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John Young, US astronaut and pioneer, dies aged 87 Image copyright AFP Image caption John Young, right, commanded the first shuttle mission in 1981, pictured here with crew member Robert Crippen US astronaut John Young, who flew to the moon twice and commanded the first ever space shuttle mission, has died aged 87, Nasa said. "Today, Nasa and the world have lost a pioneer," agency chief Robert Lightfoot said in a statement. Young was the only per
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Viden
Anders Morgenthaler går kun i 'grønt' tøj: Jeg bruger altid 24-timers reglen Tegner og filminstruktør Anders Morgenthaler er på en mission. Han vil gerne overlevere en pæn og ordentlig klode til sine børn. Derfor har han besluttet, at han vil gøre en forskel for klimaet, dér hvor han kan. Han har besluttet ikke at rejse på ferie med fly, men har købt en el-bil, som han og familien kan køre miljøvenligt rundt i i Europa. Og så er han begyndt at kigge på sit tøjforbrug. - D
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Ingeniøren
Nyt apparat skal bekæmpe honningbiernes værste fjende Bier er ikke blot truet af pesticider. Siden begyndelsen af 1980'erne har den flittige honningproducent også været truet af varroamiden, som er en snylter, der angriber honningbier. Biavlerne kan enten bekæmpe miderne mekanisk ved at fjerne vokstavlen med ung droneyngel eller kemisk ved at tilføje bifamilien myresyre i nøje kontrollerede mængder, fremgår det af en pressemeddelelse fra SDU. Proble
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hurricane Harvey survivors feel grief, distress months later Deb Eberhart sorts through her belongings Friday, Dec. 15, 2017, in Houston. Eberhart, who recently returned to her remodeled home, had to evacuate during Hurricane Harvey as floodwaters filled her neighborhood. A group of psychologists has offered free counseling sessions to people working to recover from Harvey. Eberhart sought out the counseling sessions after realizing that the stress from th
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Popular Science
How do fireflies power their blinking butts? F ireflies are butt gals. So are their male amori. On warm summer nights, both sexes home in on the blinking light of their crush’s derrière. The rest is romance. Which makes it almost heartless for us to ask: What makes their bums blink? It’s mostly a matter of chemistry, triggered by seasons, times of day, and those flashing signals. For Photinus pyralis, the common eastern firefly that populat
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Scientific American Content: Global
A Few of My Favorite Spaces: The Bicylinder The bicylinder is a lovely little shape. It has square cross-sections, but it’s still pleasingly curved. It’s the shape you get if you look at the intersection of two identical solid cylinders that meet at right angles. Early Chinese mathematicians called the shape mouhefanggai , sometimes translated as “two square umbrellas,” and it is also known as the Steinmetz solid. (People also use the term
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Taking paracetamol during pregnancy may reduce fertility of daughtersTaking paracetamol during pregnancy may impair the future fertility of female offspring, according to a new review. The article reviews three separate rodent studies that all report altered development in the reproductive systems of female offspring from mothers given paracetamol during pregnancy, which may impair their fertility in adulthood.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cells rank genes by importance to protect them, according to new researchResearchers have discovered that a cellular mechanism preferentially protects plant genes from the damaging effects of mutation. A new study has shown for the first time that DNA Mismatch Repair (MMR), which corrects mutations that arise during the replication of the genome during cell division, is targeted to particular regions of the genome, and preferentially repairs genes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Treeshrews break evolutionary 'rules'Tupaia glis, the common treeshrew, defies two widely tested rules that describe patterns of geographical variation within species: the island rule and Bergmann's rule.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Room-temperature multiferroic thin films and their propertiesScientists have developed high-quality GFO epitaxial films and systematically investigated their ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties. They also demonstrated the room-temperature magnetocapacitance effects of these GFO thin films.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gene therapy restores normal blood glucose levels in mice with type 1 diabetesA study demonstrates that a gene therapy approach can lead to the long-term survival of functional beta cells as well as normal blood glucose levels for an extended period of time in mice with type 1 diabetes. The researchers used an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector to deliver to the mouse pancreas two proteins, Pdx1 and MafA, which reprogrammed plentiful alpha cells into functional, insulin-pr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
NASA's Webb Telescope to investigate mysterious brown dwarfsTwinkle, twinkle, little star, how I wonder what you are. Astronomers are hopeful that the powerful infrared capability of NASA's James Webb Space Telescope will resolve a puzzle as fundamental as stargazing itself -- what IS that dim light in the sky? Brown dwarfs muddy a clear distinction between stars and planets, throwing established understanding of those bodies, and theories of their formati
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unusual gene evolution in bacteriaResearchers have made another discovery at the cellular level to help understand the basic processes of all life on our planet -- this time within the unusual bacteria that has lived inside cicada insects since dinosaurs roamed Earth.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tobacco shops associated with crime in urban communities of colorTobacco shops, also known as smoke shops, may represent potential 'nuisance properties' in urban communities of color, a study has found. Nuisance properties are properties where unsafe activities affecting public health and safety occur repeatedly. The study focused on 2014 violent and property crime data from South Los Angeles, a large urban community whose homicide rate is nearly four times the
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Next-generation medical scanningResearchers have developed a new way to magnetise molecules found naturally in the human body, paving the way for a new generation of low-cost magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology that would transform our ability to diagnose and treat diseases including cancer, diabetes and dementia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Space fever: Weightlessness increases astronauts' body temperatureAstronauts float weightlessly through space, and the condition of weightlessness is something many would love to experience. However, in addition to producing both physical and psychological stress, a trip into space affects our core body temperature. Researchers have observed that astronauts run hot when exposed to weightlessness, and that, even at rest, their body temperature is approximately 1°
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quantum 'spooky action at a distance' becoming practicalScientists have overcome a major challenge in applying a strange quantum effect to real applications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Common birth control shot linked to risk of HIV infectionTransitioning away from a popular contraceptive shot known as DMPA could help protect women in Sub-Saharan Africa and other high-risk regions from becoming infected with HIV, according to new research.
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Space Photos of the Week: Juno Snatches a Shot of Jupiter's Swirling Storms Feast your eyes on Jupiter! This photo was taken by the Juno spacecraft currently in orbit around the gas giant, just a few weeks ago on December 16. Here, the dizzying whorls in Jupiter’s clouds are seen in unprecedented detail, as high-flying storms cast shadows onto the atmosphere below. They don’t call it the king of the planets for nothing; the scale in this image is 5.8 miles per pixel. Sci
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Ingeniøren
Forskere vil fordoble elbilers rækkevidde med silicium-batterier Et forskningsprojekt i Storbritannien vil med 80 millioner kroner i ryggen forsøge at forøge elbilers rækkevidde til 400 miles – 644 km. Projektet vil benytte silicium som erstatning for kul i battericellernes anoder og optimere cellerne til brug i køretøjer. Startup-firmaet Nexeon, som arbejder frem mod en kommerciel silicium-anode, vil lede udviklingen af silicium-materialet og stå for opskaler
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Live Science
Curiosity Rover Spots Weird Tube-Like Structures on Mars Have trace fossils been found on Mars? In browsing the first new batch of 2018 photos taken by the Curiosity rover's Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI), researcher Barry DiGregorio speculated on whether the Red Planet robot found trace fossils on Mars . DiGregorio is a research fellow for the Buckingham Centre for Astrobiology in the United Kingdom and author of the nonfiction books "Mars: The L
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
We need one global network of 1000 stations to build an Earth observatoryScientists call for a continuous, comprehensive monitoring of interactions between the planet's surface and atmosphere.
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Live Science
Here's How Alcohol Can Damage DNA and Increase Cancer Risk Scientists think they know how alcohol damages DNA and increases the risk of cancer. Researchers in England conducted the study in mice, however, experts say that the mechanisms linking alcohol to DNA damage are the same in mice and men. Indeed, earlier studies have shown strong links between alcohol and certain cancers in humans; in addition, the International Agency for Cancer Research cl
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Seasteading: Come for the Algae Bacon, Stay for the Freedom Joe Quirk is the president of the Seasteading Institute , which hopes to see the world’s oceans settled with hundreds of environmentally restorative floating cities. The first steps in that process are currently underway. “We’re going to start very small with sustainable floating islands in the protected lagoon of Tahiti, for about 250 people,” Quirk says in Episode 289 of the Geek’s Guide to the
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cognitive science
You’re Most Likely to Do Something Extreme Right Before You Turn 30 ... or 40, or 50, or 60 ... A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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Scientific American Content: Global
5 Ways to Get Motivated When You're in a Funk 5 Ways to Get Motivated When You're in a Funk When your motivation is lower than a gravedigger at the end of his shift, it can be hard to turn things around. Savvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen offers five ways to skunk your funk Credit: Rafal Rodzoch Getty Images Advertisement Einstein himself summed it up nicely when he said, “Nothing happens until something moves.” But going from ‘not mo
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CES 2018 Trends: What to Expect From the Huge Consumer Tech Show At the world's biggest gadget show, everything is always amazing. Every year, more than a hundred thousand CES attendees pour into Las Vegas to convince each other and the world that everything before was crap and everything to come will change that. They go to see the biggest and thinnest new TVs, the fastest and lightest new laptops, the headphones and the phone cases and the drones and the ref
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"Black Museum": Why the Controversial 'Black Mirror' Episode Is the Show's Most Important One Utopianism rests upon a single, fundamental truth: that we can be better than we were before. But what if we can’t? What if we’re stuck in a loop, slave to new innovations that only amplify hate, human flaw, and social fragility? In the techno-dystopian wheelhouse that is Charlie Brooker’s darkly imaginative anthology series, Black Mirror , that is often the case at hand. In Brooker’s inverted pa
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Scientific American Content: Global
Natural Climate Patterns Create Hot Spots of Rapid Sea Level Rise The following essay is reprinted with permission from The Conversation , an online publication covering the latest research. For Americans who live along the east and Gulf of Mexico coasts, the end of the 2017 Atlantic hurricane season on Nov. 30 was a relief. This year forecasters recorded 17 named storms, 10 of which became hurricanes. Six were major hurricanes (Category 3 or stronger), and
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The Atlantic
This Week 50 Years Ago: An Eclectic News Digest Fifty years ago this week, Viet Cong guerrillas charged a U.S. base on New Year’s Day, killing at least 26 soldiers; Americans learned that a total of 9,353 Americans had been killed in the Vietnam War during the previous year; and Lyndon Johnson discouraged Americans from travel outside the Western Hemisphere. In lighter news, Hot Wheels were introduced and John Singleton was born. Those are the
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Science : NPR
It's Not Just A Cold, It's 'Sickness Behavior' Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images Fanatic Studio/Collection Mix: Sub/Getty Images It's just a cold. But even though I know I'm not horribly ill, I feel this overwhelming need to skip work, ignore my family and retreat to the far corner of the sofa. I'm not being a wimp, it turns out. Those feelings are a real thing called sickness behavior, which is sparked by the body's response to
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New on MIT Technology Review
The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending January 6, 2018) To continue reading this article, please exit incognito mode or log in . Not an Insider? Subscribe now for unlimited access to online articles. Subscribe today
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Ingeniøren
Kunne du bestå Polyteknisk Eksamen anno 1918?Hvordan fremstiller man røgfrit krudt, og hvordan opstilles en fabrik med to dampmaskiner? Sådan lød nogle af spørgsmålene i eksamensopgaven til de 98 tilmeldte til Polyteknisk Eksamen, som Ingeniøren bragte for 100 år siden.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
FX chief: Even peak TV can be a 'sideshow' to internet In this Aug. 9, 2017 file photo, John Landgraf, CEO of FX Networks and FX Productions, participates in the executive panel during the FX Television Critics Association Summer Press Tour at the Beverly Hilton in Beverly Hills, Calif. Landgraf says an investigation into sexual misconduct by Louis C.K. found nothing involving his work for the company over the past eight years. The investigation foll
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Florida hack exposed files of up to 30,000 Medicaid patientsFlorida officials say hackers may have accessed the personal information and medical records of up to 30,000 Medicaid recipients two months ago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In Antarctic dry valleys, early signs of climate change-induced shifts in soil There are no plants, birds or mammals in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, which are located in the largest region of the Antarctic continent. Credit: Ashley Shaw In a study spanning two decades, a team of researchers led by Colorado State University found declining numbers of soil fauna, nematodes and other animal species in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, one of the world's driest and coldest deserts. This dis
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Ava's landfall on Madagascar's coast Arid lands, which cover some 40 percent of the Earth's terrestrial surface, are too dry to sustain much in the way of vegetation. But far from being barren, they are home to diverse communities of microorganisms—including ...
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New on MIT Technology Review
Our Best Photographs of 2017 To continue reading this article, please exit incognito mode or log in . Not an Insider? Subscribe now for unlimited access to online articles. Subscribe today
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cognitive science
Study suggests 'sugar coma' is real -- glucose ingestion leads to worse cognitive performance A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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cognitive science
The ever astonishing Metacat - an...unprofessional look at one of the most fascinating computer models in cognitive science A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
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Big Think
Dogs Love to Play, but They Don’t Do so for Pleasure A Jack Russell terrier tears in and out of its doggie door, skidding and sliding on a hardwood floor, only to repeat the performance over and over again. A Border collie in the park leaps to catch a ball, runs and drops it back at the owner’s feet with a look of anxious anticipation. There’s no food treat in store for these animals, no pats on the head – they seem to do it out of sheer playful ex
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Big Think
Which Kills More Americans... Terrorists or Lawnmowers? Which of the following best completes this sentence: Over the past 10 years, _ killed the most Americans. Islamic jihadist terrorists Far right-wing terrorists Lawnmowers If you chose either kind of terrorist, you were wrong – by a long-shot. It turns out that lightning, lawnmowers, armed toddlers, buses, and simply falling out of bed were all independently more frequent annual caus
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taking paracetamol during pregnancy may reduce fertility of daughters Taking paracetamol during pregnancy may impair the future fertility of female offspring, according to a review published in Endocrine Connections . The article reviews three separate rodent studies that all report altered development in the reproductive systems of female offspring from mothers given paracetamol during pregnancy, which may impair their fertility in adulthood. Paracetamol, or aceta
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Futurity.org
Drone view discovers ancient Silk Road irrigation system Using satellite imaging and drone reconnaissance, archaeologists have discovered an ancient irrigation system that once allowed a farming community in arid northwestern China—one of the world’s driest desert climates—to raise livestock and cultivate crops. Lost for centuries in the barren foothills of China’s Tian Shan Mountains, the ancient farming community is hidden in plain sight—appearing to
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Futurity.org
Two things to know about crime rates in the US Violent crime in the US dropped by about half since the 1990s. But why? In this quick video, Patrick Sharkey, associate professor of sociology at New York University, offers two important factors. “We think that this evidence suggests there’s a different set of actors who can play a prominent role in confronting violence: the local residents in the organizations who are in the communities hit har
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Blowflies use drool to keep their cool SAN FRANCISCO — Blowflies don’t sweat, but they have raised cooling by drooling to a high art. In hot times, sturdy, big-eyed Chrysomya megacephala flies repeatedly release — and then retract — a droplet of saliva , Denis Andrade reported January 4 at the annual meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology. This process isn’t sweating. Blowfly droplets put the cooling power of e
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stem cell transplant is better than drug therapy for sclerodermaScleroderma with internal organ involvement is a debilitating and lethal autoimmune disorder with few effective treatments. But a study has now found new cause for optimism using an aggressive stem cell transplant regimen.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Redefining knowledge of elderly people throughout historyAn archaeologist is set to redefine what we know about elderly people in cultures throughout history, and dispel the myth that most people didn't live much past 40 prior to modern medicine.
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Live Science
The Straight Poop on Goop's Coffee Enema: Don't Do It Colon cleansers have landed people in the hospital, but that hasn't stopped actress Gwyneth Paltrow from touting one — known as the Implant O'Rama System — on her lifestyle website, goop. In a new detox guide, goop describes the Implant O'Rama as an "at-home coffee enema," which claims to relieve people from "depression, confusion, general nervous tension, many allergy related symptoms and,
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Brooke Shields Gets In The Cash Cab. This Lady Goes Nuts. Cash Cab | Sundays 10p Brooke Shields hitches a ride in the Cash Cab and surprises a big fan in the process. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/cash-cab/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery From: Discovery
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In Antarctic dry valleys, early signs of climate change-induced shifts in soil In a study spanning two decades, a team of researchers led by Colorado State University found declining numbers of soil fauna, nematodes and other animal species in the McMurdo Dry Valleys, one of the world's driest and coldest deserts. This discovery is attributed to climate change, which has triggered melting and thawing of ice in this desert since an uncharacteristically warm weather event in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Three new species of zoantharians described from coral reefs across the Indo-PacificThree new species of zoantharians -- relatives of the better-known hard corals and sea anemones - were discovered in southern Japan. One of them, Antipathozoanthus remengesaui, was named after the current president of Palau, Tommy Remengesau, in honor of his and the nation's support to the authors and marine conservation as a whole. The species can be found widely across the Indo-Pacific.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Loophole in chronic lymphocytic leukemia treatmentMedical researchers have determined that a drug approved to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) may be less effective in a particular subset of patients. The study reveals that ibrutinib has a diminished capacity to delocalize and kill tumor cells expressing an adhesive protein called CD49d, but combining ibrutinib treatment with drugs that block CD49d activation could prevent the tumor cells
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Big Think
Is There Going to Be a Big Hole in History Where the 21st Century Was? A parent lit in the glow of a monitor types away late into the night, sending notes to the future for his or her children to read upon reaching an age when they want to know who their parents were, what they thought, and what they felt. One day the kids will come across a trunkful of these intimate messages on USB thumb drives, hard drives, or solid-state drives—and have no way to read them. The
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Live Science
Thai Clinic Offers 'Brighter' Genitals: What Is Laser Skin-Lightening? A hospital in Bangkok recently experienced a massive surge in popularity for an unorthodox cosmetic procedure: penis lightening. A video posted to Facebook earlier this week by the Lelux Hospital appeared to show a medical technician servicing the nether regions of a male patient lying on a table. The post racked up over 4 million views and garnered more than 10,000 comments by Jan. 4, News
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: A Mummified Child’s Remains Show Signs of a Modern Scourge The mummified child, who died at two years old, was buried in the Basilica of Saint Domenico Maggiore in Naples during the 16th century. The researchers who have worked there acknowledge some of the emotional challenges to studying the toddler’s remains. “There’s this hollowness yet this ghostlike pain still there which is fascinating from a scientific perspective but horrific from a parental per
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New on MIT Technology Review
Your Tweets Could Show If You Need Help for Bipolar Disorder Bipolar disorder causes periods of severe depression punctuated by periods of elevated mood or mania. People with the condition behave in extreme ways, experiencing extreme highs and hyperactivity followed by devastating lows and lethargy. Some estimates suggest that 30 percent will die by suicide. One way to prevent the most extreme behaviors is to spot the symptoms as they are developing but be
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tobacco shops associated with crime in urban communities of color RIVERSIDE, Calif. - Tobacco shops, also known as smoke shops, may represent potential "nuisance properties" in urban communities of color, a study led by a researcher at the University of California, Riverside has found. Nuisance properties are properties where unsafe activities affecting public health and safety occur repeatedly. Past research has shown that alcohol outlets such as liquor or cor
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Big Think
An Infant’s Remains Suggest Who Exactly Migrated to North America Contemporary locals call her “Xach’itee’aanenh T’eede Gaay” in Middle Tanana, or “Sunrise Girl-Child” in English, though there’s no way to know what her name was when she was alive. That was 11,500 years ago. The six-week-old’s remains, found on a bed of antler points and red ocher, were discovered in an ancient Alaskan burial pit in 2010, and hers is the second-oldest genome found in North Ameri
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Big Think
What Happens to Your Body When You Donate it to Science? One of the morbid fascinations some people have is what’s going to happen at their funeral and with their mortal remains after they're gone. There are a lot of boutique options, besides the traditional things like being buried, which is expensive and not good for the environment . There’s an urn that’ll turn your body into a tree , and many options after cremation. You can turn your ashes into
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Popular Science
This is what a scientist wears to keep warm in -40°F Ryan Knapp is a senior staff meteorologist and weather observer at the Mount Washington Observatory in White Mountains, New Hampshire. When we talked on the phone, the temperature at the observatory—which is at the mountain’s summit— was hovering between -20 and -30 degrees. Most of us experience painfully frigid temperatures like that rarely, if ever, but it’s not out of the ordinary for Knapp a
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Amazon, Facebook, and Google to Join Legal Battle Over Net Neutrality Internet giants Amazon, Facebook, and Google plan to throw their collective weight behind efforts to save net neutrality. The Internet Association, the industry's primary lobbying organization, announced Friday that it plans to join lawsuits aimed at halting the Federal Communications Commission's December action to repeal Obama-era net neutrality rules. Those rules banned internet service provid
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NYT > Science
Take a Number: Cancer Deaths Continue a Steep Decline Photo An x-ray showing a tumor invading almost the entire right lung. The cancer death rate in the U.S. has dropped 26 percent since 1991. The most common cause of cancer death is still lung cancer. Credit BSIP/UIG, via Getty Images From 1991 to 2015, the cancer death rate dropped about 1.5 percent a year, resulting in a total decrease of 26 percent — 2,378,600 fewer deaths than would have occurr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Did ancient irrigation technology travel Silk Road?Using satellite imaging and drone reconnaissance, archaeologists have discovered an ancient irrigation system that allowed a farming community in northwestern China to raise livestock and cultivate crops in one of the world's driest desert climates.
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Blog » Languages » English
A Celestial Expedition for Starbursts Remember Starburst cells? Those beautiful cells that have dendrites that centrally “burst” from the cell body like a firework? We certainly do! We finished the Starburst Challenge back in 2014 , but our researchers at Princeton have found a few more potential Starburst cells that they would like traced by you, our Eyewirers. These cells are all “Off-SAC” candidates. “Off-SAC” means a starburst am
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New on MIT Technology Review
Uh Oh—CRISPR Might Not Work in People Uh Oh—CRISPR Might Not Work in People A sampling of human blood has turned up a surprise: most people could be immune to one of the world’s biggest advances in genetic engineering. It’s in our blood: Scientists searched the blood of 22 newborns and 12 adults for antibodies to the two most… Read more A sampling of human blood has turned up a surprise: most people could be immune to one of the wo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Will I look dumb?' Human-like virtual assistants can deter help-seekingVirtual assistants have become increasingly sophisticated -- and more human-like -- since the days when Clippy asked if you needed help with your document. These assistants are intended to make programs and apps easier to use, but research suggests that human-like virtual assistants may actually deter some people from seeking help on tasks that are supposed to measure achievement.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Optical efficiency in nanophotonic devicesNanophotonic devices have direct applications for use in ultra-high resolution microscopes, solar energy harvesting, optical computing and targeted medical therapies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New brainstem changes identified in Parkinson's diseaseA pioneering study has found that patients with Parkinson's disease have more errors in the mitochondrial DNA within the brainstem, leading to increased cell death in that area.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bright and stable: New acid-tolerant green fluorescent protein for bioimagingFluorescent proteins (FPs) are powerful tools for visualization of molecular and cellular processes; however, most FPs lose fluorescence at a pH lower than their neutral pKa (~6). A team of researchers developed the acid-tolerant green FP -- termed Gamillus -- cloned from flower hat jellyfish. Gamillus exhibits excellent brightness, maturation speed, and photostablity, even in low pH environments,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Is Arctic warming influencing the UK's extreme weather?Severe snowy weather in winter or extreme rains in summer in the UK might be influenced by warming trends in the Arctic, according to climate scientists in the US and the UK.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When is the right time to start infants on solid foods?The first study of a nationally representative group of US infants reports that more than half of babies are currently introduced to complementary foods, that is, foods or drinks other than breast milk or formula, sooner than they should be. Babies who were never breastfed or breastfed for less than four months were most likely to be introduced to foods too early. These findings emphasize the need
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stressed out? Try smelling your partner's shirtThe scent of a romantic partner can help lower stress levels, new psychology research have found. Women feel calmer after being exposed to their male partner's scent, but being exposed to a stranger's scent had the opposite effect and raised levels of the stress hormone, cortisol.
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Inside Science
BRIEF: Elbow Surgery Keeps Pitchers Throwing BRIEF: Elbow Surgery Keeps Pitchers Throwing Professional baseball pitchers who return after "Tommy John" surgery have similar career lengths and retirement reasons as other pitchers. Pitcher_topNteaser.jpg Pitcher Joba Chamberlain on a injury rehabilitation pitching appearance in the minor leagues in 2012. Image credits: Aspen Photo via Shutterstock Sports Friday, January 5, 2018 - 15:15 Chris G
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA catches Tropical Cyclone Ava's landfall on Madagascar's coast NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Ava as it made landfall along the coast of northeastern Madagascar. On Jan. 5 at 5:24 a.m. EST (1024 UTC) the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite showed the eye of Ava over the northeastern coast near Mahavelona. Mahavelona is a town located in the district of Toamasi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The ocean is losing its breath. Here's the global scope IMAGE: Low oxygen caused the death of these corals and others in Bocas del Toro, Panama. The dead crabs pictured also succumbed to the loss of dissolved oxygen. view more Credit: (Credit: Arcadio Castillo/Smithsonian) In the past 50 years, the amount of water in the open ocean with zero oxygen has gone up more than fourfold. In coastal water bodies, including estuaries and seas, low
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Blog » Languages » English
Eyewire Release Report 1/5/2018 Happy Friday and happy New Year! Here are all changes on Eyewire since the last report, even if there was a separate post about something big, so that you have a comprehensive picture of everything new from the last few weeks. We’ve pushed a fix for the overview flashing bug that some advanced players were experiencing. There are now additional API calls available for stats-related scripts. Techn
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The Scientist RSS
Study: UV Light Destroys Bat-Killing FungusWhite nose syndrome has killed millions of bats throughout North America since it was discovered on the continent.
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Popular Science
There are two types of fat cells. Here’s how to get more of the good stuff. Every January, fat's in the crosshairs of health columnists, fitness magazines, and desperate Americans. This year, PopSci looks at the macronutrient beyond its most negative associations. What’s fat good for? How do we get it to go where we want it to? Where does it wander when it’s lost? This, my friends, is Fat Month . Most people assume that all body fat is made the same. We should have some
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Latest Headlines | Science News
A key virus fighter is implicated in pregnancy woes An immune system mainstay in the fight against viruses may harm rather than help a pregnancy. In Zika-infected mice, this betrayal appears to contribute to fetal abnormalities linked to the virus, researchers report online January 5 in Science Immunology . And it could explain pregnancy complications that arise from infections with other pathogens and from autoimmune disorders. In pregnant mice i
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ocean acidification means major changes for California musselsAccelerating ocean acidification could be transforming the fundamental structure of California mussel shells, according to a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Special star is a Rosetta Stone for understanding the sun's variability and climate effectScientists have found a star that can help shed light on the physics underlying the solar dynamo. Researchers combined observations from the Kepler spacecraft with ground-based observations as far back as 1978, thereby reconstructing a 7.4-year cycle in this star. The star is almost identical to the Sun, except for the chemical composition. That makes it a Rosetta Stone for the study of stellar dy
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists uncover why sauna bathing is good for your healthScientists in Finland have shown that sauna bathing is associated with a variety of health benefits. Using an experimental setting this time, the research group now investigated the physiological mechanisms through which the heat exposure of sauna may influence a person's health. Their latest study with 100 test subjects shows that taking a sauna bath of 30 minutes reduces blood pressure and incre
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study boosts hope for cheaper fuel cellsSimulations by scientists show how carbon nanomaterials may be optimized to replace expensive platinum in cathodes for electricity-generating fuel cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ultrafine fibers have exceptional strengthResearchers have developed a process to produce ultrafine fibers -- whose width is measured in nanometers -- that are exceptionally strong, tough, inexpensive, and easy to produce, and could be choice materials for many applications, such as protective armor.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Advances in brain imaging settle debate over spread of key protein in Alzheimer'sRecent advances in brain imaging have enabled scientists to show for the first time that a key protein which causes nerve cell death spreads throughout the brain in Alzheimer's disease -- and hence that blocking its spread may prevent the disease from taking hold.
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Live Science
Photos: Book Fragments from Blackbeard's Ship After cleaning Credit: Courtesy of the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources Underwater archaeologists have been excavating the site of Queen Anne's Revenge for two decades. The breech chamber, shown here after cleaning, is among hundreds of thousands of artifacts found at the wreck. Surprise inside Credit: Courtesy of the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Re
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Live Science
Blackbeard's Book Club? Document Discovery May Reveal Pirate Reading List Text of one paper fragment is shown matched to text from a page in Edward Cooke's 1712 travelogue and adventure tale. Credit: Courtesy of the North Carolina Department of Natural and Cultural Resources NEW ORLEANS —A discovery from the wreck of Blackbeard's shipcould offer some insights into pirate reading tastes. Conservators in North Carolina found paper fragments wadded up inside a canno
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mechanism that converts white fat to brown identifiedIn experiments on mice, researchers have pinpointed a mechanism for the conversion of energy-storing white fat into energy-expending brown fat.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Working group proposes new regulations for stool transfersA working group of human microbiome researchers and legal experts developed what they say is an improved regulatory process for fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) which will result in better outcomes for patients and could serve as a model for other countries contemplating regulatory frameworks for FMT.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How Zika infection drives fetal demiseAn interferon cell receptor spurs cell suicide in fetuses infected with the Zika virus and could play a role in certain pregnancy complications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Strengthening citric fruit to better resist climate changeResearchers have identified the genes within citric fruit that biotechnology could improve to face climate change. Work is progressing in the understanding of the signaling pathway of a plant hormone that will make plants more resistant to stress by flooding.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Border inspections of electronic devices hits record number Energous, a San Jose, Calif., company, is the first firm to receive federal approval for a wireless charging system purported to power devices from up to 3 feet away, the company said.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
‘Laid-back’ bonobos take a shine to belligerents Despite a reputation as mellow apes, bonobos have a thing for bad guys. Rather than latching on to individuals with a track record of helpfulness, adult bonobos favor obstructionists who keep others from getting what they want. The result may help explain what differentiates humans’ cooperative skills from those of other apes, biological anthropologists Christopher Krupenye of the University of S
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Live Science
Watch for Falling Iguanas! Bomb Cyclone Drops Frozen Lizards January 4, 2018 - Palm Beach, Florida, U.S. - An Iguana that froze, apparantly fell from a tree and landed belly up along the edge of Palm Beach Post columnist Frank Cerabino's pool. Credit: Frank Cerabino/The Palm Beach Post/Zuma You know what they say: When it rains, it pours — and when it snows in Florida, it hails frozen iguanas. As a so-called bomb cyclone continues lashing the U.S. Ea
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