases and ophthalmologic diseases in 14,776 adults, asthma and allergic rhinitis were each associated with a 50% increased likelihood of having cataracts. Atopic dermatitis was not linked with cataracts in the Journal of Dermatology study, however. The findings indicate that efforts should be made to reduce the risk of ophthalmologi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bright and stable: New acid-tolerant green fluorescent protein for bioimaging IMAGE: A schematic of development of Gamillus. Gene of the fluorescent protein was cloned from tentacles of flower hat jellyfish, and was engineered to improve the monomeric property and the brightness.... view more Credit: Kamo Aquarium and Osaka University Osaka - Visualizing cellular components and processes at the molecular level is important for understanding the basis of any biologi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Three new species of zoantharians described from coral reefs across the Indo-Pacific Three new species of zoantharians were discovered by researchers from the University of the Ryukyus and Kagoshima University , Japan, and the Palau International Coral Reef Center . Despite not being previously known, all three species were found widely across the Indo-Pacific, with at least two species found in the Red Sea, the Maldives, Palau, and southern Japan. Zoantharians, or colonial anemo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Poor dental health increases risks of frailty in older menOver a three-year period, researchers from the United Kingdom examined the relationship between poor oral health and older adults' risks for becoming frail. They published their findings in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New brainstem changes identified in Parkinson's diseaseA pioneering study has found that patients with Parkinson's disease have more errors in the mitochondrial DNA within the brainstem, leading to increased cell death in that area.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breast size dissatisfaction affects self-examination New research shows that women who are dissatisfied with the size of their breasts are less likely to carry out regular self-examinations to screen for breast cancer. The findings also show that women with greater breast size dissatisfaction are less confident about detecting a change in their breasts and are more likely to delay seeing their doctor if they did detect a change. The study of 384 Br
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We need one global network of 1000 stations to build an Earth observatory IMAGE: SMEAR II is a station for measuring environmental data in Hyytiälä, Finland. view more Credit: Juho Aalto We also need to share our data. So says world's most prominent geoscientist, Markku Kulmala, professor of physics at the University of Helsinki, Finland, and head of the Aerosol and Haze Laboratory at the Beijing University of Chemical Technology, China. Environmental challenge
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Scientific American Content: Global
Can Road Salt and Other Pollutants Disrupt Our Circadian Rhythms? The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation , an online publication covering the latest research. Every winter, local governments across the United States apply millions of tons of road salt to keep streets navigable during snow and ice storms. Runoff from melting snow carries road salt into streams and lakes, and causes many bodies of water to have extraordinarily
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Viden
Alvorlig sikkerhedsfejl: Næsten alle computere kan lække kodeord Sikkerhedseksperter fra blandt andet Google har de seneste dage leveret den slags nyheder, der får det til at løbe koldt ned ad ryggen hos IT-folk verden over. Det viser sig, at alle computere, der er udstyret med en processorchip fra firmaet Intel eller AMD, har alvorlige fejl i sikkerheden. Fejlene stammer helt fra fabrikken. Processorchippen kan også kaldes computerens hjerne. Hackere kan læse
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pretty in pink and boisterous in blue? Two researchers from the University of Hong Kong suggest that toymakers and parents avoid gender-labelling toys, remove colour divides, and manufacture toys for both boys and girls in a wide range of colours. Sui Ping Yeung and Wang Ivy Wong's study is published in Springer's journal Sex Roles , and shows how easily preschoolers' ideas about what is appropriate for their gender is manipulated. Th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New principles to guide corporate investment towards climate goals Credit: CC0 Public Domain Faced with climate change today, companies and investors face many complex ethical questions. Should investors continue to invest in fossil fuels or should they divest, sending a signal about the perceived illegitimacy of particular business models in a changing climate? Further, given the internationally agreed aspirations towards achieving net-zero emissions, how shoul
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What to watch for at the CES technology show Every year one or two breakout technologies capture the imagination of consumers. Eighteen months ago, it was Pokemon Go, the first augmented reality mobile app to really catch fire. A few years before that, it was 3-D printers. Last year, it clearly was digital assistants—Amazon Echo, Google Home and others—that tapped cloud-connected artificial intelligence to respond to voice commands . Thes
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Science for a resilient EU power grid Credit: CC0 Public Domain Electricity is the backbone of European society. When a natural disaster hits the power grid, recovery can happen in a matter of hours or it could take months to fully restore electricity supply. As well as hampering emergency response efforts, power cuts can trigger accidents and bring economic activity to a halt. JRC scientists provide scientific evidence to help EU po
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hong Kong Baptist University scholars develop world-first array of compounds for det Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) Chemistry scholars have invented a new class of multifunctional cyanine compounds that can be used for detection, imaging and thus treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The discovery has been granted four US patents and a patent by the Chinese government. Research papers relating to the study were published in a renowned international academic journal. The re
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Touchy nanotubes work better when cleanHeating carbon nanotubes at high temperatures and slowly cooling them eliminates contaminants that make nanotubes difficult to test for conductivity. Scientists from Rice and Swansea universities show how decontaminated nanotubes may simplify the design and manufacture of nanoscale devices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Did ancient irrigation technology travel Silk Road? Using satellite imaging and drone reconnaissance, archaeologists from Washington University in St. Louis have discovered an ancient irrigation system that allowed a farming community in arid northwestern China to raise livestock and cultivate crops in one of the world's driest desert climates. Lost for centuries in the barren foothills of China's Tian Shan Mountains, the ancient farming community
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New principles to guide corporate investment towards climate goals Faced with climate change today, companies and investors face many complex ethical questions. Should investors continue to invest in fossil fuels or should they divest, sending a signal about the perceived illegitimacy of particular business models in a changing climate? Further, given the internationally agreed aspirations towards achieving net-zero emissions, how should investors manage the leg
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new therapeutic target to fight metastasis in ovarian cancer IMAGE: This is the research team. view more Credit: IDIBELL Researchers of the Molecular Signaling in Cancer group of the Oncobell program (Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute - IDIBELL) - proCURE Program (Catalan Institute of Oncology - ICO) have described a key cellular receptor in the processes of metastasis in ovarian cancer. The finding, published in Molecular Cancer Therapeutics ,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pretty in pink and boisterous in blue?Two researchers from the University of Hong Kong suggest that toymakers and parents avoid gender-labelling toys, remove colour divides, and manufacture toys for both boys and girls in a wide range of colours. Sui Ping Yeung and Wang Ivy Wong's study is published in Springer's journal Sex Roles, and shows how easily preschoolers' ideas about what is appropriate for their gender is manipulated.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Science for a resilient EU power grid Electricity is the backbone of European society. When a natural disaster hits the power grid, recovery can happen in a matter of hours or it could take months to fully restore electricity supply. As well as hampering emergency response efforts, power cuts can trigger accidents and bring economic activity to a halt. JRC scientists provide scientific evidence to help EU policymakers as they work to
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Small-cell lung cancer patients face barriers to receiving standard-of-care treatmentDespite decades of clinical research establishing chemotherapy with thoracic radiation as the standard-of-care for the initial management of non-metastatic small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), a large percentage of US patients do not receive these treatments and in turn have lower overall survival, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.
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The Scientist RSS
Are all Neurodegenerative Diseases Made Equal?The Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts to share their research, discuss current therapeutic approaches, and to offer their insights.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Deep Learning Sharpens Views of Cells and Genes Eyes are said to be the window to the soul—but researchers at Google see them as indicators of a person’s health. The technology giant is using deep learning to predict a person’s blood pressure, age and smoking status by analysing a photograph of their retina. Google’s computers glean clues from the arrangement of blood vessels—and a preliminary study suggests that the machines can use this info
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Our treatment of HIV has advanced. Why hasn't the stigma changed? | Arik HartmannThe treatment of HIV has significantly advanced over the past three decades -- why hasn't our perception of people with the disease advanced along with it? After being diagnosed with HIV, Arik Hartmann chose to live transparently, being open about his status, in an effort to educate people. In this candid, personal talk, he shares what it's like to live with HIV -- and calls on us to dismiss our m
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Quanta Magazine
How Triangulation Leads to Knowledge One of the “game changing” pieces of scientific news in 2017 concerns the collision of two neutron stars about 130 million light-years away, first detected on August 17. One reason astronomers and cosmologists are so excited is reflected in the title of Natalie Wolchover’s article “ Colliding Neutron Stars Could Settle the Biggest Debate in Cosmology .” The debate concerns the famous Hubble const
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The Economist: The world this week
KAL's cartoon The next frontier Using thought to control machines Brain-computer interfaces may change what it means to be human
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Feed: All Latest
Haptic Controllers Bring Real Pain to VR Games: HaptX, TEGway, Hardlight VR, bHaptics Outfitted with a 3-D tracker and motorized capsules, the CyberTouch Glove was a $15,000 mitt that vibrated as you handled virtual objects onscreen. That was way back in 2000. Today such haptic technology—vibrating actuators and electrical impulses that stimulate your skin receptors and nerve endings—has become both cheaper and increasingly advanced, allowing VR gamers to feel real-world discomfor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Autoimmune reaction successfully halted in early stage islet autoimmunity Type 1 diabetes is the most common metabolic disease in childhood and adolescence. In this disease, the body's own immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an important role in this process: In healthy people, they suppress excessive immune reactions and thus prevent autoimmune diseases. Dr. Carolin Daniel's team is investig
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Creating 2-D dichalcogenide structures using chemical vapor deposition Credit: Nature (2018). DOI: 10.1038/nature25155 A team of researchers from the University of South Florida and Florida State University has developed a one-pot synthesis technique for creating 2-D multi-junction heterostructures. In their paper published in the journal Nature , the team describes their technique and why they believe it will be useful for building future high-speed electronics and
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Ingeniøren
Grafen-sensor kan føre til planter med mindre behov for vanding Forskere fra Iowa State University i USA har opfundet en sensor, baseret på grafen, som kan måle, hvor lang tid det tager to forskellige slags majsplanter at flytte vand fra rødderne til de laveste blade og derefter til de øvre blade. Grafen-sensoren sættes på planten med tape. »Med et værktøj som det her kan vi begynde at forædle planter, der er mere effektive til at bruge vand,« siger plantefor
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Ingeniøren
Sprængfarligt og ætsende kemikalieudslip hos Haldor Topsøe Beredskab Øst og Nordsjællands Politi rykkede klokken 15.15 torsdag eftermiddag ud til et kemikalieudslip ved Haldor Topsøes laboratorier i Kgs. Lyngby. #Kemikalieuheld #Nymøllevej #Lyngby . Større udrykning på vej til Haldor Topsøe til melding om kemikalieuheld i bygning.— Beredskab Øst (@BeredskabOest) January 4, 2018 Der var ifølge et tweet fra Nordsjællands Politi tale om mellem 50 og 100 lit
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NYT > Science
A Space Station Is Expected to Fall Out of the Sky. You’ll Probably Be Fine. Tiangong 1, which has been unmanned for more than four years and whose name means heavenly palace, could fall anywhere on about two-thirds of the earth’s surface, although it is most likely to land in one of two bands that encircle the globe parallel to the Equator, the researchers said. One of those regions, in the Southern Hemisphere, includes Tasmania and parts of New Zealand, Chile and Argent
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Macrophage nanosponges could keep sepsis in check A team of researchers at the University of California San Diego has developed macrophage "nanosponges" that can safely absorb and remove molecules from the bloodstream that are known to trigger sepsis. These macrophage nanosponges, which are nanoparticles cloaked in the cell membranes of macrophages, have so far improved survival rates in mice with sepsis. This work is one example of the cell mem
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New on MIT Technology Review
Google’s Old Autonomy Wizard Will Now Make VW and Hyundai Cars Drive Themselves Is $850,000 for a Blindness Treatment Worth It? Spark Therapeutics, which makes the therapy, today announced the whopping price tag. Called Luxturna, it was approved by the FDA in December , but Spark didn’t disclose the price at the time. Now it has. And it’s a lot. In a class of its own. The only… Read more Spark Therapeutics, which makes the therapy, today announced the whopping price tag.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Erosion May Transform the Arctic Food Chain As climate change continues to grip the Arctic—causing the oceans to rise, permafrost to thaw and sea ice to melt—scientists believe they've discovered an unexpected consequence of the shifting landscape. Changes along the coastline are altering the composition of the Arctic Ocean, in ways that could fundamentally transform the local food chain. A new study published yesterday in the journal Scie
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Viden
Greenpeace taber klima-retssag mod olielandet Norge Retten i Oslo har netop truffet afgørelsen i en sag, hvor miljøorganisationerne Greenpeace og Natur og Ungdom havde hevet den norske stat i retten for lade selskaber bore efter olie i Barentshavet. Dommen falder ud til Norges fordel. Eller i hvert fald den norske regering, som er blevet frifundet for brud for den norske grundlovs paragraf 112 - også kaldet miljøparagraffen. Læs også: Greenpeace s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Macrophage nanosponges could keep sepsis in check A team of researchers at the University of California San Diego has developed macrophage "nanosponges" that can safely absorb and remove molecules from the bloodstream that are known to trigger sepsis. These macrophage nanosponges, which are nanoparticles cloaked in the cell membranes of macrophages, have so far improved survival rates in mice with sepsis. This work is one example of the cell m
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer mortality in the US continues decades-long drop ATLANTA -January 4, 2018-The cancer death rate dropped 1.7% from 2014 to 2015, continuing a drop that began in 1991 and has reached 26%, resulting in nearly 2.4 million fewer cancer deaths during that time. The data is reported in Cancer Statistics 2018, the American Cancer Society's comprehensive annual report on cancer incidence, mortality, and survival. It is published in CA: A Cancer Journal
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I Spent a Week Living With Chatbots—Did All That Self-Help Help? Recently, I was hungry. So I told the Whole Foods chatbot what I had in my fridge, and it revealed that a bacon, lettuce, and heirloom tomato sandwich was mine for the making. Yum. Then, out of boredom, I booted up the movie-­recommendation bot And Chill, which suggested I watch Jake Gyllenhaal repeatedly relive the last day of his life in Source Code . I shuddered every time the train exploded.
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New on MIT Technology Review
In the World of Cryptocurrencies, Something’s Gotta Give in 2018 In 2017 we were told that blockchain technology and cryptocurrencies were going to save the world, disrupting just about anything with a digital fingerprint. But we saw very few tangible examples that justified the hype. In 2018, many of the intriguing pitches we heard will still be around, only now the challenge is going to be finding a way to deliver real products and services. Here are some of
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Futurity.org
Scientists create particles with negative mass Objects with “negative mass” react to the application of force in exactly the opposite way from what you would expect. Researchers have created particles with negative mass in an atomically thin semiconductor, by causing it to interact with confined light in an optical microcavity. This alone is “interesting and exciting from a physics perspective,” says Nick Vamivakas, an associate professor of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sprint names Michel Combes president and financial chief Energous, a San Jose, Calif., company, is the first firm to receive federal approval for a wireless charging system purported to power devices from up to 3 feet away, the company said.
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Popular Science
Drowning in browser tabs? Tame them with these extensions As you wander around the internet, you might leave a page or two running at once. Keeping multiple tabs open is a useful practice—it lets you cross-reference pages, save long articles for later reading, and remind yourself to check email. But when those tabs balloon in number from two to three to four dozen, you can easily get lost. That's not only bad for your attention span, but also eats into
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stressed out? Try smelling your partner's shirt The scent of a romantic partner can help lower stress levels, new psychology research from the University of British Columbia has found. The study, published yesterday in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology , found women feel calmer after being exposed to their male partner's scent. Conversely, being exposed to a stranger's scent had the opposite effect and raised levels of the stres
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study of 385-million-year-old shark suggests humans and sharks shared common ancestor 440 million years ago Credit: CC0 Public Domain A team of researchers with the University of Chicago, University College Dublin and Cambridge University studying a 385-million-year-old shark fossil has found evidence that suggests humans and sharks shared a common ancestor approximately 440 million years ago. The researchers were studying a shark specimen found in Germany back in 2001. At the time, it was believed the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Redefining knowledge of elderly people throughout history An archaeologist from The Australian National University (ANU) is set to redefine what we know about elderly people in cultures throughout history, and dispel the myth that most people didn't live much past 40 prior to modern medicine. Christine Cave, a PhD Scholar with the ANU School of Archaeology and Anthropology, has developed a new method for determining the age-of-death for skeletal remains
8h
New on MIT Technology Review
That Pervasive Chip Bug Is Worse Than Originally Feared Is $850,000 for a Blindness Treatment Worth It? Spark Therapeutics, which makes the therapy, today announced the whopping price tag. Called Luxturna, it was approved by the FDA in December , but Spark didn’t disclose the price at the time. Now it has. And it’s a lot. In a class of its own. The only… Read more Spark Therapeutics, which makes the therapy, today announced the whopping price tag.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GIMPS project discovers largest known prime number Prime Numbers The Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search (GIMPS) has discovered the largest known prime number, 2 77,232,917 -1, having 23,249,425 digits. A computer volunteered by Jonathan Pace made the find on December 26, 2017. Jonathan is one of thousands of volunteers using free GIMPS software. The new prime number , also known as M77232917, is calculated by multiplying together 77,232,917 t
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The Scientist RSS
Study: Facial Cues Indicate SicknessPale skin and hanging eyelids are tell-tale signs of apparent illness.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Rainbow ButtScientists explore why male peacock spiders are so colorful.
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The Scientist RSS
Alcohol Damages Mouse DNAA byproduct of alcohol consumption causes mutations in the DNA of mouse blood stem cells, and some of the breaks are not repaired.
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The Scientist RSS
Infographic: A 3-DPrinted EthoscopeThe instrument presents a new option for researchers working on large-scale fly behavior studies.
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The Scientist RSS
Infographic: Anticipation Versus ConfrontationThe brain is activated differently when it's contemplating, rather than directly facing, a threat.
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Viden
Dansk forsker: Derfor er 11.500 år gammelt barneskelet vigtigt En international forskergruppe med deltagelse af den danske professor Eske Willerslev fra Grundforskningscenter for Geogenetik ved Københavns Universitet har gjort nogle interessante fund efter at have analyseret arvemassen fra et 11.500 år gammelt barneskelet, som blev fundet i Alaska i 2010. Konklusioner, som er offentliggjort i Nature.com , vækker genlyd internationalt, og er blevet refereret
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Futurity.org
Plants get sensor ‘tattoos’ that track water Sensors on tape that attach to plants yield new kinds of data about water use for researchers and farmers. “With a tool like this, we can begin to breed plants that are more efficient in using water,” says Patrick Schnable, plant scientist at Iowa State University. “That’s exciting. We couldn’t do this before. But, once we can measure something, we can begin to understand it.” The tool making the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shaking, no damage in San Francisco Bay Area quakeSan Francisco Bay Area residents were shaken out of their slumber by a magnitude 4.4 earthquake that was felt over a wide area but caused no major damage early Thursday.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Don't give up now -- keeping your New Year's resolutions could reduce cancer risk The New Year is an excellent time to make resolutions for a healthier lifestyle - but by the end of the first week of January, even the best intentions may start to pall. But research published this week in ecancermedicalscience may provide the motivation needed to stick with it - those hard-won healthy choices may lead to a total reduction of about one-third in cancer risk. Researchers led by Pr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers detect a loophole in chronic lymphocytic leukemia treatment IMAGE: The adhesive protein CD49d (red) is present on the surface of these adherent chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. view more Credit: Tissino et al., 2018 A team of researchers in Italy and Austria has determined that a drug approved to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) may be less effective in a particular subset of patients. The study, which will be published January 4 in the J
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Mayonnaise effect' explains breakdown of 1929 viscosity equation In the mayonnaise effect, a jamming transition occurs when a large amount of solute is added to a solution. At a critical solute concentration, the motion of the ion/liquid clusters freezes or jams, which causes the viscosity to dramatically increase. Credit: Wynne. ©2017 American Chemical Society Mayonnaise is a staple of almost every household, yet the reason why it's so thick and viscous is a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why it's so hard to keep track of ships that get up to no good The USS Cole after the deadly 2000 bombing that killed 17 US sailors. Credit: Wikimedia Commons/USMC South Korea recently seized two oil tankers that it says were illegally transferring oil to North Korean ships at sea. One was registered in Hong Kong, while the other flew the Panamanian flag. The ensuing fallout has focused mainly on who ordered the transaction and chartered the ship – but by th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers discover an M-dwarf eclipsing binary system Left: GMOS acquisition image of the binary system. The binary system is indicated by the green mark, where the third object (at a separation of 0.5 arcseconds) is well resolved. The Gemini spectra were carried out with a position angle of 90 degrees east of north, hence were resolve both the eclisping binary system and the third object into spectra. Right: GMOS spectra. The top panel shows the ec
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Ingeniøren
DSB fyrer 100 ansatte DSB siger nu farvel til omkring 100 ansatte i administrationen, svarende til en reduktion på syv procent. Nedskæringerne sker ifølge en pressemeddelelse fra DSB både som konsekvens af faldende indtægter, et behov for løbende at effektivisere virksomheden og visionen om, at DSB fra 2030 skal kunne klare sig uden kontraktbetaling fra staten. DSB meldte allerede i maj 2017 ud , at selskabet fra 2030
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The Ed-Tech Entrepreneur Diversifying Silicon Valley Imagine you’re a black woman pitching a startup. You look different. You talk different. A table of white investors has never seen someone who looks like you and who’s been successful before. All these things are working against you. Do you let that stop you, or do you just say so what? That’s what I train entrepreneurs of color to think about. When I first got to Silicon Valley, I was just like
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Futurity.org
Is autism more common that we thought? The number of children in the United States diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder may be significantly higher than previously thought, a new analysis suggests. The analysis of data from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) suggests that 2.4 percent of American children between the ages of 3 and 17—or 1 in 41—have been diagnosed with autism, a figure that is higher than most e
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Ingeniøren
5, 17 eller 30 procent? Stor usikkerhed om performance-tab efter Meltdown-patch Sårbarheden Meltdown, der vedører Intel-processorer og muliggør nedbrydning mellem brugerens programmer og styresystemet er ved at blive lukket i diverse styresystemer. Sent onsdag blev detaljer om sårbarheden og en anden CPU-sårbarhed kaldet Spectre offentliggjort . Ifølge The Register er der risiko for et performance-tab på mellem fem og op til 30 procent, når systemer med Intel-processorer bli
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Scientific American Content: Global
Ancient Tree Structure Is Like a Forest unto Itself Cut into the trunk of a pine tree, and you will see a familiar series of concentric rings, each corresponding to a season of growth. But not all stumps tell the same story. A study published in November in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA reveals that the world's oldest trees had a very different structure. Some 370 million years ago cladoxylopsid trees stood at least e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study suggests new targets for improving soybean oil content Jianxin Ma, Purdue University professor of agronomy, has found that a gene affecting bloom in soybeans also increases the crop’s seed oil content. Credit: Purdue Agricultural Communication photo/Tom Campbell Scientists working to increase soybean oil content tend to focus their efforts on genes known to impact the plant's seeds, but a Purdue University study shows that genes affecting other plant
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Less meat, more choice—a look at key food issues in 2018 They're also seeking more information about their food, including where it comes from and how it's produced. New issues of interest regularly emerge. Here are a number of key trends you can expect to be in the forefront for 2018: Increasing choice and micro-markets for food As consumers are learning more about food, different attributes are becoming more important for various individuals. F
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Live Science
Why Israelis Are Excited About this 2,700-Year-Old Piece of Clay A photo reveals the face of the thin clay seal. Credit: Courtesy of the Israeli Antiquities Authority Archaeologists have discovered a 2,700-year-old clay stamp near Jerusalem's Western Wall that seems to shed some light on the political structure of the ancient society that inhabited the city. The researchers who announced the discovery worked on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Conversation between a biologist and a philosopher—has man become a semi-god? Credit: karamel/Pixabay Two professors from the University of Lorraine continue the exchanges initiated earlier in "Self-transformation and religion" and "Identity, metamorphosis and the self". Here they address the question of whether man has reached a "divine" status. The proposition of Jean‑Pierre Jacquot To answer the question, it is first useful to ask another one: why in the first place w
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Live Science
See the 'Bomb Cyclone' Hit US East Coast in These NASA and NOAA Gifs See the 'Bomb Cyclone' Hit US East Coast in These NASA and NOAA Gifs By Tariq Malik, Space.com Managing Editor | January 4, 2018 08:32am ET Author Bio Tariq Malik, Space.com Managing Editor Tariq joined Purch's Space.com team in 2001 as a staff writer, and later editor, covering human spaceflight, exploration and space science. He became Space.com's Managing Editor in 2009. Before joining Space
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Redefining knowledge of elderly people throughout history A new method for determining the age-of-death for skeletal remains based on how worn the teeth are. Credit: Australian National University An archaeologist from The Australian National University (ANU) is set to redefine what we know about elderly people in cultures throughout history, and dispel the myth that most people didn't live much past 40 prior to modern medicine. Christine Cave, a PhD Sc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Protecting dogs in winter from extreme cold, ice, salt and deicers Credit: Martin León Barreto Dogs are just like people in that they have varying tolerance for different temperatures and ground conditions. Some dogs can run around in the snow for hours, and they actually end up panting—their version of sweating—from all the activity. Others start shivering and pulling at the leash to go back indoors after being outside for only a few minutes. There's really no
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Live Science
Why Are So Many Pets Overweight? This article was originally published at The Conversation. The publication contributed the article to Live Science's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights . When I looked at my appointment book for the day, I thought something must be wrong. Someone who worked in the fitness industry was bringing his cat in to the Tufts Obesity Clinic for Animals. Did he confuse us for a different kind of weight
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Popular Science
We’re three million miles closer to the sun in January than we are in July. So why isn't it hot? There’s something about the geometry of space that’s never quite made sense to me. I know that the axial tilt of the Earth is the reason we have seasons, but if a slight angle away from the sun can make me see my breath in winter , why does being three million miles closer not make me melt in a pool of my own sweat? Is it really not any hotter when we’re at our shortest distance from our star? An
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Futurity.org
This generic skin cream may cut carcinoma risk Using the generic skin cream fluorouacil 5 percent for two to four weeks may reduce the risk of a squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) needing surgery by 75 percent within a year, a new study suggests. The new results come from a clinical trial involving more than 900 military veterans at high risk for keratinocyte carcinoma skin cancer. The finding that less than one month’s use of fluorouacil 5 percen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Listen up! How to get your message across in just 60 seconds Credit: Shutterstock/Mike Flippo Do you have something important to say, but find it hard to get people's attention? Or have you tried to listen to someone who claims to have something interesting to impart, but they can't explain it and the idea gets lost? (Or worse, you get bored and lose interest, even if they're trying to describe their revolutionary new laser shark). Some people are natural
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The color of magnets Urii Guchenia, left, and Ran Hong proudly hold up a stained-glass rendering of the magnetic field in the Muon g-2 experiment’s storage ring. Credit: Ran Hong Particle physics and decorative glassware are two disciplines that don't often meet. But given the striking results of a recent artist-scientist collaboration, perhaps that could change. Artists Nathalie Kalbach and Urii Guchenia at the Chic
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Acid-tolerant green fluorescent protein for bioimaging A schematic of development of Gamillus. Gene of the fluorescent protein was cloned from tentacles of flower hat jellyfish, and was engineered to improve the monomeric property and the brightness. (The flower hat jellyfish was provided by Mr. Kamoizumi in Kamo Aquarium, Yamagata, Japan.) Credit: Aquarium and Osaka University Osaka University researchers develop new green fluorescent protein that c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Did ancient irrigation technology travel Silk Road? Aerial view of an ancient irrigation system discovered in the foothills of Xinjiang, China. Credit: Archaeological Research in Asia Using satellite imaging and drone reconnaissance, archaeologists from Washington University in St. Louis have discovered an ancient irrigation system that allowed a farming community in arid northwestern China to raise livestock and cultivate crops in one of the worl
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Science | The Guardian
Questioning AI: what are the key research challenges? – Science Weekly podcast In the first episode of our Questioning Artificial Intelligence mini-series, Ian Sample explores some of the key hurdles for machine learning, including reasoning and social intelligence Subscribe & Review on Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud & Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter The media is full of stories of the hopes and fears over rapidly evolving artific
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The Guardian's Science Weekly
Questioning AI: what are the key research challenges? – Science Weekly podcastIn the first episode of our Questioning Artificial Intelligence mini-series, Ian Sample explores some of the key hurdles for machine learning, including reasoning and social intelligence
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How to Buck the Brogrammer Culture and Get Women into STEM My mom doesn't believe in the impossible. A Chinese immigrant and physics teacher, she arrived in the US with big dreams and limited English. During her first six months in the country, she would visit English-speaking friends to help her write checks—and when she got tired of that, she enrolled in an English class from 7 to 9 a.m. before working a 12-hour day as a waitress. Today, she owns two t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A manifesto for designing cities Brent D. Ryan, an associate professor of urban design and public policy in MIT’s Department of Urban Studies and Planning, has detailed his perspective on urban design in a new book, “The Largest Art: A Measured Manifesto for a Plural Urbanism,” recently published by the MIT Press. Credit: Casey Atkins "The city is a people's art, a shared experience," a Philadelphia architect and planner named E
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Scientific American Content: Global
Good Feelings in the Midst of Chronic Pain Experts at the National Institutes of Health estimate that 25.3 million adults in the U.S. are living with chronic pain . Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends against opioids as a first-line or routine treatment for chronic pain, the rate of opioid prescriptions has increased dramatically in recent years, contributing significantly to the U.S. epidemic of opioid addi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is Arctic warming influencing the UK's extreme weather? Snowy weather. Credit: University of Lincoln Severe snowy weather in winter or extreme rains in summer in the U.K. might be influenced by warming trends in the Arctic, according to new findings. Climate scientists from the U.K. and the U.S. examined historic data of extreme weather events in the U.K. over the past decade and compared them with the position of the North Atlantic polar atmospheric
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Data mining to protect water quality in southeast Ohio Credit: Ohio University Tapping into its water-quality expertise, Ohio University's Appalachian Watershed Research Group (AWRG) is assessing data collected from regional mining operations in a first-of-its-kind study, to better predict how groundwater levels will respond to mining. The research group, a multidisciplinary team of undergraduate and graduate students, staff, and faculty from across
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The Atlantic
​​​​​​​Can Indian Manufacturing Be the Next Chinese Manufacturing? Not long ago, India’s underwhelming manufacturing industry was symbolized by its best-known car: the Ambassador. Modeled on a British car from the ‘50s, the boxy Hindustan Motors sedan dominated Indian roads for decades. Well into the 1990s, it was to India what the Lada was to the Soviet Union or the Trabant to East Germany, testimony to the technological shortcomings of an economy cut off from
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Live Science
9 Surprising, Everyday Things That May Be Bad for You For some individuals, a gluten-free diet is not a choice, but a necessity: People with celiac disease, a rare condition in which eating gluten triggers an immune response that damages the small intestine, must avoid gluten. People with a diagnosed wheat allergy should cut back on gluten by avoiding wheat. But as gluten-free diets have gained popularity, many people believe that avoiding gluten is
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Live Science
The Bottom of the Ocean Is Sinking Satellite data enables scientists to map the seafloor, which is sinking under the weight of rising seas. (This map shows gravity anomalies in the western Indian Ocean. Credit: NASA Earth Observatory The bottom of the ocean is more of a "sunken place" than it used to be. In recent decades, melting ice sheets and glaciers driven by climate change are swelling Earth's oceans. And along with al
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Ingeniøren
Bjarne Stroustrup modtager stor amerikansk ingeniør-pris for C++ Bjarne Stroustrup er blevet udnævnt til dette års modtager af den såkaldte Charles Stark Draper Price for Engineering. Prisen uddeles hvert år af organisationen National Academy of Engineering til en ingeniør, hvis bedrifter har haft signifikant indflydelse på samfundet. Med prisen - som officielt uddeles i februar - kommer Stroustrup i fint selskab. På listen over tidligere modtagere finder man
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Scientific American Content: Global
Diplomacy for Scientists Science is one of the best available tools for solving societal challenges—whether they are the 17 agenda items in the 2030 UN Sustainable Development Goals or finding vaccines for infections such as Zika. To help ensure success, early career academic investigators can play an important role in bridging the gap between science and policy. We attended the 12 th Anniversary of the World Science
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Advanced multi-junction solar cells deliver high efficiency, reduced costs for space Inverted Metamorphic Multi-Junction (IMM) Solar Cells are a more efficient and lighter weight alternative to the state-of-practice multi-junction space solar cells. A collaboration between the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. government and industry has led to refinement of the IMM solar cell growth process, ensuring high yield, efficient solar cell production through industrial manufactur
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Ingeniøren
Kinas centralbank vil begrænse bitcoin-mining Den kinesiske centralbank vil stække den omfattende bitcoin-mining, der foregår i Kina. Det skriver nyhedsbureauet Reuters. Selvom banken ikke direkte kan regulere bitcoin-mining, så kan den kinesiske centralbank, People's Bank of China (PBOC), bede lokale myndigheder om at regulere det kæmpe strømforbrug forbundet med skabelsen af nye enheder af kryptovalutaen. På den måde kan de nedskalere prod
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Scientific American Content: Global
As Vets Demand Cannabis for PTSD, Science Races to Unlock Its Secrets Elvis Alonzo began smoking cannabis as a last resort. Three years as a Marine Corps officer and 13 years with the Glendale Police Department in Arizona—where he was exposed to murders, suicides and people dying in his arms—had left him emotionally crippled. Toward the end of his police service, doctors diagnosed Alonzo with post-traumatic stress disorder and prescribed various medications to temp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The future of grocery shopping—faster, cheaper, smaller Credit: Case Western Reserve University Walmart was once considered the future of grocery shopping, offering consumers a slew of discounted choices, compared to the competition. Yet, market trends point toward a faster, cheaper, smaller and more streamlined experience. The result: One of the most common shopping experiences in American life is fundamentally changing, according to a new study in t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Evolution of parasite viruses hints at how Leishmania first infected vertebrates More than a million people in tropical countries contract the parasite Leishmania every year through the bites of infected sand flies. Most people develop disfiguring – but not life-threatening – skin lesions at the sites of the bites. But if the parasite spreads to the internal organs, it causes a disease known as visceral leishmaniasis, which kills about 30,000 people every year. Stephen Beverl
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experiments boost solar power Mohammed Alshayeb in front of the Center for Design Research (left, above), and Afnan Barri with her experimental light shelf. Credit: University of Kansas With global warming an ever-present worry, renewable energy – particularly solar power—is a burgeoning field. Now, two doctoral students in the School of Architecture & Design (Arc/D) have demonstrated methods of optimizing the capture of sunl
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Viden
Norsk superskib skal løse MH370's mystiske forsvinden Det er fortsat et stort mysterium, hvad der skete med Boeing-flyet MH370, som forsvandt sporløst i Det Indiske Ocean for snart fire år siden. Trods gentagne forsøg er det endnu ikke lykkedes at lokalisere flyet fra Malaysia Airlines, der havde 239 passagerer og besætningsmedlemmer med ombord. Og sidste år valgt de australske, kinesiske og malaysiske myndigheder så at indstille eftersøgningen, der
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Norway lobsters' appetite for jellyfish caught on camera Credit: Heriot-Watt University Norway lobsters' secret love of jellyfish has been caught on camera for the first time, raising questions about whether jellyfish blooms are pests or potential food sources for the commercial fishing industry. Jellyfish blooms, the vast swarms that are appearing with increasing frequency in waters around the world, are thought to have highly negative effects on mari
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New Scientist - News
A new bitcoin Ponzi scheme or scam pops up almost every day Trackable transactions don’t save you from scams iStock/Getty By Chris Stokel-Walker Everyone and their dog seems to be investing in bitcoin , but buyers beware: there are plenty of pitfalls. As well as holding your nerve as the value of the cryptocurrency rockets and plummets , potential investors have to be wary of hacks, Ponzi schemes and confidence tricks. Marie Vasek at the University of
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Ingeniøren
Isbrydende krydstogtsskib til 2,7 milliarder skal til Nordpolen og Antarktis Det bliver verdens første krydstogtskib med isbrydende egenskaber – og det skal være gas-hybrid-drevet. Fremdriftssystemet med dual fuel-LNG-motorer og batterier er udviklet i et samarbejde mellem det franske krydstogtrederi Ponant, Stirling Design International, finske Aker Arctic og norske Vard. Skroget bygges i Rumænien og færdiggøres af Vard Søviknes. Den totale kontraktværdi er på 2,7 millia
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The Atlantic
There's No Way Congress Is Going to Fix Entitlements House Speaker Paul Ryan may think otherwise, but it’s likely the tax bill that he helped drive through Congress last month has ruled out any serious effort to address the growing costs of federal entitlement programs for the elderly. That’s a problem, and not just for Republicans like Ryan looking to shrink the federal government. It’s an issue for Democrats, too: They want to preserve crucial in
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New on MIT Technology Review
Fixing Serious Bugs in Widely Used Computer Chips Means Slowing Down Your Machine The U.S. Is Blocking a Chinese Fintech Giant from Buying MoneyGram American authorities have decided that Alibaba's digital payment firm, Ant Financial, won't be allowed to acquire the cash transfer company Moneygram. Ant Financial, which was one of our 50 Smartest Companies in 2017 , is a Chinese tech company that handles… Read more American authorities have decided that Alibaba's digital paym
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists lay out why some origami won't fold under pressure Scientists and engineers are fascinated by self-folding structures. Imagine the possibilities: heart stents that unfold in the right location or pop-up tents that assemble at the press of a button, as well as nanoscale versions for tiny machines. But sometimes these structures get stuck during the folding process, and scientists don't know why. A new paper in Physical Review X by three University
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lab unlocks secrets of nanoscale 3-D printing LLNL researchers can print woodpile lattices with submicron features a fraction of the width of a human hair. Credit: Jacob Long and Adam Connell/LLNL Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) researchers have discovered novel ways to extend the capabilities of two-photon lithography (TPL), a high-resolution 3-D printing technique capable of producing nanoscale features smaller than one-hundr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lightening up soybean leaves may boost food supply Lighter and darker soybeans used in the research. Credit: UIUC/Claire Benjamin A new university-led study has shown that lightening the color of soybean leaves may increase the growth and yield of this major world food crop. The finding offers a strategy to help address Earth's future food needs. A science team led by Donald Ort of the University of Illinois and research scientist Berkley Walker
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Post-Brexit farming funding set out by Michael Gove Image copyright PA Image caption The MPs say imports of food produced with lower welfare standards should not be allowed Post-Brexit trade deals could pose the biggest peacetime threat to the UK's food security if welfare standards and farmers are not protected, MPs say. Imports of food produced with lower welfare standards should not be allowed, the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Agroecology w
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Real weather term "bomb" blows up on social media Finley Bork, 7, uses a boogie board, typically used on the beach, for sledding down a hill on a golf course at the Isle of Palms, S.C., Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018. A brutal winter storm smacked the coastal Southeast with a rare blast of snow and ice Wednesday, hitting parts of Florida, Georgia and South Carolina with their heaviest snowfall in nearly three decades. (AP Photo/Mic Smith) When it comes
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Leaving flatland – quantum Hall physics in 4-D Figure 1: Illustration of a hypothetical device for studying the quantum Hall effect in 4-D systems. Two 2-D Hall bars (left/right) - the geometry used by Klaus von Klitzing for the first measurement of the 2-D quantum Hall effect—are combined in orthogonal subspaces to form a 4-D quantum Hall system (center). This 4-D sample is depicted by encoding the fourth dimension in the colour of a surface
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel methodology increases resolution in oligodendrocyte proteomics Brazilian researchers combine mass spectrometry, 2D liquid chromatography and ion mobility to identify over 10,000 proteins in brain cells possibly involved in schizophrenia. Credit: FAPESP One of the key challenges of proteomics, the study of all proteins expressed by a cell or organism, is distinguishing between molecules that are structurally different yet have the same mass. This is hard beca
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Library of galaxy histories reconstructed from motions of stars Credit: Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía (IAA-CSIC) Just as the sun is moving within the Milky Way, all the stars in galaxies are moving, but with very different orbits. Some of the stars have strong rotations, while others may be moving randomly with no clear rotation. Comparing the fraction of stars on different orbits, researchers can determine how galaxies form and evolve. An internation
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Glucagon receptor structure offers new opportunities for type 2 diabetes drug discovery The The Crystal Structure of the Full-Length Human Glucagon Receptor (GCGR)crystal structure of the full-length human glucagon receptor (GCGR): orange (extracellular domain), blue (transmembrane domain), green (stalk), magenta (the first extracellular loop), red (NNC1702), yellow (NNC0640) and cyan (mAb1) Credit: Dr. WU Beili Class B G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) exert essential action in h
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cultural evolution has not freed hunter-gatherers from environmental forcing Blue, red, and gray arrows indicate positive, negative and statistically insignificant effect of a variable. Thickness of an arrow indicate the strength of the effect of a variable. Net primary productivity has also indirect effects on population density mediated by biodiversity and pathogens. Credit: Miska Luoto Because of culture, humans are often considered to be divorced from the environment
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists solve structure of complement C5a receptor Scientists at Heptares Therapeutics have published the first high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of the complement C5a receptor (a G protein-coupled receptor, GPCR) binding a small molecule allosteric antagonist. The findings, published in Nature today, reveal the location of a new allosteric binding site outside the transmembrane helical bundle and provide insights to the mechanisms by which
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Growing up: Researchers create new gel-forming technique that mimics the way living tissues grow Experimental demonstrations of forming a saddle-shaped leaf through oxygen diffusion-mediated differential polymerization of polyacrylamide gels. Credit: K. Jimmy Hsia While we know what a tree leaf, a flower petal, and a human heart look like, we do not always understand the deeper question of how they grow the way they do—a process known as morphogenesis. Researchers at Carnegie Mellon Universi
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Sleeping sickness not just a sleeping disorder An international study from the Instituto de Medicina Molecular shows one of Africa's most lethal diseases is actually a circadian rhythm disorder caused by the acceleration of biological clocks controlling a range of vital functions besides sleep. By understanding which clock genes are affected by the parasitic disease, scientists hope the research will eventually prove useful in developing th
12h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers create novel compound targeting melanoma cells (Boston)--An international team of researchers has developed a novel compound that successfully inhibits growth of melanoma cells by targeting specific epigenetic modifying proteins in these cells. In the human body cells turn genes on and off by means of chemical modifications that change DNA and related proteins. These epigenetic changes are continuous and are at the core of how healthy cells t
12h
New Scientist - News
Tides and atmospheres on TRAPPIST-1 planets may help life thrive The TRAPPIST-1 exoplanets are lava worlds and ice balls NASA By Leah Crane The outer planets of the TRAPPIST-1 system might be better for life than we thought. Their cores are stretched by gravity, which generates heat, and there’s a possibility these exoplanets have atmospheres, so the outermost planets could be warmer and wetter than we thought , maybe even with air. We have very little dat
12h
Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Hvordan bygger man ydermuren i gavl-til-gavl-byggeri? Vores læser Jørgen Nørgaard spørger: På hovedgader bygger man tit husene gavl-til-gavl. Når et gammelt hus er revet ned, og det nye hus bygges op med gavl mod en eksisterende husgavl, undrer jeg mig over, hvordan man byggeteknisk laver ydermuren. Det rå betonhus synes at stå med en afstand, der svarer til kun isolering plus mursten. Hejser man stykker af mur ned, som sikres indefra, eller har man
12h
Science : NPR
Share Your Flooding Story And Plan From Florida to Southern California and New York to Alaska, residents and officials are making plans to cope with increased flooding and sea level rise. As NPR and Reveal reported, Louisiana has created a buyout plan but doesn't have the money to fund it. Some residents of vulnerable areas have decided on their own to move away; others have elevated their homes or tied boats to their steps, prepa
12h
Science : NPR
'Meditation For Fidgety Skeptics' Offers Practical Advice For Stressed-Out Cynics Even one minute of "daily-ish" meditation can make a difference in reducing stress, according to Dan Harris, the author of Meditation For Fidgety Skeptics . Jamie Jones/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Jamie Jones/Ikon Images/Getty Images Even one minute of "daily-ish" meditation can make a difference in reducing stress, according to Dan Harris, the author of Meditation For Fi
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Ingeniøren
Skal omstridt jysk bro rives ned? Nu skal sagen for højesteret Banedanmark kan nu se frem til en tur i Højesteret i sagen om en bro over jernbanen ved Vejen, der er blevet flyttet som led i elektrificeringsprogrammet. Nærmere bestemt elektrificeringen af banen mellem Lunderskov og Esbjerg, som udgør den første strækning i den politiske aftale om at elektrificere den danske jernbane, og som stod klar til eltog i august sidste år. Banen går gennem Vejen Kommun
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
California: Hardly any snow but not in drought again, yet Frank Gehrke, chief of the California Cooperative Snow Surveys Program for the Department of Water Resources, looks over a nearly snow barren meadow while conducting the first snow survey of the season at the Phillips Station snow course, Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2018, near Echo Summit, Calif. The snow survey showed the snow pack at this location at 1.3 inches of depth with a water content of .4 inches
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sanctuary on side of Mexican volcano could be universe model In this 2016 photo provided by Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History, INAH, researchers excavate a site on the shores of Nahualac Lagoon, at the foot of the Iztaccihuatl volcano in Mexico State, Mexico. Mexican archaeologists say they have excavated a stone sanctuary in a pond on the side of a volcano east of Mexico City that may have been built as a miniature model of the unive
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers make wearable sensors for plants, enabling measurements of water use in crops Iowa State University researchers have developed these "plant tattoo sensors" to take real-time, direct measurements of water use in crops. Credit: Liang Dong/Iowa State University Iowa State University plant scientist Patrick Schnable quickly described how he measured the time it takes for two kinds of corn plants to move water from their roots, to their lower leaves and then to their upper leav
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
BlackBerry, Baidu announce autonomous vehicle partnershipCanadian telecommunications software company BlackBerry and China's web giant Baidu on Wednesday announced a partnership for autonomous and connected vehicles.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Computer chip 'flaw' sparks security debate amid scramble for fixA newly discovered vulnerability in computer chips raised concerns Wednesday that hackers could access sensitive data on most modern systems, as technology firms sought to play down the security risks.
14h
Science | The Guardian
Why scientists need to do more about research fraud A bout 10 years ago, in my lab rat days, I moved to a large structural biology lab. As a cell biologist I had a different skillset to my new colleagues, and my new boss asked to me tackle a problem that had been eluding the rest of the lab. This was to replicate the result of an experiment performed by our cell-biological collaborators across the road. I approached the challenge with the enthusia
14h
Big Think
How Poor Sleep May Increase Your Risk of Dementia Sleep is one of the most underappreciated factors for good health. While New Year's resolutions abound with commitments to healthier diets and more exercise, few of us resolve to go to bed earlier, quit using electronic devices before bed, and improve the conditions in our bedrooms to ensure a higher quality of sleep. This is a major oversight. Sleep is a crucial component to achieving your gym
15h
Ingeniøren
Meltdown og Spectre: Enorme sikkerhedshuller fundet i CPU'er Tirsdagens rygter angående et alvorligt sikkerhedshul i Intel-processorer blev bekræftet sent onsdag aften dansk tid, da et større hold af sikkerhedsforskere fra Googles Project Zero sammen med universiteter i Østrig, USA samt Australien, tillige med flere sikkerhedfirmaer, frigav fulde detaljer omkring to sårbarheder, som holdet bag kalder for 'Meltdown' og 'Spectre'. Ifølge Googles sikkerhedsbl
15h
cognitive science
fMRI functional connectivity of the periaqueductal gray in PTSD and its dissociative subtype (2016) fMRI functional connectivity of the periaqueductal gray in PTSD and its dissociative subtype (2016) 1 point • submitted 15 hours ago by incredulitor to r/ScienceNerds
15h
cognitive science
A Neuroscientist Explores the "Sanskrit Effect" I must have missed the part about a control where they scanned people who memorized anything other than Sanskrit.
15h
cognitive science
The complete guide to marijuana and the brain (2017) A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
15h
Science | The Guardian
The government has promised more R&D. Where will the money come from? A fter decades of lobbying, the government has promised to raise UK investment in research and development (R&D) to 2.4% of gross domestic product over the next ten years. Brexit is the big catalyst. The government is using R&D investment to combat stubbornly low productivity and persistent regional inequalities before new economic challenges appear. Governments have set out vague ambitions befor
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Ingeniøren
Rotterne boltrer sig i den lune vinter I Aarhus dukker de i stigende grad op i private hjem samt i kiosker, butikker og cafeer. I Kongens Have pibler de frem i så stort antal, at gartnerne tyer til skydevåben og særligt trænede rottehunde for at komme problemet til livs. Den lune vinter har indtil videre været dejlig for rotterne og har for mange for alvor fået frygten for skadedyrene til at blusse op på denne tid af året, hvor de ger
16h
Science-Based Medicine
Legislative Alchemy 2017: Chiropractic Legislative Alchemy State legislatures routinely incorporate pseudoscience into health care practitioner licensing laws, a process I call “ Legislative Alchemy .” These laws allow health care practitioners to use bogus diagnostic methods, diagnose fabricated diseases and conditions, and sell useless remedies to their patients. Legislatures credulously adopt the self-regulated educational and test
16h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists find surprising evidence of rapid changes in the ArcticScientists have found surprising evidence of rapid climate change in the Arctic: In the middle of the Arctic Ocean near the North Pole, they discovered that the levels of radium-228 have almost doubled over the last decade.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The sixth taste? CalciumCalcium is something of a double-edged sword. Too much of the essential element is as dangerous as too little, either case adversely affecting health in animals from humans to mice to fruit flies.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Past falls can help predict an individual's risk of bone fracture independent of other factorsResults from a new study indicate that an individual's history of past falls can help predict their risk of bone fractures, independent of bone mineral density and other clinical factors.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
An unusual form of antibiotic resistance in pandemic choleraResearchers have now shown that the enzyme that makes the El Tor family of V. cholerae resistant to those antibiotics has a different mechanism of action from any comparable proteins observed in bacteria so far. Understanding that mechanism better equips researchers to overcome the challenge it presents in a world with increasing antibiotic resistance.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Engineers make wearable sensors for plants, enabling measurements of water use in cropsScientists are developing graphene-based, sensors-on-tape that can be attached to plants and can provide data to researchers and farmers about water use in crops. The technology could have many other applications, including sensors for biomedical diagnostics, for checking the structural integrity of buildings, for monitoring the environment and, with modifications, for testing crops for diseases o
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sperm-sorting device could improve IVF successWomen undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) may become pregnant with fewer treatment cycles, thanks to a new device that uses an 'obstacle course' to sort and select faster and healthier sperm cells for use in IVF treatment.
17h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Little wasp bodies mean little wasp brain regionsA new study looking at 19 species of paper wasps found that body size may lead to variation in the complex parts of their brains.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When is the right time to start infants on solid foods? Philadelphia, January 4, 2018 - The first study of a nationally-representative group of U.S. infants reports that more than half of babies are currently introduced to complementary foods, that is, foods or drinks other than breast milk or formula, sooner than they should be. Babies who were never breastfed or breastfed for less than four months were most likely to be introduced to foods too early
17h
Science | The Guardian
Which works better: climate fear, or climate hope? Well, it's complicated T here’s a debate in climate circles about whether you should try to scare the living daylights out of people, or give them hope – think images of starving polar bears on melting ice caps on the one hand, and happy families on their bikes lined with flowers and solar-powered lights on the other. The debate came to something of a head this year, after David Wallace-Wells lit up the internet with h
17h
Live Science
Bombogenesis: What's a 'Bomb Cyclone'? A bomb cyclone is forecast to form off the coast of New England on Thursday, Jan. 4, 2018. Winds are shown here moving counter-clockwise. Credit: Windy.com "Bomb cyclones" or "weather bombs" are wicked winter storms that can rival the strength of hurricanes and are so called because of the process that creates them: bombogenesis. It's a mouthful of a meteorology term that refers to a storm (gener
18h
Futurity.org
How apocalyptic language in politics messes with our morals While evoking the apocalypse can let politicians rouse people to action, it’s a risky strategy in political language because it can create false moral clarity, argues political scientist Alison McQueen. “Apocalyptic rhetoric fills a need in troubled times.” McQueen says that apocalyptic language can comfort people during crises, making wars or economically troubled times, for instance, easier to
20h
Feed: All Latest
Why the Bomb Cyclone Hitting the East Coast Is So Unusual Now, the first thing you should know about a bomb cyclone is it’s just a name—and unlike a sharknado , it’s not a literal one. The very real scientific term describes a storm that suddenly intensifies following a rapid drop in atmospheric pressure. Bombing out, or “bombogenesis,” is when a cyclone’s central pressure drops 24 millibars or more in 24 hours, bringing furious winds that can quickly c
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New lithium-rich battery could last much longerBy using iron and oxygen to simultaneously drive the electrochemical reaction, a novel battery is less expensive and has a higher capacity.
21h
Big Think
How Does LSD Induce Short-Term Psychosis but Long-Term Optimism? When most people think of LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide) ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­the image that comes to mind is hallucinating hippies at Woodstock, but the drug’s original use was psychotherapeutic. As early as the 1960s, researchers showed that LSD reduces depression, anxiety and pain in patients with advanced cancer, and recent years have seen a resurgence of interest in the drug’s bene
21h
Popular Science
That flickering 'alien megastructure' star is probably just dusty Three hundred and ninety parsecs away from Earth, a star dimmed in a weird way. Then it did it again. Astronomers wondered what the heck they were seeing, and speculation abounded, including the appealing possibility that it might be evidence of an alien megastructure . But now a closer look , published in Astrophysical Journal Letters and authored by over 200 researchers, finds that the star’s d
22h
Scientific American Content: Global
Air Force Tracks Final Frontier “There’s three strategic trends that I see in space.” General Jay Raymond, Commander of Air Force Space Command in Colorado Springs. He recently visited Scientific American to talk about Space Command, which is responsible for space and cyber for the Air Force. “One is space is congested …we track 23,000 objects in space. We provide the conjunction assessment warning, if you will, so for
22h
Big Think
New Study Links Brain Injuries to "Acquired Sociopathy" How much of breaking legal or moral laws has to do with free will and how much with circumstances beyond our control has been fodder for philosophical debate for millennia. Mostly, this surrounded socioeconomic and political factors. The introduction of science ushered in whole other aspects. Those with certain genetic mutations for instance, specifically the gene variant MAOA , are more likely
22h
Futurity.org
Why self-folding objects get stuck Sticking points are simply intrinsic to structures designed to fold themselves, according to new research. Scientists and engineers are fascinated by self-folding structures. Imagine the possibilities: Heart stents that unfold in the right location or pop-up tents that assemble at the press of a button, as well as nanoscale versions for tiny machines. But sometimes these structures get stuck duri
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diabetes increases over time in children but adults account for most new cases in China Although China remains one of the countries with the lowest incidence of type 1 diabetes globally, a study published by The BMJ today shows that there has been a rapid increase in the number of new cases (incidence) of the condition in under 15s in the past two decades. The findings also show that most new cases of type 1 diabetes in China are diagnosed in adults, leading to calls for more resour
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Could sugar be responsible for the obesity and diabetes epidemics? The idea that sugar could be a fundamental cause of the global obesity and diabetes epidemics, with deleterious effects on the human body that go beyond just empty calories, should be considered seriously again, argues journalist and author Gary Taubes in The BMJ today. In the midst of such a huge public health crisis, Taubes says "we must do more to discourage consumption while we improve our
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Impact of US pay for performance programs 'limited and disappointing' say experts The impact of pay for performance programs in US hospitals has been "limited and disappointing" say experts in a study published by The BMJ today. Their findings show that care for older patients was no better at hospitals that had been operating under pay for performance programs for more than a decade compared with those which had only been under financial incentives for less than three years.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The BMJ reveals hundreds of drug company deals that commissioning groups fail to declare Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) in England have accepted hundreds of payments from drug companies that they have not disclosed to patients and the public, reveals an investigation by The BMJ today. Publicly declared payments include tickets to top sports matches and a Beyoncé concert. Yet only two thirds of the 4,600 payments - and a quarter of the value - that CCGs accepted from private c
22h
Futurity.org
Two experts don’t quite buy the 3D-printing hype New manufacturing technologies will transform the way we produce things, but can we expect everything to come off a 3D printer? Mirko Meboldt, professor of product development and engineering design at ETH Zurich and Torbjörn Netland, assistant professor of production and operations management, discuss the potential—and reality—of the situation: The post Two experts don’t quite buy the 3D-printin
22h
Futurity.org
Device quiets ‘phantom sounds’ of tinnitus In a recent small study, people suffering from tinnitus reported that the loudness of their symptoms decreased and their tinnitus-related quality of life improved after using a new device daily for four weeks. A sham “treatment” using just sounds did not produce such effects. “If we can stop these signals, we can stop tinnitus. That is what our approach attempts to do…” Based on years of scientif
22h
Futurity.org
Spider web-inspired implant could change insulin delivery Researchers have created a method for implanting hundreds of thousands of insulin-producing pancreatic cell clusters into diabetes patients to help manage the disease. A thin hydrogel coating protects the cell clusters, which researchers attach to a polymer thread that can be removed or replaced when the cells have outlived their usefulness. In Type 1 diabetes, the body’s immune system destroys t
23h
Futurity.org
These exercises took 3 years off of aging faces A 30-minute daily or alternate-day facial exercise program sustained over 20 weeks improved the facial appearance of middle-aged women, resulting in a younger appearance with fuller upper and lower cheeks, report researchers. “Now there is some evidence that facial exercises may improve facial appearance and reduce some visible signs of aging,” says lead author Murad Alam, vice chair and professo
23h
NYT > Science
Why So Cold? Climate Change May Be Part of the Answer Why So Cold? Climate Change May Be Part of the Answer Niagara Falls, on the border of New York and Ontario, on Wednesday. Scientists are studying how climate change is influencing cold snaps in North America and Europe. Credit Aaron Lynett/Reuters Want the latest climate news in your inbox? You can sign up here to receive Climate Fwd: , our new email newsletter. As bitter cold continues to grip m
23h
Live Science
When You're Sick, Your Face Is a Dead Giveaway When a sick person walks into a room, there's a good chance that people around them can tell something's off — even if they aren't coughing, blowing their nose or exhibiting any other obvious signs of illness, according to a small new study. In the study, published today (Jan. 3) in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Biological Sciences , researchers demonstrated that people ar
23h
The Scientist RSS
Alcohol Damages Mice DNAA byproduct of alcohol consumption causes mutations in the DNA of mouse blood stem cells, and some of the breaks are not repaired.
23h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
A Little Accident Makes For Big Damage On The Gold Claim | Gold Rush #GoldRush | Friday 9p Juan's 600-pound chrome and aluminum fender is hanging on by a single mount after hitting a rock straight on. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twitter.com/Discov
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Cast a Spell with a Bolivian Witch | La Paz, Bolivia 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe for NEW EPISODES Every Friday - Tuesday: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Meet Yvette Paz Soldan, a local witch in La Paz, Bolivia. Bolivian society has a place for the magical and the unexplained and these traditions of the Aymara run deep in Yvette's veins. Witness her traditions as she crafts potions and formulas at a magical place in the mountains. Follow her and experience the magic for yours
23h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Fight Back with the Cholitas | La Paz, Bolivia 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe for NEW EPISODES Every Friday - Tuesday: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Meet Silvina Huañapacovilela, a member of a group of women who call themselves Cholitas in La Paz, Bolivia. Victims of domestic violence, these Cholitas channel their experiences into the wrestling ring inspiring one another as well as their loyal spectators. Come meet these strong and fearless women who are not afraid to fi
23h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Space Ship Architecture Lands in Bolivia | La Paz, Bolivia 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe for NEW EPISODES Every Friday - Tuesday: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Meet Freddy Mamani Silvestre, considered an architectural renegade in La Paz, Bolivia. Freddy has created a new architectural style injecting the traditionally monochromatic buildings of his home with beautiful colorful inspirations. Join him as he reveals what's influenced his eccentric color palettes and far out designs. F
23h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Mountaintop Sunset | La Paz, Bolivia 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe for NEW EPISODES Every Friday - Tuesday: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Take in a spectacular sunset view from high up in the Andes in La Cumbre, Bolivia. For the most immersive experience of our amazing 360 content download the Discovery VR app: http://www.discoveryvr.com Experience Discovery TRVLR in-headset exclusively on your Google Cardboard or Google Daydream View! http://vr.google.com/day
23h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Watch the Sun Rise Over La Paz | La Paz, Bolivia 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe for NEW EPISODES Every Friday - Tuesday: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Watch the sun rise over the highest capital city in the world and experience the early sounds and visions of La Paz. For the most immersive experience of our amazing 360 content download the Discovery VR app: http://www.discoveryvr.com Experience Discovery TRVLR in-headset exclusively on your Google Cardboard or Google Daydr
23h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Ride With the Cockroach Kingpin | Cape Town, South Africa 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe for NEW EPISODES Every Friday - Tuesday: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Meet Sakhile Mtambeka, a leader of the Cockroach Cab industry, a dicey taxi service that provides rides for the people of his township. Jump into a cab with him for a journey and see what a day is like for this enterprising South African. Although life is tough in these unprivileged neighborhoods of Cape Town, the ingenuity
23h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Meet the Last Bushmen | Cape Town, South Africa 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe for NEW EPISODES Every Friday - Tuesday: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Meet Bradley van Sitters, a member of one of the oldest tribes in human history, as he shares the practices and traditions to preserve the rituals of the Khoisan people. Join him and his tribe as they engage in an ancient water ritual in an attempt to end a deadly drought that has been plaguing the land. For the most immersi
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Groove to Unifying Vibes | Cape Town, South Africa 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe for NEW EPISODES Every Friday - Tuesday: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Meet George Kikinis, a charismatic musician who jams in a band called The Steezies. His Zulu neighbors have been stranded in temporary housing called Three Months Estate since their town burned down and he's doing what he can to bring awareness to their plight. He dreams of staging a music festival that unites his largely wh
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
A Brilliant Sunrise in Cape Town | Cape Town, South Africa 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe for NEW EPISODES Every Friday - Tuesday: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Watch the sun rise at Grand Parade, Cape Town's historic main public square. In 1990, after being released from 27 years in prison, Nelson Mandela addressed South Africa for the first time in this square. Look for the balcony on the Old Town Hall where a free Mandela made his historic address. For the most immersive experien
23h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Soak Up a Cape Town Ocean Sunset | Cape Town, South Africa 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe for NEW EPISODES Every Friday - Tuesday: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Really one of the most stunning places in the world, stand on top of Signal Hill in Cape Town, South Africa and check out majestic Table Mountain. Stare at the incredible ocean view as you contemplate how the mountain got its name! For the most immersive experience of our amazing 360 content download the Discovery VR app: ht
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Visit the Bizarre Island of Dolls | Mexico City, Mexico 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe for NEW EPISODES Every Friday - Tuesday: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Paddle to a a bizzare island for an unexpected surprise. Meet Don Domingo Campos, a lifelong resident of the ancient Aztec neighborhood of Xochimilco. He will navigate us to a misty island where what is discovered will surprise you. For the most immersive experience of our amazing 360 content download the Discovery VR app: h
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Meet the Guardian of Death | Mexico City, Mexico 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe for NEW EPISODES Every Friday - Tuesday: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Follow an uncommon band of worshippers looking for redemption. Meet Enriqueta Romero, the guardian of the shrine to Santa Muerte in Tepito, Mexico. Join the monthly ceremony where people down on their luck pray for forgiveness from Santa Muerte. For the most immersive experience of our amazing 360 content download the Discov
23h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Meet the Last Tightrope Dancer | Yerevan, Armenia 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe now so you don’t miss an episode: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Meet Hovsep Beglaryan, one of the last living Armenian tightrope dancers. An orphan, Hovesp was trained by Zhora and Knyaz, once fierce competitors who united over their dedication to keep this art alive. Tightrope dancing, once an extremely respected art, has been fading from existence in recent years. A few decades ago there were
23h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Spectacular Yerevan Sunset | Yerevan, Armenia 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe now so you don't miss an episode: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Welcome to Sevan, an amazing resort town located high above sea level. Lake Sevan, known as "the jewel of Armenia", is an epic fresh water lake that supplies the majority of Armenia's fish capture. Look for the medieval monastery on an island on the lake. For the most immersive experience of our amazing 360 content download the Dis
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Daybreak in Yerevan’s Stunning Town Square | Yerevan, Armenia 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe now so you don't miss an episode: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Experience the early sounds and visions of Yerevan. Experience a sunrise in one of the world’s most beautiful town squares, Republic Square, in Yerevan, Armenia. See the city wake up as if you're actually right there. Before the independence of Armenia, this square was called Lenin Square. A statue of the Soviet leader Vladimir Len
23h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Blaze the Impenetrable Forest | Yerevan, Armenia 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe now so you don't miss an episode: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Meet Tom Allen, a trailblazing explorer with an impressive mission: to build a 2000-mile trail through an impenetrable forest in the mountains of Armenia. Follow a community of volunteers creating trails with their bare hands with Discovery TRVLR. For the most immersive experience of our amazing 360 content download the Discovery V
23h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Descend Into a Holy Dungeon | Yerevan, Armenia 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe now so you don't miss an episode: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Descend into a holy Armenian dungeon and learn how what happened here shaped Christianity forever. Descend into a dungeon with an Armenian priest, Taron Ghoulekyan, to witness how he's keeping ancient Armenian rituals alive. Learn what happened here, over 1700 years ago, shook the foundations of faith and changed the world forever.
23h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Zip Down Armenia's Longest Zipline | Yerevan, Armenia 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe now so you don't miss an episode: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Meet Tigran Chibukhchyan, an adrenaline junkie in Yerevan, Armenia whose created his country's longest, most magnificent zipline. His dream is to build the most extreme sports amusement park in the world and you'll learn his philosophy behind wanting to give people the greatest thrill of their lives. For the most immersive experien
23h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Mexico’s Transgender Superstar Wrestler | Mexico City, Mexico 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe for NEW EPISODES Every Friday - Tuesday: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Fly off the ropes with a spectacular lucha libre wrestler. Discovery TRVLR takes you to meet Wendy Martinez, better known to wrestling fans as Miss Gaviota, a hard-core entertainer in Mexico City. Visit the world-famous Arena Naucalpan, where Wendy made her debut as a transgender wrestler. Her moves are unconventional and he
23h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
The Sunset Steps of Acazulco | Mexico City, Mexico 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe for NEW EPISODES Every Friday - Tuesday: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Incredible sunset in San Jerónimo Acazulco, a town one hour southwest of Mexico City. As the sun fades away, check out the beauty of this dynamic community that sits on the edge of La Marquesa National Park. For the most immersive experience of our amazing 360 content download the Discovery VR app: http://www.discoveryvr.com
23h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Amazing Sunrise In Coyoacán | Mexico City, Mexico 360 VR Video | Discovery TRVLR Subscribe for NEW EPISODES Every Friday - Tuesday: https://goo.gl/bnzvkQ Your journey begins in the Mexico City’s historic center, the neighborhood of Coyoacán or “place of coyotes.” Hundreds of years ago, Mexico City was a soggy maze of 45 rivers and five lakes atop an ancient volcano. Over the centuries, the city has experienced destruction both by human and natural causes but its people are re
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stem cell transplant for severe scleroderma improves survival, quality of life New clinical trial findings show that a therapeutic regimen involving transplantation of a person's own blood-forming stem cells can improve survival and quality of life for people with severe scleroderma, a life-threatening autoimmune Adisease. The regimen, known as myeloablative autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), includes chemotherapy and total body radiation to destroy the b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows stem cell transplant is better than drug therapy for scleroderma DURHAM, N.C. -- Scleroderma with internal organ involvement is a debilitating and lethal autoimmune disorder with few effective treatments. But a study led by Duke Health researchers has found new cause for optimism using an aggressive stem cell transplant regimen. The researchers, publishing in the Jan. 4 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine , found significantly improved survival among
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NYT > Science
What Is a ‘Bomb Cyclone,’ or Bombogenesis? Video Is a ‘Bomb Cyclone’ as Scary as It Sounds? Bomb cyclones have been referred to as “winter hurricanes.” Our science reporter explains how they really work. By DREW JORDAN and CHRIS CIRILLO on Publish Date January 3, 2018. Photo by Bill Sikes/Associated Press. Watch in Times Video » A powerful winter storm has brought snow to the South and fears of whiteout conditions in the Northeast. Read m
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
After a breakthrough 2017, the race for augmented reality headset heats up in Silicon Valley Augmented reality is roaring back to prominence as one of Silicon Valley's favorite frontier technologies, nearly three years after Google's brief, unsuccessful run at the market with its infamous smart glasses. When criticism of the Google Glass over privacy and safety concerns led some bars and restaurants to ban the then-$1,500 smart glasses, the future of mixing artificial graphics with real-
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