Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New method to detect illicit drone filming developedA new technique to detect a drone camera illicitly capturing video is revealed in a new study by cyber security researchers in Israel. The study addresses increasing concerns about the proliferation of drone use for personal and business applications and how it is impinging on privacy and safety.
27min
Big Think
The Bilingual Brain: Why One Size Doesn’t Fit AllThere is more than one type of bilingualism. Read More
46min
Science-Based Medicine
The Elephant in the Compounding PharmacyContaminated products from compounding pharmacies have harmed and even killed patients. Quality control measures are being implemented, but there is a bigger problem: the injudicious use of untested and potentially dangerous treatments.
44min
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Youth using alternative tobacco products are more likely to smoke one year laterNonsmoking adolescents who use e-cigarettes, smokeless tobacco or tobacco water pipes are more likely to start smoking conventional cigarettes within a year, according to new research.
28min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fast-tracking T-cell therapies with immune-mimicking biomaterialsResearchers have developed a material-based T-cell-expansion method using APC-mimetic biomaterial scaffolds, which helps achieve greater expansion of primary mouse and human T cells than existing methods.
27min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Remote-controlled cancer immunotherapy systemA team of researchers has developed an ultrasound-based system that can non-invasively and remotely control genetic processes in live immune T cells so that they recognize and kill cancer cells.
56min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Stop the clots, spare the coagulationIn the fight to cure thromboinflammatory diseases, one of the target molecules is thrombin, a protein that promotes inflammation and can cause blood clots. However, inhibiting thrombin too much can lead to uncontrolled bleeding, limiting the use of anti-inflammatory drugs. Now, researchers have found that a class of small molecule called 'parmodulins' can reduce inflammation without compromising n
56min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Flipping the switch: Dietary fat, changes in fat metabolism may promote prostate cancer metastasisResearchers have shed new light on the genetic mechanisms that promote metastasis in the mouse model and also implicated the typical Western high-fat diet as a key environmental factor driving metastasis.
56min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Don't hold your nose and close your mouth when you sneeze, doctors warnPinching your nose while clamping your mouth shut to contain a forceful sneeze isn't a good idea, warn doctors in the journal BMJ Case Reports.
59min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Starting periods before age of 12 linked to heightened risk of heart disease and strokeStarting periods early -- before the age of 12 -- is linked to a heightened risk of heart disease and stroke in later life, suggests an analysis of data from the UK Biobank study, published online in the journal Heart.
59min
Science | The Guardian
Achoo! Why letting out an explosive sneeze is safer than stifling itFollowing the case of a man who ruptured this throat, medics say holding in a sneeze can cause ear damage or a brain aneurysm In a season where colds are rife, holding your nose and closing your mouth might seem like a considerate alternative to an explosive “Achoo!”. But doctors have warned of the dangers of such a move after a man was found to have ruptured the back of his throat when attemptin
1h
Science | The Guardian
Early menarche and menopause linked to cardiovascular disease risk – studyIncrease screening for women who start their periods at a young age or those reaching menopause early, experts suggest Women who start their periods at an early age, or experience an early menopause, are at greater risk of cardiovascular disease, new research suggests. While researchers say it is not clear whether reproductive factors are driving the increased risks, they say that more frequent s
1h
Live Science
Here's a Perfect Example of Why You Shouldn't Stifle Your SneezeA 34-year-old man in England ruptured his throat when he tried to stop a sneeze.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teens likely to crave junk food after watching TV adsTeenagers who watch more than three hours of commercial TV a day are more likely to eat hundreds of extra junk food snacks, according to a report by Cancer Research UK.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
History of humanity does not require rewriting: The case of UntermassfeldIn a newly published study, researchers refute a recent publication regarding the dispersal of humans in Europe.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Normal tissue BRCA1 methylation associated with risk for high-grade ovarian cancerNormal tissue BRCA1 methylation is associated with risk for high-grade ovarian cancer and may occur as a prenatal event. These findings are published in Annals of Internal Medicine.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists home in on a potential Anthropocene 'Golden Spike'A new study suggests that key geological markers align towards a start for the Anthropocene somewhere between 1952 to 1955, based on signals from nuclear testing and fossil fuel burning.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The more competitive, the more passionate in romantic relationships, study findsAmericans are more passionate toward their romantic partners than Japanese people are because Americans live in social environments in which people have greater freedom to choose and replace their partners, a team of Japanese researchers suggest.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Teens who were severely bullied as children at higher risk of suicidal thoughts, mental health issueTeens who were severely bullied as children by peers are at higher risk of mental health issues, including suicidal thoughts and behaviours, according to new research.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Flawed research methods exaggerate the prevalence of depressionThe common practice of using patient self-report screening questionnaires rather than diagnostic interviews conducted by researchers has resulted in overestimates of the prevalence of depression, according to a new analysis.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Robots aid better understanding of phytoplankton bloomsPhytoplankton blooms are one of the most important factors contributing to the efficiency of the carbon pump in the North Atlantic Ocean. To better understand this phenomenon, researchers have developed a new class of robots able to collect data in the ocean throughout the year. Using these unparalleled data, the researchers have identified the starting point for the explosive spring phytoplankton
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
An efficient approach of conjugated tetraenes from butadiene and alkynesConjugated tetraenes are important key substructures in electronic materials, natural products and pharmaceutical molecules. However, they are difficult to synthesize. Now, researchers in Japan have achieved a new synthetic route of conjugated tetraenes from inexpensive and easily available 1,3-butadiene and substituted acetylenes by a one-pot approach under mild conditions.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ultracold neutron source: Yield improved by factor of 3.5Researchers have improved the yield of its ultracold neutron source by a factor of 3.5 to 8.5 ultracold neutrons per cubic centimeter.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Power stations in cells may protect brain against Parkinson´sA new study shows that impairment in mitochondria may actually protect the brain in Parkinson’s disease.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biomaterials with 'logic gates' release therapeutics in response to environmental triggersScientists have announced that they have built and tested a new biomaterial-based delivery system -- known as a hydrogel -- that will encase a desired cargo and dissolve to release its freight only when specific physiological conditions are met.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Potential brain-machine interface for hand paralysisA brain-machine interface that combines brain stimulation with a robotic device controlling hand movement increases the output of pathways connecting the brain and spinal cord, according to a study of healthy adults. This work could have implications for restoring function in stroke patients with hand paralysis.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Surfers three times more likely to have antibiotic-resistant bacteria in gutsScientists compared fecal samples from surfers and non-surfers to assess whether the surfers' guts contained E. coli bacteria that were able to grow in the presence of the antibiotic cefotaxime. Cefotaxime has previously been prescribed to kill off these bacteria, but some have acquired genes that enable them to survive this treatment. The study found that 13 of 143 (9 percent) of surfers were col
3h
Big Think
What If You Could Recall Forgotten Memories?New research from MIT is shedding light on how our brain forms and recalls memories. Read More
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New application for acoustics helps estimate marine life populationsResearchers have for the first time have used hydroacoustics as a method for comparing the abundance of fishes within and outside marine protected areas (MPAs).
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genes that aid spinal cord healing in lamprey also present in humans, researchers discoverMany of the genes involved in natural repair of the injured spinal cord of the lamprey are also active in the repair of the peripheral nervous system in mammals, according to a new study.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Energy drinks can negatively impact health of youthOver half of Canadian youth and young adults who have consumed energy drinks have experienced negative health effects as a result, according to a new study.
3h
Popular Science
I’ve dived in hundreds of underwater caves hunting for new forms of lifeScience My primary focus is searching for new forms of life—mostly white, eyeless crustaceans. To study the biology and ecology of coastal, saltwater caves and the marine fauna that inhabit them, my cave diving partners and I head underground and underwater to…
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Impact of relatedness on grandmothers’ desire to care for their grandchildrenHistorically, grandmothers have been important to their grandchildren, and the help provided by grandmothers has increased grandchild survival during the times of high child mortality. However, there have been signs that in many populations, the impact of maternal grandmothers and paternal grandmothers on their grandchildren has been different. A recent study shows that X-chromosome relatedness be
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A matter of mobility: New strategy for drug discoveryA joint industry/academia study of a cancer target protein reveals unusual relation between binding site flexibility and drug-target lifetime. The results suggest a new strategy for drug discovery.
4h
Live Science
Brain Connections Set Creative Thinkers ApartBeing creative is all about making connections — in your brain, that is.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stop the clots, spare the coagulationIn the fight to cure thromboinflammatory diseases, one of the target molecules is thrombin, a protein that promotes inflammation and can cause blood clots. However, inhibiting thrombin too much can lead to uncontrolled bleeding, limiting the use of anti-inflammatory drugs. Now, researchers from BIDMC and the Wyss Institute have found that a class of small molecule called 'parmodulins' can reduce i
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New Carnegie Mellon dynamic statistical model follows gene expressions over timePublished in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the model now gives researchers a tool that extends past observing static networks at a single snapshot in time, which is hugely beneficial since network data are usually dynamic.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United StatesWith medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that US life expectancy would improve. Yet there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in American mortality during the last three decades. Penn researchers say a rise in obesity is to blame, slowing declines in death rates by a half-percentage point per year. The scientists estimate that rising obesity was about twice as
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Diabetes gene found that causes low and high blood sugar levels in the same familyA Queen Mary University of London study of families with rare blood sugar conditions has revealed a new gene thought to be critical in the regulation of insulin, the key hormone in diabetes.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers develop a remote-controlled cancer immunotherapy systemA team of researchers has developed an ultrasound-based system that can non-invasively and remotely control genetic processes in live immune T cells so that they recognize and kill cancer cells.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lifting barriers to citizenship for low-income immigrantsGaining citizenship brings life-changing opportunities, but high application fees make it unaffordable for many immigrants who are ineligible for a federal waiver. When the NaturalizeNY program offered vouchers covering the fee, recipients were twice as likely to apply. Local and federal governments can take action to make citizenship affordable for all.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel 3-D printing technique yields high-performance compositesA team of researchers at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) has demonstrated a novel 3-D printing method that yields unprecedented control of the arrangement of short fibers embedded in polymer matrices. They used this additive manufacturing technique to program fiber orientation within epoxy composites in specified locations, enabling the creation of str
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
War in Ukraine has escalated HIV spread in the countryConflict in Ukraine has increased the risk of HIV outbreaks throughout the country as displaced HIV-infected people move from war-affected regions to areas with higher risk of transmission, according to analysis by scientists.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain imaging predicts language learning in deaf childrenMRI brain scans can predict language improvement after a cochlear implant, laying the foundation for creation of brain specific therapy.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fiat Chrysler won't sell Jeep: CEOSergio Marchionne, CEO of Fiat Chrysler (FCA), swatted down speculation Monday that he might sell the group's popular Jeep brand and forecasted a future strategic plan by June in anticipation of his retirement.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
With Detroit launch, BMW aims to reignite US car salesBMW, which has been losing ground in the US luxury market to Mercedes, is hoping to turn the tide with a spate of new SUV offerings.
4h
Big Think
Why a “Genius” Scientist Thinks Our Consciousness Originates at the Quantum LevelDo our minds have quantum structures that give rise to consciousness? Sir Roger Penrose, one of the world's most famous scientists, believes this and can explain how it works. Read More
4h
Science | The Guardian
Creative thought has a pattern of its own, brain activity scans revealPeople who are flexible, original thinkers show signature forms of connectivity in their brains, study shows Donatella Versace finds it in the conflict of ideas, Jack White under pressure of deadlines. For William S Burroughs, an old Dadaist trick helped: cutting pages into pieces and rearranging the words. Every artist has their own way of generating original ideas, but what is happening inside
4h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Black Death 'spread by humans not rats'Human body lice, rather than rat fleas, spread plague during the Black Death, a study simulating the outbreak suggests.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lifting barriers to citizenship for low-income immigrantsTaking the Oath of Allegiance at a naturalization ceremony is an emotional moment for many immigrants, and for good reason: it is the culmination of an often arduous process and many years of striving. Citizenship also opens a new chapter marked by possibility, from better job prospects to full participation in civic life.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New dynamic statistical model follows gene expressions over timeResearchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a new dynamic statistical model to visualize changing patterns in networks, including gene expression during developmental periods of the brain.
4h
Viden
7 måder kroppen forandrer sig på i rummetSlatne muskler, dårligt syn og noget der ligner knogleskørhed: Astronauter må forberede sig på lidt af hvert.
5h
New Scientist - News
Mount Etna may not really be a ‘proper’ volcano at allItaly’s famous volcano Mount Etna may be fed mostly by hot water and carbon dioxide, with only a small dose of molten rock to make it resemble a classic volcano
5h
New Scientist - News
DNA of man who died in 1827 recreated from his living relativesThe DNA of Hans Jonaton, an ex-slave who fled to Iceland in 1802, has been reconstructed using only the genes of his descendants
5h
New Scientist - News
Clever maths will stop hackers spying on the quantum internetQuantum communications are theoretically secure, but keeping a complex quantum network unhackable in practice is more difficult than expected
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Possible cause of early colonial-era Mexican epidemic identifiedResearchers have used new methods in ancient DNA research to identify Salmonella enterica Paratyphi C, a pathogen that causes enteric fever, in the skeletons of victims of the 1545-1550 cocoliztli epidemic in Mexico, identifying a possible cause of this devastating colonial epidemic.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nature has more than one way to make methaneBiochemists report a bacterial, iron-only nitrogenase pathway for methane formation.
5h
Viden
Drop Bali og Barcelona: Nu går turen til solsystemetBjergbestigning på Mars eller pub crawl på Venus? Her får du den ultimative rejseguide til vores solsystem.
5h
Blog » Languages » English
Surprise Happy HourIt’s Martin Luther King day here in America. Today we celebrate equality and progress. Despite the news, the world is actually doing better than ever. For a dive through historical data showing that nearly every metric, from access to healthcare and electricity to wealth and education, is on the rise, check out Oxford University’s Our World in Data and continue the conversation about our ever-imp
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Insulating bricks with microscopic bubblesThe calculation is simple: the better a building is insulated, the less heat is lost in winter - and the less energy is needed to achieve a comfortable room temperature.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
We will treat cancer by making it 'slim down'For years, attempts have been made to understand the mechanism behind the proliferation of cancer cells: they need metabolites to grow and proliferate as much as a vehicle needs gasoline or electricity to move. However, until now it was not known which metabolites cancer cells actually need. Medical researchers have now identified one of the mechanisms behind this process.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gyroscopes lead scientists to unusual state of matter in a disorganized structureYou don't have to be perfectly organized to pull off a wave, according to scientists. Using a set of gyroscopes linked together, physicists explored the behavior of a material whose structure is arranged randomly, instead of an orderly lattice. They found they could set off one-way ripples around the edges, much like spectators in a sports arena -- a 'topological wave,' characteristic of a particu
5h
Science : NPR
Altering A Species: Darwin's Shopping ListFew scientific discoveries have caused as much excitement as that of editing our genes; yet we owe some of the most stunning wonders around us to old-fashioned breeding practices, says Jimena Canales. (Image credit: dan_wrench/Getty Images/iStockphoto)
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Preterm babies may suffer setbacks in auditory brain development, speechPreterm babies born early in the third trimester of pregnancy are likely to experience delays in the development of the auditory cortex, a brain region essential to hearing and understanding sound, a new study reveals. Such delays are associated with speech and language impairments at age 2, the researchers found.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exploring the neuroscience of behavioral therapy in ratsPsychotherapy may improve symptoms of psychiatric disorders by increasing activity in the medial prefrontal cortex, suggests a study of rats exposed to chronic stress. The research, published in JNeurosci, is a step toward understanding how the brain processes influenced by behavioral therapy may be targeted to improve treatment.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How preterm birth may impact language developmentAltered development of a part of the auditory cortex in preterm infants is associated with poorer language skills in early childhood, finds a brain imaging study of very early-born babies in a neonatal intensive care unit. The research, published in eNeuro, suggests that developmental disturbances to this brain region may underlie speech and language difficulties observed in this population.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Potential brain-machine interface for hand paralysisA brain-machine interface that combines brain stimulation with a robotic device controlling hand movement increases the output of pathways connecting the brain and spinal cord, according to a study of healthy adults published in JNeurosci. This work could have implications for restoring function in stroke patients with hand paralysis.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Solar fuels: better efficiency using microwiresResearchers have made significant efficiency improvements to the technology used to generate solar fuels. This involves the direct conversion of energy from sunlight into a usable fuel (in this case, hydrogen). Using only earth-abundant materials, they developed the most efficient conversion method to date. The trick was to decouple the site where sunlight is captured from the site where the conve
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genes that repair spinal cord in fish are also in humans, researchers findMany of the genes that repair an injured spinal cord in a fish called the lamprey are also active in the repair of the peripheral nervous system in mammals, researchers report.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Electronic modulation of carotid sinus nerve can be used as a treatment for type 2 diabetes in ratsIn a new study in rats, researchers have demonstrated that is possible to restore insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis by modulating electrically the carotid sinus nerve, the sensitive nerve that connects the carotid body with the brain.
6h
Feed: All Latest
Will Your Baby Like Cilantro? These Genetic Tests Say They Can TellA growing set of direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies like BabyGlimpse are aimed at new, expecting, and aspiring parents. But beware their claims.
6h
The Atlantic
The Least Racist People We’ve Ever InterviewedPresident Donald Trump briefly took questions from reporters at the Trump International Golf Club in West Palm Beach, Florida, on Sunday. A White House transcript shows the following exchange: Reporter: What is your response to people who say you are a racist? Trump: No, no, I'm not a racist. I am the least racist person you have ever interviewed, that I can tell you. We at The Atlantic have a bi
6h
Popular Science
Get off the couch and under a barbell with this weightlifting starter kitGadgets You don't need to be The Mountain from Game of Thrones to start moving mass. You don't need to be The Mountain from Game of Thrones to start moving mass. This is powerlifting 101.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tiny dinosaur may have dazzled mates with rainbow ruff and a bony crestAncient dinosaurs were adorned in some amazing ways, from the horns of the triceratops to the plates and spikes of the stegosaurus. A newly discovered, bird-like dinosaur fossil from China contains evidence that could add a new accessory to the list: a shaggy ruff of rainbow feathers.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
From greenhouse gases to plastics: New catalyst for recycling carbon dioxide discoveredImagine if we could take CO2, that most notorious of greenhouse gases, and convert it into something useful. Something like plastic, for example. The positive effects could be dramatic, both diverting CO2 from the atmosphere and reducing the need for fossil fuels to make products.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
CEO: Mercedes may miss emission goal if electrics don't sellIf customers don't buy electric and more efficient cars and trucks, then Mercedes may not be able to meet government-imposed carbon dioxide emissions standards across the globe, its top executive says.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
3-D-printed underwater vortex sensor mimics whiskers of sea animalA new study has shown that a fully 3D-printed whisker sensor made of polyurethane, graphene, and copper tape can detect underwater vortexes with very high sensitivity. The simple design, mechanical reliability, and low-cost fabrication method contribute to the important commercial implications of this versatile new sensor, as described in an article in Soft Robotics
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seized ivory probed for clues that could help save elephantsScientists are using information gleaned from both illegal ivory art and elephant dung to provide clues that could help save the lives of pachyderms that are being slaughtered for their tusks in Africa.
7h
NYT > Science
The Healing Edge: After Surgery in the Womb, a Baby Kicks Up HopeBaby Boy Royer, who underwent an operation for spina bifida as a fetus, had the biggest defect that the surgical team had attempted to repair.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Le smartphone? France has another term in mindSmartphones may have become ubiquitous in France, but the country's language mavens hope there's still time to keep the word from becoming ensconced in everyday speech.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
At Detroit auto show, trucks and SUVs are kingCar makers appealed to Americans' deep love of SUVs and trucks on Monday at the Detroit Auto Show, unveiling a host of choices from luxurious to utilitarian, while also beefing up the humble sedan.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unexpected environmental source of methane discoveredRoughly 10 percent of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms contain the genetic code for manufacturing a back-up enzyme, called iron iron-only nitrogenase, to do their job. New research reveals that this enzyme allows these microorganisms to convert nitrogen gas to ammonia and carbon dioxide into methane at the same time. This enzymatic pathway is a previously unknown route for the natural biological pro
7h
Big Think
Top Vets Reject Homeopathic Treatment for Animals as Primary CareThe Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons issued a statement to remind its members of their fundamental obligation to science-based medicine and animal welfare. Read More
7h
Science | The Guardian
Did you solve it? Le Sudoku français est arrivé!The solutions (and hints) for today’s puzzles. In my puzzle blog earlier today , I set you four Garam puzzles. You can see (and print out) the puzzles by clicking on this link . Continue reading...
7h
Viden
SpaceX's genbrugs-rumkapsel bringer rumforsøg hjem til JordenEfter en lille måned hos Den Internationale Rumstation er SpaceX's genbrugte Dragon-rumkapsel vendt tilbage til Jorden.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unexpected environmental source of methane discoveredRoughly 10 percent of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms contain the genetic code for manufacturing a back-up enzyme, called iron iron-only nitrogenase, to do their job. New research reveals that this enzyme allows these microorganisms to convert nitrogen gas to ammonia and carbon dioxide into methane at the same time. This enzymatic pathway is a previously unknown route for the natural biological pro
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How incurable mitochondrial diseases strike previously unaffected familiesResearchers have shown for the first time how children can inherit a severe -- potentially fatal -- mitochondrial disease from a healthy mother. The study, led by researchers from the MRC Mitochondrial Biology Unit at the University of Cambridge, reveals that healthy people harbor mutations in their mitochondrial DNA and explains how cases of severe mitochondrial disease can appear unexpectedly in
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Immunosuppressive cells in newborns play important role in controlling inflammation in early lifeNew research led by The Wistar Institute, in collaboration with Sun Yat-sen University in China, has characterized the transitory presence of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) in mouse and human newborns, revealing a critical role of these cells in regulation of inflammation in the early stages of life.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fast-tracking T cell therapies with immune-mimicking biomaterialsA team led by David Mooney at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) is now reporting in Nature Biotechnology a material-based T-cell-expansion method using APC-mimetic biomaterial scaffolds, which helps achieve greater expansion of primary mouse and human T cells than existing methods.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biomaterials with 'logic gates' release therapeutics in response to environmental triggersScientists at the University of Washington announced that they have built and tested a new biomaterial-based delivery system -- known as a hydrogel -- that will encase a desired cargo and dissolve to release its freight only when specific physiological conditions are met.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gyroscopes lead scientists to unusual state of matter in a disorganized structureYou don't have to be perfectly organized to pull off a wave, according to University of Chicago scientists. Using a set of gyroscopes linked together, physicists explored the behavior of a material whose structure is arranged randomly, instead of an orderly lattice. They found they could set off one-way ripples around the edges, much like spectators in a sports arena -- a 'topological wave,' chara
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Possible cause of early colonial-era Mexican epidemic identifiedResearchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Harvard University and the Mexican National Institute of Anthropology and History have used new methods in ancient DNA research to identify Salmonella enterica Paratyphi C, a pathogen that causes enteric fever, in the skeletons of victims of the 1545-1550 cocoliztli epidemic in Mexico, identifying a possible cause of this
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dietary fat, changes in fat metabolism may promote prostate cancer metastasisResearchers at the Cancer Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) shed new light on the genetic mechanisms that promote metastasis in the mouse model and also implicated the typical Western high-fat diet as a key environmental factor driving metastasis.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nature has more than one way to make methane, say Utah State University biochemistsUtah State University biochemists, with collaborators from the University of Washington and Montana State University, report a bacterial, iron-only nitrogenase pathway for methane formation.
8h
The Atlantic
A New Clue to the Mystery Disease That Once Killed Most of MexicoIn the decades after Hernán Cortés invaded Mexico, one of the worst epidemics in human history swept through the new Spanish colony. A mysterious disease called “cocolitzli” appeared first in 1545 and then again in 1576, each time killing millions of the native population. “From morning to sunset,” wrote a Franciscan friar who witness the epidemic, “the priests did nothing else but carry the dead
8h
Science : NPR
Salmonella May Have Caused Massive Aztec Epidemic, Study FindsThe 16th century epidemic, likely set off or exacerbated by European invaders, was one of the most deadly in human history. New evidence traces it to a type of salmonella that causes a deadly fever. (Image credit: Alexandre Meneghini/AP)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
500 years later, scientists finger germ behind Mexican 'pestilence'In 1545, disaster struck Mexico's Aztec nation when people started coming down with high fevers and headaches, bleeding from the eyes, mouth and nose. Death generally followed in three or four days.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gyroscopes lead scientists to unusual state of matter in a disorganized structureYou don't have to be perfectly organized to pull off a wave, according to University of Chicago scientists.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nature has more than one way to make methane, say biochemistsMethane is a potent greenhouse gas, trapping more solar radiation on Earth than carbon dioxide. It's also the primary component of natural gas, a critical fuel source for heating and other uses. For these reasons and more, scientists are keenly interested in how the gas is made.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers program biomaterials with 'logic gates' that release therapeutics in response to environmental triggersDrug treatments can save lives, but sometimes they also carry unintended costs. After all, the same therapeutics that target pathogens and tumors can also harm healthy cells.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fast-tracking T cell therapies with immune-mimicking biomaterialsImmunologists and oncologists are harnessing the body's immune system to fight cancers and other diseases with adoptive cell transfer techniques. In a normal immune response, a type of white blood cell known as T cells are instructed by another kind of immune cell called an antigen-presenting cell (APC) to expand their numbers and stay alive. Adoptive cell transfer procedures are mimicking exactly
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unexpected environmental source of methane discoveredAn unexpected source of methane in the environment has been inadvertently discovered.
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The Atlantic
Hawaii and the Horror of Human ErrorThe Cold War came to an end, somehow, without any of the world’s tens of thousands of nuclear warheads being fired. But there were decades-worth of close calls, high alerts, and simple mistakes that inched world leaders shockingly close to catastrophe. Saturday’s terrifying, 38-minute episode in Hawaii will not go down as one of those close calls: Residents of the state waited for the bombs to fa
8h
Ingeniøren
Kinesisk rakettrin styrter og eksploderer nær landsbyEt booster-raket fra den kinesiske Long March 3B eksploderede nær en landsby, da den faldt til jorden efter brug.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
School climate and diversity may affect students’ delinquent behaviorsIn a new study, race, sex, perceived peer inclusion, and teacher discrimination were predictors of students’ delinquent behaviors.
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Viden
VIDEO: Rumteleskop har ligget på is i månedsvisNASAs kommende rumobservatorie, James Webb-teleskopet, har tilbragt ni måneder i en gigantisk dybfryser. Nu tøes det op.
9h
Live Science
Photos: This Dinosaur's Feathers Shimmered with IridescenceDuring the Jurassic period, about 161 million years ago, a duck-size dinosaur dazzled its fellow paleo-beasts with its rainbow-colored, iridescent feathers.
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Live Science
Little 'Rainbow' Dinosaur Discovered by Farmer in ChinaThis is the oldest iridescent dinosaur on record.
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New on MIT Technology Review
The Tech Troubles Behind Hawaii’s False Missile Alert
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Ingeniøren
Ny metode kan afsløre ulovlige droneoptagelserNu bliver det muligt at afsløre, om en drone faktisk optager video, når den flyver over et hus eller et andet objekt. Det viser nyt studie fra Ben Gurion Universitetet i Israel.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Honda, Volvo, Ford scoop awards at Detroit auto showThe Detroit auto show handed out its self-proclaimed "Oscars of the auto industry" on Monday, rewarding Honda, Volvo and Ford amid a crowded slate of new truck, SUV and crossover unveilings.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
German startup AUTO1 gets $558 million Softbank investmentJapan's Softbank is investing 460 million euros ($558 million) in German used car trading platform AUTO1.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
France wants tougher rules on bitcoin to avoid criminal useFrance's finance minister says he wants new regulation targeted at virtual currencies, to stop them from being used for tax evasion, financing terrorism and other crime.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intel underfoot: Floor sensors rise as retail data sourceThe next phase in data collection is right under your feet.
9h
Dagens Medicin
Underskriftindsamling fortsætterIndsamling af underskrifter med mistillidsvotum til Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed udvides fra Facebook-grupper til også at omfatte underskrifter via nyoprettet hjemmeside, og har nu rundet 6.000 underskrifter fra læger.
9h
Feed: All Latest
6 GoPro Tips For Skiing and Snowboarding ShotsGet great results from your GoPro or other action cam as you capture your snowy heroics ... and your legendary bails.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
Researchers Race to Devise a Roadside Test for Driving While HighCould a sensor-studded brain cap pick up signs of impairment? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
New on MIT Technology Review
AI Beats Humans at a Reading Comprehension, But It Still Doesn’t Truly Comprehend Language
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Commonalities in brains of people with Huntington's disease and Parkinson's diseaseA new study strongly suggests that the brains of people who have died of Huntington's disease (HD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) show a similar response to a lifetime of neurodegeneration, despite being two very distinct diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A society divided by reconstructionIn 2004, a tsunami devastated much of the Indonesian city of Banda Aceh. An international team of researchers has studied the long-term impact that rebuilding efforts in coastal areas have had on the community.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New source of world’s deadliest toxin discoveredResearchers have identified genes encoding a previously undiscovered version of the botulinum neurotoxin in bacteria from a cow’s gut.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
NASA calculated heavy rainfall leading to California mudslidesWinter rains falling on recently burned ground triggered deadly mudslides in Santa Barbara County, California on Jan. 9. NASA calculated the amount of rain fall between Jan. 8 and 10, 2018 and calculated the potential for landslides.
9h
Popular Science
How to keep your iPhone but switch to Google or Microsoft appsDIY Your guide to a new software ecosystem. Apple may want you to use its own iPhone apps. But Google and Microsoft make excellent iOS apps too. Here's how they can replace Apple's software ecosystem.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artisanal allure of Lamborghini marvels of modernityThe Lamborghini factory in Sant'Agata Bolognese feels like an Aladdin's Cave of luxury Italian cars—a winning mix of modernity and craftsmanship which saw the company celebrate record production levels last year.
10h
Viden
Ud med nyheder: Facebook-ændring stikker medier en lussingIndhold fra familie og venner opprioriteres. Medier og reklamer vil omvendt tabe eksponering, vurderer iagttagere.
10h
Dagens Medicin
Digital strategi skal styrke vidensdeling i sundhedssektorenSundhedsministeriet har mandag lanceret en ny strategi for digital sundhed, der skal sikre sammenhæng i sundhedsvæsenet. Optimering af it-systemer på sundhedsområdet er nødvendig, mener Lægeforeningen.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Progressive eugenics is hardly history – the science and politics have just evolvedEugenics has been science's toxic brand since the end of World War II. The point was driven home yet again recently when Toby Young, appointee to the UK's newly established Office of Students, was denounced in the House of Commons for having written favourably of "progressive eugenics". Young resigned from the post the following day amid complaints about a series of other tweets and comments made
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Energy drinks can negatively impact health of youthOver half of Canadian youth and young adults who have consumed energy drinks have experienced negative health effects as a result, according to a study from the University of Waterloo.
10h
Ingeniøren
Mystikken breder sig efter hemmeligholdt, mislykket satellitopsendelseAmerikanske politikerne spørger til, hvad der gik galt for nylig under den militært klassificerede opsendelse af en satellit.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How we created a mini 'gamma ray burst' in the lab for the first timeGamma ray bursts, intense explosions of light, are the brightest events ever observed in the universe – lasting no longer than seconds or minutes. Some are so luminous that they can be observed with the naked eye, such as the burst "GRB 080319B" discovered by NASA's Swift GRB Explorer mission on March 19, 2008.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Infrared photometric observations reveal insights into the nature of the dwarf nova V2051 OphiuchiBrazilian astronomers have performed photometric observations of the dwarf nova V2051 Oph during its quiescent period, which revealed important insights into the nature of this object. The results were presented in a paper published January 4 on the arXiv pre-print repository.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China's dystopian social credit system is a harbinger of the global age of the algorithmThe Chinese government's ongoing attempts to create a social credit system aimed at rating the trustworthiness of people and companies have generated equal measures of fascination and anxiety around the world. Social credit is depicted as something uniquely Chinese – a nefarious and perverse digital innovation that could only be conceived of and carried out by a regime like the Chinese Communist P
10h
The Atlantic
Five Decades of White BacklashOn April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King, Jr., was assassinated. In response, a week later President Lyndon B. Johnson scrambled to sign into law the Fair Housing Act, a final major civil-rights bill that had languished for years under the strain of white backlash to the civil-rights movement . Five years later a New York developer and his son—then only a few years out of college—became two of the fi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why Instagram might be affecting your mental health (and what you can do about it)New research out of Notre Dame is digging into why social media isn't always good for us, especially if you're young and female.
10h
Feed: All Latest
Britain's Next Megaproject: A Coast-to-Coast Forest50 million new trees will repopulate one of the least wooded parts of the country—and offer a natural escape from several cities in the north.
10h
Feed: All Latest
Kylo's Shirtless Look Is a Problem for Star Wars CosplayersHigh-waisted tights are much harder to find than you might think.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
Scientists Are Taking Extreme Steps to Help Corals SurviveScientists are urgently transplanting, fertilizing and enhancing corals to help them adapt to warmer oceans, but rebuilding entire reefs will be daunting -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU tasks experts to find ways to fight fake newsThe European Union has set up an expert group to help identify fake news and propose ways to tackle the problem amid concern that false information is influencing elections.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers measure single atoms in a graphene 'petri-dish'Researchers working at The University of Manchester have shown new possibilities for observing nanomaterials in liquids by creating a graphene 'petri-dish'.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Europe's lost forests – study shows coverage has halved over six millenniaMore than half of Europe's forests have disappeared over the past 6,000 years thanks to increasing demand for agricultural land and the use of wood as a source of fuel, new research led by the University of Plymouth suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A brief history of fitness technologyHave you recently taken ownership of a shiny new activity tracking device? For many people, the essential fitness kit now includes gadgets designed not for sitting and staring at a screen, but for encouraging users to get up and move.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A matter of mobility: multidisciplinary paper suggests new strategy for drug discoveryA joint industry/academia study of a cancer target protein reveals unusual relation between binding site flexibility and drug-target lifetime. The results, published in Nature Communications, suggest a new strategy for drug discovery. The research was done in the framework of the Kinetics for Drug Discovery K4DD consortium, supported by the Innovative Medicines Initiative.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New record at ultracold neutron source in MainzSome 10 years ago, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) entered a new field of research by starting to generate ultracold neutrons (UCN) for use in fundamental research in physics. The participating physicists and chemists now report another major breakthrough. They have been able to increase the UCN yield of their source by a factor of 3.5. This means that the prerequisites are now in place
10h
Dagens Medicin
To forskere får hæderspris fra DiabetesforeningenMarit Eika Jørgensen og Reimar W. Thomsen er blevet hædret med Niels Schwartz Sørensens Prisen 2018.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Luminescent lizardsChameleons are known to communicate with conspecifics by altering their surface coloration. Munich researchers have now found that the bony tubercles on the heads of many species fluoresce under UV light and form impressive patterns.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cows exude lots of methane, but taxing beef won't cut emissionsWill taxing meat products based on their carbon footprint reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and improve public health? The answer is maybe, but not notably —and it will come with significant costs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows how Olympic Games affect the stock marketNew research reveals how global sports events such as the Olympic Games can affect stock market activity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Another chance for the last man hanged in Dundee?A re-examination of the medical evidence which led to the execution of William Bury, the last man hanged in Dundee 129 years ago, will be staged at a public mock trial next month, organised by the University of Dundee.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Advancing cloud with memory disaggregationHere at IBM Research – Ireland, we are rethinking the very foundations on which the cloud is built. We are developing a concept and prototype for low-power and high-utilization disaggregated cloud data centres that break known boundaries, enabling the dynamic creation of fit-for-purpose computing environments from a pool of disaggregated resources.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A black cockatoo's journey back to the wildWould you know what to do if you found a sick or injured black cockatoo?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More research needed for responsible peatland management in IndonesiaIndonesian peatland researchers recently gathered in Bogor, Indonesia, to examine the effectiveness of the latest government regulation on peatlands. We found some shortcomings, one being that the regulation isn't well supported by scientific evidence.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is the future of work necessarily glamorous? Digital nomads and 'van life'Digital nomadism continues its steady rise in most western countries. It consists of a mobile lifestyle that encompasses corporate remote workers, freelancers and entrepreneurs. Laptops, smartphones, wi-fi connections, coworking spaces, coffee shops and public libraries are some of the key components of this new work culture.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When a country's towns and villages face extinctionIt is predicted that 896 towns and villages across Japan will no longer be viable by 2040 (see map below or an interactive Japanese version here). A former minister for internal affairs, Hiroya Masuda, describes this as "local extinction".
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New species of lemur found on MadagascarA team of researchers with members from the State University of New York Polytechnic Institute, Omaha's Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium, Global Wildlife Conservation and the Madagascar Biodiversity Partnership has discovered a new species of lemur living in southeastern Madagascar. In their paper published in the journal Primate Conservation, the group describes features of the new species, some of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why it might be time to eradicate sex segregation in sportsIn many areas, gender equality has been improving gradually. But this is not the case in sport, where women continue to be banned for being insufficiently feminine to be permitted to compete.
11h
Ingeniøren
Strid om en tikrone: Forbrugere skal selv tjekke fjernaflæst vandmåler17.000 forbrugere er blevet bedt om at aflæse deres vandmåler manuelt, selvom den kan fjernaflæses digitalt. Problemet er: Hvad koster data nu om dage?
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The Scientist RSS
DOE-Sponsored Oak Ridge National Laboratory to Cut 100 More JobsPrevious layoffs affected research areas including climate change and fusion energy.
11h
Big Think
How the Mediterranean Diet Can Help You Live Live Longer and Think BetterNew studies support the benefits of the Mediterrean Diet. Read More
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Science | The Guardian
Kew Gardens’ Temperate House to reopen after £41m restorationRare plants among hundreds of specimens being planted in new beds at world’s largest surviving Victorian glasshouse The scrawny trunk and dull leathery spiky leaves of one of the rarest plants in the world will soon be admired in a new light at Kew Gardens, as Encephalartos woodii flourishes again at the north end of the restored Temperate House, the largest Victorian glasshouse in the world. As
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Science | The Guardian
Toughen up, senior snowflakes, swearing at work is good for us | André SpicerEvidence suggests that older people are more offended by foul language, but perhaps they should embrace it and find something else to complain about Taking offence has become hobby number one among the young. According to some, today’s teens and twentysomethings are part of generation snowflake . These fragile souls are supposed to find any intrusion into their carefully curated digital universe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What do cold snaps have to do with climate change?A record-shattering cold gripped the Northeastern United States during late December and early January. Meanwhile, a so-called bomb-cyclone brought in Winter Storm Grayson with its blizzard winds and heavy snowfall. Is all of this extreme weather normal, a product of global warming, or perhaps bone-chilling evidence that our climate is not really heating up after all?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How women in media won some pay equality in the 1970s, and why they're still fighting todayBBC China editor Carrie Gracie resigned her position last week in an open letter protesting the BBC's "illegal" gender pay inequality and "the culture of secrecy that helps perpetuate it". The Equalities and Human Rights Commission is investigating Gracie's claims. A BBC spokesperson has responded, saying:
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The first precise measurement of a single molecule's effective chargeFor the first time, scientists have precisely measured the effective electrical charge of a single molecule in solution. This fundamental insight of an SNSF Professor could also pave the way for future medical diagnostics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists have accidentally found the oldest ever butterfly or moth fossilsButterflies and moths, the Lepidoptera, are among the most beautiful of insects, familiar to almost everyone through thousands of different species from all around the world. But how they evolved has been something of a mystery to scientists because of a surprising lack of Lepidoptera fossils.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The stories behind Aboriginal star names now recognised by the world's astronomical bodyFour stars in the night sky have been formally recognised by their Australian Aboriginal names.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Soft material inspired by grasshoppers for better electrode adhesiveResearchers at ETH Zurich have developed a new type of health-monitoring electrode that exhibits optimum adhesion to skin and can record high quality signals. Two young spin-off founders want to turn it into a marketable product as early as this year.
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New Scientist - News
Copycat justice has turned US counties into execution hotspotsCriminals assigned the death penalty are five times more likely to be executed in some US counties than in others – a trend that some argue is unconstitutional
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New Scientist - News
Science helped cause the opioid crisis – now it must make amendsA US commission recommending how to solve the painkiller addiction killing 175 Americans a day also shows how opinion got in the way of fact to help cause the problem
11h
Feed: All Latest
A Child Abuse Prediction Model Fails Poor FamiliesWhy Pittsburgh’s predictive analytics misdiagnoses child maltreatment and prescribes the wrong solutions
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smart buildings that can manage our electricity needsResearchers at EPFL have developed a system that can be installed in a building to collect data on people's energy usage. The aim is then to send this data directly to a smart electric grid that will allocate resources optimally.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Hot topicCan a series of scorching summers be blamed on climate change, and what do they tell us?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wavy transistors that vertically gain width without increasing their on-chip footprint for future flexible displaysFlexible ultrahigh resolution displays have benefits for next-generation mobile electronics, such as point-of-care medical diagnostic devices. KAUST has developed a unique transistor architecture that boosts the performance of the display circuitry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Enzyme from briny deep resurrected in the labMysterious microbes that thrive in hot and super-salty brine lakes at the bottom of the Red Sea could yield a treasure trove of new enzymes for industrial applications—if only scientists had access to their biological bounty.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A burning ambition for clean fuelFuel combustion chemist Mani Sarathy began his research career as an environmental engineer studying the environmental impact of pollution. But before long, Sarathy realized that the most effective way to mitigate environmental damage was to stop pollution at its source. Sarathy tells us, "I got into combustion research to look at how we could maximize engine efficiency and minimize exhaust emissi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technology for diagnosing immunity to EbolaA promising new approach to detect immunity to Ebola virus infection has been developed by researchers from i-sense in a collaboration between UCL and Imperial College London.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Light may unlock a new quantum dance for electrons in grapheneA team of researchers has devised a simple way to tune a hallmark quantum effect in graphene—the material formed from a single layer of carbon atoms—by bathing it in light. Their theoretical work, which was published recently in Physical Review Letters , suggests a way to realize novel quantum behavior that was previously predicted but has so far remained inaccessible in experiments.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Huge oil spill left after burning tanker sinks off ChinaFuel from the Sanchi has spread over more than 100 sq km and could badly damage marine life.
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Science | The Guardian
Don't knock the flu jab – it’s a modern miracleAs the flu season begins to ramp up, so too do the annual complaints about the vaccine “ The flu jab DOESN’T work, officials admit ,” scolded a recent headline from the Daily Mail . Meanwhile, in the comments under that article, and in shadier regions of the internet, conspiracy theorists are having their usual annual field day: the flu vaccine actually makes people sick; the World Health Organis
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Feed: All Latest
Don’t Blame Social Media for the "Oprah For President" Talk—Blame Everyone.Mass disdain for the political system makes it easy for anyone with a social network to launch themselves into politics.
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Feed: All Latest
Texas Instruments' New Headlights Dazzle With a Million PixelsToo bad federal regulations won't allow the cool tech on American roads.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Tiny scales in ancient lagoon may be the first fossil evidence of the moth-butterfly lineFancy liquid-sipper mouthparts might have evolved before the great burst of flower evolution
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Science : NPR
Oregon Artist Turns Dead Creatures Into Beautiful CompositionsChristopher Marley only uses specimens that have died from natural causes or been caught as fishing bycatch. Then he freeze-dries them, which is why they seem so alive in his artwork. (Image credit: Christopher Marley Studio)
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The Atlantic
The Trump Protest-Song Boom, in the Eye of HistoryThe first anniversary of Donald Trump’s presidency is also the first anniversary of a landmark weekend for art and politics. Trump’s inauguration festivities brought Toby Keith and 3 Doors Down to the National Mall—amid rumors that bigger performers had turned down invitations. Then came the Women’s March, in which pink-hatted protestors sang taunts at the new president, activists and pop stars s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UK's Guardian daily goes tabloid to cut costsBritain's Guardian newspaper has adopted a new tabloid format and a re-designed masthead with simple black lettering from Monday as part of a drive to cut costs.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seeking music edge, Apple buys song recognition app ShazamApple said Monday that it would buy leading song recognition app Shazam in a fresh bid to secure an edge in the intensifying battle of streaming services.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How climate change alters plant growthGlobal warming affects more than just plant biodiversity—it even alters the way plants grow. A team of researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) joined forces with the Leibniz Institute for Plant Biochemistry (IPB) to discover which molecular processes are involved in plant growth. In Current Biology, the group presents its latest findings on the mechanism controlling growth a
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists observe particles acting coherently as they undergo phase transitionsThe common link between liquid-crystal TVs and the birth of the universe, when you look at the big picture, is that they are both characterized by the intriguing phenomenon in which matter abruptly changes states.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Jupiter's colorful cloud beltsColorful swirling cloud belts dominate Jupiter's southern hemisphere in this image captured by NASA's Juno spacecraft.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists unravel mystery of stable fullerenesScientists at the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russia) have explained the stability of nitrogen-doped fullerenes, which makes their industrial production and application easier. The article was published in Physica E: Low-dimensional Systems and Nanostructures.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Robots aid better understanding of phytoplankton bloomsPhytoplankton blooms are one of the most important factors contributing to the efficiency of the carbon pump in the North Atlantic Ocean. To better understand this phenomenon, the ERC remOcean project, led by researchers at the Laboratoire d"Océanographie de Villefranche (CNRS/UPMC), has developed a new class of robots: biogeochemical profiling floats, the first robots able to collect data in the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sanchi oil spill contamination could take three months to reach mainlandWater contaminated by the oil currently leaking into the ocean from the Sanchi tanker collision is likely to take at least three months to reach land, and if it does the Korean coast is the most likely location. However, the oil's fate is highly uncertain, as it may burn, evaporate, or mix into the surface ocean and contaminate the environment for an extended duration.
12h
Scientific American Content: Global
Alexa, What Are You Doing with My Family's Personal Info?Amazon Alexa, Google Assistant and several smart-home technologies that debuted at last week’s CES add convenience but also raise privacy concerns -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biochemists show how evolution combines a nutrient sensor from existing elementsA team led by the Freiburg biochemist Prof. Dr. Susana Andrade has characterized a protein that enables certain microorganisms to recognize and absorb ammonium in their environment. Ammonium is considered a toxin that pollutes ecosystems—but for these bacteria it represents an important nutrient and energy source. The researchers have published their findings in the scientific journal Nature Commu
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Subtle changes in chemical structure can affect drug toxicityNUS pharmaceutical scientists have discovered the mechanisms involved when small chemical modifications to certain pharmaceutical drugs may cause harm instead of improving treatment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An efficient approach of conjugated tetraenes from butadiene and alkynesConjugated tetraenes are important key substructures in electronic materials, natural products and pharmaceutical molecules. However, they are difficult to synthesize. They are conventionally prepared by repetitions of the stoichiometric reactions using phosphorus reagents and subsequent reduction and partial oxidation. For making one C=C double bond, one needs to conduct 3 step reactions by this
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Future weather forecasting—it's all in the 'MRI' of cloudsAnalyzing and determining the structure of clouds remains a challenge for scientists trying to forecast weather. A team of researchers at the Stony Brook University School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS), led by Professor Pavlos Kollias, is using news types or radar in combination with current meteorology technology to take an "MRI" of clouds. In the same way an MRI and other imaging te
13h
BBC News - Science & Environment
'Floating on air' after surgeons remove 19kg tumourWatch surgeons as they remove a 19.5kg tumour from a woman's body.
13h
The Scientist RSS
Californias Owls Being Exposed to Rat PoisonResearchers suspect the source of the toxins may be some of the state's 50,000 or so marijuana farms.
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The Atlantic
Can Government Officials Have You Arrested for Speaking to Them?If a citizen speaks at a public meeting and says something a politician doesn’t like, can the citizen be arrested, cuffed, and carted off to the hoosegow? Suppose that, during this fraught encounter, the citizen violates some law—even by accident, even one no one has ever heard of, even one dug up after the fact—does that make her arrest constitutional? Deyshia Hargrave, meet Fane Lozman. You nee
13h
The Atlantic
How the Tet Offensive Undermined American Faith in GovernmentWhen Americans wince upon hearing presidents make proclamations about foreign policy, the legacy of the 1968 Tet Offensive looms large. On January 30, at the start of the sacred Vietnamese holiday of Tet, which celebrated the start of the new lunar year, the North Vietnamese and the Vietcong launched a massive military offensive that proved the battle raging in Southeast Asia was far from over, a
13h
Ingeniøren
OL-ingeniør: Sådan sniger du toptræning ind i en hektisk hverdagJob, familie, OL. Tre krævende ting i livet, som civilingeniør og langrendsløber ved OL i Sydkorea Martin Møller skal få til at spille.
13h
Ingeniøren
Undervisningsminister: Ingen ordentlige retningslinjer for brug af data om børnMerete Riisager vurderer, at der mangler dataetiske principper, efter kommuner har brugt trivselsdata om børn og unge til sagsbehandling.
13h
Ingeniøren
Smart grid-system skal udnytte Samsøs vedvarende energiHvis Samsø skal udnytte den egenproducerede vedvarende energi til fulde, er det nødvendigt at gentænke måden, den distribueres på.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Turkey unveils route of 45 km 'Istanbul Canal'The Turkish government on Monday unveiled the route of its planned new canal for Istanbul, a hugely ambitious 45 kilometre (28 mile) project designed to be its answer to the famed artificial shipping lanes in Panama or Egypt's Suez.
14h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Psykiske arbejdsskader rammer hårdere end fysiskeMedarbejdere, der får stress eller andre psykiske lidelser på jobbet, står langt ringere...
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Identifying species via environmental DNAEnvironmental DNA analysis makes it possible to detect water organisms without having to capture them first. For the first time, a team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) systematically investigated the effect of various environmental factors on environmental DNA analyses. By doing so, the researchers have made an important step towards the standardized application of this method for the
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thinking outside the box on climate mitigationIn a new commentary in the journal Nature Climate Change, IIASA researchers argue that a broader range of scenarios is needed to support international policymakers in limiting climate change to under 2°C above pre-industrial levels, and to avoid potential negative environmental and social consequences of carbon dioxide removal on a massive scale.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists found excitons in nickel oxide for the first timeRussian scientists from Ural Federal University (UrFU), together with their colleagues from Institute of Metal Physics of the Ural Department of Russian Academy of Sciences, have studied fundamental characteristics of nickel oxide nanocrystals and found excitons on the light absorption edge for the first time. An exciton is an electron-hole pair bound with electrostatic coupling that migrates in a
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Frequent growth events and fast growth rates of fine aerosol particles in BeijingSerious environmental problems have arisen alongside the rapid economic development of China, including the well-known issue of haze pollution. Not only does haze bring low atmospheric visibility, causing traffic-related problems, but it can also damage human health, and affect other aspects of the weather and climate, directly or indirectly. Secondary aerosol formation and rapid increases in aero
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Maintaining canola oil qualityCanola and other edible oils are easily affected by light irradiation or heat treatment. Since such processes deteriorate the oil quality, affecting flavor, understanding this oxidation process is imperative to identify effective quality control measures, such as the best way to package or store oil.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Renault posts record year for car salesRenault sold a record number of cars last year, the French carmaker said Monday, with global unit sales reaching 3.76 million, a rise of 8.5 percent over 2016.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World's fifth largest diamond discovered in LesothoA diamond thought to be the fifth largest of gem quality ever found has been discovered in Lesotho, miner Gem Diamonds said Monday, and could be worth as much as $40 million.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Feinstein Institute discovers genes that repair spinal cord in fish are also in humansNorthwell Health's Feinstein Institute for Medical Research Associate Professor Ona E. Bloom, PhD, along with colleagues at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), published today in Scientific Reports that many of the genes that repair an injured spinal cord in a fish called the lamprey are also active in the repair of the peripheral nervous system in mammals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genes that aid spinal cord healing in lamprey also present in humans, MBL team discoversMany of the genes involved in natural repair of the injured spinal cord of the lamprey are also active in the repair of the peripheral nervous system in mammals, according to a study by a collaborative group of scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) and other institutions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New application for acoustics helps estimate marine life populationsResearchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego were part of an international team that for the first time used hydroacoustics as a method for comparing the abundance of fishes within and outside marine protected areas (MPAs).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Robots aid better understanding of phytoplankton bloomsPhytoplankton blooms are one of the most important factors contributing to the efficiency of the carbon pump in the North Atlantic Ocean. To better understand this phenomenon, an ERC project, led by researchers at the Laboratoire d'Océanographie de Villefranche (CNRS/UPMC), has developed a new class of robots able to collect data in the ocean throughout the year. Using these unparalleled data, the
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists use hydroacoustics to find abundance of marine life in reserve is 4 times greater than in surrounding watersResearchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego were part of an international team that for the first time used hydroacoustics as a method for comparing the abundance of fishes within and outside marine protected areas (MPAs).
14h
Dagens Medicin
Læge bliver løsgænger i regionsrådMarianne Mørk Mathiesen melder sig ud af Liberal Alliance i protest
14h
Science : NPR
For Now, Sequencing Cancer Tumors Holds More Promise Than ProofSequencing the DNA of cancer tumors to help pinpoint treatment is an emerging element of precision medicine. While patients and doctors alike want these tests, they often don't benefit patients. (Image credit: Meredith Rizzo/NPR)
14h
Dagens Medicin
Nytænkning som løftestang for diabetes og folkesundhedenDer opstod en ny model, da en erhvervsdrivende fond og det offentlige sundhedsvæsen for et år siden etablerede den store satsning Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen. Men kan en satsning på et enkelt område virkelig være til gavn for alle? Min påstand er ja!
15h
Ingeniøren
Fremtidens batteri kan være lavet af vand og saltMed en øgning af spændingen i en battericelle til 2,6 volt kan vand og salt være et bud på fremtidens elektrolyt til stationære anvendelser.
15h
Ingeniøren
Ugens job: Rekordmange ledige stillinger for ingeniører og naturvidenskaberePå dagens liste finder du job for ingeniører og naturvidenskabelige kandidater i flere forskellige firmaer. Blandt andet som specialist, projektleder, konsulent og mere endnu.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Earworm melodies with strange aspects' – what happens when AI makes musicThe first full-length mainstream music album co-written with the help of artificial intelligence (AI) was released on 12 January and experts believe that the science behind it could lead to a whole new style of music composition.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lava flowing from Philippine volcano, thousands evacuatedMore than 9,000 people have evacuated the area around the Philippines' most active volcano as lava flowed down its crater Monday in a gentle eruption that scientists warned could turn explosive.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Airbus overtakes Boeing, says could halt A380 programme (Update)European aerospace giant Airbus overtook arch-rival Boeing in terms of aircraft orders last year, but warned that it could cease making its A380 jet if it does not receive any more orders for the supersize plane.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amid tax and trade concerns, Detroit auto show offers nostalgia, glamorThe Detroit auto show arrived Sunday with showman's flair, as the car industry tied its latest offerings to American nostalgia and Hollywood glamor.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Japan's SoftBank Group soars on listing reportsShares in Japan's SoftBank Group soared six percent Monday on reports it could list its mobile unit, raising up to $18 billion in one of the country's biggest public offerings.
17h
Ingeniøren
Sundhedsplatformen sender ikke-anonymiserede sundhedsdata til USAVi har brug for en forventningsafstemning om, hvordan man håndterer sundhedsdata, mener formand for Patientdataforeningen.
17h
Science | The Guardian
Can you solve it? Le Sudoku français est arrivé!Savour a new puzzle from across the Channel Bonjour guzzleurs! Today’s puzzle comes from France. It is called Garam, and provides some spice for the brain.... Continue reading...
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Volkswagen reports record global car sales in 2017Volkswagen said Sunday that its namesake brand sold more vehicles worldwide in 2017 than ever before, a sign it is recovering from a bruising emissions-cheating scandal three years ago.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First method to detect illicit drone filming developedThe first technique to detect a drone camera illicitly capturing video is revealed in a new study published by Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) and Weizmann Institute of Science cyber security researchers. The study addresses increasing concerns about the proliferation of drone use for personal and business applications and how it is impinging on privacy and safety.
17h
Science | The Guardian
Psychotherapist Philippa Perry's guide to resilience in the workplaceWant to be less stressed in 2018? The author and broadcaster advises on how to deal with difficult times at work Your strength is not in your resilience, it is in recognising and owning your vulnerability. We need to be ourselves with other people for most of the time, not just the person we feel we ought to be. If you are in a business environment where everyone seems to be wearing a “game-face”
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US to 'carefully' review GM request on autonomous car: ChaoRegulators will "carefully and responsibly" review General Motors' request to test an autonomous car without a steering wheel, US Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao said Sunday.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dutch millers get fresh wind in their sailsAn icy wind blows the windmill's soaring sails, turning them quickly and cranking the large stone wheels inside in a time-honoured method of grinding grain.
17h
Science | The Guardian
Gene editing – and what it really means to rewrite the code of lifeWe now have a precise way to correct, replace or even delete faulty DNA. Ian Sample explains the science, the risks and what the future may hold So what is gene editing? Scientists liken it to the find and replace feature used to correct misspellings in documents written on a computer. Instead of fixing words, gene editing rewrites DNA, the biological code that makes up the instruction manuals of
18h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An efficient approach of conjugated tetraenes from butadiene and alkynesTUAT researchers have achieved the new synthetic route of conjugated tetraenes from inexpensive and easily available 1,3-butadiene and substituted acetylenes by a one-pot approach under mild conditions. This is the most straightforward synthetic method ever reported. This new method has been published in the ACS journal, Organometallics.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The presence of sexual violence in neighborhoods erodes feelings of safetyFeelings about the frequency of rape or other forms of sexual assault in a neighborhood are significantly tied to women's -- but not men's -- perceptions of its safety, according to new research.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Experts seek to standardize treatments for childhood rheumatic diseasesPediatric rheumatic diseases are a varied group of rare diseases including juvenile forms of arthritis, lupus, fibromyalgia, and other conditions. Currently, there is considerable variability in how patients with these diseases are treated in clinical practice, making it difficult to understand which therapies work best.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An emergency response to Canada's opioid overdose crisisTo help address the opioid overdose epidemic, Canada should develop a regulated program to distribute opioids and prevent deaths, argues a commentary in CMAJ.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flawed research methods exaggerate the prevalence of depressionThe common practice of using patient self-report screening questionnaires rather than diagnostic interviews conducted by researchers has resulted in overestimates of the prevalence of depression, according to an analysis in CMAJ.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Teens who were severely bullied as children at higher risk of suicidal thoughts, mental health issueTeens who were severely bullied as children by peers are at higher risk of mental health issues, including suicidal thoughts and behaviours, according to new research in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First method to detect illicit drone filming developed'The beauty of this research is that someone using only a laptop and an object that flickers can detect if someone is using a drone to spy on them,' says Ben Nassi, a Ph.D. student in the BGU Department of Software and Information Systems Engineering and a researcher at the BGU Cyber Security Research Center (CSRC). 'While it has been possible to detect a drone, now someone can also tell if it is
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sanchi oil spill contamination could take three months to reach mainlandWater contaminated by the oil currently leaking into the ocean from the Sanchi tanker collision is likely to take at least three months to reach land, and if it does the Korean coast is the most likely location. However, the oil's fate is highly uncertain, as it may burn, evaporate, or mix into the surface ocean and contaminate the environment for an extended duration.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Aerial vehicle flying freely with independently controlled main wingsProfessor Dongsoo Har and his team in Cho Chun Shik Graduate School of Green Transportation in Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) lately developed an aerial vehicle that is able to control the main wings separately and independently.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel real-time undersea wireless communications and surveillance technologyResearchers will design, deploy and evaluate a first-of-its-kind software-defined testbed for real-time undersea wireless communications (data, voice, and video streaming) and surveillance.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Estrogen-mimicking compounds in foods may reduce effectiveness of breast cancer treatmentA new study suggests breast cancer patients taking palbociclib/letrozole combination therapy should avoid foods rich in xenoestrogens.
20h
Ingeniøren
Barsel: Fem regler, du bør kendeHusk alle de vigtige detaljer, når du skal søge barsel. Jobfinder giver en guide til ansatte i det offentlige, medarbejdere i det private og studerende under uddannelse.
20h
Ingeniøren
DSB forsøgte at ændre Rigsrevisionens kritik af IC4-arbejdetDSB forsøgte flere gange at påvirke konklusionen i Rigsrevisionens beretning om forløbet med IC4, viser aktindsigt.
20h
The Atlantic
The Humiliation of Aziz AnsariAziz Ansari MisconductSexual mores in the West have changed so rapidly over the past 100 years that by the time you reach 50, intimate accounts of commonplace sexual events of the young seem like science fiction: You understand the vocabulary and the sentence structure, but all of the events take place in outer space. You’re just too old. This was my experience reading the account of one young woman’s alleged sexual e
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NHS bowel scope uptake boosted by a fifth when patients sent reassuring remindersBowel scope screening increased by more than a fifth (21.5 percent) when people were sent additional reminders with a leaflet that addressed common concerns, according to a new study funded by Cancer Research UK.
1d
Futurity.org
The Milky Way ate 11 other galaxiesAstronomers have discovered 11 new stellar streams—remnants of smaller galaxies torn apart and devoured by our Milky Way. The finding is among the highlights of the first three years of survey data from the Dark Energy Survey —research on about 400 million astronomical objects, including distant galaxies as well as stars in our own galaxy. This image shows the entire Dark Energy Survey field of v
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Science-Based Medicine
The final push to pass a federal version of the cruel sham of “right-to-try” is under wayRight-to-try laws are a cruel sham that claim to help terminally ill patients by providing them with earlier access to experimental therapeutics, even though they do very little in this regard. Promoted primarily by the libertarian think tank the Goldwater Institute, in reality they are a strategy to weaken the FDA's regulatory power to assure that marketed drugs are safe and effective. Now, a fin
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Futurity.org
Making these nanotube fibers by hand is actually fasterA new method to quickly produce fibers from carbon nanotubes is both handmade and high tech. The method allows researchers to make short lengths of strong, conductive fibers from small samples of bulk nanotubes in about an hour. In 2013, Rice University chemist Matteo Pasquali found a way to spin full spools of thread-like nanotube fibers for aerospace, automotive, medical, and smart-clothing app
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Futurity.org
Watch: Drones give closer view of active volcanoWith the help of drones, researchers are investigating an active Nicaraguan volcano that could pose a hazard to millions of people. Masaya volcano is located in an active volcanic and seismic zone and is nearby Managua, Nicaragua’s capital. The researchers are using many methods, including drones, to study how the volcano and surrounding earth are changing over time. The drones are able to captur
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Futurity.org
Marijuana farms are poisoning spotted owlsNorthern spotted owls and other wildlife are being exposed to high levels of rat poison in northwest California, and illegal marijuana farms are the most likely source point, a new study suggests. Researchers found that 7 of 10 northern spotted owls collected tested positive for rat poison—as did 40 percent of 84 barred owls. The study is the first published account of anticoagulant rodenticide i
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Electronic modulation of carotid sinus nerve can be used as a treatment for type 2 diabetes in ratsThe team lead by Sílvia Vilares Conde, from CEDOC-NOVA Medical School, in collaboration with the pharmaceutical company Galvani Bioelectronics, demonstrated through findings in rats that is possible to restore insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis, by modulating electrically the carotid sinus nerve, the sensitive nerve that connects the carotid body with the brain.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Tickle Is Out Of Jail And Ready To Straighten Up And Fly Right | Moonshiners#Moonshiners | Tuesdays 9p Tim and JT take Tickle out for his first meal as a free man in nearly a year. Will he be able to stay out of trouble? Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/moonshiners/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/MoonshinersTV Follow on Twitter: https://t
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