Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum 'spooky action at a distance' becoming practical Scientists from Griffith University (Australia) have overcome a major challenge connected to Einstein's 'spooky action at a distance' effect. Credit: Griffith University A team from Griffith's Centre for Quantum Dynamics in Australia have demonstrated how to rigorously test if pairs of photons - particles of light - display Einstein's "spooky action at a distance", even under adverse conditions t
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Science | The Guardian
Oceans suffocating as huge dead zones quadruple since 1950, scientists warn Ocean dead zones with zero oxygen have quadrupled in size since 1950, scientists have warned, while the number of very low oxygen sites near coasts have multiplied tenfold. Most sea creatures cannot survive in these zones and current trends would lead to mass extinction in the long run, risking dire consequences for the hundreds of millions of people who depend on the sea. Climate change caused b
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Ingeniøren
Aarhus Letbane mangler fire godkendelser af næste strækning – ingen ansøgninger er afleveret Hele fire godkendelser mangler Aarhus Letbane for at få lov til at tage næste strækning, de ca. 30 km mellem banegården i den jyske hovedby og Odder. Det fremgår af en mailudveksling, som Ingeniøren har haft med Trafikstyrelsen og med selskabet bag letbanen. Dermed kan det have lange udsigter, inden pendlerne syd for Aarhus igen kan køre med tog. Banen skulle have været åbnet i november, og passa
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Batman's Gotham City provides test case for community resilience modelIf a community is resilient, it can withstand and recover from an unanticipated disaster, like an earthquake, fire or flood. But since every disaster and every community is unique, a uniform measure for defining 'resilience' has been hard to come by for engineers and social scientists. A new study offers an innovative approach to defining resilience that could help communities better prepare for h
6min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Use of mobile devices at home can carry conflict to workplace, study saysResearchers have found that using a mobile device at home for work purposes has negative implications for the employee's work life and also their spouse.
5min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Radiation therapy algorithm could reduce side effects, maintain effect against tumorsA mathematical model for computing radiation therapy treatments could substantially reduce patient side effects while delivering the same results as conventional radiation therapy.
5min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Geopolitical risks to US oil supply lowest since the early 1970sThe geopolitical risks to the United States' oil supply are the lowest since the early 1970s, due to fracking, climate action and a more diverse global supply, according to a new paper. America's energy prosperity contrasts with a more fraught period for energy-exporting countries where geopolitical challenges have been compounded by fiscal stress and rising domestic energy demand, the authors sai
5min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Excess fat disrupts heart cell's energy systemA new study finds that lipid overload in heart cells, a common feature in diabetes and obesity, leads to misshapen mitochondria that don't produce energy efficiently. This structural disruption may contribute to the two- to five-fold increased risk of heart failure in people with diabetes.
5min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First discover the disorder and then find the patientsBiochemists have confirmed the cause of initially unclear symptoms of patients in Israel. Their studies reveal that the patients suffer from a disorder called 'MPS III-E'. It was discovered by the researchers in 2012. However, until now there were no known patients.
5min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In scientific first, IU researchers grow hairy skin in a dishResearchers have successfully developed a method to grow hairy skin from mouse pluripotent stem cells -- a discovery that could lead to new approaches to model disease and new therapies for the treatment of skin disorders and cancers.
5min
New Scientist - News
How to protect yourself from the Meltdown and Spectre bugs Hackers get a new tool Sergei Konkov/Tass/Getty By Leah Crane Thanks to an enormous security flaw, almost all the computer processors in the world are vulnerable to attack . Problems with processors built by Intel, AMD, and ARM are letting attackers access areas of your computer’s memory that ought to be secure. Fixing this problem could lead to slowdowns of up to 30 per cent. But don’t panic
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New Scientist - News
Arsonist falcons suggest birds discovered fire before humans did Auscape International Pty Ltd/Alamy Stock Photo By Andy Coghlan Some birds of prey have learned to control fire, a skill previously thought to be unique to humans. The birds appear to deliberately spread wildfires in order to flush out prey. The finding suggests that birds may have beaten us to the use of fire. There are many anecdotes about Australian birds of prey using fire, according to ornit
22min
New Scientist - News
Tackle UK’s killer toxic air before waging war on ocean plastic Levels of air pollution are dangerously high in many UK cities Guy Bell/Alamy Stock Photo Two things are almost certain to happen soon. UK environment secretary Michael Gove, moved to urgent action, will publish a plan to tackle plastic pollution. At about the same time, the annual limits on toxic air will be passed in at least one part of London – even though it’s only January – and be large
22min
New Scientist - News
How besieged ants decide when it’s time to abandon their nests Alex Wild/alexanderwild.com By Joshua Rapp Learn Colonies of turtle ants behave as if they are playing a game of Risk. They spread out their forces to control more resources, but also retreat if their position is not defensible. “They’re sensitive to changes in the environment. They can change the allocation of their defenses in response to that,” says Matina Donaldson-Matasci at Harvey Mudd
22min
The Scientist RSS
Maternal Response to Zika Damages Mouse FetusesSignaling pathways triggered by the mother's immune system may cause complications during fetal development.
25min
Popular Science
All the cool new friends you'll meet when you drink raw water Do you ever feel like your drinking water is just too clean ? Last week, The New York Times reported on a trendy new beverage known as raw water. Yes: people are spending loads on unfiltered, untreated, and totally unsterilized spring water. “It has a vaguely mild sweetness, a nice smooth mouth feel, nothing that overwhelms the flavor profile,” Kevin Freeman, a shift manager at San Francisco’s Ra
30min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study on super-silenced DNA hints at new ways to reprogram cells Enhanced reprogramming of skin cells (blue) to liver-like cells (red and green) by reducing expression of a repressive protein. Credit: The laboratory of Ken Zaret, PhD, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Newly described stretches of super-silenced DNA reveal a fresh approach to reprogram cell identity to use in regenerative medicine studies and one day in the clinic, accordi
31min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team publishes research on unusual gene evolution in bacteria A Chilean cicada, which hosts particularly unusual symbiotic bacteria. Credit: Piotr Lukasik University of Montana researchers have made another discovery at the cellular level to help understand the basic processes of all life on our planet - this time within the unusual bacteria that has lived inside cicada insects since dinosaurs roamed Earth. During the past 70 million years, the bacteria und
31min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Molecular imaging technique identifies lung nodules for resection in osteosarcoma patient IMAGE: Osteosarcoma metastases display in situ fluorescence during intraoperative molecular imaging. Four hours after delivery of OTL38, osteosarcoma metastases display fluorescence during real-time molecular imaging. This technology may help surgeons localize... view more Credit: Jarrod Predina, Andrew Newton, Charuhas Deshpande, and Sunil Singhal of The Perelman School of Medicine at the Univer
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New on MIT Technology Review
DeepMind’s Cofounder Thinks AI Should Get Ethical in 2018 This Question Helps Reveal How Slippery Online Harassment Is to Define A new Pew Research Center study hints at why social networks rarely seem to get harassment issues right. A sample question: Alice has a disagreement with Bob. Alice forwards it to Clare, who posts it online. Bob gets unkind and vulgar messages, and is… Read more A new Pew Research Center study hints at why social networks ra
39min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Super-silenced DNA study hints at new ways to reprogram cellsNewly described stretches of super-silenced DNA reveal a fresh approach to reprogram cell identity to use in regenerative medicine studies and one day in the clinic.
40min
Live Science
Brrrr! Why It's So $#%*! Cold This temperature anomaly map is based on data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer on NASA's Terra satellite. It shows land surface temperatures from Dec. 26, 2017 to Jan. 2, 2018, compared with the 2001–2010 average for the same eight-day period. Credit: NASA Earth Observatory The " bomb cyclone ," with its whipping winds and foot-plus snowdrifts, has passed, but even more te
48min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
University of Montana publishes research on unusual gene evolution in bacteria IMAGE: A Chilean cicada, which hosts particularly unusual symbiotic bacteria. view more Credit: Piotr Lukasik MISSOULA - University of Montana researchers have made another discovery at the cellular level to help understand the basic processes of all life on our planet - this time within the unusual bacteria that has lived inside cicada insects since dinosaurs roamed Earth. During the past
53min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penn study on super-silenced DNA hints at new ways to reprogram cells IMAGE: Enhanced reprogramming of skin cells (blue) to liver-like cells (red and green) by reducing expression of a repressive protein. view more Credit: The laboratory of Ken Zaret, PhD, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania PHILADELPHIA - Newly described stretches of super-silenced DNA reveal a fresh approach to reprogram cell identity to use in regenerative medicine studie
53min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum 'spooky action at a distance' becoming practicalScientists from Griffith University have overcome a major challenge in applying a strange quantum effect to real applications.
53min
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Researchers unlocking potential for next-generation medical scanning Researchers have developed a new way to magnetise molecules found naturally in the human body, paving the way for a new generation of low-cost magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology that would transform our ability to diagnose and treat diseases including cancer, diabetes and dementia. While still in the early stages, research reported today in the journal Science Advances has made significa
53min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immune response to Zika virus contributes to fetal harmThe same proteins that mount a potent immune response to Zika viral infection can also harm the placenta and fetal development, according to a Yale-led study published in Science Immunology.
53min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How Zika infection drives fetal demise IMAGE: When human placental tissue (fluorescence microscopy image shown) is exposed to interferon-β, it develops syncytial knots, which appear as protruding bulges, not seen in healthy tissue. view more Credit: Yockey et al., Science Immunology (2018) A powerful antiviral protein may act as a checkpoint for keeping or ending a pregnancy. When exposed to Zika virus before birth, mouse
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Scientific American Content: Global
Bonobos Prefer "Jerks" Over Helpers Bonobos Prefer "Jerks" Over Helpers A new study shows joining “jerks” provides unexpected benefits for bonobos. Tags: Advertisement Related Video Every Issue. Every Year. 1845 - Present Neuroscience. Evolution. Health. Chemistry. Physics. Technology. Subscribe Now! Bonobos Prefer "Jerks" Over Helpers A new study shows joining “jerks” provides unexpected benefits for bonobos.
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The Atlantic
Photos of the Week: Bomb Cyclone, Giant Gorilla, Legal Marijuana A buffalo herd runs in Hungary, Potato the corgi runs in Boston, protests erupt in Iran, a “bomb cyclone” hits the northeastern U.S., the Ten-Thousand Buddha Cave reopens in China, Niagara Falls freezes up, the new year is ushered in, and much more.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New tool to assess largely ignored risk in pharmaceutical industryA new method to test the likelihood of a drug turning into a potentially harmful version of itself when it enters the body has been developed by researchers.
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Live Science
NASA Goes for 'GOLD' to Scan the Border of Earth and Space A new NASA mission, the first to hitch a ride on a commercial communications satellite, will examine Earth's upper atmosphere to see how the boundary between Earth and space changes over time. Researchers discussed the new mission, which will launch Jan. 25 from Kourou, French Guiana, attached to the SES-14 communications satellite, in a live video from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Cente
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers unlocking potential for next-generation medical scanning Researchers have developed a new way to magnetise molecules found naturally in the human body, paving the way for a new generation of low-cost magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology that would transform our ability to diagnose and treat diseases including cancer, diabetes and dementia. While still in the early stages, research reported today in the journal Science Advances has made significa
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ocean acidification means major changes for California mussels, researcher says McCoy and her team found that ocean acidification has begun to change California mussel shells on a basic structural level. Credit: Sophie McCoy Accelerating ocean acidification could be transforming the fundamental structure of California mussel shells, according to a new report from a Florida State University-led team of scientists. For thousands of years, California mussel shells have shared a
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Big Think
Imagine All the Trees Are Gone — Maybe You Don’t Want To. They’re everywhere. No wonder we take them for granted at times. Trees. Sure, we know they absorb CO2 and produce oxygen we need — that’s certainly a big deal. But recently, Alton Cedar Greenhouses , a UK company that designs and builds greenhouses framed in cedar, dug deeper into just how much we depend on them. They’ve created an infographic that lays it all out, showing how the benefits trees
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Radiation therapy algorithm could reduce side effects, maintain effect against tumors Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a mathematical model for computing radiation therapy treatments that could substantially reduce patient side effects while delivering the same results as conventional radiation therapy. Cancer patients who receive radiotherapy to destroy their tumors are given a total dose of radiation split into multiple equal treatments delivered ove
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Temperature may affect pollen colorWhile studies on flowers' petal-color variation abound, new research looks at differences in the performance of pollen under varied environmental conditions based on its color.
1h
NYT > Science
A Fragile Biblical Text Gets a Virtual Read Dr. Seales had not tackled a codex, which unlike a scroll has writing on both sides. Tests with a parchment mock-up constructed by Dr. Dilley suggested that the technique would work. But Maria L. Fredericks, the Morgan Library’s head book conservator, had determined that the little codex was unfit to travel. She displayed a loose page and a dish of small fragments that have dropped off the charre
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Depression in black adolescents requires different treatmentBlack adolescents express depressive symptoms differently than people from other age and racial groups, requiring that clinicians take this into account when developing treatment plans, according to a new study led by a Rutgers University-Camden researcher.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
ASK the enzyme: New potential targets for cancerNew understandings of how molecules affect the activity of an enzyme could lead to potential targets for the treatment of cancers and neurodegenerative diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Effectiveness of booster seats investigatedBooster seats, car seats and seat belts are equally effective at saving the lives of children, while booster seats top the others at reducing minor injuries specifically among children ages 8-12, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Supercharged antibiotics could turn tide against superbugsAn old drug supercharged by researchers has emerged as a new antibiotic that could destroy some of the world's most dangerous superbugs. The supercharge technique potentially could revitalize other antibiotics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mirror neuron activity predicts people's decision-making in moral dilemmasNew research suggests that scientists could make a good guess based on how the brain responds when people watch someone else experience pain. The study found that those responses predict whether people will be inclined to avoid causing harm to others when facing moral dilemmas.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Landmark genetic study better predicts stomach cancerAlthough stomach cancer is treatable if detected early, diagnosis often occurs at an advanced stage, resulting in high mortality. A new study has identified genetic patterns in intestinal metaplasia (a precondition for stomach cancer) which help predict the development of this life-threatening cancer. The discovery could enable targeted screening and earlier detection of stomach cancer, leading to
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ocean acidification means major changes for California mussels, FSU researcher saysAccelerating ocean acidification could be transforming the fundamental structure of California mussel shells, according to a new report from a Florida State University-led team of scientists.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Geopolitical risks to US oil supply lowest since the early 1970s HOUSTON - (Jan. 5, 2018) - The geopolitical risks to the United States' oil supply are the lowest since the early 1970s, due to fracking, climate action and a more diverse global supply, according to a new paper by experts at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy. America's energy prosperity contrasts with a more fraught period for energy-exporting countries where geopolitical chall
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Radiation therapy algorithm could reduce side effects, maintain effect against tumors Researchers at North Carolina State University have developed a mathematical model for computing radiation therapy treatments that could substantially reduce patient side effects while delivering the same results as conventional radiation therapy. Cancer patients who receive radiotherapy to destroy their tumors are given a total dose of radiation split into multiple equal treatments delivered o
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Use of mobile devices at home can carry conflict to workplace, UTA study says IMAGE: This is Wayne Crawford, assistant professor of management in UTA's College of Business. view more Credit: UT Arlington A University of Texas at Arlington researcher is part of a team of authors who have found that using a mobile device at home for work purposes has negative implications for the employee's work life and also their spouse. Wayne Crawford, assistant professor of managem
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Batman's Gotham City provides test case for community resilience model IMAGE: A map of Gotham City is laid out in a Finite Element Analysis grid. The grid shows recovery of different lifelines, and how they affect recovery of various parts of... view more Credit: Hussam Mahmoud and Akshat Chulahwat/Colorado State University If a community is resilient, it can withstand and recover from an unanticipated disaster, like an earthquake, fire or flood. But since
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Temperature may affect pollen color While studies on flowers' petal-color variation abound, new research looks at differences in the performance of pollen under varied environmental conditions based on its color. In the New Phtyologist study of the North American herb Campanula americana, investigators found that differential heat tolerance among pollen color variants could contribute to geographic variation in pollen pigmentation.
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Viden
Undgå løbeskader: Her er 3 råd og 2 myter Et nyt år er begyndt, og flere hopper i løbeskoene i håbet om at ryste julefedtet af sidebenene. Men pas på med at være for ivrig. Løb er nemlig den motionsform, hvor flest får skader. Det viser en undersøgelse fra Idrættens Analyseinstitut. Og det kan være frustrerende, når smerter i for eksempel knæet eller hælen tvinger dig til at stoppe din nytårskur. Her får du tre råd til at undgå løbeskade
2h
Live Science
Rudeness Wins: Bonobos Are Attracted to Creeps Fizi, an adult male bonobo at Lola ya Bonobo Sanctuary in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. A new study of these African apes hints at how human cooperation came to be. Credit: Christopher Krupenye, Duke University "You like me because I'm a scoundrel," interstellar smuggler Han Solo confidently told Princess Leia Organa in the 1981 film "The Empire Strikes Back." And scientists recently disc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Excess fat disrupts heart cell's energy system IMAGE: The image shows mitochondria from normal heart (left) and lipid overloaded heart (right). Excess fat results in more numerous, more contorted mitochondria. These misshapen mitochondria do not produce energy as... view more Credit: E. Dale Abel Lab, University of Iowa A University of Iowa study has identified how excess fat in the heart, a common feature in diabetes and obesity, can h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows treeshrews break evolutionary 'rules' Credit: stock.adobe.com/Yale University A new study has exposed the common treeshrew, a small and skittish mammal that inhabits the tropical forests of Southeast Asia, as an ecogeographical rule breaker. According to the study—published in the journal Ecology and Evolution —Tupaia glis, the common treeshrew, defies two widely tested rules that describe patterns of geographical variation within sp
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'Downsizing': A Brief History of Putting Small Things in Movies Hobbits, fairies, Dr. Septimus Pretorius’ people in bell jars—Hollywood has been miniaturizing things in movies for decades. But ever since Pretorius put ballerinas and kings behind glass in Bride of Frankenstein in 1935, filmmakers have used many different methods to make people appear small onscreen. Back in the 1930s, it was done by filming two different sets of shots that were composited toge
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spend next New Year's eve with New Horizons Artist's impression of NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft encountering 2014 MU69, a Kuiper Belt object that orbits one billion miles (1.6 billion kilometers) beyond Pluto, on Jan. 1, 2019. Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute/Steve Gribben The New Year's celebration to usher in 2019 will include an event like no other – more than four billion m
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows treeshrews break evolutionary 'rules' New Haven, Conn. -- A new study has exposed the common treeshrew, a small and skittish mammal that inhabits the tropical forests of Southeast Asia, as an ecogeographical rule breaker. According to the study -- published in the journal Ecology and Evolution -- Tupaia glis, the common treeshrew, defies two widely tested rules that describe patterns of geographical variation within species: the isla
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ultrafine fibers have exceptional strength CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- Researchers at MIT have developed a process that can produce ultrafine fibers -- whose diameter is measured in nanometers, or billionths of a meter -- that are exceptionally strong and tough. These fibers, which should be inexpensive and easy to produce, could be choice materials for many applications, such as protective armor and nanocomposites. The new process, called gel el
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research paves the way for treatment strategies of multidrug-resistant chronic infectionsA new study published in Cell Press finds that antibiotic treatment of chronic infections can be optimized by targeting vulnerabilities of antibiotic-resistant pathogens paving the way for more effective treatment strategies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Room-temperature multiferroic thin films and their properties IMAGE: Spontaneous polarization appears to be parallel with the c-axis, while spontaneous magnetism appears to be parallel with the a-axis. view more Credit: None Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tohoku University have developed high-quality GFO epitaxial films and systematically investigated their ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties. They also demonstra
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The Atlantic
Justin Timberlake Is Bringing Sexy Robots Back For how long have people been dreaming about sexy robots? Scholars answer the question with the ancient Greek myth of the sculptor Pygmalion kissing a statue that had come to life. These days, Westworld , Ex Machina , and real-life inventors make human-hardware humping seem imminent. Music has linked the synthetic and the carnal at least since Giorgio Moroder and Donna Summer transformed pop in 1
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Ingeniøren
Energistyrelsen: I 2025 vil Danmark mangle forbrændingsovne til affald Danmark rider lige nu på en bølge af overkapacitet til forbrænding af affald. Faktisk så stor en overkapacitet, at vi i 2015 importerede 350.000 ton affald for at holde forbrændingsovnene kørende. Men en ny analyse fra Energistyrelsen spår, at denne bølge vil knække i 2025, hvorefter der vil blive produceret mere affald, end vi har kapacitet til at forbrænde. Og det bør give stof til eftertanke,
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Live Science
Breast Implants Linked to a Rare Cancer: How Big Is the Risk? Women with breast implants are at increased risk of developing a rare type of cancer of the immune system , but the overall chance of getting this cancer from implants is very low, according to a new study from the Netherlands. The study provides one of the most precise estimates to date of the risk for women with breast implants of developing this cancer, which is called anaplastic large c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Proceed to checkout? Not on your mobile, say researchers Shoppers hoping to bag a bargain in the post-Christmas sales are much less likely to go through with their purchases if they are using phones and tablets to buy goods online. This is because consumers often worry they are not seeing the full picture on a mobile app or that they could be missing out on special offers or overlooking hidden costs, according to new research. Concerns about privacy an
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Dana Foundation
New Year’s Resolution: Successful Aging & Your Brain The beginning of a new year usually starts with resolutions–to eat healthier, to exercise more, or to improve quality of life in some way. Keeping your brain healthy, understanding how the brain works, and learning how to maximize brain function should be added to that list! Good mental health or “cognitive fitness” are as important to a good overall quality of life as physical health– in fact, t
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Popular Science
Can it be too cold to snow? All anyone can talk about this week is the weather . Wind chill advisories have been issued for most of the midwestern United States . Snow fell in Florida . And the PopSci offices have been transformed into a treacherous snow globe as a so-called “bomb cyclone” whallops New York City with snow . As we sit here shivering and typing (and typing and shivering) we can’t help but wonder: Will it even
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The Scientist RSS
New Initiatives Offer Jobs, Funding to Women OnlyTo correct gender disparities in academic science, the Max Planck Society and the Australian government are taking the uncommonly direct approach of affirmative action.
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Live Science
Real-Life 'Game of Thrones' Tale Told in Medieval Scroll A team of researchers in New Zealand is working to make an astonishing and mysterious medieval document available for public consumption. The 600-year-old "Canterbury Roll" dates to the Wars of the Roses — the bloody, 33-year-long civil war between the English House of Lancaster and the House of York that ran from 1455 to 1487. ( King Richard III , of the House of York, died toward the end
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New on MIT Technology Review
This Question Helps Reveal How Slippery Online Harassment Is to Define This Question Helps Reveal How Slippery Online Harassment Is to Define A new Pew Research Center study hints at why social networks rarely seem to get harassment issues right. A sample question: Alice has a disagreement with Bob. Alice forwards it to Clare, who posts it online. Bob gets unkind and vulgar messages, and is… Read more A new Pew Research Center study hints at why social networks ra
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3hA Symbol of the Palestinian Resistance for the Internet AgeConfrontations between Israeli soldiers and Palestinian civilians are nearly as old as Israel’s military presence in the occupied territories itself. Confrontations between Israeli soldiers and Palestinian minors are not uncommon—one advocacy group estimated that approximately 375 Palestinians between the ages of 12 and 17 were under Israeli military detention in 2016, often on charges of stone throwing.The Atlantic
New on MIT Technology Review
Tech Firms Hope Hardware Fixes Won’t Be Required to Solve the Chipocalypse DeepMind’s Co-founder Thinks AI Should Get Ethical in 2018 Mustafa Suleyman, who co-founded Google's deep-learning subsidiary, wants the artificial intelligence community to focus on ethics in 2018. His argument: Writing in Wired UK , Suleyman explains that machine learning has the potential to improve or worsen… Read more Mustafa Suleyman, who co-founded Google's deep-learning subsidiary, want
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New on MIT Technology Review
A New Fleet of Robots Is Taking Aim at the Service Industry DeepMind’s Co-founder Thinks AI Should Get Ethical in 2018 Mustafa Suleyman, who co-founded Google's deep-learning subsidiary, wants the artificial intelligence community to focus on ethics in 2018. His argument: Writing in Wired UK , Suleyman explains that machine learning has the potential to improve or worsen… Read more Mustafa Suleyman, who co-founded Google's deep-learning subsidiary, want
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Science | The Guardian
Lab notes: from zero aliens to a whopping prime, 2018 is already racking up the digits This week’s biggest stories We’re going to start big: with over 23m digits. That’s right, not even a week into 2018 and records have already tumbled at the discovery of the largest prime number ever to be found - less than a year after its predecessor. It’s exciting, it a math-sy sort of way, but for my money the most intriguing story this week was the genetic analysis of an ice age baby girl whi
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The Atlantic
The End of the F***ing World Is Pitch-Black Perfection “I feel, I dunno, I feel comfortable with him,” is how 17-year-old Alyssa (Jessica Barden) describes her burgeoning relationship with James (Alex Lawther), another teenage misfit whom she met at school, in the first episode of The End of the F*ing World . “I feel sort of safe .” Unbeknownst to Alyssa, while she’s pondering her feelings, James is ferociously sharpening a hunting knife with a gle
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The Atlantic
The Death of a Prophet To his church, he was a “prophet, seer, and revelator.” To his detractors, he was a barrier to progress. But when thousands of Mormons line up next Friday on Salt Lake City’s Temple Square to pay their final respects to Thomas S. Monson, the late president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, who exactly will they be saying goodbye to? In the days since Monson’s death, much of the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Preventing and treating acute chest syndrome in children with sickle cell disease IMAGE: Pediatric Allergy, Immunology, and Pulmonology is a quarterly, peer-reviewed journal published online with open access options and in print that synthesizes the pulmonary, allergy, and immunology communities in the advancement... view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, January 4, 2018--Acute chest syndrome (ACS), a potentially severe lung complication of
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This AI-Fortified Robot Will Build the First Homes for Humans on Mars When humans are finally ready to relocate civilization to Mars, they won’t be able to do it alone. They’ll need trusted specialists with encyclopedic knowledge, composure under pressure, and extreme endurance—droids like Justin. Built by the German space agency DLR, such humanoid bots are being groomed to build the first martian habitat for humans. Engineers have been refining Justin’s physical a
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Mammoths resurrected, geoengineering and other thoughts from a futurist | Stewart Brand and Chris AndersonStewart Brand is a futurist, counterculturist and visionary with a very wide-ranging mind. In conversation with TED Curator Chris Anderson, Brand discusses ... just about everything: human nature, bringing back the wooly mammoth, geoengineering, rewilding and science as organized skepticism -- plus the story of an acid trip on a San Francisco rooftop in the '60s that sparked a perspective-shifting
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Big Think
Scientists Accidentally Discover a Breakthrough Treatment for Alzheimer's Scientists found a potential treatment for Alzheimer’s disease by testing an existing drug used for another illness. Researchers from Lancaster University in the UK discovered that a drug developed for type 2 diabetes has "significantly reversed memory loss" in mice. Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia and affects nearly 44 million people around the world, according to 201
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study boosts hope for cheaper fuel cells IMAGE: Simulations by Rice University scientists show how carbon nanomaterials may be optimized to replace expensive platinum in cathodes for electricity-generating fuel cells for transportation and other applications. view more Credit: Yakobson Research Group/Rice University Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes or modified graphene nanoribbons may be suitable replacements for platinum for fast
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cells rank genes by importance to protect them, according to new research IMAGE: This is an Arabidopsis thaliana , the plant species used in this study. view more Credit: Eric Belfield Researchers at the University of Oxford have discovered that a cellular mechanism preferentially protects plant genes from the damaging effects of mutation. Whilst DNA sequence mutation is the fundamental fuel of species evolution, mutations in genes are often harmful. As a form
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Special star is a Rosetta Stone for understanding the sun's variability and climate effect The spots on the surface on the Sun come and go with an 11-year periodicity known as the solar cycle. The solar cycle is driven by the solar dynamo, which is an interplay between magnetic fields, convection and rotation. However, our understanding of the physics underlying the solar dynamo is far from complete. One example is the so-called Maunder Minimum, a period in the 17th century, where spot
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find culprits for extreme rainfall over Yangtze River in May 2016 IMAGE: This is the monthly precipitation anomaly (mm/mn) over China in May 2016. view more Credit: CHUNXIANG LI In May 2016, an extreme rainfall occurred in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River Valley. The area averaged anomaly of total precipitation over the region (117°-121°E, 26°-34°N) was the third wettest on record since 1961. There were 25 stations broke 56-year maximum records. Meanw
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists uncover why sauna bathing is good for your healthScientists at the University of Eastern Finland have shown that sauna bathing is associated with a variety of health benefits. Using an experimental setting this time, the research group now investigated the physiological mechanisms through which the heat exposure of sauna may influence a person's health. Their latest study with 100 test subjects shows that taking a sauna bath of 30 minutes reduce
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The CSI effect: Viewing TV crime shows does not make better criminals IMAGE: The CSI effect experiment: crime scene mock-up to be 'cleaned up' by subjects. view more Credit: photo/©: Andreas Baranowski Does watching the work of fictional forensic investigators on TV influence viewers? There is a belief that this is the case and that the consequences of people watching shows such as the American crime drama television series "CSI: Crime Scene Investigation" are
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Big Think
Alien Megastructure Debunked - Astronomers Finally Explain the Weirdest Star in the Universe Among the most recent promises of extraterrestrial contact, the so-called “alien megastructure” has been one of the most exciting. It’s a star that inexplicably dims and brightens, prompting the Penn State astronomer Jason Wright to famously theorize that the explanation might be that it’s not a star at all but a swarm of alien energy-collecting spacecrafts in a Dyson sphere -like formation. Bu
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The Atlantic
Radio Atlantic: How Has America Changed Since 1968? As 2018 begins, tensions and tumult in America are high. But before the end of 1968, Conor Friedersdorf reminded us in The Atlantic , "Martin Luther King Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy would be assassinated; U.S. troops would suffer their deadliest year yet in Vietnam—and massacre scores of civilians at My Lai; Richard Nixon would be elected president; the Khmer Rouge would form in Cambodia; humans wo
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Ingeniøren
Nu bliver det første teleselskab slæbt i retten for ulovlig masseovervågning af danskerne TDC bliver som det første teleselskab herhjemme slæbt i retten med krav om stoppe den omfattende registrering af oplysninger om kunderne, som i praksis gør det muligt at følge danskernes færden i tykt og tyndt. Sagen vil blive anlagt af en gruppe internetaktivister, som er oprørte over, at logningen fortsætter. EU-Domstolen kendte allerede for godt et år siden en tilsvarende logning i Sverige ulo
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Futurity.org
Does this image freak you out? Here’s why Trypophobia, commonly known as “fear of holes,” is linked to a physiological response more associated with disgust than fear, a new study suggests. Trypophobia is not officially recognized in the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). Many people, however, report feeling an aversion to clusters of holes—such as those of a honeycomb, a lotus
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Proceed to checkout? Not on your mobile, say researchers Shoppers hoping to bag a bargain in the post-Christmas sales are much less likely to go through with their purchases if they are using phones and tablets to buy goods online. This is because consumers often worry they are not seeing the full picture on a mobile app or that they could be missing out on special offers or overlooking hidden costs, according to new research. Concerns about privacy an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First discover the disorder and then find the patients IMAGE: The biochemist Prof. Dr. Thomas Dierks is carrying out research on hereditary disorders and treatment concepts with a particular focus on defective enzymes and their replacement. view more Credit: Bielefeld University The sequencing of the human genome has made it possible: nowadays scientists can discover potential disorders for which there are no known patients. Such a disorder i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Harnessing the potential of blockchain to transform education Blockchain technology can help improve old models of data management and bring benefits to learners and educational institutions in the EU - if policymakers are well prepared to embrace the change. That's the main message of a Science for Policy report from the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service. The report highlights how blockchain technology could imp
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Space fever: Weightlessness increases astronauts' body temperature Astronauts float weightlessly through space, and the condition of weightlessness is something many would love to experience. However, in addition to producing both physical and psychological stress, a trip into space affects our core body temperature. Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have observed that astronauts run hot when exposed to weightlessness, and that, even at rest,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Thermometer for global oceanThere's a new way to measure the average temperature of the ocean.
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Futurity.org
No, cow milk in baby formula doesn’t up diabetes risk Drinking formula made with cow’s milk does not increase children’s risk of developing type 1 diabetes, according to the results of a 15-year global study of children genetically predisposed to developing the disease. The findings provide a long-awaited answer to the question of whether infant formula made with cow’s milk plays a role in the development of type 1 diabetes, according to researchers
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Feed: All Latest
'Mortal Engines' Trailer: The Physics of Those Giant Driving Cities Next December, there'll be a new entrant into the end-of-year, blockbuster science fiction movie category: the Peter Jackson film Mortal Engines . A teaser trailer for it dropped just before the holidays, and there's really only one thing you need to know about it. Driving cities. Driving cities ! Now, I know the movie is based on a book series, which probably has a lot of detail about these gian
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The Atlantic
The U.S. Economy Added 2.1 Million Jobs in 2017 In the final month of 2017, the U.S. economy added 148,000 jobs, while the unemployment rate remained at 4.1 percent, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. All told, an additional 2.11 million jobs were added in all of 2017—a performance that will be hard to repeat in 2018. As the economy has steadily improved, adding jobs for one of the longest consecutive streaks in modern history, many
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The Atlantic
The Understated Elegance of Phantom Thread Phantom Thread is the second collaboration between the writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson and the actor Daniel Day-Lewis—and if the latter is to be believed, it will be the last. Day-Lewis has announced that he is retiring following this performance. I don’t doubt the sincerity of this vow, but I dearly hope he will change his mind. (Steven Soderbergh did , after all.) At 60, Day-Lewis has many
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New on MIT Technology Review
DeepMind’s Co-founder Thinks AI Should Get Ethical in 2018 The Science Linking Arctic Warming to This Crazy-Cold Winter It’s well known that the rapidly warming Arctic is melting sea ice, thawing permafrost, and accelerating sea-level rise. But a growing body of research suggests, counterintuitively, that it could also be amplifying cold snaps, much like the brutal one… Read more It’s well known that the rapidly warming Arctic is melting sea ice, thawing
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
People who sleep less than 8 hours a night more likely to suffer from depression, anxietySleeping less than the recommended eight hours a night is associated with intrusive, repetitive thoughts like those seen in anxiety or depression, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Type 1 Diabetes: Autoimmune reaction successfully halted in early stage islet autoimmunityScientists have discovered a mechanism that amplifies the autoimmune reaction in an early stage of pancreatic islet autoimmunity prior to the progression to clinical type 1 diabetes. If the researchers blocked the corresponding molecules, the immune system was significantly less active.
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Futurity.org
Scientists aim to turn off mosquito genes for biting Focusing on Wyeomyia smithii , also known as pitcher plant mosquitoes, researchers have pinpointed and sorted out 902 genes related to blood feeding and 478 genes linked to non-blood feeding among female mosquitoes. The researchers hope to use this genetic information to stop mosquitoes from feeding on blood, which would, in turn, stop the spread of many serious diseases. “…if we can figure out h
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New tool to assess largely ignored risk in pharmaceutical industry A new method to test the likelihood of a drug turning into a potentially harmful version of itself when it enters the body has been developed by researchers at Cardiff University. In collaboration with Liverpool John Moores University and AstraZeneca, the team have developed a simple approach to trawl through large databases of pharmaceutical drugs and assess the likely risk of a drug undergoin
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Science : NPR
While The Eastern U.S. Freezes, It's Too Warm In Alaska Ice skaters in Anchorage, AK take advantage of warmer than average temperatures at Westchester Lagoon. Mark Thiessen/AP hide caption toggle caption Mark Thiessen/AP Ice skaters in Anchorage, AK take advantage of warmer than average temperatures at Westchester Lagoon. Mark Thiessen/AP While above average temperatures might sound good to much of the U.S. right now, it's too warm in rural Alaska. Hi
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cognitive science
A paper in JCR looks at the Presenter's Paradox: A difference between how people want to present information about things and how that information is evaluated. A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
5G: What is it? What does it mean for your smartphone? On Thursday, AT&T confirmed the first smartphones supporting the new wireless service will arrive later this year. The transition to 5G promises faster smartphones, and a lot more. Here's what you need to know about 5G. 1. What is 5G? It stands for fifth generation. So, this would mark the fifth generation mobile network. 2. What does this mean for my smartphone ? Compared to 4G, which
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Ingeniøren
Virksomheder ser lyst på 2018, men investeringslysten halter Ingen ved, hvad fremtiden bringer – men deltagerne i DI's virksomhedspanel er netop kommet med et bud, og hvis deres spådom holder stik, kommer det til at gå godt for både omsætning og beskæftigelse i 2018. Således forventer 20 procent af dem en vækst på ti procent, mens 50 procent regner med en fremgang på mellem to og ti procent. Kun syv procent regner med en tilbagegang, fremgår det af en anal
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Popular Science
Tech tricks to help you organize your digital photo library Smartphones' ever-improving cameras encourage us to snap an ever-increasing pile of digital photos. And as these images build up in your phone's storage, they become harder and harder to organize. That's where apps come in. Both Google Photos (for Android and iOS ) and Apple Photos (built into iOS ) can sort pictures by date, album, and other attributes (in addition to editing and backing up your
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The Scientist RSS
Are All Neurodegenerative Diseases Made Equal?The Scientist is bringing together a panel of experts to share their research, discuss current therapeutic approaches, and to offer their insights.
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Futurity.org
Cleaning carbon nanotubes makes them work better Scientists have found a way to remove contaminants from carbon nanotubes, which need to be as clean as possible to maximize their utility in next-generation nanoscale devices. In the process, the researchers also discovered why the electrical properties of nanotubes have historically been so difficult to measure. Like any normal wire, semiconducting nanotubes are progressively more resistant to c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Family Medicine and Community Health Journal Volume 5, Issue Number 4 publishes Beijing, December 23, 2017: The December 2017 issue includes an editorial, five original research articles, one case study, one systematic review and two China Focus articles addressing various topics in family medicine in both China and internationally. The first featured article in this issue is an original research article entitled "Seguin Form Board as an intelligence tool for young child
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mirror neuron activity predicts people's decision-making in moral dilemmasMirror neuron activity predicts certain decisions in the face of moral dilemmas; findings could one day benefit people with mental disorders that make social communication difficult
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In scientific first, IU researchers grow hairy skin in a dish IMAGE: Lee et al. show that hair follicles can be generated from mouse pluripotent stem cells in a 3-D cell culture system. The hair follicles (red) grow radially out of spherical... view more Credit: Artwork by Jiyoon Lee and Karl Koehler. Researchers at Indiana University School of Medicine have successfully developed a method to grow hairy skin from mouse pluripotent stem cells--a di
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MSU studies investigate effectiveness of booster seats BOZEMAN -- Booster seats, car seats and seat belts are equally effective at saving the lives of children, while booster seats top the others at reducing minor injuries specifically among children ages 8-12, according to Montana State University economist D. Mark Anderson. Anderson recently published two studies that investigated booster seats. One looked at their effectiveness relative to seat be
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New on MIT Technology Review
This Question Helps Reveal How Online Harassment Is Super-Slippery to Define Is $850,000 for a Blindness Treatment Worth It? Spark Therapeutics, which makes the therapy, today announced the whopping price tag. Called Luxturna, it was approved by the FDA in December , but Spark didn’t disclose the price at the time. Now it has. And it’s a lot. In a class of its own. The only… Read more Spark Therapeutics, which makes the therapy, today announced the whopping price tag.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hard-to-stretch silicon becomes superelastic Illustration of the growth of stretchable silicon nanowires. Credit: Xue et al. ©2017 American Chemical Society As a hard and brittle material, silicon has practically no natural elasticity. But in a new study, researchers have demonstrated that amorphous silicon can be grown into superelastic horseshoe-shaped nanowires that can undergo stretching of more than twice their original length, and sti
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the largest European soil dataset was born Ten years of planning and sampling has led to the creation of the largest harmonised European soil dataset, and the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, is ready to carry out the most comprehensive assessment of soil biodiversity across the continent. Soil scientists at the JRC have been busy gathering and analysing soil samples from across the Europe.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Landmark genetic study better predicts stomach cancer Singapore, [05 January 2018] - A research team led by National University Health System (NUHS) and Duke-NUS Medical School has used genomic technologies to better understand intestinal metaplasia (IM), a known risk factor for gastric (stomach) cancer. Patients with IM are six times more likely to develop stomach cancer than those without. This study is an important part of an ambitious investigat
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Supercharged antibiotics could turn tide against superbugsAn old drug supercharged by University of Queensland researchers has emerged as a new antibiotic that could destroy some of the world's most dangerous superbugs.The supercharge technique, led by Dr. Mark Blaskovich and Professor Matt Cooper from UQ's Institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB), potentially could revitalize other antibiotics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ASK the enzyme: New potential targets for cancer IMAGE: This image shows tumor suppressive roles of TRIM48-mediated ASK1 activation and cell death. view more Credit: Atsushi Matsuzawa New understandings of how molecules affect the activity of an enzyme could lead to potential targets for the treatment of cancers and neurodegenerative diseases. Atsushi Matsuzawa at Tohoku University and colleagues in Japan used gene silencing techniques
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Swift parrots bred on predator-free islands at risk of extinction Critically endangered swift parrots. Credit: Australian National University New research from The Australian National University (ANU) has found genetic evidence that critically endangered swift parrots, which breed all over Tasmania and on predator-free islands, form a single nomadic population at high risk of extinction. Nomadic swift parrots breed across Tasmania wherever their food is most ab
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Batman's Gotham City provides test case for community resilience model A map of Gotham City is laid out in a Finite Element Analysis grid. The grid shows how stresses to different lifelines affect various parts of the city. Credit: Colorado State University If a community is resilient, it can withstand and recover from an unanticipated disaster, like an earthquake, fire or flood. But since every disaster and every community is unique, a uniform measure for defining
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The Atlantic
You’re Most Likely to Do Something Extreme Right Before You Turn 30 Each year, cities, regions, and other organizers around the world host around 3,000 marathons . In large races like the Los Angeles Marathon and the London Marathon , more than half the participants are running a marathon for the very first time. This article is adapted from Pink’s upcoming book . For Red Hong Yi, an artist based in Malaysia, “a marathon was always one of those impossible things
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Ingeniøren
MH370: Skanderborg-software skal behandle eftersøgningsdata Den 8. marts 2014 forsvandt Malaysia Airlines MH370 med 239 mennesker om bord på vej fra Kuala Lumpur i Malaysia til Beijing i Kina. Det er aldrig lykkedes at lokalisere flyet. Eftersøgningen blev opgivet for et år siden, men Malaysias myndigheder forhandler nu med det amerikanske selskab Ocean Infinity om en ny eftersøgning ved hjælp af otte autonome undervandsdroner og et stort norsk havundersø
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Latest Headlines | Science News
2018’s Top 10 science anniversaries With each new year, science offers a fresh list of historical occasions ideally suited for a Top 10 list. Science’s rich history guarantees a never-ending supply of noteworthy anniversaries. Centennials of births, deaths or discoveries by prominent scientists (or popular centennial fractions or multiples) offer reminders of past achievements and context for appreciating science of the present day
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Where is AI headed in 2018? Your phone will know you better than your friends do, researcher predicts From self-driving cars to finding disease cures, artificial intelligence, or AI, has rapidly emerged as a potentially revolutionary technology – and the pace of innovation is only set to speed up. To get a sense of where the field is headed in 2018, U of T News sat down with the University of Toronto's Richard Zemel, a professor of computer science and the research director at the Vector Institut
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Scientific American Content: Global
Can Gene Editing Save the World's Chocolate? Fungi and viruses are poised to doom chocolate, which is why scientists are racing to save cacao—the tree that sprouts the colorful, football-size pods containing beans used to make chocolate—with the gene-editing tool known as CRISPR-Cas9, according to a new report. Cacao trees ( Theobroma cacao ) grow in tropical environments, within about 20 degrees north and 20 degrees south of the equato
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
4000-year-old woodhenge discovered in Yorkshire might have been a sauna Aerial picture of the excavations at Little Catwick Quarry. Credit: John Tibbles A team of researchers led by freelance archaeologist John Tibbles has found evidence suggesting that a woodhenge discovered in Yorkshire several months ago might have been used for sacrifices, or perhaps as a sauna. Tibbles spoke to the Yorkshire Post recently, offering up details of the site and his ideas on its pur
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists help Costa Rican community manage dwindling water supply A stream in the Potrero-Caimital watershed in Costa Rica during the dry (top) and wet (bottom) season. Residents depend on high rainfall during the wet season to provide enough water to get them through the four-month long dry season. Credit: Silja Hund A new tool could help local authorities in Costa Rica prepare for periods of drought during the dry season based on rainfall during the wet seaso
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Live Science
Cutting-Edge Camera Deciphers Messages Written on Mummy Wrappings About 2,000 years ago, ancient Egyptians made homemade wrappings for mummies from "recycled" scraps of paper that people had first used to scribble down shopping lists and personal notes. Scientists have tried a wide array of methods — many of them destructive — to try to first peel apart these papyri and then decipher the ancient writings on them. Now, in an effort to analyze the papyri wi
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Florida iguanas falling from treesThey're not dead, just chilling in cool temperatures in the US.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How playing games on your phone or tablet could cut your power bill Summer has arrived, and with it, soaring energy bills. Australian households are paying more for their power as generators struggle to meet consumer demand. We blast our air conditioners to stay cool, and put on that old fridge for the Christmas drinks, both of which are likely to blow out our electricity bill. But while we wait for the situation to improve, there is something you can do to hel
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Virus SpacecraftResearchers reconstruct images of a virus that infects Escherichia coli bacteria.
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The Scientist RSS
PNAS Editor-in-Chief Placed on LeaveIn a gender discrmination lawsuit against the Salk Institute, a female scientist alleges that biologist Inder Verma was dismissive of his female colleagues.
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Science | The Guardian
Starstruck: the best space images of 2017 With space missions in 2018 set to boldly go further than ever before, here is a look back at some of biggest breakthroughs and most breathtaking views offered by 2017 Continue reading...
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Live Science
1,000-Year-Old Stone Structure in Mexico May Depict Creation of Earth When water levels in the pond are low, the Tetzacualco can be seen. Credit: Arturo Cruz, Terrasat Cartografía A 1,000-year-old stone structure in Mexico may represent how some people in ancient Mesoamerica believed the Earth was created, an archaeologist suggests. Located on the foothills of a volcano in the middle of a pond, the "Tetzacualco" (a name that can mean "stone enclosure") has b
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Futurity.org
Folding ‘exoskeleton’ could get cell-sized robots moving Researchers have created a robot “exoskeleton” that can rapidly change its shape by sensing shifts in its environment. The researchers say these microscale machines—equipped with electronic, photonic, and chemical payloads—could become a powerful platform for robotics at the size scale of biological microorganisms. “You could put the computational power of the spaceship Voyager onto an object the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Big data could bring about workplace utopia—or the office from hell Credit: Jesus Sans/Shutterstock.com The cost of poor employee well-being for individuals, organisations and society is significant – 25.7m days were lost to work-related ill health during 2016-17, half of which can be accounted for by stress, depression and anxiety. Not only is this problematic for employees and organisations, it can put added pressure on health services. Assessing and reducing s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Harnessing the potential of blockchain to transform education Blockchain technology can help improve old models of data management and bring benefits to learners and educational institutions in the EU—if policymakers are well prepared to embrace the change. That's the main message of a Science for Policy report from the Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service. The report highlights how blockchain technology could impro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DropSynth, a one-pot approach to gene synthesis Credit: CC0 Public Domain A team of researchers at the University of California has found a way to synthesize multiple genes from a group of microarray-generated oligonucleotides. In their paper published in the journal Science , the group describes their technique, called DropSynth, how well it works, and its drawbacks. Synthesizing genes has become so popular that there are now companies that d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
General approach for the solution of lattice gauge theories It is not the daily occurrence that physicists from entirely different fields closely work together. However, in theoretical physics a general ansatz can offer solutions for a large variety of problems. A team of scientists from the Theory Division of Professor Ignacio Cirac at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics has now for a couple of years collaborated with theorists from the field of p
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Scientific American Content: Global
Obscure Vomiting Illness Linked to Long-Term Pot Use For 17 years, Chalfonte LeNee Queen suffered periodic episodes of violent retching and abdominal pain that would knock her off her feet for days, sometimes leaving her writhing on the floor in pain. “I’ve screamed out for death,” said Queen, 48, who lives in San Diego. “I’ve cried out for my mom who’s been dead for 20 years, mentally not realizing she can’t come to me.” Queen lost a model
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Popular Science
Experts just ranked the best diets, and their choices will probably surprise you Extreme diets are just the nutritional version of 30-day fitness challenges. Nearly everyone tries them at some point, but they don't generally turn your life around. We seek out both for the same reason: because it’s often not good enough for us to make a change. It also has to feel like we’ve made a change. Consuming more fibrous veggies and fewer simple carbs doesn’t seem like the path to shed
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New street light runs on dog waste Credit: Shutterstock Turning human and animal waste from problem to energy source is not new, animal dung has been used as fuel since the neolithic period. But a pilot project is showing dog poo can be used to fuel street lighting. Our streets need less dog poo and greener ways of fueling street lighting , so why not use one to do the other? We've been getting flammable gas from decaying organic
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New tool to assess largely ignored risk in pharmaceutical industry A new method to test the likelihood of a drug turning into a potentially harmful version of itself when it enters the body has been developed by researchers at Cardiff University. In collaboration with Liverpool John Moores University and AstraZeneca, the team have developed a simple approach to trawl through large databases of pharmaceutical drugs and assess the likely risk of a drug undergoing
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Algorithms obtain the maximal amount of knowledge from images Professor Stefan Roth. Credit: Technische Universitat Darmstadt Digital images and videos contain much more information than computers currently extract from them. With the help of intelligent algorithms, a research team led by Professor Stefan Roth aims to obtain the maximal amount of knowledge from images. A typical street scene can be seen on the screen in Stefan Roth's office – but from the '
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change will displace millions of people. Where will they go? Credit: Columbia University Islands like Barbuda may seem like paradise now, but they face many challenges from climate change in the future. Credit: Tiffany Challe Barbuda, the sister island of Antigua, is a small, low-lying Caribbean island. Most of its 1,700 residents lived in Codrington, the central location for stores and schools. The town is also the location for the Barbuda Research Comple
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Ingeniøren
Døde havområder med iltsvind firdoblet siden 1950’erne Temperaturen i verdens have stiger – og det får iltindholdet i vandmasserne til at falde. Samtidig udledes der stadig mere forurening i form af gødning fra landbrug og spildevand fra verdens eksplosivt voksende kystbyer til havene. Det giver næring til alger, der forbruger ilt og producerer nitrogendioxid – en potent drivhusgas. Siden 1950’erne har iltsvind firdoblet arealet af såkaldte døde havo
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bullfinches stick together for years Bonded pairs likely have an advantage during the breeding season because they can begin mating earlier in the spring and don’t have to expend energy on finding a new mate. Credit: Nina Tveter, NTNU Scientists and many bird enthusiasts have long assumed that bullfinches (Pyrrhula pyrrhula) mate for several years, and perhaps even for life. But believing and knowing are two different things. A prof
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The trouble with rockets Space is big. Really big. It takes 10 years just to cross our solar system. The next star is 70,000 years away at the same speed. So if we're going to get anywhere, we're going to need more than just rockets. When it comes to getting off the Earth, rockets are just about our only option. They're the only thing powerful enough to pull a spaceship out of Earth's gravity. They release their energy q
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Feed: All Latest
Even Realistic Videogames like Call of Duty Won’t Help Us Win Wars Millennials can now storm the beaches of Normandy and fight Nazis with a new level of realism. Sure, past games like like Castle Wolfenstein let them role play America’s Greatest Generation. But the recently released Call of Duty: WWII provides a more human and realistic dimension of war, whereas previous videogames delved into fantasy or featured cyber-mutant soldiers out of a bad '90s movie. WI
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Dagens Medicin
Sportslæger skal betale 4.000 kroner for at arbejde frivilligt Frivillige sportslæger, der er tilknyttet eksempelvis ishockeyklubber, skal som følge af ny tilsynsordning betale 4.000 kroner årligt for at stå til rådighed under sportsstævner i lægerens fritid.
7h
The Atlantic
Each Grain of the Ocean Floor Is Home to a Diverse, Mysterious World Sand is not as passive as you might think. Down on the ocean floor, it’s filtering seawater and, thanks to a teeming set of microbes living on it, busily processing nutrients from the constant rain of sediment drifting downward. Microbiologists have studied the tiny inhabitants of sand by analyzing bulk DNA extracted from scoops of ocean floor, but while this can give you a general list of the bu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rover could discover life on Mars – here's what it would take to prove it Mars seen by Viking. Credit: NASA / USGS Finding past or present microbial life on Mars would without doubt be one of the greatest scientific discoveries of all time. And in just two years' time, there's a big opportunity to do so, with two rovers launching there to look for signs of life – Mars2020 by NASA and ExoMars by the European Space Agency and Roscosmos. I am helping to develop one of the
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Rise of the Bro Tortoise This year saw the drama of Jeremy the “lonely lefty snail.” Found in 2016, Jeremy’s left-twisting shell structure interested geneticists at Nottingham University and prompted a global call for other left twisting snails to act as mates. In May 2017 Angus Davison , a geneticist at Nottingham, introduced two more left twisting snails to Jeremy. In a headline- and pun-worthy twist, Jeremy became cau
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The origins of the cigar-shaped alien 'asteroid' 'Oumuamua Artist’s illustration of planet formation. Credit: NASA / Lynette Cook One of the highlights of 2017 was the discovery of the first object in our solar system that definitely came from somewhere else. At first we thought it was a comet , then an asteroid , and now the International Astronomical Union has reclassified it as something new entirely, an interstellar object . The Hawaiian astronomers
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Green bonds are taking off—and could help save the planet The " tragedy of the horizons ," a term coined by Canada's Mark Carney, governor of the Bank of England, has been haunting the financial sector ever since climate change began posing serious threats to the planet. As Carney put it: Can the financial sector address long-term climate change problems when most investments are made for the short term? Behavioural economics has shown us that people
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
You, too, can be an astrophysicist with your new telescope Credit: Flickr/Grand Canyon National Park, CC BY A telescope can reveal the beauty of the universe, such as the Moon's craters, Saturn's rings, and the glowing gas of the Orion nebula. But a telescope isn't just for sightseeing – it is also a scientific instrument. If you've just received a telescope as a present then it's probably better than any used by the Italian scientist Galileo Galilei (15
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A nonaddictive opioid painkiller with no side effects The findings show how USC Michelson Center scientists collaborate with other experts in multiple disciplines to conduct groundbreaking research. Credit: Janels Katlaps What if scientists could develop an opioid-based painkiller that is not addictive and has limited side effects? That is possible based on new findings by an international team of scientists that included contributions from top rese
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Viden
Sikkerhedsekspert opfordrer til at opdatere efter hackerhul Husk at opdatere din computer, smartphone og tablet, lyder rådet fra medstifter af it-sikkerhedsvirksomheden CSIS Peter Kruse. Opfordringen kommer, efter at der er opdaget to alvorlige sikkerhedsbrister i computere, tablets og smartphones i hele verden. En sikkerhedsbrist i så stort et omfang er ikke set før, fortæller han. Læs også: Apple lukker kritisk sikkerhedshul på Mac-computere - Det er en
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers show how to optimize nanomaterials for fuel-cell cathodes Simulations by Rice University scientists show how carbon nanomaterials may be optimized to replace expensive platinum in cathodes for electricity-generating fuel cells. Credit: Yakobson Research Group Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes or modified graphene nanoribbons may be suitable replacements for platinum for fast oxygen reduction, the key reaction in fuel cells that transform chemical energy i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Threat identification tool for cybersecurity in self-driving cars While every new generation of auto tech brings new security risks, the vulnerabilities that come along with advanced mobility are both unprecedented and under-studied, new research from the University of Michigan shows. A new white paper could help academic and industry researchers analyze the likelihood and severity of potential cyberthreats to autonomous and connected vehicles. Credit: Steve Al
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Use of mobile devices at home can carry conflict to workplace A University of Texas at Arlington researcher is part of a team of authors who have found that using a mobile device at home for work purposes has negative implications for the employee's work life and also their spouse. Wayne Crawford, assistant professor of management in UTA's College of Business, was one of five authors on "Your Job Is Messing With Mine! The Impact of Mobile Device Use for Wor
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Computational astrophysics team uncloaks magnetic fields of cosmic events Computational astrophysicists describe a new method for acquiring information on experiments using laser beams to reproduce cosmic conditions. Credit: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory The development of ultra-intense lasers delivering the same power as the entire U.S. power grid has enabled the study of cosmic phenomena such as supernovae and black holes in earthbound laboratories. Now, a n
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
With climate change, insurance may provide best safety net for world's poor A maize farmer in Tanzania stands in front of her crop. Credit: Laura Paul /AMA Innovation Lab The poorest people in the world are among the most vulnerable to the effects of climate change, including droughts, floods and wildfires. This is especially true for poor farmers in drought-prone regions of the world who rely on crops or livestock to feed their families. A new study led by researchers a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: NOAA's GOES-16 satellite captures powerful East Coast stormThis Geocolor image from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) GOES-16 satellite captures the deepening storm off the East coast of the United States on Jan. 4, 2018, at 16:22 UTC. The powerful nor'easter is battering coastal areas with heavy snow and strong winds, from Florida to Maine. Notice the long line of clouds stretching over a thousand miles south of the storm, which
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Trial of laser beams to scare sea eagles from lambs Image copyright Iain Erskine/RSPB Scotland Image caption Sea eagles are the UK's largest bird of prey and one of its most protected species Shining laser beams onto hillsides could be used as a method of scaring white-tailed sea eagles away from flocks of sheep. The technology is to be trialled in Argyll, an area where crofters and farmers have had issues with the raptors preying on lambs. Scotti
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Braer: The huge oil spill that Shetland survived Image copyright STR Image caption The Liberian-registered oil tanker Braer hit rocks on the Shetland Isles Twenty five years ago the Braer oil tanker ran aground off the Shetland Isles in hurricane-force winds, spilling almost 85,000 tonnes of crude oil. The captain and crew of the vessel were airlifted to safety by helicopter after its engines failed and it became clear the disaster was imminent
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Technique could produce strong, resilient nanofibers for many applications New ultra-fine fibers created by the MIT team are seen in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) image. Credit: Massachusetts Institute of Technology Researchers at MIT have developed a process that can produce ultrafine fibers—whose diameter is measured in nanometers, or billionths of a meter—that are exceptionally strong and tough. These fibers, which should be inexpensive and easy to produce, co
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Eclipse Megamovie project seeks public's help analyzing 50,000 photosAlthough August's total solar eclipse was over in minutes, analysis of the 50,000 photos uploaded to the Eclipse Megamovie website is a time-consuming job, so team leaders are asking citizen scientists for help.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How bird genetics adapt to climate change Biologists studied the yellow warbler, which spends its winters in Central and South America, and flies as far north as Alaska and the Arctic Circle in summer. Credit: Joe Ellis As Earth's climate changes, species must adapt, shift their geographical ranges or face decline and, in some cases, extinction. Using genetics, UCLA biologists involved in the Bird Genoscape Project are racing against tim
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovering the structure of RNA A new study develops an innovative simulation model able to efficiently predict the conformation of ribonucleic acid molecules, opening up interesting opportunities for application and research Credit: Simon Poblete RNA, or ribonucleic acid, plays an essential role in many biological processes, not only as messenger molecule with the task of transmitting genetic information from the nucleus to th
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Exploring the realistic nature of the wave function in quantum mechanics Inserting the second BS when the two sub-waves have an encounter, as in (a), can produce two resultant sub-waves, as in (b), if two-sub waves inside the MZI are in-phase. Credit: Science China Press Quantum mechanics is a pillar of modern science and technology, and has benefited human society for a century. The wave function, also known as the quantum state, is the description of a quantum objec
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New application for acoustic control of bee families Credit: Glebskij The application for smartphones based on Android OS—Apivox Auditor, designed for quick control of bees without opening hives, passed the second testing season in apiaries. The application is based on the theory of acoustic control and this means that the beekeeper does not need to open the hive, in order to find out what is the state the bees at the moment. Such an approach to be
8h
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What Happens If Russia Attacks Undersea Internet Cables It might seem like a nightmare scenario. A terrorist organization or nefarious nation state decides to derail the global internet by faulting the undersea fiber optic cables that connect the world. These cables, which run along the ocean floor, carry almost all transoceanic digital communication, allowing you to send a Facebook message to a friend in Dubai, or receive an email from your cousin in
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Feed: All Latest
McLaren's New 570S Spider Supercar Adds Practicality to Luxury McLaren built its reputation on high-tech, high-spec, top priced racing cars. Borrowing engineering acumen from its (historically great, currently weak) Formula One team, the British company has produced some truly wondrous road cars, starting with the three-seater F1 in the nineties—the world's fastest production car for a decade—up to the all-new, million-dollar Senna , with a 789-horsepower en
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Viden
Sådan spiller en kunstig intelligens Super Mario Der er mange måder at spille computerspil på: din smartphone, i sofaen, ved skrivebordet eller med dine venner i en gammeldags arkadehal. Men du kan også overlade opgaven til et computerprogram. Det har Mario-eksperten som går under navnet SethBling (her dog under et andet YouTube navn) gjort, rapporterer onlinemediet The Next Web . Og det er underligt dragende at se programmet fejle igen og igen
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Rise of Citizen Bioscience It is 5 P.M. in Santa Clara, California. Elodie Rebesque, a senior at Los Altos High School, is rushing out of class. She has a medical appointment of sorts. A few blocks away, she pushes open the door of BioCurious , a community lab whose mission is to create a space for amateurs, inventors, entrepreneurs and anyone else who wants to learn and experiment with biology in a friendly, educational e
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Latest Headlines | Science News
The largest known prime number has 23 million-plus digits There’s a new largest known prime number in town, with a whopping 23,249,425 digits. The figure is calculated by multiplying 2 by itself 77,232,917 times and then subtracting 1. Announced on January 3, the number is almost a million digits longer than the last record-breaking prime. A prime number can’t be divided by anything other than 1 and itself. If you started counting at 1, you’d encounter
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Ingeniøren
Topsøe-ulykken: Op til 100 liter ethylamin væltede ud på gulvet Da beredskabet i går rykkede ud til et kemikalieudslip ved Haldor Topsøes afdeling i Kgs. Lyngby, var der tale om det stærkt brandfarlige kemikalie ethylamin, som var væltet ud på gulvet. Det fortæller Haldor Topsøe til Ingeniøren. Dog oplyser de, at det endnu ikke vides, hvad der præcist skete i går, men kan dog fortælle, at uheldet skete »i en situation, hvor der skulle pumpes væske fra en tønd
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cognitive science
The Language of Religion: Origins of God submitted by /u/IdeasInHat [link] [comments]
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Scientific American Content: Global
Icebergs Can Be Green, Black, Striped, Even Rainbow [Slide Show] The iconic iceberg is a towering white hunk of snow-covered ice, common in cold oceans. But take a trip to Antarctica and you will discover that icebergs come in myriad hues and multicolor patterns, even resembling striped candy. Icebergs can be green, blue, yellow or black. The ice can shine like a sapphire or be as murky as a frozen mud puddle. An iceberg’s color is determined by how it int
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Science | The Guardian
Will 2018 be a year of scientific breakthroughs – or frustrations? | Philip Ball Quantum computers This will be the year when we see a quantum computer solve a computational problem that conventional computers can’t, using the rules of quantum mechanics to manipulate data, potentially making them much more powerful than classical devices. Many researchers think that the prototype devices built during the past year will soon be able to achieve “quantum supremacy” – the solutio
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Viden
Zuckerbergs nytårsforsæt: Stop misbrug af Facebook Nytårsforsæt er for mange lig med flere grøntsager og mere motion. Men for Facebook-topchef Mark Zuckerberg handler 2018 om at fortsætte med at gøre sit arbejde og fikse de problemer, som han indrømmer, Facebook har i øjeblikket. Det skriver han i et årligt nytårsindlæg på Facebook. - Det lyder måske ikke som en personlig udfordring, men jeg tror, jeg vil lære mere ved at fokusere intensivt på pr
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Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Skabes der energi, når ferskvand løber ud i havet? Vores læser Bent Rendal spørger: Jeg har læst, at når saltvand og ferskvand møder hinanden, opstår der energi, som kan udvindes gennem et osmose-kraftværk. Hvordan ytrer den energi sig, når en ferskvandsflod løber ud i havet? Henrik Tækker Madsen , Ph.d. hos Applied Biomimetic, svarer: Den mængde energi, der kan omsættes til arbejde, kaldes Gibbs fri energi, og den består af to dele: Entalpi og e
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Science : NPR
Hospitals Nationally Hit Hard By Medicare's Safety Penalties Each year, hundreds of hospitals lose 1 percent of their Medicare payments through the Hospital-Acquired Conditions Reduction Program. The penalties — now in their fourth year — were created by the Affordable Care Act to drive hospitals to improve the quality of their care. Maskot/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Maskot/Getty Images Each year, hundreds of hospitals lose 1 percent of their
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Ingeniøren
Verdensrekorden for store primtal er slået igen Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search (GIMPS), der siden 1996 systematisk har ledt efter nye store primtal af formen 2^ n -1, hvor n selv er et primtal, oplyser , at den 51-årige elektroingeniør Jonathan Pace fra Tennessee i USA har fundet, at tallet 2^77.232.917-1 med 23.249.425 cifre er et primtal. Rigtigheden er verificeret uafhængigt af hinanden af fire personer, der har benyttet forskellig so
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China's Alibaba under fire over use of customer data Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba has come under fire over its handling of user data in an episode that underscores growing concerns for privacy in the hyper-digitised country. Alibaba affiliate Ant Financial was forced to apologise on Wednesday after users said they felt misled into allowing its Alipay service to share data on their spending habits with Ant's credit-scoring arm and other third-pa
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Attention backcountry skiers: Scientists want your help This April, 2017, photo provided by the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys shows geologist Katreen Wikstrom Jones using an avalanche probe to measure snow depth at Thompson Pass, Alaska. Researchers in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska are looking for backcountry enthusiasts who want to aid a science mission. A program funded by NASA is recruiting citizen scientists to measure s
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NYT > Science
A Voracious Starfish Is Destroying the Great Barrier Reef To eat the hard coral, the starfish has an extrudable stomach that wraps around the coral and ingests it. A starfish can eat its body diameter in coral every night. Since the inception of a control program in 2012, the marine park authority has culled more than 600,000 starfish from the northern and central reef areas, Mr. Nucifora said. One study found that between 1985 and 2012, the reef lost a
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Ingeniøren
Podcast-special: Her er årets største danske forskningsresultater Transformator Ingeniørens fredagspodcast sætter strøm til ugens største nyheder inden for teknologi, forskning og naturvidenskab og analyserer de svingninger, der på godt og ondt transformerer verden og vores samfund. Anders Høeg Nissen er vært på Transformator Foto: PodLAB Abonnér på Transformator: Følg i iTunes På mobilen: Søg på Ingeniøren i din podcast-app. På iPhone er podcast-appen indbygge
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fowl weather friends: Arkansas students print 3-D duck leg Solving the world's food, feed and bioenergy challenges requires integration of multiple approaches and diverse skills. Andrea Eveland, Ph.D., assistant member at the Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, and her team identified ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why cable bills are rising again and what can you do This Wednesday, May 30, 2007, file photo shows a cable box on top of a television in Philadelphia. Cable and satellite TV providers are ringing in 2018 with an unwelcomed gift: higher cable bills. Although annual rate hikes are inevitable, many consumers manage to lower their bills by pushing back and getting promotional rates. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File) Cable and satellite TV providers are rin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
HP recalls computer batteries over fire riskHP on Thursday announced a recall of batteries in some of its notebook and mobile workstation computers due to the risk they could burst into flames.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intel CEO sold shares before chip security flaw disclosed This Thursday, Jan. 7, 2016, file photo shows a laptop that uses Intel's chip technology, at the Intel booth during CES International in Las Vegas. Technology companies are scrambling to fix serious security flaws affecting computer processors built by Intel and other chipmakers and found in many of the world's personal computers and smartphones. (AP Photo/John Locher, File) Intel's CEO sold shar
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shakedown in Oklahoma: To cut the number of bigger earthquakes, inject less saltwater Figure 2 from Pollyea et al., Annual geographic centroid locations for the years 2011-2016 (the underlying fault map is by Marsh and Holland, 2016), including volume-weighted well centroids, the 1σ radius of gyration, and M3+ earthquake centroids. Credit: Pollyea et al. and Geology In Oklahoma, reducing the amount of saltwater (highly brackish water produced during oil and gas recovery) pumped in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Inattentional blindness: Why drivers may fail to see motorcycles in plain sight Credit: CC0 Public Domain The disproportionately high number of motorcycle-related traffic accidents may be linked to the way the human brain processes—or fails to process—information, according to new research published in Human Factors, "Allocating Attention to Detect Motorcycles: The Role of Inattentional Blindness." The study examines how the phenomenon of inattentional blindness, or a person
11h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Cardiff University scientists' drugs test breakthrough Image copyright Getty Images Scientists in Wales have helped develop a technique to streamline production of new drugs to detect if they could become ineffective or even harmful. Researchers can now spot if molecules could be unable to bind to proteins or enzymes in the body as intended. Compounds can become mirror images of themselves, known as racemisation, rendering them unable to work properl
11h
Ingeniøren
https://karriere.jobfinder.dk/da/ugens-it-job-1På dagens liste er der job for både teknikere, ledere, arkitekter og udviklere. Find det rette job for dig.
11h
Ingeniøren
Ugens it-job: Udviklerjob hos 3Shape eller sikkerhedschef hos SydbankPå dagens liste er der job for både teknikere, ledere, arkitekter og udviklere. Find det rette job for dig.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
'Latte levy' of 25p urged by MPs in bid to cut cup waste Image copyright Getty Images MPs are calling for a 25p "latte levy" on disposal coffee cups - and a total ban unless recycling improves. The Environmental Audit Committee says the tax should be used to improve the UK's recycling and reprocessing facilities. The MPs say throwaway cups should be prohibited altogether by 2023 if they are not all being recycled. The government agrees plastic waste is
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Viden
Se videoen: Kan du koncentrere dig i et minut? Afsløring - der sker ikke noget på videoen herover. Det er bare en et minut lang video, filmet på Peter Qvortrup Geislings fisketur, hvor man kigger ud over vandet. Videoen er fra Sundhedsmagasinet i tirsdags, der handlede om hjernen og om, hvordan vi kan træne os til mere koncentration og nærvær. Måske burde nytårsforsættet være at træne hjernen i år? Læs også: Sådan træner du din hjerne i topfo
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Viden
Virksomhed i Mariager skal være med til at løse Kina-problem med husholdningsaffald 04. jan. 2018 kl. 17.09 opdateret 04. jan. 2018 kl. 21.32 Noget plastikaffald er betydeligt nemmere at genanvende end andet, og derfor har Danmark i stil med mange andre lande sendt for eksempel rugbrødsposer og plastbakker fra husholdningsaffaldet så langt som til Kina for at komme af med det. I 2016 alene modtog Kina syv millioner tons plastaffald fra vestlige lande, men nu har kineserne sagt f
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Viden
Amatør opdager 23 millioner cifre langt primtal Det er ikke meget mere end et år siden, at matematikere sidste gang opdagede et primtal, der var større end det, man hidtil har regnet sig frem til. Kort efter jul fandt en amatørs hjemmecomputer et endnu længere et. Det skriver den britiske avis The Guardian . Primtallet er 23 millioner cifre langt og bliver derfor ikke gengivet her. Men ifølge The Guardian kendes det som M77232917 . Amatørs com
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Science : NPR
Cold Casualties: Sharksicles And Frozen Iguanas In Florida, it's raining iguanas. And in Cape Cod, sharksicles are washing ashore. The unusual cold that has slammed the U.S. East Coast is wreaking havoc with wildlife, particularly the cold-blooded variety. As one no doubt remembers from grade-school science class, reptiles and fish take heat from their environment — when it is warm enough, all is well, but if it gets too cold, you can expect s
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Science | The Guardian
Think twice about buying 'squashed-faced' breeds, vets urge dog-lovers Vets have urged dog-lovers to think twice about buying squashed-faced dogs such as pugs and French bulldogs, after many would-be owners were found to be unaware of the health problems such breeds often experience. According to data from the Kennel Club, registrations of squashed-faced, or brachycephalic, breeds have shot up in recent years: while just 692 French bulldogs were registered in 2007,
13h
Ingeniøren
Jurist: Under GDPR ville Statens Serum Institut være blevet ramt af bøde-hammeren En vred minister , forargede borgere og kritik i pressen har været efterdønningerne af, at Statens Serum Institut (SSI) ikke overholdt persondataloven. Sagen rejser dog også spørgsmålet om, hvad konsekvensen for instituttet ville være, hvis brøden var foregået efter den 25. maj i år, hvor de nye persondataregler GDPR træder i kraft. Og om SSI til den tid ville kunne få en bøde. Kort om GDPR - den
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Inattentional blindness The disproportionately high number of motorcycle-related traffic accidents may be linked to the way the human brain processes--or fails to process--information, according to new research published in Human Factors, "Allocating Attention to Detect Motorcycles: The Role of Inattentional Blindness." The study examines how the phenomenon of inattentional blindness, or a person's failure to notice an
14h
Ingeniøren
Leder: I et år har Justitsministeriet krævet ulovlig overvågning. Nu må det stoppe Landets Justitsministerium burde være garant for, at de regler, vi indretter vores samfund efter, lever op til internationale aftaler, vores egen grundlov og ikke er i konflikt med sig selv. Alligevel har netop Justitsministeriet i nu over et år blæst på, at ministeriets egen bekendtgørelse om logning af teledata er direkte ulovlig. For godt et år siden, den 21. december 2016, afsagde EU-Domstole
15h
Ingeniøren
Super-avanceret sensorteknologi skal finde MH370 Hvis nogen skal finde rester af det forsvundne Malaysia Airlines-passagerfly MH370 på havbunden, så er det bedste bud lige nu nok det amerikanske firma Ocean Infinity , der har leaset det norske skib Seabed Constructor . Skibet byder i sig selv som sådan ikke på noget, man ikke er set før. Men under dæk venter otte højteknologiske vidundere – undervandsdroner, der er udstyret med verdens bedste s
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Earthquake Alerts: How to Get an Early Warning for the Next Big One At 2:39 am Thursday morning, millions of Bay Area residents from Sacramento to San Jose were shaken awake by the rolling tremble of a 4.4 magnitude earthquake . The eight-mile deep tremor struck along the Hayward fault, two miles southeast of Berkeley. From my apartment just 20 blocks from the epicenter, I woke with the rest of the neighborhood and rode out the wave from bed for about 10 seconds.
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Impact of inactivity on muscles more severe for older people According to a recent study published in The Journal of Physiology , researchers have been able to document for the first time how the same period of inactivity has a greater and more severe impact on the muscle power of the lower limbs of the elderly than young people, which is essential for movements like climbing the stairs. The disuse of muscles due to a sedentary lifestyle or short periods o
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Popular Science
Does all this cold weather mean there will be fewer mosquitoes next summer? The snow is blowing sideways outside, and the temperature is stuck somewhere between ‘brrrrrr’ and ‘Holy Fahrenheit and Lord Celsius, whyyyyy?!?’ It’s awful out there, and we’re only a few days into the year. So is there anything we can look forward to? Any upside to the massive chill pill being forced down our throats? Maybe the cold will kill off the cold-blooded bloodsuckers that make our live
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Advances in brain imaging settle debate over spread of key protein in Alzheimer's Recent advances in brain imaging have enabled scientists to show for the first time that a key protein which causes nerve cell death spreads throughout the brain in Alzheimer's disease - and hence that blocking its spread may prevent the disease from taking hold. An estimated 44 million people worldwide are living with Alzheimer's disease, a disease whose symptoms include memory problems, changes
19h
Futurity.org
What is ‘blockchain’ and what does it mean for me? You may have heard of blockchain, but still be confused about exactly what it is, what the hype around it really means, and how it could affect you. “…there is a bit too much hype surrounding the term ‘blockchain.'” Roger Wattenhofer, a professor of distributed computing at the information technology and electrical engineering department at ETH Zurich, began to take an interest in bitcoin and blo
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Futurity.org
Bonobos like bullies more than helpers While most people prefer individuals who are kind and helpful to others, bonobos may be more attracted to the opposite, a new study finds. “Humans might have this unique preference for helpers that is really at the heart of why we’re so cooperative…” The researchers were surprised by the findings because these African apes—our closest relatives in the animal kingdom along with chimpanzees—have be
20h
Science | The Guardian
WHO accused of 'institutional ageism' over five-year work programme The World Health Organisation (WHO) is being accused of institutional ageism by academics, who say older people and dementia have been left out of its work programme for the next five years. In a letter published in the Lancet medical journal , the academics say WHO is “washing its hands” of older people. “This is entirely unacceptable. If the proposed programme is approved, it will considerably
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Experts call for World Health Organization to rethink 'unacceptable' plans The World Health Organization (WHO) has been accused of "washing its hands of older people" in its proposed priorities for future work. In a letter published online in The Lancet , experts on ageing from the University of East Anglia (UEA) and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) say the draft WHO 13th General Programme of Work makes no reference to older people or to conditio
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Futurity.org
Will self-driving cars threaten your security? While every new generation of automobile technology brings new security risks, the vulnerabilities that come along with self-driving cars are unprecedented and understudied, a new paper suggests. Imagine the following scenarios: Instead of taking you home from work, your self-driving car delivers you to a desolate road, where it pulls off on the shoulder and stops. You call your vehicle to pick y
20h
NYT > Science
Jimmie Holland, Who Cared for the Cancer Patient’s Mind, Dies at 89 Then her ambitions widened — she planned to be a country doctor or a pediatrician — before she gravitated to what would prove to be a groundbreaking psychiatric specialty. She recounted several reasons for doing so: Her uncle had been institutionalized for a mental breakdown when she was 9; her first husband committed suicide when she was 27; and she was frustrated that her second husband’s oncol
20h
Big Think
A ‘Humanely’ Killed Animal Is Still Killed—And That’s Wrong Western conventional wisdom about animal ethics is that killing an animal is not the problem; the problem is making the animal suffer. As long as we have treated and killed an animal in a ‘humane’ way, we have done nothing wrong. A compelling example of this belief is found in the case of dogs and cats, animals particularly valued in Western culture. If someone inflicts suffering on a dog or cat,
20h
New on MIT Technology Review
Beijing Is Getting a $2.1 Billion AI District This Question Helps Reveal How Slippery Online Harassment Is to Define A new Pew Research Center study hints at why social networks rarely seem to get harassment issues right. A sample question: Alice has a disagreement with Bob. Alice forwards it to Clare, who posts it online. Bob gets unkind and vulgar messages, and is… Read more A new Pew Research Center study hints at why social networks rare
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Futurity.org
‘Pillows’ reveal when oceans got spurt of oxygen The transition to a world with an oxygenated deep ocean occurred between 540 and 420 million years ago, new research suggests. Researchers attribute the change to an increase in atmospheric O 2 to levels comparable to the 21 percent oxygen in the atmosphere today. This inferred rise comes hundreds of millions of years after the origination of animals, which occurred between 700 and 800 million ye
20h
Latest Headlines | Science News
NASA is headed to Earth’s outermost edge In the Dec. 23 & Jan. 6 SN : Our top stories of 2017, grounded pterosaur hatchlings, protectors of the Dead Sea Scrolls, a counterintuitive metamaterial, neutron star sizing, arrow of time reversed, E. coli in flour and more.
21h
Live Science
The Ocean Is Suffocating, and It's Our Fault Ocean "dead zones" — regions of the sea where oxygen is severely or entirely depleted and most forms of life can't survive — are becoming more numerous, and scientists warn that they will continue to increase unless we curb the factors driving global climate change, which is fueling this alarming shift in ocean chemistry. Even outside these near-lifeless ocean regions , rising global temper
21h
Live Science
How Do You Survive Nuclear War? The CDC Is About to Tell You This photo of the mushroom cloud over Nagasaki was taken by Charles Levy from one of the B-29 Superfortresses used in the attack. Credit: U.S. National Archives Do you know what to do in the event of a nuclear detonation ? If not, you're in luck: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is giving a talk next week on just that topic. On Thursday (Jan. 16), the agency's monthly public h
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Largest known prime number discoveredA collaborative computer project has discovered the largest known prime number. The new prime number is nearly one million digits larger than the previous record prime number, in a special class of extremely rare prime numbers known as Mersenne primes.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
To Get His Gear To Eureka, Tony Beets Has To Get To The Barge On Time #GoldRush | Friday 9p Tony Beets races to get to the barge in time to send more equipment to Dredge 2 at Thistle Creek. If only he can drive fast AND carry the buckets at the same time. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: ht
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