Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Device creates negative mass—and a novel way to generate lasers In this optical microcavity, created by the lab of Nick Vamivakas, confined light interacts with an atomically thin semiconductor to create particles with negative mass. The device also presents “a way to generate laser light with an incrementally small amount of power,” says Vamivakas, an associate professor of quantum optics and quantum physics at Rochester’s Institute of Optics. Credit: Michae
4h
Viden
Elektronisk pille afslører hemmelighed om prutter Du spiser noget mad. Det kommer ned i maven og videre gennem dit tarmsystem, hvor det bliver skilt ad, så du optager alle de vigtige næringsstoffer, der får din krop til at fungere. Maden gennemgår så en kemisk forandring, hvor det bliver til affald. Og ja, du ved, hvor det ender. Måske går der ikke lang tid før, at et rutinebesøg hos lægen involverer et tjek af dine vitale organer og en anmodnin
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Ingeniøren
Rigsrevisionen undrer sig: Ministeriet svarer ikke på, hvordan det går med IC4 Det er ikke muligt at få svar fra Transport-, Bygnings- og Boligministeriet på, hvad status er på DSB’s bestræbelser på at løse de mange problemer med IC4-togene. Det er heller ikke muligt at få svar fra ministeriet på, om arbejdet med togene holder budgettet. Det konstaterer Rigsrevisionen i et nyt notat , som samler op på Rigsrevisionens beretning fra oktober , der afdækkede omfattende mangler
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Ingeniøren
Nu skal det opklares: Hvor bliver mikroplasten fra bildæk af? Den allerstørste kilde til mikroplast er bildæk. De bidrager, ifølge teoretiske beregninger af dækslid, med 60 procent af al mikroplast fra landbaserede kilder, viste en rapport fra Miljøstyrelsen i 2015 , fuldstændig på linje med tilsvarende, udenlandske undersøgelser. Der er kun ét problem. Ingen har nogensinde identificeret en partikel fra bildæk i vandprøver. Det ved vi, konkluderer en helt n
2min
Inside Science
Valerie Brown Contributor Valerie Brown writes about science from Eugene, Oregon. She has been published in Science, Scientific American, Bioengineering Today, Environmental Health Perspectives, Pacific Standard, and In These Times, among others. She has been recognized by her peers for her explanatory journalism.
5min
Inside Science
Device to Detect Pesticide Residue on Produce May Soon Be Available Device to Detect Pesticide Residue on Produce May Soon Be Available An inexpensive handheld sensor may soon simplify testing for pesticides on fruits and vegetables – but it won’t replace government monitoring. Produce.jpg Image credits: Aaron Fulkerson via Flickr Rights information: CC BY-SA 2.0 Technology Tuesday, January 9, 2018 - 15:30 Valerie Brown, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Pesticides
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Between the lines: Tree rings hold clues about a river's pastBy analyzing centuries-old tree rings, researchers are extracting data about monthly streamflow trends from periods long before the early 1900s when recorded observations began.
16min
Ingeniøren
Polsk gasledning overrasker østjysk kommune Med en frist allerede d. 22. januar har de travlt i Kolding kommune. Da skal der nemlig ligge et svar på det forslag til den kommende gasrørledning, kaldet Baltic Pipe, der skal gå fra gasfelterne i Nordsøen til Polen. Det er Energistyrelsen og Miljøstyrelsen, der står bag høringsudkastet. Borgmester i Kolding kommune, Jørn Pedersen (V), er ikke glad for det fremsendte forslag. Det skriver Jyske
30min
Live Science
Runners' Back Pain Starts Deep, 3D Models Show Motion-capture technology has revealed that the source of runners' back pain lies deeper than expected, according to a new study. Scientists collected data using a motion-capture system and pressure-sensitive plates as participants ran around a track; the researchers then used the findings to 3D-model bones and muscles in a moving human body. The models showed the different muscle group
30min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists use underwater robot to spy on zooplankton at night Credit: Northeastern University Zooplankton are the foundation of the marine food chain. These tiny organisms provide food and energy to fish, sea birds, and other marine mammals—including the bowhead whale, which feeds exclusively on zooplankton. What do zooplankton eat? They feed on phytoplankton, which rely on sunlight. But in the Arctic Ocean during winter months, there is little to no light.
30min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The origin of flower making genesA research team led by Professor Mitsuyasu Hasebe of the National Institute for Basic Biology revealed that the MADS-box genes control sperm motility and cell division and elongation of the stem of gametophores, using the moss Physcomitrella patens.
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Giant extinct burrowing bat discovered in New Zealand IMAGE: An artist's impression of a New Zealand burrowing bat, Mystacina robusta , that went extinct last century. The new fossil find, Vulcanops jennyworthyae, that lived millions of years ago in New... view more Credit: Illustration by Gavin Mouldey. The fossilized remains of a giant burrowing bat that lived in New Zealand millions of years ago have been found by a UNSW Sydney-led in
31min
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Sex education doesn't reflect real-life realities of lesbian and bisexual girls IMAGE: This is UBC nursing professor Elizabeth Saewyc. view more Credit: University of British Columbia Most lesbian and bisexual girls don't know they can get sexually transmitted infections (STIs) from other girls, because sex education is mostly designed for their straight peers. This knowledge gap could be placing them at increased risk for getting STIs. That's one of the conc
31min
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Cancer patients given fluids live longer Dying cancer patients given fluids will generally live longer, a new study led by researchers from Royal Surrey County Hospital NHS Foundation Trust and the University of Surrey has found. End-of-life patients receiving assisted hydration had a 26 per cent greater survival, which meant that they lived for on average one-and-a-half more days, compared to those who were not receiving such treatment
31min
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The biennial rainfall relationship in the tropical western hemisphere has weakened in recent decadesBiennial rainfall relationship could be observed in both the tropical eastern hemisphere associated with the tropospheric biennial oscillation and the tropical western hemisphere. A new study reports that this biennial rainfall relationship between Central America(CA) and equatorial South America(ESA) has weakened remarkably since 2000.
31min
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HKBU and CUHK discovered that human-perceived temperature is rising faster than actual air temperatureProfessor David Chen and Dr Li Jianfeng found the apparent temperature (AP)increased faster than air temperature (AT) over land in the past few decades, especially in the low latitude areas, and the rise is expected to continue in the future.
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Science | The Guardian
Two suns? No, it's a supernova drawn 6,000 years ago, say scientists For decades, stone carvings unearthed in the Himalayan territory of Kashmir were thought to depict a hunting scene. But the presence of two celestial objects in the drawings has piqued the interest of a group of Indian astronomers. They have proposed another theory. According to a study published in the Indian Journal of History of Science, the Kashmir rock drawings may be the oldest depiction of
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cognitive science
Is everything you think you know about depression wrong? submitted by /u/dfekt [link] [comments]
41min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tracing how disaster impacts escalate will improve emergency responses Eyjafjallajökull volcano in Iceland. Credit: rachelcifelli Mapping common pathways along which the effects of natural and man-made disasters travel allows more flexible and resilient responses in the future, according to UCL researchers. Naturally occurring extreme space weather events or man-made cyber security attacks affect critical infrastructure through shared points of vulnerability, causin
42min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study illustrates the combined effects of climate change and forest fires Portland State study illustrates the combined effects of climate change and forest fires over time A new study co-authored by Portland State University geographer Andrés Holz, tracked the ebb and flow of ecosystem changes over the last 10,000 years, showing patterns that could shed light on current climate change and its role in shaping the world's forests. Holz and fellow scientists studied se
42min
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Earthquakes as a driver for the deep-ocean carbon cycle In a paper recently published in Nature Communications , geologist Michael Strasser presented the initial findings of a month-long research expedition off the coast of Japan. The research initiative had been organised in March 2012 by MARUM - Center for Marine Environmental Sciences. Strasser, who until 2015 was Assistant Professor for Sediment Dynamics at ETH Zurich and is now a Full Professor f
46min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds strong support for ocean protectionPeople around the world strongly support ocean conservation measures, according to a new study of public perceptions of marine threats and protection.
46min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chemoradiation in elderly patients with stage III NSCLC improves overall survival DENVER -Elderly patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) showed improved overall survival (OS) when treated with chemoradiation (CRT) compared to definitive radiation (RT) alone. Lung cancer is the most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. NSCLC constitutes between 80-85% of all lung cancers and more than 30% of those are diagnosed with stage I
46min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Patients react better when doctors imply uncertainty, rather than state it directly Choice of words might matter when doctors communicate uncertainty of diagnosis to their patients. A paper published in the International Journal for Quality in Health Care shows that the parents of pediatric patients may react more negatively to doctors who communicate uncertainty of diagnosis explicitly, such as directly stating they are unsure, as compared to doctors who use implicit language,
46min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Portland State study illustrates the combined effects of climate change and forest fires Portland State study illustrates the combined effects of climate change and forest fires over time A new study co-authored by Portland State University geographer Andrés Holz, tracked the ebb and flow of ecosystem changes over the last 10,000 years, showing patterns that could shed light on current climate change and its role in shaping the world's forests. Holz and fellow scientists studied
46min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The silver lining: Scientists examine how aerosol types influence cloud formation IMAGE: Transport pathways of clean, continental air masses from the north and polluted, maritime air masses from the south are given by trajectory (colored lines) and meteorological (colored shading) analyses. view more Credit: Advances in Atmospheric Sciences Not all aerosols are made equally. Sea salt and some types of wild fire smoke can take flight to create clouds and, eventually, rain, whil
46min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Gyroscope' molecules form crystal that's both solid and full of motionTo make a solid crystal, molecules are generally so tightly packed together there's no room for any movement. It means that solid crystals -- despite their strength and durability -- have generally been ignored as having any possible function as molecular machines. UCLA researchers have formed a crystal out of molecules that look like gyroscopes. The crystal is externally solid but contains moving
46min
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Advances in Atmospheric Science launches special issue on cloud studies A special issue of the journal Advances in Atmospheric Science provides new research on aerosol and cloud properties and their effects on radiation and precipitation. The journal's February issue features 11 articles that broadly examine this important topic, addressing one of the bigger mysteries still surrounding climate change despite years of inquiry: How do aerosols impact the climate? "The
46min
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Discovering the creation era of ancient paintings at Mogao Grottoes, China Mogao Grottoes is located in the western end of the Hexi Corridor along the ancient Silk Road in Dunhuang, China. From 366 to 1368 AD, a large group of Buddha caves were constructed that includes 735 caves, 45,000m2 mural paintings, and 2,415 argillaceous painted sculptures. It was listed as a World Heritage Site in 1987. Until now, most mural paintings at Mogao Grottoes have been dated by direct
46min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Controlling superconductivity using spin currents IMAGE: The spin-polarized chromium (Cr) tip being scanned over the pristine superconducting area of the C2 magnetic order, represented in the background with electron pairs shown as coupled red spheres. The... view more Credit: KAIST A KAIST research team has discovered a method to flip between superconducting and non-superconducting states within an iron-based superconductor using a type of elec
46min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Artificial muscles power up with new gel-based robotics Scientists are one step closer to artificial muscles. Orthotics have come a long way since their initial wood and strap designs, yet innovation lapsed when it came to compensating for muscle power--until now. A collaborative research team has designed a wearable robot to support a person's hip joint while walking. The team, led by Minoru Hashimoto , a professor of textile science and technology a
46min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds strong support for ocean protection Credit: CC0 Public Domain The public widely believes that the marine environment is under threat from human activities, and supports actions to protect the marine environment in their region, according to a new study to be published in the February issue of the journal Ocean and Coastal Management . The study, conducted by an international team of researchers, reviews a set of public perception s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earthquakes as a driver for the deep-ocean carbon cycle Seismogram being recorded by a seismograph at the Weston Observatory in Massachusetts, USA. Credit: Wikipedia An international team led by geologist Michael Strasser has used novel methods to analyze sediment deposits in the Japan Trench in order to gain new insights into the carbon cycle. In a paper recently published in Nature Communications , geologist Michael Strasser presented the initial fi
48min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New tipping point prediction model offers insights to diminishing bee colonies Network A: Data from Hicking, Norfold, UK -- 62 pollinators, 17 plants and 146 mutualistic interactions. Network B: Data from Hestehaven, Denmark -- 42 pollinators, 8 plants and 79 mutualistic connections. Credit: Arizona State University A new method to predict tipping points - the moment at which sudden change occurs in complex networked systems - may offer insights that prevent colony collapse
48min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Special paper can be erased and printed on multiple times Schematic illustration of multicolour and water printing. Chemical structures of L 1 , L 2 and L 3 , and the printing and erasing processes for the constructed rewritable paper. Credit: Nature Communications (2017). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-017-02452-w A team of researchers with Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing Tech University and Northwestern Polytechnical University, all i
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Crying elephants and giggling rats – animals have feelings, too Mother love. Credit: Shutterstock Years ago, we believed that we weren't animals and that animals were here solely for our use. Indeed, a cow was just a walking burger, steak of Sunday roast, keeping itself fresh and tasty ready for when we were hungry . Luckily, for their sake, things have progressed significantly from then and now we recognise that animals (including our "superior" human selves
48min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Between the lines: Tree rings hold clues about a river's past By analyzing centuries-old growth rings from trees in the Intermountain West, researchers at USU are extracting data about monthly streamflow trends from periods long before the early 1900s when recorded observations began. Credit: Matt Jensen/USU Hydrologists are looking centuries into the past to better understand an increasingly uncertain water future. By analyzing centuries-old growth rings f
48min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Worldwide importance of honey bees for natural habitats captured in new report A honey bee pollinates a Carpobrotus plant. Credit: Keng-Lou James Hung/UC San Diego An unprecedented study integrating data from around the globe has shown that honey bees are the world's most important single species of pollinator in natural ecosystems and a key contributor to natural ecosystem functions. The first quantitative analysis of its kind, led by biologists at the University of Califo
54min
Futurity.org
Grocery store program pushed farmers to go green A program of one of the five largest supermarket chains in South Africa, drove increased adoption of environmental practices at the farm level, a new study of the store’s supply chain indicates. The study is one of the first analyses of a company-led sustainability program in the food and agriculture space. Agriculture environmental is one of the largest global polluters, driving deforestation an
59min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First flashes of light observed from individual graphene nanoribbons A graphene nanoribbon is partially suspended by a microscope tip, resulting in bright light emission. Credit: Chong et al. ©2017 American Chemical Society For the first time, researchers have experimentally observed light emission from individual graphene nanoribbons. They demonstrated that 7-atom-wide nanoribbons emit light at a high intensity that is comparable to bright light-emitting devices
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A signaling pathway that restricts cleavage furrow formation to the mid-plane of the cell Cell division in the C. elegans embryo (magenta: microtubules, blue: TPXL-1, green: chromosomes). Credit: Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich Cell division is a fundamental biological process which ensures that, following the replication of the mother cell's genome, the two sets of chromosomes are equally distributed between two daughter cells. Chromosomes are segregated by the spindle apparat
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Scientific American Content: Global
Ralph Steadman's World of Endangered Animals, a Natural History of Carbon and Other New Science Books Critical Critters by Ralph Steadman and Ceri Levy. Bloomsbury Natural History, 2017 ($50) After collaborating on two books showcasing extinct and endangered birds, legendary cartoonist Steadman and filmmaker Levy have paired up again to create this eccentric, wildly imaginative collection of illustrations of other critically endangered animals. Steadman's drawings are nonconformist, splot
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why society needs a more scientific understanding of human values Credit: Shutterstock When we talk about "human values" we tend to mean important abstract ideals. Things like freedom, equality, security, tradition and peace. Politicians mention values all the time, while all kinds of organisations claim to put "key values" at the heart of whatever business they are in. This makes perfect sense, as values are relevant to everything we do. They help us to choose
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Exploring alien worlds with lasers Artist’s impression of ESA’s ExoMars rover (foreground) and Russia’s science platform (background) on Mars. Credit: ESA/ATG medialab In everyday life we look and touch things to find out what they are made of. A powerful scientific technique does the same using lasers – and in two years' time it will fly in space for the first time. A researcher working with ESA has been investigating how lasers
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Worldwide importance of honey bees for natural habitats captured in new reportAn unprecedented study integrating data from around the globe has shown that honey bees are the world's most important single species of pollinator in natural ecosystems and a key contributor to natural ecosystem functions. The report weaves together information from 80 plant-pollinator interaction networks. The results clearly identify the honey bee (Apis mellifera) as the single most frequent vi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Health Department IDs 10 outbreaks of foodborne illness using Yelp reviews since 2012 A computer system developed by Columbia University with Health Department epidemiologists detects foodborne illness and outbreaks in NYC restaurants based on keywords in Yelp reviews Using Yelp, 311, and reports from health care providers, the Health Department has identified and investigated approximately 28,000 complaints of suspected foodborne illness overall since 2012 January 10, 2018 -
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Incorporating social media reviews can improve surveillance of restaurant health problemsA recent paper published in JAMIA, Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, illustrates the success of an improved system that tracks foodborne illness via online Yelp restaurant reviews developed by the Columbia University Department of Computer Science. Since 2012 this system has been used by the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to identify instances of foodb
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Between the lines: Tree rings hold clues about a river's past LOGAN, UTAH - Hydrologists are looking centuries into the past to better understand an increasingly uncertain water future. By analyzing centuries-old growth rings from trees in the Intermountain West, researchers at Utah State University are extracting data about monthly streamflow trends from periods long before the early 1900s when recorded observations began. Their findings were published Jan
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fiber OLEDs, thinner than a hair IMAGE: Fiber-based OLEDs woven into knitted clothes. view more Credit: KAIST Professor Kyung Cheol Choi from the School of Electrical Engineering and his team succeeded in fabricating highly efficient Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (OLEDs) on an ultra-thin fiber. The team expects the technology, which produces high-efficiency, long-lasting OLEDs, can be widely utilized in wearable displays. Ex
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Innovations in primary care: Behavioral approach to treating Opioid use disorderInnovations in primary care: Behavioral approach to treating Opioid use disorder.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New tipping point prediction model offers insights to diminishing bee colonies IMAGE: Network A: Data from Hicking, Norfold, UK -- 62 pollinators, 17 plants and 146 mutualistic interactions. Network B: Data from Hestehaven, Denmark -- 42 pollinators, 8 plants and 79 mutualistic connections. view more Credit: Arizona State University A new method to predict tipping points - the moment at which sudden change occurs in complex networked systems - may offer insights that preven
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More than five percent of family physicians did not attempt recertification Of 51,678 family physicians who received board certification between 1980 and 2000, 5.6 percent did not attempt to recertify, with a slight increase in the most recent cohort. The percentage not attempting recertification increased with each additional failed initial certification attempt, rising to 24 percent for diplomates who failed three or more times. International medical graduates, men, an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Language access plans are key as US demographics change United States' medical professionals who work with patients with limited English proficiency should rely on trained medical interpreters to give them the best comprehension of what a patient is saying. According to a new report from medical, legal, and education professionals, federal law requires health programs and clinicians receiving federal funds (e.g., federal grants, Medicaid, or Medicare
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dirt-like skin condition is described Terra firma-forme dermatosis is a hyperpigmented skin disease with a dirt-like appearance. Swabbing the lesions with alcohol serves to both diagnose and treat it. Although not well known, the condition might be more common than expected. In a retrospective study of the medical records of 79 patients, the dermatoses were found on the trunks of 28 percent of patients, on extremities of 27 percent o
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Can an Arrow Fired Straight Up Fall Fast Enough to Kill You? In a recent episode of Mythbusters, Brian and Jon (the new MythBusters) wanted to see what happens when you shoot an arrow straight up into the air. It will obviously come back down—but would it still be moving fast enough to kill you? If you are a MythBuster , the best option is to actually shoot an arrow straight up into the air and measure its velocity on impact. But for normal people, it migh
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The Scientist RSS
Immunity May Make CRISPR-Based Therapies IneffectiveResearchers identify antibodies for two commonly used Cas9 proteins in human blood. Investors take notice.
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Viden
Psykolog-tip: Sådan skal du håndtere din arbejdsmail Bag forskningen står psykolog Emma Russel fra Kingston Business School. Hun baserer sine konklusioner på gennemgang af 42 forskningsartikler og supplerende brugerstudier om anvendelsen af mail på jobbet. Læs også: Hey chef, hold op med at maile efter arbejdstid Bedre end sit rygte Ud fra det føler hun sig klædt på til at aflive tre udbredte myter om brug af mail. Myte #1: Mail forhindrer os i at
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Students who view medicine as a calling are more likely to pursue primary careStudents who view medicine as a calling are more likely to pursue primary care.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Family physicians in South Africa strengthen district hospital care In South Africa, district (generalist) hospitals with family physicians have better clinical processes and health system performance, while community health centers with family physicians have lower scores in those domains. In a study across seven South African provinces, district hospitals with family physicians had higher availability of essential services, such as pediatric and emergency care,
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Scientific American Content: Global
Why Our Own Immune Systems Attack Our Best Drugs--And How to Stop It Why Our Own Immune Systems Attack Our Best Drugs--And How to Stop It Many new drugs trigger an immune reaction that cripples them—and the race is on to thwart the attack Ever since he can remember, even as a boy growing up on a small farm in Michigan, Ken Martin has battled betrayal by his own body. Now 50 years old, Martin was born with hemophilia, and he bleeds almost uncontrollably from a cut.
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Dagens Medicin
Hudafdeling og Allergicentret på Odense Universitetshospital får ny ledende overlægeDen 1. februar 2018 tiltræder konstitueret ledende overlæge Flemming Andersen som leder af Hudafdeling I og Allergicentret på Odense Universitetshospital.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mother-child left-side face-to-face preference found to extend to walruses and Indian flying foxes Left visual field positioning in walrus. (a) Face-to-face resting in mother and calf. (b) Calf floating on the side of the mother prior to diving for suckling. Credit: Biology Letters (2018). DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2017.0707 A team of researchers with Saint Petersburg State University and the Institute of Experimental Medicine, both in Russia, has found that a left-side face-to-face preference seen in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why does the UK have so many accents? Let me guess where you’re from. Credit: Shutterstock Where we come from matters. Our origins form an important part of a distinctive personality, which can become a group identity when we share these origins. More often than not, our use of language, especially our dialect, is an expression of that distinctiveness. In addition to distinctive words and grammatical patterns, which may not follow th
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Dagens Medicin
Politiet ser intet strafbart i meningitis-sagenPolitiet mener ikke, at de ansvarlige læger har optrådt strafbart i sagen om den manglende indberetning af meningitis-dødsfald på Rigshospitalet, siger Politiets anklager. Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed er enig i vurderingen, men forsvarer samtidig sin beslutning om at gå til politiet.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Finding liquid water's coldest temperature and its singularity Credit: George Hodan/public domain Two teams of researchers working independently of one another have discovered some remarkable features of liquid water—it can be chilled to −42.55°C and it appears to have what is described as a singularity. The first team, made up of members from across Europe, conducted experiments designed to find the lowest temperature at which liquid water can exist. They h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Harnessing the power of algae—new, greener fuel cells move step closer to reality Glaucocystis sp. Image: Wikipedia. A new design of algae-powered fuel cells that is five times more efficient than existing plant and algal models, as well as being potentially more cost-effective to produce and practical to use, has been developed by researchers at the University of Cambridge. As the global population increases, so too does energy demand. The threat of climate change means that
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Science-Based Medicine
Cancer Deaths Continue to Decline Cancer remains the number 2 killer in the US, causing 22% of all deaths, just behind heart disease at 23%. The American Cancer Society carefully tracks all cancer statistics as a way of gauging how we are doing in all aspects of the fight to reduce the cancer burden in the population. The latest statistics are available for 2015 and they show that recent trends have continued. There is a lot to u
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Popular Science
There are better ways to measure body fat than BMI Every January, fat's in the crosshairs of health columnists, fitness magazines, and desperate Americans. This year, PopSci looks at the macronutrient beyond its most negative associations. What’s fat good for? How do we get it to go where we want it to? Where does it wander when it’s lost? This, my friends, is Fat Month . Like a nice mutton, your body gets more fatty as it gets older. This is jus
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study examines obesity and reproductive status of zoo elephants While obesity has been linked to abnormal ovarian cycles in other large mammals, the new findings suggest there is not an association between body fat and reproductive cycling in zoo elephants. Credit: University of Alabama at Birmingham With low birth rates, the sustainability of a zoo African elephant population is in question. A new study from University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers re
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
These two things matter when bouncing back from natural disasters Elizabeth Petheo works in Mexico City after the September 2017 earthquake. Credit: Miyamoto International On Sept. 19, 2017, an earthquake hit Mexico City that damaged and destroyed buildings across the city, killing more than 155 people. After the earthquake, Miyamoto International, with the support of the U.S. Agency for International Development's Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance, assiste
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Elections may be a catalyst for deforestation, new research suggests A growing demand for sugarcane has led to rapid deforestation in Bolivia. An estimated 2000 hectares of Bolivian rainforest was cleared in preparation for the expansion of the San Buenaventura Sugar Mill, seen in this photo. Credit: Planet Labs Democratic elections may be a catalyst for deforestation, according to new research. A study that examined deforestation rates during election years found
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Scientific American Content: Global
Could Cobalt Choke Our Electric Vehicle Future? An electric car future is speeding closer; economic analysts project that a third of all automobiles could be battery-powered by 2040. Most of these vehicles rely on large lithium-ion batteries, prompting worries about whether the world's lithium supply can keep up. But another element—cobalt—is a bigger concern, scientists reported in October in the journal Joule . “The best lithium battery
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shifting temperatures to alter household electricity expenses, researchers find Electricity grids provide light, heat, and power to European households, but not without cost - cost that is expected to rise with climate change according to Virginia Tech researchers. Credit: NASA In a study involving 19 European Union nations, researchers have found that future climate change will make power outages more costly for European households. The study is the first to consider the ef
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to stop the humble hedgehog disappearing from British gardens and countryside forever Ecologist and author Hugh Warwick explained how : "Beatrix Potter managed to sprinkle some magic over the hedgehog, transforming it into the irresistible companion of our gardens." But despite their popularity, hedgehogs are now something of a rare sight in British gardens – and are in fact disappearing at the same rate as tigers worldwide . Rural hedgehogs in the UK have halved in number sin
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Futurity.org
Drug combo cuts fracture risk for women with osteoporosis Taking a medication that builds bone mass followed by one that maintains it can significantly reduce the risk of fracture among post-menopausal women with severe osteoporosis, according to the results of a clinical trial. “Keeping patients at a constant bone mass isn’t adequate when they are already suffering from osteoporosis and their bones aren’t strong enough to resist fracture.” Osteoporosis
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Making the Internet of Things possible with a new breed of memristors The probe-station device (the full instrument, left, and a closer view of the device connection, right) which measures the electrical responses of the basic components for computers mimicking the human brain. The tunnel junctions are on a thin film on the substrate plate. Credit: Tapio Reinekoski The Internet of Things is coming, that much we know. But not without components and chips that can ha
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fiber OLEDs thinner than a hair Fiber-based OLEDs woven into knitted clothes. Credit: The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) Professor Kyung Cheol Choi from the School of Electrical Engineering and his team have fabricated highly efficient organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) on an ultra-thin fiber. The team expects the technology, which produces high-efficiency, long-lasting OLEDs, to be widely used in
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Van Gogh MicroscopyScientists identify the cells that give rise to the soft tissue cancer rhabdomyosarcoma.
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When Wi-Fi Won't Work, Let Sound Carry Your Data If you've ever struggled to pair your phone with a Bluetooth speaker or set up a wireless printer, you know that it's often easier to connect to a server halfway around the world than to a gadget across the room. That's a problem as we increasingly use our phones to pay for stuff, unlock doors, and control everything from televisions to thermostats. No one wants to wait for coffee because the cas
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The Neurocritic
Sexual Violence is Horrible, But First Look at Causes Outside the Brain "At the brain level, empathy for social exclusion of personalized women recruited areas coding the affective component of pain (i.e., anterior insula and cingulate cortex), the somatosensory components of pain (i.e., posterior insula and secondary somatosensory cortex) together with the mentalizing network (i.e., middle frontal cortex) to a greater extent than for the sexually objectified women. T
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CES 2018 Liveblog Day 3: Watch Us Touch All of the Gadgets in VegasWe're halfway through the giant consumer product showcase. Follow along live from CES 2018.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New materials being developed to prevent wind turbine damage Researchers of Spain's Universitat Jaume I of Castellón are developing new materials that will make wind turbines more resistant to the extreme climate conditions they have to withstand. The University Institute of Ceramic Technology Agustín Escardino of the Universidad Jaume I in Castellón, Spain, is participating in the development of new materials that are resistant to extreme climate for the
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Old is the Universe? How Old is the Universe? Everyday Einstein explains how we determine the age of our universe from ancient stars and relic radiation left over from the Big Bang Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Flickr ( CC BY 2.0 ) Advertisement Hi! I’m Everyday Einstein, Sabrina Stierwalt, bringing you Quick and Dirty Tips to help you make sense of science. Our universe is 13.8 billion years old, a
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Scientific American Content: Global
When Two (Disciplines) Become One Last month I had the pleasure of attending two separate conferences focused on the intersection of art and science. I had co-organized one of the events, a one-day affair called SciVizNYC , which featured 15 speakers working in various fields involving science visualization. After listening to this diverse series of professionals, including medical illustrators, journalists, fine artists and acad
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study suggests heavy rains from tropical cyclones distort the ground below A view of Hurricane Isabel seen from the International Space Station in 2003. New research finds torrential rainfall during a tropical cyclone could be responsible for reshaping the shallow layer of Earth’s crust in the days following the storm. Credit: Mike Trenchard, Earth Sciences & Image Analysis Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center Torrential rainfall during a tropical cyclone could be resp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hurricanes and earthquakes—can one predict the other? Hurricane locations as of September 8, 2017, 2 a.m. EDT. Credit: National Hurricane Center When three major hurricanes and just as many powerful earthquakes happen at around the same time, as they did in 2017, many wonder if they are connected. While the 2017 hurricanes and the earthquakes in Mexico are likely not connected, geophysicist Shimon Wdowinski believes there could be a correlation betw
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change and sustainable lifestyles Credit: University of Bath Professor Ricardo García-Mira is currently a Member of the Parliament of Spain, and is the Spokesperson of the Commission for the Study of Climate Change. He is a Professor of Social and Environmental Psychology at the University of A Coruna, and a Visiting Professor at the IPR, as well as the President of the International Association for People-Environment Studies. Ov
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Without culling, Victoria's feral horse plan looks set to fail Feral horses in the eastern Alps. Credit: Griff en/Wikimedia Commons, CC BY-SA Victoria's new draft feral horse management plan , released on the last working day before Christmas, will be open for comment until February 2. But will it protect the Alpine National Park? The answers are yes on the Bogong High Plains, and no in the eastern Alps. The government deserves congratulations for planning t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Healing burned paws with fish skin Jamie Peyton applies tilapia skin to the mountain lion cub's foot. Credit: Karin Higgins/UC Davis In the wake of massive wildfires that burned through the Sonoma and Napa areas last fall, Deana Clifford had a bad feeling. "I feel like we're going to get a burned animal," said Clifford, who is a senior wildlife veterinarian with the California Department of Fish and Wildlife and an assistant clini
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Live Science
Alligators 'Snorkel' to Survive Ice-Covered Swamp An alligator sticks its snout out through the ice at Shallotte River Swamp Park, in North Carolina. Credit: "The Swamp Park” in Ocean Isle, NC A video showing alligator snouts poking out though an ice-covered swamp in North Carolina during last week's cold snap may look like the preview of an avant-garde art installation, but it actually depicts an adaptive trick that helps these reptiles survi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ship noise affects ability of marine species to communicate Rosalyn Putland and colleague installing a hydrophone in the Hauraki Gulf. Credit: University of Auckland University of Auckland scientists have carried out the first-ever large scale investigation into the effects of ship noise in the waters of the Hauraki Gulf. The research shows a significant reduction in the amount of " communication space" available for at least two key marine species. Ph.D.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Aerospace engineers developing drone for NASA concept mission to Titan The Dragonfly dual-quadcopter, shown here in an artist’s rendering, would land on Saturn’s moon, Titan, and then make multiple flights to explore diverse locations as it characterizes the habitability of the ocean world’s environment. Dragonfly was chosen as a finalist for NASA’s New Frontiers program. Credit: Johns Hopkins Applied Research Laboratory/Steve Gribben Researchers from the Penn State
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New-wave connector buoys off-shore energy sector Credit: Brunel University A new multi-material connector predicted to rinse running costs for the renewables industry launches at Brunel University London in front of experts in wind, wave and tidal energy. Connectors are key components that join moorings for floating devices such as tidal energy converters with their anchors. A novel material developed by Brunel's Experimental Techniques Centr
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why did the elephant cross the road? In Malaysia, they are trying to find the answer Credit: University of Nottingham The body of an elephant calf lies on the side of a remote highway in the north of Peninsular Malaysia – the East-West Highway is flanked by two wildlife refuges, Royal Belum State Park and the Temengor Forest Reserve. It is stories like this in the Malaysian media that are of increasing concern to wildlife experts. They highlight the growing difficulty of human-el
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The Atlantic
The Strange Brands In Your Instagram Feed It all started with an Instagram ad for a coat, the West Louis (TM) Business-Man Windproof Long Coat to be specific. It looked like a decent camel coat, not fancy but fine. And I’d been looking for one just that color, so when the ad touting the coat popped up and the price was in the double-digits, I figured: hey, a deal! The brand, West Louis, seemed like another one of the small clothing compa
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Dagens Medicin
Smertestillende medicin kan skade mænds hormonbalance Ny fransk-dansk forskning tyder på, at 14 dage på ibuprofen er nok til at kunne skade produktionen af det mandlige kønshormon i testiklerne. Mænd skal dog ikke boykotte medicinen, påpeger Lægemiddelstyrelsen.
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Live Science
Kitchen of Thomas Jefferson's Enslaved Chef Is Uncovered NEW ORLEANS —James Hemings was one of the most masterful chefs in the young United Sates. He trained in aristocratic kitchens in France and introduced crème brûlée, meringues and macaroni and cheese into American cooking. He was also enslaved by Thomas Jefferson. There is little material record of Hemings' life beyond a few surviving recipes for desserts like " snow eggs " and a written 179
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Live Science
Photos: Monticello's Original Kitchen Excavated Archaeologists are contributing to the Mountaintop Project at Monticello, an effort to restore Thomas Jefferson’s 5,000-acre plantation in Charlottesville, Virginia, to the way it might have looked 200 years ago. Last year, they excavated the South Pavilion, the first brick building on the property, which had been repurposed as bathrooms 50 years ago. [ Read more about the Monticello excavation .
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NYT > Science
R.S.V.? She Hadn’t Heard of It. Then Her Child Was Hospitalized. What is R.S.V.? Every winter, R.S.V. becomes a common and potentially serious illness, said Dr. Ethan S. Wiener, associate chief of pediatric emergency medicine at N.Y.U. Langone Health. While it affects both children and adults, it is most dangerous — and can even be fatal — in babies who are born prematurely and people with weak immune systems, heart disease or lung disease. But even babies who
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Columbus module stripped Credit: ESA Inside the cylindrical modules of the International Space Station is the standard stuff of technology. Wires, cables and pumps form the framework of the one-of-a-kind European Columbus laboratory, seen here in its early days of assembly. The cornerstone of Europe's contribution to the Space Station, Columbus is a pressurised laboratory that allows astronauts to work in a comfortable a
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Scientific American Content: Global
Rhino Poachers Prosecuted Using DNA Database A genetic database that holds DNA from thousands of African rhinoceroses has secured the convictions of poachers and led to stiffer criminal sentences since its establishment eight years ago, researchers say. However, not all scientists are convinced the effort is worthwhile. In an 8 January paper in Current Biology , researchers highlight the database, which has been used in more than 120 ca
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seeing in the dark—how plant roots perceive water through growth Drawings using the computational model, which indicated that the perception of water as observed by water movement into the root was dramatically affected by the root growth rate are provided courtesy of Neil Robbins II. Credit: Carnegie Institution for Science Without eyes, ears, or a central nervous system, plants can perceive the direction of environmental cues and respond to ensure their surv
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Meteorites reveal story of Martian climate New research by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory shows that trapped gasses in ancient Martian meteorites pin down the timing and effectiveness of atmospheric escape processes that have shaped Mars’ climate. Credit: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Liquid water is not stable on Mars' surface because the planet's atmosphere is too thin and temperatures are too cold. However, at one time
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Parasites and hosts may respond differently to a warmer world Alyssa Gehman found that organisms infected with parasites may be more sensitive to changes in temperature. Credit: University of Georgia Organisms infected by parasites may respond differently to changes in temperature than their uninfected counterparts, according to new research from the University of Georgia. The study of a host-parasite system in coastal waters of the southeastern U.S. found
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intel advances quantum and neuromorphic computing research Intel Corporation’s self-learning neuromorphic research chip, code-named Loihi. Credit: Intel Corporation Today at the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Intel announced two major milestones in its efforts to research and develop future computing technologies including quantum and neuromorphic computing, which have the potential to help industries, research institutions and society solv
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The Atlantic
A Tiny Texas Town Takes a Chance on Medical Marijuana Last September, a farm near Schulenburg, Texas, a quiet, conservative town of fewer than 3,000 people, became a medical-marijuana dispensary. Knox Medical, based in Florida, owns the farm and is one of the three newly licensed cannabis outfits in Texas to start selling cannabidiol, or CBD, a substance derived from low-THC marijuana. When deliveries start going out to patients this month, Schulenb
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Softwear: How Outlier, the Underground Fashion Label for Nerds, Got Cool It’s 12:21 pm on a Tuesday, and the new coat from Outlier is going live. For the obsessed fans of this technically minded menswear house, Tuesday drops are always a big deal. This one is bigger than most. The Shelter From the Storm is Outlier’s first breathable waterproof shell. That’s the kind of thing that, if you care about it, you care about it a lot. The jacket, in Outlier parlance, is an “e
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Refrigerators, Robots, and the Rest of the Best Gadgets at CES So Far Even if you're uncomfortable with the idea of robots taking your job or dominating the human race forever, you'd probably like a robot to help get the bags outside. LG's three new robots do just that: one's made specifically to carry your groceries (and speed up checkout), while another exists only to carry your luggage to your hotel room. A third does food delivery. All are unlikely to show up i
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WhatsApp Encryption Security Flaws Could Allow Snoops to Slide Into Group Chats When WhatsApp added end-to-end encryption to every conversation for its billion users two years ago, the mobile messaging giant significantly raised the bar for the privacy of digital communications worldwide. But one of the tricky elements of encryption—and even trickier in a group chat setting—has always been ensuring that a secure conversation reaches only the intended audience, rather than so
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CES 2018: Screen Tech from LG, Samsung Shows Us TV’s Future CES is still a TV conference. Even as the tech industry experiments with augmented reality, self-driving cars, and the outer limits of what you can embed in a refrigerator, everything in Vegas still revolves around the big screen. The 2018 crop mostly marches along the same path manufacturers have been following for decades: Everything's a little bigger and sharper, and there are new inscrutable
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two astronomers, a hundred years apart, use stars to measure the universe Henrietta Leavitt (left) and Kate Hartman (right) — two astronomers a century apart studying Cepheid variable stars. Credit: Cynthia Hunt (Carnegie Institution for Science) Our entire understanding of the universe is based on knowing the distances to other galaxies, yet this seemingly-simple question turns out to be fiendishly difficult to answer. The best answer came more than 100 years ago from
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Scientific American Content: Global
What Should IVF Practitioners Disclose to Expectant Parents? Dubbed “Snowbaby,” Emma Gibson is now more than a month old Her birth made headlines globally recently as her 25-year-old mother gave birth to her though she was conceived in 1992. Frozen as an embryo that had been donated to a faith-based clinic in Tennessee, this case was the longest an embryo had been frozen resulting in a successful birth. Emma’s face on video belied any signs of havi
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Latest Headlines | Science News
This artificial cartilage gets its strength from the stuff in bulletproof vests A new kind of artificial cartilage, made with the same kind of fiber that fortifies bulletproof vests, is proving stronger than others. The fabricated material mimics the stiffness, toughness and water content of natural cartilage , researchers report in the Jan. 4 Advanced Materials . This synthetic tissue could replace the cartilage in a person’s body that naturally wears down and heals poorly
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Live Science
Pack of Female Wolves Destroys Enemy Intruder in Brutal Fight (Video) A pack of female wolves defends its den from an intruder in a new PBS documentary. Credit: Nature: Arctic Wolf Pack/WNET Moms are fierce — especially when they're wolves. In a dramatic new video from an upcoming PBS documentary on Arctic wolves , a pack of female wolves defends its den from a bedraggled, strange wolf who attempts to make a meal of the pack's defenseless cubs. Well, defe
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Dagens Medicin
Aalborg kan nu behandle blodpropper i hjernen med kateter Patienter på Aalborg Universitetshospital kan nu få foretaget et kateterbaserede indgreb for at fjerne blodpropper i hjernen. Det er af stor betydning for patienterne, mener overlæge.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher discusses the self-assembly of materials to make diverse nanoscale patterns Materials scientist Gregory Doerk in the materials processing lab at CFN. Credit: Brookhaven National Laboratory Some materials have the unique ability to self-assemble into organized molecular patterns and structures. Materials scientist Gregory Doerk of the Electronic Nanomaterials Group at the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN)—a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Fa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Evolved illusion—blackest black gives bird of paradise an edge Credit: Ed Scholes The mating display of the male bird of paradise owes its optical extravagance to a background so black it is the envy of telescope and solar panel engineers, according to a new study published Jan. 9 in the journal Nature Communications . Their velvety black plumage is so dark it gives the illusion that adjacent patterns of color glow brilliantly, an effect much appreciated by
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Iron-rich stars host shorter-period planets An artist’s rendering of how the iron content of a star can impact its planets. A normal star (green label) is more likely to host a longer-period planet (green orbit), while an iron-rich star (yellow label) is more likely to host a shorter-period planet (yellow orbit). Credit: Dana Berry/SkyWorks Digital Inc.; SDSS collaboration Astronomers with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) have learned t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: High above Jupiter's cloudsNASA's Juno spacecraft was a little more than one Earth diameter from Jupiter when it captured this mind-bending, color-enhanced view of the planet's tumultuous atmosphere.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Orangutans, like people, use medicinal plants to treat joint and muscle inflammation Credit: CC0 Public Domain Scientists have discovered that the same plant used by indigenous people on Borneo is also used by wild orangutans to treat joint and muscle inflammation. Borneo Nature Foundation scientists have been observing wild Bornean orangutans in the Sabangau Forest (Central Kalimantan, Indonesian Borneo) since 2003 and have collected over 20,000 hours of observational data. Du
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Eco espresso and upcycled inks set to make coffee greener Recycling old coffee waste can help create environmentally friendly inks. Credit: 'A lot of coffee beans' is licenced under CC-SA 1.0 An environmentally friendly coffee machine and a way to turn used coffee grounds into a new type of ink are helping to increase the green credentials of one of the most popular beverages in the world. Globally, more than 2 billion cups of coffee are consumed every
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Ingeniøren
Undervisningsministeriet til kommunerne: Slet al ulovlig data om børn Undervisningsministeriet sætter nu en stopper for, at kommunerne benytter sundhedsdata til sagsbehandling, som forældre ellers blev lovet var anonyme . Derfor beder ministeriet nu i et brev til landets kommuner om, at de indsamlede data slettes, skriver Politiken . »Derudover bedes disse kommuner oplyse elever og forældre, hvordan elevers besvarelser er anvendt, samt at disse fremover udelukkende
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Ingeniøren
Kodak introducerer KodakCoin og fordobler sin aktieværdi Den amerikanske virksomhed Kodak, der er bedst kendt for produktionen af fotografisk film, er hoppet på kryptovaluta-vognen. Det har i første omgang vist sig at været et ekstremt indbringende valg. Virksomhedens aktieværdi fordobledes i går efter annonceringen af den kommende kryptovaluta for fotografer kaldet 'KODAKCoin'. Kryptovalutaen bliver en del af Kodak's platform for billedrettigheder kal
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Leopards kill at least 3 children in rural India At least three children have been killed by leopards in a series of recent attacks in rural India, according to media reports and wildlife experts. Two of the children were killed in a village in central India—possibly by the same leopard—with a 14-year-old boy killed in the country's north, near the edge of a wildlife conservation area. All three were killed Sunday, the reports said. With thou
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Top car tech trends from CES 2018 This photo provided by Nissan shows its brain-to-vehicle device. The driver of the vehicle wears the cap, which reads the driver's brain waves and uses them to help improve vehicle reaction times.(Courtesy of Nissan North America Inc. via AP) Artificial intelligence that controls your infotainment screen. A vehicle that can read your brain. Cars that can see around blind corners. These are some o
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists manage to observe the inner structure of photonic crystals The scheme of analysis of photonic crystals' inner structure with the help of ptychography. Credit: ©NUST MISIS With the help of electronic microscopy, scientists have tracked defects in the surface of two-dimensional photonic crystals. But there are difficulties with bulk photonic crystals. There is no way for scientists to research the interiors of these unusual crystals. So scientists have bee
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronauts conducting metallurgical experiments aboard ISS This image shows how a metal alloy could look like as it solidifies, using a transparent organic mixture as a stand-in for metals. X-rays allow us to peer into the casting process but ideally researchers should look at the process under normal lighting. Unfortunately, metals are not transparent. Credit: E-USOC Astronauts on the International Space Station have begun running an experiment that cou
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dead trees are alive with fungi Deadwood logs of different tree species were laid out at three areas of temperate forests by UFZ scientists. They want to analyze which fungus species inhabit dead trees. Credit: Witoon Purahong Little research has been conducted to date on fungi that live on dead trees, although they are vital to forest ecology, breaking down dead wood and completing the elemental cycle between plants and soil.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Diverse causes behind frequency fluctuations in power grids Frequency measurements from 2015 (data: 50Hertz): the power grid frequency fluctuates around 50 Hz in the European grid and exhibits large jumps particularly in the trading intervals of 15 minutes. Usually, the grid frequency is within the yellow area but upward and downward deviations (grey) are particularly likely every 15 minutes. Credit: MPI für Dynamik und Selbstorganisation / Benjamin Schäf
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solid-state physics offers insights into dielectric properties of biomaterials Some of the experimental data were obtained using a terahertz spectrometer based on backward-wave oscillators. Credit: MIPT A team of Russian, Czech and German researchers has gained a new perspective on the properties of three materials of biological origin. Besides two reference materials with well-studied properties—serum albumin and cytochrome C—the researchers looked at the extracellular mat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Want to make money with stocks? Never listen to analysts Credit: Bocconi University Investors probably expect that following the suggestions of stock analysts would make them better off than doing the exact opposite. Nevertheless, recent research by Nicola Gennaioli and colleagues shows that the best way to gain excess returns would be to invest in the shares least favored by analysts. They compute that, during the last 35 years, investing in the 10 pe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team develops rapid authentication method of Chinese medicines PolyU's research team led by Dr Yao Zhongping, Associate Professor of the Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology, has developed a new method for rapid authentication of Chinese herbal medicines, including Lingzhi, and Tianma. Credit: The Hong Kong Polytechnic University The Food Safety and Technology Research Centre under the Department of Applied Biology and Chemical Technology of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Soil freeze-thaw stimulates nitrous oxide emissions from alpine meadowsThe rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere lead to global warming, which is a major challenge for sustainable development. The Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau with widespread distribution of seasonal frozen soil is very sensitive to global warming. Soil freeze-thaw is a common natural phenomenon in the plateau, which can not only change the water and heat conditions, and the physical
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
One-step production of aromatic polyesters by E. coli strains Biosynthesis of aromatic polyesters by metabolically engineered E. coli .This schematic diagram shows the overall conceptualization of how metabolically engineered E. coli produced aromatic polyesters from glucose. Credit: KAIST KAIST systems metabolic engineers have defined a novel strategy for microbial aromatic polyesters production fused with synthetic biology from renewable biomass. The team
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using ALMA to solve the sun's coronal heating mystery At the outermost edges of the sun's atmosphere the temperature rises to several million degrees Celsuis. Credit: Flickr/ NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Few would be surprised to learn that the sun is very, very hot. At its surface, the temperature is several thousand degrees Celsius. But you might think that, like a fire, the temperature drops as you move away from the surface. In fact, way out
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Ingeniøren
Signal-kaos hakker sjællandske pendler-strækninger over i to Pendlere fra nogle af de yderste strækninger, som DSB dagligt fragter ind til arbejdet i landets hovedstad, risikerer i flere år at skulle skifte tog, hvor de i dag kan køre direkte. Det skyldes det stærkt forsinkede og fordyrede projekt med at indføre det nye digitale signalsystem ERTMS på den danske fjernbane. For at give sig selv mere luft har Banedanmark lagt et gigantisk puslespil, som også
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Ingeniøren
DTU henter dansk topprofessor hjem fra USA Med en bevilling på 28 mio. kr. fra Villum Fonden har DTU oprettet et nyt professorat til den anerkendte teoretiker inden for katalyse Jens Kehlet Nørskov. På DTU skal den 65-årige topforsker stå i spidsen for et nyt center for katalyseteori, som bliver et tværfagligt center med udgangspunkt i DTU Fysik, DTU Kemi og DTU Energi. Her skal forskere med udgangspunkt i kvantefysiske beregninger og sup
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Dagens Medicin
PLO: Undgå tidligere fejl med støtte til store lægehuse De praktiserende læger skal med på råd, når regeringens nye millionpulje til læge- og sundhedshuse udmøntes, mener PLO. Regionsrådsformand er enig, men lægerne kan ikke diktere f.eks. lavere husleje, forklarer hun.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New depth limit for deep-sea marine burrows IMAGE: This image shows cross-cutting burrows on the margins of a sandstone injectite. view more Credit: Sarah Cobain, University of Leeds Scientists have found fossil evidence of deep-sea marine life burrowing up to eight metres below the seabed -- four times the previously observed depth for modern deep-sea life. A team of scientists from the University of Leeds and the National
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Dagens Medicin
Nyt selskab vil have flere praksis til at bruge ultralyd Hvis kvaliteten i almen praksis behandling skal helt i top, skal de praktiserende læger i højere grad bruge ultralyd i det diagnostiske arbejde. Sådan lyder budskabet fra det fra et nyetablerede selskab Dansk Almen Medicinsk Ultralydsselskab (DAUS), der er en foreningen, som vil fremme forskning, kvalitetsudvikling, uddannelse og hensigtsmæssig brug af ultralydsdiagnostik i almen praksis. »Der er
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New depth limit for deep-sea marine burrows Cross-cutting burrows on the margins of a sandstone injectite. Credit: Sarah Cobain, University of Leeds Scientists have found fossil evidence of deep-sea marine life burrowing up to eight metres below the seabed—four times the previously observed depth for modern deep-sea life. A team of scientists from the University of Leeds and the National Oceanography Centre examined remains of deep-sea bur
5h
Dagens Medicin
Medicinrådet: Det kan blive nødvendigt at fravige habilitetskravFor at finde en formand til fagudvalget for æggestokkræft er Medicinrådet klar til at fravige de normale habilitetskrav eller finde en formand uden for subspecialet.
5h
The Atlantic
Aliens Didn't Send That Mysterious Object to Our Solar System After All In December, astronomers checked every inch of an interstellar object that had entered our solar system for evidence of artificial technology. They spent weeks pouring over the data, looking for radio signals that would suggest the object, known as ‘Oumuamua, may be something other than a just a strange space rock. They didn’t find anything. The Breakthrough Listen Initiative, a $100 million effo
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Ingeniøren
Firmaer tørster efter unge talenter: Behov for nyuddannede og studerendeBåde it-folk og ingeniører er eftertragtede på månedens liste for nyligt uddannede og studerende. Forsvarets Efterretningstjeneste, Siemens, Netcompany, Rambøll og mange flere har ledige graduatestillinger, praktikpladser og studiejob.
5h
Ingeniøren
Svenske rådgivere snupper to store danske tegnestuer Det er ikke længere nok for ingeniørrådgiverne at kunne regne, projektere og have helt styr på ståbierne. Kunderne efterspørger i stigende omfang arkitektydelser sammen med de tekniske kompetencer. Sådan begrunder den administrerende direktør i Sweco Danmark, Dariush Rezai, rådgivningsvirksomhedens opkøb af den over 300 mand store arkitektvirksomhed Årstiderne. »Byggeriets værdikæde har gennem ma
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Japanese astronaut sorry for 9cm ISS growth mistake Image copyright Reuters Image caption Astronaut Norishige Kanai (L) left Earth for the ISS last month on a six-month mission A Japanese astronaut has apologised for wrongly stating he has grown 9cm (3.5in) since arriving at the International Space Station (ISS) just over three weeks ago. Norishige Kanai said in fact he grew by 2cm, blaming "a measurement mistake". "I'm very sorry for tweeting out
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Acetaminophen use during pregnancy associated with elevated rate of language delay in girls (New York - January 10, 2018) -- In the first study of its kind, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai found an elevated rate of language delay in girls at 30 months old born to mothers who used acetaminophen during pregnancy, but not in boys. This is the first study to examine language development in relation to acetaminophen levels in urine. The study will be published on
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineered sandbars don't measure up for nesting plovers Piping Plovers have more success nesting on natural sandbars than on human-built habitat. Credit: D. Borden Dams alter rivers in ways that reduce the creation of natural sandbars, which is bad news for threatened Piping Plovers that depend on them for nesting habitat. Between 2004 and 2009, more than 200 hectares of engineered sandbars were built along the Missouri River to address the problem—bu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Robotic weeders: to a farm near you? This robotic weeder is operating in a field near Santa Maria, CA in June 2015. The field is full of a specialty crop. Credit: Steven Fennimore The future of weeding is here, and it comes in the form of a robot. The growing popularity of robotic weeders for specialty crops has grown partly out of necessity, says Steven Fennimore, an extension specialist at the University of California, Davis. Spec
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NYC taking steps to divest pension funds of fossil fuels In this Jan. 19, 2016 file photo, a man watches a BP refinery in Gelsenkirchen, Germany. New York City officials say they will begin the process of dumping about $5 billion in pension fund investments in fossil fuel companies, including BP, because of environmental concerns. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner, File) New York City officials are citing climate change as their motivation to join a growing nu
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'To boldly grow': Japan astronaut worried by space growth spurt A Japanese astronaut has sparked hilarity back on Earth after he claimed to have grown nine centimetres in space, making him worried he would not squeeze into the capsule home. Norishige Kanai, who is aboard the International Space Station, tweeted: "We had our bodies measured after reaching space , and wow, wow, wow, I had actually grown by as much as 9 centimetres (3.5 inches)!" "I have grown
7h
Science | The Guardian
Japanese astronaut apologises for saying he had grown 9cm in space Japanese astronaut Norishige Kanai, on a mission to the International Space Station , has apologised for saying he had grown 9cm while in space and expressing concern about whether he would be safe on his return to Earth. Most astronauts “grow” during protracted space missions because their spines extend in the absence of gravity, but the gains are usually limited to a couple of centimetres and d
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Foreo launches 'UFO' for easy beauty face masks Beauty startup Foreo is launching a "UFO" to make salon-style face mask treatments as much a part of people's days as brushing teeth. The young Swedish firm is giving visitors the full treatment with a glamor gadget that resembles a tiny alien spacecraft this week at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. Face masks, which typically involve coating one's face with skin-loving lotions that
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Malaysia to pay firm up to $70M if it finds missing plane Director General of Civil Aviation Malaysia, Azharuddin Abdul Rahman, left, shakes hand and exchanges the Memorandum of Understanding documents with CEO of Ocean Infinity Limited, Oliver Plunkett, right, during the signing ceremony of the MH370 missing plane search operations between Malaysian government and Ocean Infinity Limited in Putrajaya, Malaysia, Wednesday, Jan. 10, 2018. (AP Photo/Sadiq
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Travis the translator aims to make people understood Netherlands-based startup Travis is out to make people understood no matter what language they speak. Travis was at the Consumer Electronics Show here late Tuesday with a small device capable of translating conversations between people speaking different languages in real time. "Technology connects us as far as we are accessible to each other, but those true connections aren't going to happen u
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lawmakers demand probe into Intel CEO's stock sales Two U.S. lawmakers are asking federal regulators to open an investigation into stock sales that reaped a $25 million profit for Intel's CEO several weeks before the company disclosed a serious security flaw threatening millions of computers, phones and other devices. Sen. Jack Reed, a Rhode Island Democrat, and Sen. John Kennedy, a Louisiana Republican, made the demand in a letter sent Tuesday to
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reports: AT&T drops plan to sell Huawei smartphone in US U.S. telecoms carrier AT&T has dropped plans to sell Chinese brand Huawei's smartphones in the United States, dealing a setback to the No. 3 global phone maker's expansion plans, according to news reports. The Wall Street Journal, which reported the development Tuesday, gave no reason for AT&T Inc.'s decision. The South China Morning Post of Hong Kong said Huawei Technologies Ltd.'s vice presiden
7h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Flying telescope yields insights into birth of stars Image copyright NASA/F. Pereira Santos Image caption The team was able to map differences in the polarization of dust grains within the central portion of the cloud A Nasa telescope housed on a converted jumbo jet has yielded important insights into how stars are born from collapsing gas and dust. Measurements by the Sofia observatory underline the importance of magnetic fields for star formation
8h
Ingeniøren
Region erkender: Har ikke ført tilsyn med sundhedsdata Region Syddanmark har ikke styr på, om dens patientoplysninger faktisk bliver behandlet med den krævede it- og datasikkerhed. Regionen har et samarbejde med Rambølls spørgeskema-service SurveyXact, hvor patienter inden hospitalsbesøg kan udfylde en række sundhedsoplysninger. Problemet er, at regionen ikke har ført tilsyn med, at Rambøll faktisk har styr på patienternes data. »Det har ikke været m
8h
Science | The Guardian
One cigarette 'may lead to habit for more than two-thirds of people' More than two-thirds of people who try just one cigarette may go on to become regular smokers, new research suggests. Researchers found that just over 60% of adults said they had tried a cigarette at some point in their lives, with almost 69% of those noting that they had, at least for a period, gone on to smoke cigarettes daily. “[This shows] prevention, providing [fewer] opportunities or reason
9h
Science | The Guardian
Mammals prefer to cradle babies on the left, study demonstrates There is more to cradling an infant than meets the eye, according to new research revealing that, like humans, other mammal mothers and babies prefer to keep each other on the left when face-to-face. A new study shows the phenomenon is also seen in Pacific walruses and Indian flying foxes, suggesting it is more widespread than previously thought. “Our results suggest an ancient origin of cradling
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Robotic weeders: to a farm near you? The future of weeding is here, and it comes in the form of a robot. The growing popularity of robotic weeders for specialty crops has grown partly out of necessity, says Steven Fennimore, an extension specialist at the University of California, Davis. Specialty crops are vegetables like lettuce, broccoli, tomatoes, and onions. They are not mass-produced like corn, soybeans, and wheat. The need fo
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Transitional care nurses in the geriatric emergency department reduce risk of inpatient admissions Geriatric patients seen by transitional care nurses in the emergency department (ED) are less likely to be admitted to the hospital, according to a study conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and published today in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society . These findings show that interventions initiated during an older patient's arrival through the ED can have a signifi
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Large-scale study to pinpoint genes linked to obesity It's not just diet and physical activity; your genes also determine how easily you lose or gain weight. In a study published in the January issue of Nature Genetics , researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and other institutions of the Genetic Investigation of Anthropometric Traits (GIANT) consortium found 13 genes that carry variations associated with body mass index (BMI). T
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Altered voice processing in young children with autism and delayed language development IMAGE: This is a comparison of the MMF amplitudes in the left pars orbitalis among the three groups. There was a significant differences among the three groups (F = 6.932 P... view more Credit: Kanazawa University "The diagnosis, 'autism spectrum disorder,' covers a lot of symptoms. For each various symptom, there should be a various brain pathophysiology," said Yuko Yoshimura, an assis
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Factors affecting the success of grizzly bear translocations IMAGE: Factors affecting the success of grizzly bear translocations. view more Credit: Journal of Wildlife Management The number of grizzly bear translocations has increased in recent years to protect the bears and reduce conflicts with humans. In a recent Journal of Wildlife Management analysis of translocations in Alberta, Canada, researchers found that the most important factors for tran
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Individuals' perceptions on immigration and political trust may have shaped the Brexit vote A few weeks prior to the EU Referendum in the UK, researchers surveyed 1000 residents of Kent in the south east of England (where a majority intended to vote to leave), and 1000 across Scotland (where a majority intended to vote to remain). The findings are published in the British Journal of Social Psychology . Participants were asked about their trust in politicians, concerns about acceptable l
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Review reveals potential predictors of long-term distress after cancer diagnosis A new review of published studies indicates that distress and neuroticism at or within 3 months of cancer diagnosis may predict emotional distress at least 12 months later. In the Psycho-Oncology analysis, there was no consistent evidence that demographic, clinical, or social factors reliably predict long-term distress. The investigators noted that studies included in the analysis were varied, wi
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Endometriosis may increase the risk of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis A new Neurology & Urodynamics study has demonstrated a link between endometriosis and a subsequent diagnosis of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC). In the study of 9191 individuals with endometriosis and 27,573 people randomly selected as controls, incidences of BPS/IC during three years of follow-up were 0.2% and 0.05% for individuals with and without endometriosis, respectivel
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ethical issues are important in 'standard-of-care' clinical trials A Learning healthcare system (LHS) aligns science, informatics, incentives, and culture for continuous improvement and innovation, with a delivery process that is based on best practices while also capturing new knowledge. Integral to LHSs are clinical trials that compare interventions that are already commonly in use (as "accepted" or "standard-of-care"). A new Learning Health Systems research r
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines urinary tract infections and antibiotic use in nursing homes In a Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study of nursing homes in the tropics, one in five residents had received antibiotics within the last 30 days. Also, urinary tract infection (UTI) accounted for 40 percent of all infections treated with antibiotics within the last 30 days. New or worsening confusion was one of the strongest factors associated with antibiotic treatment for suspected
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study provides insights on links between childhood abuse and later depression Results from an International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry study suggest that smaller social networks and feelings of loneliness might be important risk factors for late-life depression in older adults with a history of childhood abuse as well as with an earlier onset of depression. The findings highlight the importance of detecting the presence of childhood abuse in adults with depression and
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research may improve artificial joints used in hip replacement surgery A new Journal of Orthopaedic Research study that examined artificial joints used for total hip replacement found that ceramic components may experience less corrosion than cobalt-chromium components. The findings may be useful for improving artificial joints in the future. ### Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contribut
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Analysis examines link between bone turnover markers and fracture risk in osteoporosis trials Pooled data from 14 osteoporosis clinical trials of anti-resorptive drugs indicate that patients who have reduced levels of two bone turnover markers during treatment have lower risks of later experiencing vertebral fractures. No bone turnover markers were significantly associated with non-vertebral or hip fracture risks, according to the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research analysis. The finding
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Could melatonin be the key to healthy aging? A new British Journal of Pharmacology review highlights the role of melatonin--a hormone that is produced at night--in regulating sleep and the body's biological, or circadian, clock. Research suggests that melatonin treatments may even help to improve the restorative value of sleep and to promote healthy physical and mental aging. The review notes that, with age and certain diseases, the robustn
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Certain factors may predict lung cancer patients' response to chemotherapy In a retrospective analysis of 73 lung squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with the chemotherapy regimen of gemcitabine plus cisplatin, higher body mass index and younger age were linked with longer progression-free survival, the length of time that a patient lives with cancer but it does not get worse. Patients with better response to treatment and higher body mass index had longer overall
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Engineered sandbars don't measure up for nesting plovers IMAGE: Piping Plovers have more success nesting on natural sandbars than on human-built habitat. view more Credit: D. Borden Dams alter rivers in ways that reduce the creation of natural sandbars, which is bad news for threatened Piping Plovers that depend on them for nesting habitat. Between 2004 and 2009, more than 200 hectares of engineered sandbars were built along the Missouri River to
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Factors affecting the success of grizzly bear translocationsThe number of grizzly bear translocations has increased in recent years to protect the bears and reduce conflicts with humans. In a recent Journal of Wildlife Management analysis of translocations in Alberta, Canada, researchers found that the most important factors for translocation success were the level of human-caused mortality risk at the release site and the time of year when the translocati
10h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
At least 3 out of 5 people who try a cigarette become daily smokersAt least 61 percent of people who try their first cigarette become, at least temporarily, daily smokers, suggests an analysis of survey data.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
General anesthetics do more than put you to sleepA new understanding of the complex ways in which general anesthetics act on the brain could eventually lead to improved drugs for surgery. It remains unclear how general anesthesia works, even though it is one of the most common medical procedures worldwide. University of Queensland researcher, Associate Professor Bruno van Swinderen, said his team had overturned previous understanding of what gen
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dead trees are alive with fungiSo far, little research has been conducted on fungi that live on dead trees, although they are vital to the forest ecology by breaking down dead wood and completing the element cycle between plants and soil. Soil biologists have now discovered that the number of fungus species inhabiting dead trees is 12 times higher than previously thought. Once trees die they are also colonized by different fung
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Moms of obese children use different words to restrict eatingMothers of children with obesity may be more likely to use direct statements to restrict a child's eating.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Place of residence linked to heart failure riskAccording to new research, almost 5 percent of heart failure risk was connected to neighborhood factors.
11h
Ingeniøren
Personlighedstest: Sådan undgår du at ødelægge dine jobchancer Tre tips til testen: Lad være med at lyve. Tag et spørgsmål ad gangen – undgå at overtænke dine svar ved at forsøge at finde bestemte mønstre. Hent hjælp hos en kollega eller studiekammerat, som kender dig, og som vil være ærlig over for dig. Inden du ankommer til en jobsamtale, bliver du ofte bedt om at gennemføre en personlighedstest. Du svarer på spørgsmål om alt fra din beslutningskraft, til
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Illnesses caused by recreation on the water costs $2.9 billion annually in the USSwimming, paddling, boating and fishing account for more than 90 million cases of gastrointestinal, respiratory, ear, eye and skin-related illnesses per year in the US with an estimated annual cost of $2.9 billion, according to a new report.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
MERS antibodies produced in cattle safe, treatment well tolerated in phase 1 trialAn experimental treatment developed from cattle plasma for Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus infection shows broad potential, according to a small clinical trial. The treatment, SAB-301, was safe and well tolerated by healthy volunteers, with only minor reactions documented.
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Potentially life-saving health monitor technologySick babies in remote parts of the world could be monitored from afar thanks to new wearable technology. And parents at home, concerned about the risk of cot death, could keep track of their new babies' heart and breathing rates with automatic updates to their smart phones, using 'fitness tracker'-style technology built into baby sleep suits.
11h
Live Science
Pregnancy Diet & Nutrition: What to Eat, What Not to Eat What a woman eats and drinks during pregnancy is her baby's main source of nourishment. So, experts recommend that a mother-to-be choose a variety of healthy foods and beverages to provide the important nutrients a baby needs for growth and development. Key pregnancy nutrition A pregnant woman needs more calcium, folic acid, iron and protein than a woman who is not expecting, according
12h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Plastic bag charge: 5p levy could be extended in England Image copyright Getty Images The 5p charge for plastic bags in large shops in England is set to be extended to cover nearly all carrier bags, as part of new plans for the environment. Environment Secretary Michael Gove told a meeting of the cabinet that he wanted to tackle our "throwaway culture". Shops with fewer than 250 employees are currently exempt from the charge, which since being introduc
12h
New Scientist - News
When people sleep more they also eat less sugar and carbs Not-so-sweet dreams Peter Glass/Getty By New Scientist staff and Press Association Want to eat better? Sleep more . Increasing the amount of sleep a person gets has been linked to eating fewer sugary foods, and making better nutritional choices. Wendy Hall , at King’s College London, and her team enlisted 42 volunteers to help them investigate the link between sleep and diet. Half the partici
12h
New Scientist - News
People with diabetes seem to be protected against migraine By Jessica Hamzelou A huge study of the population of Norway has found that people who are being treated for diabetes are less likely to be treated for migraines . The finding suggests that something about diabetes – or the drugs used to treat it – might offer protection against migraines. “It could give us some insight into the mechanisms of migraine, and in future could improve the treatmen
12h
Live Science
Ectopic Pregnancy: Signs, Symptoms & Treatment An ectopic pregnancy occurs when a fertilized egg implants outside of the uterus or not within the uterine cavity. The word "ectopic" refers to something medically that is in the wrong place or position. In about 98 percent of ectopic pregnancies, the fertilized egg implants within a woman's fallopian tube, the narrow tube that links the ovaries and uterus. This is also called a tubal pre
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Pollution hotspots revealed: Check your area Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Cyclists wear masks against pollution in London, one of 16 areas where limits have been breached Marylebone Road and Hyde Park Corner, both in central London, have the most polluted postcodes in Britain, says a new study on air quality. The data comes from a project to map concentrations of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) across the country. However, the results
13h
Big Think
More Nations Are Banning Ritual Slaughter. Should Religious Tradition Be Honored Over Animal Rights? Kosher butchers must have a steady hand. Their ritual slaughter, shechita , must result in one precise cut severing carotid arteries, jugular veins, vagus nerves, trachea, and esophagus; it has to be above the epiglottis but cannot breach the cilia. Observant Jews believe this reduces animal suffering. The prescription in Islam is similar: one cut separating the carotid arteries, trachea, and
13h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New discovery could improve brain-like memory and computingFrom various magnetic tapes, floppy disks and computer hard disk drives, magnetic materials have been storing our electronic information along with our valuable knowledge and memories for well over half of a century.
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
3-D imaging of fat reveals potential targets for new obesity treatmentsWith new imaging methods, scientists hope to make significant progress in the fight against obesity. A new report reveals striking images of neural projections within fat tissue, and clues for the development of new drugs.
14h
cognitive science
Building Machines that Learn and Think Like People A community for those who are interested in the mind, brain, language and artificial intelligence. Want to know more? Take a look at our reading list here. If you have any suggestions for further inclusions, post them here .
14h
Futurity.org
Mass extinctions took out dinosaurs but not diversity Sixty-five million years ago, clouds of ash choked the skies over Earth. Dinosaurs, along with about half of all the species on Earth, staggered and died. But in the seas, a colorful population of marine bivalves—the group including oysters, clams, and scallops—soldiered on, tucked into the crevices of ocean floors and shorelines. Though they also lost half their species, curiously, at least one
14h
Futurity.org
Quiz: How much do you know about fruit flies? Source: Brandeis University The post Quiz: How much do you know about fruit flies? appeared first on Futurity .
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BBC News - Science & Environment
A marine biologist says a humpback whale saved her from a sharkA marine biologist says a humpback whale saved her from a shark during a recent research expedition
14h
Scientific American Content: Global
Glow Sticks Help Ecologists Study Amphibians Populations of frogs, salamanders and other amphibians are declining around the world —even in protected areas, like U.S. national parks. Ecologists needed a simple method to track the animals’ numbers. Now, researchers have found an effective way to keep tabs on amphibians—using that concert and party favorite: glow sticks . Green glow sticks, to be specific. “What we do know is that the
14h
Popular Science
Most Emperor penguins fast for 115 days—but a few of them sneak snacks May in Antarctica means winter, with frigid temperatures and nights that stretch out, shoving what scant daylight remains into a shrunken block of a few hours, if the sun manages to peek above the horizon at all. Almost 20 years ago in May, scientists disembarked the icebreaker R.V. Nathaniel B. Palmer at Cape Washington, at the edge of the ice covering the Ross Sea. It was a short two-day detour
15h
Futurity.org
Stuff from stinging nettles activates reusable cancer treatment Researchers have developed a new way to attack cancer: using a non-toxic dose of sodium formate—found in nettles and ants—to trigger an organic-osmium compound. “This is a significant step in the fight against cancer…” Named JPC11, the organic-osmium compound targets a metabolic process which cancer cells rely on to survive and multiply. It does this by converting a key substance used by cancer c
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Futurity.org
Viruses could inspire nano drug-delivery device Researchers have discovered a path toward virus-like, nanoscale devices that may be able to deliver drugs to cells by chipping away at a viral protein. “Viruses have evolved to invade cells very effectively… We want to harness what nature has already created…” The protein is one of three that make up the protective shell, called the capsid, of natural adeno-associated viruses (AAV). By making pro
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Futurity.org
U.S. lags behind peers in fighting child mortality The United States has been slowest among 20 economically similar nations to improve childhood mortality rates, according to new research. “The findings show that in terms of protecting child health, we’re very far behind where we could be.” While looking at deaths between 1961 and 2010, researchers found that US childhood mortality has been higher since the 1980s than those in all 19 peer nations
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Life on land and tropical overheating 250 million years ago IMAGE: The Permian-Triassic world 250 million years ago, showing all continents fused as the supercontinent Pangaea, the tropical belt (orange and yellow colours), and reptile distributions. view more Credit: Massimo Bernardi 2018 One of the key effects of the end-Permian mass extinction, 252 million years ago, was rapid heating of tropical waters and atmospheres. How this affected life o
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exposure to trees, the sky and birdsong in cities beneficial for mental wellbeing More than 3.5 billion people, over half the world's population, live in urban areas 'Urban Mind: Using Smartphone Technologies to Investigate the impact of Nature on Mental Wellbeing in Real Time' published in BioScience on Wednesday 10 January Findings have potential implications from the perspectives of global mental health and urban planning and design Researchers at King's College London
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sleeping for longer leads to a healthier diet Sleeping for longer each night is a simple lifestyle intervention that could help reduce intake of sugary foods and lead to a generally healthier diet, according to a King's College London study. Sleep is a modifiable risk factor for various conditions including obesity and cardio-metabolic disease with some figures suggesting more than a third of adults in the UK are not getting enough sleep. Th
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
At least 3 out of 5 people who try a cigarette become daily smokers At least 61 per cent of people who try their first cigarette become, at least temporarily, daily smokers, suggests an analysis of survey data by Queen Mary University of London. The findings, from over 215,000 survey respondents and published in the journal Nicotine & Tobacco Research , provides strong support for prioritising efforts to reduce cigarette experimentation among adolescents. Lead re
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scouting the eagles: Proof that protecting nests aids reproduction MADISON, Wisconsin -- Reproduction among bald eagles in a remote national park in Minnesota was aided when their nests were protected from human disturbance, according to a study published today (Jan. 9, 2018) in the Journal of Applied Ecology . The study, by researchers at University of Wisconsin-Madison, the National Park Service and the U.S. Geological Survey, focused on a nest-protection prog
15h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Parasites and hosts may respond differently to a warmer worldOrganisms infected by parasites may respond differently to changes in temperature than their uninfected counterparts, according to new research.
15h
Live Science
Sleeping More May Curb Sugar Cravings, Really Is the trick to cutting cravings for sugary foods as simple as getting a good night's sleep? A new small study from the United Kingdom suggests that may be the case. It's no surprise that tossing and turning all night can cause a person to feel tired, cranky and out of sorts the next day. But missing out on the recommended minimum of 7 hours of nightly shut-eye is also linked to various hea
15h
Live Science
Man Declared Dead Snores to Life Right Before His Autopsy A man in Spain who was declared dead by three doctors was actually still alive, which doctors discovered only when he began snoring on the autopsy table, according to news reports. The man, 29-year-old Gonzalo Montoya Jiménez, was a prisoner at a jail in northern Spain. He was found unconscious in his cell on Sunday (Jan. 7), and was believed to be dead, according to the Spanish news outlet
15h
Live Science
Strange Sky Spiral May Come from Secretive SpaceX Zuma Launch This is the image taken by Dutch pilot Peter Horstink, from his aircraft over Khartoum near 3:15 UT, 2h 15m after launch. This is probably the Falcon 9 venting fuel. #Zuma pic.twitter.com/EEsl7e1sQP — Dr Marco Langbroek (@Marco_Langbroek) January 8, 2018 A pair of spectacular images of an ethereal spiral in the night sky may show the upper stage of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket after it la
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scouting the eagles: Proof that protecting nests aids reproduction Bald eagles tend to nest along the many lakeshores in Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota. Credit: Jennyffer Cruz Reproduction among bald eagles in a remote national park in Minnesota was aided when their nests were protected from human disturbance, according to a study published today (Jan. 9, 2018) in the Journal of Applied Ecology . The study, by researchers at University of Wisconsin-Madison,
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Exposure to trees, the sky and birdsong in cities beneficial for mental wellbeing Researchers at King's College London, landscape architects J & L Gibbons and art foundation Nomad Projects have used smartphone-based technology to assess the relationship between nature in cities and momentary mental wellbeing in real time. They found that (i) being outdoors, seeing trees, hearing birdsong, seeing the sky, and feeling in contact with nature were associated with higher levels of
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Life on land and tropical overheating 250 million years ago The Permian-Triassic world 250 million years ago, showing all continents fused as the supercontinent Pangaea, the tropical belt (orange and yellow colours), and reptile distributions. Credit: Massimo Bernardi 2018 One of the key effects of the end-Permian mass extinction, 252 million years ago, was rapid heating of tropical waters and atmospheres. How this affected life on land has been uncertain
15h
Big Think
Want Faster Data and a Cleaner Planet? Start Mining Asteroids Mining asteroids might seem like the stuff of science fiction, but there are companies and a few governments already working hard to make it real. This should not be surprising: compared with the breathtaking bridges that engineers build on Earth, asteroid-mining is a simple, small-scale operation requiring only modest technological advances. If anything is lacking, it is the imagination to see h
15h
Futurity.org
Here’s how we taste things like bacon, coffee, and sugar Until now, many scientists believed a single protein acted as a gatekeeper for tasting sugary, bitter, and savory flavors. A new study challenges this thinking. Remove the protein TRPM5 from a person’s taste cells, and they would no longer be able to identify sweet, bitter, or savory (also called umami) foods. “This is important because taste is actually central to our survival.” The research, pu
15h
Big Think
Here’s How a Shirt Could Become a Powerful Coping Mechanism for Stress There are a couple of shirts I should never expect back, according to my wife. Instead of being miffed, I should be happy. A study out of the University of British Columbia (UBC) finds that women derive comfort from the smell of their partner. It helps relieve stress. While the smell of a strange male triggers the opposite effect. The results of the study were published in the Journal of Personal
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MERS antibodies produced in cattle safe, treatment well tolerated in phase 1 trial IMAGE: Colorized transmission electron micrograph showing particles of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus that emerged in 2012. The round, spiked objects at center are MERS coronavirus particles. view more Credit: NIAID An experimental treatment developed from cattle plasma for Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus infection shows broad potential, according to a sm
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microsoft stops fixing security flaw on PCs with AMD chipsMicrosoft has temporarily stopped fixing a serious security flaw on personal computers powered by certain chips from Advanced Micro Devices because the repair is crippling the affected machines.
15h
Live Science
Mitt Romney's Prostate Cancer: What's a Good Prognosis? Former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney was treated for prostate cancer last summer, according to news reports. Romney, who is 70, had surgery over the summer, according to a statement provided to ABC News . His treatment was successful and "his prognosis is good," the statement said. What does it mean to have a good prognosis for prostate cancer? [ 5 Things You Should Know A
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Gyroscope' molecules form crystal that's both solid and full of motion UCLA researchers formed a crystal out of molecules that each has a solid exterior but contains moving parts. Credit: Kendall Houk Laboratory/UCLA Molecular machines, much smaller than single cells, may one day be able to deliver drugs to kill cancer cells or patrol your body for signs of disease. But many applications of these machines require large arrays of rock-hard moving parts, which would b
16h
The Atlantic
France, Where #MeToo Becomes #PasMoi PARIS —Has #MeToo gone #TooFar? Catherine Deneuve thinks so. On Tuesday, the actress and 99 other notable French women from the arts, medicine and business published an open letter in Le Monde calling out what they dubbed a “puritanical” wave of resignations and a group-think—largely in the United States and Britain, since no heads have rolled in France—that they said infantilized women and denie
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Emperor penguins may shorten record fast by snacking Adults with chicks. Credit: Public Domain The endurance of emperor penguins, trudging through the perpetual Antarctic night to their breeding colonies, is legendary. Many trek more than 100 km from their ocean feeding grounds to rookeries at inland locations in preparation for mating; and the male partners often face a lengthy fast of more than 100 days while mating and incubating their eggs befo
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Emperor penguins may shorten record fast by snacking The endurance of emperor penguins, trudging through the perpetual Antarctic night to their breeding colonies, is legendary. Many trek more than 100 km from their ocean feeding grounds to rookeries at inland locations in preparation for mating; and the male partners often face a lengthy fast of more than 100 days while mating and incubating their eggs before embarking on the lengthy return journey
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Promise of new antibiotics lies with shackling tiny toxic tetherballs to bacteria In the SLAY method, each bacterium is genetically engineered to produce a molecule on its cell surface that is part peptide and part tether--like a playground tetherball. This arrangement allows the peptides to mimic free-floating drugs in the human body. Credit: Ashley Tucker Biologists at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a method for rapidly screening hundreds of thousands of po
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Missing link for solar hydrogen is... ammonia? Ammonia (NH3) actually packs in more hydrogen than hydrogen (H2), making it the ideal hydrogen carrier, says Australian solar fuels expert. Credit: Science Direct Ammonia (NH3) is key to enabling a solar hydrogen (H2) future, says a prominent Australian researcher. Solar energy could be stored, bottled and shipped globally in existing ammonia infrastructure as a zero carbon liquid fuel , accordin
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers demonstrate the existence of a new kind of magnetoresistance involving topological insulators The schematic figure illustrates the concept and behavior of magnetoresistance. The spins are generated in topological insulators. Those at the interface between ferromagnet and topological insulators interact with the ferromagnet and result in either high or low resistance of the device, depending on the relative directions of magnetization and spins. Credit: University of Minnesota From various
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Emperor Penguins: Good Dads, but Less Dedicated Than You May Have Thought Before they left, the researchers tagged four birds with satellite tags and “water switches” that allowed them to track how far the animals traveled and how often they entered the sea. The data confirmed that the penguins continued to take moonlight swims throughout the breeding season. The researchers believe the males ceased their hunting activity once the females laid their eggs. Photo A Cape
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Popular Science
CES 2018: All the cool new gadgets from day two Yesterday was press day at CES, but now the show floor is open and the gadgets are spilling out all over the place. Here’s a rundown of some of the coolest new stuff to debut. Samsung really, really wants you to use its virtual assistant, Bixby The Samsung press conference is always one of the biggest productions at CES. This year’s event was slightly dull compared to previous years. We got to se
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Illnesses caused by recreation on the water costs $2.9 billion annually in the US Swimming, paddling, boating and fishing account for more than 90 million cases of gastrointestinal, respiratory, ear, eye and skin-related illnesses per year in the U.S. with an estimated annual cost of $2.9 billion, according to a new report by University of Illinois at Chicago researchers. This is the first time the cost associated with waterborne illnesses contracted during recreational activi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bad air quality along Utah's Wasatch Front causes more than 200 pneumonia cases each yearF SALT LAKE CITY - Air pollution trapped by winter inversions along Utah's Wasatch Front, the state's most populated region, is estimated to send more than 200 people to the emergency room with pneumonia each year, according to a study by University of Utah Health and Intermountain Healthcare . Bad air quality especially erodes the health of adults over age 65, a population particularly vulnera
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Live Science
How High Doses of Ibuprofen May Impact Male Infertility Men who take relatively high doses of ibuprofen may be at increased risk for fertility problems, early research suggests. The small study, which was published yesterday (Jan. 8) in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that men who took 1,200 milligrams of ibuprofen a day for six weeks developed a hormonal condition that is linked with reproductive problems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New discovery could improve brain-like memory and computing IMAGE: The schematic figure illustrates the concept and behavior of magnetoresistance. The spins are generated in topological insulators. Those at the interface between ferromagnet and topological insulators interact with the ferromagnet... view more Credit: University of Minnesota MINNEAPOLIS / ST. PAUL (01/09/2018) -- From various magnetic tapes, floppy disks and computer hard disk drives,
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Winter road salt, fertilizers turning North American waterways increasingly saltier IMAGE: Uncovered salt piles near the NSF Baltimore Long-Term Ecological Research site. view more Credit: Sujay Kaushal Across North America, streams and rivers are becoming saltier, thanks to road deicers, fertilizers and other salty compounds that humans indirectly release into waterways. At the same time, freshwater supplies are becoming more alkaline or basic, the "opposite" of aci
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
3-D imaging of fat reveals potential targets for new obesity treatments Stunning three-dimensional images of fat cells, the first of their kind, are the latest tactic in the ongoing fight against the global obesity epidemic. The above movie, produced by The Rockefeller University's Laboratory of Molecular Metabolism, is part of a new report that reveals the inner workings of fat tissue in mice and identifies potential targets for new drugs to treat and prevent obesit
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Leading organizations in prenatal screening and diagnosis issue new consensus statement on genome se January 9, 2018, Washington DC - Prenatal screening and testing has changed dramatically since the 1970s. The introduction of ultrasound technology and the more recent completion of DNA sequencing of the human genome have led to tremendous advances in prenatal diagnosis. With the availability of genomic sequencing, much more detailed genetic information related to the fetus can now be uncovered.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Younger patients constitute half of hospital-acquired pneumonia cases, most of which originate outside of the ICU, study finds Arlington, VA, January 9, 2018 -- Hospital-acquired pneumonia has long been associated with the elderly and intensive care units (ICU). But according to a new multicenter nationwide study , nonventilator hospital-acquired pneumonia (NV-HAP) occurs across all units in all types and sizes of U.S. hospitals, putting every patient--the young included--at higher risk for developing the infection. The
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BBC News - Science & Environment
How North Carolina's alligators are surviving the cold snapThe reptiles employ a clever trick when the water they live in freezes over
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Live Science
This Humpback Whale Saved a Woman's Life, But Probably Not on Purpose Would you let a humpback whale beat you up to save your life? Marine biologist Nan Hauser did not realize she was answering this question last October when a giant, perhaps 50,000-pound (22,700 kilograms) humpback swam up to her in the waters off the Cook Islands, and began lifting her out of the ocean with its massive head. Over the tense 10 minutes that followed, Hauser swam calmly around
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New on MIT Technology Review
Baidu Sees Maps for Self-Driving Cars as Bigger Business Than Web Search Baidu, China’s largest search company, may one day have an even bigger business: making the detailed high-definition maps needed for autonomous cars to get around safely. The company believes that in the long term HD maps in China will be a “much bigger business” than Baidu’s search business is today, said Baidu’s chief operating officer, Qi Lu , speaking with a small group of reporters at the an
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Science : NPR
The Man In The Google Doodle: From Poor Villager To Nobel Prize Winner The Google Doodle for January 9, 2018 honors Har Gobind Khorana. Google hide caption toggle caption Google Tuesday's Google Doodle honors Har Gobind Khorana. He would have turned 96 on this day according to legal documentation, though nobody knows the exact date the Nobel Prize-winning scientist was born. Khorana was from a small village of roughly 100 in what is now Raipur, Pakistan, but was par
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New drug capsule may allow weekly HIV treatmentResearchers have developed a capsule that can deliver a week's worth of HIV drugs in a single dose. This advance could make it much easier for patients to adhere to the strict schedule of dosing required for the drug cocktails used to fight the virus, the researchers say.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
For city kids with asthma, telemedicine and in-school care cut ER visits in halfUrban children with asthma who received a combination of telemedicine support and school-based medication therapy were less than half as likely to need an emergency room or hospital visit for their asthma.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How quickly can children learn routes?New research suggests that children as young as eight can learn a route after only a single experience of it.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Smoke from wildfires can tip air quality to unhealthy levelsSmoke plumes emanating from wildfires are swept high up into the air and spread over thousands of kilometers even days after a fire has been put out. The fine particles and harmful ozone contained in these plumes often have devastating effects on the air quality of US cities and consequently the health of their inhabitants.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Medical tech designed to meet Africa's needs | Soyapi MumbaIn sub-Saharan Africa, power outages, low technology penetration, slow internet and understaffed hospitals plague health care systems. To make progress on these problems in Malwai, TED Fellow Soyapi Mumba and his team created a new system from scratch -- from the software that powers their electronic health records to the infrastructure used to support it. In this quick, hopeful talk, Mumba shares
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Planets around other stars are like peas in a podA study of 909 planets and 355 stars reveals that, unlike our solar system, other planetary systems are distinguished by strict regularity.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Black hole research could aid understanding of how small galaxies evolveScientists have solved a cosmic mystery by finding evidence that supermassive black holes prevent stars forming in some smaller galaxies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dual migration created genetic 'melting pot' of the first ScandinaviansNew genomic data suggest that the first human settlers on the Scandinavian peninsula followed two distinct migration routes. The study also indicates that the resulting mixed population genetically adapted to the extreme environmental conditions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New skin barrier product reduces costs for ostomy careOstomy patients using a new type of skin barrier product -- infused with ceramides that play an essential role in the normal barrier function of the skin--experience lower costs of care, according to a randomized trial.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Most patients with unknown spinal cord disease later given specific diagnosis, study showsA study found that most patients with suspected spinal cord inflammation of unknown cause have an alternative, specific diagnosis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rapid authentication method of Chinese medicinesScientists have developed a new method for rapid authentication of Chinese herbal medicines, including Ganoderma (known as Lingzhi in Chinese), and Gastrodiae Rhizoma (known as Tianma in Chinese).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Promise of new antibiotics lies with shackling tiny toxic tetherballs to bacteria Biologists at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a method for rapidly screening hundreds of thousands of potential drugs for fighting infections, an innovation that holds promise for combating the growing scourge of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The method involves engineering bacteria to produce and test molecules that are potentially toxic to themselves. A description of the meth
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Viden
Se lægerne hente en blodprop ud af hjernen på en patient 47-årige Søren er en ud af omkring 10.000 danskere, der hvert år bliver ramt af en blodprop i hjernen. En scanning viser, at det er en stor blodprop, som lægerne vil forsøge at fjerne ved hjælp af en ny slags behandling, en såkaldt trombektomi. Tidligere skulle man i behandling inden seks timer, men nye undersøgelser viser, at man har en øget chance for at overleve og med få mén, hvis man får beh
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Live Science
Working Human Mini Muscles Grown from Skin Cells in Scientific First Scientists have created tiny artificial human muscles that contract and respond to neural and electrical stimuli just like real muscles do, a new study reports. There's just one twist: The functioning muscle fibers were made from skin cells, not muscle cells. Previously, scientists have been able to make muscle cells from other types of cells; however, no one so far has managed to make func
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Big Think
Is Bitcoin Too Complex and Unproven for Amateur Day Traders to Handle? Everybody seems to be making money on bitcoin and other cryptocurrency, but not many people grasp how the underlying technology works. Does that matter? We will soon find out, now that Bitcoin has recently been added to the Chicago Board Options Exchange and The Chicago Mercantile Exchange to allow for futures trading. Every day brings new stories of investors pouring money into cryptocurre
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Scientific American Content: Global
Back to Black: How Birds-of-Paradise Get Their Midnight Feathers Many male birds-of-paradise are noted for their bright colors and iridescent feathers, but several species of these tropical marvels also sport superblack plumage. Now researchers have teased out the structural secrets behind these light-absorbing feathers, which rival even the deep velvety blackness of some man-made materials. Feathers, like most opaque objects, typically get their color one
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate change drives collapse in marine food websA new study has found that levels of commercial fish stocks could be harmed as rising sea temperatures affect their source of food.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In urban streams, pharmaceutical pollution is driving microbial resistanceIn urban streams, persistent pharmaceutical pollution can cause aquatic microbial communities to become resistant to drugs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic alteration can cause obesity among GreenlandersFour per cent of the Greenlandic population are, due to a specific genetic alteration, in the risk of developing obesity and diabetes, a new study concludes. The gene represent a possible treatment target, the researchers argue.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Evolution of Alpine landscape recorded by sedimentary rocksRock avalanches and torrents started to form V-shaped valleys in the Swiss Alps approximately 25 million years ago. This landscape contrasts to the flat and hilly scenery, which characterized the Alps a few millions of years before. Geologists applied digital technologies to unravel these changes in landscape evolution. They analyzed 30 to 25 million-year old lithified rivers in Central Switzerlan
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Prolonged periods of sedentary time strongly associated with amount of fat around internal organsResearchers have found new evidence to suggest that longer periods of sedentary time (defined as any sitting/reclining activity with low energy expenditure) are more strongly associated with the amount of fat deposited around internal organs.
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New on MIT Technology Review
A Field Guide to Deception Everybody is familiar with the sense of shock and betrayal at having been lied to. At the same time, people are familiar with the temptation to lie to benefit themselves. Many will have done so. And that raises an interesting question—given the chance to lie for their own benefit, which people will take the opportunity? What percentage always tell the truth regardless of how much is at stake? And
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New on MIT Technology Review
Combining IoT and Blockchain Toward New Levels of Trust Whether an organization is addressing a system view of IoT (connected things, gateways, network services, and cloud services or a business view (platform, connectivity, business model, and applications), security is paramount. Understand the benefits and constraints of Blockchain as a public, decentralized, and autonomous technology that can serve as a foundational element supporting IoT solution
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
FoxP3 scanning mutagenesis reveals functional variegation and mild mutations with atypical autoimmune phenotypes [Immunology and Inflammation] FoxP3 scanning mutagenesis reveals functional variegation and mild mutations with atypical autoimmune phenotypes Ho-Keun Kwon a , b , Hui-Min Chen a , b , Diane Mathis a , b , 1 , and Christophe Benoist a , b , 1 a Division of Immunology, Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women’s Hospital , Boston, MA 02115; b Evergrande Center for Immunologic Disea
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Designing a retrievable and scalable cell encapsulation device for potential treatment of type 1 diabetes [Medical Sciences] Designing a retrievable and scalable cell encapsulation device for potential treatment of type 1 diabetes Duo An a , Alan Chiu a , James A. Flanders b , Wei Song a , Dahua Shou c , Yen-Chun Lu a , Lars G. Grunnet d , Louise Winkel d , Camilla Ingvorsen d , Nicolaj Strøyer Christophersen d , Johannes Josef Fels e , Fredrik Wolfhagen Sand d , Yewei Ji f , Ling Qi f , Yehudah Pardo g , Dan Luo a , h
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Stand-alone ClpG disaggregase confers superior heat tolerance to bacteria [Microbiology] Stand-alone ClpG disaggregase confers superior heat tolerance to bacteria Changhan Lee a , 1 , Kamila B. Franke b , 2 , Shady Mansour Kamal a , c , 2 , Hyunhee Kim a , 1 , 2 , Heinrich Lünsdorf d , Jasmin Jäger b , Manfred Nimtz e , Janja Trček f , Lothar Jänsch e , Bernd Bukau b , Axel Mogk b , 3 , and Ute Römling a , 3 a Department of Microbiology, Tumor and Cell Biology, Karolinska Institutet
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Colorectal cancer specific conditions promote Streptococcus gallolyticus gut colonization [Microbiology] Colorectal cancer specific conditions promote Streptococcus gallolyticus gut colonization Laetitia Aymeric a , b , 1 , Françoise Donnadieu a , b , Céline Mulet a , b , Laurence du Merle c , d , Giulia Nigro a , b , Azadeh Saffarian a , b , Marion Bérard e , Claire Poyart f , g , Sylvie Robine h , Béatrice Regnault i , Patrick Trieu-Cuot c , d , Philippe J. Sansonetti a , b , j , 2 , 3 , and Shayn
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
ATM and ATR play complementary roles in the behavior of excitatory and inhibitory vesicle populations [Neuroscience] ATM and ATR play complementary roles in the behavior of excitatory and inhibitory vesicle populations Aifang Cheng a , b , Teng Zhao c , d , Kai-Hei Tse a , b , Hei-Man Chow a , b , e , Yong Cui f , Liwen Jiang f , Shengwang Du c , g , Michael M. T. Loy c , and Karl Herrup a , b , 1 a Division of Life Science, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology , Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kon
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cell-specific and region-specific transcriptomics in the multiple sclerosis model: Focus on astrocytes [Neuroscience] Cell-specific and region-specific transcriptomics in the multiple sclerosis model: Focus on astrocytes Noriko Itoh a , 1 , Yuichiro Itoh a , 1 , Alessia Tassoni a , 1 , Emily Ren a , Max Kaito a , Ai Ohno a , Yan Ao b , Vista Farkhondeh a , Hadley Johnsonbaugh a , Josh Burda b , Michael V. Sofroniew b , and Rhonda R. Voskuhl a , 2 a Department of Neurology, University of California, Los Angeles ,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Locus coeruleus input to hippocampal CA3 drives single-trial learning of a novel context [Neuroscience] Locus coeruleus input to hippocampal CA3 drives single-trial learning of a novel context Akiko Wagatsuma a , 1 , Teruhiro Okuyama a , Chen Sun a , Lillian M. Smith a , Kuniya Abe b , and Susumu Tonegawa a , c , d , 1 a RIKEN-MIT Center for Neural Circuit Genetics at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory, Department of Biology and Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, Massachusetts I
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Heat activation is intrinsic to the pore domain of TRPV1 [Physiology] Heat activation is intrinsic to the pore domain of TRPV1 Feng Zhang a , Andres Jara-Oseguera a , Tsg-Hui Chang a , Chanhyung Bae a , Sonya M. Hanson a , 1 , and Kenton J. Swartz a , 2 a Molecular Physiology and Biophysics Section, Porter Neuroscience Research Center, National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of Health , Bethesda, MD 20892 Edited by Ardem Patapou
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
ALKBH5-dependent m6A demethylation controls splicing and stability of long 3'-UTR mRNAs in male germ cells [Physiology] ALKBH5-dependent m6A demethylation controls splicing and stability of long 3′-UTR mRNAs in male germ cells Chong Tang a , 1 , Rachel Klukovich a , 1 , Hongying Peng a , Zhuqing Wang a , Tian Yu a , Ying Zhang a , Huili Zheng a , Arne Klungland b , c , and Wei Yan a , d , 2 a Department of Physiology and Cell Biology, University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine , Reno, NV 89557; b Department of
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
ZmCCT9 enhances maize adaptation to higher latitudes [Plant Biology] ZmCCT9 enhances maize adaptation to higher latitudes Cheng Huang a , Huayue Sun a , Dingyi Xu a , Qiuyue Chen a , Yameng Liang a , Xufeng Wang a , Guanghui Xu a , Jinge Tian a , Chenglong Wang a , Dan Li a , Lishuan Wu a , Xiaohong Yang a , Weiwei Jin a , John F. Doebley b , 1 , and Feng Tian a , 1 a National Maize Improvement Center of China, Beijing Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, L
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Singh et al., Increasing potential for intense tropical and subtropical thunderstorms under global warming [Corrections]EARTH, ATMOSPHERIC, AND PLANETARY SCIENCES Correction for “Increasing potential for intense tropical and subtropical thunderstorms under global warming,” by Martin S. Singh, Zhiming Kuang, Eric D. Maloney, Walter M. Hannah, and Brandon O. Wolding, which was first published October 16, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1707603114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:11657–11662). The authors...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Retraction for Jayandharan et al., Activation of the NF-{kappa}B pathway by adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors and its implications in immune response and gene therapy [Retractions]MEDICAL SCIENCES Retraction for “Activation of the NF-κB pathway by adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors and its implications in immune response and gene therapy,” by Giridhara R. Jayandharan, George Aslanidi, Ashley T. Martino, Stephan C. Jahn, George Q. Perrin, Roland W. Herzog, and Arun Srivastava, which was first published February 14,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS] In This Issue Whole-brain atlas of the mouse cholinergic system Horizontal view of 50 cholinergic neurons in basal forebrain reconstructed from whole-brain database. Image courtesy of Yefei Li (artist). The cholinergic system modulates neuronal activity tied to critical functions, including memory, learning, behavior, sensory processing, and sleep–wake cycles. Researchers have begun to pinpoint t
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Climate change and agricultural suicides in India [Social Sciences] Climate change and agricultural suicides in India Kamal Kumar Murari a , T. Jayaraman a , 1 , and Madhura Swaminathan b a Center for Climate Change and Sustainability Studies, School of Habitat Studies, Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai, Maharashtra 400088, India; b Economic Analysis Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, Bangalore 560059, India Carleton ( 1 ) claims that “temperature during
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Unfounded assumptions in linking crop-damaging temperature and suicide in India [Social Sciences] Unfounded assumptions in linking crop-damaging temperature and suicide in India Saudamini Das a , b , c , 1 a Institute of Economic Growth, Delhi 110007, India; b Department of Economic Analysis and Research, National Bank for Agriculture and Rural Development, Mumbai 400051, India; c Swami Shradhanand College, University of Delhi, Delhi 110036, India Carleton ( 1 ) established that high temperat
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Analyzing Indian farmer suicide rates [Social Sciences] Analyzing Indian farmer suicide rates Ian Plewis a , 1 a Emeritus Professor of Social Statistics, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL, United Kingdom Arguments about the causes of Indian farmer suicides have been widely aired in recent years, both in the media and in academic papers. It is plausible to suppose, as Carleton ( 1 ) does, that climate change has an indirect causal effect on
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Plewis, Murari et al., and Das: The suicide-temperature link in India and the evidence of an agricultural channel are robust [Social Sciences] Reply to Plewis, Murari et al., and Das: The suicide–temperature link in India and the evidence of an agricultural channel are robust Tamma A. Carleton a , b , 1 a Agricultural & Resource Economics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720; b Global Policy Lab, Goldman School of Public Policy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 In Carleton ( 1 ) I demonstrate that increases in growi
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Note on bias from averaging repeated measurements in heritability studies [Biological Sciences] Note on bias from averaging repeated measurements in heritability studies Benjamin B. Risk a , 1 and Hongtu Zhu b a Department of Biostatistics & Bioinformatics, Emory University , Atlanta, GA 30322; b Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center , Houston, TX 77030 Ge et al. ( 1 ) consider the extension of Fisher’s classic model for heritability to the case wher
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Risk and Zhu: Mixed-effects modeling as a principled approach to heritability analysis with repeat measurements [Biological Sciences] Reply to Risk and Zhu: Mixed-effects modeling as a principled approach to heritability analysis with repeat measurements Tian Ge a , b , c , 1 , Avram J. Holmes a , d , e , Randy L. Buckner a , e , f , g , Jordan W. Smoller b , c , and Mert R. Sabuncu a , h , i a Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School , Charlestown, MA 02129; b
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Fraternal birth order effect on sexual orientation explained [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences] Fraternal birth order effect on sexual orientation explained Twenty years ago, Ray Blanchard and Anthony Bogaert demonstrated that the probability of a boy growing up to be gay increases for each older brother born to the same mother, the so-called fraternal birth order (FBO) effect. Their first investigation indicated that each older brother increased the probability of being gay by about 33% (
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Replication fork convergence at termination: A multistep process [Cell Biology] Replication fork convergence at termination: A multistep process Nina Y. Yao a and Mike E. O’Donnell a , b , 1 a Laboratory of DNA Replication, The Rockefeller University , New York, NY 10065; b HHMI , New York, NY 10065 Termination of replication occurs when two forks converge, an important but understudied process. In PNAS, a report from the Courcelle group examines replication termination usin
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Interplay of structure, elasticity, and dynamics in actin-based nematic materials [Applied Physical Sciences] Interplay of structure, elasticity, and dynamics in actin-based nematic materials Rui Zhang a , 1 , Nitin Kumar b , c , 1 , Jennifer L. Ross d , Margaret L. Gardel b , c , e , 2 , and Juan J. de Pablo a , f , 2 a Institute for Molecular Engineering, The University of Chicago , Chicago, IL 60637; b James Franck Institute, The University of Chicago , Chicago, IL 60637; c Department of Physics, The
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Interfacial curvature effects on the monolayer morphology and dynamics of a clinical lung surfactant [Engineering] Interfacial curvature effects on the monolayer morphology and dynamics of a clinical lung surfactant Amit Kumar Sachan a and Joseph A. Zasadzinski a , 1 a Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota , Minneapolis, MN 55455 Edited by Steven G. Boxer, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, and approved December 4, 2017 (received for review September 8, 2017) Signif
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Quantitative historical analysis uncovers a single dimension of complexity that structures global variation in human social organization [Anthropology] Author contributions: P.T., T.E.C., H.W., P.F., and K.F. designed research; P.T., T.E.C., H.W., P.F., K.F., D.M., D.H., C. Collins, S.G., G.M.-G., E.T., A.D., E.C., J.R., J.L., G.J., E. Brandl, A.W., R.C., M.K., A. Ceccarelli, J.F.-R., P.P., and A.P. performed research; P.T., T.E.C., and P.S. analyzed data; D.M., D.H., C. Collins, S.G., and G.M.-G. participated in the conceptual development of da
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural basis for the regulation of {beta}-glucuronidase expression by human gut Enterobacteriaceae [Biochemistry] Structural basis for the regulation of β-glucuronidase expression by human gut Enterobacteriaceae Michael S. Little a , Samuel J. Pellock a , William G. Walton a , Ashutosh Tripathy b , and Matthew R. Redinbo a , b , c , d , 1 a Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill , NC 27599-3290; b Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Caroli
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural and molecular basis of mismatch correction and ribavirin excision from coronavirus RNA [Biochemistry] Structural and molecular basis of mismatch correction and ribavirin excision from coronavirus RNA François Ferron a , 1 , Lorenzo Subissi a , 1 , Ana Theresa Silveira De Morais a , 1 , Nhung Thi Tuyet Le a , Marion Sevajol a , Laure Gluais a , Etienne Decroly a , Clemens Vonrhein b , Gérard Bricogne b , Bruno Canard a , 2 , and Isabelle Imbert a , 2 , 3 a Centre National de la Recherche Scientifi
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Protonation state of glutamate 73 regulates the formation of a specific dimeric association of mVDAC1 [Biochemistry] Protonation state of glutamate 73 regulates the formation of a specific dimeric association of mVDAC1 Lucie A. Bergdoll a , 1 , Michael T. Lerch b , c , 1 , John W. Patrick d , Kendrick Belardo a , Christian Altenbach b , c , Paola Bisignano e , Arthur Laganowsky d , Michael Grabe e , Wayne L. Hubbell b , c , 2 , and Jeff Abramson a , f , 2 a Department of Physiology, David Geffen School of Medic
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Genome-wide CRISPR screen for PARKIN regulators reveals transcriptional repression as a determinant of mitophagy [Cell Biology] Genome-wide CRISPR screen for PARKIN regulators reveals transcriptional repression as a determinant of mitophagy Christoph Potting a , Christophe Crochemore a , Francesca Moretti a , Florian Nigsch a , Isabel Schmidt a , Carole Manneville a , Walter Carbone a , Judith Knehr a , Rowena DeJesus b , Alicia Lindeman b , Rob Maher b , Carsten Russ b , Gregory McAllister b , John S. Reece-Hoyes b , Gre
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
RSK2 drives cell motility by serine phosphorylation of LARG and activation of Rho GTPases [Cell Biology] RSK2 drives cell motility by serine phosphorylation of LARG and activation of Rho GTPases Geng-Xian Shi a , Won Seok Yang a , Ling Jin a , Michelle L. Matter a , and Joe W. Ramos a , 1 a Cancer Biology Program, University of Hawaii Cancer Center, University of Hawaii at Mānoa , Honolulu, HI 96813 Edited by Melanie H. Cobb, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, and approved
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Neuronal delivery of Hedgehog directs spatial patterning of taste organ regeneration [Cell Biology] Neuronal delivery of Hedgehog directs spatial patterning of taste organ regeneration Wan-Jin Lu a , b , 1 , Randall K. Mann a , Allison Nguyen a , Tingting Bi a , Max Silverstein a , Jean Y. Tang c , Xiaoke Chen d , and Philip A. Beachy a , b , e , f , 1 a Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine , Stanford, CA 94305; b Department of Bioche
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Listeria monocytogenes triggers noncanonical autophagy upon phagocytosis, but avoids subsequent growth-restricting xenophagy [Cell Biology] Listeria monocytogenes triggers noncanonical autophagy upon phagocytosis, but avoids subsequent growth-restricting xenophagy Gabriel Mitchell a , Mandy I. Cheng a , Chen Chen a , Brittney N. Nguyen b , Aaron T. Whiteley c , 1 , Sara Kianian a , Jeffery S. Cox a , Douglas R. Green d , Kent L. McDonald e , and Daniel A. Portnoy a , f , 2 a Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Cal
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Hybrid speciation leads to novel male secondary sexual ornamentation of an Amazonian bird [Evolution] Hybrid speciation leads to novel male secondary sexual ornamentation of an Amazonian bird Alfredo O. Barrera-Guzmán a , 1 , Alexandre Aleixo b , Matthew D. Shawkey c , and Jason T. Weir a , d , 1 a Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto , Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 3B2; b Department of Zoology, Museu Paráense Emílio Goeldi , Belém, Pará, 66040-170 Brazil; c Department
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Multiple origins of interdependent endosymbiotic complexes in a genus of cicadas [Evolution] Multiple origins of interdependent endosymbiotic complexes in a genus of cicadas Piotr Łukasik a , 1 , Katherine Nazario b , James T. Van Leuven a , Matthew A. Campbell a , Mariah Meyer a , Anna Michalik c , Pablo Pessacq d , Chris Simon b , Claudio Veloso e , and John P. McCutcheon a , 1 a Division of Biological Sciences, University of Montana , Missoula, MT 59812 ; b Department of Ecology and E
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Ancient polymorphisms and divergence hitchhiking contribute to genomic islands of divergence within a poplar species complex [Evolution] Ancient polymorphisms and divergence hitchhiking contribute to genomic islands of divergence within a poplar species complex Tao Ma a , 1 , Kun Wang a , 1 , Quanjun Hu a , 1 , Zhenxiang Xi a , 1 , Dongshi Wan b , Qian Wang a , Jianju Feng b , Dechun Jiang b , Hamid Ahani c , Richard J. Abbott d , Martin Lascoux e , Eviatar Nevo f , 2 , and Jianquan Liu a , 2 a Key Laboratory of Bio-Resource and E
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Histone demethylase LSD1 regulates hematopoietic stem cells homeostasis and protects from death by endotoxic shock [Immunology and Inflammation] Histone demethylase LSD1 regulates hematopoietic stem cells homeostasis and protects from death by endotoxic shock Jianxun Wang a , b , 1 , Kaoru Saijo c , 1 , Dylan Skola d , Chunyu Jin b , e , Qi Ma b , e , Daria Merkurjev b , e , Christopher K. Glass d , 1 , and Michael G. Rosenfeld b , e , 1 a School of Life Sciences, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, Beijing, China 100029; b Department
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Two types of aggression in human evolution [Anthropology] Two types of aggression in human evolution Richard W. Wrangham a , 1 a Department of Human Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University , Cambridge, MA 02138 Edited by Kristen Hawkes, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT, and approved November 20, 2017 (received for review August 7, 2017) Abstract Two major types of aggression, proactive and reactive, are associated with contrasting expression, eli
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Inactivation of porcine interleukin-1{beta} results in failure of rapid conceptus elongation [Agricultural Sciences] Inactivation of porcine interleukin-1β results in failure of rapid conceptus elongation Jeffrey J. Whyte a , Ashley E. Meyer a , Lee D. Spate a , Joshua A. Benne a , Raissa Cecil a , Melissa S. Samuel a , Clifton N. Murphy a , Randall S. Prather a , and Rodney D. Geisert a , 1 a Division of Animal Sciences, University of Missouri , Columbia, MO 65211 Edited by R. Michael Roberts, University of Mi
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Inner Workings: Fishing for artifacts beneath the waves [Anthropology] Inner Workings: Fishing for artifacts beneath the waves Fisherman Mike Anderson has accidentally hauled up all manner of oddities in his fishing gear—bits of pottery, lumps of coal, even a silver spoon. But he’d never seen anything like the heavy, jagged block pulled up by his scallop dredge as he cruised near the New England coast in the spring of 2013. When researchers analyzed a sediment core
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
A mixed-scale dense convolutional neural network for image analysis [Applied Mathematics] A mixed-scale dense convolutional neural network for image analysis Daniël M. Pelt a and James A. Sethian a , b , 1 a Center for Applied Mathematics for Energy Research Applications, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720; b Department of Mathematics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 Contributed by James A. Sethian, November 3, 2017 (sent for review September 11, 20
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Platelet integrins exhibit anisotropic mechanosensing and harness piconewton forces to mediate platelet aggregation [Applied Physical Sciences] Platelet integrins exhibit anisotropic mechanosensing and harness piconewton forces to mediate platelet aggregation Yun Zhang a , 1 , Yongzhi Qiu b , c , d , 1 , Aaron T. Blanchard b , Yuan Chang a , Josh M. Brockman b , Victor Pui-Yan Ma a , Wilbur A. Lam b , c , d , e , 2 , and Khalid Salaita a , b , d , 2 a Department of Chemistry, Emory University , Atlanta, GA 30322; b Wallace H. Coulter Dep
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Atmospheric escape from the TRAPPIST-1 planets and implications for habitability [Astronomy] Atmospheric escape from the TRAPPIST-1 planets and implications for habitability Chuanfei Dong a , b , 1 , Meng Jin c , Manasvi Lingam d , e , Vladimir S. Airapetian f , Yingjuan Ma g , and Bart van der Holst h a Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University , Princeton, NJ 08544; b Princeton Center for Heliophysics, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University , Princet
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
LAMOST telescope reveals that Neptunian cousins of hot Jupiters are mostly single offspring of stars that are rich in heavy elements [Astronomy] LAMOST telescope reveals that Neptunian cousins of hot Jupiters are mostly single offspring of stars that are rich in heavy elements Subo Dong a , 1 , 2 , Ji-Wei Xie b , c , 1 , 2 , Ji-Lin Zhou b , c , Zheng Zheng d , and Ali Luo e a Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China; b School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structure of the human monomeric NEET protein MiNT and its role in regulating iron and reactive oxygen species in cancer cells [Biochemistry] Structure of the human monomeric NEET protein MiNT and its role in regulating iron and reactive oxygen species in cancer cells Colin H. Lipper a , Ola Karmi b , Yang Sung Sohn b , Merav Darash-Yahana b , Heiko Lammert c , d , e , f , Luhua Song g , Amy Liu g , Ron Mittler g , Rachel Nechushtai b , José N. Onuchic c , d , e , f , 1 , and Patricia A. Jennings a , 1 a Department of Chemistry and Bio
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
High-resolution structure of podovirus tail adaptor suggests repositioning of an octad motif that mediates the sequential tail assembly [Biochemistry] High-resolution structure of podovirus tail adaptor suggests repositioning of an octad motif that mediates the sequential tail assembly Lingfei Liang a , Haiyan Zhao a , Bowen An a , and Liang Tang a , 1 a Department of Molecular Biosciences, University of Kansas , Lawrence, KS 66045 Edited by Michael G. Rossmann, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, and approved November 29, 2017 (received for
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural basis of the phosphorylation-independent recognition of cyclin D1 by the SCFFBXO31 ubiquitin ligase [Biochemistry] Structural basis of the phosphorylation-independent recognition of cyclin D1 by the SCF FBXO31 ubiquitin ligase Yunfeng Li a , Kai Jin a , Eric Bunker b , Xiaojuan Zhang b , Xuemei Luo c , Xuedong Liu b , and Bing Hao a , 1 a Department of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, University of Connecticut Health Center , Farmington, CT 06030; b Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Col
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
A growing microcolony can survive and support persistent propagation of virulent phages [Biophysics and Computational Biology] A growing microcolony can survive and support persistent propagation of virulent phages Rasmus Skytte Eriksen a , Sine L. Svenningsen b , 1 , Kim Sneppen a , and Namiko Mitarai a , 1 a Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen , DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark; b Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen , DK-2200 Copenhagen, Denmark Edited by Bruce R. Levin, Emory University, Atlanta, GA,
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Visualizing long-term single-molecule dynamics in vivo by stochastic protein labeling [Biophysics and Computational Biology] Visualizing long-term single-molecule dynamics in vivo by stochastic protein labeling Hui Liu a , Peng Dong a , Maria S. Ioannou a , Li Li a , Jamien Shea a , H. Amalia Pasolli a , Jonathan B. Grimm a , Patricia K. Rivlin a , Luke D. Lavis a , Minoru Koyama a , and Zhe Liu a , 1 a Janelia Research Campus , Howard Hughes Medical Institute , Ashburn, VA 20147 Edited by Taekjip Ha, Johns Hopkins Uni
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
SbcC-SbcD and ExoI process convergent forks to complete chromosome replication [Cell Biology] SbcC-SbcD and ExoI process convergent forks to complete chromosome replication Brian M. Wendel a , 1 , Jessica M. Cole a , Charmain T. Courcelle a , and Justin Courcelle a a Department of Biology, Portland State University , Portland, OR 97201 Edited by Philip C. Hanawalt, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, and approved November 10, 2017 (received for review September 10, 2017) Significance SbcC-
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
CO2 reduction to acetate in mixtures of ultrasmall (Cu)n,(Ag)m bimetallic nanoparticles [Chemistry] CO 2 reduction to acetate in mixtures of ultrasmall (Cu) n ,(Ag) m bimetallic nanoparticles Ying Wang a , Degao Wang a , Christopher J. Dares b , Seth L. Marquard a , Matthew V. Sheridan a , and Thomas J. Meyer a , 1 a Department of Chemistry, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Chapel Hill, NC 27599; b Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida International University , Mia
19h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Low-lying excited states in crystalline perylene [Chemistry] Low-lying excited states in crystalline perylene Tonatiuh Rangel a , b , 1 , Andre Rinn c , 1 , Sahar Sharifzadeh d , e , Felipe H. da Jornada b , f , André Pick c , Steven G. Louie b , f , Gregor Witte c , Leeor Kronik g , 2 , Jeffrey B. Neaton a , b , h , 2 , and Sangam Chatterjee c , i , 2 a Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory , Berkeley, CA 94720; b Department of Physics,

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