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Proper exercise can reverse damage from heart aging DALLAS - Jan. 8, 2018 - Exercise can reverse damage to sedentary, aging hearts and help prevent risk of future heart failure - if it's enough exercise, and if it's begun in time, according to a new study by cardiologists at UT Southwestern and Texas Health Resources. To reap the most benefit, the exercise regimen should begin by late middle age (before age 65), when the heart apparently ret
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Viden
Minus 30 grader: Ekstrem kulde fryser Niagara Falls til is Florida er ellers kendt som Solskins-staten, men de seneste dage et tyndt lag sne dækket jorden flere steder i den nordlige del af delstaten. Hele vejen fra Florida og op til Massachusetts er den amerikanske østkyst ramt af frostvejr og hård blæst, som sænker temperaturerne, så de nogle steder føles som minus 30 grader. - Det er meget farligt, forklarer meteorolog ved vejrtjenesten Accuweather, D
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Ingeniøren
DTU-notat: Batteritog kan erstatte elledninger langs en del af de danske skinner Teknisk ligger det lige for at bygge et elektrisk tog, der minder om IC3, og som kan køre hele vejen fra København til Kalundborg på energi lagret i batterier. Det fastslog forskere fra DTU allerede i 2016 i et notat, som Transportministeriet havde bestilt. Notatet er blevet aktuelt igen, fordi signalprogrammet er forsinket – og det er en forsinkelse, der vælter en hel stribe dominobrikker. Den h
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Live Science
Coca-Cola Plus … Laxatives? What's in Coke's 'Healthy' Japanese Drink? The Japanese government has given a "gold label" to the soda Coca-Cola Plus, a designation meant to certify the drink's "health benefits," The Wall Street Journal reported Sunday (Jan. 7). Coca-Cola Plus (which isn't available in the United States) contains an additional ingredient — one that The Wall Street Journal calls a laxative. In fact, the zero-calorie drink contains dextrin, a d
3min
Live Science
Woman Dies After Eating Raw Oysters: What Are Vibrio Bacteria? A scanning electron micrograph image of Vibrio vulnificus bacteria. Credit: CDC/Janice Haney Carr A Texas woman developed a fatal infection with flesh-eating bacteria after eating raw oysters, according to news reports. The woman, Jeanette LeBlanc, went crabbing with her friends and family on the coast of Louisiana in September, according to CBS News . During the trip, LeBlanc and her frien
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Science | The Guardian
Gas-sniffing pill that transmits from the gut passes first human trials An electronic gas-detecting pill could help in diagnosing gastrointestinal ailments, including irritable bowel syndrome. Scientists from Melbourne’s RMIT University first unveiled their swallowable capsule early in 2015 in the hope it would it would help doctors work out what foods were problematic for their patients by detecting and measuring intestinal gases produced by gut bacteria. Now they h
24min
Live Science
Are iPhones Bad for Kids? Two Investors Are Urging Apple to Investigate Negotiating screen time is becoming as classic a parent-child debate as golden oldies like "Vegetables v. Dessert" and "Bedtime v. One More Story." But what role, if any, should the manufacturers of phones and tablets take in regulating children's access to the products? According to an open letter released Saturday (Jan. 6) by Apple investors JANA Partners LLC and the California State Teac
27min
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Todd's Team Faces Major Consequences For Ignoring Safety Rules #GoldRush | Friday 9p Safety Officer Trey, gets a surprise visit from the MSHA inspectors and it's not good news. Given an imminent danger citation, the Hoffman crew is in bigger trouble than ever before. Can Hunter be trusted to lead a crew? Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: ht
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Big Think
After the Apocalypse, New York’s Cave Cities Will Still Have Coca-Cola After the Apocalypse, when what’s left of humanity huddles together in spherical cave cities below Manhattan, there’ll still be Coca-Cola. And at least one (subterranean) helicopter. At least that’s according to this map, which appeared in the December 1969 issue of Esquire under the title ‘Plan for an Underground Nuclear Shelter’. This was the height of the Cold War, when the fear of nuclear a
39min
New on MIT Technology Review
Baidu Could Beat Google in Self-Driving Cars with a Totally Google Move It’s a damp evening in early January, and I’m riding shotgun in a Lincoln MKZ hybrid as it traverses the dark streets of Sunnyvale, California. Traffic is light, even though it’s rush hour on a Thursday, so we take twists and turns at a good clip. It would be a largely unremarkable ride, if not for the fact that the guy in the driver’s seat doesn’t have his hands on the wheel. Traveling in Baidu’
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An exercise program provides mobility benefits to all seniors 1. A structured exercise program provides mobility benefits to all older patients, regardless of frailty status Abstract: http://annals. org/ aim/ article/ doi/ 10. 7326/ M16-2011 Editorial: http://annals. org/ aim/ article/ doi/ 10. 7326/ M17-3048 FREE Summary for Patients: http://annals. org/ aim/ article/ doi/ 10. 7326/ P17-9052 URLs go live when the embargo lifts Physicians should prescribe p
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: The Invisible Underwater Messaging System in Blue Crab Urine “They smell death around them, and if that death is of their own type, they want out of there,” said Dr. Kubanek. Photo Mud crabs spend more time hiding if they sense that blue crabs are nearby. Credit Georgia Tech This invisible, underwater messaging system has far-reaching signals. Just a single blue crab eating one mud crab and then urinating in an estuary can change the interactions up and do
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Success in community college aided by comprehensive case management, study findsNew research from the University of Notre Dame shows that students who participated in the full comprehensive case management program were significantly more likely to stay enrolled and to graduate within six semesters.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New biomarkers predict outcome of cancer immunotherapyResearchers have identified biomarkers in the blood that make it possible to predict whether cancer patients will respond positively to immunotherapy. Patients for whom therapy does not work can thus be treated using different methods at an earlier stage.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What species is most fit for life? All have an equal chance, scientists say A new study says large animals such as elephants are no more or less fit for survival than tiny microscopic species. Credit: SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry There are more than 8 million species of living things on Earth, but none of them—from 100-foot blue whales to microscopic bacteria—has an advantage over the others in the universal struggle for existence. In a paper publis
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What species is most fit for life? All have an equal chance, scientists say There are more than 8 million species of living things on Earth, but none of them -- from 100-foot blue whales to microscopic bacteria -- has an advantage over the others in the universal struggle for existence. In a paper published Jan. 8 in the prestigious journal Nature Ecology & Evolution , a trio of scientists from universities in the United States and the United Kingdom describe the dynamic
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Hide or get eaten,' urine chemicals tell mud crabsPinpointing urine compounds for the first time that make mud crabs hide for their lives, if blue crabs pee nearby, opens new doors to understanding how chemicals invisibly regulate marine wildlife.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
US rivers and streams are compromised by increasing salt loadsHuman activities are exposing US rivers and streams to a cocktail of salts, with consequences for infrastructure and drinking water supplies. So reports a new study that is the first to assess the combined, long-term changes in freshwater salinity and alkalization across the country.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Growing opioid epidemic forcing more children into foster careThe opioid crisis is causing serious consequences across the country. One of the biggest, illicit opioid abusers are neglecting their children, resulting in more kids being removed from their homes. A new study finds a direct correlation between the epidemic and growing number of children placed in foster care.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gene test to predict breast cancer recurrence less cost effective in real world practiceThe most commonly used gene expression profile test, Oncotype DX®, used to help predict breast cancer recurrence may not be as cost-effective as once thought, say a team of researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Recreational marijuana legalization: Do more youth use or do youth use more?Recent results indicate that the effects of recreational marijuana legalization on Oregon teens' use depends on whether the teens were already using marijuana when legal sales began.
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Science : NPR
New Report Shows Weather Disasters In 2017 Cost More Than $300 Billion Hurricane Harvey put vast swaths of Texas under water. Elsewhere, fires, tornadoes and extreme weather caused hundreds of billions in damages. Emily Kask/AFP/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Emily Kask/AFP/Getty Images Hurricane Harvey put vast swaths of Texas under water. Elsewhere, fires, tornadoes and extreme weather caused hundreds of billions in damages. Emily Kask/AFP/Getty Images B
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Live Science
Why Is Flu Season So Bad This Year? Flu season is off to an early — and severe — start, with rates of hospitalizations and deaths from flu higher than what's typical for this time of year. But why is the flu so bad this year? During the week that ended Dec. 30 (the most recent period for which data is available), 46 states reported widespread flu activity, up from 36 states the week before, according to the U.S. Centers f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ACA Medicaid expansion resulted in fewer hospital closures, especially in rural areas A new report published in the January issue of Health Affairs is the first to examine hospital closures in the context of the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid expansion. The study from researchers at the Colorado School of Public Health at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus used data from 2008 to 2016, including multiple years of post-expansion hospital performance data. The findi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
VA bests Medicare in end-of-life care for cancer patients, Stanford/VA-led study reports Cancer patients treated by the Department of Veterans Affairs are less likely to receive excessive end-of-life interventions than those treated through Medicare, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine and Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System. The study will be published online Jan. 8 in Health Affairs . "The findings are not just important f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
US childhood mortality rates have lagged behind other wealthy nations for the past 50 years IMAGE: A new study reveals childhood mortality trends from 1961 to 2010 in the United States and 19 economically similar countries. view more Credit: Credit: Johns Hopkins Medicine In a new study of childhood mortality rates between 1961 and 2010 in the United States and 19 economically similar countries, researchers report that while there's been overall improvement among all the countr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Growing opioid epidemic forcing more children into foster care IMAGE: Data from the Adoption and Foster Care Analysis and Reporting System shows a 129 percent increase in the number of children removed from their homes due to parental neglect, tied... view more Credit: Troy Quast, PhD, University of South Florida College of Public Health TAMPA, Fla. (January 8, 2018)- The opioid epidemic has become so severe it's considered a national public health emerg
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In the January Health Affairs: US child mortality rates worse than in other OECD nations IMAGE: Child mortality in the US and the OECD19, by age group, 1960-2010. view more Credit: Health Affairs The January issue of Health Affairs includes a study by Ashish Thakrar of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System and coauthors. The United States has poorer child health outcomes than other industrialized nations despite greater per capita spending. The authors compare child mortal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gene test to predict breast cancer recurrence less cost effective in real world practice WASHINGTON -- The most commonly used gene expression profile test used to help predict breast cancer recurrence may not be as cost-effective as once thought, say a team of researchers led by Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center . Their study, published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology ("Cost-Effectiveness of Gene-expression Profile Testing in Community Practice"), is the first to
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Big Think
A Diet Lacking in Fiber Wreaks System-Wide Havoc, Scientists Find The first two episodes of the Netflix documentary series Rotten touch upon important issues in our relationship to food. The first focuses on the dangers of colony collapse in bee populations as well as international companies filling bottles with ingredients that definitely are not honey. The second deals with food allergies, particularly focused on the largest: peanuts. While these are dist
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Most sea turtles now female in north Great Barrier Reef Credit: CC0 Public Domain The vast majority of green sea turtles in the northern Great Barrier Reef are now female because of warmer temperatures due to climate change, which influences their sex during incubation, researchers said Monday. The population of about 200,000 nesting females in the area along the east coast of Queensland, Australia, is one of the largest in the world, and could crash
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Toyota brings the store to you with self-driving concept vehicleSelf-driving buses aren't new, but Toyota's concept vehicle unveiled Monday aims to be more than just that—a mobile platform for e-commerce, ridesharing and medical services, for a start.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
LG adds Google AI in 'smart home' push (Update) Consumer electronics titan LG on Monday proclaimed this year a "tipping point" for smart homes, pushing hard into artificial intelligence and building Google Assistant into a smart speaker. LG Electronics is developing technology designed to enable its appliances, televisions and other devices adapt to users and collaborate to handle tasks. The AI platform is "open" to utilizing software made b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nutrition Today publishes expert commentary on high-quality carbohydrates and physical performance Denver, CO. (January 8, 2018) - A report about high-quality carbohydrates and physical performance was recently released in the peer-reviewed journal Nutrition Today . The report focuses on commentary that took place during an expert panel. The results of the report suggest that balanced diets high in natural, carbohydrate-rich foods, including nutrient-dense potatoes, may be optimal for improvin
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Popular Science
All the cool new stuff from CES 2018: Let's play bingo! Every year, once the New Year’s confetti has been vacuumed up from Time Square and Santa is deep in the heart of his post-Christmas cruise, the Consumer Electronics Show kicks off in Las Vegas. It’s a hearty stew of media, analysts, and just about every consumer electronics company (except for Apple) that provides our first opportunity to see this year’s new gadgets. We’re keeping up with CES fro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team modifies nanoscale virus to deliver peptide drugs to cells, tissues Rice University bioengineers have developed programmable adeno-associated viruses by modifying one of three proteins that assemble into a tough shell called a capsid. In this illustration, blue subunits in the capsid represent the protein VP3 and green subunits represent a truncated mutant of VP2. From top to bottom: a VP3-only capsid that does not display any peptides; a mosaic capsid with a maj
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Powerful tropical cyclone irving examined with GPMOn Jan. 8, Tropical Cyclone Irving was hurricane-force in the Southern Indian Ocean. The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission or GPM core satellite passed overhead and measured cloud heights and rainfall rates in the powerful storm.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tropical Cyclone Ava moving away from MadagascarNASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Ava as it continued moving away from the island nation of Madagascar. Ava was located in the Southern Indian Ocean, off the southeastern coast of the country.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Finding and Sustaining New DifferentiationThe Internet of Things (IoT) and advanced data analytics are enabling problem solving and improving performance, whether these technologies are being utilized to quickly move people through buildings on elevators and escalators or to safely and efficiently transport people in vehicles.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tropical Cyclone Ava moving away from Madagascar NASA's Terra satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Ava as it continued moving away from the island nation of Madagascar. Ava was located in the Southern Indian Ocean, off the southeastern coast of the country. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite provided a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Ava early on Jan. 8. The image showed most
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Powerful Tropical Cyclone Irving examined with GPM On Jan. 8, Tropical Cyclone Irving was hurricane-force in the Southern Indian Ocean. The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission or GPM core satellite passed overhead and measured cloud heights and rainfall rates in the powerful storm. Tropical Cyclone Irving formed in the South Indian Ocean on January 6, 2018. Irving posed no threat to land because it developed over the open ocean far to the we
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Live Science
This Huge New Prime Number Is a Very Big Deal There's a new biggest known prime number in the universe. It's called M77232917, and it looks like this: Despite being a ridiculously huge number (just that text file, which readers can download here , takes up more than 23 megabytes of space on a computer), M77232917 can't be divided up without using fractions. It won't break into integers no matter what other factors, large or sma
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New on MIT Technology Review
OK Google: Copy Amazon and Build a Smart Speaker with a Screen OK Google: Copy Amazon and Build a Smart Speaker with a Screen The EMBARGO lifts at 8 PM EASTERN/ 5 PM PACIFIC on Jan 8. Google Assistant is seeking a popularity boost by coming to gadgets with screens—a move Amazon already made with Alexa. Copycat: Google said Monday that it will let companies make touch-screen… Read more The EMBARGO lifts at 8 PM EASTERN/ 5 PM PACIFIC on Jan 8. Google Ass
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The Atlantic
Mountain Gorillas at Home According to a report by the International Union for Conservation of Nature in 2016, the total population of mountain gorillas living in the wild is about 880. These remaining critically endangered gorillas live within four national parks in the central African countries of Uganda, Rwanda, and the Democratic Republic of Congo. For decades, the survival of mountain gorillas has been threatened by
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BBC News - Science & Environment
El Nino's long reach to Antarctic ice Image copyright NASA Image caption The Getz Ice Shelf in West Antarctica feels the linkage strongly Antarctica may be thousands of kilometres from the central Pacific but events there can have a significant effect on the White Continent's ice. Scientists have shown how ice shelves - the floating fronts of marine-terminating glaciers - respond to the El Niño phenomenon. The warming of tropical eas
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Live Science
Not Cool: Why an Ice Cream Museum Got Fined for Its 'Sprinkles' I scream, you scream, we all scream for…inedible plastic? Credit: Bebeto Matthews/AP/REX/Shutterstock Multicolored, sugary sprinkles are a popular topping for ice cream cones and sundaes, but a swimming pool filled with fake sprinkles at a Florida pop-up museum recently landed the institution in hot water. The Museum of Ice Cream celebrates the dairy treat through frozen-dessert-themed inte
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Noise pollution causes chronic stress in birds, with health consequences for young GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- Birds exposed to the persistent noise of natural gas compressors show symptoms remarkably similar to those in humans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, new research shows. In a study published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , researchers found that adults and nestlings of three species showed multiple signs of chronic stress caus
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Noise from oil and gas operations stresses birds, hinders reproductionBirds exposed to constant noise from oil and gas operations show physiological signs of chronic stress, have chicks whose growth is stunted, and -- in some cases -- lay fewer eggs that hatch, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Hide or get eaten,' urine chemicals tell mud crabs IMAGE: A blue crab in a tank in a research lab at Georgia Tech. In the tank behind it, small mud crabs are hiding in plastic tubes. view more Credit: Georgia Tech / Alex Draper Psssst, mud crabs, time to hide because blue crabs are coming to eat you! That's the warning the prey get from the predators' urine when it spikes with high concentrations of two chemicals, which researchers
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
North American waterways are becoming saltier and more alkaline Across North America, streams and rivers are becoming saltier, thanks to road deicers, fertilizers and other salty compounds that humans indirectly release into waterways. At the same time, freshwater supplies are becoming more alkaline. Salty, alkaline freshwater can create big problems for drinking water supplies, urban infrastructure and natural ecosystems. For example, when Flint, Michigan, s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
US rivers and streams are compromised by increasing salt loads IMAGE: This map shows changes in the salt content of fresh water in rivers and streams across the United States over the past half century. Warmer colors indicate increasing salinity while... view more Credit: Ryan Utz/Chatham University (Millbrook, NY) Human activities are exposing US rivers and streams to a cocktail of salts, with consequences for infrastructure and drinking water
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Big Think
Millennials Are at Higher Risk for Mental Health Issues. This May Be Why Millennials are experiencing higher levels of anxiety, depression, and thoughts of suicide than generations past. Many reasons have been offered but none definitive, until now. A new study finds that this generation carries much higher levels of perfectionism, and that these elevated expectations may be to blame. UK researchers came to these conclusions, which were published in the journal Psycho
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Science | The Guardian
Ibuprofen may increase risk of fertility issues in men, study suggests Men who take high doses of ibuprofen for months at a time may be at greater risk of fertility issues and also other health problems, such as muscle wastage, erectile dysfunction and fatigue, scientists have found. Research on healthy young men who took the common painkiller for up to six weeks showed that the drug disrupted the production of male sex hormones and led to a condition normally seen
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NYT > Science
The Healing Edge: Brain Surgery in 3-D: Coming Soon to the Operating Theater “This is like landing on the moon,” said a neurosurgeon who was visiting to watch and learn. The equipment produces magnified, high-resolution, three-dimensional digital images of surgical sites, and lets everyone in the room see exactly what the surgeon is seeing. The videomicroscope has a unique ability to capture “the brilliance and the beauty of the neurosurgical anatomy,” Dr. Langer said. He
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
North American waterways are becoming saltier and more alkaline This map shows changes in the salt content of fresh water in rivers and streams across the United States over the past half century. Warmer colors indicate increasing salinity while cooler colors indicate decreasing salinity. The black dots represent the 232 US Geological Survey monitoring sites that provided the data for the study. Credit: Ryan Utz/Chatham University Across North America, stream
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Hide or get eaten,' urine chemicals tell mud crabs A blue crab in a tank in a research lab at Georgia Tech. In the tank behind it, small mud crabs are hiding in plastic tubes. Credit: Georgia Tech / Alex Draper Psssst, mud crabs, time to hide because blue crabs are coming to eat you! That's the warning the prey get from the predators' urine when it spikes with high concentrations of two chemicals, which researchers have identified in a new study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Noise pollution causes chronic stress in birds, with health consequences for young This western bluebird guards her clutch of eggs in a nesting box in a natural gas field. Unable to discern whether their environment is safe due to compressor noise, mother birds must choose between staying on guard and finding food for their young. Credit: Nathan Kleist Birds exposed to the persistent noise of natural gas compressors show symptoms remarkably similar to those in humans suffering
3h
The Atlantic
America's Rivers Are Getting Saltier America’s freshwater is changing. According to an analysis of 232 sites in streams and rivers over several decades, it has become saltier in some places, and in almost all places, it’s becoming less acidic and more alkaline. These two processes may be related, and researchers have dubbed it “freshwater salinization syndrome.” There are many likely causes: road salt (particularly in the Midwest an
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Recreational marijuana legalization: Do more youth use or do youth use more? What impact may legalization of recreational marijuana in Oregon have on teen marijuana use? Recent results from an Oregon Research Institute (ORI) study indicate that the influence of legalization on youth may depend on whether they were already using at the time of legalization. Following legalization of recreational marijuana, no significant changes in the numbers of youth who used marijuana o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Activity monitors only effective when users set goalsThe activity monitors that many received as holiday gifts won't automatically make their recipients active or healthy, new research indicates. However, trackers can have a significant impact when users establish clearly defined objectives.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine issues guidance on informal milk sharing IMAGE: Breastfeeding Medicine publishes original scientific papers, reviews, and case studies on a broad spectrum of topics in lactation medicine. view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, January 8, 2018-- In response to the increasing informal sharing of human milk, the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine (ABM) has published guidelines to minimize the risk of this
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Activity monitors only effective when users set goals PORTLAND, Ore. -- The activity monitors that many received as holiday gifts won't automatically make their recipients active or healthy, new research indicates; however, trackers can have a significant impact when users establish clearly defined objectives. "To make activity trackers effective, users need to set a specific goal and stick with it," said the study's corresponding author, Luke Burch
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Popular Science
I hardly ever use my Nima allergen sensor. I’m still glad I bought it. Prior to the night of August 10, 2017, I harbored an unabashed love for lobster mac and cheese. I realize that undercooked pasta and cheddar sauce are no real place for delicate crustacean meat, but I longed for it anyway—because there’s only one restaurant I know of where I can eat it. Or at least I could, before that evening. It might seem silly, or perhaps pathetic, to mourn the loss of a food
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Repeated influenza vaccination helps prevent severe flu in older adultsRepeated vaccination for influenza in older adults reduced the severity of the virus and reduced hospital admissions, found new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A botanical mystery solved by phylogenetic testingResearchers used DNA testing to rediscover Dracaena umbraculifera, which was thought to be extinct.
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Popular Science
In his first PopSci appearance, a young Stephen Hawking explains an incredible discovery How will the universe end? Will it sputter out in a realm of ice, cooling continually as it expands until it reaches the absolute zero of temperature throughout its vast expanse? Will it die in a fiery blast as its component parts rush together faster and faster until they all meet in an enormous fireball? Or will the cosmos live on forever, expanding and contracting in relentless succession? It
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Scientific American Content: Global
"Oral Parity": Reducing the Cost of Cancer Care “Oral Parity”: Reducing the Cost of Cancer Care In many ways this is a golden age of progress in the fight against blood cancer. For many Americans living with leukemia, lymphoma or myeloma, they have seen their cancer diagnosis transformed from a death sentence to a manageable chronic disease. This is thanks in large part to the discovery of new, targeted drug therapies, many of which come i
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Water-based, eco-friendly and energy-saving air-conditionerA team of researchers has pioneered a new water-based air-conditioning system that cools air to as low as 18 degrees Celsius without the use of energy-intensive compressors and environmentally harmful chemical refrigerants.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unusual plant immune response to bacterial infection characterizedWhen you see brown spots on otherwise healthy green leaves, you may be witnessing a plant's immune response as it tries to keep a bacterial infection from spreading. Some plants are more resistant to such infections than others, and plant biologists want to understand why. Scientists studying a plant protein called SOBER1 recently discovered one mechanism by which, counterintuitively, plants seem
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Surprising result shocks scientists studying spinScientists analyzing results of spinning protons striking different sized atomic nuclei at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) found an odd directional preference in the production of neutrons that switches sides as the size of the nuclei increases. The results offer new insight into the mechanisms affecting particle production in these collisions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Beta blockers may boost immunotherapy, help melanoma patients live longerMelanoma patients who took a specific type of beta blocker while receiving immunotherapy lived longer than patients who received immunotherapy alone, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain-cell 'antenna' may be key to understanding obesityResearchers have discovered that the brain's ability to regulate body weight depends on a novel form of signaling in the brain's 'hunger circuit' via antenna-like structures on neurons called primary cilia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Throwing molecular wrench into gene control machine leads to 'melting away' of leukemiaResearchers have figured out a way to prevent MYB, one of the most potent cancer-aiding proteins, from activating genes in AML, an aggressive form of leukemia. Tested in mice, the new method resulted in dramatic cancer reduction and no harm to healthy cells. This could lead to a new therapy for AML and possibly other cancers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Feel anxious? Have trouble sleeping? You may be traveling for business too oftenPeople who travel for business two weeks or more a month report more symptoms of anxiety and depression and are more likely to smoke, be sedentary and report trouble sleeping than those who travel one to six nights a month. Among those who consume alcohol, extensive business travel is associated with symptoms of alcohol dependence. Poor behavioral and mental health outcomes significantly increased
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanoscale virus modified to deliver peptide drugs to cells, tissuesBioengineers have developed programmable adeno-associated viruses that may be used to deliver peptide drugs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Interactions between simple molecular mechanisms give rise to complex infection dynamicsBacteria can themselves be infected -- by viruses. Not all viruses are harmful to bacteria and some can even benefit them. Can bacteria tell good and bad viruses apart? Scientists now studied how infections with potentially beneficial viruses play out in bacteria that carry a certain type of anti-viral immune mechanism called restriction-modification. They show that population-level interactions b
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Severe obesity linked to newly identified gene mutationsResearchers have discovered mutations in a gene related to obesity, offering new treatment possibilities in the fight against the global epidemic.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cellular traffic jam seen in ALS/FTD -- Supports drug strategyA cellular traffic jam appears to affect neurons in most forms of ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), researchers have shown. The findings suggest that a drug strategy aimed at easing the traffic jam may be generalizable to sporadic and at least some familial types of ALS and FTD (frontotemporal dementia).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Methane hydrate dissociation off Spitsbergen not caused by climate changeFor years, methane emissions from the seabed have been observed in the Arctic Ocean off Spitsbergen. The assumption that the warming of seawater by climate change is responsible for the release of methane, has not been confirmed. Research shows that post-glacial uplift is the most likely cause of methane hydrate break-down.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Agricultural fungicide attracts honey beesWhen given the choice, honey bee foragers prefer to collect sugar syrup laced with the fungicide chlorothalonil over sugar syrup alone, researchers report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Many Midwestern retailers sell mislabeled invasive vinesGardeners hoping to celebrate the beauty of American bittersweet -- a native vine that produces orange berries in the fall and is used for wreaths -- may be unwittingly buying an invasive bittersweet instead. That's because many Midwestern retailers are selling oriental bittersweet with labels misidentifying it as the native plant, researchers report. These sales are occurring in stores and online
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Uncovering the power of glial cellsImplanted devices send targeted electrical stimulation to the nervous system to interfere with abnormal brain activity, and it is commonly assumed that neurons are the only important brain cells that need to be stimulated by these devices. However, new research reveals that it may also be important to target the supportive glial cells surrounding the neurons.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Improved blood stabilization should expand use of circulating tumor cell profilingA new blood stabilization method significantly prolongs the lifespan of blood samples for microfluidic sorting and transcriptome profiling of rare circulating tumor cells, living cancer cells carried in the bloodstream.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Amazon biodiversity hotspot to suffer even more losses after contentious law passedIn August 2017, the Bolivian government passed a contentious law that paved the way for construction of a new 190-mile road cutting through one of the country's most iconic and biodiverse protected rainforests. But a new report shows that the Isiboro-Sécure National Park and Indigenous Territory (or TIPNIS) has been subject to alarming levels of deforestation within its borders for many years, a r
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New approach can save up to 95 percent of energy used for pipelinesUntil now it had been assumed that, once a flow of a fluid has become turbulent, turbulence would persist. Researchers have now shown that this is not the case. In their experiments they managed to destabilize turbulence so that the flow turned to a laminar state, and they observed that the flow remained laminar thereafter. Eliminating turbulence can save as much as 95 percent of the energy requir
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Amphetamine abuse disrupts development of mouse prefrontal cortex IMAGE: Axons continue to grow to the orbital prefrontal cortex during adolescence. This image illustrates the dual-viral injection method used to label nucleus accumbens-projecting ventral tegmental area neurons. view more Credit: Hoops et al., eNeuro (2018) Recreational drug use during adolescence may disrupt development of an understudied part of the prefrontal cortex, according to a study
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The Atlantic
The Weird, Wondrous World of Competitive Dog Grooming For competitive groomers, dogs are more than pets—they’re living canvases. These dedicated hobbyists spend months sculpting, coiffing, and dyeing their canines into vibrant works of art, ranging from recreations of Michael Jackson to Disney characters to lions. Rebecca Stern’s whimsical short documentary Well Groomed follows creative groomers as they intricately style their dogs to compete for Be
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Long-Term Brain Rhythms Offer Possibility of Predicting SeizuresResearchers identify patterns of neural activity ranging from a few days to four weeks in individuals with epilepsy.
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Rice University lab modifies nanoscale virus to deliver peptide drugs to cells, tissues IMAGE: Nicole Thadani, left, and Junghae Suh of Rice University have developed programmable adeno-associated viruses that may be used to deliver peptide drugs. view more Credit: Jeff Fitlow/Rice University By chipping away at a viral protein, Rice University scientists have discovered a path toward virus-like, nanoscale devices that may be able to deliver drugs to cells. The protein
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New on MIT Technology Review
A Game of Civilization May Help People Understand AI’s Existential Threat Uh Oh—CRISPR Might Not Work in People A sampling of human blood has turned up a surprise: most people could be immune to one of the world’s biggest advances in genetic engineering. It’s in our blood: Scientists searched the blood of 22 newborns and 12 adults for antibodies to the two most… Read more A sampling of human blood has turned up a surprise: most people could be immune to one of the wo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Latest: Autos overshadow the small at CES tech show LG's new concept robots are introduced during a news conference at CES International, Monday, Jan. 8, 2018, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong) The Latest on the CES technology show in Las Vegas (all times local): 9:40 a.m. Robot fails are almost a given at technology trade shows, and this year's CES is no exception. As LG unveiled its lineup of smart appliances , executive David VanderWaal
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Self-defense for plants This cartoon depicts a leaf with areas of damage (brown spots) caused by the plant's innate immune response. The superimposed schematic shows SOBER1's three-dimensional structure. Credit: Salk Institute When you see brown spots on otherwise healthy green leaves, you may be witnessing a plant's immune response as it tries to keep a bacterial infection from spreading. Some plants are more resistant
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A so-called 'muscle' cancer is not really a muscle cancerOncologists have discovered the cell type that gives rise to rhabdomyosarcoma, the most prevalent soft tissue cancer in children. Previously, scientists thought the cancer arose from immature muscle cells, because the tumor resembled muscle under the microscope. However, the researchers discovered the cancer arises from immature progenitors that would normally develop into cells lining blood vesse
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New catalyst for making fuels from shale gasMethane in shale gas can be turned into hydrocarbon fuels using an innovative platinum and copper alloy catalyst, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Strong El Niño events cause large changes in Antarctic ice shelvesA new study reveals that strong El Nino events can cause significant ice loss in some Antarctic ice shelves while the opposite may occur during strong La Nina events.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
DNA evidence used to protect the rhinoceros from extinctionA new study shows that genetic database now being used in the fight against poaching the rhinoceros.
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Science : NPR
Pfizer Halts Research Into Alzheimer's And Parkinson's Treatments Pfizer said it would be abandoning its neuroscience development programs and allocating its spending elsewhere. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images Pfizer said it would be abandoning its neuroscience development programs and allocating its spending elsewhere. Dominick Reuter/AFP/Getty Images Pfizer has announced plans to end its research e
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: This Worm Evolved Self-Fertilization and Lost a Quarter of Its DNA “That tells us that the stuff being lost in Caenorhabditis briggsae is disproportionately involved in male biology,” said Erich Schwarz , an assistant research professor at Cornell University who led the sequencing efforts for the study. Digging into a specific example of what C. briggsae lost when it dumped all those genes, the researchers studied male secreted short (or m.s.s.) genes, which hav
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NYT > Science
In Africa, Geneticists Are Hunting Poachers The rangers have learned forensic crime-scene principles and the importance of the so-called chain of custody to ensure that the samples are not corrupted. Dr. Harper’s lab performs the analysis and stores DNA fingerprints. The scientists’ database, which they call Rhodis, is modeled after Codis, the F.B.I. system used to link the DNA of suspects to evidence at a crime scene. The approach is prom
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Common birth control shot linked to risk of HIV infection IMAGE: This is Zdenek Hel. view more Credit: UAB BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - Replacing the popular contraceptive shot known as DMPA with alternative methods of contraception could help protect women in sub-Saharan Africa and other high-risk regions from becoming infected with HIV, according to a comprehensive review of available evidence published in the journal Endocrine Reviews . "Human studies su
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Self-defense for plants IMAGE: This cartoon depicts a leaf with areas of damage (brown spots) caused by the plant's innate immune response. The superimposed schematic shows SOBER1's three-dimensional structure. view more Credit: Salk Institute LA JOLLA -- (Jan. 8, 2018) When you see brown spots on otherwise healthy green leaves, you may be witnessing a plant's immune response as it tries to keep a bacterial in
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Science | The Guardian
Nasal spray aimed at tackling gambling addiction to be trialled in Finland Could gambling addiction be treated with a nasal spray? A group of Finnish researchers are launching a study to find out. The fast-working spray contains naloxone, which is commonly used as an emergency treatment for overdoses of opiates such as heroin, opium and morphine. It blocks the production of dopamine, a neurotransmitter linked to pleasure with a central role in addictions. Hooked: how po
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Surprising result shocks scientists studying spin Neutrons produced when a spin-aligned (polarized) proton collides with another proton come out with a slight rightward-skew preference. But when the polarized proton collides with a much larger gold nucleus, the neutrons' directional preference becomes larger and switches to the left. These surprising results imply that the mechanisms producing particles along the beam direction may be very diffe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists discover molecule that could reverse cellular agingResearchers have found that manipulating a single RNA molecule may be enough to reverse cellular aging.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Survival strategy of messenger RNAs during cellular sugar shortageIf a cell runs low on sugar, it stores certain messenger RNAs in order to prolong its life. As a research group has now discovered, the protein Puf5p determines whether individual messenger RNAs will be stored or degraded when sugar levels are low. The study shows that Puf5p therefore sends the messenger RNAs to a cell organelle where their fate is sealed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Higher stress among minority and low-income populations can lead to health disparities, says reportPeople with low incomes and racial/ethnic minority populations experience greater levels of stress than their more affluent, white counterparts, which can lead to significant disparities in both mental and physical health that ultimately affect life expectancy, according to a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Yeast may be the solution to toxic waste clean-upAbout 46,000 nuclear weapons were produced during the Cold War era, leading to tremendous volumes of acidic radioactive liquid waste seeping into the environment. A new study suggests yeast as a potentially safer and more cost effective way to help clean up these radioactive waste sites.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Depression in black adolescents requires different treatmentBlack adolescents express depressive symptoms differently than people from other age and racial groups, requiring that clinicians take this into account when developing treatment plans.
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Live Science
Astronaut John Young, Who Walked on the Moon and Led 1st Shuttle Mission, Dies at 87 John Young, NASA's longest-serving astronaut, who walked on the moon and flew on the first Gemini and space shuttle missions, has died. The first person to fly six times into space — seven, if you count his launch off of the moon in 1972 — and the only astronaut to command four different types of spacecraft, Young died on Friday (Jan. 5) following complications from pneumonia.. He was 8
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Uncovering the power of glial cells IMAGE: A depiction of the brain glial cell response towards site injury upon insertion of neural interface probe track (rectangular hole), which disrupts the maintenance of their important regulatory roles. view more Credit: TDY Kozai/BionicLab.ORG PITTSBURGH (January 8, 2018) ... Implanted devices send targeted electrical stimulation to the nervous system to interfere with abnormal brain a
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Surprising result shocks scientists studying spin IMAGE: Brookhaven Lab physicist Alexander Bazilevsky and RIKEN physicist Itaru Nakagawa use billiards and a bowling ball to demonstrate surprising results observed at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider's PHENIX detector when... view more Credit: Brookhaven National Laboratory UPTON, NY--Imagine playing a game of billiards, putting a bit of counter-clockwise spin on the cue ball and wat
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Researchers discover that a 'muscle' cancer is not really a muscle cancer IMAGE: St. Jude researchers show that rhabdomyosarcoma also originates from endothelial cells lining blood vessels. The image shows red endothelial progenitor cells expanding and proliferating forming tumors between the green muscle... view more Credit: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital St. Jude Children's Research Hospital oncologists have discovered the cell type that gives rise t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Throwing molecular wrench into gene control machine leads to 'melting away' of leukemia IMAGE: By inducing the expression of a small peptide in mouse models of human AML, CSHL researchers were able to prevent MYB, a major cancer enabler, from promoting cancer growth. Imaged... view more Credit: Vakoc Lab, CSHL Cold Spring Harbor, NY - Cancer researchers today announced they have developed a way of sidelining one of the most dangerous "bad actors" in leukemia. Their approac
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Amazon biodiversity hotspot to suffer even more losses after contentious law passed IMAGE: This is a photograph of fTamandua tetradactyla . view more Credit: Oriol Massana & Adrià López-Baucells In August 2017, the Bolivian government passed a contentious law that paved the way for construction of a new 190-mile road cutting through one of the country's most iconic and biodiverse protected rainforests. But a report in Current Biology on January 8 shows that the I
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DNA evidence is putting rhino poachers behind bars, study shows In murder investigations, DNA evidence often helps to link a perpetrator to a crime scene and put him or her behind bars. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on January 8 show that DNA evidence is also successfully being used to link rhinoceros horns seized from poachers and traffickers in various countries directly to the specific crime scenes where rhinoceros carcasses were left behin
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Primary Cilia in Neurons Linked to ObesityThree studies-one of mice and two of human genetics-describe the role of two proteins, adenylyl cyclase and melanocortin 4 receptor, in the development of obesity and diabetes.
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Science | The Guardian
Rhinoceros DNA database successful in aiding poaching prosecutions A large database of rhinoceros DNA is successfully being used to prosecute poachers and those trading rhino horns, new research has revealed. While numbers of the southern white rhino – the only wild subspecies of white rhino in Africa – have grown to about 20,000, fewer than 5,500 black rhinos are thought to exist in the wild, and both species are affected by poaching. The animals’ horns are tra
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Science | The Guardian
Great Barrier Reef: rising temperatures turning green sea turtles female Rising temperatures are turning almost all green sea turtles in a Great Barrier Reef population female, new research has found. The scientific paper warned the skewed ratio could threaten the population’s future. Sea turtles are among species with temperature dependent sex-determination and the proportion of female hatchlings increases when nests are in warmer sands. Tuesday’s paper, from the Nat
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New on MIT Technology Review
China Has More Plans to Stamp Out Bitcoin Uh Oh—CRISPR Might Not Work in People A sampling of human blood has turned up a surprise: most people could be immune to one of the world’s biggest advances in genetic engineering. It’s in our blood: Scientists searched the blood of 22 newborns and 12 adults for antibodies to the two most… Read more A sampling of human blood has turned up a surprise: most people could be immune to one of the wo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Agricultural fungicide attracts honey bees, study finds Fungicides are among the top contaminants of honey bee hives and can interfere with the bees' ability to metabolize other pesticides. Credit: L. Brian Stauffer When given the choice, honey bee foragers prefer to collect sugar syrup laced with the fungicide chlorothalonil over sugar syrup alone, researchers report in the journal Scientific Reports . The puzzling finding comes on the heels of other
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Many Midwestern retailers sell mislabeled invasive vines Unlike native bittersweet, oriental bittersweet can girdle young trees, leaving a permanent spiraling groove in the bark and killing a tree before it matures. Credit: David Zaya Gardeners hoping to celebrate the beauty of American bittersweet - a native vine that produces orange berries in the fall and is used for wreaths - may be unwittingly buying an invasive bittersweet instead. That's because
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Science | The Guardian
Is everything Johann Hari knows about depression wrong? I do not know Johann Hari. We’ve never crossed paths, he’s done me no wrong that I’m aware of, I have no axe to grind with him or his work. And, in fairness, writing about mental health and how it’s treated or perceived is always a risk. It’s a major and often-debilitating issue facing a huge swathe of the population , and with so many unpleasant and unhelpful stigmas attached. In recent years th
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon biodiversity hotspot to suffer even more losses after contentious law passed Photograph of an Amazonian rainforest. Credit: Oriol Massana and Adrià López-Baucells In August 2017, the Bolivian government passed a contentious law that paved the way for construction of a new 190-mile road cutting through one of the country's most iconic and biodiverse protected rainforests. But a report in Current Biology on January 8 shows that the Isiboro-Sécure National Park and Indigenou
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DNA evidence is putting rhino poachers behind bars, study shows Rhinoceros. Credit: Cindy Harper, D.V.M.Veterinary Genetics LaboratoryUniversity of Pretoria In murder investigations, DNA evidence often helps to link a perpetrator to a crime scene and put him or her behind bars. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on January 8 show that DNA evidence is also successfully being used to link rhinoceros horns seized from poachers and traffickers in vario
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New on MIT Technology Review
How Amazon Will Put Alexa Everywhere Uh Oh—CRISPR Might Not Work in People A sampling of human blood has turned up a surprise: most people could be immune to one of the world’s biggest advances in genetic engineering. It’s in our blood: Scientists searched the blood of 22 newborns and 12 adults for antibodies to the two most… Read more A sampling of human blood has turned up a surprise: most people could be immune to one of the wo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improved blood stabilization should expand use of circulating tumor cell profiling A new blood stabilization method, developed at the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Engineering in Medicine (MGH-CEM), significantly prolongs the lifespan of blood samples for microfluidic sorting and transcriptome profiling of rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs), living cancer cells carried in the bloodstream. This work, which overcomes a significant barrier to the translation of liquid
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Beta blockers may boost immunotherapy, help melanoma patients live longer HERSHEY, Pa. -- A common, inexpensive drug that is used to prevent heart attacks and lower blood pressure may also help melanoma patients live longer, according to researchers. Researchers at Penn State found that melanoma patients who received immunotherapy while taking a specific type of beta blocker lived longer than patients who received immunotherapy alone. In a follow-up experiment with mic
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can good blood sugar control during labor benefit offspring of diabetic mothers? Hypoglycaemia, or low blood sugar, is a common and potentially serious outcome in newborns whose mothers were diabetic during pregnancy. Clinicians have wondered whether good blood sugar control during labour might reduce the risk that newborns will have hypoglycaemia. A new Diabetic Medicine review of published studies reveals that there is a paucity of high-quality data concerning this potentia
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Conception during IUD use increases risks to mother and infantWomen who conceive while using an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) have a greater risk of preterm delivery, low birth weight babies, bacterial infections, or losing a fetus, according to researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel PET tracer clearly identifies and tracks bacterial infection in lungsResearchers have demonstrated that a new radiotracer, 2-18F-fluorodeoxysorbitol (18F-FDS), can identify and track bacterial infection in lungs better than current imaging methods and is able to differentiate bacterial infection from inflammation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Monthly brain cycles predict seizures in patients with epilepsyNeurologists have discovered monthly cycles of brain activity linked to seizures in patients with epilepsy. The finding suggests it may soon be possible for clinicians to identify when patients are at highest risk for seizures, allowing patients to plan around these brief but potentially dangerous events.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Camelina oil improves blood lipid profileThe use of camelina oil reduces overall and LDL cholesterol levels in persons with impaired glucose metabolism, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Teens show decreased risk for heart disease later in life after bariatric surgeryAdolescents with severe obesity who had bariatric surgery showed significant improvements in cardiovascular disease risk factors, according to this study. Prior to bariatric surgery, 33 percent of the study participants had three or more defined cardiovascular disease risk factors. However, three years post-surgery only 5 percent of study participants had three or more risk factors; representing s
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Efforts to track food intake on smartphone app impacted by day of week but not season of yearDietary self-monitoring is a key component of successful behavioral weight loss interventions and is essential for facilitating other behavior change techniques (eg, setting goals, providing behavioral feedback). A new study found that the amount of time in a study and day of the week were associated with dietary self-monitoring.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Large increase in non-powder gun-related eye injuriesA study investigated sports- and recreation-related eye injuries during a 23-year period and found a slight decrease in eye injuries overall; however, the rate of eye injury associated with non-powder guns (including BB, pellet and paintball guns) increased by almost 170 percent.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vision, sensory and motor testing could predict best batters in baseballResearchers found players with higher scores on computer-based vision and motor tasks had better on-base percentages, more walks and fewer strikeouts -- collectively referred to as plate discipline -- compared to their peers.
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Many Midwestern retailers sell mislabeled invasive vines IMAGE: Unlike native bittersweet, oriental bittersweet can girdle young trees, leaving a permanent spiraling groove in the bark and killing a tree before it matures. view more Credit: Photo by David Zaya CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- Gardeners hoping to celebrate the beauty of American bittersweet - a native vine that produces orange berries in the fall and is used for wreaths - may be unwitting
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Quanta Magazine
Why an Old Theory of Everything Is Gaining New Life Twenty-five particles and four forces. That description — the Standard Model of particle physics — constitutes physicists’ best current explanation for everything. It’s neat and it’s simple, but no one is entirely happy with it. What irritates physicists most is that one of the forces — gravity — sticks out like a sore thumb on a four-fingered hand. Gravity is different. Unlike the electromagneti
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New long-acting, less-toxic HIV drug suppresses virus in humanized miceA team of researchers tested a new chemical compound that suppresses HIV, protects immune cells, and remains effective for weeks with a single dose. In animal experiments, the compound proved to be a promising new candidate to enhance current HIV treatment regimens -- without increasing toxic side effects, the researchers said.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How gardeners can dig for health, not injuryNew research reveals that a bad digging technique can as much as double the load on the joints in the body, leaving people susceptible to chronic injuries.
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Using AI technology to chart immune cell receptorScientists have used a form of artificial intelligence to create a map that compares types of cellular receptors, the chemical "antennas" on the surface of immune system T-cells. Their experiments with lab-grown mouse and human T-cells suggest that people with cancer who have a greater variety of such receptors may respond better to immunotherapy drugs and vaccines.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A biological solution to carbon capture and recycling?Scientists have discovered that E. coli bacteria could hold the key to an efficient method of capturing and storing or recycling carbon dioxide. They have developed a process that enables the E. coli bacterium to act as a very efficient carbon capture device.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How bacteria turbocharged their motorsUsing detailed 3-D images, researchers have shown how bacteria have evolved molecular motors of different powers to optimize their swimming.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pan-European sampling campaign sheds light on the massive diversity of freshwater planktonIn a major pan-European study, biologists have successfully extracted environmental DNA from as many as 218 lakes to refute a long-year belief that vital microorganisms do not differ significantly between freshwater bodies and geographic regions the way plants and animals do. Their new-age approach to biodiversity studies resulted in the largest freshwater dataset.
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Agricultural fungicide attracts honey bees, study finds IMAGE: Fungicides are among the top contaminants of honey bee hives and can interfere with the bees' ability to metabolize other pesticides. view more Credit: Photo by L. Brian Stauffer CHAMPAIGN, Ill. -- When given the choice, honey bee foragers prefer to collect sugar syrup laced with the fungicide chlorothalonil over sugar syrup alone, researchers report in the journal Scientific Repor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Counselors are often unprepared to identify and treat race-based traumaIn a Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development study that included106 counseling professionals, 71 percent of participants reported working with clients who had symptoms associated with race-based trauma, but 67 percent indicated they had not received training to identify race-based trauma among individuals of color, and 81 percent indicated they had not received training to treat race-b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Methane hydrate dissociation off Spitsbergen not caused by climate change Methane hydrates, also known as flammable ice, occur in many regions of the oceans. But only under high pressure and cold temperatures the product of methane and water forms a solid com-pound. If the pressure is too low or the temperature is too high, the hydrates decompose and the methane is released as gas from the sea floor into the water column. Spitsbergen has been experiencing severe outgas
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Feel anxious? Have trouble sleeping? You may be traveling for business too often January 8, 2018 -- People who travel for business two weeks or more a month report more symptoms of anxiety and depression and are more likely to smoke, be sedentary and report trouble sleeping than those who travel one to six nights a month, according to a latest study conducted by researchers at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and City University of New York. Among those w
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Cellular traffic jam seen in ALS/FTD -- Supports drug strategy A cellular traffic jam appears to affect neurons in most forms of ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), researchers at Emory University School of Medicine and Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville have shown. The results are scheduled for publication in Nature Neuroscience . ALS research had already identified nuclear transport problems in the most common inherited form of the neurodegenerative disease, cause
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Severe obesity linked to newly identified gene mutations Researchers have discovered mutations in a gene related to obesity, offering new treatment possibilities in the fight against the global epidemic. Research into the genetic causes of obesity, and related conditions, could be incredibly valuable in finding ways to treat them. Currently, there are some drugs available or being tested, but knowing what specific mutations cause obesity allows scienti
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New biomarkers predict outcome of cancer immunotherapy Nowadays, melanoma and lung cancer can be combatted effectively through immunotherapy, which makes targeted use of the immune system's normal function of regularly examining the body's tissue for pathogens and damages. Specific inhibitors are used to activate immune cells in a way that makes them identify cancer cells as foreign bodies and eliminate them. This way, the immune system can boost its
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Interactions between simple molecular mechanisms give rise to complex infection dynamics IMAGE: Populations of bacteria infected with viruses are sampled and analysed on Petri dishes to study infection dynamics. view more Credit: IST Austria/Maroš Pleška When we think of bacteria, images of nasty infections like pneumonia, meningitis or food poisoning come to mind, but bacteria can themselves be infected - by viruses, also called bacteriophages. Interestingly, just like not all b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New approach can save up to 95 percent of energy used for pipelines Until now it had been assumed that, once a flow of a fluid has become turbulent, turbulence would persist. Researchers at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria) including Professor Björn Hof and co-first authors Jakob Kühnen and Baofang Song have now shown that this is not the case. In their experiments, which they published in Nature Physics , they managed to d
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Brain-cell 'antenna' may be key to understanding obesity UC San Francisco researchers have discovered that the brain's ability to regulate body weight depends on a novel form of signaling in the brain's "hunger circuit" via antenna-like structures on neurons called primary cilia. Primary cilia are distinct from motile cilia, the finger-like projections that act as a sort of cellular conveyer belt, with functions such as removing debris from the lungs
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How prevalent is severe obesity among young children enrolled in WIC? Bottom Line: Recent modest declines in the pervasiveness of severe obesity among young children enrolled in the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) suggest some progress in tackling this public health concern among low-income children. Why The Research Is Interesting: Childhood obesity is a public health concern and it disproportionately affects children l
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New study reveals strong El Niño events cause large changes in Antarctic ice shelves A new study published Jan. 8 in the journal Nature Geoscience reveals that strong El Nino events can cause significant ice loss in some Antarctic ice shelves while the opposite may occur during strong La Nina events. El Niño and La Niña are two distinct phases of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a naturally occurring phenomenon characterized by how water temperatures in the tr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New catalyst for making fuels from shale gas Methane in shale gas can be turned into hydrocarbon fuels using an innovative platinum and copper alloy catalyst, according to new research led by UCL (University College London) and Tufts University. Platinum or nickel are known to break the carbon-hydrogen bonds in methane found in shale gas to make hydrocarbon fuels and other useful chemicals. However, this process causes 'coking' - the metal
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Swallowable sensors reveal mysteries of human gut health Findings from the first human trials of a breakthrough gas-sensing swallowable capsule could revolutionise the way that gut disorders and diseases are prevented and diagnosed. The trials by researchers at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia have uncovered mechanisms in the human body that have never been seen before, including a potentially new immune system. The new technology and discoverie
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Popular Science
Seagulls are eating all of our garbage Seagulls are pretty intrepid scavengers. They have no qualms about sifting through our dumps and landfills for scraps of food . But this buffet comes at a cost, indicates a study published December 27 in the Archives of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology . Scientists examined the stomach contents of gulls that foraged on landfills and found most of the birds were filling their bellies wit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US hits record for costly weather disasters: $306 billion (Update 2)With three strong hurricanes, wildfires, hail, flooding, tornadoes and drought, the United States tallied a record high bill last year for weather disasters: $306 billion.
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The Atlantic
2018: The Golden Globes’ Year of (Literal) Fashion Statements Black clothing—particularly when that clothing is the high-end stuff of red-carpet couture—has a way of refining things, of clarifying things, of cutting to the chase: Stripped of bright color and its pretty distractions, the focus can become the details that allow fashion to double as art. The perfect tailoring. The artful seaming. The layering and beading and draping. The testing of craft—and o
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Image of the Day: See You Later!Developmental biologists take a close look at how alligator embryos grow.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bacteria makes blue jeans green Bio-indican can be used as an effective, reductant-free cotton textile dye. (a) Top row, Pure indican with no β-glucosidase (BGL); pure indican with β-glucosidase; bio-indican with β-glucosidase. Bottom row, Indigo, nonreduced; indigo, reduced with sodium dithionite. All swatches are dyed on white cotton denim. Scale bar, 1 cm. (b) Scarf (100% white cotton gauze fabric) dyed with indican. All sam
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Interactions between simple molecular mechanisms give rise to complex infection dynamics Populations of bacteria infected with viruses are sampled and analysed on Petri dishes to study infection dynamics. Credit: IST Austria/Maroš Pleška Bacteria, which cause infections, can themselves be infected by viruses called bacteriophages. Just as not all bacteria are harmful to humans, not all viruses are harmful to bacteria, and some can even benefit them. Can bacteria distinguish good and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New approach can save up to 95 percent of energy used for pipelines Turbulent flow (top) compared to laminar flow (bottom). Credit: Jakob Kühnen Scientists have assumed that once a flow of a fluid has become turbulent, turbulence would persist. Researchers at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), including Professor Björn Hof and co-first authors Jakob Kühnen and Baofang Song, have now shown that this is not the case. In their experiments
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study reveals strong El Nino events cause large changes in Antarctic ice shelves The Pine Island Ice Shelf Terminus. Credit: Jeremy Harbeck/NASA A new study published Jan. 8 in the journal Nature Geoscience reveals that strong El Nino events can cause significant ice loss in some Antarctic ice shelves while the opposite may occur during strong La Nina events. El Niño and La Niña are two distinct phases of the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO), a naturally occurring phenomen
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New catalyst for making fuels from shale gas Methane in shale gas can be turned into hydrocarbon fuels using an innovative platinum and copper alloy catalyst, according to new research led by UCL (University College London) and Tufts University. Platinum or nickel are known to break the carbon-hydrogen bonds in methane found in shale gas to make hydrocarbon fuels and other useful chemicals. However, this process causes 'coking' - the metal
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Ingeniøren
Nu pilles den havarerede Samsø-vindmølle ned – Samsø Havvind måtte betale for fejlen Nu pilles resterne af den havvindmølle, der styrtede i havet ud for Samsø i 2015, ned. Det sker, fordi Samsø Havvind A/S, som ejer den havarerede mølle, i slutningen af ugen skal opføre erstatningen – en havvindmølle af tilsvarende kapacitet på 2,3 MW. I sidste ende var det driftselskabet Samsø Havvind A/S, der måtte punge ud for opførelsen af en erstatning for den ødelagte vindmølle. Det på trod
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Science : NPR
Gut Check: Gas-Sniffing Capsule Charts The Digestive Tract These large capsules, which can be swallowed, measure three different gases as they traverse the gastrointestinal tract. Courtesy of Peter T. Clarke/RMIT University hide caption toggle caption Courtesy of Peter T. Clarke/RMIT University These large capsules, which can be swallowed, measure three different gases as they traverse the gastrointestinal tract. Courtesy of Peter T. Clarke/RMIT Universi
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Science : NPR
Are Gummy Bear Flavors Just Fooling Our Brains? Color really does impact our perception of taste — even if the ingredients are otherwise the same, scientists say. It's something candy companies use to their advantage. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images Color really does impact our perception of taste — even if the ingredients are otherwise the same, scientists say. It's something candy compani
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The Hellish E-Waste Graveyards Where Computers Are Mined for Metal Each year the planet generates some 50 million tons of electronic waste, ranging from batteries to mobile phones to light-up children’s toys. And although such devices may have been discarded, they’re not without value— the United Nations recently estimated the total worth of all that e-waste at $55 billion, thanks largely to the trace amounts of gold, silver, and other metals they contain. The p
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Latest Headlines | Science News
New pill tracks gases through your gut Ingestible electronics are giving their first full tours of the gas in people’s guts. Newly constructed capsules , described online January 8 in Nature Electronics , sense various gases while traveling through a person’s digestive tract, revealing how the gut’s chemical composition reacts to factors like diet. What exactly each person’s gut gas could reveal about his or her health “is still to be
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Latest Headlines | Science News
White dwarf’s inner makeup is mapped for the first time Astronomers have probed the inner life of a dead star. Tiny changes in a white dwarf’s brightness reveal that the stellar corpse has more oxygen in its core than expected, researchers report online January 8 in Nature . The finding could challenge theories of how stars live and die, and may have implications for measuring the expansion of the universe. As a star ages, it sheds most of its gas int
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NSU researcher part of team using DNA to protect the rhinoceros from extinction IMAGE: This is a rhinoceros. view more Credit: Cindy Harper, D.V.M. Veterinary Genetics Laboratory University of Pretoria FORT LAUDERDALE/DAVIE, Fla. - Call it CSI meets conservation. Stephen O'Brien, Ph.D., a research scientist at Nova Southeastern University's (NSU) Halmos College of Natural Sciences and Oceanography, has worked with colleagues across the globe to create a DNA dat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel PET tracer clearly identifies and tracks bacterial infection in lungs IMAGE: Mice were inoculated with dead K. pneumoniae (10^8 CFU/mL). Imaging was performed for days 1, 2, 3 and 4 using 18 F-FDG and 18 8F-FDS. CT images showed clear inflammation on day... view more Credit: J Li et al., University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY RESTON, Va. - Researchers at the University of Louisville, Kentucky, have demonstrated that a new radiotracer, 2- 18
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Big Think
Can This Household Spice Help Cure Cancer? Remarkable New Case Raises the Possibility A British woman had a remarkable turnaround in her battle with cancer thanks to, she claims, a household spice. While the scientific jury is still out on turmeric , the spice she used, doctors have studied her case and concluded that there is no better explanation at the moment than that the spice did, in fact, help her defeat an illness that five years of chemotherapy and other treatments coul
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New on MIT Technology Review
Five Jobs That Are Set to Grow in 2018 The future of work is going to be determined by artificial intelligence and automation. These technologies will eliminate some jobs, but they will also create new opportunities and greater demand for the jobs that humans still do best. We decided to shine the spotlight on five positions you will see much more of on job boards in 2018. Want to keep up with job growth, automation and the future of
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New on MIT Technology Review
500,000 Britons’ Genomes Will Be Public by 2020, Transforming Drug Research In an effort to vault genetics into a new era of big data, six drug companies say they will decode the genes of half a million Brits and then make the data public—all by 2020. The plan will turn the UK Biobank, the source of the DNA samples, into the world’s single biggest concentration of genetic and health data anywhere, giving scientists and drug companies a powerful tool for understanding dis
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New Scientist - News
The ugly, fractured reality of the cosmos deserves our attention Not all the universe is in balance NASA, ESA, and the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) By Geraint Lewis Why would cosmologists, philosophers, astronomers and particle physicists gather to talk about symmetry? It sounds odd. But symmetry in a law of nature implies something extremely powerful and beloved of physicists: conservation. It is a difficult concept though. To make life easier, consi
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Inside Africa's thriving art scene | Touria El GlaouiArt fair curator Touria El Glaoui is on a mission to showcase vital new art from African nations and the diaspora. She shares beautiful, inspiring, thrilling contemporary art that tells powerful stories of African identity and history -- including works by Senegalese photographer Omar Victor Diop, Moroccan artist Hassan Hajjaj and Zimbabwean painter Kudzanai-Violet Hwami. "It is really through art
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Ingeniøren
Batteritog: Den mest oplagte besparelse er broerne – og så alligevel ikke 12,7 milliarder kroner har Danmark sat af til at elektrificere en lang række jernbanestrækninger, hvor DSB hidtil har været tvunget til at køre med dieseltog, bl.a. med IC4-skandalen til følge. Men nogle steder er der ifølge DTU teknisk mulighed for at droppe masterne med køreledninger og i stedet sende batteritog ud på skinnerne. Det er der dog ingen planer om, fordi batteritog kun kører i komme
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Conception during IUD use increases risks to mother and infant -- Ben-Gurion University study BEER-SHEVA, Israel...January 8, 2018 - Women who conceive while using an intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD) have a greater risk of preterm delivery, low birth weight babies, bacterial infections, or losing a fetus, according to researchers at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and the Soroka University Medical Center. The research will be presented at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Med
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A systematic framework to understand central bank digital currency Qian YAO, Head of the Institute of Digital Money of the People's Bank of China. This paper represents academic views of the author and does not represent the opinions of the author's organization. From the Industrial Revolution, the electrical revolution to the information and technological revolution, every significant step in technological progress has reinvented mankind's way of production and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Trawl of Red Sea surface waters finds little plastic IMAGE: A raw sample before sorting, showing one piece of blue plastic. view more Credit: © 2017 Cecilia Martin Researchers are mapping global patterns of marine plastic pollution as alarm grows over floating rubbish. A team led by marine scientist Carlos Duarte from KAUST shows that the level of plastic debris in the Red Sea is relatively low. Samples of floating plastic rubbish w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study uncovers healthcare disparities among octogenarians and nonagenarians with advanced lung cancer A new study reveals that, among patients of advanced age with stage III lung cancer, African Americans and individuals who live in lower income areas are more likely to not receive any treatment. Published early online in CANCER , a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society, the study also found that patients who receive the standard of care treatment for their cancer live longer. Indi
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Grows Politics & Policy Team: Elaina Plott Hired as Staff Writer, Reihan Salam Becomes Contributing Editor Washington, D.C. (January 8, 2017)—The Atlantic is adding two voices to its political coverage: Elaina Plott will join the publication as a staff writer and Reihan Salam has signed on as a contributing editor. Plott and Salam will begin writing for The Atlantic at the end of January. As a staff writer, Plott will primarily focus on covering Congress and national politics, augmenting the political
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Multi-gene test predicts early heart disease riskA risk score based on multiple genetic differences, or polygenic test, predicted significantly more cases of early heart disease than standard tests for single genetic defects. The polygenic test predicted a high risk for early-onset heart disease in 1 out of 53 individuals, compared to 1 in 256 for the most frequent single genetic defect.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Proper exercise can reverse damage from heart agingExercise can reverse damage to sedentary, aging hearts and help prevent risk of future heart failure -- if it's enough exercise, and if it's begun in time, according to a new study by cardiologists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Female night shift workers may have increased risk of common cancersNight shift work was associated with women having an increased risk of breast, skin, and gastrointestinal cancer, according to a meta-analysis.
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New Scientist - News
Freeze-dried valves used in animal heart surgery for first time Storing valves for longer could lead to a better fit Garo/Phanie/REX/Shutterstock By Jessica Hamzelou Pieces of heart tissue can be freeze-dried and later rehydrated for transplantation, according to research in sheep. The technique could allow donated human tissue to be stored cheaply for years, and enable doctors to choose the perfect transplants “off the shelf”, rather than having to use w
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New long-acting, less-toxic HIV drug suppresses virus in humanized mice New Haven, Conn.-- A team of Yale researchers tested a new chemical compound that suppresses HIV, protects immune cells, and remains effective for weeks with a single dose. In animal experiments, the compound proved to be a promising new candidate to enhance current HIV treatment regimens -- without increasing toxic side effects, the researchers said. The finding builds on the work of senior
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research reveals how gardeners can dig for health, not injury New research from Coventry University and the Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) reveals that a bad digging technique can as much as double the load on the joints in the body, leaving people susceptible to chronic injuries. The results, published in the journal HortTechnology , reveal the risks that the nation's 27 million gardeners might be running if using a bad digging technique and comes at a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pan-European sampling campaign sheds light on the massive diversity of freshwater plankton IMAGE: This photo shows plankton sampling at Lake Weissensee, Austria. view more Credit: Jens Boenigk In a major pan-European study, a research team from Germany have successfully extracted environmental DNA (eDNA) from as many as 218 lakes to refute a long-year belief that vital microorganisms do not differ significantly between freshwater bodies and geographic regions the way plan
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How bacteria turbocharged their motorsUsing detailed 3-D images, researchers have shown how bacteria have evolved molecular motors of different powers to optimize their swimming.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers use AI technology to chart immune cell receptorJohns Hopkins scientists have used a form of artificial intelligence to create a map that compares types of cellular receptors, the chemical 'antennas' on the surface of immune system T-cells. Their experiments with lab-grown mouse and human T-cells suggest that people with cancer who have a greater variety of such receptors may respond better to immunotherapy drugs and vaccines.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
World first multimodal biomicroscopic system enhances the accuracy of cancer treatment IMAGE: This is Professor JaeYoun Hwang (right) and PhD Student Jihun Kim (left) of Information & Communication Engineering. view more Credit: Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST) A research team of Information and Communication Engineering at DGIST has developed the world's first multimodal biomicroscopic system to analyze the characteristics of tumors and to utiliz
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pan-European sampling campaign sheds light on the massive diversity of freshwater plankton Plankton sampling at Lake Weissensee, Austria. Credit: Jens Boenigk In a major pan-European study, a research team from Germany have successfully extracted environmental DNA (eDNA) from as many as 218 lakes to refute a long-year belief that vital microorganisms do not differ significantly between freshwater bodies and geographic regions the way plants and animals do. Their new-age approach to bio
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Futurity.org
Gratitude journals may change our brains In a new study, researchers found a notable change in the brains of 16 women who wrote daily about gratitude in an online journal. Compared to 17 other women who wrote about neutral topics, the gratitude group was more likely to take pleasure watching a donation going to Food for Lane County rather than receiving the money themselves. “When we are counting our blessings, this part of the brain is
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Popular Science
Why can't we decide what to do about nuclear energy? W ithin sight of the sunbathers at Old Man’s surf spot, 55 miles north of San ­Diego, California, loom a pair of 176-foot-tall orbs. They’re a strange backdrop, home of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station. Since its first reactor fired up in 1968, the plant has powered millions of lives. But now these concrete and steel domes house a problem. Inside their frames sit millions of pounds of ra
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Why One Man Has Spent Years Building a Boeing 777 Out of Paper Quick. Imagine a paper airplane. Got it? It's a folded up piece of standard 8 1/2 by 11-inch printer paper, right? A sort of three-dimensional hieroglyph of an airplane made of paper. How boring of you. Now try imagining an airplane. A Boeing 777, the long range model to be exact. Think of the wing flaps moving, the landing gear unfolding, the reverse thrusters for the engines. You know, the deta
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New on MIT Technology Review
Privacy May Finally Be Starting to Matter in China Uh Oh—CRISPR Might Not Work in People A sampling of human blood has turned up a surprise: most people could be immune to one of the world’s biggest advances in genetic engineering. It’s in our blood: Scientists searched the blood of 22 newborns and 12 adults for antibodies to the two most… Read more A sampling of human blood has turned up a surprise: most people could be immune to one of the wo
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Ingeniøren
DR: Radiolytning på DAB faldt med 40 pct. efter skift til DAB+ Da danskerne 1. oktober sidste år skulle skifte den velkendte DAB-teknologi ud med den nyere DAB+-teknologi eller internetradio, blev mellem 200.000 og 400.000 danskeres radioer med ét ubrugelige. Og det fik konsekvenser: Umiddelbart efter skiftet faldt DAB-lytningen med 40 pct., oplyser DR i en pressemeddelelse på baggrund af tal fra DR's årlige medieudviklingsrapport, der udkommer senere på mån
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A biological solution to carbon capture and recycling? Scientists at the University of Dundee have discovered that E. coli bacteria could hold the key to an efficient method of capturing and storing or recycling carbon dioxide. Cutting carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to slow down and even reverse global warming has been posited as humankind's greatest challenge. It is a goal that is subject to considerable political and societal hurdles, but it also r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Camelina oil improves blood lipid profile The use of camelina oil reduces overall and LDL cholesterol levels in persons with impaired glucose metabolism, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The findings were published in Molecular Nutrition & Food Research . The study analysed the associations of camelina oil, fatty fish and lean fish with lipid and glucose metabolism, and low-grade inflammation. Camelina o
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chemists discover plausible recipe for early life on EarthChemists find key chemical reactions that support life today could have been carried out with ingredients likely present on the planet four billion years ago.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genome size affects whether plants become invasiveScientist studying the invasive plant Phragmites have found evidence to suggest that the most significant factor in determining whether a plant will become invasive is the size of its genome.
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Futurity.org
Lay off the antibiotics for these small infections? Got a sore throat? The doctor may write a quick prescription for penicillin or amoxicillin, and with the stroke of a pen, help diminish public health and your own future health by helping bacteria evolve resistance to antibiotics. It’s time to develop alternatives to antibiotics for small infections, researchers say, and to do so quickly. It has been widely reported that bacteria will evolve to r
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers call for true picture of domestic violent crime Violence against women could become significantly less visible in police-recorded crime figures when a new counting method comes into effect, warn researchers at Lancaster University. Plans for Home Office Counting Rules to count coercive and controlling behaviour as 'non-injurious violent crime ' capped at one crime per victim - even though statistics show one in 20 victims can experience more t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gene therapy offers long-term treatment for mice with diabetes The newly resurgent field of gene therapy, which recently produced treatments for blood cancers and blindness, has taken a step toward fighting a scourge that is on the rise worldwide: diabetes. In research reported last week in the journal Cell Stem Cell , scientists showed that a single infusion of a virus containing two handpicked genes restored normal blood sugar levels in mice with Type 1 di
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers design dendrite-free lithium battery A thin asymmetric solid electrolyte meets both the requirements of the lithium metal (blocking dendrite formation) and cathode (enabling low interface resistance). Credit: H. Duan et al. ©2017 American Chemical Society By designing a solid electrolyte that is rigid on one side and soft on the other, researchers have fabricated a lithium-metal battery that completely suppresses dendrite formation—
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Survival strategy of messenger RNAs during cellular sugar shortageIf a cell runs low on sugar, it stores certain messenger RNAs in order to prolong its life. As a research group at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel has now discovered, the protein Puf5p determines whether individual messenger RNAs will be stored or degraded when sugar levels are low. The study published in eLife shows that Puf5p therefore sends the messenger RNAs to a cell organelle where
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers call for true picture of domestic violent crimePlans for Home Office Counting Rules to count coercive and controlling behavior as 'non-injurious violent crime' capped at one crime per victim -- even though statistics show one in 20 victims can experience more than 10 domestic violence crimes a year -- will mask the true extent of the problem.The warning comes in a new paper, 'Untangling the concept of coercive control: theorizing domestic viol
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Monthly brain cycles predict seizures in patients with epilepsy UC San Francisco neurologists have discovered monthly cycles of brain activity linked to seizures in patients with epilepsy. The finding, published online January 8 in Nature Communications , suggests it may soon be possible for clinicians to identify when patients are at highest risk for seizures, allowing patients to plan around these brief but potentially dangerous events. "One of the most d
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover molecule that could revert cellular agingResearchers at Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM) João Lobo Antunes have found that manipulating a single RNA molecule is enough to revert cellular aging.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Even if you don't know you're sick yet, your face will give you away Scientists combined 16 photo portraits into one composite image. On the left, the composite “sick” face, and on the right, the composite healthy one. Credit: Audrey Henderson/St Andrews University People can judge whether someone is sick by looking at a photo for just a few seconds. That may not sound remarkable—until you consider that the sick people in the photos were in the very early stages o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers study complex morphology of the protoplanetary disc around star MWC 758 ALMA images of MWC 758. Left: Map of the dust continuum emission obtained using super-uniform weighting. Right: Map of the disk cavity in logarithmic scale. Credit: Boehler et al., 2017. Using the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile, an international team of researchers has studied the disc surrounding the star MWC 758. The new observations reveal further insights into the complex morp
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Futurity.org
Hidden virus makes this tropical disease much worse Leishmania’s viruses may have helped the parasite infect vertebrates, according to new research. More than a million people in tropical countries contract the parasite Leishmania every year through the bites of infected sand flies. Most people develop disfiguring—but not life-threatening—skin lesions at the sites of the bites. But if the parasite spreads to the internal organs, it causes a diseas
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Dagens Medicin
Disse sundhedslove er på vej Disse sundhedslove er på vej Sundhedsministeren har ni forskellige lovforslag på tapetet i løbet af de kommende måneder. Få et overblik her. Lasse Lange Close: Biografi Journalist , Dagens Medicin Flere artikler af Lasse Lange Ni lovforslag er på vej de kommende tre måneder. Derudover er der tre lovforslag, som i øjeblikket er under behandling i Folketinget. Og endelig er der fire love på sundhed
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New on MIT Technology Review
It’s CES This Week—Here’s What to Expect Uh Oh—CRISPR Might Not Work in People A sampling of human blood has turned up a surprise: most people could be immune to one of the world’s biggest advances in genetic engineering. It’s in our blood: Scientists searched the blood of 22 newborns and 12 adults for antibodies to the two most… Read more A sampling of human blood has turned up a surprise: most people could be immune to one of the wo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Higher stress among minority and low-income populations can lead to health disparities, says report WASHINGTON -- People with low incomes and racial/ethnic minority populations experience greater levels of stress than their more affluent, white counterparts, which can lead to significant disparities in both mental and physical health that ultimately affect life expectancy, according to a report from the American Psychological Association. "Good health is not equally distributed. Socio-economic
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Survival strategy of messenger RNAs during cellular sugar shortage P-Bodies are the place of fate: Transported by the protein Puf5p (orange), mRNAs are here either degraded or stored – depending on whether they are needed or not in case of sugar shortage in the cell. Credit: University of Basel, Biozentrum If a cell runs low on sugar, it stores certain messenger RNAs in order to prolong its life. As a research group at the Biozentrum of the University of Basel h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How bacteria turbocharged their motors 3-D model images of the eight studied bacterial motors. Credit: Morgan Beeby/Imperial College London Using detailed 3-D images, researchers have shown how bacteria have evolved molecular motors of different powers to optimize their swimming. The discovery, by a team from Imperial College London, provides insights into evolution at the molecular scale. Bacteria use molecular motors just tens of na
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A botanical mystery solved by phylogenetic testing Missouri Botanical Garden researchers used DNA testing to rediscover Dracaena umbraculifera , which was thought to be extinct. The methods and results were published in Oryx . The authors include Garden researchers in both St. Louis and Madagascar. Dracaena umbraculifera was described in 1797 from a cultivated plant attributed to Mauritius. However, repeated attempts to locate the plant in Maurit
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Futurity.org
Treeshrews defy these 2 evolution rules The common treeshrew, a small and skittish mammal that inhabits the tropical forests of Southeast Asia, defies two widely tested rules that describe patterns of geographical variation within species, according to a new study. The treeshrew, also known as Tupaia glis , bucks both the island rule and Bergmann’s rule. The island rule predicts that populations of small mammals evolve larger body size
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'Getting Over It With Bennett Foddy': The Guy Who Made 'QWOP' Is Back To Infuriate You All Over Again From its title to its premise, Getting Over It With Bennett Foddy reads as a dark joke. Whether that a joke includes you or not, though, is impossible to say. It's true that the PC game is uproariously, darkly funny. It has a simple aim: climb this mountain. The only problem is that your character is a man stuck inside a pot, his only climbing implement a hammer he can swing. As such, the process
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research must be better reported—the future of society depends on it Understanding how and why things happen can help people make sense of the world. Credit: Pexels Newspaper articles, TV appearances and radio slots are increasingly important ways for academics to communicate their research to wider audiences. Whether that be the latest health research findings or discoveries from the deepest, darkest parts of the universe. In this way, the internet can also help
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A biological solution to carbon capture and recycling? E.coli bacteria shown to be excellent at CO2 conversion. Credit: NIAID/Wikimedia Commons Scientists at the University of Dundee have discovered that E. coli bacteria could hold the key to an efficient method of capturing and storing or recycling carbon dioxide. Cutting carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to slow down and even reverse global warming has been posited as humankind's greatest challenge. I
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bitcoin and cryptocurrency for n00bs Credit: CC0 Public Domain Everyone is talking about it, but no one actually understands it. Read this and impress your friends by explaining bitcoin. In a restaurant the other night, I overheard an older couple talking about how their son had made a whole bunch of money with this "new fake online currency". They were, of course, talking about bitcoin. Bitcoin is indeed an online currency, but it
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Dagens Medicin
Lov om Nationalt Genom Center udskudtDet kontroversielle lovforslag om Nationalt Genom Center skulle have været fremsat i Folketinget i november. Den megen virak om forslaget betyder, at der går endnu en rum tid, før folketingsbehandlingen kan begynde.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reducing climate uncertainty, improving weather forecasts, and understanding sea-level rise NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) should implement a coordinated approach for their space-based environmental observations to further advance Earth science and applications for the next decade, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. This approach should be based on key scien
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop graphene sensors that could revolutionise the Internet of Things Credit: University of Manchester Researchers at The University of Manchester have devised graphene sensors embedded into RFIDs, which have the potential to revolutionise the Internet of Things (IoT). By layering graphene-oxide (a derivative of graphene) over graphene to create a flexible heterostructure the team have developed humidity sensors for remote sensing with the ability to connect to any
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
On the way to plastic-free oceans Most microplastics come from bigger items - many of them only used once. Credit: PlanetEarth Online Four days since leaving port, Dr. Katsiaryna Pabortsava reaches her destination. She's in the middle of the North Atlantic, thousands of miles from land, and she's looking for microplastics. Microplastics are tiny fragments of plastic often too small to see with the naked eye . She said: "You mig
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The Atlantic
What the Men Didn't Say The women of the 2018 Golden Globes collectively ( almost ) wore black. On the red carpet, many of them brought as their dates not husbands and partners, but activists for gender and racial equality. They talked about endemic sexual harassment in America and a sea change sparked by industry-shattering stories from The New York Times and The New Yorker about the abuse perpetrated for decades by Ha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What's the noise eating quantum bits? Noise is an obstacle in the race to realize systems that can be used to develop quantum computing technologies. Among the approaches for quantum computing is the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID), shown at the bottom of the figure. Researchers have shown that the main source of noise is magnetic defects on the SQUID. These defects are produced by molecular oxygen (O2) adsorbed o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two of the world's tea species extinct in the wild according to new report Credit: Fauna & Flora International The Red List of Theaceae, the tea family, published by the Global Trees Campaign (a joint initiative between Fauna & Flora International and Botanic Gardens Conservation International), has identified more than a third of the world's Theaceae species are threatened with extinction. Sadly, two species of tea, Franklinia alatamaha and Camellia amplexicaulis are a
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Ingeniøren
Kina tager første skridt mod udbredt ansigtsgenkendelse på sikkerhedskameraer Politiet i den kinesiske Chongqing region tester i det nye år et automatisk ansigtsgenkendelses-system, der med en database af billeder fra politidatabaser og sociale medier skal genkende kriminelles ansigter, når de spottes på offentlige sikkerhedskameraer. Det skriver The Washington Post. Pilotprojektet er en del af den ambitiøse ‘Xue Liang’ plan, der kan oversættes til ‘Sharp Eyes’ og som skal
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists sift through lunar dirt for record of early Earth's rocks In this 1992 photo from the Galileo spacecraft, the surface of the moon is marked with craters from impacts, but isn’t weathered. Many particles on the moon’s surface can last billions of years undisturbed. Credit: NASA/JPL/USGS Hidden in the particles of moon dirt brought back by astronauts more than fifty years ago, secrets of ancient Earth lie in wait. A team of scientists are examining crushe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientist dives hundreds of underwater caves hunting for new forms of life Author Tom Iliffe leads scientists on a cave dive. Credit: Jill Heinerth , CC BY-ND Maybe when you picture a university professor doing research it involves test tubes and beakers, or perhaps poring over musty manuscripts in a dimly lit library, or maybe going out into the field to examine new crop-growing techniques or animal-breeding methods. All of it's good, solid research and I commend them
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Finding form by folding Three-dimensional structure of a nucleolar ribosomal complex. Assembly factors are indicated in various colors, while ribosomal RNAs and proteins are indicated in light and dark gray, respectively. Credit: L.Kater, LMU Ribosomes are the organelles responsible for protein synthesis in cells. LMU researchers have now dissected early steps in their assembly and visualized how their RNA components fo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Trawl of Red Sea surface waters finds little plastic The plankton nets were dragged slowly just below the sea surface to capture floating plastics. Credit: 2017 Cecilia Martin The Red Sea has relatively low amounts of floating plastic debris in its surface waters due to fewer sources or faster removal. Researchers are mapping global patterns of marine plastic pollution as alarm grows over floating rubbish. A team led by marine scientist Carlos Duar
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Popular Science
We need to stop letting our pets get fat W hen I looked at my appointment book for the day, I thought something must be wrong. Someone who worked in the fitness industry was bringing his cat in to the Tufts Obesity Clinic for Animals. Did he confuse us for a different kind of weight management clinic? Is he looking to get muscle on his cat or maybe kitty protein shakes? I was utterly surprised when I called for my appointment in the lob
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Dagens Medicin
Ny test kan forudsige aggressiv lymfekræft i hudenNy epigenetisk test kan allerede ved diagnosetidspunktet afgøre, om en patient har en aggressiv form for lymfekræft i huden, viser ny forskning.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A botanical mystery solved by phylogenetic testing Missouri Botanical Garden researchers used DNA testing to rediscover Dracaena umbraculifera , which was thought to be extinct. The methods and results were published in Oryx . The authors include Garden researchers in both St. Louis and Madagascar. Dracaena umbraculifera was described in 1797 from a cultivated plant attributed to Mauritius. However, repeated attempts to locate the plant in Maurit
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Ingeniøren
Tvisternes tårn bliver dyrere og dyrere Selv om det er knap et år siden, at Mærsk Tårnet blev indviet, og forskerne fra Københavns Universitets Sundhedsfaglige Fakultet for længst er rykket ind, så kan der gå længe, før fakultetet ved, hvad det kommer til at betale i husleje. For byggeriet af den 75 meter høje bygning på Nørrebro i København har været plaget af såvel mangler i projektmaterialet som sjusk med udførelsen. Det skriver Tra
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Signal processing: A field at the heart of science and everyday life Is it just surfing or is it signal processing? Credit: dozemode/Pixabay The notion of "signal processing" might seem like something impenetrably complex, even to scientists. However, the fact is that most of them have already being doing it for a long time, albeit in an unconscious way. Acquiring, shaping and transforming data, cleaning it for the sake of improved analysis and extraction of usefu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Net neutrality may be dead in the US, but Europe is still strongly committed to open internet access Credit: Shutterstock The belief that unrestricted internet access is vital to modern life is not necessarily a view held by all businesses that provide internet services. And now that net neutrality – the equal treatment of all data sent and received without differential charges and service quality – has come to an end in the US, how will this affect the rest of the world? The idea that all inter
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why I jumped at the chance to bring the real T. rex to life for TV Credit: BBC/Dom Walter, Tailsmith productions The chance to work on a major documentary is always a testing experience for a researcher. It's a huge opportunity to communicate cutting edge research to the public, but the way the information is presented can lack nuance and detail. This is especially true for dinosaur documentaries that are inevitably watched by young children and have to counter
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Feed: All Latest
CES 2018 Liveblog Day 1: The Giant Gadget Show Kicks Off TodayWe’re live in Las Vegas, Nevada for the first day of CES 2018. Join in the fun for announcements from Samsung, LG, and Sony.
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Dagens Medicin
Ny direktør for kommende stenocenter fundetLise Tarnow bliver centerdirektør for det kommende Steno Diabetes Center Sjælland. Hun skal stå i spidsen for at skabe en diabetesbehandling på højeste niveau tæt på borgerne i Region Sjælland.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What we know so far about where humans come from The story of where we come from evolves almost every year. Credit: Shutterstock/Eugenio Marongiu The question of where we humans come from is one many people ask, and the answer is getting more complicated as new evidence is emerging all the time. For most of recorded history humankind has been placed on a metaphorical, and sometimes literal, pedestal. Sure, modern humans were flesh and blood lik
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why African board games should be introduced into the classroom Two men playing Morabaraba. Board games are a part of the social fabric of many African societies. Credit: ConstantineD/flickr When most of us think about learning, we imagine a teacher and a classroom. In reality most of the things we know, and a great number of the skills we acquire as children and adults, are learned outside the classroom – in conversations with peers, engaging in community se
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Machine learning and neural networks recognize exotic insulating phases in quantum materials An exotic topological phase of matter was identified with a machine-learning approach. The left schematic illustrates a snapshot of the electronic density of the system. Using a quantum loop topography (QLT) technique, the neighboring triangular regions in the electronic density profile are translated to multidimensional images of the material’s structure. These images show different insulating p
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Puppy dog eyes influence dog choiceThe frequency a dog raises it's 'inner eyebrow' influences how quickly it finds a new home
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The coldest temperatures recorded during 120 years of weather data On Grounds, like most of the Eastern Seaboard, it's been really cold the past few days. Can't-feel-my-face cold. Run-not-walk-in-the-parking-lot cold. But the recent frigid conditions recorded at McCormick Observatory haven't even cracked the top 20 lowest temperatures recorded over the more than 120 years of daily weather observations captured at the University of Virginia. The coldest ever? J
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The view from near-earth orbit—scientist helps set satellites' priorities A fast-moving winter storm hit the eastern United States during the first week of 2018. Here’s the view from a NASA Earth observing satellite. Credit: NASA The "eye in the sky" has become a major part of research for segments of the scientific community. But how should it be trained? Over the past two years, University of Virginia environmental scientist Scott Doney served on a National Academies
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Hubble's barred and booming spiral galaxyThis image, captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), shows a galaxy named UGC 6093. As can be easily seen, UGC 6093 is something known as a barred spiral galaxy—it has beautiful arms that swirl outwards from a bar slicing through the galaxy's center.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pond scum explains evolution of first animals Dickinsonia costata, one of the most common species of the Ediacaran period, moved and fed on seafloor microbe mats. This specimen and its silly putty cast are about 6 centimeters across and from the Nilpena Station of South Australia. Credit: Mary Droser Microbial mats that existed on sea floors prior to the Cambrian explosion provided the foundation for early animal life to arise, new research
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biochar could benefit anaerobic digestion of animal manure Dr. Hyun Min Jang, AgriLife Research environmental engineer (left), and Dr. Eunsung Kan, AgriLife Research chemical and environmental engineer, both in Stephenville, are working with biochar to find an efficient way to rid farms of animal waste via anaerobic digestion. Credit: Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service photo by Adam Russell New research by Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists shows b
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Live Science
Megalodon Ancestor: Fossil Teeth Link Beast to Earth’s Largest Shark The Bryant Shark's teeth are about 1 inch tall, while the great white shark (represented by the jaw) has teeth approaching 3 inches. Credit: McWane Science Center It took nearly 40 years, but researchers have finally collected enough fossil teeth in Alabama to properly identify a previously unknown species of ancient shark — one that was a possible ancestor of megalodon , the largest shark to e
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Live Science
Stephen Hawking Is Worried About Humanity's Future Venus may have been habitable about 4 billion years ago (as shown in this model), but runaway greenhouse warming made the planet so hot its atmosphere is a supercritical liquid. That same thing could happen to Earth, Hawking warns. Credit: NASA Stephen Hawking turns space explorer in his second-ever episode of "Favorite Places," an Emmy-winning series that sees the famed physicist explore Venus
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Live Science
Stephen Hawking Turns 76: How Has He Lived So Long With ALS? Renowned physicist Stephen Hawking turns 76 today (Jan. 8) — an age well beyond what he was expected to reach when he was diagnosed with the incurable neurological disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) more than 50 years ago. Hawking was 21 years old when he was diagnosed with ALS in 1963, and he was given just two years to live. The disease causes the progressive degeneration and dea
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The Atlantic
A New Way to Find the Tree of Life's Missing Branches Scientists have been been studying the DNA of microbes for a quarter-century, and in that time, they have sequenced about 2 million microbes. By one estimate , as many as 1 trillion microbial species may live on Earth. Progress? 0.0002 percent. Only a tiny fraction of the tree of life has been filled in. In fact, whole branches are likely still yet to be discovered: branches of microbes living in
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Feed: All Latest
Scientists Just Solved a Major Piece of the Opioid Puzzle When it comes to tackling the opioid crisis , public health workers start with the drugs: fentanyl, morphine, heroin. But biochemists have a different focus: Not the opioids, but opioid receptors —the proteins the drugs latch onto within the body. These receptors embed themselves in the walls of cells throughout the brain and peripheral nervous system. There, they serve as cellular gatekeepers, u
11h
Feed: All Latest
CES 2018: Inside the Lab Where Amazon's Alexa Takes Over The World When it first launched in 2014, Amazon's Alexa voice assistant was little more than an experiment. It appeared first inside the Echo, itself a wacky gadget launched without warning or much expectation. As it took off, though, and millions of people began to put a smart speaker in their home, Amazon's ambition exploded. The company saw an opportunity to build a new voice-first computing platform t
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Science : NPR
Soaring Popularity Of Grass-Fed Beef May Hit Roadblock: Less Nutritious Grass Joe Craine grabs a handful of late-winter Kansas prairie plants. Cattle need the nutrient-rich green grass to grow. Alex Smith/Harvest Public Media hide caption toggle caption Alex Smith/Harvest Public Media Joe Craine grabs a handful of late-winter Kansas prairie plants. Cattle need the nutrient-rich green grass to grow. Alex Smith/Harvest Public Media A few years ago, Kansas City restaurateur A
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New on MIT Technology Review
500,000 Britons’ Genomes Will Be Public by 2020, Transforming Drug Research In an effort to vault genetics into a new era of big data, six drug companies say they will decode the genes of half a million Brits and then make the data public—all by 2020. The plan will turn the UK Biobank, the source of the DNA samples, into the world’s single biggest concentration of genetic and health data anywhere, giving scientists and drug companies a powerful tool for understanding dis
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Scientific American Content: Global
Are Alien Civilizations Technologically Advanced? As we discover numerous habitable planets around other stars in the Milky Way galaxy, including the nearest star, Proxima Centauri, one cannot help but wonder why we have not yet detected evidence for an alien civilization. As the physicist Enrico Fermi asked, “Where is everybody?” Even though the first interstellar object to be discovered in the solar system, 'Oumuamua, had an unusually elongate
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Scientific American Content: Global
Talking Science with Mom If I were an apple I would be the kind of apple that didn’t fall very far from the tree. My father is a neuroscientist, my mother is a cell biologist and I have been working in labs and academic research settings since high school. As a field scientist studying snow and permafrost in Alaska, I often tell people that I have the coolest job in the world. Simultaneously, I experience some glarin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Parasites from domestic pets affecting wildlife world wide A cat flea. Credit: Stephen Doggett Fleas from domestic pets are infesting native wildlife and feral animals in all continents except Antarctica, a new study reveals. The University of Queensland-led global study found domestic pet fleas feeding on species as diverse as Australian brushtail possums, coyotes, golden jackals and Iberian lynx. UQ School of Veterinary Science researcher Dr. Nichola
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientist's work may provide answer to Martian mystery A digital elevation model of Gale Crater shows the pattern of mid-latitude Martian craters with interior sedimentary mounds. Credit: University of Texas at Dallas By seeing which way the wind blows, a University of Texas at Dallas fluid dynamics expert has helped propose a solution to a Martian mountain mystery. Dr. William Anderson, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering in the Erik Jo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genome size affects whether plants become invasive URI Professor Laura Meyerson discusses her Phragmites research in a common garden in the Czech Republic. Credit: Laura Meyerson A University of Rhode Island scientist who studies the invasive plant Phragmites was part of an international research team that found that the most significant factor in determining whether a plant will become invasive is the size of its genome. Laura Meyerson, URI prof
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New model measures characteristics of carbon nanotube structures for energy storage and water desalination applications Evelyn Wang (left) and Heena Mutha have developed a nondestructive method of quantifying the detailed characteristics of carbon nanotube (CNT) samples — a valuable tool for optimizing these materials for use as electrodes in a variety of practical devices. Credit: Stuart Darsch Using electrodes made of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can significantly improve the performance of devices ranging from capac
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: A sun a dayThis montage of 365 images shows the changing activity of our sun through the eyes of ESA's Proba-2 satellite during 2017, along with a partial eclipse for good measure.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gravitational waves measure the universe NGC4993, the galaxy hosting the gravitational wave event GW170817 that has been used to measure the age of the universe. The source of the event is the red dot to the upper left of the galaxy's center; it was not there in earlier images. Credit: NASA and ESA The direct detection of gravitational waves from at least five sources during the past two years offers spectacular confirmation of Einstein
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
W. M. Keck Observatory achieves first light with NIRES The “first-light” image from NIRES is of NGC 7027, a planetary nebula. The NIRES spectrum shows the near-IR spectrum of this nebula dominated by emission lines of hydrogen and helium. The direct image shows NBC 7027 in the K’ filters at 2.2 microns. Credit: W. M. Keck Observatory Astronomers at W. M. Keck Observatory have successfully met a major milestone after capturing the very first science d
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ultra-thin light emitting diodes Figure shows the emission of red light from an electrically excited LED fabricated with 2D semiconductor materials. (A) The left image illustrates the device structure consisting of various layered materials. The stack of layers consist of few-layer graphene (FLG), hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and tungsten disulfide (WS2). (B) The right image shows a microscope image taken in the dark while a vo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop ultrafast battery with quarter-million cycle life LED lights powered by ultrafast batteries designed by ZJU scientists. Credit: Zhejiang University Aluminum-ion batteries (AIB) have significant merits of low cost, non-flammability, and high-capacity metallic aluminum anodes based on three-electron redox properties. However, due to its inadequate cathodic performance, especially in terms of capacity, high-rate capability, and cycle life, AIB stil
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Developing flies jump without legs Overlaid image illustrates a full jump trajectory of a midge. Credit: Grace Farley Imagine jumping 25 times your body length in only 2.5 seconds. Impossible, right? Now imagine making that jump with no running start, having just gotten out of bed…and with no legs. Though utterly impossible for humans to conceive, some larval insects across many orders, including Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera, and Dipt
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Strengthening citric fruit to better resist climate change Credit: Asociación RUVID Research of the Department of Agricultural Sciences and the Natural World of the Universitat Jaume I in Castellón, Spain, has identified the genes within citric fruit that biotechnology could improve to fight climate change. Work spearheaded by professor Vicent Arbona is progressing in the understanding of the signaling pathway of a plant hormone that will make plants mor
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists find culprits for extreme rainfall over Yangtze River in May 2016In May 2016, an extreme rainfall occurred in the lower reaches of the Yangtze River Valley. The area averaged anomaly of total precipitation over the region (117°-121°E, 26°-34°N) was the third wettest on record since 1961. There were 25 stations that broke 56-year maximum records. Meanwhile, the 2015-16 El Niño event was regarded as one of the strongest El Niño events in recorded history, bringin
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New Scientist - News
We should teach kids how to use social media, not scare them off Teach them how to tweet Mixmike/Getty By Nic Fleming Is social media broadening children’s horizons and opening up new opportunities? Or is it undermining their confidence, creativity and attention spans? The minimum official age for use of Facebook, WhatsApp, Instagram and Snapchat is 13, yet three-quarters of 10- to 12-year-olds in the UK are said to have accounts. So what should parents do
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New Scientist - News
Aussie flu: Just what the doctor ordered? FLU season stalks the northern hemisphere. That is not news – it happens every year, and for most of us it is usually little more than a nuisance. But the flu of 2018 could be as bad as an annual winter outbreak gets (see “ Winter flu: All the essential facts you need to know ”). You may think you have heard it all before, but you probably haven’t. To be clear, we are not talking about an eme
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The CSI effect—viewing TV crime shows does not make better criminals The CSI effect experiment: crime scene mock-up to be 'cleaned up' by subjects. Credit: Andreas Baranowski Does watching the work of fictional forensic investigators on TV influence viewers? There is a belief that this is the case and that the consequences of people watching shows such as the American crime drama television series CSI: Crime Scene Investigation are filtering through into real life
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Weightlessness increases astronauts' body temperature Astronauts float weightlessly in space, and the condition of weightlessness is something many would love to experience. However, in addition to producing both physical and psychological stress, a trip into space affects the core body temperature of astronauts. Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have observed that body temperature rises during weightlessness, and that, even at r
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Special star is a Rosetta Stone for understanding the sun's variability and climate effect A picture of dark sunspots and bright diffuse faculae (best seen around the edges). The study shows how the larger mix of heavy elements leave the spots unchanged, while increasing the contrast of the bright diffuse faculae. Credit: NASA/SDO The spots on the surface on the sun come and go with an 11-year periodicity known as the solar cycle. The solar cycle is driven by the solar dynamo, which is
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Ingeniøren
Negative elpriser kostede danske vindmølleejere 8 mio. kroner juleaften Hver gang det blæser ekstra kraftigt i Danmark, er der risiko for, at elpriserne ryger ned under nul. For når vinden rusker i træerne om vinteren, er der også brug for varme, og derfor kører langt de fleste af de danske kraftvarmeværker, som altså også leverer strøm til nettet. Samtidig blæser det også i vores nabolande, og hvis der er begrænsninger på forbindelserne – hvilket der ofte er, når de
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Ingeniøren
Techtopia #34: Hvordan får vi flere kvinder i it-branchen? Kun omkring 25 pct. af de ansatte i den danske it-branche er kvinder. Og de færreste af dem programmerer. Man skal ikke have besøgt eller arbejdet i ret mange teknologivirksomheder, før man begynder at savne noget – eller rettere nogen. Kvinder er nemlig en stor mangelvare i it-branchen. Og det er noget skidt – ikke bare for kvinder og ligestillingen, men også for de produkter og services, som vi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Room-temperature multiferroic thin films and their properties Spontaneous polarization appears to be parallel with the c-axis, while spontaneous magnetism appears to be parallel with the a-axis. Credit: None Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and Tohoku University have developed high-quality GFO epitaxial films and systematically investigated their ferroelectric and ferromagnetic properties. They also demonstrated the room-temperature
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NYT > Science
States Confront the Spread of a Deadly Disease in Deer If the disease prevalence is higher than 5 percent of the deer population, the state will step up its efforts to find and remove infected deer. “That could be increasing the harvest of bucks because bucks are two to three times more likely to be infected and to spread the infection,” Mr. Vore said. “If there are hot spots within the broader area with high prevalence, we can go in and address deer
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Ingeniøren
Intel sagsøges efter Meltdown-sårbarhed Processor-fabrikanten Intel er genstand for tre forskellige søgsmål i amerikanske distriktsdomstole. De drejer sig alle om sårbarheden Meltdown, der blev afsløret af blandt andet Google-forskere i sidste uge, og optræder i alle Intel's x86-64 mikroprocessorer fra senest 2011. Det skriver The Register. Søgsmålene repræsenterer forbrugere, der har købt en computer med de ramte Intel CPU'er, og er i
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Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor får man sommerfugle i maven? Vores læser Pernille Viuff spørger: Jeg gik og undrede mig over, hvad der forårsager sommerfugle i maven, når man glæder sig til noget eller tænker på en bestemt person? Det er ikke selve forelskelsen, men den kilden i maven, der pludselig opstår ved blot en tanke? Troels Wesenberg Kjær , hjerneforsker, specialeansvarlig overlæge ved Sjællands Universitetshospital og professor ved Københavns Univ
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chemists discover plausible recipe for early life on Earth IMAGE: Ramanarayanan Krishnamurthy, PhD, associate professor of chemistry at TSRI and senior author of the new study. view more Credit: Faith Hark LA JOLLA, CA - Jan. 8, 2018 - Chemists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed a fascinating new theory for how life on Earth may have begun. Their experiments, described today in the journal Nature Communications , demonstrate th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vision, sensory and motor testing could predict best batters in baseball DURHAM, N.C. -- New research from Duke Health suggests baseball scouts looking for a consistent, conscientious hitter may find clues not only in their performance on the field, but also in front of a computer screen. In a study of 252 baseball professionals published today in the journal Scientific Reports , Duke researchers found players with higher scores on a series of vision and motor tasks c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Multi-gene test predicts early heart disease risk DALLAS, Jan. 8, 2018 -- A risk score based on multiple genetic differences, or polygenic risk score, predicted significantly more cases of early-onset heart disease than standard tests for single genetic defects, according to new research in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine . "Our results provide convincing evidence that the polygenic risk sco
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Middle-aged couch potatoes may reverse heart effects of a sedentary life with exercise training DALLAS, Jan. 8, 2018 -- Middle-aged couch potatoes may reduce or reverse the risk of heart failure associated with years of sitting if they participate in two years of regular aerobic exercise training, according to a new study in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation . Study participants who adhered to the aerobic exercise regimen had significant improvements in how their body use
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Dagens Medicin
Nyt professorat i biomedicin i AarhusThomas Vorup-Jensen skal som professor ved Aarhus Universitet forske i proteinmolekylers funktion i immunsystemet.
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Science : NPR
As Cracks Widen In Washington State, Government Prepares For A Landslide Nearly 70 people live on a sliver of land wedged between Interstate 82 and Rattlesnake Ridge in central Washington state. In a depression below the cracked ridge just east of the interstate, two firefighters go door to door among mobile homes, trying to get the residents here to leave quickly. One of the residents, farm worker Janeth Solorio, says it's a difficult time. "We have to move and we do
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vision, sensory and motor testing could predict best batters in baseball Duke Health researchers found players with higher scores on computer-based vision and motor tasks had better on-field performance. In this photo, a Duke student demonstrates some of the tasks. Credit: Shawn Rocco, Duke Health New research from Duke Health suggests baseball scouts looking for a consistent, conscientious hitter may find clues not only in their performance on the field, but also in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists discover plausible recipe for early life on Earth Credit: CC0 Public Domain Chemists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have developed a fascinating new theory for how life on Earth may have begun. Their experiments, described today in the journal Nature Communications , demonstrate that key chemical reactions that support life today could have been carried out with ingredients likely present on the planet four billion years ago. "This w
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Ingeniøren
Ugens job: Widex, Ørsted og Ambu har flere ledige jobsPå dagens liste finder du job for ingeniører og naturvidenskabelige kandidater i flere forskellige firmaer. Blandt andet som specialist, projektleder, konsulent og mere endnu.
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Ingeniøren
Forskere: Færre skovbrande har givet lavere methanudslip til atmosfæren Klimaforskere holder skarpt øje med atmosfærens indhold af methangas, der er en af de værste drivhusgasser, næst efter CO2. Mens eksperter har set en stigning i methanniveauet i løbet af det 21. århundrede, har der dog været problemer med at få regnestykket til at gå op. Et nyt Nasa-ledet studie har fundet ud af, at færre skovbrande i perioden kan være årsag til forskellen mellem de teoretiske be
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Science | The Guardian
When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing review – timely guide I n 2011, two Cornell researchers, Michael Macy and Scott Golder, began an unusual project . They gathered approximately 500m tweets that had been posted by more than 2 million users in 84 countries over the previous two years. Then they subjected these tweets to careful analysis. The sociologists’ aim was straightforward. The pair wanted to measure how people’s feelings varied from morning until
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Virtual aide market a "wildfire" at CES gadget show Voice-commanded virtual assistants packed into speakers and other devices will be a "game-changing" trend this year, Consumer Electronics Show researchers said Sunday. Sales of smart speakers are expected to nearly double in the US, to $3.8 billion, from last year according to Lesley Rohrbaugh and Steve Koenig, researchers with the Consumer Technology Association, which organizes the annual CES t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tech faithful gather to worship at mecca of innovation After a rollercoaster year for the tech world, many industry leaders are looking to the cutting edge for salvation. As tech industry players converge in Las Vegas for the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show, an overriding theme is that gizmos, artificial intelligence, cloud computing and superfast internet connections hold answers to many if not all ills—the new religion. One of the world's largest
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fear not the alphabet soup of TV features unveiled at CES (Update) A plush, robotic duck may soon become a fixture in the world of children who have cancer—a social robot that can be silly, happy, angry, scared or sick just like them, and help them cope creatively with their illness through ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple investors urge action to curb child gadget addictionTwo major Apple investors have urged the iPhone maker to take action to curb growing smartphone addiction among children, highlighting growing concern about the effects of gadgets and social media on youngsters.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Poisonous and running out: Pakistan's water crisis Barely 15 days old, Kinza whimpers at an Islamabad hospital where she is suffering from diarrhoea and a blood infection, a tiny victim among thousands afflicted by Pakistan's severely polluted and decreasing water supplies. Cloaked in a colourful blanket, Kinza moves in slow motion, like a small doll. Her mother, Sartaj, does not understand how her daughter became so ill. "Each time I give her
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Robot duck's aim: Helps kids with cancer via power of play In this undated photo made from video, 12-year-old cancer patient Ethan Daniels at medical facility in Atlanta speaks with Aaron Horowitz, co-founder and CEO of Sproutel, who designed "My Special Aflac Duck" to promote emotional well-being by helping children living with cancer develop a sense of control and manage stress through interactive technology. (AP Photo/Marina Hutchinson) A plush, robot
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Less chewing the cud, more greening the fuel Plant biomass contains considerable calorific value but most of it makes up robust cell walls, an unappetising evolutionary advantage that helped grasses to survive foragers and prosper for more than 60 million years. The trouble is that this robustness still makes them less digestible in the rumen of cows and sheep and difficult to process in bioenergy refineries for ethanol fuel. But now a mult
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Viden
Meteorolog: Derfor er USA ramt af 'atmosfærisk bombe' Niagra Falls, hajer og palmetræer, der fryser til is, hundredvis af skoler, der lukker, tusindvis af aflyste flyafgange, boliger uden strøm og flere stater i undtagelsestilstand. Et gigantisk tæppe af sne og ekstrem kulde har siden slutningen af december og ind i det nye år lagt sig over USA. Omkring nytåret lå temperaturerne under frysepunktet i hele 90 procent af landet, og flere steder har kul
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Viden
Professor: Nedbør og forhøjet grundvand er et overset klimaproblem kl. 01.37 opdateret kl. 01.53 Flere dele af Danmark er ved at drukne i store mængder vand. Det skriver Jyllands-Posten mandag. Årsagen er blandt andet stigende nedbør, og det faktum at grundvandet er steget over det meste af landet. Og den voldsomme vandmængde udgør et stort og overset klimaproblem i Danmark. Det mener Jørgen Eivind Olesen, der er professor ved Institut for Agroøkologi på Aarhus
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Ingeniøren
Sidste chance for at hente åbne kort fra Mapzen Kortplatformen Mapzen oplyser i en kort meddelelse på sit website , at de lukker ned for Mapzens API og andre services ved udgangen af måneden. Kortplatformen er open source og bruges af udviklere til at arbejde med geodata fra især OpenStreetMap, hvor de blandt andet har lavet Valhalla Routing Project - en open source-ruteberegner. Lukningen var absolut ikke forventet og har skabt en del røre i
16h
Ingeniøren
Linux-brugere forment adgang til eksamen Når eleverne på Aalborg Universitet (AAU) skal til eksamen, skal de bruge eksamensovervågningsprogrammet ITX-Flex. Det er et krav, men programmet fungerer ikke på Linux, hvilket efterlader nogle elever i en mildest talt presset situation her i januar, hvor universitetet holder eksamenerne. »Problemet ville ikke være så stort, hvis det kun drejede sig om skriveopgaver, hvor programmerne tilnærmels
16h
The Atlantic
Full Transcript: Oprah Winfrey's Speech at the Golden Globes It was undeniably the most electrifying moment of the 2018 Golden Globes: Oprah Winfrey, the actor, author, entrepreneur, and humanitarian, accepted the Cecil B. DeMille Award for outstanding contributions to entertainment, and gave a speech that captured the systemic inequality that’s still rooted at the heart of the entertainment industry. But Winfrey’s speech also offered a note of hope. It wi
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Female night shift workers may have increased risk of common cancers Bottom Line: Night shift work was associated with women having an increased risk of breast, skin, and gastrointestinal cancer, according to a meta-analysis. Journal in Which the Study was Published: Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research Author: Xuelei Ma, PhD, oncologist at State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study finds large increase in non-powder gun-related eye injuries A new study conducted by researchers in the Center for Injury Research and Policy of the Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital investigated sports- and recreation-related eye injuries during a 23-year period and found a slight decrease in eye injuries overall; however, the rate of eye injury associated with non-powder guns (including BB, pellet and paintball guns) increased by almo
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Efforts to track food intake on smartphone app impacted by day of week but not season of year AUDIO: A new study examines weekly and seasonal patterns of dietary self-monitoring, particularly when using a smartphone app. view more Credit: Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior Philadelphia, January 8, 2018 - Dietary self-monitoring is a key component of successful behavioral weight loss interventions and is essential for facilitating other behavior change techniques (eg, settin
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teens show decreased risk for heart disease later in life after bariatric surgery Adolescents with severe obesity who had bariatric surgery showed significant improvements in cardiovascular disease risk factors, according to the most recent "Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery" (Teen-LABS) study, published online today by Pediatrics . Prior to bariatric surgery, 33 percent of the study participants had three or more defined cardiovascular disease risk factors. Ho
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Repeated influenza vaccination helps prevent severe flu in older adults Repeated vaccination for influenza in older adults reduced the severity of the virus and reduced hospital admissions, found new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) A team of Spanish researchers looked at the effect of repeated influenza vaccinations in the current and 3 previous seasons in people aged 65 years and older admitted to 20 Spanish hospitals in 2013/14 a
18h
Ingeniøren
Her er det bedste tidspunkt at sende din ansøgning Dit drømmejob dukker pludselig frem på skærmen. Et spritnyt stillingsopslag tilbyder spændende muligheder og nye udfordringer, og du går i din ivrighed straks i gang med at forberede din ansøgning. Men lige inden din jobansøgning ryger af sted, overvejer du at vente. Måske er det bedre at sende sin ansøgning tættere på deadline frem for lige efter offentliggørelsen? Nye jobtilbud hver uge. Tjek J
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Less chewing the cud, more greening the fuel Plant biomass contains considerable calorific value but most of it makes up robust cell walls, an unappetising evolutionary advantage that helped grasses to survive foragers and prosper for more than 60 million years. The trouble is that this robustness still makes them less digestible in the rumen of cows and sheep and difficult to process in bioenergy refineries for ethanol fuel. But now a
23h
Futurity.org
Catalyst turns toxic nitrate pollution into air and water Researchers have found a catalyst that can clean toxic nitrates from drinking water by converting them into air and water. “Nitrates come mainly from agricultural runoff, which affects farming communities all over the world,” says lead study scientist Michael Wong, a chemical engineer at Rice University. “Nitrates are both an environmental problem and health problem because they’re toxic. There a
23h
Science : NPR
Dozens Evacuate In Washington State, Fearing Landslide Washington's Yakima Valley is preparing for a potential landslide, as a crack in Rattlesnack Ridge grows by the day. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call,Inc. hide caption toggle caption Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call,Inc. Washington's Yakima Valley is preparing for a potential landslide, as a crack in Rattlesnack Ridge grows by the day. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call,Inc. The first to notice the growing crack in Rat
23h
High Resolution pictures of the Brain
Time-consuming but fun This was actually a fun quiz to take. Try it! I completed mine alone with no Google searches or thumbing through books. Enjoy!!! submitted by /u/FearfulOfSheep [link] [comments]
23h
Futurity.org
How doped nanomaterials could cut fuel cell costs Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes or modified graphene nanoribbons could be effective, less costly replacements for expensive platinum in fuel cells, according to a new study. The tricky bit is making a catalyst that is neither too strong nor too weak… In fuel cells, platinum is used for fast oxygen reduction, the key reaction that transforms chemical energy into electricity. The findings come from
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Science : NPR
Controversial Social Scientist Charles Murray Retires After more than 30 years, The Bell Curve author Charles Murray is taking on a new role as emeritus scholar at the American Enterprise Institute. NPR's Michel Martin talks to Dr. Murray about his career.
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Feed: All Latest
Mark Zuckerberg Essentially Launched Facebook’s Reelection Campaign Since 2009, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has publicly announced a personal improvement challenge in January, a sort of New Year's resolution and Oprah’s Book Club rolled into one. Learn Mandarin. Run 365 miles. Kill your own meat. But this year, Zuckerberg pledged to spend 2018 "fixing" big problems at Facebook. "The world feels anxious and divided," he wrote , "and Facebook has a lot of work to
1d
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
The Staple Ingredients Of Moonshine Haven't Always Been Readily Available #Moonshiners | Tuesdays 9p What makes a good moonshine? Stone ground malt corn that's been germinated, dried, and finely ground contains natural yeast. Grain and sugar, the staple ingredients of moonshine have not always been readily available. Lance goes back to basics. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/moonshiners/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscov
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