EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Print a 200-million-year-old dinosaur fossil in your own homeThe digital reconstruction of the skull of a 200-million-year-old South African dinosaur, Massospondylus, has made it possible for researchers to make 3-D prints and in this way facilitate research on other dinosaurs all over the world.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Finnish firm detects new Intel security flawA new security flaw has been found in Intel hardware which could enable hackers to access corporate laptops remotely, Finnish cybersecurity specialist F-Secure said on Friday.
12h
Ingeniøren
Justitsminister afviser at forbyde masseovervågningJustitsministeren finder det for vigtigt, at politiet har adgang til oplysninger om danskernes færden og telefonsamtaler, til at han vil ændre de danske logningsregler, som er i strid med EU-retten. Han venter i stedet på fælles EU-retningslinjer.
10h

LATEST

Science : NPR
Scientists Say A Fluctuating Jet Stream May Be Causing Extreme Weather EventsA new study says unusual patterns of the polar jet stream circling the Northern Hemisphere may have led to dramatic weather in Europe and North America. (Image credit: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images)
now
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Newborn immune activation may have long-term negative impact on brain functionNeuroscientists have found that even a brief episode of immune system activation within days of birth can cause persistent changes in sleep patterns concurrent with increases in epilepsy-like brain activity -- a combination of symptoms common in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental conditions.
7min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New antifungal provides hope in fight against superbugsMicroscopic yeast have been wreaking havoc in hospitals around the world -- creeping into catheters, ventilator tubes, and IV lines -- and causing deadly invasive infection. One culprit species, Candida auris, is resistant to many antifungals, meaning once a person is infected, there are limited treatment options. But researchers have now confirmed a new drug compound kills drug-resistant C. auris
21min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quantum leap: Computational approach launches new paradigm in electronic structure theoryA group of researchers specializing in quantum calculations has proposed a radically new computational approach to solving the complex many-particle Schrödinger equation, which holds the key to explaining the motion of electrons in atoms and molecules.
21min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can early symptoms predict bipolar disorder? Evidence shows differing patterns of risk factorsTwo patterns of antecedent or 'prodromal' psychiatric symptoms may help to identify young persons at increased risk of developing bipolar disorder (BD), according to a new analysis in the Harvard Review of Psychiatry. The journal is published by Wolters Kluwer.
26min
Scientific American Content: Global
Looming Landslide Stokes Fears, May Help Disaster PredictionsRattlesnake Ridge is collapsing in Washington State. As residents hurry to safety, scientists try to figure out which way rocks will fall -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
28min
Latest Headlines | Science News
Trio of dead stars upholds a key part of Einstein’s theory of gravityA cosmic test fails to topple the strong equivalence principle.
32min
Live Science
'Alien' Shark with Goblin-Like Jaws Hauled Up from the Deep SeaImagine this fearsome sight: an ink-black shark with gnarly, needle-like teeth; creepy, glass-like eyes; a glowing belly and a potentially extendable jaw. That's what scientists saw when they pulled up this rare creature, along with four of its pals.
46min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Localized cooling of the heart limits damage caused by a heart attackResearchers have succeeded in the localized cooling of the heart during a heart attack, a world first. By cooling part of the heart prior to and following angioplasty, the cardiologists believe that the damage from a heart attack can be limited.
50min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Species identification in the water bottleEnvironmental DNA analysis makes it possible to detect water organisms without having to capture them first. For the first time, researchers systematically investigated the effect of various environmental factors on environmental DNA analyses. By doing so, the researchers have made an important step towards the standardized application of this method for the monitoring of water bodies.
50min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technology will create brain wiring diagramsScientists have developed new technology that allows them to see which neurons are talking to which other neurons in live fruit flies.
50min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Black hole spin cranks-up radio volumeStatistical analysis of supermassive black holes suggests that the spin of the black hole may play a role in the generation of powerful high-speed jets blasting radio waves. By analyzing nearly 8000 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, research team found that the oxygen emissions are 1.5 times stronger in radio loud quasars than in radio quiet quasars. This implies that spin is an important
50min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Emotionally demanding workload and confrontational patients key stressors for GPsThe emotional impact of their daily workload and confrontational patients are among the key stressors for family doctors in England, reveals an analysis of feedback from general practitioners.
50min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fast-moving electrons create current in organic solar cellsResearchers at Purdue University have identified the mechanism that allows organic solar cells to create a charge, solving a longstanding puzzle in physics, according to a paper published Friday (Jan. 12) in the journal Science Advances.
51min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
With headbands, sensor socks, wearable tech seeks medical inroadsWant to manage your stress? A "neurofeedback" headband could help. Need to be sure your elderly father is taking his medication? Attach a sensor to his sock.
57min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stingray-inspired soft biobotUCLA bioengineering professor Ali Khademhosseini has led the development of a tissue-based soft robot that mimics the biomechanics of a stingray. The new technology could lead to advances in bio-inspired robotics, regenerative medicine and medical diagnostics.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Don't let skiing and snowboarding injuries take you downhillSkiing and snowboarding are fun winter sports. As the popularity of these winter sports continue to rise, according to a review article published in the Jan. 1, 2018, issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons, the number of skier and snowboarder injuries also continues to rise.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penn-led team uncovers the physiology behind the hour-long mating call of midshipman fishA new study led by University of Pennsylvania researchers provides an explanation for how Pacific midshipman fish can generate a mating call that emits continuously from their bodies for a full hour, entailing 360,000 muscle contractions.
1h
Big Think
This Ancient Mnemonic Technique Builds a Palace of MemoryImagined memory palaces are still used by memory champions and the few who practice the memory arts, but they are best known from Greco-Roman times. Read More
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New model for uncovering true HIV mortality rates in ZambiaA new study that seeks to better ascertain HIV mortality rates in Zambia could provide a model for improved national and regional surveillance approaches, and ultimately, more effective HIV treatment strategies.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanostructure boosts stability of organic thin-film transistorsA nanostructured gate dielectric may have addressed the most significant obstacle to expanding the use of organic semiconductors for thin-film transistors. The structure, composed of a fluoropolymer layer followed by a nanolaminate made from two metal oxide materials, serves as gate dielectric and protects the organic semiconductor - which had previously been vulnerable to damage from the ambient
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Surprising discovery could lead to better batteriesScientists have observed the concentration of lithium inside individual nanoparticles reverse at a certain point, instead of constantly increasing. This discovery is a major step toward improving the battery life of consumer electronics.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Past exposures shape immune response in pediatric acute respiratory infectionsBy analyzing immune cells of children who came to the emergency department with flu symptoms, researchers found that the suite of genes these early-response cells expressed was shaped by factors such as age and previous exposures to viruses. Better understanding how early infections influence long-term immune response has implications for the diagnosis and treatment of young patients who suffer fr
1h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: If We Ever Get to Mars, the Beer Might Not Be BadCollege students at Villanova University found that hops, leafy greens, carrots and scallions all could grow in an approximation of Martian dirt.
1h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: The Swiss Consider the Lobster. It Feels Pain, They Decide.The Swiss government has banned tossing lobsters and other crustaceans into boiling water. But what’s the science behind that decision?
1h
NYT > Science
Q&A: Eyes in the SkiesInstead of sending probes to faraway planets, why not hitch them to comets?
1h
Feed: All Latest
Clashes Over the Future of Gene Therapy and Crispr at the US's Biggest Biotech MeetingAfter 30 years in the making, gene therapy is finally an FDA-approved reality. What comes next—and how will Crispr get a slice of the action?
1h
New on MIT Technology Review
A New Map of the “Darknet” Suggests Your Local Drug Pusher Now Works OnlineThe first-ever global map of the online drug trade shows it’s not that different from the offline one.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stingray soft robot could lead to bio-inspired roboticsUCLA bioengineering professor Ali Khademhosseini has led the development of a tissue-based soft robot that mimics the biomechanics of a stingray. The new technology could lead to advances in bio-inspired robotics, regenerative medicine and medical diagnostics.
1h
The Atlantic
'People Who Are Different Are Not the Problem in America'Donald TrumpThis year, Martin Luther King Jr. Day carries additional significance, as it marks the 50th anniversary of his tragic death. In April of 1968, King was killed in Memphis, Tennessee, at the hands of a ruthless murderer who was filled with hate and racism. One of the reasons we, as Americans and citizens around the world, remember King’s legacy is his call to freedom and racial unity through love a
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New method to map miniature brain circuitsIn a feat of nanoengineering, scientists have developed a new technique to map electrical circuits in the brain far more comprehensively than ever before. Scientists worldwide could use the technique to uncover the architecture of different parts of the brain.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Print a 200-million-year-old dinosaur 'fossil' in your own homeThe digital reconstruction of the skull of a 200-million-year-old South African dinosaur, Massospondylus, has made it possible for researchers to make 3-D prints and in this way facilitate research on other dinosaurs all over the world.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can Muesli help against arthritis?It is well known that healthy eating increases our general sense of wellbeing. Researchers have now discovered that a fiber-rich diet can have a positive influence on chronic inflammatory joint diseases, leading to stronger bones.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic analysis can improve depression therapyThe failure of SSRI antidepressants can be a result of genetic variations in patients. Variations within the gene that encodes the CYP2C19 enzyme results in extreme differences in the levels of escitalopram achieved in patients, according to a new study. Prescribing the dose of escitalopram based on a patient's specific genetic constitution would greatly improve therapeutic outcomes.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Thinking outside the box on climate mitigationA new article lays the groundwork for alternative climate mitigation scenarios that place less reliance on unproven negative emissions technologies in the future.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The combination of two proteins exerts a regenerating effect in Parkinson's diseaseCurrent therapies for Parkinson's disease are mainly of a replacement type and pose problems in the long term, so the challenge is to establish an early diagnosis and develop neuroprotective and neurorestorative therapies that will allow the symptoms of the disease to be slowed down or even reversed. Researcher have now documented the regenerative, neuroprotective effect of two neurotrophic factor
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Expert unlocks mechanics of how snakes move in a straight lineBiologists are studying the mechanics of snake movement to understand exactly how they can propel themselves forward like a train through a tunnel.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Does an exploding brain network cause chronic pain?New research reports that hyperreactive brain networks could play a part in the hypersensitivity of fibromyalgia.
1h
Live Science
Why Scientists Just Created the Creepiest Robot Baby You'll Ever SeeThis dirt-dispersing robot-baby torso will crawl out of the lab and into your nightmares.
1h
Live Science
Don't Eat Laundry Pods: Why the 'Tide Pod Challenge' Is So DangerousTeens are deliberately eating laundry pods as part of a new online fad called the Tide Pod Challenge.
1h
Science : NPR
Southern California Hillsides Remain Vulnerable After Deadly MudslidesDeadly mudslides occured in Santa Barbara County, Calif., after heavy rain pushed debris down fire-scarred hillsides. If it rains again, more debris could be swept down the mountains. (Image credit: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
2h
The Atlantic
Photos of the Week: Snowy Sahara, Dancing Devils, Cryptocurrency J-PopThe Singapore Zoo shows off its babies, a church emerges from a drying reservoir in Spain, a different church is torn down for a coal mine in Germany, ice blankets in the U.S., fog drifts in the U.K., Saudi Arabia opens its first automotive showroom solely dedicated to women, and much more.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Surprising discovery could lead to better batteriesA collaboration led by scientists at Brookhaven has observed the concentration of lithium inside individual nanoparticles reverse at a certain point, instead of constantly increasing. This discovery is a major step toward improving the battery life of consumer electronics
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers offer new model for uncovering true HIV mortality rates in ZambiaA new study that seeks to better ascertain HIV mortality rates in Zambia could provide a model for improved national and regional surveillance approaches, and ultimately, more effective HIV treatment strategies.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanostructure boosts stability of organic thin-film transistorsA nanostructured gate dielectric may have addressed the most significant obstacle to expanding the use of organic semiconductors for thin-film transistors. The structure, composed of a fluoropolymer layer followed by a nanolaminate made from two metal oxide materials, serves as gate dielectric and protects the organic semiconductor - which had previously been vulnerable to damage from the ambient
2h
Live Science
Even Chemists Are Baffled by This GIF of a Droplet Spiraling to Its DoomWhy does this drop of liquid look like a spinning galaxy? It's complicated.
2h
Popular Science
A six pack won’t make you a better runner, but these deep core exercises mightHealth Your deep core muscles aren't visible, but they could prevent chronic back pain. Runners who have weaker deep core muscles could be more likely to experience chronic back pain than runners with stronger ones.
2h
Science | The Guardian
Great Barrier Reef tourism spokesman attacks scientist over slump in visitorsCol McKenzie calls on government to stop funding work of Terry Hughes, saying tourists ‘won’t do long-haul trips when they think the reef is dead’ A Queensland tourism representative has called one of the Great Barrier Reef’s leading researchers “a dick”, blaming the professor for a downturn in tourism growth at the state’s greatest natural asset. Col McKenzie, the head of the Association of Mari
2h
The Scientist RSS
Researchers Develop a Technique to Regenerate the Mouse ThymusThe discovery reveals the role of a growth factor and endothelial cells in thymus repair, and could have implications for chemotherapy and radiation patients' recovery following treatment.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanostructure boosts stability of organic thin-film transistorsA nanostructured gate dielectric may have addressed the most significant obstacle to expanding the use of organic semiconductors for thin-film transistors. The structure, composed of a fluoropolymer layer followed by a nanolaminate made from two metal oxide materials, serves as gate dielectric and simultaneously protects the organic semiconductor - which had previously been vulnerable to damage fr
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Past exposures shape immune response in pediatric acute respiratory infectionsBy analyzing immune cells of children who came to the emergency department with flu symptoms, researchers found that the suite of genes these early-response cells expressed was shaped by factors such as age and previous exposures to viruses. Better understanding how early infections influence long-term immune response has implications for the diagnosis and treatment of young patients who suffer fr
2h
The Atlantic
What It Took to Save a North Korean Defector's LifeSEOUL, South Korea—In late November, a 24-year-old North Korean soldier dashed across the demilitarized zone separating North from South Korea. He barely escaped with his life as his former comrades opened fire at his back. The medical team at Ajou University Trauma Center in Suwon, about 20 miles south of Seoul, had no idea who he was when less than 25 minutes later, a military helicopter bearin
2h
The Atlantic
A Foreboding Similarity in Today’s Oceans and a 94-Million-Year-Old CatastropheThe ocean is losing its oxygen. Last week, in a sweeping analysis in the journal Science , scientists put it starkly: Over the past 50 years, the volume of the ocean with no oxygen at all has quadrupled, while oxygen-deprived swaths of the open seas have expanded by the size of the European Union. The culprits are familiar: global warming and pollution. Warmer seawater both holds less oxygen and
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scarring molecule in fat tissue links obesity with distressed fatThe fat of obese people becomes distressed, scarred and inflamed, which can make weight loss more difficult.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scleroderma study: Hope for a longer life for patients with rare autoimmune disorderThe approach could represent the first new treatment to improve survival in patients with severe scleroderma in more than four decades.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New warning system discovered in the immune defenseResearchers have discovered a previously unknown warning system that contributes to the body's immune system. Mitochondria in the white blood cells secrete a web of DNA fibers that raises the alarm. The results may lead to increased knowledge about autoinflammatory diseases and cancer.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Q&A: What Facebook's shift could mean to users, businessesFacebook Mark ZuckerbergIn coming days, Facebook users will see fewer posts from publishers, businesses and celebs they follow. Instead, Facebook wants people to see more stuff from friends, family and other people they are likely to have "meaningful" conversations with—something the company laments has been lost in the sea of videos, news stories (real and fake), and viral quizzes on which "Big Bang Theory" character yo
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
Gene Therapy Could Make Cancer Care More Unequal, and This Map Shows WhyRevolutionary new cancer treatments won’t be available in many rural areas of the U.S.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Virgin Galactic conducts 7th glide test of spacecraftVirgin Galactic says the latest glide test of its space tourism rocket plane was a success, nearly reaching the speed of sound high over California.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A look at Facebook's changes over the years in what you seeFacebook Mark ZuckerbergFacebook is once again tweaking what you see to focus more on personal connections and take the spotlight off brands and news articles.
3h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Pollution is endangering the future of astronomyAstronomers discuss multiple threats from pollution that will make it harder to observe the night sky.
3h
Science | The Guardian
Having one’s royal cake and eating it | Brief lettersMeghan Markle handshake | Apple’s tax payment | No bull | Tabloid Guardian | Philip Hammond | Rude place names Meghan Markle visits a community radio station and meets staff on a magazine collective, in response to their invitation. She provides both with masses of invaluable publicity and, it appears, generates a great deal of pleasure. But, oh dear me, the magazine’s deputy editor, Charlie Brink
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tropical Cyclone Joyce makes landfall on Australia's Pilbara CoastNOAA's JPSS-1 satellite provided a visible image of the tropical storm after it made landfall along the Pilbara Coast in the northwestern part of Western Australia.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A society divided by reconstructionIn 2004, a tsunami devastated much of the Indonesian city of Banda Aceh. An international team of researchers has studied the long-term impact that rebuilding efforts in coastal areas have had on the community.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research shows importance of second pediatric blood-pressure screeningNearly one-quarter of children and teens who had their blood pressure screened at a primary care appointment showed a reading in the hypertensive range, but less than half of those readings could be confirmed after the blood pressure was repeated, according to a new Kaiser Permanente study released today in The Journal of Clinical Hypertension. The research shows the importance of taking a second
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New antifungal provides hope in fight against superbugsMicroscopic yeast have been wreaking havoc in hospitals around the world -- creeping into catheters, ventilator tubes, and IV lines -- and causing deadly invasive infection. One culprit species, Candida auris, is resistant to many antifungals, meaning once a person is infected, there are limited treatment options. But in a recent Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy study, researchers confirmed a
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers explain how snakes can crawl in a straight lineSnakes are known for their iconic S-shaped movements. But they have a less noticeable skill that gives them a unique superpower.
3h
Feed: All Latest
Meltdown and Spectre Patches Have Caused Serious Performance IssuesTwo of the worst vulnerabilities in years are slowly being fixed—but at a cost to consumers and companies alike.
3h
Popular Science
Five rad and random things I found this weekGadgets The end-of-week dispatch from PopSci's commerce editor. Vol. 33. Throughout the week I spend hours scouring the web for things that are ingenious or clever or ridiculously cheap. Below, gadgets that are awesome, rad, and random.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tropical Cyclone Joyce makes landfall on Australia's Pilbara CoastNOAA's JPSS-1 satellite provided a visible image of the tropical storm after it made landfall along the Pilbara Coast in the northwestern part of Western Australia.
4h
Science | The Guardian
Workplaces 'should cater for menopause as they do for pregnancy'Exclusive: A new study shows that a simple set of CBT exercises can help with symptoms, yet many workplaces have no policies in place to support women Workplaces should start catering for the menopause in a comparable way to pregnancy, according to one of Britain’s leading women’s health experts. Myra Hunter, emeritus professor of clinical health psychology at King’s College London said that meno
4h
Science : NPR
VIDEO: Take A Trip Through The Orion Nebula, A Baby Star NurseryThe constellation Orion is home to a busy, glowing nebula. Data from telescopes has been used to create a three-minute, three-dimensional tour around its colorful caverns and bright star clusters. (Image credit: NASA)
4h
Live Science
Why Do Hurricanes Have Eyes? Scientists Still Don't Really KnowA new paper offers the most complete model yet of how a hurricane gets its eye.
4h
Viden
Skype-samtaler bliver snart privateBåde lydsamtaler og beskeder mellem to personer er på vej til at blive totalt krypteret - hvis du aktiverer det.
4h
New on MIT Technology Review
Why Canada Looks like the Next Bitcoin-Mining Haven
4h
Live Science
You Have the Flu. Should You Go to the Doctor, or Wait It Out?When you have the flu, one choice looms large in front of your feverish eyes: Should you drag your aching body out in the cold to go to the doctor or hospital, or should you just wrap yourself in blankets, drink fluids and stay put?
4h
The Atlantic
Brain Cells Share Information Using a Gene that Came From VirusesHundreds of millions of years ago, at a time when back-boned animals were just starting to crawl onto land, one such creature became infected by a virus. It was a retrovirus, capable of smuggling its genes into the DNA of its host. And as sometimes happens, those genes stayed put. They were passed on to the animal’s children and grandchildren. And as these viral genes cascaded through the generat
4h
NYT > Science
War’s Other Victims: AnimalsOver decades, armed conflict has reduced animal populations in Africa more than any other factor, according to new research.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New method to map miniature brain circuitsIn a feat of nanoengineering, scientists have developed a new technique to map electrical circuits in the brain far more comprehensively than ever before. Scientists worldwide could use the technique to uncover the architecture of different parts of the brain.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does an exploding brain network cause chronic pain?New research reports that hyperreactive brain networks could play a part in the hypersensitivity of fibromyalgia.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer's gene-determined 'immune landscape' dictates progression of prostate tumorsThe field of immunotherapy -- the harnessing of patients' own immune systems to fend off cancer -- is revolutionizing cancer treatment today. However, clinical trials often show marked improvements in only small subsets of patients, suggesting that as-yet unidentified variations among tumors result in distinct paths of disease progression and response to therapy.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The combination of two proteins exerts a regenerating effect in Parkinson's diseaseCurrent therapies for Parkinson's disease are mainly of a replacement type and pose problems in the long term, so the challenge is to establish an early diagnosis and develop neuroprotective and neurorestorative therapies that will allow the symptoms of the disease to be slowed down or even reversed. As part of her PhD thesis, Catalina Requejo, documented the regenerative, neuroprotective effect o
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
What to Expect from Cryptocurrency in 2018You've heard of Bitcoin and possibly some others, but the major competitors, including central banks, have not even entered the market yet -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
New on MIT Technology Review
This Is What Your Dashboard of the Future Looks Like
4h
The Atlantic
Animals Have Culture, TooIn this episode of Animalism featuring The Atlantic science writer Ed Yong , we investigate fascinating examples of culture in the animal kingdom, including the bizarre traditions of Capuchin monkeys in Costa Rica, the long-held fashion trends of bottlenose dolphins in Australia’s Shark Bay, and the incredible "Top 20" music charts of humpback whales, which have a structure that strongly resemble
4h
Blog » Languages » English
Everest vs. Mariana Trench: Results!Whoa, that’s like… deep, man. The winning team this week is Team Mariana Trench! Congratulations to all on a battle well fought, and enjoy your bonuses! Leaderboard: Artwork by Zoe Gillette
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New warning system discovered in the immune defenseResearchers at Linköping University in Sweden have discovered a previously unknown warning system that contributes to the body's immune system. Mitochondria in the white blood cells secrete a web of DNA fibers that raises the alarm. The results have been published in the scientific journal PNAS, and may lead to increased knowledge about autoinflammatory diseases and cancer.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum leap: computational approach launches new paradigm in electronic structure theoryA group of Michigan State University researchers specializing in quantum calculations has proposed a radically new computational approach to solving the complex many-particle Schrödinger equation, which holds the key to explaining the motion of electrons in atoms and molecules.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Expert unlocks mechanics of how snakes move in a straight lineUniversity of Cincinnati biologist Bruce Jayne studied the mechanics of snake movement to understand exactly how they can propel themselves forward like a train through a tunnel. His study titled 'Crawling without Wiggling' was published in the Journal of Experimental Biology.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scleroderma study: Hope for a longer life for patients with rare autoimmune disorderThe approach could represent the first new treatment to improve survival in patients with severe scleroderma in more than four decades.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pitt study suggests risk management approach to combat EMS fatigueExtended shift work has historically been linked to interrupted sleep patterns and risk of injury, and is a persistent problem for emergency medical services (EMS) personnel who are tasked with delivering acute care under significant pressure. New guidelines, written by a team led by University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine scientists aim to mitigate the effects of fatigue by addressing the imp
5h
Popular Science
Scientists are making carbon fiber from plants instead of petroleumNexus Media News Cheaper, plant-based carbon fiber could be used to make lighter cars that consume less fuel. Scientists say it may soon be possible to make carbon fiber from plants instead of petroleum, driving down costs, making the material more widely available for use in…
5h
Viden
Facebook vil blande sig i dit sociale liv: Det kan du forventeFacebook vil af med de passive 'scrollere' og få dig til at kommunikere mere med dine nærmeste.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can muesli help against arthritis?It is well known that healthy eating increases our general sense of wellbeing. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered that a fiber-rich diet can have a positive influence on chronic inflammatory joint diseases, leading to stronger bones.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How climate change alters plant growthGlobal warming affects more than just plant biodiversity -- it even alters the way plants grow. A team of researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) joined forces with the Leibniz Institute for Plant Biochemistry (IPB) to discover which molecular processes are involved in plant growth. In the current edition of the internationally renowned journal "Current Biology", the group p
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researcher discovers commonalities in brains of people with HD and PDA new study strongly suggests that the brains of people who have died of Huntington's disease (HD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) show a similar response to a lifetime of neurodegeneration, despite being two very distinct diseases.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New epidemiological study finds no connection between cases of cancer and use of plant protection products containing glyphosateBfR Communication No. 036/2017 from 22 December 2017Epidemiological studies are a central element of public discussion in the debate surrounding the carcinogenic potential of glyphosate. A publication that appeared in the USA in November examined whether there is a possible connection between the use of glyphosate containing plant protection products and cases of cancer among people who work in ag
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Map of ionospheric disturbances to help improve radio network systemsThe paper, titled "Collocated ionosonde and dense GPS/GLONASS network measurements of midlatitude MSTIDs", covers the first ever complex analysis of MSTIDs obtained by two methods of radio sounding. MSTIDs, which are huge wave perturbations somewhat resembling aurora borealis, are invisible in midlatitude areas.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New therapeutic approach for advanced lung diseaseResearchers have demonstrated the potential of a new class of drugs for the treatment of refractory chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, i.e. COPD. Incurable to date, the disease is one of the most frequent causes of death worldwide and is typically triggered by smoking. In the current preclinical study, two anti-inflammatory substances have proved more effective than preparations used to date.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The negative impact of climate change on freshwater bodiesA lot of research is being conducted into the acidification of the world's oceans. A recent study has proved that freshwater bodies are likewise affected. Rising carbon dioxide levels could upset the balance of species.
5h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
How to put the power of law in people's hands | Vivek MaruWhat can you do when the wheels of justice don't turn fast enough? Or when they don't turn at all? Vivek Maru is working to transform the relationship between people and law, turning law from an abstraction or threat into something that everyone can understand, use and shape. Instead of relying solely on lawyers, Maru started a global network of community paralegals, or barefoot lawyers, who serve
5h
New on MIT Technology Review
AI Could Diagnose Your Heart Attack on the Phone—Even If You’re Not the Caller
5h
Feed: All Latest
Gadget Lab Podcast: The Smart Home Is Here. Are We Ready?This week on the show, we talk about the proliferation of smart home tech. Recorded live at CES.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scarring molecule in fat tissue links obesity with distressed fatThe fat of obese people becomes distressed, scarred and inflamed, which can make weight loss more difficult, research at the University of Exeter has found.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How far to the nearest city? Global map of travel time to cities publishedThe Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, provided expert input on the mapping of urban accessibility worldwide to support global and local decision-making on development and environmental policies.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic analysis can improve depression therapyThe failure of SSRI antidepressants can be a result of genetic variations in patients. Variations within the gene that encodes the CYP2C19 enzyme results in extreme differences in the levels of escitalopram achieved in patients, according to a new study from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and Diakonhjemmet Hospital in Norway published in The American Journal of Psychiatry. Prescribing the dose of
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A society divided by reconstructionIn 2004, a tsunami devastated much of the Indonesian city of Banda Aceh. An international team of researchers has studied the long-term impact that rebuilding efforts in coastal areas have had on the community.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Jet stream changes since 1960s linked to more extreme weatherIncreased fluctuations in the path of the North Atlantic jet stream since the 1960s coincide with more extreme weather events in Europe such as heat waves, wildfires and flooding. The new research is the first reconstruction of historical changes in the North Atlantic jet stream prior to the 20th century. By using tree rings, the researchers developed a historical look at the position of the North
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Anxiety: An early indicator of Alzheimer's disease?A new study suggests an association between elevated amyloid beta levels and the worsening of anxiety symptoms. The findings support the hypothesis that neuropsychiatric symptoms could represent the early manifestation of Alzheimer's disease in older adults.
5h
Science : NPR
Science Says That To Fight Ignorance, We Must Start By Admitting Our OwnThe best way to defend everything we really do know, according to science, is to begin by admitting our own ignorance — to ask "What don't you know?" says astrophysicist Adam Frank. (Image credit: robuart/Getty Images/iStockphoto)
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New on MIT Technology Review
Y Combinator Will Give You $1 Million to Try to Cure Aging
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
India's TCS signs 'largest deal' worth $2 billionIndia's largest IT services company Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) on Friday announced bagging its biggest new deal valued over $2 billion from a US-based insurance company, a day after reporting a slide in its quarterly earnings.
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Futurity.org
Rebuilding after tsunami helped segregate Banda AcehIn 2004, a tsunami devastated much of the Indonesian city of Banda Aceh. New research identifies an unfortunate result of the reconstruction: lower-income residents are now disproportionately exposed to coastal hazards. The massive tsunami leveled nearly half of the city and killed an estimated 160,000 people across the province. Countless others lost their families, homes, and everything they ow
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Futurity.org
This enzyme could be a drug target for Huntington’sResearchers have identified a new drug target for treating Huntington’s disease, a fatal neurological disorder for which there currently is no cure or preventative therapy. Huntington’s is an inherited disorder caused by a defect in a single gene, which causes mutant proteins to aggregate in cells. The disease triggers the progressive breakdown of nerve cells in the brain, producing severe physic
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Futurity.org
To tally seniors in poverty, go beyond incomeMore older Americans live in deprivation than official US statistics suggest, according to research in a new book. In her research, Shatakshee Dhongde, associate professor at Georgia Institute of Technology, found that 12.27 percent of senior citizens were deprived in two or more crucial areas, including multiple disabilities, low income, a lack of education, and severe housing burden. “The main
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Glucose-induced nerve damage: Research identifies underlying mechanismsNew research has demonstrated that an enzyme she had previously identified as playing a role in peripheral neuropathy induced by cancer chemotherapy also plays a role in peripheral neuropathy caused by diabetes. The significance of the identification of a common molecular mechanism is that the drug candidates she identified to treat chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy could potentially be u
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Asthma costs the US economy more than $80 billion per yearAsthma costs the US economy more than $80 billion annually in medical expenses, missed work and school days and deaths, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
White graphene makes ceramics multifunctionalBilayer white graphene combined with a ceramic creates a multifunctional material with high strength and toughness, according to new research. The material may be suitable for construction and refractory materials and applications in the nuclear industry, oil and gas, aerospace and other areas that require high-performance composites.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Urban insects are more resilient in extreme weatherA new study will help researchers understand how to make predictions and conservation decisions about how organisms living in cities will respond to catastrophic weather events.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A major step forward in organic electronicsResearchers have developed the world's first complementary electrochemical logic circuits that can function stably for long periods in water. This is a highly significant breakthrough in the development of bioelectronics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate impacts of deforestationDeforestation is likely to warm the climate even more than originally thought, scientists warn. Research has found reactive gases emitted by trees and vegetation have an overall cooling effect on our climate, meaning deforestation would lead to higher temperatures than previously anticipated as less of the gases would be created.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stem cell-rich cord blood donations could increase by 'nudging' parents, study suggestsA two-year study of expectant mothers in Milan, Italy, has found that cord blood donations increased significantly when parents received information about the procedure and 'prompts' to indicate their interest in donating at both early and late stages of their pregnancies.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New biomarkers for colorectal cancerResearchers have found a new biomarker for colorectal cancer (CRC) that might improve therapy and survival rates of patients. Biomarkers are measurable biological indicators for a specific disease, such as changes in the amounts of certain proteins that occur in combination with certain illnesses. Such biomarkers help physicians to diagnose a condition, identify the disease stage, and determine a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cell biology: Positioning the cleavage furrowResearchers have identified a signaling pathway that restricts cleavage furrow formation to the mid-plane of the cell.
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Big Think
NASA Discovers Clean-Water Ice Just Below Mars' SurfaceMars Ice WaterThe thick sheets of ice at these eight sites could provide the reservoir of water necessary for human expeditions to Mars. Read More
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Species identification in the water bottleEnvironmental DNA analysis makes it possible to detect water organisms without having to capture them first. For the first time, a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) systematically investigated the effect of various environmental factors on environmental DNA analyses. By doing so, the researchers have made an important step towards the standardized application of this method for the
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Thinking outside the box on climate mitigationA new article lays the groundwork for alternative climate mitigation scenarios that place less reliance on unproven negative emissions technologies in the future.
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Ingeniøren
Her er Siemens-toget, der skal køre på Københavns letbaneAvenio-togene, som passagererne i Københavns forstæder kan sætte sig til rette i i 2024, samles i Wien og kører blandt andet i Siemens' hjemby München og i en hybridudgave i Qatar.
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Ingeniøren
Københavns nye letbanetog er en videreudvikling af gammel kendingModsat Aarhus og Odense har København valgt tog fra Siemens til at køre på den kommende letbane i forstæderne. Siemens-togene kører bl.a. i München.
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NYT > Science
Inside the Global Relay Race to Deliver Moly-99The isotope is a cancer-detecting necessity, but is decays within days and isn’t made in North America. A company is rushing to build a plant in Wisconsin to change that.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Re-programming innate immune cells to fight tuberculosisTuberculosis (TB), an infectious disease which attacks the lungs, claims someone's life every 20 seconds and 1.5 million lives worldwide every year. A cure has eluded scientists for more than a century but, now, researchers may have discovered a new weapon to combat this global killer. The team is re-programing - or 'training' - immune cells to kill TB.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanotube fibers in a jiffyScientists are making short carbon nanotube fibers by hand as a way to quickly test materials before spinning industrial quantities of fiber for aerospace, automotive, medical and smart-clothing applications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cycling does not damage men's sexual or urinary functionsCycling is increasingly popular for transportation, exercise, and leisure, and its impact on sexual health has received a great deal of media attention, especially regarding erectile function. Researchers have now found that contrary to some previous studies, neither recreational nor intense cycling appear to have a negative impact on men's sexual and urinary function.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Do less harm: E-cigarettes a safer option than smoking, experts sayA new article focuses on harm minimization and smoking cessation, with alternative nicotine products like e-cigarettes emerging as a promising avenue for people who want to quit smoking.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists make cells that enable the sense of touchResearchers have, for the first time, coaxed human stem cells to become sensory interneurons -- the cells that give us our sense of touch. The new protocol could be a step toward stem cell-based therapies to restore sensation in paralyzed people who have lost feeling in parts of their body.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Surprise: A virus-like protein is important for cognition and memoryA protein pivotal to how the brain acquires knowledge originated from a chance evolutionary event that occurred hundreds of millions of years ago. The protein, called Arc, is involved in storing long-term memories and learning. But new research shows that Arc looks and acts like a protein from viruses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Developing a secure, un-hackable quantum networkA method of securely communicating between multiple quantum devices has been developed by a team of scientists, bringing forward the reality of a large-scale, un-hackable quantum network.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Students more engaged and attentive following outdoor lesson in natureA study has found that children are significantly more attentive and engaged with their schoolwork following an outdoor lesson in nature. Teachers could teach uninterrupted for almost twice as long during a subsequent indoor lesson. Outdoor lessons may be an inexpensive and convenient way to improve student engagement.
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Dagens Medicin
Lægeforeningens formand: Underskriftindsamling sender alvorligt signalStyrelsen for Patientsikkerhed bør lytte til lægernes protester og ændre adfærd, mener Lægeforeningens formand Andreas Rudkjøbing.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Augmented reality 'sandbox' shows how gravity worksAt the University of Iowa, you can see how gravity works by playing in the sand.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Russian scientists found excitons in nickel oxide for the first time'We first found excitons with charge transfer at the boundary of fundamental adsorption in nickel oxide and at the impurity adsorption edge in magnesium oxide. These results may be of interest to specialists in theoretical physics who study the band structure of oxides with strong correlations. NiO has been considered as prototype of such oxides for a long time, and many calculation schemes have b
6h
New on MIT Technology Review
NASA Is Worried About the Safety of Commercial Space Launches
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Scientific American Content: Global
Protected Wildlife Is a Major Casualty In War-Torn Areas of AfricaDuring war, rates of ivory poaching go up and animal reproduction declines -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Experts raise concerns over raw meat diets for cats and dogsExperts are warning dog and cat owners to be aware of the risks associated with feeding their pets raw meat-based diets, instead of the more conventional dry or canned pet foods.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Archeology of our Milky Way's ancient hubA new analysis of about 10,000 normal Sun-like stars in the Milky Way's bulge reveals that our galaxy’s hub is a dynamic environment of variously aged stars zipping around at different speeds.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Risk of non-infectious elephantiasis mapped in CameroonBoth the etiology and demographics of podoconiosis, a non-infectious disease which causes massive swelling of the legs, are poorly understood. To help contribute to the global atlas of podoconiosis knowledge, researchers have now described the distribution of podoconiosis in Cameroon.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Human protein may aid neuron invasion by virus that causes hand, foot, and mouth diseaseA human protein known as prohibitin may play a significant role in infection of the nervous system by EV71, one of several viruses that can cause hand, foot, and mouth disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Different strains of same bacteria trigger widely varying immune responsesGenetic differences between different strains of the same pathogenic bacterial species appear to result in widely varying immune system responses, according to new research.
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Popular Science
We asked for your best photos of frozen soap bubbles—and wow, did you deliverDIY PopSci readers made their own DIY ice orbs When temperatures plunge, there's only one thing to do: Try a Popular Science DIY project that lets you freeze soap bubbles into gorgeous ice.
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Popular Science
Even as we use more gadgets, American energy consumption is droppingGadgets More appliances? No problem. Although we're tied to more gadgets than ever, these appliances are growing so efficient that per-capita power use dropped 7 percent between 2010 and 2016.
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Ingeniøren
Dansk professor: Videnskabelig artikel risikerer at blive til grinRussiske forskere mener, at naturlige sandstensformationer er opstået på måder, der er helt sammenlignelige med mekaniske optimeringsmetoder. Det er rent vrøvl, siger Ole Sigmund fra DTU.
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Live Science
'Raw' Diet for Pets Not As Healthy As You Might ThinkA "raw" diet for pets carries risks of their exposure to parasites and bacteria.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Sahara snowThe Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission has captured rare snowfall in northwest Algeria, on the edge of the Sahara desert.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Black hole spin cranks-up radio volumeStatistical analysis of supermassive black holes suggests that the spin of the black hole may play a role in the generation of powerful high-speed jets blasting radio waves. By analyzing nearly 8000 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, research team found that the oxygen emissions are 1.5 times stronger in radio loud quasars than in radio quiet quasars. This implies that spin is an important
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Newborn immune activation may have long-term negative impact on brain functionMcLean neuroscientists have found that even a brief episode of immune system activation within days of birth can cause persistent changes in sleep patterns concurrent with increases in epilepsy-like brain activity -- a combination of symptoms common in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental conditions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Maintaining canola oil qualityCanola and other edible oils are easily affected by light irradiation or heat treatment. Since such processes deteriorate the oil quality such as flavor or taste, understanding this process, called oxidation, is imperative to identify effective measures to control the oil quality such as the best way to package or store oil.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Frequent growth events and fast growth rates of fine aerosol particles in BeijingSecondary aerosol formation and rapid increases in aerosol particle sizes are believed to play important roles in haze formation. However, some simple but important questions remain unanswered, such as: How frequently and how fast do fine aerosol particles grow? And what affects their rates of growth?
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Older adult-friendly emergency department staff help reduce hospital admissionsWhen older adults arrive at a hospital's emergency department, they may face unexpected challenges. To address these challenges, geriatrics experts have developed special programs such as the "Geriatric Emergency Department Innovations in Care through Workforce, Informatics, and Structural Enhancements" (GEDI WISE) program.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can writing your 'to-do's' help you to doze? Study suggests jotting down tasks canWriting a 'to-do' list at bedtime may aid in falling asleep, according to a new study. Research compared sleep patterns of participants who took five minutes to write down upcoming duties versus participants who chronicled completed activities.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Facebook Promises to Build a “More Meaningful” News FeedFacebook Mark Zuckerberg
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cognitive science
Cognitive Test Prep Strategies For SAT/ACTsubmitted by /u/MorpheusLearning [link] [comments]
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Accelerating light beams in curved spaceBy shining a laser along the inside shell of an incandescent light bulb, physicists have performed the first experimental demonstration of an accelerating light beam in curved space. Rather than moving along a geodesic trajectory (the shortest path on a curved surface), the accelerating beam bends away from the geodesic trajectory as a result of its acceleration.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study says community involvement may entice consumers to shop in-storeIncreased pressure from large online retailers is reducing brick-and-mortar retailers' sales and profits, causing numerous store closings on both local and national levels. But community engagement may be an answer for local retailers.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technology will create brain wiring diagramsScientists from Caltech have developed a technology that allows them to see which neurons are talking to which other neurons in live fruit flies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Celluloid Ceiling study finds women still largely underrepresented in HollywoodThe thriving #MeToo movement together with "Time's Up," a legal defense fund designed to help women combat sexual discrimination and harassment, underscore the struggle of women to succeed in male-dominated workplaces – including Hollywood.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lanternfish reveal how ocean warming impacts the twilight zoneA new study from the British Antarctic Survey shows how lanternfish, small bioluminescent fish, are likely to respond to the warming of the Southern Ocean.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Secretin protein with a crownBacteria are consummate survivalists. They are aided in this by their ability to assimilate DNA from their surroundings, which allows them to constantly acquire new characteristics. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Biophysics and Goethe University in Frankfurt have now gained new insights into exactly how bacteria import DNA.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Meet Africa's bird master of vocal imitationSinging a duet in a foreign language isn't just for opera stars—red-capped robin-chats do it too. These orange-brown birds with grey wings can imitate the sounds of 40 other bird species, even other species' high-speed duets.
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The Atlantic
The State of the Food Industry Is RottenIf Netflix’s Chef’s Table is a delectable exercise in the art of haute cuisine food porn , Rotten , its newest docuseries, is more of an appetite suppressant. Over six episodes, the show tackles a variety of afflictions blighting the food industry, from a glut of diluted Chinese honey undercutting American beekeepers to mafiosi-like power grabs in New England fisheries. Rotten ’s scope is wide, a
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Tech Companies Are Complicit in Censoring Iran ProtestsOpinion: Google, Twitter, and Signal should take steps to ensure their tools aren’t restricting Iranian’s free speech.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Ancient Moth WingsThe 200-million-year-old fossils, the earliest found of lepidopterans, show characteristics of extant moths.
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The Scientist RSS
Secret Eugenics Conference Uncovered at University College LondonThe university says it is launching an investigation into the meeting, which was held by one of its senior lecturers.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Thirsty cityWith water usage and droughts across the globe rising, the race is on to manage water more efficiently.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
How green are the Tories?Theresa May's environment policy pledge is the latest step in the party's journey on the issue.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research scientists discover new production pathway for plant SOS signalsWhen harmful insects attack a plant, it defends itself. It forms protective substances that are poisonous for the insects. This defense response is activated by messengers, jasmonates. Their biosynthesis had been deemed to have been elucidated for almost two decades. But now plant physiologists from the University of Hohenheim in Stuttgart and the National Center for Biotechnology (CNB-CSIC) in Ma
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why do we need to know about prime numbers with millions of digits?Prime numbers are more than just numbers that can only be divided by themselves and one. They are a mathematical mystery, the secrets of which mathematicians have been trying to uncover ever since Euclid proved that they have no end.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is the cosmic colossus RCS2J2327 heavier than allowed?An international team of scientists led by researchers from the Argelander Institute for Astronomy has mapped the mass distribution in a distant galaxy cluster (RCS2J2327). This cosmic colossus is located in the constellation Pisces at a distance of approximately 6.4 billion light years. According to current research results it consists of about 85 percent invisible dark matter.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
CT-scan study makes it possible to 3-D print the skull of the dinosaur species massospondylusThe digital reconstruction of the skull of a 200-million-year-old South African dinosaur, Massospondylus, has made it possible for researchers to make 3-D prints and in this way facilitate research on other dinosaurs all over the world.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New dams in Africa could add risk to power supplies down the lineIn the 1980s and 1990s parts of Africa saw a surge in dam building for energy production. After a brief hiatus there has been renewed interested. Many new construction projects are planned and underway across sub-Saharan Africa.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
MDI Biological Laboratory discovery could lead to new therapies for diabeticsNew research by MDI Biological Laboratory scientist Sandra Rieger, Ph.D., has demonstrated that an enzyme she had previously identified as playing a role in peripheral neuropathy induced by cancer chemotherapy also plays a role in peripheral neuropathy caused by diabetes. The significance of the identification of a common molecular mechanism is that the drug candidates she identified to treat chem
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Citizen science bags five-planet haulAstronomy enthusiasts help to confirm the existence of a five-planet system orbiting a far-off star.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Schools can't tackle child literacy levels alone—it takes a villageThe recently released NAPLAN 2017 results and findings from the latest Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) have got Australia talking again about how our children are faring when it comes to literacy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nature article turns theory of stellar evolution upside-downThis week, Nature published an article that could challenge the theory of stellar evolution.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GM seeks US approval for car with no steering wheelGM Cruise AVGeneral Motors is seeking approval from US regulators for an autonomous vehicle with no steering wheel or pedals, the automaker announced Friday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discovery of a new source of world's deadliest toxinResearchers from the Quadram Institute have identified genes encoding a previously undiscovered version of the botulinum neurotoxin in bacteria from a cow's gut.
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Futurity.org
How certain quantum dots shine so brightlyResearchers have found an explanation for why a certain class of quantum dots shines with such incredibly bright colors. The nanocrystals in question contain caesium lead halide compounds arranged in a perovskite lattice structure. Three years ago, Maksym Kovalenko, a professor at ETH Zurich and the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (Empa), succeeded in creating nano
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New nanotweezers able to move sub-micrometer size objects in fluidsTwo researchers with the Indian Institute of Science have developed tiny tweezers that can manipulate objects in fluids as small as an individual bacterium. In their paper published in the journal Science Robotics, Souvik Ghosh and Ambarish Ghosh describe their nanotweezers and how well they work.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
E-learning will not erode African knowledgeWhen people discuss the challenges related to e-learning (the use of electronic technology to facilitate learning), they tend to focus on access. This can mean access to financial resources to buy equipment as well as geographical constraints: some regions are simply too remote and underdeveloped to be properly connected to the internet – or even the electricity grid – which are of course both cru
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Collaboration between scientists and stakeholders vital to climate readiness in AlaskaAs a U.S. state, Alaska is unique not only for its massive size but also for its reserves of natural resources and its land management. Over 60 percent of the state is federally owned, and the majority of the remainder is either state land, university land or owned by Alaska Native corporations.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why thawing permafrost mattersIn Bethel, Alaska, walls are splitting, houses are collapsing, and the main road looks like a kiddy rollercoaster. In the coastal town of Kongiganak, sinking cemeteries prevent Alaskans from burying their dead in the ground. The village of Shishmaref, located on an island five miles from the western Alaska mainland, has eroded so much that it is contemplating total relocation. These communities ar
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Popular Science
Here's why your body stores more fat in certain placesFat Month We’re talkin’ bout sex (hormones), baby. We’re a little obsessed with moving fat around. And no, we’re not talking about stealing bags of liposuction fat to make soap.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum speed limit may put brakes on quantum computersOver the past five decades, standard computer processors have gotten increasingly faster. In recent years, however, the limits to that technology have become clear: Chip components can only get so small, and be packed only so closely together, before they overlap or short-circuit. If companies are to continue building ever-faster computers, something will need to change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Black hole spin cranks-up radio volumeStatistical analysis of supermassive black holes suggests that the spin of the black hole may play a role in the generation of powerful high-speed jets blasting radio waves and other radiation across the universe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fuel aerosols reducing pollution of the environmentA resource-efficient technology for the production of fuel aerosols has been developed at Tomsk Polytechnic University. The development can be used to quickly ignite the boilers of thermal power plants and boiler houses, in the combustion chambers of diesel generators, as well as in internal combustion engines of cars. TPU technology will contribute to the cost-effective use of fuels and the reduc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New smart sensor to help farmers spot lameness in sheepA new smart wearable device that can automatically detect lameness in sheep is being developed by veterinary researchers at the University of Nottingham and industry partners Intel and Farm Wizard.
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Viden
Ingen panik: Sikkerhedshuller i næsten alle computere er snart lappetIT-ekspert opdagede et alvorligt sikkerhedshul i millioner af computere. Men han opfordrer til, at man ikke går i panik.
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Live Science
Huge Glaciers Found Hiding Beneath Mars SurfaceThe newfound sheets are buried by just a few feet of Martian dirt in some places, meaning it might be accessible to future crewed missions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How scientists are monitoring whale health by using drones to collect their blowMacquarie University researchers have led the design and construction of a new system that can be fitted to a custom-built, waterproof drone in order to sample whale microbiota – the combination of natural bacterial colonies that live in an organism – by flying over and collecting the exhaled vapours from their blowholes. The collaborative research project, which involved an array of experts inclu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Invasive worms spreading in Arboretum forests, limited effects so farWhen researchers found invasive Asian jumping worms at the University of Wisconsin–Madison Arboretum in 2013, they spotted an opportunity to follow the invaders, and their effects, from the beginning.
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Please Do Not Assault the Towering Robot That Roams WalmartAt over six feet tall, Bossa Nova navigates the aisles of Walmart on its own, blasting shelves with light and snapping photos.
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Science-Based Medicine
Legionnaires’ Disease: The Other Disneyland OutbreakAs 2017 came to a close, Disneyland again played a role in the outbreak of an infectious disease, this one much more deadly than measles.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Ancient Moth WingThe 200-million-year-old fossils, the earliest found of lepidopterans, show characteristics of extant moths.
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The Scientist RSS
Amid Criticism, University of Rochester President Steps DownAcademics had expressed disapproval with the college's handling of sexual harassment allegations made against a brain sciences professor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New exotic phenomena seen in photonic crystalsTopological effects, such as those found in crystals whose surfaces conduct electricity while their bulk does not, have been an exciting topic of physics research in recent years and were the subject of the 2016 Nobel Prize in physics. Now, a team of researchers at MIT and elsewhere has found novel topological phenomena in a different class of systems—open systems, where energy or material can ent
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GeoCarb—a new view of carbon over the AmericasA new NASA Earth science mission in the early stages of design may achieve a transformational advance in our understanding of the global carbon cycle by mapping concentrations of key carbon gases from a new vantage point: geostationary orbit. Satellites in geostationary orbit travel at the same speed as Earth's rotation, allowing them to remain over the same place on Earth's surface at all times.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shark biologist teams up with aerospace engineer to discover behaviors of oceanic whitetipsOceanic whitetip sharks move with extreme efficiency, exploiting physics to maximize their energy surplus for both hunting and downtime.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The nanoscopic structure that locks up our genesFor decades, scientists could only speculate about the shape of heterochromatin, a type of chromatin that consists of tightly packed DNA and proteins. Recently, however, researchers from the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology, Graduate University (OIST) and Waseda University have been able to define its structure thanks to new, high-contrast imaging in cryo-electron microscopy. Their work
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research opening for atomically thin metal nanostructuresResearchers at the Nanoscience Center at the University of Jyväskylä, Finland, have made a new opening in nanomaterial research. Opening's essence resides in the exclusive use of metallic elements in flat, atomically thin nanostructures.
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The Atlantic
The Commuter Is a Train Worth CatchingFor years now, there’s been a particular genre of action cinema that has consistently lured moviegoers to the box office—films in which Liam Neeson has “ a very particular set of skills .” Starting with Taken in 2008, Neeson began a second life as a gritty hero, someone with a talent for violence and a long, but explosive, fuse. Within this genre is an even more exciting sub-genre: films in which
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Live Science
Why Women Have the Survival Advantage in Times of CrisisWomen have a longer life expectancy than men do under normal circumstances, and now a new study from Denmark and Germany reveals that women also outlive men even in the worst of times.
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Live Science
Serena Williams' Blood Clot After Childbirth: How Does It Happen?Tennis star Serena Williams has revealed that she experienced potentially life-threatening blood clots after giving birth to her daughter last year.
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Live Science
Silk Road Travelers' Ancient Knowledge May Have Irrigated DesertMore than 1,700 years ago, ancient farmers in China transformed one of Earth's driest deserts into farmland, possibly by using ancient knowledge of irrigation passed along by Silk Road travelers, a new study finds.
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A Clever Radio Trick Can Tell If a Drone Is Watching YouA quirk of video compression lets spy targets see what the drone watching them sees.
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Feed: All Latest
CES 2018 in Photos: A Glimpse of the Gadget ZaninessCES Las Vegas ShowAs we wrap up at CES 2018, here's a peek into the massive gadget show through the lens of WIRED photographer Amy Lombard.
9h
Ingeniøren
Hør ugens podcast om Spectre, batteritog og undervandsrobotterIngeniørens ugentlige podcast, Transformator, sætter i denne uge fokus på it-sårbarhederne Meltdown og Spectre, der giver store udfordringer i disse uger. Batteritog er igen kommet på dagsordenen, og sprøjtegifte er måske ikke så farlige for os, hævder en ny undersøgelse.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Carcass RaceA surprising relationship between mammalian and avian scavengers might tell us something about how humans evolved -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Dagens Medicin
Enighed om skitse til gebyrløsningMinisterium, styrelse, regioner og læger er enige om, at det stærkt kritiserede vagtlæge-gebyr skal sløjfes.
9h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
A one-man audio-visual musical phenomenon | Jacob CollierJacob Collier is a one-man band and force of nature. In a dynamic, colorful performance, he recreates the magical room at his home in London where he produces music, performing three songs in which he sings every part and plays every instrument -- accompanied by kaleidoscopic visuals that take cues from the music and grow in real time.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
Resistance to Common Germs Poses a Hurdle to New Gene TherapiesExposure to everyday pathogens generates an immune response that could interfere with CRISPR-based gene-editing treatment -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Dagens Medicin
Flere tusinde læger underskriver mistillidsvotum til Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed2.700 læger har i skrivende stund skrevet under på brev til styrelsen, som opfordrer til at fokusere mindre på bebrejdelser af sundhedspersonale, der begår fejl, og i stedet fokusere på læring og den kliniske virkelighed, sundhedspersonalet arbejder under.
10h
Science : NPR
Researchers Spot Massive Black Hole In Double 'Burp'The cosmic sinkhole is at the center of a galaxy 800 million light-years from Earth and supports the theory that such objects can switch their power output on and off in relatively short time-scales. (Image credit: NASA , ESA, and J. Comerford (University of Colorado-Boulder))
10h
Dagens Medicin
Benspænd kan forsinke speciale i akutmedicinEtableringen af det nye akutmedicinske speciale bliver mødt med talrige bekymringer fra eksisterende specialer, og det forsinker arbejdet med at skabe en målbeskrivelse for det nye speciale. Ledende overlæge i akutmedicin er nervøs for, om det er realistisk at holde fast i planen om at besætte de første introduktionsstillinger til sommer.
10h
Ingeniøren
Kortvarig luftforurening dræber, selvom grænseværdier overholdesFå dages stigninger i luftens indhold af ozon og fine partikler fører til akutte dødsfald blandt ældre.
10h
Dagens Medicin
Den stædige læge og landingspladsenI sine 30 år som praktiserende læge i Thyborøn har Hans Asger Holmsgaard lagt arm med regions- og folketingspolitikerne. Kamppladsen har været akutberedskabet og slagene mange, det seneste om akut- lægehelikopteren. Et slag, som praksislægen vandt, og i dag kan helikopteren lande på græsplænen ved siden af klinikken. Den lander i snit hver femte dag i Lemvig Kommune.
10h
Dagens Medicin
Psykisk syge skal være herre i eget livRegion Hovedstadens Psykiatri gør op med ambulant behandling, hvor den syge enten møder op på et center eller permanent får intensiv behandling i eget hjem. Fra årsskiftet vil flere udgående teams overgå til en mere fleksibel model, hvor behandlingen kun er intensiv, når den syge er i krise. Det skal give hurtigere fodfæste og forebygge indlæggelser.
10h
Big Think
Do Near-Death Experiences Prove That an Afterlife Exists?The scientific quest for immortality is predicated on the belief that evidence may already exist in the form of Near-Death Experiences and reincarnation. Read More
10h
Ingeniøren
Nyt it-system indkaldte sygepleje til død patientIkke bare i Aarhus men også i Odsherred Kommune er et system med elektroniske omsorgsjournaler alvorlige problemer, bl.a. med manglende medicinering.
10h
Latest Headlines | Science News
See a 360-degree visualization of the center of the Milky WayA 360-degree simulation, made with data from several telescopes, shows the center of the Milky Way as seen from the galaxy’s supermassive black hole.
10h
Dagens Medicin
Her er de bedste afdelinger til psykiatriDagens Medicin udpeger de bedste afdelinger til udredning og behandling af centrale sygdomsområder inden for psykiatri, ADHD, skizofreni, og depression.
10h
Dagens Medicin
Kvalitetstal bærer præg af underrapporteringDanmarks bedste til behandling af depression 2018
11h
Ingeniøren
OVERBLIK: Sådan kan et nyt energiforlig skrues sammenPolitikerne er kommet på prøve: Ny finansiering, indblanding fra EU og billig sol og vind er nye præmisser for energipolitikken frem mod 2030.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A major step forward in organic electronicsResearchers at the Laboratory of Organic Electronics, Linköping University, have developed the world's first complementary electrochemical logic circuits that can function stably for long periods in water. This is a highly significant breakthrough in the development of bioelectronics.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The circadian clock sets the pace of plant growthResearchers at the Centre for Research in Agricultural Genomics (CRAG) have discovered that the members of a protein family associated with the internal clocks of plants act sequentially to limit plant growth until the end of the night. This could help researchers to understand how plants deal with different kinds of stress that affect their growth, such as drought or high temperature.
11h
Dagens Medicin
Midtjylland skiller sig positivt udDanmarks bedste til behandling af skizofreni 2018
11h
Dagens Medicin
Ny smerteklinik vil tilbyde cannabis-recepterNy smerteklinik, oprindeligt initieret af Klaus Riskær Petersen, har fået flere patienthenvendelser om cannabis-medicin allerede inden sin fysiske åbning. Virksomhedsansvarlig læge ser frem til at gå fordomsfrit ind i ny forsøgsordning.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What sort of stream networks do scientific ideas flow along?"Panta rhei, everything flows." If Heraclitus of Ephesus was correct, ideas, like rivers, should flow. Tracking the flow of ordinary ideas can be difficult. In the case of scientific ideas, it is much easier. The researchers exchanging them usually produce joint publications.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First, Pizza Hut began delivering beer. Now, a self-driving car may bring your pizzaYour delivery order from Pizza Hut may eventually arrive in a self-driving car.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is there an iron throne in the newly discovered chamber in Cheops' pyramid?In early November 2017, Nature published the results of the Scan Pyramids project, led by Mehdi Tayoubi (Hip Institute, Paris) and Kunihiro Morishima (University of Nagoya, Japan). It found a "huge void," at least 30 meters long, within the Pyramid of Cheops. Discovering its function and content clearly is a most passionate challenge for archaeologists.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Jet stream changes since 1960s linked to more extreme weatherIncreased fluctuations in the path of the North Atlantic jet stream since the 1960s coincide with more extreme weather events in Europe such as heat waves, wildfires and flooding. The new research published in Nature Communications is the first reconstruction of historical changes in the North Atlantic jet stream prior to the 20th century. By using tree rings, the researchers developed a historica
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An innovative PET tracer can measure damage from multiple sclerosis in mouse modelsIn the Jan. 12, 2018, Scientific Reports, a research team describes early tests of a minimally-invasive way to assess myelin damage -- the hallmark of multiple sclerosis -- using positron emission tomography (PET). This approach could be used to follow MS lesions over time.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists identify a key mechanism regulating a protein required for muscle and heart functionScientists at the CNIC and Columbia University have identified a new mechanism regulating the elasticity of titin, a protein with important roles in the function of skeletal and heart muscle.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gadgets: Device lets you keep your eyes on the roadNow, this is cool and more important, useful.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Orlando startup faces off with high-profile investor on podcast; new guided-tour city app launchesAn Orlando entrepreneur impressed a high-profile startup backer on the experienced investor's podcast recently, although the host wasn't exactly excited that she was from Orlando.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The complexities of clouds and the seeds that make themClouds are complicated. Each cloud formation depends on the timing of the water cycle, in which water evaporates from Earth's surface, condensates in the atmosphere and falls back down, as well as the types of aerosols in the atmosphere.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Jet stream changes since 1960s linked to more extreme weatherIncreased fluctuations in the path of the North Atlantic jet stream since the 1960s coincide with more extreme weather events in Europe such as heat waves, droughts, wildfires and flooding, reports a University of Arizona-led team.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
BMW drives to new sales record but still lags MercedesGerman high-end carmaker BMW said Friday it booked record sales for the seventh year in a row in 2017, but continued to trail rival Mercedes-Benz.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nepal accesses internet through China, ending India monopolyNepal opened an optical fiber link across the Himalayan mountains to China on Friday, ending years of dependency on India for internet access.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gadgets for kids still big at tech show despite concernsThe children's section at the giant Consumer Electronics Show this week touted "innovations that enable 21st century kids to learn and play smarter than ever.​"
12h

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