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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Single-molecule FRET studies on the cotranscriptional folding of a thiamine pyrophosphate riboswitch [Chemistry]Single-molecule FRET studies on the cotranscriptional folding of a thiamine pyrophosphate riboswitch Heesoo Uhm a , b , c , Wooyoung Kang a , b , c , Kook Sun Ha d , Changwon Kang e , and Sungchul Hohng a , b , c , 1 a Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University , Seoul 08826, Republic of Korea; b Institute of Applied Physics, Seoul National University , Seoul 08826, Republic o
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Neural induction by the node and placode induction by head mesoderm share an initial state resembling neural plate border and ES cells [Developmental Biology]Neural induction by the node and placode induction by head mesoderm share an initial state resembling neural plate border and ES cells Katherine E. Trevers a , 1 , 2 , Ravindra S. Prajapati b , c , 1 , Mark Hintze b , c , 1 , Matthew J. Stower a , 1 , 3 , Anna C. Strobl a , 4 , Monica Tambalo b , c , 5 , Ramya Ranganathan b , c , Natalia Moncaut a , 6 , Mohsin A. F. Khan a , 7 , Claudio D. Stern
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Causes and consequences of decreasing atmospheric organic aerosol in the United States [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Causes and consequences of decreasing atmospheric organic aerosol in the United States D. A. Ridley a , 1 , C. L. Heald a , b , K. J. Ridley a , and J. H. Kroll a , c a Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology , Cambridge, MA 02139; b Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology , Cambridge, MA 02139
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Field- and clinically derived estimates of Wolbachia-mediated blocking of dengue virus transmission potential in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes [Ecology]Field- and clinically derived estimates of Wolbachia -mediated blocking of dengue virus transmission potential in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes Lauren B. Carrington a , b , 1 , Bich Chau Nguyen Tran a , Nhat Thanh Hoang Le a , Tai Thi Hue Luong c , Truong Thanh Nguyen c , Phong Thanh Nguyen c , Chau Van Vinh Nguyen c , Huong Thi Cam Nguyen c , Trung Tuan Vu a , Long Thi Vo a , Dui Thi Le a , Nhu Tuyet
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Control on rate and pathway of anaerobic organic carbon degradation in the seabed [Environmental Sciences]Control on rate and pathway of anaerobic organic carbon degradation in the seabed F. Beulig a , 1 , H. Røy a , C. Glombitza a , b , and B. B. Jørgensen a , 1 a Center for Geomicrobiology, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University , 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark; b Space Sciences Division, NASA Ames Research Center , Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 Edited by David M. Karl, University of Hawaii, Honolulu,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Impact of an historic underground gas well blowout on the current methane chemistry in a shallow groundwater system [Environmental Sciences]Impact of an historic underground gas well blowout on the current methane chemistry in a shallow groundwater system Gilian Schout a , b , c , 1 , Niels Hartog b , c , S. Majid Hassanizadeh b , and Jasper Griffioen a , d a Copernicus Institute of Sustainable Development, Utrecht University , 3584 CS Utrecht, The Netherlands; b Earth Sciences Department, Utrecht University , 3584 CD Utrecht, The Ne
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Identification of fusion genes and characterization of transcriptome features in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia [Genetics]Identification of fusion genes and characterization of transcriptome features in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia Bing Chen a , 1 , Lu Jiang a , 1 , Meng-Ling Zhong a , 1 , Jian-Feng Li a , 1 , Ben-Shang Li b , 1 , Li-Jun Peng a , Yu-Ting Dai a , Bo-Wen Cui a , Tian-Qi Yan a , Wei-Na Zhang a , Xiang-Qin Weng a , Yin-Yin Xie a , Jing Lu a , Rui-Bao Ren a , Su-Ning Chen c , Jian-Da Hu d , De-Pei
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Evaluating the contribution of rare variants to type 2 diabetes and related traits using pedigrees [Genetics]Author contributions: R.D., M.B., G.R.A., and J.B. designed research; G.J., A. Manning, M.A., M.Z., A.R.W., T.M.T., C.F., S.F., P.C., K.J.G., T.D., T.W.B., H.C., P.S.C., S.C., C.C., P.F., R.K., S.E.L., V.T., M.D., T.F., R.G., J.G., A.H., J.K., Y.J.K., J. Laramie, J. Lee, H.L., X.L., O.L., A.E.L., J.M., A. Mazur, A.P.M., T.I.P., D. Ragona, D. Reich, M.A.R., L.J.S., X.S., R.G.T., Y.Y.T., A.L.W., S.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Male homosexuality and maternal immune responsivity to the Y-linked protein NLGN4Y [Immunology and Inflammation]Male homosexuality and maternal immune responsivity to the Y-linked protein NLGN4Y Anthony F. Bogaert a , b , 1 , Malvina N. Skorska b , c , Chao Wang d , José Gabrie a , Adam J. MacNeil a , Mark R. Hoffarth b , Doug P. VanderLaan c , e , Kenneth J. Zucker f , and Ray Blanchard f a Department of Health Sciences, Brock University , St. Catharines, ON L2S 3A1, Canada; b Department of Psychology, Br
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mixed signature of activation and dysfunction allows human decidual CD8+ T cells to provide both tolerance and immunity [Immunology and Inflammation]Mixed signature of activation and dysfunction allows human decidual CD8 + T cells to provide both tolerance and immunity Anita van der Zwan a , b , Kevin Bi c , Errol R. Norwitz d , e , Ângela C. Crespo a , f , Frans H. J. Claas b , Jack L. Strominger a , 1 , and Tamara Tilburgs a , 1 a Department of Stem Cell and Regenerative Biology, Harvard University , Cambridge, MA 02138; b Department of Imm
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Enhancement of hepatic autophagy increases ureagenesis and protects against hyperammonemia [Medical Sciences]Enhancement of hepatic autophagy increases ureagenesis and protects against hyperammonemia Leandro R. Soria a , Gabriella Allegri b , Dominique Melck c , Nunzia Pastore d , e , Patrizia Annunziata a , Debora Paris c , Elena Polishchuk a , Edoardo Nusco a , Beat Thöny b , Andrea Motta c , Johannes Häberle b , Andrea Ballabio a , d , e , f , and Nicola Brunetti-Pierri a , f , 1 a Telethon Institute
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Role of enhanced receptor engagement in the evolution of a pandemic acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis virus [Microbiology]Role of enhanced receptor engagement in the evolution of a pandemic acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis virus Jim Baggen a , 1 , Daniel L. Hurdiss b , 1 , Georg Zocher c , Nitesh Mistry d , Richard W. Roberts a , Jasper J. Slager a , Hongbo Guo a , Arno L. W. van Vliet a , Maryam Wahedi a , Kimberley Benschop e , Erwin Duizer e , Cornelis A. M. de Haan a , Erik de Vries a , José M. Casasnovas f , Ra
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Familial Parkinson’s point mutation abolishes multiple system atrophy prion replication [Neuroscience]Familial Parkinson’s point mutation abolishes multiple system atrophy prion replication Amanda L. Woerman a , b , Sabeen A. Kazmi a , Smita Patel a , Atsushi Aoyagi a , c , Abby Oehler a , Kartika Widjaja a , Daniel A. Mordes d , Steven H. Olson a , b , and Stanley B. Prusiner a , b , e , 1 a Institute for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Weill Institute for Neurosciences, University of California, Sa
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Generation of a whole-brain atlas for the cholinergic system and mesoscopic projectome analysis of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons [Neuroscience]Generation of a whole-brain atlas for the cholinergic system and mesoscopic projectome analysis of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons Xiangning Li a , b , 1 , Bin Yu c , d , 1 , Qingtao Sun a , Yalun Zhang a , Miao Ren a , Xiaoyan Zhang a , Anan Li a , b , Jing Yuan a , Linda Madisen e , Qingming Luo a , b , Hongkui Zeng e , Hui Gong a , b , 2 , and Zilong Qiu b , c , 2 a Britton Chance Center f
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Genetic variation interacts with experience to determine interindividual differences in learned song [Neuroscience]Genetic variation interacts with experience to determine interindividual differences in learned song David G. Mets a , b , c , d , 1 and Michael S. Brainard a , b , c , d , 1 a Department of Physiology, University of California , San Francisco, CA 94158; b Department of Psychiatry, University of California , San Francisco, CA 94158; c Center for Integrative Neuroscience, University of California
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Body weight homeostat that regulates fat mass independently of leptin in rats and mice [Physiology]Body weight homeostat that regulates fat mass independently of leptin in rats and mice John-Olov Jansson a , 1 , Vilborg Palsdottir a , Daniel A. Hägg b , Erik Schéle a , Suzanne L. Dickson a , Fredrik Anesten a , Tina Bake a , Mikael Montelius c , Jakob Bellman a , Maria E. Johansson a , Roger D. Cone d , e , Daniel J. Drucker f , Jianyao Wu b , Biljana Aleksic b , Anna E. Törnqvist b , Klara Sj
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Ava fizzling south of MadagascarIMAGE: On Jan. 9 the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite saw Tropical Storm Ava south of Madagascar. view more Credit: NOAA/NASA Rapid Response Team NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Ava as it continued to move away from southeastern Madagascar and weaken. On Jan. 9, 2018 the Visible Inf
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Viden
Ny behandling øger chancen for at overleve en blodprop i hjernenHvert år bliver omkring 12.000 danskere ramt af apopleksi, der er en fælles betegnelse for en blodprop i hjernen og hjerneblødninger. Langt de fleste får en blodprop, og for en del af dem er der nu rigtigt godt nyt. En ny behandling, kaldet trombektomi, hvor man via et tyndt kateter så at sige suger blodproppen ud af blodkarret i hjernen, har øget chancen for at overleve en blodprop uden væsentli
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Targeting breast cancer through precision medicineResearchers have discovered a mechanism that may make cancer cells more susceptible to treatment. The research team found that the protein RYBP prevents DNA repair in cancer cells, including breast cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cluster of resistant tuberculosis pathogen discoveredBetween February and November 2016, researchers discovered a multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in eight refugees arriving in Europe from the Horn of Africa. The analyses provided an impulse for launching a transnational investigation and developing a pan-European alerting system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Jeans made with child labor? People choose willful ignoranceMany consumers have found a way to cope with the knowledge that products they like have been made unethically: They simply forget they ever knew it.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
One-step production of aromatic polyesters by E. coli strainsSystems metabolic engineers defined a novel strategy for microbial aromatic polyesters production fused with synthetic biology from renewable biomass. The team produced aromatic polyesters from Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains by applying microbial fermentation, employing direct microbial fermentation from renewable feedstock carbohydrates.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Ava fizzling south of MadagascarNASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and captured a visible image of Tropical Cyclone Ava as it continued to move away from southeastern Madagascar and weaken.
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Is SpaceX's Covert Zuma Payload Missing in Action?After months of launch delays, the clandestine spacecraft built by Northrop Grumman finally launched on Sunday evening on board a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. The mission, code-named Zuma , lifted off from Cape Canaveral at 8:00 PM Eastern, headed toward an unknown destination in low Earth orbit. But it may not have made it there. On Monday, SpaceX was already preparing for its next big launch from th
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Popular Science
Scientists are speed breeding plants in a race to beat climate changeSome years ago, NASA bred wheat in space with the goal of providing an unending food supply for astronauts. To help the plant along, astronauts shined light on the plant continuously. As far as the crop was concerned, the sun never set. It was always noon on a cloudless day. The extra light fueled its rapid growth. Researchers are now using the same technique here on Earth to quickly grow several
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Oversimplifying beliefs about causes of mental illness may hinder social acceptanceBelief that mental illness is biological has increased among both health experts and the public in recent years. But campaigns to treat it as a disease and remove stigma may be lacking because other factors, such as bad character and upbringing, still are viewed as playing a role, a Baylor University study has found. "Individuals who endorse biological beliefs that mental illness is 'a disease li
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For city kids with asthma, telemedicine and in-school care cut ER visits in halfChildren with asthma in the Rochester City School District who received a combination of telemedicine support and school-based medication therapy were almost half as likely to need an emergency room or hospital visit for their asthma, according to new research from the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC). One in 10 children in the United States has asthma, making it the country's most c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UC researchers find protein that mediates formation of HER2-driven breast cancerCINCINNATI--Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have identified for the first time that the estrogen receptor-binding protein MED1 is a critical mediator of HER2-driven breast cancer, identifying it as a potential therapeutic target. MED1 is a protein often produced, or expressed, at abnormally high levels in breast cancer cells that when eliminated is found to stop ca
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Proteomics analyses could present new opportunities to diagnose and treat dementiasOne of the most intriguing properties of the brain is its means to undergo synaptic plasticity which represents the basis for learning and memory, abilities that severely decline in the case of a dementia. New research suggests that particular proteins important in the communication between neurons could be targets for early interventions in patients with different types of dementias.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Spotty coverage: Climate models underestimate cooling effect of daily cloud cycleResearchers have found that the climate models scientists use to project future conditions on our planet underestimate the cooling effect that clouds have on a daily basis, which results in warmer, drier conditions than might actually occur. The researchers found that inaccuracies in accounting for the daily cloud cycle did not seem to invalidate climate projections, but did increase the margin of
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Noise from oil and gas operations stresses birds, hinders reproductionBirds exposed to constant noise from oil and gas operations show physiological signs of chronic stress, have chicks whose growth is stunted, and -- in some cases -- lay fewer eggs that hatch, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cancer targeted with reusable 'stinging nettle' treatmentCancer cells can be destroyed more effectively and selectively with a unique new reusable treatment, activated with a substance found in stinging nettles and ants.
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Live Science
Wreck of Dutch Warship Found Buried Beneath CoralSea-life-encrusted cannons from an 18th-century Dutch frigate Credit: Helena Barba/INAH Divers in the blue waters around the Yucatán Peninsula have discovered three historic treasures: a sunken lighthouse and the remains of an 18th-century Dutch warship and a 19th-century British steamer, according to Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH). The battered wrecks were f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Black hole research could aid understanding of how small galaxies evolveSize comparison of a dwarf galaxy (right inset, bottom) with a larger galaxy in the centre. Top inset: Dwarf galaxy overlain with some of the MaNGA data, revealing the winds from the supermassive black hole. Credit: Samantha Penny (Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth) and the SDSS collaboration Scientists have solved a cosmic mystery by finding evidence that supermass
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA Alaska-launched rockets to study space X-ray emissions and create polar mesospheric cloudPersonnel at the Wallops Flight Facility test the DXL payload's ability to connect with the Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) network which will be used to determine the location of the payload during flight. Credit: NASA/Berit Bland NASA rockets launched during the Alaskan winter typically explore the interaction of solar winds with Earth's atmosphere and the resulting auroras that dance across
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tropical Cyclone Irving appears elongated in NASA imageryAcross North America, streams and rivers are becoming saltier, thanks to road deicers, fertilizers and other salty compounds that humans indirectly release into waterways. At the same time, freshwater supplies are becoming ...
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NYT > Science
Secret Zuma Satellite Launched by SpaceX May Have Failed. What Happened?Secret Satellite Launched by SpaceX May Have Failed. What Happened? - The New York Times"> Secret Satellite Launched by SpaceX May Have Failed. What Happened? The Falcon 9 rocket launched at Cape Canaveral, Fla., on Sunday, for the satellite mission known as Zuma. Credit SpaceX On Sunday, SpaceX launched its first rocket of the year. During the company’s webcast of the liftoff, everything seemed
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Google's VR180 Cameras Are the Future of Point-and-ShootJust about everyone agrees virtual and augmented reality are going to be important. The tech already sort of works, and will get better quickly from here. Gadgets offering the ability to truly feel as if you've been transported to another place, or to superimpose the digital world on the real one, will be transformative. Somehow. Eventually. For some reason. No one knows exactly what AR and VR wi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Kodak surges at it becomes latest 'cryptocurrency' convertKodak, which traces its roots to the early days of film-based photography, is getting into the digital licensing and cryptocurrency market as part of a partnership with WENN Digital. The companies are launching blockchain technology with KodakOne and KodakCoin. Blockchain is a ledger where transactions of digital currencies, like bitcoin , are recorded. Rochester, New York-based Kodak, founded
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The Atlantic
The 2018 Procession of the Black NazareneThis week, in Manila, Philippines, hundreds of thousands of Catholic devotees took part in an annual procession lasting 22 hours, where they carry a centuries-old icon of Jesus Christ through the streets as barefoot worshipers climb over each other to kiss, touch, or rub bits of cloth on the statue. The Black Nazarene is an ebony statue of Jesus Christ brought to the Philippines in 1606, and is b
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The Atlantic
Just Eat More FiberIn the spirit of Drynuary , I’d like to propose another health-oriented month of the year. Perhaps called Crunch-uary or Poop-tober, it would be 30 days in which Americans, for once, eat enough dietary fiber. Currently, Americans only eat about 16 grams of fiber —the parts of plants that can’t be digested—per day. That’s way less than the 25 to 30 grams that’s recommended. There are so many reaso
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tropical Cyclone Irving appears elongated in NASA imageryIMAGE: NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible-light image of Tropical Cyclone Irving on Jan. 9, 2018 at 3:45 a.m. EST (0845 UTC). The image showed the storm to be somewhat elongated.... view more Credit: NASA Rapid Response Team NASA's Aqua satellite passed over Tropical Cyclone Irving and found wind shear was stretching the storm out. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alaska-launched rockets to study X-rays, create polar mesospheric cloudNASA rockets launched during the Alaskan winter typically explore the interaction of solar winds with Earth's atmosphere and the resulting auroras that dance across the night sky. However this winter, between January 15 - 31, 2018, NASA personnel and university researchers are traveling to the Poker Flat Research Range (PFRR) in Alaska to launch several rocket-borne investigations for other purpo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Black hole research could aid understanding of how small galaxies evolveIMAGE: Size comparison of a dwarf galaxy (right inset, bottom) with a larger galaxy in the centre. Top inset: Dwarf galaxy overlain with some of the MaNGA data, revealing the winds... view more Credit: Samantha Penny (Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth) and the SDSS collaboration Scientists have solved a cosmic mystery by finding evidence that supermassive black
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Planets around other stars are like peas in a podAn international research team led by Université de Montréal astrophysicist Lauren Weiss has discovered that exoplanets orbiting the same star tend to have similar sizes and a regular orbital spacing. This pattern, revealed by new W. M. Keck Observatory observations of planetary systems discovered by the Kepler Telescope, could suggest that most planetary systems have a different formation histor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change drives collapse in marine food websIMAGE: Reduced energy flow means that the amount of food available for predators -- such as fishes -- at the top of food webs is reduced, with potential consequences for fisheries species. view more Credit: Lance Anderson, Unsplash. A new study has found that levels of commercial fish stocks could be harmed as rising sea temperatures affect their source of food. University of Adelaide sci
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genomic data suggest two main migrations into Scandinavia after the last ice ageIn a new study published in PLoS Biology , an international research team suggests Scandinavia was populated by two main migrations after the last glacial maximum: an initial migration of groups from the south (modern day Denmark and Germany) and an additional migration from the north-east, following the ice-free Atlantic coast. After the last glacial maximum more than 10,000 years ago, Scandin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Linking success in some fields to intellectual talent undermines women's interest in themDue to the cultural stereotypes that portray 'brilliance' as a male trait, messages that tie success in a particular field, job opportunity, or college major to this trait undermine women's interest in it, shows a new study appearing in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology . "We know that women are underrepresented in fields whose members believe you have to be brilliant to succeed," exp
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change drives collapse in marine food websIMAGE: Reduced energy flow means that the amount of food available for predators -- such as fishes -- at the top of food webs is reduced, with potential consequences for fisheries species. view more Credit: Lance Anderson, Unsplash A new study demonstrates how climate change can drive the collapse of marine food webs by restricting energy flows between producers, herbivores, and carnivores.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dual migration created genetic 'melting pot' of the first ScandinaviansIMAGE: These are skeletal fragments from Hummervikholmen, one of sites featured in this study. view more Credit: Beate Kjørslevik New genomic data suggest that the first human settlers on the Scandinavian peninsula followed two distinct migration routes. The study publishing January 9 in the open access journal PLOS Biology led by researchers from Uppsala University with an international te
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spotty coverage: Climate models underestimate cooling effect of daily cloud cycleThe researchers used both reanalysis data and satellite images from 1986-2005 to calculate the average diurnal cycles of clouds in each season worldwide. The reanalysis (above) shows (left to right) the mean (average), standard deviation (amplitude) and phase (timing) of global cloud coverage by season. The color scale indicates low (blue) to high (red) coverage, amplitude and timing. The majorit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smoke from wildfires can tip air quality to unhealthy levelsSmoke plumes emanating from wildfires are swept high up into the air and spread over thousands of kilometers even days after a fire has been put out. The fine particles and harmful ozone contained in these plumes often have devastating effects on the air quality of US cities and consequently the health of their inhabitants. This is according to Alexandra Larsen of North Carolina State University
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bio-based compound offers a greener carbon fiber alternativeThe catalytic reactor shown here is for converting chemical intermediates into acrylonitrile. The work is part of the Renewable Carbon fiber Consortium. Credit: Dennis Schroeder/NREL From cars and bicycles to airplanes and space shuttles, manufacturers around the world are trying to make these vehicles lighter, which helps lower fuel use and lessen the environmental footprint. One way that cars,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First ELT main mirror segments successfully castThe first hexagonal segments for the main mirror of ESO's Extremely Large Telescope (ELT) are shown being successfully cast by the German company SCHOTT at their facility in Mainz. These segments will form parts of the ELT's 39-metre main mirror, which will have 798 segments in total when completed. The ELT will be the largest optical telescope in the world when it sees first light in 2024. Credi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NREL launches electrification futures study seriesThe Electrification Futures Study examines U.S. scenarios with widespread electrification in all sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation. Credit: National Renewable Energy Laboratory The U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is spearheading the Electrification Futures Study, a research collaboration to explore the impacts of widespread el
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists design potentially life-saving health monitor technologyMicrograph of the graphene, water and oil emulsion developed by Uni of Sussex physicists. Credit: University of Sussex Sick babies in remote parts of the world could be monitored from afar thanks to new wearable technology designed by physicists at the University of Sussex. And parents at home, concerned about the risk of cot death, could keep track of their new babies' heart and breathing rates
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Pfizer to Halt Alzheimers and Parkinsons Drug ResearchThe company's recent effort to find new treatments for Alzheimer's ended in disappointment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Multi-model effort highlights progress, future needs in renewable energy modelingModels of the U.S. electricity sector are relied upon by sector stakeholders and decision makers, but the recent surge in variable renewable energy (VRE), such as wind and solar, led a team of modeling experts to examine how these models would represent scenarios with high penetrations of VRE. Four agencies, including the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), hos
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Hormone replacement makes sense for some menopausal womenInternist Gail Povar has many female patients making their way through menopause, some having a tougher time than others. Several women with similar stories stand out in her mind. Each came to Povar’s Silver Spring, Md., office within a year or two of stopping her period, complaining of frequent hot flashes and poor sleep at night. “They just felt exhausted all the time,” Povar says. “The joy had
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The Atlantic
Health Care Just Became the U.S.'s Largest EmployerThis moment was inevitable. It just wasn’t supposed to happen so soon. Due to the inexorable aging of the country—and equally unstoppable growth in medical spending—it was long obvious that health-care jobs would slowly take up more and more of the economy. But in the last quarter, for the first time in history, health care has surpassed manufacturing and retail, the most significant job engines
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Scientific American Content: Global
Fate of Secret "Zuma" Satellite Unknown after SpaceX LaunchThe U.S. government's hush-hush Zuma satellite may have run into some serious problems during or shortly after its Sunday (Jan. 7) launch, according to media reports. Zuma lifted off atop a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Florida's Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Sunday evening—a launch that also featured a successful landing back on Earth by the booster's first stage. Everything seemed OK a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change drives collapse in marine food websReduced energy flow means that the amount of food available for predators -- such as fishes -- at the top of food webs is reduced, with potential consequences for fisheries species. Credit: Lance Anderson, Unsplash. A new study has found that levels of commercial fish stocks could be harmed as rising sea temperatures affect their source of food. University of Adelaide scientists have demonstrated
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genomic data suggest two main migrations into Scandinavia after the last ice ageA photograph of the excavations of Stora Förvar on Stora Karlsö. Credit: Hjalmar Stolpe. Antiquarian Topographical Archives (ATA), Stockholm. In a new study published in PLoS Biology , an international research team suggests Scandinavia was populated by two main migrations after the last glacial maximum: an initial migration of groups from the south (modern day Denmark and Germany) and an additio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Linking success in some fields to intellectual talent undermines women's interest in themDue to the cultural stereotypes that portray 'brilliance' as a male trait, messages that tie success in a particular field, job opportunity, or college major to this trait undermine women's interest in it, shows a new study appearing in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology . "We know that women are underrepresented in fields whose members believe you have to be brilliant to succeed," exp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Planets around other stars are like peas in a podThis artist's concept depicts a planetary system. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech An international research team led by Université de Montréal astrophysicist Lauren Weiss has discovered that exoplanets orbiting the same star tend to have similar sizes and a regular orbital spacing. This pattern, revealed by new W. M. Keck Observatory observations of planetary systems discovered by the Kepler Telescope,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New stem cell method sheds light on a tell-tale sign of heart diseaseWhile refining ways to grow arterial endothelial cells in the lab, a regenerative biology team unexpectedly unearthed a powerful new model for studying a hallmark of vascular disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Grocery store program improves farmers' adoption of environmental practicesIn one of the first analyses of a company-led sustainability program in the food and agriculture space, researchers found a major grocery chain fostered increased adoption of environmental practices at the farm level.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mass extinctions remove species but not ecological varietyThough mass extinctions wiped out staggeringly high numbers of species, they barely touched the overall 'functional' diversity -- how each species makes a living, be it filtering phytoplankton or eating small crustaceans, burrowing or clamping onto rocks.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Deadly disinfection in ant coloniesAnts kill colony mates infected with deadly diseases when they are unable to prevent them from falling sick in the first place. In doing so, the ants protect their colony from the outbreak of an epidemic.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Extra-terrestrial Hypatia stone rattles solar system status quoAnalyses on a small pebble found in south-west Egypt cast significant questions on a widely-held view about the primitive pre-solar dust cloud which our Sun, Earth and other planets were formed from. Researchers found exotic micro-mineral compounds in the 'Hypatia' stone that are not known to occur on Earth, elsewhere in our solar system, or in known meteorites or comets.
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Quanta Magazine
In Praise of Simple ProblemsMost of the important discoveries in mathematics take place after decades or centuries of effort. If you want to attack the biggest problems , you’ll need to master a lot of highly technical material before you can even begin to say something new. Such questions don’t interest Richard Schwartz . He likes problems he can read about today and start solving tomorrow — simple problems, fun problems,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Deep sea creatures provide a guiding light in the quest to develop cancer therapiesScientists use enzymes responsible for marine animal bioluminescence to help researchers test whether cancer immunotherapies work.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
World's smallest wearable device measures UV exposureResearchers have developed the smallest wearable device in the world. The wafer-thin, feather-light sensor can fit on a fingernail and precisely measures a person's exposure to UV light from the sun.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Heart health at risk for Latinas over worries about deportationA recent study has found that worry about deportations was associated with multiple cardiovascular health risk factors in Latinas from California's Salinas Valley, an area with a large immigrant community.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
State administrative data can help identify children's adverse experiencesIdentifying children with adverse childhood experiences is crucial but challenging. A new study finds that state administrative data can be used to identify children's social complexity risk factors. Researchers linked administrative data for more than 500,000 children receiving Washington State Medicaid insurance coverage with parent data to identify social complexity risk factors (individual, f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Public health-primary care testing has high uptake, doesn't identify hidden hepatitis CA strategy to test the general population for hepatitis B and C viruses in areas of high prevalence had high test uptake but did not detect hidden chronic hepatitis C infections. The study, a public health-primary care collaboration, sought to test individuals between 40 and 70 years of age (n=6,743) in two Dutch hepatitis hotspots. All family physicians in the hotspots invited their patients to
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Live Science
How Onion Peels Landed One Farmer in the HospitalWorkers may like to complain that their job is making them sick, but for one man in Japan, that turned out to be the case: The 62-year-old, who worked as an onion farmer, developed a rare allergic reaction from repeated exposure to moldy onion peels, according to a new report of the man's case. The mold growing on the onion peels turned out to be Aspergillus niger, a common type of mold tha
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Live Science
Here's What We Know About SpaceX's Possibly-Failed 'Zuma' LaunchA launchpad photo provided by SpaceX shows the Falcon 9 carrying Zuma Credit: SpaceX Something weird is going on with a classified SpaceX payload launched Sunday night (Jan. 7), codenamed Zuma. Either the mission failed, and a U.S. spy satellite was lost in space, per Bloomberg and Wall Street Journal reports that were posted Monday (Jan. 9), or it succeeded, per SpaceX. Loren Grush, a repo
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Science : NPR
Siri, Cortana, And Alexa Carry The Marks Of Their Human Makerskimberrywood/Getty Images kimberrywood/Getty Images Jimena Canales is a faculty member of the Graduate College at University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign and a research affiliate at MIT. She focuses on 19th and 20th century history of the physical sciences and science in the modern world. Her most recent book is titled The Physicist and the Philosopher: Einstein, Bergson and the Debate That Chan
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Magnets with a single pole are still giving physicists the slipMagnetic poles are seemingly inseparable: Slice a magnet in half, and you get two smaller magnets, each with its own north and south poles. But exotic magnetic particles that flout this rule may be lurking undetected, some physicists suspect. The hunt is in full swing for these hypothetical particles known as magnetic monopoles — which possess a lone north or south pole. Now, two groups of resear
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deep sea creatures provide a guiding light in the quest to develop cancer therapiesLOS ANGELES - A team of scientists at the Keck School of Medicine of USC is looking to some deep sea dwellers to create a better way to develop cancer-fighting therapies. Harnessing the power of the enzymes that give these marine animals the ability to glow, the team created a test that makes it easy for researchers to see whether a therapy is having its intended effect -- killing cancer cells. T
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The Atlantic
The New York Times's Glenn Thrush DilemmaAmerica’s newspapers and magazines have doggedly covered the nation’s reckoning with sexual harassment in recent months—yet there’s ongoing debate about how well those newsrooms are handling their own scandals. Dozens of reporters and editors gathered at the Newseum in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday to talk about gender inequity and sexual misconduct in American newsrooms, and the extent to which n
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The Atlantic
You May Already Be Immune to CRISPR2018 is supposed to be the year of CRISPR in humans . The first U.S. and European clinical trials that test the gene-editing tool's ability to treat diseases—such as sickle-cell anemia, beta thalassemia , and a type of inherited blindness —are slated to begin this year. But the year has begun on a cautionary note. On Friday, Stanford researchers posted a preprint (which has not been peer reviewed
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Popular Science
How to actually succeed on a dating appGone are the days when you had to lie about meeting your significant other through a dating app. As smartphones have transformed the way we look for love, swiping left and right to choose a potential partner has gradually become the new normal. But with so many people searching for a soulmate on these apps and sites, how can you stand out from the crowd? These expert tips, inspired by advice from
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Big Think
Time Is Actually Slowing Down and Will Come to a Halt, Says a Radical TheoryIf you think about it, time can really weird you out. What is it exactly? How do we know it is even real and not a concoction of our brain? We certainly have a use for it, and it pretty much runs our lives on a daily basis. We constantly check the time, we make appointments based on it, we judge the courses of our lives based on the seeming fact that certain events happen to us at one point in
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Scientific American Content: Global
Weird "Tubes" on Mars Are Probably Not Signs of LifeIf you heard that NASA's Mars rover Curiosity just spotted signs of life on the Red Planet—well, don't get your hopes up. The odd tubular structures that Curiosity has been investigating lately were probably formed by crystal growth, not tiny burrowing creatures, mission team members said. "When we looked at these things close up, they're linear, but they're not tubular in the sense of be
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spotty coverage: Climate models underestimate cooling effect of daily cloud cycleIMAGE: The researchers used both reanalysis data and satellite images from 1986-2005 to calculate the average diurnal cycles of clouds in each season worldwide. The reanalysis (above) shows (left to right)... view more Credit: Image by Jun Yin, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering Princeton University researchers have found that the climate models scientists use to project future
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The bright side of an infectious proteinPrions are self-propagating protein aggregates that can be transmitted between cells. The aggregates are associated with human diseases. Indeed, pathological prions cause mad cow disease and in humans Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The aggregation of prion-like proteins is also associated with neurodegeneration as in ALS.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A water-based, rechargeable batteryIn the quest to find safe, low-cost batteries for the future, eventually we have to ask ourselves a question: Why not simply use water as an electrolyte? Water is cheap, in abundant supply, doesn’t burn and can conduct ions. But it has one major drawback: It is only chemically stable up to a voltage of 1.23 volts. In other words, a water cell provides three times less voltage than a customary lith
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study finds source of toxic green algal blooms and the results stinkFlorida's St. Lucie Estuary received national attention in 2016 as toxic green algal blooms wreaked havoc on this vital ecosystem. A new study contradicts the widespread misconception that periodic discharges from Lake Okeechobee were responsible. Water samples gathered and tested in the year-long study provide multiple lines of evidence that human wastewater nitrogen from septic systems was a maj
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists find heightened attention to surprise in veterans with PTSDScientists have found that people with PTSD have an increased learning response to surprising events. While most everyone reacts to surprise, people with PTSD tend to pay even more attention to the unexpected.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lake Michigan waterfowl botulism deaths linked to warm waters, algaeVolunteers tracked bird deaths along Lake Michigan from 2010 to 2013 to discover what conditions lead to large die-offs. The researchers found that warm waters and algae -- both of which have become more frequent over the years -- tended to precede bird deaths, likely because they promoted the growth of botulism toxin-producing bacteria.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Identical twins can share more than identical genes: Molecular similarityIndependent of their identical genes, identical twins share an additional level of molecular similarity that influences their biological characteristics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Closing roads counters effects of habitat loss for grizzly bearsIt's simple math, says a scientist. The closer grizzly bears are to humans, the more ways there are for the bears to die. Put more simply, more roads equal fewer grizzly bears.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Sam Gyimah is new science ministerImage copyright PA Sam Gyimah has been made Higher Education Minister for England in Theresa May's cabinet reshuffle. Mr Gyimah's role straddles the Department for Education and the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy. He replaces Jo Johnson, who has been made Transport Minister. Mr Gyimah, 41, will work alongside the newly appointed Education Secretary, Damian Hinds , who is
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Heart health at risk for Latinas over worries about deportationA recent study conducted by researchers at UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley's Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health (CERCH) found that worry about deportations was associated with multiple cardiovascular health risk factors in Latinas from California's Salinas Valley, an area with a large immigrant community. The study was published in the journal, Annals of Behavioral Medicine
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bio-based compound offers a greener carbon fiber alternativeIMAGE: The catalytic reactor shown here is for converting chemical intermediates into acrylonitrile. The work is part of the Renewable Carbon fiber Consortium. view more Credit: Dennis Schroeder/NREL From cars and bicycles to airplanes and space shuttles, manufacturers around the world are trying to make these vehicles lighter, which helps lower fuel use and lessen the environmental foo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Targeting breast cancer through precision medicineIMAGE: Mohammad Ali, Michael Hendzel and Leo Spyracopoulos have made a discovery that could help treat cancer more effectively. view more Credit: Melissa Fabrizio University of Alberta researchers have discovered a mechanism that may make cancer cells more susceptible to treatment. The research team found that the protein RYBP prevents DNA repair in cancer cells, including breast cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Strengths and challenges in interactions with newly diagnosed diabetes patientsWhen patients are diagnosed with diabetes, primary care clinicians display high levels of technical knowledge and communication skill, but initial consultations are often driven by biomedical explanations out of context from patient experience. A qualitative study of 32 patients newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes found strengths in primary care interactions including high levels of communicatio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Four practice characteristics facilitate integration of community health workersFour practice characteristics facilitate the integration of community health workers into medical home care teams: leaders who champion community health workers, a culture of innovation, recognition of patients' non-medical needs, and a positive perception of the financial sustainability of community health workers. Researchers from the University of Minnesota conducted 51 semi-structured, key in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Most patients with unknown spinal cord disease later given specific diagnosis, study showsROCHESTER, Minn. -- A study by Mayo Clinic researchers found that most patients with suspected spinal cord inflammation of unknown cause have an alternative, specific diagnosis. The research is published in Neurology , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. "Our review draws attention to the critical need to properly diagnose spinal cord disease to initiate appropriate therapy
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Malnutrition frequently underdiagnosed and undertreated among hospital patientsIMAGE: Principal diagnoses that ranked in the top ten in either volume (number of discharges with the principal diagnosis who were also diagnosed with coded diagnoses of pediatric malnutrition) or rate... view more Credit: Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Philadelphia, January 9, 2018 - Malnutrition among hospitalized patients remains a serious issue that has been underdiag
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can CranioSacral therapy improve symptoms of concussion & mild TBI among football players?IMAGE: The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine (JACM) provides observational, clinical, and scientific reports and commentary intended to help healthcare professionals, delivery organization leaders, and scientists evaluate and integrate therapies... view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, January 9, 2018-- This invited commentary references a pr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pioneering new technique could boost understanding of causes of heart diseaseThe complex and mysterious mechanisms that drive communication and reactions within human cells could be on the verge of being unravelled, due to a pioneering new technique. Researchers from the Universities of Exeter, Leeds and Cambridge have harnessed an innovative new method to gain a greater understanding of signalling stations within the cells, called nanodomains. They believe that the new t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New stem cell method sheds light on a tell-tale sign of heart diseaseIMAGE: These are mesenchymal arterial cells, which become more star-shaped and can pile up on one another, leading to a thickening or buildup in the arteries. view more Credit: Morgridge Institute for Research MADISON -- While refining ways to grow arterial endothelial cells in the lab, a regenerative biology team at the Morgridge Institute for Research unexpectedly unearthed a powe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
General anesthetics do more than put you to sleepIMAGE: A representation of thousands of tracked syntaxin1A molecules in a neuron exposed to propofol. view more Credit: Associate Professor Bruno van Swinderen A new understanding of the complex ways in which general anaesthetics act on the brain could eventually lead to improved drugs for surgery. It remains unclear how general anaesthesia works, even though it is one of the most common me
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NYT > Science
The U.K. Has Banned Microbeads. Why?Many of those companies have pledged to voluntarily phase out use of the pellets . What’s the problem? About eight million tons of plastic enter the world’s oceans each year, according to a 2015 report by the journal Science. While microbeads represent only a small percentage of those plastics, there is growing concern about their presence in oceans, lakes and rivers. Microbeads that wash down dr
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New on MIT Technology Review
Nano/micro 3-D printing is capable of generating complex, minute components.Traditional manufacturing faces significant challenges when tasked with quickly creating small components that involve highly complex, minute, precision-crafted structures—items such as miniature connectors and micro-lenses for endoscopes. All these parts require high-end precision manufacturing to create an exact surface profile and complicated internal structures, which is costly. Now, cutting-
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Scientific American Content: Global
Timing Is EverythingWhen should you schedule that meeting—or find a new job? Is it time to start dating again? What’s the secret to an afternoon that drags just a little bit less? Every day we face questions of timing, but we have no guiding principles to answer them. In his new book, When , best-selling author Daniel Pink takes a comprehensive look at the psychology behind questions like these, offering practical a
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Scientific American Content: Global
Smoking Is Way Down in the U.S., but Not for People with Mental IllnessPeople suffering from mental health issues face numerous challenges in the United States, including limited access to mental health providers , shortages of psychiatric beds , and widespread incarceration . But another oft-overlooked issue harms the lives of millions of Americans with mental illness—cigarette smoking. The national effort to reduce tobacco consumption has been cited among the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Multi-model effort highlights progress, future needs in renewable energy modelingModels of the U.S. electricity sector are relied upon by sector stakeholders and decision makers, but the recent surge in variable renewable energy (VRE), such as wind and solar, led a team of modeling experts to examine how these models would represent scenarios with high penetrations of VRE. Four agencies, including the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), ho
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Headlines to cover at the AAAS Annual Meeting in Austin, TexasPRESS REGISTRATION: Credentialed Reporters and Public Information Officers May Register Here: https:/ / www. eurekalert. org/ aaasnewsroom/ 2018/ registration/ AUSTIN, TEXAS--Regenerating organs for patient transplants, research and policy questions for "smart" vehicles, advances in the fight against cancer, and voter participation in elections will be discussed at the 2018 American Associat
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physicians use complex process in addressing non-patient requestsWhen confronted with a medical request from family or friends (non-patients), physicians follow a complex process in deciding how to respond. According to a focus group study of 33 family medicine residents and 16 senior physicians, physicians first orient themselves to the situation: who is this person; what is he or she asking of me, and where are we? They also consider the nature and strength
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Popular Science
This pill could help you figure out why you’re always fartingEveryone gets gas . And (almost) everyone could stand to live without it. But figuring out what drives gas is a difficult endeavor—even for doctors. A multitude of foods can initiate gassiness, to varying degrees, depending on the individual. But a new gadget might someday help. In a paper in the journal Nature Electronics , a pair of researchers just introduced an electronic pill that can measur
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Uneasiness in observers of unnatural android movements explainedWhen the human-likeness of androids exceeds a certain threshold, the human's affinity for them decreases and an uncanny feeling about them increases. This effect, however, has been relatively unexplored. Osaka University-centered researchers recently found the visual observation of the android, compared with that of the human model, caused greater activation in the subthalamic nucleus, a brain reg
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sun, wind, and power tradingThe use of renewables like the sun and wind can cause fluctuations in power grids. But what impact do these fluctuations have on security of supply? To answer this question, scientists analyzed different types of fluctuations in several power grids in Europe, Japan, and the USA -- and came to surprising conclusions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How good bacteria control your genesScientists have discovered a way that bacteria in the gut can control genes in our cells. Their work shows that chemical messages from bacteria can alter chemical markers throughout the human genome. The signal chemicals are made when bacteria digest fruits and vegetables. By communicating in this way, the bacteria may help to fight infections and to prevent cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hereditary facial features could be strongly influenced by a single gene variantDo you have your grandmother's eyes? Or your father's nose? A new study has uncovered variations in singular genes that have a large impact on human facial features, paving the way to understanding what determines the facial characteristics passed on from generation to generation.
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Live Science
Burn, Baby, Burn: Australian Birds Steal Fire to Smoke Out PreyGrassland fires that are deadly and devastating events for many kinds of wildlife are a boon to certain types of birds known as fire foragers. These opportunists prey on animals fleeing from a blaze, or scavenge the remains of creatures that succumbed to the flames and the smoke. But in Australia, some fire-foraging birds are also fire starters. Three species of raptors — predatory bird
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Ingeniøren
Nyt studie: Immunforsvaret kan blive en showstopper for gensaksen CrisprAt redigere gener direkte i menneskekroppen med værktøjet Crispr/Cas9 kan vise sig at blive svært. Det fastslår et nyt studie fra Stanford University i Californien. I dag bliver proteiner fra to typer bakterier ofte brugt til at klippe i dna med, men nu har det vist sig, at de fleste mennesker bærer rundt på antistoffer mod enzymer fra netop disse to bakterier. Dermed er der risiko for, at vores
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Why some birds of paradise have ultrablack feathersIn these scanning electron microscope images, microscopic differences in filaments in black feathers of three bird of paradise species and one close relative, the lesser melampitta ( Melampitta lugubris ), become clear. An ordinary black feather from M. lugubris , for example, does not have the spikes and is not angled as much as filaments in superblack feathers from the other species. et al
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mass extinctions remove species but not ecological varietySixty-five million years ago, clouds of ash choked the skies over Earth. Dinosaurs, along with about half of all the species on Earth, staggered and died. But in the seas, a colorful population of marine bivalves--the group including oysters, clams and scallops--soldiered on, tucked into the crevices of ocean floors and shorelines. Though they also lost half their species, curiously, at least one
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New skin barrier product reduces costs for ostomy careJanuary 9, 2018 - Ostomy patients using a new type of skin barrier product--infused with ceramides that play an essential role in the normal barrier function of the skin-- experience lower costs of care, according to a randomized trial published in the Journal of Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nursing , the official journal of the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses (WOCN®) Society. The journal is
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How patients and healthcare providers communicate outside the office is changingIMAGE: Joy L. Lee of the Regenstrief Institute's William M. Tierney Center for Health Services Research studies how patients and providers communicate with each other electronically. view more Credit: Regenstrief Instituet INDIANAPOLIS - How patients and their healthcare providers communicate with one another outside the clinic or doctor's office is changing. But how do patients and their p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deadly disinfection in ant coloniesIMAGE: These are two ants and a pupa. view more Credit: Christopher Pull Ants kill colony mates infected with deadly diseases when they are unable to prevent them from falling sick in the first place. In doing so, the ants protect their colony from the outbreak of an epidemic. When fighting diseases, ant colonies show a remarkable similarity with the immune system that protects the organism
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Women survive crises better than menWomen today tend to live longer than men almost everywhere worldwide -- in some countries by more than a decade. Now, three centuries of historical records show that women don't just outlive men in normal times: They're also more likely to survive even in the worst of circumstances, such as famines and epidemics.
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Science | The Guardian
Alzheimer's setback as promising drug shows no benefit in clinical trialsThe quest to develop drugs to treat Alzheimer’s disease has experienced a new setback, with a promising medication failing to show benefits in the latest series of clinical trials. Earlier trials had suggested that the drug idalopirdine, from the Danish international pharmaceutical company Lundbeck, might improve cognition in those with Alzheimer’s disease when taken alongside existing drugs – kn
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Engineers grow functioning human muscle from skin cellsEngineers have grown the first functioning human muscle from non-muscle cells -- skin cells reverted to their primordial stem cell state. The ability to start from cellular scratch using non-muscle tissue will allow scientists to grow far more muscle cells, provide an easier path to genome editing and cellular therapies, and develop individually tailored models of rare muscle diseases for drug dis
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Grocery store program improves farmers' adoption of environmental practicesIMAGE: Leafy green vegetables are produced in a growing facility in the Gauteng Province, South Africa. A new study shows a company-led sustainability program at a major food retailer in South... view more Credit: Katherine Smit When grocery stores tout sustainable products, consumers may take their claims at face value. Yet few studies have analyzed whether or not companies who claim to impr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NUST MISIS scientists manage to observe the inner structure of photonic crystalsIMAGE: This is the scheme of analysis of photonic crystals' inner structure with the help of ptychography. view more Credit: ©NUST MISIS With the help of electronic microcopy, scientists have managed to track defects in the surface of two-dimensional photonic crystals, but there was a problem with bulk photonic crystals. There was no way for scientists to research the inner parts of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women survive crises better than menDURHAM , N.C. -- Women today tend to live longer than men almost everywhere worldwide -- in some countries by more than a decade. Now, three centuries of historical records show that women don't just outlive men in normal times: They're more likely to survive even in the worst of circumstances, such as famines and epidemics, researchers report. Most of the life expectancy gender gap was due to a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Jeans made with child labor? People choose willful ignoranceCOLUMBUS, Ohio -- Many consumers have found a way to cope with the knowledge that products they like have been made unethically: They simply forget they ever knew it. In a series of studies, researchers found that consumers conveniently "forgot" that brands of desks were made with wood from rainforests or that jeans may have been made with child labor. In fact, consumers not only forget the uncom
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dead trees are alive with fungiIMAGE: Deadwood logs of different tree species were laid out at three areas of temperate forests by UFZ scientists. They want to analyze which fungus species inhabit dead trees. view more Credit: Witoon Purahong Fungi that live on trees perform an important function in the forest ecosystem by breaking down dead wood. This is no easy feat, because wood is very resilient. It is held together by
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How quickly can children learn routes?New research from the University of Liverpool suggests that children as young as eight can learn a route after only a single experience of it. Wayfinding is the ability to learn and recall a route through an environment. Theories of wayfinding suggest that for adult and children to learn a route successfully, they must have repeated experience of it. Researchers from the University's School of Ps
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Potentially life-saving health monitor technology designed by Sussex University physicistsIMAGE: This is a sensing element of a prototype of the monitor device (flexible pipe filled with graphene emulsion) -- developed by University of Sussex physicists. view more Credit: University of Sussex Sick babies in remote parts of the world could be monitored from afar thanks to new wearable technology designed by physicists at the University of Sussex. And parents at home, concerne
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Patients who receive prescription opioids are more satisfied with care than other patientsPatients with musculoskeletal conditions who receive prescription opioids are more satisfied with their care than comparable patients who do not receive opioids. In a study of nationally representative data, 13 percent (2,564) of more than 19,000 patients with musculoskeletal conditions used prescription opioids. Among those who used opioids over time, moderate and heavy use was associated with g
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New method stabilizes siRNAs without affecting gene silencing activityIMAGE: Nucleic Acid Therapeutics is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published bimonthly in print and online that focuses on cutting-edge basic research, therapeutic applications, and drug development using nucleic acids or related... view more Credit: Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers New Rochelle, NY, January 9, 2018--Researchers have reported the ability to modify the structure of s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Metabolic pathway involved in immune response to Zika also participates in neurogenesisResearchers at the University of Campinas (UNICAMP) in São Paulo State, Brazil, have identified molecules that serve as markers of Zika in blood serum taken from patients with this viral infection. The finding enabled the group to discover an important cellular signaling pathway involved in the immune response to Zika. The study was published in the journal Frontiers in Microbiology . "This s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smoke from wildfires can tip air quality to unhealthy levelsSmoke plumes emanating from wildfires are swept high up into the air and spread over thousands of kilometers even days after a fire has been put out. The fine particles and harmful ozone contained in these plumes often have devastating effects on the air quality of US cities and consequently the health of their inhabitants. This is according to Alexandra Larsen of North Carolina State University
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Solid-state physics offers insights into dielectric properties of biomaterialsIMAGE: Some of the experimental data were obtained using a terahertz spectrometer based on backward-wave oscillators. view more Credit: MIPT Press Office A team of Russian, Czech and German researchers gained a new perspective on the properties of three materials of biological origin. Besides two reference materials with well-studied properties -- serum albumin and cytochrome C -- the r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Software-defined networking: The key to a scalable, manageable, and adaptable InternetSoftware-Defined Networking can make the Internet scalable, manageable, and adaptable at an industry-grade level, according to a recent research study led by scientists from the Madrid research institute IMDEA Networks. While the origins of Software-Defined Networking (SDN) date back to the 90's, it has only recently gained popularity. SDN replaces the traditional distributed control of network
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New treatments, screening methods dramatically reduce breast cancer deaths, study findsIn the last few decades, dozens of new breast cancer drugs -- from chemotherapies to targeted compounds -- have become available for clinical use, and mammogram technology has gone from film to digital. But are the changes making a difference in how many women die of breast cancer? The answer to that question is a resounding yes, according to a multi-institutional network of researchers who have
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lyndra announces publication of feasibility study of oral once-weekly drug delivery system for HIV antiretroviral therapy in Nature CommunicationsWATERTOWN, Mass., January 9, 2017 - Lyndra Inc. , an emerging biopharmaceutical company developing oral dosage forms designed to release drug for up to a week or longer, today announced the publication of a feasibility study of an oral, once-weekly drug delivery platform for HIV antiretroviral therapy in the peer-reviewed journal Nature Communications . The study demonstrated proof-of-concept of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Slow-release pill developed to deliver HIV therapeuticsIn the fight against the HIV epidemic, medication non-adherence remains a major challenge. Although combination therapies have been successful in managing the disease and can be taken to help prevent its spread, research shows that many patients do not stick to these regimens. Studies have found that in HIV clinical trials, only about 30 percent of patients stick to their dosage plans, which make
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New drug capsule may allow weekly HIV treatmentCAMBRIDGE, MA -- Researchers at MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital have developed a capsule that can deliver a week's worth of HIV drugs in a single dose. This advance could make it much easier for patients to adhere to the strict schedule of dosing required for the drug cocktails used to fight the virus, the researchers say. The new capsule is designed so that patients can take it just once a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Not enough evidence on benefits, harms of routine scoliosis screening for children and adolescentsBackground: The USPSTF routinely makes recommendation statements about the effectiveness of preventive care services. This one on screening for idiopathic scoliosis, a common form of curvature of the spine whose cause is unknown, is an update from 2004 when the USPSTF concluded the harms of screening outweighed potential benefits. Recommendation: The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Medication did not decrease cognitive loss in patients with Alzheimer's diseaseBottom Line: The use of the drug idalopirdine for six months did not improve or reduce the loss of cognition for patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease. Why The Research Is Interesting: Two phase 2 trials have suggested that a certain type of drug, a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine-6 receptor antagonist, such as idalopirdine, may improve cognition in Alzheimer disease when added with anot
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The Atlantic
Why Women Prefer Male BossesStudies show that when women have a preference, they would choose to have a male boss instead of a female boss. Participants in one study described their female bosses as “emotional,” “catty,” or “bitchy.” Where does this aversion to female bosses come from? And why do some women seem to undercut each other at work? Read Olga Khazan’s article for more on the psychology of queen bees.
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Inside Science
BRIEF: For Birds of Paradise, Super-Black Feathers Make Bright Spots ShineBRIEF: For Birds of Paradise, Super-Black Feathers Make Bright Spots Shine Unique microscopic structures make the feathers so black they look like a hole in space around the colored patches. BirdOfParadise_topNteaser.jpg The male superb bird of paradise shows his super black feathers to a brown female. Image credits: Ed Scholes Creature Tuesday, January 9, 2018 - 11:00 Catherine Meyers, Editor (I
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Feed: All Latest
The Feathers of Planet Earth's Bird of Paradise Literally Eat LightThe mating dance of the male superb bird of paradise is like nothing else on Earth. To win the affection of a female, he forms a sort of satellite dish with his body, revealing an entrancing band of blue. He jumps about like this, clicking in the face of the rather drab female, who appears simultaneously intrigued and horrified. VIDEO Other species of birds of paradise may vary in their plumage a
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How adaptive clothing empowers people with disabilities | Mindy ScheierDo you have a favorite T-shirt or pair of jeans that transforms you and makes you feel confident -- makes you feel like you? That's because what you wear can affect your mood, your health and your self-esteem, says fashion designer Mindy Scheier. Inspired by her son, who was born with a degenerative disorder that makes it hard for him to dress himself or wear clothing with buttons or zippers, Sche
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MSU scientists created a magnetic trap for neutronsIMAGE: (a) Standard swaveguide structure consisting of reflective layers A and C and transparent layer B between them. (b,c) Magnetic waveguide structure consisting of three layers A, B (magnetic) and C... view more Credit: Yury Khaydukov A team from Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics (MSU) together with their colleagues developed a magnetic waveguide able to sort neutrons with differe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Extraterrestrial Hypatia stone rattles solar system status quoIn 2013, researchers announced that a pebble found in south-west Egypt, was definitely not from Earth. By 2015, other research teams had announced that the 'Hypatia' stone was not part of any known types of meteorite or comet, based on noble gas and nuclear probe analyses. (The stone was named Hypatia after Hypatia of Alexandria, the first Western woman mathematician and astronomer). However, if
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Viden
Smerteforsker: Usandheder om cannabis kan skade patienterneProfessor Lars Arendt-Nielsen leder smerteforskningen på Aalborg Universitet og er præsident for den internationale smerteforskerorganisation IASP ( International Association for the Study of Pain ). Læs også: Frustrerede patienter afvises: Læger vil ikke udskrive medicinsk cannabis Alligevel har han svært ved at trænge igennem med sin advarsel om, at cannabis ikke er det mirakelmiddel, smertepla
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Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Kan parfume skade centralnervesystemet?Vores læser Lone Bech har spurgt: Er parfumestoffer potentielt neurotoksiske? Baggrund: Der advares mod parfumestoffer, især med henvisning til risiko for kontaktallergi, hvis man smører dem på huden. Men alle stoffer, der dufter og smager, må da påvirke hjernen pr. definition? Naturen – tror jeg – doserer normalt duftene i ret små afmålte doser, hvorimod mennesket vist er begyndt at øge disse do
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The Atlantic
Super-Black Is the New BlackBlackbirds, it turns out, aren’t actually all that black. Their feathers absorb most of the visible light that hits them, but still reflect between 3 and 5 percent of it. For really black plumage, you need to travel to Papua New Guinea and track down the birds of paradise. Although these birds are best known for their gaudy, kaleidoscopic colors, some species also have profoundly black feathers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Extra-terrestrial Hypatia stone rattles solar system status quoResearchers Jan Kramers and Georgy Belyanin found mineral compounds unlike anything on Earth, or in known meteorites or comets, in these fragments from the Hypatia stone, which was picked up in south-west Egypt in the Libyan Desert Glass Field. Credit: Dr Mario di Martino, INAF Osservatorio Astrofysico di Torino In 2013, researchers announced that a pebble found in south-west Egypt, was definitel
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds diversity boosts innovation in US companiesCredit: CC0 Public Domain A recent study finds that taking steps to foster diversity makes a company more innovative, in terms of product innovations, patents created and citations on patents - meaning the relevant innovations are also used to develop new technologies. "We wanted to know whether companies with policies encouraging the promotion and retention of a diverse workforce - in terms of g
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How do we taste sugar, bacon and coffee? Science finds a surprising answerUntil now, many scientists believed that a single protein -- TRPM5 -- acted as a gatekeeper for tasting sweet, bitter and savory foods. Remove TRPM5 from a person's taste cells, and they would no longer be able to identify sweet, bitter or savory (also called umami) foods. A new study challenges this thinking.
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Scientific American Content: Global
"The Problem Child of Seasonal Flu": Beware This Winter's VirusPeople in public health hate H3N2 flu seasons, like the one gripping most of North America right now. So do folks who work in hospitals and in the care facilities that look after the elderly. To put it flatly, H3N2 is the problem child of seasonal flu. It causes more deaths than the other influenza A virus, H1N1, as well as flu B viruses. It’s a quirky virus that seems, at every turn, to misbehav
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds diversity boosts innovation in US companiesA recent study finds that taking steps to foster diversity makes a company more innovative, in terms of product innovations, patents created and citations on patents - meaning the relevant innovations are also used to develop new technologies. "We wanted to know whether companies with policies encouraging the promotion and retention of a diverse workforce - in terms of gender, race and sexual ori
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer targeted with reusable 'stinging nettle' treatmentIMAGE: This is a representation of the organic-osmium compound, which is triggered using a non-toxic dose of sodium formate, a natural product found in many organisms, including nettles and ants.... view more Credit: James Coverdale/University of Warwick Cancer cells can be destroyed more effectively and selectively with a unique new reusable treatment, activated with a substance foun
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Want to make money with stocks? Never ever listen to analystsInvestors probably expect that following the suggestions of stock analysts would make them better off than doing the exact opposite. Nevertheless, recent research by Nicola Gennaioli and colleagues shows that the best way to gain excess-returns would be to invest in the shares least favored by analysts. They compute that, during the last thirty-five years, investing in the 10% of U.S. stocks anal
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cluster of resistant tuberculosis pathogen discoveredBetween February and November 2016, the Institute of Medical Microbiology at the University of Zurich discovered a multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis in eight refugees arriving in Europe from the Horn of Africa. The analyses provided an impulse for launching a transnational investigation and developing a pan-European alerting system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hereditary facial features could be strongly influenced by a single gene variantDo you have your grandmother's eyes? Or your father's nose? A new study by the Universities of Oxford and Surrey has uncovered variations in singular genes that have a large impact on human facial features, paving the way to understanding what determines the facial characteristics passed on from generation to generation. The study, which has been published by Proceedings of the National Academy o
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Great Barrier Reef: Warmer seas 'turning turtles female'Green sea turtles' gender is temperature dependent and there are now too many females.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smoking iPhone battery forces evacuation at Zurich storeAn overheated and smoking iPhone battery forced the evacuation of about 50 people from an Apple Store in Zurich on Tuesday and left an employee slightly injured, police said.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In urban streams, pharmaceutical pollution is driving microbial resistanceMicroorganisms like bacteria and algae grow in complex assemblages called biofilms -- the slimy coatings found on rocks in streambeds. These taxonomically diverse communities are essential to maintaining freshwater health. Credit: Sylvia Lee In urban streams, persistent pharmaceutical pollution can cause aquatic microbial communities to become resistant to drugs. So reports a new study published
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The bright side of an infectious protein: Stress sensors promote yeast cell survivalCryo-electron microscopy image of a biomolecular condensate of a prion protein. Credit: MPI-CBG Prions are self-propagating protein aggregates that can be transmitted between cells. The aggregates are associated with human diseases. Indeed, pathological prions cause mad cow disease and in humans Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The aggregation of prion-like proteins is also associated with neurodegener
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Women and men in STEM often at odds over workplace equityHalf of women working in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) jobs report having experienced gender discrimination at work, according to a new Pew Research Center survey examining people's experiences in the workplace and perceptions of fair treatment for women - as well as racial and ethnic minorities - in STEM occupations. The share of women in STEM reporting gender discrimination a
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New Scientist - News
Survey reveals extreme gender bias plagues STEM – it must changeA fifth of women in STEM jobs in the US have been sexually harassed at work Jason Butcher/Getty By Lara Williams It seems no matter where you look, claims of gender discrimination at work can be found. Hollywood. The BBC. Google. The latest addition to a depressing stream of reports of such bias in many walks of life comes in the form of a new survey showing that half of women in STEM jobs in the
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New Scientist - News
Extreme weather in US and Australia may be due to climate change2018 is barely a week old, but it has already brought some stunning weather extremes. Australia has experienced a heatwave, with thermometers hitting 47.3 ° C in Sydney on 6 January. To stay cool, New Scientist ’s local reporter Alice Klein says she had to sleep under a wet towel cuddling a bag of ice. Meanwhile, on the east coast of the US, a rapidly intensifying “ bomb cyclone ” was followe
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The bright side of an infectious proteinIMAGE: This is a cryo-electron microscopy image of a biomolecular condensate of a prion protein. view more Credit: MPI-CBG Prions are self-propagating protein aggregates that can be transmitted between cells. The aggregates are associated with human diseases. Indeed, pathological prions cause mad cow disease and in humans Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The aggregation of prion-like proteins is
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How good bacteria control your genesIMAGE: This is an image of the lining of the large intestine of a mouse. DNA is marked in red with the epigenetic marker known as crotonylation shown in green. Yellow... view more Credit: Dr Juri Kazakevych, Babraham Institute Key Messages: Good bacteria in the gut can produce a chemical signal that affects the human genome The changes in the genome may help to fight infections and preve
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pew Research Center: Women and men in STEM often at odds over workplace equityWashington, D.C. (Jan. 9, 2018) - Half of women working in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) jobs report having experienced gender discrimination at work, according to a new Pew Research Center survey examining people's experiences in the workplace and perceptions of fair treatment for women - as well as racial and ethnic minorities - in STEM occupations. The share of women in STEM
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In urban streams, pharmaceutical pollution is driving microbial resistance(Millbrook, NY) In urban streams, persistent pharmaceutical pollution can cause aquatic microbial communities to become resistant to drugs. So reports a new study published today in the journal Ecosphere . Emma Rosi, an aquatic ecologist at the Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies and lead author on the study explains, "Wastewater treatment facilities are not equipped to remove many pharmaceutical
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The Atlantic
Call for Entries: Atlantic Media's 15th Annual Michael Kelly AwardWashington, D.C. (January 9, 2018)—Atlantic Media has issued a call for entries for its 2018 Michael Kelly Award , honoring journalists for their exemplary work in memory of the late Atlantic Media editor Michael Kelly. The deadline to enter is Friday, February 2, 2018. There is no entry fee. The Michael Kelly Award, now in its 15th year, is open to writers and editors at U.S.-based newspapers, m
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Ingeniøren
Tilbud: 62 kroner for adgang til 1,2 mia. menneskers dataTi minutters ventetid og 500 rupi svarende til omkring 60 kroner. Så lidt krævede det for en journalist fra The Tribune for at udstille et alvorligt sikkerhedshul at købe sig adgang til data om over 1,2 milliarder personer. Disse data eksisterer i den indiske biometriske database Aadhaar med 4-8 megabyte pr. person. Der er tale om fingeraftryk, nethinde-skanninger, navne, billeder, mail-adresser,
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New on MIT Technology Review
Wi-Fi Will Get a Little More Secure This YearOK Google: Copy Amazon and Build a Smart Speaker with a Screen Google Assistant is seeking a popularity boost by coming to gadgets with screens—a move Amazon already made with Alexa. Copycat: Google said Monday that it will let companies make touch-screen devices that include its Google Assistant digital helper,… Read more Google Assistant is seeking a popularity boost by coming to gadgets with
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic alteration can cause obesity among GreenlandersGreenland is like many other countries struggling with overweight and obesity. Both environment and genetics play a role in development of obesity. However, it is not fully known which specific genes that are causing obesity. Researchers from the University of Copenhagen, among others, now appear to have found one of these genes. 'We have found a gene, ADCY3, which predisposes Greenlanders to obe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Some leukemia patients may be missing out on new treatmentsPatients with an aggressive form of leukaemia, currently ineligible for any type of targeted therapy, may in fact benefit from some of these new drugs, according to new research by Queen Mary University of London. One such drug, named midostaurin, was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration to treat this type of leukaemia, but only for patients who show mutations on a gene named
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Uneasiness in observers of unnatural android movements explainedIMAGE: The movies of the android robot showed stronger activation in the subthalamic nucleus than those of the human model. The subthalamic nucleus is involved in the motor system and plays... view more Credit: Osaka University Osaka - It has been decades in the making, but humanoid technology has certainly made significant advancements toward creation of androids - robots with human-li
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sun, wind, and power tradingIMAGE: Frequency measurements from 2015 (data: 50Hertz): the power grid frequency fluctuates around 50 Hz in the European grid and exhibits large jumps particularly in the trading intervals of 15 minutes.... view more Credit: MPI für Dynamik und Selbstorganisation / Benjamin Schäfer Our power grid works at a frequency of 50 hertz - usually generated by turbines, for example in hydro- or coa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New smart sensor could revolutionise crime and terrorism preventionCrime, terrorism prevention, environmental monitoring, reusable electronics, medical diagnostics and food safety, are just a few of the far-reaching areas where a new chemical sensor could revolutionise progress. Capable of recognising a vast range of reactive surfaces, the technology can pick-up small quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), such as acetone. When detected the chemical tu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change is triggering a migrant crisis in VietnamCredit: Tonkinphotography/Shutterstock.com The Vietnamese Mekong Delta is one of Earth's most agriculturally productive regions and is of global importance for its exports of rice, shrimp, and fruit. The 18m inhabitants of this low-lying river delta are also some of the world's most vulnerable to climate change. Over the last ten years around 1.7m people have migrated out of its vast expanse of f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New biomarkers predict outcome of cancer immunotherapyNEW VERSION: SOME CHANGES IN ENGLISH TRANSLATION OF THE QUOTATIONS Nowadays, melanoma and lung cancer can be combatted effectively through immunotherapy, which makes use of the immune system's normal function of regularly examining the body's tissue for pathogens and damages. Specific inhibitors are used to activate immune cells in a way that makes them identify cancer cells as foreign bodies and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PolyU develops rapid authentication method of Chinese medicinesIMAGE: PolyU's research team led by Dr Yao Zhongping, Associate Professor of the Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, has developed a new method for rapid authentication of Chinese herbal... view more Credit: The Hong Kong Polytechnic University The Food Safety and Technology Research Centre under the Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology of The Hong Kong P
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alzheimer's drug turns back clock in powerhouse of cellSalk researchers identify the molecular target of J147, which is nearing clinical trials to treat Alzheimer's disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How do we taste sugar, bacon and coffee? Science finds a surprising answerIMAGE: A microscope image of taste buds in a mouse tongue shows taste cells with TRPM4 ion channels highlighted in red. view more Credit: Credit: Debarghya Dutta Banik BUFFALO, N.Y. -- How do we taste the sugary richness of candy, or the bitter undertones of coffee? What about the savory flavors of smoked and cured meats? Until now, many scientists believed that a single protein -- TRPM5 --
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Popular Science
Can we actually stop using fossil fuels?T his past July, as Dawn Lippert surfed the swells at her home beach in Honolulu, a rogue board sprang up and slammed her between the eyes. It could have been a knockout blow. But Lippert, a former high school soccer champ who had taken up surfing when she arrived here a decade ago—fresh from Yale and working as an energy consultant to the state as it began to wean itself from fossil fuels —posse
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is homelessness a matter of choice?Credit: www.shutterstock.com Ahead of the royal wedding in May, the Conservative leader of Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead council, urged Thames Valley police to use their powers to clear the area around Windsor Castle of its expanding population of homeless people. Simon Dudley's letter to the police raised the perennial issue of the extent to which homelessness is a matter of choice. He
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Scientists Continue to Use Outdated MethodsThe use of underperforming computational tools is a major offender in science's reproducibility crisis-and there's growing momentum to avoid it.
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The Scientist RSS
Rhino Forensics Used to Track Down Poachers and TraffickersA genetic library for African rhinoceros populations has helped match illegally trafficked products to individual poached animals in more than 120 criminal cases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Alzheimer’s drug turns back clock in powerhouse of cellThe experimental drug J147 is something of a modern elixir of life; it's been shown to treat Alzheimer's disease and reverse aging in mice and is almost ready for clinical trials in humans. Now scientists have solved the puzzle of what, exactly, J147 does. They report that the drug binds to a protein found in mitochondria, the energy-generating powerhouses of cells. In turn, they showed, it makes
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Futurity.org
Mosquito sex swap leaves females ‘loyal’A chemical that the male Aedes aegypti mosquito transfers during sex plays a key role in shaping the female’s sexual proclivities, research shows. The work, from the lab of Leslie B. Vosshall at Rockefeller University, could yield new strategies for keeping the pests—and the Zika, dengue, and yellow fever they bring—in check. The female Ae. aegypti mates but once, in seconds and on the wing, with
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Futurity.org
These 5 tips may help you finally quit smokingQuitting smoking is a popular New Year’s resolution—but many have trouble sticking with it. “Many people underestimate how difficult it is to not only quit smoking, but to maintain the change.” “Many people underestimate how difficult it is to not only quit smoking, but to maintain the change,” says Zane Freeman, research coordinator for the YMCA exercise intervention for smoking cessation study
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists create first direct images of the square of the wave function of a hydrogen moleculeImage of the square of the wave function of a hydrogen molecule with two electrons. Credit: Waitz et al. Published in Nature Communications For the first time, physicists have developed a method to visually image the entanglement between electrons. As these correlations play a prominent role in determining a molecule's wave function—which describes the molecule's quantum state—the researchers the
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Futurity.org
Your morals may be more flexible than you thinkDisapproval of qualities people often associate with immorality such as selfishness, dishonesty, sexual infidelity, and mercilessness is conditional, rather than universal, according to a new study. “We all know of some immoral people who are well liked, but we tend to assume that these people are not considered immoral by their admirers…” In a 1968 study of 555 personal traits, people ranked lia
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds source of toxic green algal blooms and the results stinkCommonly known as red tides, brown tides and green tides, blue-green algae or cyanobacteria, like Microcystis, are considered harmful algal blooms and can have severe impacts on human health, aquatic ecosystems and the economy. Credit: Bob Hogensen, Martin County, Florida All eyes were on southeast Florida's St. Lucie Estuary in 2016 as it received national attention due to beach closures on the
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Scientific American Content: Global
Loneliness Can Be ToxicLoneliness Can Be Toxic Isolation from others can lead to a range of illnesses and even premature death. New science is probing causes and solutions to the problem of social disconnection Carrie Aulenbacher grew up painfully lonely in rural Pennsylvania. Despite having a loving husband and friends, the 39-year-old administrative assistant and writer in Erie still battles her sense of aloneness. T
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Connecting sexual and gun violence with media archetypesStars of TV Westerns embodied a Cowboy Code. Credit: ABC Television If you feel as if there's been an uptick in the frequency and lethality of mass shootings in recent years, you're not imagining it . The time between mass shootings (involving four or more casualties) in the U.S. has been shrinking since the 1990s, and the death rate in these massacres has almost tripled since 2000. And if it als
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ants sacrifice their colony mates as parts of a deadly disinfectionCredit: Royal Holloway, University of London New research from the IST Austria (Institute of Science and Technology Austria), in collaboration with Royal Holloway, University of London, and the University of Würzburg, has found that Lasius neglectus ants sacrifice ill ants to protect their colony from infection. In a paper published today in eLife , researchers showed that ants kill colony mates
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Soil freeze-thaw stimulates nitrous oxide emissions from alpine meadowsIMAGE: This image shows the stimulating mechanism of soil freeze-thaw on N2O emissions during the spring thaw period. view more Credit: Chunyan Liu The rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere lead to global warming, which is a major challenge for the sustainable development of human society. The Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau with widespread distribution of seasonal frozen soil
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Moms of obese children use different words to restrict eatingANN ARBOR, Mich. - It's a familiar scene at a birthday party: As a child goes back for a second cupcake or piece of cake, a parent says he has had enough sweets. But the rebuke may differ family to family. In a small new study, researchers found caregivers of children with obesity may be more likely to use direct statements to restrict a child's eating. A research team led by University of Michig
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds source of toxic green algal blooms and the results stinkAll eyes were on southeast Florida's St. Lucie Estuary in 2016 as it received national attention due to beach closures on the Fourth of July weekend from the massive amounts of toxic green slime that covered parts of the 7-mile-long inlet linked to a coastal river system. Microcystis aeruginosa - a freshwater blue-green alga that can produce toxins - wreaked havoc on this important ecosystem prom
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
January/February 2018 Annals of Family Medicine tip sheetPatients Who Receive Prescription Opioids are More Satisfied With Care Than Other Patients Patients with musculoskeletal conditions who receive prescription opioids are more satisfied with their care than comparable patients who do not receive opioids. In a study of nationally representative data, 13 percent (2,564) of more than 19,000 patients with musculoskeletal conditions used prescription
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
One-step production of aromatic polyesters by E. coli strainsIMAGE: Biosynthesis of aromatic polyesters by metabolically engineered E. coli . This schematic diagram shows the overall conceptualization of how metabolically engineered E. coli produced aromatic polyesters from glucose.... view more Credit: KAIST KAIST systems metabolic engineers defined a novel strategy for microbial aromatic polyesters production fused with synthetic biology from rene
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New on MIT Technology Review
SpaceX May Have Destroyed a U.S. Spy Satellite Worth Billions of DollarsOK Google: Copy Amazon and Build a Smart Speaker with a Screen Google Assistant is seeking a popularity boost by coming to gadgets with screens—a move Amazon already made with Alexa. Copycat: Google said Monday that it will let companies make touch-screen devices that include its Google Assistant digital helper,… Read more Google Assistant is seeking a popularity boost by coming to gadgets with
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Jeans made with child labor? People choose willful ignoranceMany consumers have found a way to cope with the knowledge that products they like have been made unethically: They simply forget they ever knew it. In a series of studies, researchers found that consumers conveniently "forgot" that brands of desks were made with wood from rainforests or that jeans may have been made with child labor . In fact, consumers not only forget the uncomfortable truth,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How good bacteria control your genesGenome crotonylation (green) in cells lining the mouse large intestine. Credit: Babraham Institute Scientists from the Babraham Institute near Cambridge in collaboration with colleagues from Brazil and Italy have discovered a way that good bacteria in the gut can control genes in our cells. The work, published today (9th January) in Nature Communications , shows that chemical messages from bacter
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EEG headset for emotion detectionCredit: IMEC At the International Consumer Electronics Show (CES) taking place in Las Vegas, Nev. Jan. 9-12, 2018, imec and Holst Centre will demonstrate a prototype of an electroencephalogram (EEG) headset that can measure emotions and cognitive processes in the brain. The headset is a major breakthrough in emotion measurement for therapeutic, learning and gaming applications. Traditionally, EEG
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers discover a new co-moving group of starsThe location of the V1062 Sco Moving Group (red circle). Credit: Röser et al., 2017. A team of astronomers from Germany and Hungary has detected a new group of co-moving young stars. The newly found group is located in the Upper Centaurus Lupus (UCL) section of the Scorpius–Centaurus Association. The finding is reported in a paper published December 29 on the arXiv pre-print repository. The Scorp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Evolution of Alpine landscape recorded by sedimentary rocksHeadwaters of Alpine streams approximately 30 million years ago (left) with an Alpine plateau and a meadow countryside. The handcraft on the right side illustrates the landscape of the Alps at 25 million years before present with steep valleys where torrents originated. Credit: Philippos Garefalakis, University of Bern Rock avalanches and torrents started to form V-shaped valleys in the Swiss Alp
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Winter TV: From Philip K. Dick to 'The Chi'—All the New Midseason Shows You Need to WatchIf you happen to live on the East Coast, then you know this feeling: cold. It's genuinely, bone-chillingly, brutally cold out there right now. No one wants to leave the house. And for that, there's another feeling: the idea that you don't have to abandon the comfort of your couch. Sound boring? It won't be. Thanks to that joy known as "midseason premieres," there's plenty of television coming you
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High-resolution X-ray gratings enable state-of-the-art spectrometerElectron micrograph of cross-section through a CAT grating showing the atomically smooth nano mirrors (left), and a tested 32 mm-wide CAT grating coated with platinum using atomic layer deposition (right). Credit: R. Heilmann, MIT, and A. Bruccoleri, Izentis, LLC X-ray-optics technology has progressed such that future astrophysics X-ray observatories will have orders-of magnitude better performan
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is fishing with electricity less destructive than digging up the seabed with beam trawlers?Cod and other fish may be unintentionally caught by pulse trawlers. Credit: saltmedia/Shutterstock While many people may be interested in the sustainability and welfare of the fish they eat, or the health of the environment, fewer probably worry about the effect that trawl fishing – which accounts for 20% of landings – has on the ocean. For a long time researchers and the industry have been tryin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Inexpensive and stable—The salt water batteryResearch on the water electrolyte: Empa researcher Ruben-Simon Kühnel connecting a test cell to the charger with the concentrated saline solution. The stability of the system is determined in several charging and discharging cycles. Credit: Empa Water could form the basis for future particularly inexpensive rechargeable batteries. Empa researchers have succeeded in doubling the electrochemical st
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How scientists saved us from scallop stock collapsePsssst, mud crabs, time to hide because blue crabs are coming to eat you! That's the warning the prey get from the predators' urine when it spikes with high concentrations of two chemicals, which researchers have identified ...
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Well Do Movies Predict Our Tech Future?Everyone judges the plausibility of a movie through a different lens. If you're a doctor, you may think: “That character would not have survived that fall.” If you're an astrophysicist: “That's not how black holes work.” And if you're me, it's more like: “What a dumb concept of future personal technology!” It makes me crazy when sci-fi moviemakers dream up stuff with no basis in science. Huma
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technique eases production, customization of soft roboticsStephen Morin and his colleagues have detailed a method for more strongly bonding plastics with silicones, offering new possibilities for fabricating fluid-carrying channels (left) that are commonly used to direct the motion of soft robotic components (right). Credit: University of Nebraska-Lincoln By helping rubber and plastic stick together under pressure, University of Nebraska-Lincoln chemist
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Are couples who choose to 'live apart' tested when partners require caregiving?Previous research has shown that unmarried adults are choosing long-distance or cross-residential relationships as a way to have companionship and independence later in life. Jacquelyn Benson, an expert of older adult relationships from the University of Missouri, has found that such couples safeguard personal autonomy to maintain partnerships and relationship satisfaction. While autonomy is para
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New Scientist - News
Invasive toxic pufferfish causes havoc in European watersBy Chris Baraniuk AN INVASIVE pufferfish is causing havoc for Mediterranean fishers, and the toxin it carries is turning up in native shellfish. The silver-cheeked toadfish ( Lagocephalus sceleratus, pictured) is native to the Pacific and Indian Oceans. It has thrived in the Mediterranean since arriving this century, apparently via the Suez Canal. It is a pufferfish, the group eaten as the de
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New Scientist - News
Ban on plastic microbeads comes into force in the UKTiny microbeads are too tiny to be filtered out using waste-water treatment processes Science History Images / Alamy Stock Photo By New Scientist Staff and Press Association A UK-wide ban on the manufacture of cosmetics and care products containing tiny pieces of plastic known as “microbeads” has come into force. The move is aimed at protecting the marine environment from one source of plasti
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New Scientist - News
AI listens in on emergency calls to diagnose cardiac arrestDiagnosing cardiac arrest quickly is vital VM/Getty By Timothy Revell If you dial the emergency services in Denmark, soon you won’t just get a human operator, but an artificially intelligent assistant will be listening in too. Developed by start-up Corti, the system kicks into action when some dials 112 in Copenhagen, then it starts listening for signs of a possible cardiac arrest. To do this
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the dry rot Serpula lacrymans adapted to a new ecological habitatShown attacking this dresser: the dry rot Serpula lacrymans var. lacrymans, an aggressive decomposer of the built environment. Credit: Inger Skrede By comparing genetic information from similar organisms, researchers have gained insights on why the dry rot (Serpula lacrymans) is so destructive in houses. A study involving six brown rot fungi reveals the genomic changes Serpula lacrymans has under
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Exotic animals and the hunt for goldCredit: University of New Mexico Men, women and their families arrived in large numbers to northern California with the dream of striking it rich during the mid-19th century. What most people don't know about the California Gold Rush is that exotic animals became as much a part of the experience as the exotic medals. "During the Gold Rush of the 1850s, gold seekers, or Argonauts as they were know
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First PEPSI data releaseThe PEPSI instrument at the LBT. Credit: AIP The Potsdam Echelle Polarimetric and Spectroscopic Instrument (PEPSI) at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) in Arizona released its first batch of high-spectral resolution data to the scientific community. In a series of three papers in the European journal Astronomy & Astrophysics , the PEPSI team presents a new spectral atlas of the sun, a total of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Radical methods for infected implantsDental implants are increasingly more common as substitute for teeth in Norway. The replacement does not always come withouth problems, however. Credit: Colourbox.com Molecules that are more often known for their potential to cause cancer may have a new, health-promoting role. Scientists are now discovering how these "radicals" may be used to prevent infections and promote the long-term success o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First 'cell map' of 20,000 cells in mammalian embryoScientists at the Wellcome—MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute have used cutting-edge technology to profile over 20,000 individual cells to produce the first 'cell map' describing all the major cell types present at the early stage of mammalian embryo development. The researchers used the map to identify an important new pathway involved in blood cell development and say the map could open up new a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Evolution acceptance in children linked to aptitude, not beliefThe study found that students that did not accept evolution tended to have lower understanding of science in general. Credit: University of Bath In contrast to adults, acceptance of evolution in schoolchildren in the UK is linked to their scientific aptitude rather than conflicts with belief systems, say scientists at our Milner Centre for Evolution. Previous studies in the USA have shown that ad
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Minions of the CicadaScientists study the unusual genome evolution of the bacteria that live within a genus of cicadas.
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Dagens Medicin
Regeringsudspil om det nære sundhedsvæsen giver ingen løsningNyt regeringsudspil viser, at regeringen gerne vil gøre noget ved sommerens 20 anbefalinger, men den er reelt ikke kommet meget længere med arbejdet, mener Sidsel Vinge, Projektchef ved VIVE.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study suggests female advantage in life expectancy related to fundamental biological rootsCredit: CC0 Public Domain A small team of researchers from Denmark and Germany has found evidence that suggests a biological reason for why women live longer than men. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , the group outlines their study which involved analyzing survival data from several periods in history when groups of people were subjected to extreme dur
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Dagens Medicin
Praksislæge om cannabis-forsøg: Jeg er klar til at skrive recepterBent Damgaard er positiv over for den nye cannabis-forsøgsordning, men mener ikke, at ansvaret for behandlingen udelukkende er lægens. Han forstår samtidig kollegers skepsis over for den nye forsøgsordning.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find heightened attention to surprise in veterans with PTSDIMAGE: People with PTSD have an increased learning response to surprising events compared to people without PTSD, according to a new study led by Pearl Chiu, an associate professor at the... view more Credit: Davide Bonazzi Fireworks on nights other than the fourth of July or New Year's Eve might be nothing more than inconsiderate neighbors, but for veterans with Post Traumatic Stress Disorde
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Viden
Havskildpadder trues alvorligt af klimaforandringerDen store bestand på over 200.000 redeliggende havskildpadder ved det nordlige Great Barrier Reef i Australien risikerer at kollapse, hvis der ikke rettes op på kønsfordelingen. Det viser ny forskning, som WWF har deltaget i, og som er publiceret i tidsskriftet Current Biology. Udviklingen bekymrer Bo Øksnebjerg, generalsekretær i WWF Verdensnaturfonden. - Denne ikoniske art er i forvejen truet p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Putting some skin in the turbulence gameAn algorithm that improves simulations of turbulent flows by enabling the accurate calculation of a parameter called skin friction has been developed by KAUST researchers in collaboration with researchers at the California Institute of Technology. The application of this algorithm may aid the aerospace and shipping industries in their race to develop more fuel-efficient transportation. Computing
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Modeling where the wind blowsThe ensemble standard deviation for the yearly near-surface wind speed from the training set. Credit: KAUST By incorporating geographical information into models for wind energy, researchers from KAUST have developed an innovative statistical tool that reduces the computational burden of locating global wind resources. Renewable energy generated from wind has the potential to ease the demand for
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NYT > Science
State of the Art: What a $4,000 Treadmill Means for the Future of GadgetsPeloton does not sell just a simple piece of hardware. Instead, the company spent tens of millions of dollars creating an inviting experience, complete with brand-ambassador celebrities and high-end retail locations. At the core of its business is a beguiling online service: Get on the bike, turn on the screen, and you are instantly connected with live fitness classes tailored to your preferences
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Feed: All Latest
CES 2018 Liveblog Day 2: The Flood of Gadgets Flows ForthPodcasts Seasteading: Come for the Algae Bacon, Stay for the Freedom echo esc_html( wired_get_the_byline_name( $related_video ) ); ?>
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Viden
Forsker om ibuprofen-risiko: Man kan roligt tage det en gang imellem- Jeg er mest bekymret for dem, som har taget ibuprofen hver dag over en årrække. Det siger David Møbjerg Kristensen, der er seniorforsker på Dansk Hovedpinecenter ved Rigshospitalet. Han er en af hovedkræfterne bag et nyt studie, som er lavet i samarbejde med forskere fra Bispebjerg Hospital og det franske Institut for Sund og Sygdom, Inserm. Fakta om forsøget 31 unge frivillige mænd blev inddel
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Popular Science
Alaska is warming so quickly that weather algorithms can't keep upThe National Centers for Environmental Information get a lot of, well, environmental information. They gather an immense amount of climate data , and in order to organize it all, they sit down on the 4th of every month to review everything that’s come in. It was at this meeting in December 2017 that the folks at NCEI noticed something: Utqiaġvik, Alaska was missing. Not the town itself, of course
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BBC News - Science & Environment
End signalled for European Ariane 5 rocketImage copyright ESA Image caption The Ariane 5 has an unblemished record since 2003 A final order for a batch of 10 Ariane 5 rockets has been raised. The vehicle, which has been the mainstay of European launcher activity for the past 20 years, will be phased out once its successor is in place. ArianeGroup, the French-led industrial consortium, expects its new Ariane 6 to be flying no later than m
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Science : NPR
After Devastating Cyclone, Fiji Farmers Plant For A Changed ClimateFarmer Adi Nacoba began diversifying her crops and spreading out plantings after a cyclone destroyed her farm in 2016. Sonia Narang hide caption toggle caption Sonia Narang Farmer Adi Nacoba began diversifying her crops and spreading out plantings after a cyclone destroyed her farm in 2016. Sonia Narang Inside a bustling market in the north coast town of Tavua on Fiji's largest island, farmer Adi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seismic sensors record hurricane intensity, study findsSeismometers often record vibrations from storms. A new study shows it’s possible to use those small blips to learn a hurricane’s intensity. Credit: Ray Bouknight via Flickr The earth is a noisy place. Seismometers, which measure ground movements to detect earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, and manmade explosives, are constantly recording smaller vibrations caused by ocean waves, rushing rivers, an
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Dagens Medicin
Politiet rejser ikke tiltale mod Rigshospitalet i meningitis-sagPolitiet rejser ikke tiltale mod Rigshospitalet i meningitis-sag Politiet har besluttet ikke at rejse tiltale mod ansatte på Rigshospitalet i sagen om manglende anmeldelse af meningitisdødsfald. Lasse Lange Close: Biografi Journalist , Dagens Medicin Flere artikler af Lasse Lange Desværre, kun abonnenter har adgang til at læse denne artikel. Allerede abonnent – log ind P
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microbeads in cosmetics might already be on the way out, new research suggestsUniversity of Plymouth image showing the contrast in levels of microbeads found in cosmetics products, 2015 (top) and 2018. Credit: University of Plymouth As the government ban on microbeads in cosmetics comes into force, scientists at the University of Plymouth have revealed companies appear to have taken action to eradicate the tiny particles from their products. In August 2015, a study publish
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Veil of ice in Saturn's ringsUsing the now-complete Cassini data set, Cornell astronomers have created a new global topographic map of Saturn's moon Titan that has opened new windows into understanding its liquid flows and terrain. Two new papers, published ...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mass extinctions remove species but not ecological varietyUChicago scientists examined how species (including these colorful marine bivalves) are lost in mass extinctions compared to environmental changes between the tropics and the poles. Credit: Stewart Edie Sixty-five million years ago, clouds of ash choked the skies over Earth. Dinosaurs, along with about half of all the species on Earth, staggered and died. But in the seas, a colorful population of
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Paraguay lagoon sees giant lily pads returnImage copyright AFP Image caption Water lilies in the area are known for their giant size, 1.5m Giant lily pads have reappeared in a Paraguay lagoon after being listed as endangered in 2006. The aquatic plants, their scientific name is Victoria cruziana, appeared in a tributary of the Paraguay river 25km north of Asunción, the capital. The environment ministry told the Associated Press that the p
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BBC News - Science & Environment
ISS: Japanese astronaut Norishige Kanai worried by growth spurtImage copyright Reuters Image caption Astronaut Norishige Kanai (L) left Earth for the ISS last month on a six-month mission A Japanese astronaut who is living on the International Space Station says he has grown 9cm (3.5in) since arriving there just over three weeks ago. Norishige Kanai wrote on social media he was worried he would not fit into the seat of the Russian Soyuz vehicle that is due t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
U.S. cargo spacecraft set for departure from International Space StationThe SpaceX Dragon cargo craft is pictured attached to the Harmony module of the International Space Station after it arrived on Dec. 17. 2017. Credit: NASA After delivering more than 4,800 pounds of science and supplies to the International Space Station, a SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft will depart the orbiting laboratory on Saturday, Jan. 13. NASA will provide live coverage of Dragon's departur
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cancer targeted with reusable 'stinging nettle' treatmentRepresentation of the organic-osmium compound, which is triggered using a non-toxic dose of sodium formate, a natural product found in many organisms, including nettles and ants. Credit: Dr James Coverdale/University of Warwick Cancer cells can be destroyed more effectively and selectively with a unique new reusable treatment, activated with a substance found in stinging nettles and ants—thanks t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New artificial intelligence index tracks the emerging field“In many ways, we are flying blind in our discussions about artificial intelligence and lack the data we need to credibly evaluate activity.” Credit: Unsplash/Paul Smith Since the term "artificial intelligence" (AI) was first used in print in 1956, the one-time science fiction fantasy has progressed to the very real prospect of driverless cars, smartphones that recognize complex spoken commands a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find major food retailer's sustainability program drives farmers' environmental practicesLeafy green vegetables are produced in a growing facility in Western Cape Province, South Africa. A new study shows a company-led sustainability program at a major food retailer in South Africa drove increased adoption of environmental practices at the farm level. Credit: Tannis Thorlakson When grocery stores tout sustainable products, consumers may take their claims at face value. Yet few studie
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breast cancer research gets a mechanical boostOne of the most puzzling questions in breast cancer research is why some tumors stay put, while rogue cells from others break free and spread to surrounding tissues, the first step toward creating a more lethal disease. Although researchers have found some signs in mutated genes or telltale proteins on the cell's surface, those discoveries don't tell the whole story. Curiously, one path to unrave
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineering solution for magnetic materials to significantly decrease costs of MRI researchProject leader Yevgeny Gorelikov conducts laboratory tests of a magnet sample for an MRI scanner. Credit: The National University of Science and Technology MISIS Researchers from the NUST MISIS Engineering Center for Industrial Technologies have developed an innovative technology for the production of magnetic materials and permanent magnets at a reduced cost. This engineering solution will allow
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Dagens Medicin
Sportslæger kan blive fritaget for gebyrAllerede i dag kan frivillige læger, der stiller sig til rådighed ved ishockeykampe og andre sportsarrangementer, søge om fritagelse for et nyt gebyr på 4000 kr. om året. En opblødning af reglerne kan dog komme på tale.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why are women accused of witchcraft? Study in rural China gives clueRural China sheds light on the role of witchcraft in society. Credit: Ruth Mace, Author provided From medieval witch hunts in Europe to contemporary "witch doctors" in Tanzania, belief in witchcraft has existed across human societies throughout history. Anthropologists have long been fascinated by the phenomenon, but have struggled to study it with quantitative methods – our understanding of how
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Saturn's moon Titan sports Earth-like featuresThis unprocessed image of Saturn's moon Titan was captured by NASA's Cassini spacecraft during its final close flyby of the hazy, planet-sized moon on April 21, 2017. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute Using the now-complete Cassini data set, Cornell astronomers have created a new global topographic map of Saturn's moon Titan that has opened new windows into understanding its liquid
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Methane hydrate dissociation off Spitsbergen not caused by climate changeWhite methane hydrate layers traverse the sediments. Credit: MARUM - Zentrum für Marine Umweltwissenschaften, Universität Bremen; G. Bohrmann For years, methane emissions from the seabed have been observed in the Arctic Ocean off Spitsbergen. Researchers have proposed that the warming of seawater by climate change is responsible for the release of methane, but this has not been confirmed. Now, an
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers pioneer water-based, eco-friendly and energy-saving air-conditionerResearchers from the Department of Mechanical Engineering at National University of Singapore's Faculty of Engineering developed a novel water-based, eco-friendly and energy-saving air-conditioner.Seated: (From left to right) Dr Md Raisul Islam and Associate Professor Ernest ChuaBack row: (From left to right) Dr M Kum Ja and Dr Bui Duc Thuan Credit: National University of Singapore A team of rese
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Some lemurs are loners, others crave connectionBest buddies Fern and Alena at the Duke Lemur Center in Durham, North Carolina. Credit: Ipek Kulahci If lemurs were on Facebook, Fern would have oodles of friends, liking and commenting on their posts. Captain Lee, on the other hand, would rarely send a friend request. These are just two of the distinct personalities discovered in a recent study of group dynamics in ring-tailed lemurs, primate co
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Identical twins can share more than identical genesIMAGE: This is Dr. Robert A Waterland, the senior author of this work. view more Credit: Baylor College of Medicine An international group of researchers has discovered a new phenomenon that occurs in identical twins: independent of their identical genes, they share an additional level of molecular similarity that influences their biological characteristics. The researchers propose a mechanis
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Ingeniøren
Har SpaceX mistet raket med hemmelig satellit om bord?Natten til mandag dansk tid skulle en SpaceX Falcon 9 sende en hemmelig amerikansk satellit op med kodenavn Zuma. Nu melder flere medier, at den milliarddyre satellit formentlig er gået tabt. Bl.a. skriver Bloomberg, at U.S. Strategic Command, som holder øje med luftrummet, ikke har kunnet se satellitten i kredsløb. »Vi har ikke noget at tilføje satellitkataloget denne gang,« siger kaptajn Brook
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Live Science
Rare Hybrid Bird Discovered in the Amazon in a FirstThe golden-crowned manakin was first discovered in Brazil in 1957 Credit: Dysmorodrepanis/CC-BY 3.0 A rare, vivid green bird with radiant yellow head feathers is actually a unique hybrid species that lives in the Amazon rainforest, researchers have found. The small, golden-crowned manakin was first discovered in Brazil in 1957, but then it was not seen again until its rediscovery 45 years l
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Science : NPR
Weather Hampers Efforts To Put Out Tanker Blaze In East China SeaIn this photo provided by Korea Coast Guard, the Panama-registered tanker Sanchi is seen ablaze after a collision with a Hong Kong-registered freighter off China's eastern coast on Sunday. AP hide caption toggle caption AP In this photo provided by Korea Coast Guard, the Panama-registered tanker Sanchi is seen ablaze after a collision with a Hong Kong-registered freighter off China's eastern coas
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What Is MicroLED and When am I Going to Get It?The television industry invites jargon like few others, an alphabet soup of specs and techs. Some of these convey important information; others emerged, devoid of any useful meaning, from the marketing gloaming. In that spirit, The Wall, Samsung’s new 146-inch stunner, invokes a term as yet unfamiliar the broader TV-buying audience: MicroLED. Your next TV almost certainly won’t be MicroLED, or ev
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Website invites you to probe a 3-D human brainIn movies, exploring the body up close often involves shrinking to microscopic sizes and taking harrowing rides through the blood. Thanks to a new virtual model, you can journey through a three-dimensional brain. No shrink ray required. The Society for Neuroscience and other organizations have long sponsored the website BrainFacts.org , which has basic information about how the human brain functi
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Science | The Guardian
Don’t listen to Gwyneth Paltrow: keep your coffee well away from your rectum | Jen GunterI t seems January is Gwyneth Paltrow’s go-to month for promoting potentially dangerous things that should not go in or near an orifice. January 2015 brought us vagina steaming , January 2017 was jade eggs , and here we are in the early days of January 2018 and Goop.com is hawking coffee enemas and promoting colonic irrigation. I suspect that GP and her pals at Goop.com believe people are especial
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Live Science
Pill-Size Sensor Sniffs Out Gases as It Passes Through Your GutA swallowable, pill-size sensor that can sense gases as it travels through the human digestive tract may one day help doctors diagnose patients' gut conditions, such as lactose intolerance and irritable bowel syndrome, a new, small study finds. Researchers tested the electronic sensor in seven healthy people and found that the device could accurately detect the concentrations of hydrogen, c
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Live Science
Climate Change Turned 99.8% of These Sea Turtle Babies into GirlsA photo provided by the Australian government shows baby sea turtles crawling toward the surf on Raine Island. Credit: Credit: State of Queensland The climate is changing, and so are the turtles. A study published yesterday (Jan. 8) in the journal Current Biology about green sea turtles that nest along island beaches near Australia's Great Barrier Reef found that turtles born in areas most
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Live Science
A Nose for Loot? Dogs Training to Sniff Out Stolen ArtifactsCan dogs sniff out stolen artifacts with their amazing noses? Credit: Shutterstock A team of scientists will train dogs to see if the animals can sniff out looted artifacts from the Middle East that are being smuggled into the United States. Dogs have a greater sense of smell than humans and are already being used to sniff out bombs, drugs and ivory. Now, scientists are hoping the canines c
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Scientific American Content: Global
It's Never Aliens--until It IsWhat do a strangely fading faraway star , an oddly shaped interstellar interloper in the solar system and a curious spate of UFO sightings by members of the U.S. military all have in common? They are all mysterious, for one thing—eye-catchingly weird, yet still just hazy outlines that let the imagination run wild. All have recently generated headlines as possible signs of life and intelligenc
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Science : NPR
Hidden Brain: Great Recession DeathsRecessions are painful for a variety of reasons. A new study shows that during the Great Recession, mortality rates declined faster in areas where the unemployment rate grew faster.
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The Atlantic
Why 'Cooking With Your Mouth' ExistsIn a short time, 2018 has provided plenty of material to make people queasy, from a YouTubed corpse to a president bragging of his stable genius . But one piece of media that went viral in the year’s first days offered a particularly bizarre, and oddly inspired, gross-out experience. Trigger warning: Chewing, spitting, and salmonella risk ahead. In a video entitled “Cooking With Your Mouth” a wom
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Science : NPR
Fighting Bias With Board GamesThe game Buffalo prompts players to think of people that buck stereotypes, and subliminally challenges those stereotypes in the process. Maanvi Singh for NPR hide caption toggle caption Maanvi Singh for NPR The game Buffalo prompts players to think of people that buck stereotypes, and subliminally challenges those stereotypes in the process. Maanvi Singh for NPR Quick, think of a physicist. If yo
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Ingeniøren
Ny wifi-standard gør trådløs virtual reality muligtSiden 802.11ad-standarden til wifi blev annonceret i 2012, har det været småt med produkter, som rent faktisk udnytter de kraftfulde overførselshastigheder, som teknologien tillader. Det gør HTC nu noget ved, da de til Consumer Electronics Show i Las Vegas netop har annonceret en trådløs adapter, der gør det muligt at streame trådløs virtual reality fra computere til deres Vive-headsets. »Trådløs
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Ingeniøren
Microsoft bremser Meltdown og Spectre-patches til AMD: PC’er kan ikke starteMicrosoft har stoppet udrulning af patches af CPU-sårbarhederne Meltdown og Spectre til AMD-computere efter brugere rapporterer om PC’er der ikke kan startes. Det skriver The Verge . Microsoft bruger-fora er blevet fyldt af adskillige brugere med AMD-computere, der oplever, at de nyligt udsendte patches efterlader computeren, så den ikke kan boote. Spectre og Meltdown Meltdown og Spectre er navne
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Ingeniøren
Jura-forsker: Selve grundlaget for den danske logning er forkertNår Lene Wacher Lentz, tidligere anklager og nu ph.d.-stipendiat ved Aalborg Universitet, fastslår, at selve grundlaget for den danske logningsbekendtgørelse er forkert, så er det ikke et ligegyldigt udsagn fra en tilfældig jurist. Ph.d.-stipendiat ved Aalborg Universitet, Lene Wacher Lentz Foto: Privatfoto/Twitter Lene Wacher Lentz har nemlig skrevet en artikel om konsekvenserne af den et år gam
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Latest Headlines | Science News
CRISPR gene editor could spark immune reaction in peopleIn the Dec. 23 & Jan. 6 SN : Our top stories of 2017, grounded pterosaur hatchlings, protectors of the Dead Sea Scrolls, a counterintuitive metamaterial, neutron star sizing, arrow of time reversed, E. coli in flour and more.
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Big Think
Everything You Should Know About Happy Relationships in One InfographicIf there is one thing Hollywood has taught us (a.k.a managed to mislead us) about relationships, it is that once you meet your “soulmate”, happiness automatically ensues - eternally ever after. And if there is one thing we have learned from scientific research on couples who have managed to remain happy after years of being together, it is that happiness does not just ensue, and its ever-after is
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Place of residence linked to heart failure riskLocation. Location. Location. When buying and selling real estate, the phrase is a realtor's mantra. It is also the central theme of a recently released journal report on factors that can predict heart failure risk. According to new research in the American Heart Association journal, Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes , almost 5 percent of heart failure risk was connected to neighbo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Engineers grow functioning human muscle from skin cellsDURHAM, N.C. -- Biomedical engineers have grown the first functioning human skeletal muscle from induced pluripotent stem cells. The advance builds on work published in 2015 when researchers at Duke University grew the first functioning human muscle tissue from cells obtained from muscle biopsies. The ability to start from cellular scratch using non-muscle tissue will allow scientists to grow far
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neighborhood factors may predict heart failureDALLAS, Jan. 9, 2018 - Neighborhood-level socioeconomic factors in low-income areas may significantly predict heart failure risk beyond individual health factors and socioeconomic status, according to new research in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes , an American Heart Association journal. The study compared census tract data on socioeconomic deprivation - a clustering of neighbor
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Dagens Medicin
Skizofrene med blodprop i hjertet får mindre behandlingSkizofrene patienter med blodprop i hjertet får mindre behandling end deres ikke-skizofrene medpatienter, viser nyt dansk studie. Det er dog svært at sige hvorfor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
France investigates Apple for slowing down old iPhonesA plush, robotic duck may soon become a fixture in the world of children who have cancer—a social robot that can be silly, happy, angry, scared or sick just like them, and help them cope creatively with their illness through ...
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Science : NPR
VA Clears The Air On Doctors Talking To Veterans About Marijuana UseEven veterans who are using marijuana legally worry they might lose VA benefits if they tell their doctors. jopstock/Getty Images hide caption toggle caption jopstock/Getty Images Even veterans who are using marijuana legally worry they might lose VA benefits if they tell their doctors. jopstock/Getty Images "Don't ask, don't tell" is how many veterans have approached health care conversations ab
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Scientists Figure Out How to Make Muscles from Stem CellsFor the past several years, Nenad Bursac has been trying to make muscles from scratch. A biological engineer at Duke, Bursac came close in 2015, when his lab became the first to grow functional human skeletal muscle in culture. "Functional" being the operative word. Like the muscle fibers in, say, your bicep, the tissues could contract and generate forces in response to things like electrical pul
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New Scientist - News
With political will, we can solve the global vision crisisEye surgeon Andrew Bastawrous examines a patient using an adapted smartphone IF YOU are among the estimated one-in-four people with eyeballs that are the wrong shape, try to imagine life without glasses or contact lenses. In the UK, that would mean roughly 10 million people with eyesight too poor to drive legally or read a classroom whiteboard. The impact on education, the economy and society
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New Scientist - News
Sex tweets help track spread of sexually transmitted infectionsOversharing on social media? DigitalVision/Getty By Chris Stokel-Walker A lot of sexual tweets in your area? Local syphilis rates could be on the rise. Oversharing on social media may be annoying, but it could predict the next outbreak of sexually transmitted disease . Sean Young at the University of California, Los Angeles, and his colleagues analysed tweets posted in 2012. They narrowed dow
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Science : NPR
U.S. Spy Satellite Reportedly 'Write Off' After Failing To Reach OrbitA SpaceX Falcon9 rocket blasts off the launch pad in Feb. 2015, carrying the NOAA's Deep Space Climate Observatory spacecraft. The same type of rocket attempted to place a U.S. spy satellite in orbit on Sunday. Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images hide caption toggle caption Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images A SpaceX Falcon9 rocket blasts off the launch pad in Feb. 2015, carrying the NOAA's
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
2017 was a hot and disaster-filled year for the United States, NOAA saysCredit: public domain The year 2017 was the third-warmest on record for the United States, and featured a pileup of weather and climate disasters that cost the nation a record-breaking $306 billion, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. The preliminary data released by NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information serve as another indication that climate change
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
CES 2018: Google Smart Displays are 'show and tell' answer to Echo ShowGoogle Assistant has a message for its digital assistant rival: "Hey, Alexa, I can show stuff, too." Google is teaming with four consumer tech companies to bring its digital helper to the video screen soon. Consider it a direct challenge to rival Amazon, which started selling its touchscreen Echo Show with Alexa earlier this year. The question now is whether customers will want to buy Google's
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists identify breast cancer patients who may develop incurable secondary cancersScientists from King's College London, funded by Breast Cancer Now, believe they have found a way to identify lymph-node positive breast cancer patients who are most likely to develop incurable secondary tumours (metastases) and those who are less at risk. The research is published today in The Journal of Pathology: Clinical Research . Currently, when a patient is diagnosed with breast cancer, do
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Ingeniøren
Forskere skaber stokastisk beregner i samme enhedForskere ved det amerikanske University of Minnesota har taget et stort skridt i retning af at gøre stokastiske computerberegninger praktisk mulige. Stokastiske computerberegninger bruger tilfældige bits til at regne ved hjælp af simplere kredsløb. Disse kredsløb bruger mindre strøm og har større fejltolerance. Stokastiske beregninger går helt tilbage til starten af 1950’erne, hvor en af datalogi
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Gen-ændring kan give grønlændere fedme09. januar 2018 Gen-ændring kan give grønlændere fedme Fedme 4 procent af den grønlandske befolkning er på grund af en specifik gen-ændring i risikozonen for at udvikle fedme og diabetes. Det viser et nyt studie fra Københavns Universitet, Syddansk Universitet, Grønlands Universitet og Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen. Genet kan være et muligt mål for behandling, siger forskerne. I Grønland er de
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intel CEO: Fixes on the way for serious chip security flawsIntel CEO Brian Krzanich delivers a keynote speech at CES International Monday, Jan. 8, 2018, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong) Intel has big plans to steer toward new business in self-driving cars, virtual reality and other cutting-edge technologies. But first it has to pull out of a skid caused by a serious security flaw in its processor chips, which undergird many of the world's smartphones
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Marine wildlife charities' worries over management planImage copyright Redders48/Getty Images Image caption Wildlife charities are worried the Welsh Government's draft marine management plan puts too much emphasis on development over conservation A long-awaited plan for managing Wales' seas could have "significant negative consequences" for marine wildlife, environment groups have warned. AMs are set to debate the draft Welsh national marine plan on
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Closing roads counters effects of habitat loss for grizzly bearsInfographic of study of impact of roads on grizzly bears. Credit: Clayton Lamb, University of Alberta It's simple math, says scientist Clayton Lamb. The closer grizzly bears are to humans, the more ways there are for the bears to die. Put more simply, more roads equal fewer grizzly bears. In a recent study examining a long-term DNA dataset of grizzly bear activity in British Columbia, Lamb and hi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The road to recoveryIMAGE: This is an infographic of study of impact of roads on grizzly bears. view more Credit: Courtesy Clayton Lamb, University of Alberta EDMONTON (Jan. 9, 2018)--It's simple math, says scientist Clayton Lamb. The closer grizzly bears are to humans, the more ways there are for the bears to die. Put more simply, more roads equal fewer grizzly bears. In a recent study examining a long-term D
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alpine air at work? Delhi eyes novel ways to battle smogPolitical apathy over the poisonous smog choking India's capital has led many like businessman Kamal Meattle to take matters into their own hands, with an office building he says pumps air as fresh as from the Swiss Alps. From the outside, the Paharpur Business Centre looks like any modern office block. But inside it is a virtual jungle where rooms and corridors are lined with more than 7,000 pot
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intel chief says chip flaw damage contained by industryIntel chief Brian Krzanich said Monday the impact of a recently discovered vulnerability in computer chips has been limited due to "remarkable" collaboration by the tech industry. Krzanich took the unusual step of addressing the security issue as he delivered a keynote ahead of the opening of the huge Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, an industry event expected to draw some 180,000 people f
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Viden
Investorer: Apple skal bekæmpe børns mobilafhængighedTo store Apple-investorer opfordrer i et åbent brev teknologigiganten Apple til at gøre noget ved den stigende afhængighed af smartphones blandt børn. Apple er nødt til at tilbyde flere muligheder for at bekæmpe børns afhængighed af Apples produkter. Det skriver investorerne Jana Partners LLC og California State Teachers' Retirement System i brevet lørdag. Tilsammen har de to investorer Apple-akt
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Viden
Ny forskning: Populært håndkøbsmedicin kan forstyrre unge mænds hormonerEr du en ung mand og har taget de smertestillede gigtpiller ibuprofen i bare 14 dage, så kan du risikere at skade produktionen af hormonet testosteron. Den populære håndkøbsmedicin kan føre til, at unge mænds hormonbalance minder om en 70-årigs. Det viser et nyt dansk-fransk forskningsprojekt ifølge en pressemeddelelse fra Region Hovedstaden. - For mænd er det vigtigt, at testosteronniveauet ligg
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smart robot falls dumb as LG touts 'connected life'A cute, table-top robot packed with digital smarts fell dumb on stage at an LG Electronics event touting "connected" lifestyles where machines obey spoken commands and anticipate needs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pole-dancing robots aim to spice up nerd festThey grind and gyrate around a pole, with moves like a real stripper. But these dancers are robots, brought in to offer a new entertainment twist to the crowds descending on Las Vegas this week for the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show. The robo-strippers are the creation of British artist Giles Walker, who said he designed the vaguely humanoid machines as an expression about surveillance, power a
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Lars von Trier får Sonningprisen 201809. januar 2018 Lars von Trier får Sonningprisen 2018 Kulturpris Den danske instruktør og manuskriptforfatter, Lars von Trier, modtager Sonningprisen 2018. Sonningprisen er Danmarks største kulturpris på 1 mio. kroner og bliver uddelt af Københavns Universitet. Prisen bliver givet til en person, der har udført et fortjenstfuldt arbejde til gavn for den europæiske kultur. Modtageren af Sonningpris
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tech a new religion at consumer gadget extravaganzaTech is the new religion, offering hope of salvation in a troubled world as industry leaders converge in Las Vegas this week. Technology will not just help us communicate better and give us bolder and brighter screens. It is promising to end urban congestion, treat cancer and depression, and help us live fitter and more productive lives. As tech industry players large and small converge for the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bucking trend, Hyundai bets on hydrogen fuel cell for new carHyundai unveiled Monday a hydrogen fuel-cell powered vehicle aimed at showcasing its newest technologies, bucking the all-electric trend of most rival automakers. The South Korean manufacturer used the 201 Consumer Electronics Show to debut its Nexo, a sport utility vehicle that uses voice commands, artificial intelligence and can be transformed into an autonomous car . "We call this the next f
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google engineer fired for sexist memo sues ex-employerA Google engineer who was fired after writing a memo defending the gender gap in Silicon Valley tech jobs as a matter of biology has sued his former employer for discrimination. The Dhillon Law Group said it was filing a class action law suit on behalf of James Damore and others it says were discriminated against due to their "perceived conservative political views ," their gender and their Cauca
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Digital assistants duel for dominance at major electronics showCredit: CC0 Public Domain Virtual aides battled to rule "smart homes" on the eve of the official opening of the Consumer Electronics show gadget gala here. Samsung, LG Electronics, Panasonic and others touted a future in which homes, cars and pockets brim with technology that collaborates to make lives easier. Google and Amazon are key players in the trend, with their rival Assistant and Alexa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Success in community college aided by comprehensive case management, study findsCommunity colleges provide a path out of poverty for many low-income students. However, far too many never graduate. Nationally, fewer than 40 percent of community college students obtain a degree within six years. New research from the University of Notre Dame shows that a comprehensive case management program that also addresses day-to-day obstacles can effectively tackle this completion crisis
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Ingeniøren
Museumssystem ramt af årelang forsinkelseI november 2015 museumssystemet SARA blev fremhævet af Statens It-projektråd som et vellykket offentligt it-projekt. Systemet var på det tidspunkt forud for både tidsplan og budget, skrev vi her på Version2. Projektet gik så godt, at man valgte at fremskynde idriftsættelsen med et lille år – fra slutningen af 2016 til starten af samme år. Men her to år senere er SARA endnu ikke i drift. Revideret
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Science | The Guardian
NHS hospital bans sugar from its meals to tackle staff obesityA hospital in Manchester has become the first in Britain to ban sugar from its restaurant in an attempt to tackle growing concerns about obesity among NHS staff. Tameside hospital has removed all added sugar from the meals it prepares for visitors and health service workers, and taken sugary snacks and fizzy drinks off its menu. The only drinks visitors can buy are tea, coffee, milk and water. Th
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BBC News - Science & Environment
BBC's Antiques Roadshow to review ivory objects policyImage caption The BBC said the Antiques Roadshow, presented by Fiona Bruce, rarely shows ivory items The BBC is to review its policy of allowing objects made of ivory to appear on the Antiques Roadshow. The programme has faced criticism from wildlife campaigner Virginia McKenna, who said it presented ivory as a thing of beauty, not a symbol of destruction. The UK prohibits the sale of ivory piece
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lake Michigan waterfowl botulism deaths linked to warm waters, algaeIMAGE: Karine Princé studied the causes of waterfowl botulism deaths in Lake Michigan while a postdoctoral researcher at UW-Madison. view more Credit: Karine Princé Since the 1960s, tens of thousands of birds living on the Great Lakes have died during periodic outbreaks of botulism. The outbreaks have only become more common and widespread in recent years, leaving scientists who t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lake Michigan waterfowl botulism deaths linked to warm waters, algaeMap showing the three regions of upper Lake Michigan surveyed in the current study. Citizen Scientists regularly walked beaches along in these regions surveying for sick and dead birds. Credit: Karine Princé/Esri Since the 1960s, tens of thousands of birds living on the Great Lakes have died during periodic outbreaks of botulism. The outbreaks have only become more common and widespread in recent
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Live Science
Bleeding and Spotting During Pregnancy: Symptoms & CausesWhen a woman sees blood on her underpants during pregnancy, it's typically a frightening and worrisome sign. But not all bleeding is a sign of trouble. Bleeding or spotting can happen at any point during pregnancy, from the time the embryo is conceived to before a woman gives birth. Some causes of vaginal bleeding or spotting are serious, such as possibly indicating a miscarriage or a probl
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ArXiv Query
The reciprocal sum of primitive nondeficient numbersWe investigate the reciprocal sum of primitive nondeficient numbers, or pnds. In 1934, Erd\H{o}s showed that the reciprocal sum of pnds converges, which he used to prove that abundant numbers have a natural density. However no one has investigated the value of this series. We provide the first known bound by showing the reciprocal sum of pnds is less than 14.
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ArXiv Query
The Presence of Dust and Ice Scattering in X-Ray Emissions from CometsX-ray emissions from cometary atmospheres were modeled from first principles using the charge-exchange interaction with solar wind ions as well as coherent scattering of solar X-rays from dust and ice grains. Scattering cross-sections were interpolated over the 1 nm-1 cm grain radius range using approximations based on the optically thin or thick nature of grains with different sizes. The theoreti
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Ingeniøren
Faste ritualer kan styrke dine jobchancerNervøsitet kan hæmme selv de allerbedste. For eksempel når du skal til jobsamtale i dit drømmefirma eller leverer en afgørende præsentation på dit arbejde. Men jobsøgere er ikke de eneste, som skal tackle angst, når nervøsiteten breder sig i kroppen inden et vigtigt øjeblik. Nogle af de bedste sportsfolk i nyere tid udfører ritualer, inden de skal præstere på banen. En af dem er Cristiano Ronaldo
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New on MIT Technology Review
Intel’s New Chips Are More Brain-Like Than EverIntel's neuromorphic chip. Intel Labs This week, Intel will show off a chip that learns to recognize objects in pictures captured by a webcam. Nothing fancy about that, except that the chip uses about a thousandth as much power as a conventional processor. The device, called Loihi, which Intel is putting through its paces at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, is a neuromorphic chip
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Feed: All Latest
The Google Assistant Versus Amazon Alexa War Is On at CES 2018It's been a while since Google showed up in a big way at CES. The company's always in Vegas, of course: execs hold meetings with carriers and partners, and the halls of the convention center practically overflow with devices. For the last few years, that's been enough for Google. At CES 2018 , however, Google's back in a big way. Its massive installation in the convention center parking lot inclu
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Swallowable sensors reveal mysteries of human gut healthFindings from the first human trials of a breakthrough gas-sensing swallowable capsule could revolutionize the way that gut disorders and diseases are prevented and diagnosed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
US childhood mortality rates have lagged behind other wealthy nations for the past 50 yearsIn a new study of childhood mortality rates between 1961 and 2010 in the United States and 19 economically similar countries, researchers report that while there's been overall improvement among all the countries, the U.S. has been slowest to improve. Infants in the U.S. were 76 percent more likely to die.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
What species is most fit for life? All have an equal chance, scientists sayThere are more than 8 million species of living things on Earth, but none of them -- from 100-foot blue whales to microscopic bacteria -- has an advantage over the others in the universal struggle for existence.A trio of scientists report that regardless of vastly different body size, location and life history, most species are equally 'fit' in the struggle for existence.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Would you pay $20 a day to lease a luxury car?Frequent payments can make consumers feel better about the benefits they are receiving from their purchase. More frequent payments can help people appreciate recurring pleasures and increase the likelihood of purchasing. The findings has implications for merchants and nonprofits.
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Feed: All Latest
Facebook’s Virtual Assistant M Is Dead. So Are ChatbotsIt’s difficult to remember now, but there was a moment in early 2016 when many in the tech industry believed chatbots—automated text-based virtual assistants—would be the next big platform. Messaging app Kik staked its company’s future on bots and “ chatvertising .” Startup studio Betaworks launched an accelerator program called Botcamp . And at its 2016 F8 conference, Facebook pitched bots to de
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Futurity.org
Game-like vision tests could predict baseball’s best battersResearchers have found an association between baseball players’ scores on a number of vision and reaction tests and their batting statistics. In a study of 252 baseball professionals, researchers found players with higher scores on a series of vision and motor tasks completed on large touch-screen machines called Nike Sensory Stations, had better on-base percentages, more walks, and fewer strikeo
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Warming ocean water is turning 99 percent of these sea turtles femaleIn the Dec. 23 & Jan. 6 SN : Our top stories of 2017, grounded pterosaur hatchlings, protectors of the Dead Sea Scrolls, a counterintuitive metamaterial, neutron star sizing, arrow of time reversed, E. coli in flour and more.
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Popular Science
When you burn fat, where does it actually go?Every January, fat's in the crosshairs of health columnists, fitness magazines, and desperate Americans. This year, PopSci looks at the macronutrient beyond its most negative associations. What’s fat good for? How do we get it to go where we want it to? Where does it wander when it’s lost? This, my friends, is Fat Month . When you dig into your meal or grab a quick bite on the way to work, the fo
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Live Science
Hundreds of 'Boiled' Bats Fall from Sky in Australian Heat WaveMore than 200 bats have lost their lives to southern Australia's ongoing heat wave. As temperatures rose to 111.5 degrees Fahrenheit (44.2 degrees Celsius) in Campbelltown in the Australian state of New South Wales, a colony of flying fox bats that lives near the town's train station felt the effects. Volunteers struggled to rescue the heat-stricken bats, according to the Campbelltown-M
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Futurity.org
Kids can become tightwads or spenders by age 5Children as young as five may have already formed distinct emotional reactions to spending and saving money, a new study suggests. “…in 5-to-10-year-olds, one’s emotional response to spending and saving is a useful predictor of what you do with your money…” The study indicates that these reactions translate into actual, real-life spending behaviors. The findings also suggest that these emotional
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The Atlantic
The Difference Between Speaking ‘Your Truth’ and ‘The Truth’On Monday, as Oprah Winfrey’s stirring acceptance speech at the Golden Globes secured a place in the national conversation, Byron Tau of The Wall Street Journal tweeted , “Oprah employed a phrase that I’ve noticed a lot of other celebrity using these days: ‘your truth’ instead of ‘the truth.’ Why that phrasing?” He fretted that “your truth” undermines the idea of shared common facts. Well, Garanc
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Futurity.org
Beta blockers may prolong melanoma patients’ livesIn a new study, melanoma patients who received immunotherapy while taking a specific type of beta blocker lived longer than patients who received immunotherapy alone, researchers report. “The benefit of this is that beta blockers already have a long history of safety in people, and they’re cheap and generic…” In a follow-up experiment with mice, the researchers saw the same results. Todd Schell,
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Science-Based Medicine
Five Fatal FoodsI get a lot of emails offering dubious health advice and dubious products. I recently got one with the alarming title “Five Fatal Foods” and a link to a video. It had a warning in big red capitals: WARNING: YOUR LIFE IS IN DANGER! DON’T EAT THESE FIVE FOODS BEFORE YOU WATCH THIS VIDEO. “A shocking presentation the mainstream medical establishment does not want you to see.” You can watch the video
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Futurity.org
Telemedicine and school nurse combo cut asthma ER visitsKids with asthma who participated in a program that involved a combination of telemedicine support and school-based medication therapy were almost half as likely to require an emergency room or hospital visit due to their asthma, according to new research. One in 10 children in the United States have asthma, making it the country’s most common chronic childhood disease. Though symptoms can be eff
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Popular Science
China is making 1,000-UAV drone swarms nowEastern Arsenal These autonomous swarms can make decisions on how and when to repair themselves. China flies a drone swarm with a record-breaking 1180 quadcopters.
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Futurity.org
Zika-fighting protein can also harm fetusThe same proteins that mount a potent immune response to Zika viral infection can also harm the placenta and fetal development, according to a new study. Researchers had established that these antiviral proteins—known as type I interferons—were required to fight Zika infection in mothers. But it was not clear what role they played in providing an immune defense for the fetus. To investigate, rese
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Live Science
The Hole in Earth's Ozone Layer Is HealingOzone hole healing animation Credit: Katy Mersmann/NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center Efforts to heal the hole in Earth's ozone layer over Antarctica appear to be paying off, according to a new, first-of-its-kind study that looked directly at ozone-destroying chemicals in the atmosphere. Earth's ozone layer protects the planet's surface from some of the sun's more harmful rays that can caus
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Futurity.org
Insulin isn’t the only factor for burning fatA new study identifies leptin, a hormone made by fat cells, as a key mediator in the transition to fat metabolism. To keep the human brain supplied with energy when food was scarce, mammals evolved the ability to switch from burning carbohydrates to burning fat in order to preserve skeletal muscle that would otherwise be metabolized and converted to glucose. Scientists have long believed that jus
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