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Neurons Use Virus-Like Proteins to Transmit InformationIn mice and flies, the Arc protein forms capsids and carries genetic information.
7h
Ingeniøren
Topchef i Rambøll: Fire lektier unge ingeniører skal lære på universitetetArbejdsmarkedet udvikler sig konstant. Det samme gør de kompetencer, der er brug for. Studerende såvel som erfarne folk bør derfor få styr på særligt fire ting, mener Rambølls administrerende direktør.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Named after Stanley Kubrick, a new species of frog is a 'clockwork orange' of natureTwo new frog species were discovered in the Amazon Basin. Both had been previously misidentified as another superficially identical species. One of them received a name translating to 'demon' or 'devil' in allusion to the horn-like projections visible on its eyelids. The second one was named in honor of famous American filmmaker Stanley Kubrick, because of his masterpiece A Clockwork Orange. The a
4h
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study suggests shark declines can lead to changes in reef fish body shapesScientists studying nearly identical coral reef systems off Australia discovered something unusual on the reefs subjected to nearly exclusive fishing of sharks—fish with significantly smaller eyes and tails. The study is the first field evidence of body shape changes in fish due to human-driven shark declines from overfishing. These findings shed new light on the cascading effects the loss of the
now
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study suggests shark declines can lead to changes in reef fish body shapesScientists studying nearly identical coral reef systems off Australia discovered something unusual on the reefs subjected to nearly exclusive fishing of sharks--fish with significantly smaller eyes and tails. The study is the first field evidence of body shape changes in fish due to human-driven shark declines from overfishing. These findings shed new light on the cascading effects the loss of the
now
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study advances gene therapy for glaucomaIn a study published today in the scientific journal Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Kaufman and Curtis Brandt, a fellow professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences at UW-Madison, showed an improved tactic for delivering new genes into the eye's fluid drain, called the trabecular meshwork. It could lead to a treatment for glaucoma.
now
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Weather anomalies accelerate the melting of sea iceETH researchers reveal why Arctic sea ice began to melt in the middle of winter two years ago -- and that the increased melting of ice in summer is linked to recurring periods of fair weather.
now
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clockwork under the microscopeCircadian clocks regulate the behaviour of all living things. Scientists from the University of Würzburg have now taken a closer look at the clock's anatomical structures and molecular processes in the honeybee.
now
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Who might benefit from immunotherapy? New study suggests possible markerNew research finds that PDL-1 expressed in antigen presenting cells -- macrophages and dendritic cells found in the tumor microenvironment and in the nearby lymph nodes -- is a better indicator than PDL-1 in the tumor of who will respond to immunotherapy drugs.
now
Live Science
The Internet Is Changing the Way People Feel About ReligionDoes more Internet mean less God? Probably not — but it might mean less church.
4min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Named after Stanley Kubrick, a new species of frog is a 'clockwork orange' of natureTwo new frog species were discovered in the Amazon Basin. Both had been previously misidentified as another superficially identical species. One of them received a name translating to 'demon' or 'devil' in allusion to the horn-like projections visible on its eyelids. The second one was named in honor of famous American filmmaker Stanley Kubrick, because of his masterpiece A Clockwork Orange.
10min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Confined movements: How cells form tubes in confined spacesA team of scientists has described a novel 'microtube'-based platform to study how tubular organs, such as the heart and the kidneys, form under the various topographical restrictions commonly experienced inside the body.
10min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Shale gas is one of the least sustainable ways to produce electricity, research findsShale gas is one of least sustainable options for producing electricity, according to new research.
10min
Live Science
Uganda Confirms Case of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever: What Is It?A 9-year-old boy in Uganda has tested positive for a potentially life-threatening disease called Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever.
14min
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Talk about your death while you're still healthy | Michelle KnoxDo you know what you want when you die? Do you know how you want to be remembered? In a candid, heartfelt talk about a subject most of us would rather not discuss, mortal realist Michelle Knox asks each of us to reflect on our core values around death and share them with our loved ones, so they can make informed decisions without fear of having failed to honor our legacies. "Life would be a lot ea
15min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The Montmaurin-La Niche mandible reveals the complexity of the Neanderthals’ originA team of scientists has examined the Middle Pleistocene Montmaurin-La Niche mandible, which reveals the complexity of the origin of the Neanderthals.
38min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drones confirm importance of Costa Rican waters for sea turtlesA new drone-enabled population survey -- the first ever on sea turtles -- shows that larger-than-anticipated numbers of turtles aggregate in waters off Costa Rica's Ostional National Wildlife Refuge. Scientists estimate turtle densities may reach up to 2,086 animals per square kilometer. The study underscores the importance of the Ostional habitat; it also confirms that drones are a reliable tool
38min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In sweet corn, workhorses winWhen deciding which sweet corn hybrids to plant, vegetable processors need to consider whether they want their contract growers using a workhorse or a racehorse. Is it better to choose a hybrid with exceptional yields under ideal growing conditions (i.e., the racehorse) or one that performs consistently well across ideal and less-than-ideal conditions (i.e., the workhorse)? New research suggests t
38min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pharmaceuticals and other contaminants force fish to work much harder to survivePharmaceuticals and other human-made contaminants are forcing fish that live downstream from a typical sewage treatment plant to work at least 30 percent harder just to survive, researchers have found.
38min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Digitally preserving important Arkansas dinosaur tracksResearchers used LiDAR imaging to digitally preserve and study important dinosaur tracks.
52min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Memory loss from West Nile virus may be preventableMore than 10,000 people in the United States are living with memory loss and other persistent neurological problems that occur after West Nile virus infects the brain. Now, a new study in mice suggests that such ongoing neurological deficits may be due to unresolved inflammation that hinders the brain's ability to repair damaged neurons and grow new ones. When the inflammation was reduced by treat
52min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Decoy molecule created to block pain where it startsPain researchers have developed a new method of reducing pain-associated behaviors with RNA-based medicine, creating a new class of decoy molecules that prevent the onset of pain.
52min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists home in on a potential Anthropocene 'Golden Spike'Scientists are reviewing the potential settings where a global reference section for the Anthropocene might be searched.
52min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nuclear power plants must be able to withstand fires caused by aircraft impactsResearches examined the transport, evaporation and combustion of liquids in large-scale fire incidents.
52min
New on MIT Technology Review
The World’s Biggest Shipping Firm Plans to Track the Planet’s Containers On a Blockchain
59min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drones confirm importance of Costa Rican waters for sea turtlesHundreds of thousands of sea turtles come ashore to lay their eggs during mass-nesting events at Ostional National Wildlife Refuge on Costa Rica's Pacific coast, making it one of the most important nesting beaches in the world.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Citigroup says women have a pay gap of 1% compared to menUnder pressure to provide data on pay equity, US financial giant Citigroup said Tuesday its female and minority employees face a pay gap of just one percent compared to men.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New process could slash energy demands of fertilizer, nitrogen-based chemicalsNitrogen-based synthetic fertilizer forms the backbone of the world food supply, but its manufacture requires a tremendous amount of energy. Now, computer modeling points to a method that could drastically cut the energy needed by using sunlight in the manufacturing process.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hubble weighs in on mass of 3 million billion sunsIn 2014, astronomers found an enormous galaxy cluster contains the mass of a staggering three million billion suns -- so it's little wonder that it has earned the nickname of "El Gordo" ("the Fat One" in Spanish)! Known officially as ACT-CLJ0102-4915, it is the largest, hottest, and brightest X-ray galaxy cluster ever discovered in the distant Universe.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can training improve memory, thinking abilities in older adults with cognitive impairment?A new, first-of-its-kind study was designed to assess whether cognitive training, a medication-free treatment, could improve MCI. Studies show that activities that stimulate your brain, such as cognitive training, can protect against a decline in your mental abilities. Even older adults who have MCI can still learn and use new mental skills.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
T-cells engineered to outsmart tumors induce clinical responses in relapsed Hodgkin lymphomaA research team has validated a way to outfox tumors. They engineered T-cells, essential players in the body's own immune system, to strip tumors of their self-preservation skill and were able to hold Hodgkin lymphoma at bay in patients with relapsed disease for more than four years.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Are amoebae safe harbors for plague?Amoebae, single-celled organisms common in soil, water and grade-school science classrooms, may play a key role in the survival and spread of deadly plague bacteria. New research shows that plague bacteria, Yersinia pestis, not only survive, but thrive and replicate once ingested by an amoeba. The discovery could help scientists understand why plague outbreaks can smolder, stay dormant for years,
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A 'touching sight': How babies' brains process touch builds foundations for learningA new study provides one of the first looks inside the infant's brain to show where the sense of touch is processed -- not just when a baby feels a touch to the hand or foot, but when the baby sees an adult's hand or foot being touched, as well. Researchers say these connections help lay the groundwork for the developmental and cognitive skills of imitation and empathy.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New UVa data center part of $200M microelectronics ventureA new, multimillion-dollar center at the University of Virginia will bring together researchers to eliminate a data bottleneck built into computer systems 70 years ago.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In sweet corn, workhorses winWhen deciding which sweet corn hybrids to plant, vegetable processors need to consider whether they want their contract growers using a workhorse or a racehorse. Is it better to choose a hybrid with exceptional yields under ideal growing conditions (i.e., the racehorse) or one that performs consistently well across ideal and less-than-ideal conditions (i.e., the workhorse)? New research from the U
1h
The Atlantic
Gorgeous Images of the Planet JupiterLaunched in 2011, NASA’s Juno mission to Jupiter arrived in mid-2016, and the spacecraft maneuvered into a 53-day orbit around the gas giant. The JunoCam imaging instrument, one of nine scientific instruments on board, has been returning red, green, and blue filtered images of Jupiter to Earth, and NASA is encouraging anyone to download , process, and share them. Citizen scientists like Seán Dora
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New process could slash energy demands of fertilizer, nitrogen-based chemicalsNitrogen-based synthetic fertilizer forms the backbone of the world food supply, but its manufacture requires a tremendous amount of energy. Now, computer modeling at Princeton University points to a method that could drastically cut the energy needed by using sunlight in the manufacturing process.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Memory gene goes viralTwo independent teams of scientists from the University of Utah and the University of Massachusetts Medical School have discovered that a gene crucial for learning, called Arc, can send its genetic material from one neuron to another by employing a strategy commonly used by viruses. The studies, both published in Cell, unveil a new way that nervous system cells interact.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drones confirm importance of Costa Rican waters for sea turtlesA new drone-enabled population survey -- the first ever on sea turtles -- shows that larger-than-anticipated numbers of turtles aggregate in waters off Costa Rica's Ostional National Wildlife Refuge. Scientists from Duke and UNC-Chapel Hill estimate turtle densities may reach up to 2,086 animals per square kilometer. The study underscores the importance of the Ostional habitat; it also confirms th
1h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Evidence grows that normal childbirth takes longer than we thoughtAnother study finds that labor lasts longer than is traditionally taught — an insight that could mean fewer unnecessary cesarean deliveries.
1h
NYT > Science
Mathilde Krim, Mobilizing Force in an AIDS Crusade, Dies at 91Dr. Krim raised awareness of the scourge and money to fight it while lobbying governments and enlisting a broad spectrum of powerful allies.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds black children face higher risk of death post surgeryA recent study, Race, Preoperative Risk Factors, and Death After Surgery, has found that black children are more than twice as likely to die following surgery than white children and describes race-specific models to predict surgical outcomes. The study is published in the February 2018 issue of Pediatrics.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New process could slash energy demands of fertilizer, nitrogen-based chemicalsNitrogen-based synthetic fertilizer forms the backbone of the world food supply, but its manufacture requires a tremendous amount of energy. Now, computer modeling at Princeton University points to a method that could drastically cut the energy needed by using sunlight in the manufacturing process.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pregnant women in NC exposed to less secondhand nicotine after 'smoking ban'A new study from Duke Health has found pregnant women experienced less secondhand smoke exposure since the 2009 passage of the 'smoking ban' in North Carolina, which outlawed smoking inside public places such as bars and restaurants.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
In sweet corn, workhorses winWhen deciding which sweet corn hybrids to plant, vegetable processors need to consider whether they want their contract growers using a workhorse or a racehorse. Is it better to choose a hybrid with exceptional yields under ideal growing conditions (i.e., the racehorse) or one that performs consistently well across ideal and less-than-ideal conditions (i.e., the workhorse)? New research from the U
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Young people with shared residency have fewer mental problemsYoung people with shared residency after their parents’ divorce have fewer mental problems than young people with other residency arrangements.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How mantis shrimp pack the meanest punchScientists have identified a unique structure that wraps around the mantis shrimp's club to protect it from self-inflicted damage as it crushes hard-shelled prey. The finding will help researchers develop ultra-strong materials for the aerospace and sports industries.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Slow 'hot electrons' could improve solar cell efficiencyPhotons with energy higher than the 'band gap' of the semiconductor absorbing them give rise to what are known as hot electrons. The extra energy is lost very fast, as it is converted into heat so it does not contribute to the voltage. Researchers have now found a material in which these hot electrons retain their high energy levels for much longer.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Math can predict how cancer cells evolveApplied mathematics can be a powerful tool in helping predict the genesis and evolution of different types of cancers, a study has found.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Teens likely to crave junk food after watching TV adsTeenagers who watch more than three hours of commercial TV a day are more likely to eat hundreds of extra junk food snacks, according to a new report.
1h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Mount Mayon: Philippines volcano spews out lavaVolcanologists say a "hazardous explosion" could be imminent, as thousands flee the area around Mount Mayon in the Philippines.
1h
Popular Science
The grease recycling industry feeds on your city’s oily underbellyFat Month While you're just sitting around causing fatbergs. We've all seen the fatbergs that result from improper grease disposal. What happens when waste is disposed of properly? The possibilities are limitless.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New catalyst for hydrogen production is a step toward clean fuelA nanostructured composite material has shown impressive performance as a catalyst for the electrochemical splitting of water to produce hydrogen. An efficient, low-cost catalyst is essential for realizing the promise of hydrogen as a clean, environmentally friendly fuel.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New way to unmask melanoma cells to the immune systemA research team has found a new way to keep the immune system engaged, and is planning to test the approach in a phase 1 clinical trial.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bariatric surgery prolongs lifespan in obeseObese, middle-age men and women who had bariatric surgery have half the death rate of those who had traditional medical treatment over a 10-year period, reports a study that answers questions about the long-term risk of the surgery. Previous studies looking at this question were indefinite because follow-up data was limited due to high costs and patients dropping out.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Improving stroke treatment through machine learningMethods from optogenetics and machine learning should help improve treatment options for stroke patients. Researchers have now developed a computer vision technique to analyze the changes in motor skills that result from targeted stimulation of healthy areas of the brain.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Magnetic liquids improve energy efficiency of buildingsClimate protection and the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions have been on top of global development agendas. Accordingly, research and development projects have been conducted on national and international levels, which aim for the improvement of the CO2-footprint in diverse processes. Apart from particularly energy-intensive sectors of the industry, the building sector in particular is among
1h
Live Science
Face-lift by Lava: Eruption Makes Volcano a Perfect ConeA fiery eruption just gave the Philippines’ most active volcano a face-lift, according to news reports.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
T-cells engineered to outsmart tumors induce clinical responses in relapsed Hodgkin lymphomaA research team that includes Children's National Health System clinician-researchers has validated a way to outfox tumors. They engineered T-cells, essential players in the body's own immune system, to strip tumors of their self-preservation skill and were able to hold Hodgkin lymphoma at bay in patients with relapsed disease for more than four years.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Patients receive most opioids at the doctor's office, not the ERA close examination of federal survey data shows that while many settings including ERs cut back on prescribing opioids for more than a decade, physicians' offices continued to prescribe them.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women who have gestational diabetes in pregnancy are at higher risk of future health issuesWomen who have gestational diabetes mellitus during pregnancy have a higher than usual risk of developing type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and ischemic heart disease in the future.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Epigenetics study helps focus search for autism risk factorsResearchers at Washington State University and elsewhere have associated more than 2,000 DNA regions that control gene expression and are strongly associated with autism. Further study within one of those regions revealed a genetic mutation that is associated with increased risk of developing autism.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gestational diabetes points toward heightened risk of heart diseaseWomen who have gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) during pregnancy have a higher than usual risk of developing type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and ischemic heart disease in the future, according to a retrospective cohort study published this week in PLOS Medicine by Krishnarajah Nirantharakumar from the University of Birmingham, UK, and colleagues.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Spontaneous labor progression for vaginal births is slower than expected in many womenCervical dilatation during labor for vaginal births can progress more slowly than the widely accepted benchmark of 1 cm/hour in many women, according to a new data published this week in PLOS Medicine.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New study shows producers where and how to grow cellulosic biofuel cropsA new report provides practical agronomic data for five cellulosic feedstocks, which could improve adoption and increase production across the country.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Great scat! Bears -- not birds -- are the chief seed dispersers in AlaskaIn southeastern Alaska, brown and black bears are plentiful because of salmon. Their abundance also means they are the primary seed dispersers of berry-producing shrubs, according to a new study.
2h
The Atlantic
Is This the Beginning of the End of the Bitcoin Bubble?Bitcoin is a bubble. That much was clear to economists, investors, and analysts for quite some time. But one of the shortcomings of such analysis is that certainty of an economic bubble offers little insight on how, when, or why that bubble will pop. “I can say almost with certainty that they will come to a bad ending,” Warren Buffett said last week, to the great consternation of crypto fans. “Wh
2h
The Atlantic
Aziz Ansari and the Paradox of ‘No’It was true that everything did seem okay to me, so when I heard that it was not the case for her, I was surprised and concerned. I took her words to heart and responded privately after taking the time to process what she had said. I continue to support the movement that is happening in our culture. It is necessary and long overdue. That was Aziz Ansari, responding to a story that was published a
2h
The Atlantic
The Accidental Poison That Founded the Modern FDAIn 1937, the antibiotic Elixir Sulfanilamide killed more than 100 Americans. “The first time I ever had occasion to call in a doctor for [Joan] ... she was given Elixir of Sulfanilamide,” wrote the mother of one of the drug’s many young victims, in a letter imploring President Franklin Delano Roosevelt to ban the medicine. “All that is left to us is the caring for her little grave.” At the time,
2h
Popular Science
I've been researching products for a year. Here are my favorites.Gadgets The nine best items of the year. IMO. I try out—and buy—products like it's my job. It, in fact, is my job, and has been for exactly one year. Here are the nine items that I had zero regrets purchasing this…
2h
NYT > Science
High-Fat Diet May Fuel Spread of Prostate CancerNew research suggests a strong link between genes, dietary fat and prostate cancer.
2h
Live Science
Is America's Hypersonic Spy Plane Back and Better Than Ever?The SR-71 Blackbird hypersonic spy plane may be back and faster than ever.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Memory gene goes viralTwo independent teams of scientists from the University of Utah and the University of Massachusetts Medical School have discovered that a gene crucial for learning, called Arc, can send its genetic material from one neuron to another by employing a strategy commonly used by viruses. The studies, both published in Cell, unveil a new way that nervous system cells interact.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are amoebae safe harbors for plague?Amoebae, single-celled organisms common in soil, water and grade-school science classrooms, may play a key role in the survival and spread of deadly plague bacteria. New Colorado State University research shows that plague bacteria, Yersinia pestis, not only survive, but thrive and replicate once ingested by an amoeba. The discovery could help scientists understand why plague outbreaks can smolder
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers devise decoy molecule to block pain where it startsFor anyone who has accidentally injured themselves, Dr. Zachary Campbell not only sympathizes, he's developing new ways to blunt pain. Campbell, who researches pain on the molecular level at the University of Texas at Dallas, recently published a study in the journal Nature Communications that describes a new method of reducing pain-associated behaviors with RNA-based medicine, creating a new clas
2h
The Atlantic
Trump Discovers the Costs of Undermining TruthA long weekend with lots of executive time , simmering tensions with politicians of both parties, a looming government shutdown: It’s the most potent cocktail that Donald Trump, a teetotaler, could imbibe, and it produced a predictably jarring and erratic series of statements. Over the course of several days, mostly in tweets, Trump tried to make three points. First, he sought to discredit the id
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Click, tap, buy: Holiday shoppers spent record amount onlineShoppers spent a record amount online during the holiday season.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Latvia's e-health system hit by cyberattack from abroadLatvia said its new e-health system was on Tuesday hit by a large-scale cyberattack that saw thousands of requests for medical prescriptions pour in per second from more than 20 countries in Africa, the Caribbean and the European Union.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World's largest sea turtle could come off 'endangered' listFederal ocean managers say it might be time to move the East Coast population of the world's largest turtle from the United States' list of endangered animals.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
No evidence to support link between violent video games and behaviorResearchers have found no evidence to support the theory that video games make players more violent.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A high-salt diet produces dementia in miceA high-salt diet reduces resting blood flow to the brain and causes dementia in mice.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Want people to work together? Familiarity, ability to pick partners could be keyThe key to getting people to work together effectively could be giving them the flexibility to choose their collaborators and the comfort of working with established contacts, new research suggests.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United StatesWith medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that US life expectancy would improve. Yet there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in American mortality during the last three decades.Researchers say a rise in obesity is to blame, slowing declines in death rates by a half-percentage point per year. The scientists estimate that rising obesity was about twice as import
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New dynamic statistical model follows gene expressions over timeA new model now gives researchers a tool that extends past observing static networks at a single snapshot in time, which is hugely beneficial since network data are usually dynamic.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Diabetes gene found that causes low and high blood sugar levels in the same familyA study of families with rare blood sugar conditions has revealed a new gene thought to be critical in the regulation of insulin, the key hormone in diabetes.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
War in Ukraine has escalated HIV spread in the countryConflict in Ukraine has increased the risk of HIV outbreaks throughout the country as displaced HIV-infected people move from war-affected regions to areas with higher risk of transmission, according to analysis by scientists.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global
Cells Hack Virus-like Protein to CommunicateProteins that researchers think are key to long-term memory formation also move genetic material between cells in both mice and flies -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google 'cloud' grows with new undersea data cablesGoogle on Tuesday said it is adding three new undersea data cables as it continues to bulk up its ability to power cloud services around the world.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A 'touching sight': How babies' brains process touch builds foundations for learningA new study from the University of Washington Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences provides one of the first looks inside the infant's brain to show where the sense of touch is processed -- not just when a baby feels a touch to the hand or foot, but when the baby sees an adult's hand or foot being touched, as well. Researchers say these connections help lay the groundwork for the developmental
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cleveland Clinic researchers find new gene variant linked to deadly prostate cancerCleveland Clinic researchers have confirmed for the first time a mechanistic link between the gene HSD17B4 and deadly, treatment-resistant prostate cancer. The research, led by Nima Sharifi, M.D., Cleveland Clinic Lerner Research Institute, Department of Cancer Biology, shows that men who lack a certain subtype of the gene may be more susceptible to aggressive prostate cancer that does not respond
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
Smart Thermometers Provide a Real-Time View of Spreading Flu Outbreaks
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
AI Beats Humans at Reading Comprehension, but It Still Doesn’t Truly Comprehend Language
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Coping with climate stress in AntarcticaSome Antarctic fish living in the planet's coldest waters are able to cope with the stress of rising carbon dioxide levels the ocean. They can even tolerate slightly warmer waters. But they can't deal with both stressors at the same time, according to a study from the University of California, Davis.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Berguitta heading toward MauritiusNASA's Terra satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and saw Tropical Cyclone Berguitta moving southwest toward the island of Mauritius. A tropical cyclone alert class 2 is in effect for Mauritius.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rates of great earthquakes not affected by moon phases, day of yearThere is an enduring myth that large earthquakes tend to happen during certain phases of the Moon or at certain times during the year. But a new analysis confirms that this bit of earthquake lore is incorrect.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Snapshot of DNA repairScientists have described the crystal structure of RNF168 bound to ubiquitin chains, a crucial interaction for DNA repair, to find a unique interaction.
2h
Viden
Find din dobbeltgænger i klassisk kunstDet er dragende, men ikke altid nemt at se ligheden i Googles seneste eksperiment.
2h
Viden
Internettet er frit for alle - hvis du har altså har teknisk snildeHvad jagten på at få adgang til en sjov app, fortæller om vores komplicerede teknologilandskab.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hubble weighs in on mass of three million billion sunsIn 2014, astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope found that this enormous galaxy cluster contains the mass of a staggering three million billion suns—so it's little wonder that it has earned the nickname of "El Gordo" ("the Fat One" in Spanish)! Known officially as ACT-CLJ0102-4915, it is the largest, hottest, and brightest X-ray galaxy cluster ever discovered in the distant Universe
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study shows producers where and how to grow cellulosic biofuel cropsAccording to a recent ruling by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, 288 million gallons of cellulosic biofuel must be blended into the U.S. gasoline supply in 2018. Although this figure is down slightly from last year, the industry is still growing at a modest pace. However, until now, producers have had to rely on incomplete information and unrealistic, small-scale studies in guidi
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Memory loss from West Nile virus may be preventableMore than 10,000 people in the United States are living with memory loss and other persistent neurological problems that occur after West Nile virus infects the brain. Now, a new study in mice suggests that such ongoing neurological deficits may be due to unresolved inflammation that hinders the brain's ability to repair damaged neurons and grow new ones. When the inflammation was reduced by treat
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hubble weighs in on mass of 3 million billion sunsIn 2014, astronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope found that this enormous galaxy cluster contains the mass of a staggering three million billion suns. Known officially as ACT-CLJ0102-4915, it is the largest, hottest, and brightest X-ray galaxy cluster ever discovered in the distant universe.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Coping with climate stress in AntarcticaSome Antarctic fish living in the planet's coldest waters are able to cope with the stress of rising carbon dioxide levels the ocean. They can even tolerate slightly warmer waters. But they can't deal with both climate change stressors at the same time, according to a study from the University of California, Davis.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New molecular probes to allow non-destructive analysis of bioengineered cartilageA new study describes novel probes that enable non-invasive, non-destructive, direct monitoring of the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in real-time during the formation of engineered cartilage to replace damaged or diseased tissue.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Berguitta heading toward MauritiusNASA's Terra satellite passed over the Southern Indian Ocean and saw Tropical Cyclone Berguitta moving southwest toward the island of Mauritius. A tropical cyclone alert class 2 is in effect for Mauritius.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can training improve memory, thinking abilities in older adults with cognitive impairment?A new, first-of-its-kind study was published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society by scientists from research centers in Montreal and Quebec City, Canada. They designed a study to learn whether cognitive training, a medication-free treatment, could improve MCI. Studies show that activities that stimulate your brain, such as cognitive training, can protect against a decline in your men
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New hope for critically endangered Myanmar snub-nosed monkeyScientists and conservation teams from Fauna & Flora International (FFI), Dali University and the German Primate Center just published a comprehensive conservation status review of one of the world's most threatened primate species, the critically endangered Myanmar snub-nosed monkey (also known affectionately as the 'snubby' by scientists, and as the black snub-nosed monkey in China), Rhinopithe
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify new way to unmask melanoma cells to the immune systemA research team at the Duke Cancer Institute has found a new way to keep the immune system engaged, and is planning to test the approach in a phase 1 clinical trial.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New catalyst for hydrogen production is a step toward clean fuelA nanostructured composite material developed at UC Santa Cruz has shown impressive performance as a catalyst for the electrochemical splitting of water to produce hydrogen. An efficient, low-cost catalyst is essential for realizing the promise of hydrogen as a clean, environmentally friendly fuel.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bariatric surgery prolongs lifespan in obeseObese, middle-age men and women who had bariatric surgery have half the death rate of those who had traditional medical treatment over a 10-year period, reports a study that answers questions about the long-term risk of the surgery. Previous studies looking at this question were indefinite because follow-up data was limited due to high costs and patients dropping out.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study shows producers where and how to grow cellulosic biofuel cropsA new multi-institution report provides practical agronomic data for five cellulosic feedstocks, which could improve adoption and increase production across the country.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Oxysterols guide gut immune cells and are involved in inflammatory bowel diseaseResearchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden report that cholesterol metabolites cause specific immune cells in the large intestine to move, which lies behind the formation of the immune system's important lymphoid tissue in the intestine. The study, published in the journal Immunity, paves the way for a new possible treatment for patients with inflammatory bowel disease.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Magic pools' approach can hurry studies of novel bacteriaTo characterize the genes of newly identified bacteria, microbiologists often introduce mutations within the bacteria using mobile DNA segments called transposons to study the impact of these mutations.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New catalyst for hydrogen production is a step toward clean fuelA nanostructured composite material developed at UC Santa Cruz has shown impressive performance as a catalyst for the electrochemical splitting of water to produce hydrogen. An efficient, low-cost catalyst is essential for realizing the promise of hydrogen as a clean, environmentally friendly fuel.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Want people to work together? Familiarity, ability to pick partners could be keyThe key to getting people to work together effectively could be giving them the flexibility to choose their collaborators and the comfort of working with established contacts, new research suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pharmaceuticals and other contaminants force fish to work much harder to survivePharmaceuticals and other man-made contaminants are forcing fish that live downstream from a typical sewage treatment plant to work at least 30 per cent harder just to survive, McMaster researchers have found.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New insights into underwater adhesivesAn international team of researchers has succeeded in developing a new type of underwater adhesives that are tougher than the natural biological counterpart.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wealth may drive preference for short-term relationshipsAccording to new research by psychologists, resource-rich environments may cause people to favor short-term relationships.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
An eNose is able to sniff out bacteria that cause soft tissue infectionsA recent study has concluded that an electronic nose (eNose) can be used to identify the most common bacteria causing soft tissue infections.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
International study identify the process of rock formed by meteors or nuclear blastsScientists have made a model to map out the phases in which silica (SiO2) transforms into coesite, by analyzing how the inelastic scattering of light among molecules changes according to pressure variation.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cellular seismology: Putting vibrations on the mapUsing a unique technology called 'cell quake elastography,' scientists can now map to the millisecond the elasticity of components vibrating inside a cell. This discovery opens up a whole new field of research in mechanobiology, opening the door to many practical applications in medicine.
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Perineuronal nets and recall of distant fear memories PNN (green) around a parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory neuron (red) in rat V2L. Perineuronal nets (PNN) are gauzy, carbohydrate-rich structures that envelop subsets of neurons in the central nervous system, forming a long-lived extracellular matrix that stabilizes synaptic connections between neurons. PNNs are thought...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Action of steroids and plant triterpenoids on CatSper Ca2+ channels in human sperm [Biological Sciences]The sperm-specific Ca2+ channel CatSper (cation channel of sperm) controls the intracellular Ca2+ concentration and, thereby, the swimming behavior of sperm. Human CatSper is activated by progesterone (1, 2), an oviductal hormone, which stimulates Ca2+ influx and motility responses. By patch-clamp recording from human sperm, Mannowetz et al. (3) studied...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Brenker et al.: The plant triterpenoid pristimerin inhibits calcium influx into human spermatozoa via CatSper [Biological Sciences]In the letter by Brenker et al. (1), the authors assessed actions of various steroids toward the human calcium channel of sperm (CatSper). The experiments, carried out with calcium imaging, are minimally supplemented by electrophysiology. The authors show that all tested steroids activate CatSper with different efficiencies. However, the plant...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Considering hypertonicity in the interpretation and analysis of cell type-specific gene expression pattern in the collecting duct [Biological Sciences]The different parts of the renal nephron have different functions that are related to reabsorption or secretion processes. This is mediated by genes that show a distinct expression pattern along the renal nephron segments (1). The majority of the segments contain only one epithelial cell type. However, the collecting duct...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Edemir: Physiological regulation and single-cell RNA sequencing [Biological Sciences]Tacitly, Edemir (1) points to an important issue in the interpretation of data from single-cell RNA-sequencing experiments. Any given cell can exist in a variety of regulatory states that are affected both by extracellular signals and the prior history of the cell. Consequently, data from single-cell RNA sequencing, such as...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Profile of David M. Sabatini [Profile]As a young doctoral candidate at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, David M. Sabatini was allowed to choose his own research project for his thesis. He chose to investigate the molecular mechanism of rapamycin, a compound with antifungal, antitumor, and immunosuppressant properties. The decision was pivotal, because Sabatini...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Profile of Joachim Frank, Richard Henderson, and Jacques Dubochet, 2017 Nobel Laureates in Chemistry [Profile]In 2017, the Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded to three key pioneers in the birth and development of cryoelectron microscopy (cryo-EM): Jacques Dubochet, Joachim Frank, and Richard Henderson. As a starting graduate student in England, moving from physics to biology and the study of macromolecular structure, I had the...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Microbial proteins for organic material degradation in the deep ocean [Ecology]Organic material is synthesized in the sunlit surface layer of the oceans and that is where most of it is decomposed back to carbon dioxide and other inorganic constituents. However, a small fraction escapes immediate degradation and makes its way into deeper waters, some as far as the bottom thousands...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Endless skulls most beautiful [Evolution]The amazing disparity of living birds is self-apparent, yet immensely challenging to fully quantify. After all, birds are represented by nearly 11,000 living species, comprising a mind-boggling spectrum of shapes, sizes, and colors (1). This incredible variability manifests in an incalculable number of ways (from habitat type to diet to...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Searching for the neural causes of criminal behavior [Neuroscience]All behavior is proximally caused by the brain, but the neural causes of most complex behaviors are still not understood. Much of our ignorance stems from the fact that complex behavior depends on distributed neural control. Unlike a reflex, where the arc from sensation to action can be traced through...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dynamics and mechanisms of intracellular calcium waves elicited by tandem bubble-induced jetting flow [Engineering]One of the earliest events in cellular mechanotransduction is often an increase in intracellular calcium concentration associated with intracellular calcium waves (ICWs) in various physiologic or pathophysiologic processes. Although cavitation-induced calcium responses are believed to be important for modulating downstream bioeffects such as cell injury and mechanotransduction in ultrasound therap
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Creation of disease-inspired biomaterial environments to mimic pathological events in early calcific aortic valve disease [Engineering]An insufficient understanding of calcific aortic valve disease (CAVD) pathogenesis remains a major obstacle in developing treatment strategies for this disease. The aim of the present study was to create engineered environments that mimic the earliest known features of CAVD and apply this in vitro platform to decipher relationships relevant...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Migration-based selections of antibodies that convert bone marrow into trafficking microglia-like cells that reduce brain amyloid {beta} [Applied Biological Sciences]One goal of regenerative medicine is to repair damaged tissue. This requires not only generating new cells of the proper phenotype, but also selecting for those that properly integrate into sites of injury. In our laboratory we are using a cell-migration–based in vivo selection system to generate antibodies that induce...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Atomic mutagenesis of stop codon nucleotides reveals the chemical prerequisites for release factor-mediated peptide release [Biochemistry]Termination of protein synthesis is triggered by the recognition of a stop codon at the ribosomal A site and is mediated by class I release factors (RFs). Whereas in bacteria, RF1 and RF2 promote termination at UAA/UAG and UAA/UGA stop codons, respectively, eukaryotes only depend on one RF (eRF1) to...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Computational modeling of three-dimensional ECM-rigidity sensing to guide directed cell migration [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Filopodia have a key role in sensing both chemical and mechanical cues in surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM). However, quantitative understanding is still missing in the filopodial mechanosensing of local ECM stiffness, resulting from dynamic interactions between filopodia and the surrounding 3D ECM fibers. Here we present a method for characterizing...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Organic matter processing by microbial communities throughout the Atlantic water column as revealed by metaproteomics [Ecology]The phylogenetic composition of the heterotrophic microbial community is depth stratified in the oceanic water column down to abyssopelagic layers. In the layers below the euphotic zone, it has been suggested that heterotrophic microbes rely largely on solubilized particulate organic matter as a carbon and energy source rather than on...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Pairwise comparisons across species are problematic when analyzing functional genomic data [Evolution]There is considerable interest in comparing functional genomic data across species. One goal of such work is to provide an integrated understanding of genome and phenotype evolution. Most comparative functional genomic studies have relied on multiple pairwise comparisons between species, an approach that does not incorporate information about the evolutionary...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Induced GnasR201H expression from the endogenous Gnas locus causes fibrous dysplasia by up-regulating Wnt/{beta}-catenin signaling [Genetics]Fibrous dysplasia (FD; Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man no. 174800) is a crippling skeletal disease caused by activating mutations of the GNAS gene, which encodes the stimulatory G protein Gαs. FD can lead to severe adverse conditions such as bone deformity, fracture, and severe pain, leading to functional impairment and...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Expression of an active G{alpha}s mutant in skeletal stem cells is sufficient and necessary for fibrous dysplasia initiation and maintenance [Genetics]Fibrous dysplasia (FD) is a disease caused by postzygotic activating mutations of GNAS (R201C and R201H) that encode the α-subunit of the Gs stimulatory protein. FD is characterized by the development of areas of abnormal fibroosseous tissue in the bones, resulting in skeletal deformities, fractures, and pain. Despite the well-defined...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Antagonistic regulation of trafficking to Caenorhabditis elegans sensory cilia by a Retinal Degeneration 3 homolog and retromer [Genetics]Sensory neurons often possess cilia with elaborate membrane structures that are adapted to the sensory modality of the host cell. Mechanisms that target sensory transduction proteins to these specialized membrane domains remain poorly understood. Here, we show that a homolog of the human retinal dystrophy gene Retinal Degeneration 3 (RD3)...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cyclic AMP-dependent plasticity underlies rapid changes in odor coding associated with reward learning [Genetics]Learning and memory rely on dopamine and downstream cAMP-dependent plasticity across diverse organisms. Despite the central role of cAMP signaling, it is not known how cAMP-dependent plasticity drives coherent changes in neuronal physiology that encode the memory trace, or engram. In Drosophila, the mushroom body (MB) is critically involved in...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
SRC1 promotes Th17 differentiation by overriding Foxp3 suppression to stimulate ROR{gamma}t activity in a PKC-{theta}-dependent manner [Immunology and Inflammation]Th17 cells are major players in multiple autoimmune diseases and are developmentally contingent on reciprocal functionality between the transcription factor Retineic acid receptor-related orphan nuclear receptor gamma (RORγt) and Forkhead box protein P3 (Foxp3). Here we deciphered a previously unappreciated role of Steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC1) in defining the...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Affinity purification mass spectrometry analysis of PD-1 uncovers SAP as a new checkpoint inhibitor [Immunology and Inflammation]Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) is an essential inhibitory receptor in T cells. Antibodies targeting PD-1 elicit durable clinical responses in patients with multiple tumor indications. Nevertheless, a significant proportion of patients do not respond to anti–PD-1 treatment, and a better understanding of the signaling pathways downstream of PD-1 could provide...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Lymphocytes eject interferogenic mitochondrial DNA webs in response to CpG and non-CpG oligodeoxynucleotides of class C [Immunology and Inflammation]Circulating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is receiving increasing attention as a danger-associated molecular pattern in conditions such as autoimmunity, cancer, and trauma. We report here that human lymphocytes [B cells, T cells, natural killer (NK) cells], monocytes, and neutrophils derived from healthy blood donors, as well as B cells from chronic...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Distinctive roles of age, sex, and genetics in shaping transcriptional variation of human immune responses to microbial challenges [Immunology and Inflammation]The contribution of host genetic and nongenetic factors to immunological differences in humans remains largely undefined. Here, we generated bacterial-, fungal-, and viral-induced immune transcriptional profiles in an age- and sex-balanced cohort of 1,000 healthy individuals and searched for the determinants of immune response variation. We found that age and...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Gene regulation and suppression of type I interferon signaling by STAT3 in diffuse large B cell lymphoma [Medical Sciences]STAT3 is constitutively activated in many cancers and regulates gene expression to promote cancer cell survival, proliferation, invasion, and migration. In diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), activation of STAT3 and its kinase JAK1 is caused by autocrine production of IL-6 and IL-10 in the activated B cell–like subtype (ABC)....
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Viral discovery and diversity in trypanosomatid protozoa with a focus on relatives of the human parasite Leishmania [Microbiology]Knowledge of viral diversity is expanding greatly, but many lineages remain underexplored. We surveyed RNA viruses in 52 cultured monoxenous relatives of the human parasite Leishmania (Crithidia and Leptomonas), as well as plant-infecting Phytomonas. Leptomonas pyrrhocoris was a hotbed for viral discovery, carrying a virus (Leptomonas pyrrhocoris ostravirus 1) with...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Biphasic functions for the GDNF-Ret signaling pathway in chemosensory neuron development and diversification [Neuroscience]The development of the taste system relies on the coordinated regulation of cues that direct the simultaneous development of both peripheral taste organs and innervating sensory ganglia, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. In this study, we describe a novel, biphasic function for glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF)...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
KLU suppresses megasporocyte cell fate through SWR1-mediated activation of WRKY28 expression in Arabidopsis [Plant Biology]Germ-line specification is essential for sexual reproduction. In the ovules of most flowering plants, only a single hypodermal cell enlarges and differentiates into a megaspore mother cell (MMC), the founder cell of the female germ-line lineage. The molecular mechanisms restricting MMC specification to a single cell remain elusive. We show...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Motor dexterity and strength depend upon integrity of the attention-control system [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Attention control (or executive control) is a higher cognitive function involved in response selection and inhibition, through close interactions with the motor system. Here, we tested whether influences of attention control are also seen on lower level motor functions of dexterity and strength—by examining relationships between attention control and motor...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Preservation of the genetic diversity of a local common carp in the agricultural heritage rice-fish system [Sustainability Science]We examined how traditional farmers preserve the genetic diversity of a local common carp (Cyprinus carpio), which is locally referred to as “paddy field carp” (PF-carp), in a “globally important agricultural heritage system” (GIAHS), i.e., the 1,200-y-old rice–fish coculture system in Zhejiang Province, China. Our molecular and morphological analysis showed...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Novel concept of the smart NIR-light-controlled drug release of black phosphorus nanostructure for cancer therapy [Applied Biological Sciences]A biodegradable drug delivery system (DDS) is one the most promising therapeutic strategies for cancer therapy. Here, we propose a unique concept of light activation of black phosphorus (BP) at hydrogel nanostructures for cancer therapy. A photosensitizer converts light into heat that softens and melts drug-loaded hydrogel-based nanostructures. Drug release...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Graphene-based bimorphs for micron-sized, autonomous origami machines [Applied Physical Sciences]Origami-inspired fabrication presents an attractive platform for miniaturizing machines: thinner layers of folding material lead to smaller devices, provided that key functional aspects, such as conductivity, stiffness, and flexibility, are persevered. Here, we show origami fabrication at its ultimate limit by using 2D atomic membranes as a folding material. As...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Evolution of real contact area under shear and the value of static friction of soft materials [Applied Physical Sciences]The frictional properties of a rough contact interface are controlled by its area of real contact, the dynamical variations of which underlie our modern understanding of the ubiquitous rate-and-state friction law. In particular, the real contact area is proportional to the normal load, slowly increases at rest through aging, and...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structure of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase cleaving RNA in an RNA/DNA hybrid [Biochemistry]HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) contains both DNA polymerase and RNase H activities to convert the viral genomic RNA to dsDNA in infected host cells. Here we report the 2.65-Å resolution structure of HIV-1 RT engaging in cleaving RNA in an RNA/DNA hybrid. A preferred substrate sequence is absolutely required to...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Slow domain reconfiguration causes power-law kinetics in a two-state enzyme [Biophysics and Computational Biology]Protein dynamics are typically captured well by rate equations that predict exponential decays for two-state reactions. Here, we describe a remarkable exception. The electron-transfer enzyme quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase (QSOX), a natural fusion of two functionally distinct domains, switches between open- and closed-domain arrangements with apparent power-law kinetics. Using single-molecule FRET...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Folding of maltose binding protein outside of and in GroEL [Biophysics and Computational Biology]We used hydrogen exchange–mass spectrometry (HX MS) and fluorescence to compare the folding of maltose binding protein (MBP) in free solution and in the GroEL/ES cavity. Upon refolding, MBP initially collapses into a dynamic molten globule-like ensemble, then forms an obligatory on-pathway native-like folding intermediate (1.2 seconds) that brings together...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Identification of a ubiquitin-binding interface using Rosetta and DEER [Biophysics and Computational Biology]ExoU is a type III-secreted cytotoxin expressing A2 phospholipase activity when injected into eukaryotic target cells by the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The enzymatic activity of ExoU is undetectable in vitro unless ubiquitin, a required cofactor, is added to the reaction. The role of ubiquitin in facilitating ExoU enzymatic activity is...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
CDC42 binds PAK4 via an extended GTPase-effector interface [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The p21-activated kinase (PAK) group of serine/threonine kinases are downstream effectors of RHO GTPases and play important roles in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, cell growth, survival, polarity, and development. Here we probe the interaction of the type II PAK, PAK4, with RHO GTPases. Using solution scattering we find that...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cargo navigation across 3D microtubule intersections [Biophysics and Computational Biology]The eukaryotic cell’s microtubule cytoskeleton is a complex 3D filament network. Microtubules cross at a wide variety of separation distances and angles. Prior studies in vivo and in vitro suggest that cargo transport is affected by intersection geometry. However, geometric complexity is not yet widely appreciated as a regulatory factor...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Motion parallax in electric sensing [Biophysics and Computational Biology]A crucial step in forming spatial representations of the environment involves the estimation of relative distance. Active sampling through specific movements is considered essential for optimizing the sensory flow that enables the extraction of distance cues. However, in electric sensing, direct evidence for the generation and exploitation of sensory flow...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
The prodrug of 7,8-dihydroxyflavone development and therapeutic efficacy for treating Alzheimer’s disease [Chemistry]The BDNF mimetic compound 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF), a potent small molecular TrkB agonist, displays prominent therapeutic efficacy against Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, 7,8-DHF has only modest oral bioavailability and a moderate pharmacokinetic (PK) profile. To alleviate these preclinical obstacles, we used a prodrug strategy for elevating 7,8-DHF oral bioavailability and brain...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Hypoxia-induced transcription factor signaling is essential for larval growth of the mosquito Aedes aegypti [Developmental Biology]Gut microbes positively affect the physiology of many animals, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these benefits remain poorly understood. We recently reported that bacteria-induced gut hypoxia functions as a signal for growth and molting of the mosquito Aedes aegypti. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that transduction of a...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Aridity weakens population-level effects of multiple species interactions on Hibiscus meyeri [Ecology]Predicting how species’ abundances and ranges will shift in response to climate change requires a mechanistic understanding of how multiple factors interact to limit population growth. Both abiotic stress and species interactions can limit populations and potentially set range boundaries, but we have a poor understanding of when and where...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Unraveling submicron-scale mechanical heterogeneity by three-dimensional X-ray microdiffraction [Engineering]Shear banding is a ubiquitous phenomenon of severe plastic deformation, and damage accumulation in shear bands often results in the catastrophic failure of a material. Despite extensive studies, the microscopic mechanisms of strain localization and deformation damage in shear bands remain elusive due to their spatial−temporal complexities embedded in bulk...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
High fire-derived nitrogen deposition on central African forests [Environmental Sciences]Atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition is an important determinant of N availability for natural ecosystems worldwide. Increased anthropogenic N deposition shifts the stoichiometric equilibrium of ecosystems, with direct and indirect impacts on ecosystem functioning and biogeochemical cycles. Current simulation data suggest that remote tropical forests still receive low atmospheric N deposition...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Developmental origins of mosaic evolution in the avian cranium [Evolution]Mosaic evolution, which results from multiple influences shaping morphological traits and can lead to the presence of a mixture of ancestral and derived characteristics, has been frequently invoked in describing evolutionary patterns in birds. Mosaicism implies the hierarchical organization of organismal traits into semiautonomous subsets, or modules, which reflect differential...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Silk-based multilayered angle-ply annulus fibrosus construct to recapitulate form and function of the intervertebral disc [Medical Sciences]Recapitulation of the form and function of complex tissue organization using appropriate biomaterials impacts success in tissue engineering endeavors. The annulus fibrosus (AF) represents a complex, multilamellar, hierarchical structure consisting of collagen, proteoglycans, and elastic fibers. To mimic the intricacy of AF anatomy, a silk protein-based multilayered, disc-like angle-ply construct..
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Noncanonical agonist PPAR{gamma} ligands modulate the response to DNA damage and sensitize cancer cells to cytotoxic chemotherapy [Medical Sciences]The peroxisome-proliferator receptor-γ (PPARγ) is expressed in multiple cancer types. Recently, our group has shown that PPARγ is phosphorylated on serine 273 (S273), which selectively modulates the transcriptional program controlled by this protein. PPARγ ligands, including thiazolidinediones (TZDs), block S273 phosphorylation. This activity is chemically separable from the canonical activation..
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Cross-genus rebooting of custom-made, synthetic bacteriophage genomes in L-form bacteria [Microbiology]Engineered bacteriophages provide powerful tools for biotechnology, diagnostics, pathogen control, and therapy. However, current techniques for phage editing are experimentally challenging and limited to few phages and host organisms. Viruses that target Gram-positive bacteria are particularly difficult to modify. Here, we present a platform technology that enables rapid, accurate, and...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Conserved features of the primate face code [Neuroscience]A recent paper demonstrated that the pattern of firing rates across ∼100 neurons in the anterior medial face patch is closely related to which human face (of 2,000) had been presented to a monkey [Chang L, Tsao DY (2017) Cell 169:1013–1028]. In addition, the firing rates for these neurons can...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Somatostatin and parvalbumin inhibitory synapses onto hippocampal pyramidal neurons are regulated by distinct mechanisms [Neuroscience]Excitation–inhibition balance is critical for optimal brain function, yet the mechanisms underlying the tuning of inhibition from different populations of inhibitory neurons are unclear. Here, we found evidence for two distinct pathways through which excitatory neurons cell-autonomously modulate inhibitory synapses. Synapses from parvalbumin-expressing interneurons onto hippocampal pyramidal neuro
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Detection of synchronous brain activity in white matter tracts at rest and under functional loading [Neuroscience]Functional MRI based on blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast is well established as a neuroimaging technique for detecting neural activity in the cortex of the human brain. While detection and characterization of BOLD signals, as well as their electrophysiological and hemodynamic/metabolic origins, have been extensively studied in gray matter (GM),...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Lesion network localization of criminal behavior [Neuroscience]Following brain lesions, previously normal patients sometimes exhibit criminal behavior. Although rare, these cases can lend unique insight into the neurobiological substrate of criminality. Here we present a systematic mapping of lesions with known temporal association to criminal behavior, identifying 17 lesion cases. The lesion sites were spatially heterogeneous, including...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Removal of perineuronal nets disrupts recall of a remote fear memory [Neuroscience]Throughout life animals learn to recognize cues that signal danger and instantaneously initiate an adequate threat response. Memories of such associations may last a lifetime and far outlast the intracellular molecules currently found to be important for memory processing. The memory engram may be supported by other more stable molecular...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Localizing softness and stress along loops in 3D topological metamaterials [Physics]Topological states can be used to control the mechanical properties of a material along an edge or around a localized defect. The rigidity of elastic networks is characterized by a topological invariant called the polarization; materials with a well-defined uniform polarization display a dramatic range of edge softness depending on...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Estrogen-dependent epigenetic regulation of soluble epoxide hydrolase via DNA methylation [Physiology]To elucidate molecular mechanisms responsible for the sexually dimorphic phenotype of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) expression, we tested the hypothesis that female-specific down-regulation of sEH expression is driven by estrogen-dependent methylation of the Ephx2 gene. Mesenteric arteries isolated from male, female, ovariectomized female (OV), and OV with estrogen replacement (OVE)...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
When linearity prevails over hierarchy in syntax [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Hierarchical structure has been cherished as a grammatical universal. We use experimental methods to show where linear order is also a relevant syntactic relation. An identical methodology and design were used across six research sites on South Slavic languages. Experimental results show that in certain configurations, grammatical production can in...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Opinion: Measuring how countries adapt to societal aging [Social Sciences]Across the developed world, large increases in life expectancy over the past century, often coupled with decreasing fertility rates, have created older, top-heavy societies. The United Nations projects that by 2050 the world population of “oldest-old” aged 80 years and above will triple to 434 million (1). In the United...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Engineering posttranslational proofreading to discriminate nonstandard amino acids [Systems Biology]Incorporation of nonstandard amino acids (nsAAs) leads to chemical diversification of proteins, which is an important tool for the investigation and engineering of biological processes. However, the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases crucial for this process are polyspecific in regard to nsAAs and standard amino acids. Here, we develop a quality control system...
3h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Alonso-Mora et al., On-demand high-capacity ride-sharing via dynamic trip-vehicle assignment [Correction]COMPUTER SCIENCES, SOCIAL SCIENCES Correction for “On-demand high-capacity ride-sharing via dynamic trip-vehicle assignment,” by Javier Alonso-Mora, Samitha Samaranayake, Alex Wallar, Emilio Frazzoli, and Daniela Rus, which was first published January 3, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1611675114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:462–467). The authors note that Fig. 5D, mean travel distance, in the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Boxell et al., Greater Internet use is not associated with faster growth in political polarization among US demographic groups [Correction]ECONOMIC SCIENCES Correction for “Greater Internet use is not associated with faster growth in political polarization among US demographic groups,” by Levi Boxell, Matthew Gentzkow, and Jesse M. Shapiro, which was first published September 19, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1706588114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:10612–10617). The authors wish to note the following:...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Retraction for Chanmanee et al., Solar photothermochemical alkane reverse combustion [Retractions]CHEMISTRY Retraction for “Solar photothermochemical alkane reverse combustion,” by Wilaiwan Chanmanee, Mohammad Fakrul Islam, Brian H. Dennis, and Frederick M. MacDonnell, which was first published February 22, 2016; 10.1073/pnas.1516945113 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 113:2579–2584). The authors wish to note the following: “We have now demonstrated that our results in...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Great scat! Bears—not birds—are the chief seed dispersers in AlaskaIt's a story of bears, birds and berries.
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Viden
Salget af smarte højttalere eksploderer i USAHver sjette amerikaner har nu en højttaler, der lytter til alt, hvad de siger. 25 procent af brugerne er stødt til i løbet af julen.
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The Atlantic
Not Your Average Brazilian Model“When we tell people we’re from the favela, they automatically think of danger, violence, mess, or worthlessness,” says Caio Guimaraes, a model featured in Geoff Levy’s short film, Rio's Different Face of Fashion . “Of course, there are bad things, but there are a lot of great things, too. It’s a magical world.” Jacarezinho, one of the largest favelas in Rio de Janeiro, is home to a modeling agen
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The Atlantic
Blue Planet II Is the Greatest Nature Series Of All TimeAcross seven episodes of Blue Planet II , viewers are treated to a number of wondrous images. Orcas stun schools of herring by slapping them with their tails. Cuttlefish mesmerize shrimp by splaying out their arms and sending moving clouds of pigment across their skin, like a living gif. Mobula rays cavort in the deep, stirring glow plankton as they move, creating an ethereal scene that looks lik
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research reveals that wealth may drive preference for short-term relationshipsIn a new study titled 'Mating strategy flexibility in the laboratory: Preferences for long- and short-term mating change in response to evolutionarily relevant variables', the research team captured the relationship preferences of 151 heterosexual male and female volunteers (75 men and 76 women) by asking them to look at pictures of 50 potential partners, and to indicate whether they would prefer
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Great scat! Bears -- not birds -- are the chief seed dispersers in AlaskaIn southeastern Alaska, brown and black bears are plentiful because of salmon. Their abundance also means they are the primary seed dispersers of berry-producing shrubs, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Want people to work together? Familiarity, ability to pick partners could be keyThe key to getting people to work together effectively could be giving them the flexibility to choose their collaborators and the comfort of working with established contacts, new research suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Evidence supports 'weekend effect' for mortality after surgeryAs for other types of medical care, surgery appears to be prone to a significant 'weekend effect' -- with higher odds of death when surgery is performed during or one or two days before the weekend, suggests a report in the February issue of Medical Care, published by Wolters Kluwer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists synthesize nanoparticle-antioxidants to treat strokes and spinal cord injuriesAn international science team has developed an innovative therapeutic complex based on multi-layer polymer nano-structures of superoxide dismutase (SOD). The new substance can be used to effectively rehabilitate patients after acute spinal injuries, strokes, and heart attacks.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Smart Thermometers Provide a Real-Time View of Flu Spread
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
In chronic disease care, family helpers are key, but feel left outPeople with diabetes, heart failure and other chronic diseases often live independent lives, without a traditional caregiver. But many have a family member or friend who plays a key supporting role in their health care.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Computer-aided facial analysis helps diagnosisIn rare diseases, the computer-aided image analysis of patient portraits can facilitate and significantly improve diagnosis. This has been demonstrated on the basis of so-called GPI anchor deficiencies. Using data on genetic material, cell surface texture and typical facial features, researchers utilized artificial intelligence methods to simulate disease models.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New study offers insights on genetic indicators of COPD riskResearchers have discovered that genetic variations in the anatomy of the lungs could serve as indicators to help identify people who have low, but stable, lung function early in life, and those who are particularly at risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) because of a smoke-induced decline in lung function.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists unleash power of genetic data to identify disease riskMassive banks of genetic information are being harnessed to shed new light on modifiable health risks that underlie common diseases. Researchers have pioneered a method to integrate data from multiple large-scale studies to assess risk factors such as body mass index (BMI) and cholesterol levels, and their association with diseases including type two diabetes and heart disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Circadian clocks under the microscopeCircadian clocks regulate the behavior of all living things. Scientists have now taken a closer look at the clock's anatomical structures and molecular processes in the honeybee.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Magic pools' approach can hurry studies of novel bacteriaTo characterize the genes of newly identified bacteria, microbiologists often introduce mutations within the bacteria using mobile DNA segments called transposons to study the impact of these mutations.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Hawaii's Missile Alert Gaffe: Why Good Human–Machine Design Is CriticalPoor interface design clearly fails to address human errors -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
What's Hiding Inside Egypt's Great Pyramid? Tiny Robots May Find OutPossibilities range from a new burial chamber to a sealed-off construction passage.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Speed of universe’s expansion remains elusiveA discrepancy between two measures of the universe’s expansion rate suggests the presence of some unknown astronomical feature.
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The Atlantic
What College Is Like as a Single MotherAt the age of 21, Robyn Young was in and out of jobs, living on friends’ couches, and struggling to take care of her daughter. “I recognized that education was a way out,” she says. Young enrolled in college, but she couldn’t keep up with the child-care bill. So she dropped out. According to a report by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR), the number of single mothers in college more
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A high-salt diet produces dementia in miceA high-salt diet reduces resting blood flow to the brain and causes dementia in mice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pharmaceuticals and other contaminants force fish to work much harder to survivePharmaceuticals and other man-made contaminants are forcing fish that live downstream from a typical sewage treatment plant to work at least 30 percent harder just to survive, McMaster researchers have found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Older adults are increasingly identifying -- but still likely underestimating -- cognitive impairmentAn increasing number of older adults are reporting cognitive impairment in their families over the past two decades, according to a new study led by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and East Carolina University's Brody School of Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The only video you'll ever need to watch about gluten (video)Bakers on TV are always talking about whether their goodies have enough gluten. But the masses on Twitter act like gluten is some kind of monster hiding in your bread. So what gives? Is gluten good, or is it bad? This video from Reactions explains what gluten is, how it leads to tasty bread, and the health risks it holds for certain groups of people: https://youtu.be/-JVO62Vzhqc.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Insurance company requirements place heavy administrative burden on physicians seeking to prescribe new cholesterol-lowering drugsA rare glimpse into the prior authorization requirements implemented by public and private insurance providers across the country has found substantial administrative burden for a new class of medications for patients with high cholesterol that places them at high risk for heart attack or stroke, according to new research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
International study identify the process of rock formed by meteors or nuclear blastsScientists from Brazil, China and Italy have reached a model to map out the phases in which silica (SiO2) transforms into coesite rock, by analyzing how the inelastic scattering of light among molecules changes according to pressure variation. Computer simulation was required in the study of coesite, found on a crater produced by a comet or asteroid that hit Mexico and led to extinction of the din
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists identify genes implicated in the high regenerative capacity of embryos and ESCsResearchers at Insilico Medicine, AgeX Therapeutics and the Biogerontology Research Foundation have published a landmark study titled 'Use of deep neural network ensembles to identify embryonic-fetal transition markers: repression of COX7A1 in embryonic and cancer cells' in the journal Oncotarget.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Power stations in cells may protect brain against Parkinson'sImpairment in mitochondria may actually protect the brain in Parkinson's disease.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Fields Medal fallacy: Why this math prize should return to its rootsThe Fields Medal, whose origins date back to the 1930s, will be issued again this year in August to up to four of the world's most accomplished mathematicians under the age of 40. In a commentary for Nature, Michael Barany, a Society of Fellows post-doctoral fellow in history at Dartmouth, proposes that the Fields Medal return to its roots as a tool intended to shape the future of mathematics, rat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Named after Stanley Kubrick, a new species of frog is a 'clockwork orange' of natureTwo new treefrog species were discovered in the Amazon Basin of Bolivia, Peru, and Brazil. Both had been previously misidentified as another superficially identical species.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is it time for a new financial services tribunal?A new article published in Capital Markets Law Journal argues that consumers and banks could benefit from the creation of a quick and inexpensive financial services tribunal, modeled on the Employment Tribunals, to resolve substantial disputes between banks and small and medium sized companies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers propose new gas-solid reaction for high-speed perovskite photodetectorA recent paper published in Nano showed the gas-solid reaction method provides a full coverage of the perovskite film and avoids damage from the organic solvent, which is beneficial for light capture and electrons transportation, resulting in a faster response time and stability for perovskite photodetectors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The Fields Medal fallacy: Why this math prize should return to its rootsThe Fields Medal, whose origins date back to the 1930s, will be issued again this year in August to up to four of the world's most accomplished mathematicians under the age of 40. Experts now propose that the Fields Medal return to its roots as a tool intended to shape the future of mathematics, rather than recognizing those who have already found the spotlight.
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The Atlantic
A Linguistic Guide to Donald Trump's Scatological InsultsDid Donald Trump use the word shithole when referring to African countries in a meeting with lawmakers on immigration policy, or did he actually say shithouse ? These are the scatological depths to which our political discourse has sunk. Let’s stipulate that regardless of whether Trump said shithole or shithouse , it does little to change the underlying racist sentiment of disparaging the whole c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An eNose is able to sniff out bacteria that cause soft tissue infectionsA recent study conducted at the University of Tampere, Tampere University of Technology, Pirkanmaa Hospital District and Fimlab in Finland has concluded that an electronic nose (eNose) can be used to identify the most common bacteria causing soft tissue infections.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Obesity and overweight multiply the risk of suffering cancer and heart diseaseObese women are 12 times more like to get cancer than those of a normal weight. Obese men are twice as likely to develop this disease. The data is the result of the largest Spanish study ever in this field, involving a 10-year follow up of 54,000 people from seven autonomic communities. Only 26 percent of those taking part had a normal weight. The rest were either obese or overweight.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No evidence to support link between violent video games and behaviorResearchers at the University of York have found no evidence to support the theory that video games make players more violent.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rates of great earthquakes not affected by moon phases, day of yearThere is an enduring myth that large earthquakes tend to happen during certain phases of the Moon or at certain times during the year. But a new analysis published in Seismological Research Letters confirms that this bit of earthquake lore is incorrect.
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Live Science
Apollo 17 Astronaut Laments Size of Moon Rock at Trump Signing CeremonyApollo 17 astronaut Jack Schmitt wishes NASA had brought a bigger moon rock to the December 2017 signing ceremony for Space Policy Directive 1.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Perovskite solar cells: Perfection not requiredMetal-organic perovskite layers for solar cells are frequently fabricated using the spin coating technique on industry-relevant compact substrates. These perovskite layers generally exhibit numerous holes, yet attain astonishingly high levels of efficiency. The reason that these holes do not lead to significant short circuits between the front and back contact has now been discovered.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pulsating dissolution found in crystalsWhen researchers zoomed in to the nanometer scale on time-lapse images of dissolving crystals, they found a surprise: Dissolution happened in pulses, marked by waves that spread just like ripples on a pond.
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Popular Science
No one knows if lobsters feel pain, which makes boiling them alive rather complicatedAnimals Switzerland's new laws ask you to consider the lobster. If you like eating lobster but have never cooked one yourself, here’s a brief word of advice: don’t.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The HLF gene protects blood stem cells by maintaining them in a resting stateThe HLF gene is necessary for maintaining our blood stem cells in a resting state, which is crucial for ensuring normal blood production. This has been shown by a new research study from Lund University in Sweden published in Cell Reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Evening hours may pose higher risk for overeating, especially when under stress, study findsExperiments with a small group of overweight men and women have added to evidence that 'hunger hormone' levels rise and 'satiety (or fullness) hormone' levels decrease in the evening. The findings also suggest that stress may increase hunger hormone levels more in the evening, and the impact of hormones on appetite may be greater for people prone to binge eating.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research reveals that wealth may drive preference for short-term relationshipsAccording to new research by psychologists at Swansea University, resource-rich environments may cause people to favor short-term relationships.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cannabis abuse alters activity of brain regions linked to negative emotionYoung people with cannabis dependence have altered brain function that may be the source of emotional disturbances and increased psychosis risk that are associated with cannabis abuse, according to a new study published in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging. The alterations were most pronounced in people who started using cannabis at a young age. Findings reveal potenti
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers offer new model for uncovering true HIV mortality rates in ZambiaA new study that seeks to ascertain HIV mortality rates in Zambia could provide a model for improved national and regional surveillance approaches and, ultimately, more effective HIV treatment strategies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
IDIBELL researchers successfully test a new combination therapy in sarcomasResearchers of the Sarcoma group of the Oncobell program -- Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) have successfully tested a new combined therapy for the treatment of this rare, aggressive tumor type, which affects children and adults.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UNIST provides new insights into underwater adhesivesAn international team of researchers, affiliated with South Korea's Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) has succeeded in developing a new type of underwater adhesives that are tougher than the natural biological counterpart.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New record at ultracold neutron source in MainzResearchers at Mainz University installed an update to their ultracold neutron source. Now the prerequisites are in place that are needed to begin the more sensitive measurements required to determine the lifetime of the free neutron.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists home in on a potential Anthropocene 'Golden Spike'Anthropocene Working Group led by University of Leicester scientists and invited specialists review the potential settings where a global reference section for the Anthropocene might be searched.
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The Atlantic
When an Earthquake Hits Next DoorMost days, it’s easy to forget that coastal California sits at the boundary of two tectonic plates—the Pacific and North American—which are slowly sliding by each other, creating the San Andreas complex of faults. It’s easy to forget that one strand, the Hayward Fault, runs the whole length of the East Bay, cutting under Berkeley and Oakland, just a mile from my house, and that there is a one-in-
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rates of great earthquakes not affected by moon phases, day of yearThere is an enduring myth that large earthquakes tend to happen during certain phases of the Moon or at certain times during the year. But a new analysis published in Seismological Research Letters confirms that this bit of earthquake lore is incorrect.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bile acids fire up fat burningScientists have discovered a novel role for bile acids: converting energy-storing white fat depots into energy-expending beige fat.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Europe's lost forests: Coverage has halved over 6,000 yearsResearch shows more than half of the forests across Europe have been lost over the past 6,000 years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mysteries of a promising spintronic material revealedResearchers have used an unconventional approach to determine the strength of the electron spin interactions with the optical phonons in antiferromagnetic nickel oxide (NiO) crystals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Zoology: Luminescent lizardsChameleons are known to communicate with conspecifics by altering their surface coloration. Munich researchers have now found that the bony tubercles on the heads of many species fluoresce under UV light and form impressive patterns.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Oral health may have an important role in cancer preventionThe bacteria that cause periodontitis, a disease affecting the tissues surrounding the teeth, seems to play a part also in the onset of pancreatic cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Preterm babies may suffer setbacks in auditory brain development, speechPreterm babies born early in the third trimester of pregnancy are likely to experience delays in the development of the auditory cortex, a brain region essential to hearing and understanding sound, a new study reveals. Such delays are associated with speech and language impairments at age 2, the researchers found.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Why Are Some People More Creative Than Others?Neuroscientists have started to identify thinking processes and brain regions involved with creativity -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU sets 2030 target for recyclable plastic packagingThe European Union unveiled plans Tuesday for all plastic packaging in Europe to be recyclable by 2030 and phase out single-use plastic like coffee cups to fight pollution.
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Big Think
The 3 Biggest Mistakes Made by EinsteinDespite his famous successes, Einstein also had some failures. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uber limits driver hours in Britain to 10Uber UK DriversUS ride-hailing app Uber on Tuesday said it would cap the number of hours its drivers can work in Britain from next week in a bid to increase safety after heavy criticism of its business practices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Miles Davis is not Mozart: The brains of jazz and classical pianists work differentlyA musician's brain is different to that of a non-musician. Making music requires an interplay of abilities which are also reflected in more developed brain structures. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig have discovered that these capabilities are embedded in a much more finely tuned way than assumed: The brain activity of jazz pianists differs
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nuclear power plants must be able to withstand fires caused by aircraft impactsIn his dissertation, Topi Sikanen, a Master of Science (Technology) and Research Scientist at VTT, examined the transport, evaporation and combustion of liquids in large-scale fire incidents.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Snapshot of DNA repairOsaka University scientists, in collaboration with The University of Tokyo, describe the crystal structure of RNF168 bound to ubiquitin chains, a crucial interaction for DNA repair, to find a unique interaction.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cryo-electron microscopy reveals shape of heterochromatinScientists from Waseda University, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology and the National Institute for Basic Biology became the first to successfully visualize the structure of heterochromatin, thanks to high-contrast imaging in cryo-electron microscopy. Their study demonstrates Japan's international competitiveness in structural biology research using this technique.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Early results reported on e-health tool to prevent opioid overdoseThe new ORION e-health psychoeducational tool, designed to help opioid-dependent individuals prevent an overdose, can impart new knowledge and impact a person's intention to change opioid abuse behavior, but it did not improve overall self-efficacy in overdose prevention.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Oral health may have an important role in cancer preventionThe bacteria that cause periodontitis, a disease affecting the tissues surrounding the teeth, seems to play a part also in the onset of pancreatic cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is it time for a new financial services tribunal?A new article published in Capital Markets Law Journal argues that consumers and banks could benefit from the creation of a quick and inexpensive financial services tribunal, modeled on the Employment Tribunals, to resolve substantial disputes between banks and small and medium sized companies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
European cities could avoid up to 10,000 premature deaths by expanding cycling networksA study led by researchers from the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) has found that expanding designated cycling networks in cities could provide considerable health and economic benefits.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HKBU scholars develop new technology to decode gene transcriptionA research team from the School of Chinese Medicine (SCM) of Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) has developed the world's first model framework and 'LogicTRN' algorithm to accurately establish a gene regulatory route to analyse the genetic function and understand the biological processes.
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Futurity.org
How your classmates’ DNA could affect your educationOur classmates’ DNA may play a role in how far we go in school, a new paper suggests. “We examined whether the genes of your peer groups influenced your height, weight, or educational attainment. We didn’t find a correlation to height or weight, but did find a small one with how far you go in school,” says Ben Domingue, assistant professor at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Education and
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The Atlantic
Trump Might Finally Get His ShutdownThe first government shutdown of the Donald Trump presidency has been a long time coming. It has been eight months since the president, in a tweet of pique during a soon-forgotten spending fight with Democrats, suggested that the country “needs a good ‘shutdown’” to fix its mess. The two parties veered away from the brink then, and they have kept refueling the federal tank a few gallons at a time
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The Atlantic
How Automation Could Worsen Racial InequalityAll across the world, small projects demonstrating driverless buses and shuttles are cropping up: Las Vegas , Minnesota , Austin , Bavaria , Henan Province in China , Victoria in Australia . City governments are studying their implementation, too, from Toronto to Orlando to Ohio . And last week, the Federal Transit Administration of the Department of Transportation issued a “request for comments”
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Quanta Magazine
What Makes the Hardest Equations in Physics So Difficult?Physics contains equations that describe everything from the stretching of space-time to the flitter of photons. Yet only one set of equations is considered so mathematically challenging that it’s been chosen as one of seven “ Millennium Prize Problems ” endowed by the Clay Mathematics Institute with a $1 million reward: the Navier-Stokes equations, which describe how fluids flow. Last month I wr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genome architecture's surprising role in cell fate decisionsA new study shows unexpected and crucial role of genome architecture in determining cell fate. The work represents an important advance in our understanding of gene regulation and reveals a new layer of complexity that needs to be studied to properly interpret genomics and gene expression in the future. An example of how risky fundamental science with innovative approaches leads to surprising and
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New treatment target for melanoma identifiedResearchers have identified a new therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma. For decades, research has associated female sex and a history of previous pregnancy with better outcomes after a melanoma diagnosis. Now, a research team says it may have determined the reason for the melanoma-protective effect.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
More evidence of link between severe gum disease and cancer riskA new study adds to accumulating research that gum disease is associated with some cancer risk. It reports a 24 percent increase in the risk of cancer among participants with severe gum disease. The highest risk was observed in cases of lung cancer, followed by colorectal cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Redshift space distortions measured by quasars in scientific firstThe eBOSS team released its latest results on Jan. 10, 2018: a measurement of redshift space distortions (RSD) with high significance has been successfully accomplished using observations of quasars distributed 6.8 to 10.5 billion light years away from Earth (with redshifts 0.8 to 2.2). This is the first probe of cosmic structure growth using quasars.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
3-D-printed underwater vortex sensor mimics whiskers of sea animalA new study has shown that a fully 3-D-printed whisker sensor made of polyurethane, graphene, and copper tape can detect underwater vortexes with very high sensitivity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Europe's lost forests -- study shows coverage has halved over 6,000 yearsResearch led by the University of Plymouth shows more than half of the forests across Europe have been lost over the past 6,000 years.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Key player in cell metabolism identifiedPublished in Nature Cell Biology (NCB), the study shows that the EXD2 protein is critical for the mitochondria, the cell's powerhouses, to produce energy. This protein was previously thought to be located in the cell nucleus and to be involved in DNA repair. The results contribute to our basic understanding of mitochondria and suggest that EXD2 could be important for fertility and represent a pote
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pediatric physician-scientists struggle for fundingA new, multicenter study that included Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has found that most NIH grants awarded to researchers in pediatrics during the past five years have been limited to physicians in senior positions at a small number of institutions. The findings indicate an overall downward trend in funding for pediatric research, particularly among early-career physician-
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Thirty-year study shows women who breastfeed for 6 months or more reduce their diabetes riskIn a long-term national study, breastfeeding for six months or longer cuts the risk of developing type 2 diabetes nearly in half for women throughout their childbearing years, according to new Kaiser Permanente research published Jan. 16 in JAMA Internal Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Does benefit of weight-loss surgery for patients with diabetes persist over time?Obese adults with type 2 diabetes who underwent gastric bypass surgery continued to improve after five years at meeting a target for blood sugar, cholesterol and blood pressure control but that improvement seemed to lessen over time.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Weight-loss surgery associated with lower rate of deathObese patients who underwent weight-loss surgery had a lower rate of death from any cause compared with obese adults who received nonsurgical care to manage their obesity.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is breastfeeding longer associated with lower risk for later diabetes among mothers?Longer duration of breastfeeding was associated with lower risk of diabetes among mothers later in life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Outcomes after deep brain stimulation for uncontrolled Tourette syndromeDeep brain stimulation was associated with some symptom improvement in a small group of patients with uncontrolled Tourette syndrome but also some adverse events.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mount Sinai researchers identify protein involved in cocaine addictionMount Sinai researchers have identified a protein produced by the immune system -- granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) -- that could be responsible for the development of cocaine addiction.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers propose new gas-solid reaction for high-speed perovskite photodetectorThe gas-solid reaction method provides a full coverage of the perovskite film and avoids the damage from the organic solvent, which is beneficial for the light capture and electrons transportation, resulting in a faster response time and stability for the perovskite photodetector.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Danish researchers reveal how the MRSA bacterium handles stressAn international team of researchers has revealed a fundamental mechanism responsible for handling stress in staphylococci when they are exposed to antibiotics. It is expected that the research results eventually can be used to develop new antibiotics that circumvent such stress mechanisms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Confined movements: How cells form tubes in confined spacesA team of scientists from Singapore and France, led by Professor Lim Chwee Teck, Principal Investigator at the Mechanobiology Institute, Singapore and the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the National University of Singapore, has described a novel 'microtube'-based platform to study how tubular organs, such as the heart and the kidneys, form under the various topographical restrictions comm
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mysteries of a promising spintronic material revealedResearchers at UC Riverside used an unconventional approach to determine the strength of the electron spin interactions with the optical phonons in antiferromagnetic nickel oxide (NiO) crystals.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cellular seismology: Putting vibrations on the mapUsing a unique technology called 'cell quake elastography,' scientists can now map to the millisecond the elasticity of components vibrating inside a cell. This discovery published in PNAS this week by Guy Cloutier and his team from CRCHUM, Université de Montréal and INSERM, opens up a whole new field of research in mechanobiology, opening the door to many practical applications in medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists identify genes implicated in the high regenerative capacity of embryos and ESCsResearchers at Insilico Medicine , AgeX Therapeutics and the Biogerontology Research Foundation have published a landmark study titled 'Use of deep neural network ensembles to identify embryonic-fetal transition markers: repression of COX7A1 in embryonic and cancer cells' in the journal Oncotarget.
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Feed: All Latest
The Project Veritas Twitter Videos Show the Conservative Backlash Against ModerationJames O'Keefe's Project Veritas has targeted Twitter, after the social media giant took steps to curb abuse on its platform.
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New on MIT Technology Review
One Person May Have Driven Bitcoin’s 2013 Jump to $1,000
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Science | The Guardian
Obesity surgery 'halves risk of death' compared with lifestyle changesLatest study lends support to experts who say more operations should be carried out in UK Obese patients undergoing stomach-shrinking surgery have half the risk of death in the years that follow compared with those tackling their weight through diet and behaviour alone, new research suggests. Experts say obesity surgery is cost-effective, leads to substantial weight loss and can help tackle type
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Ingeniøren
Video: Se James Webb-rumteleskopet blive sat på frostSe Nasas time lapse-video af det store James Webb-rumteleskop, der er blevet testet ved minus 260 grader.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genome architecture's surprising role in cell fate decisionsNew study led by researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona, shows unexpected and crucial role of genome architecture in determining cell fate. The work represents an important advance in our understanding of gene regulation and reveals a new layer of complexity that needs to be studied to properly interpret genomics and gene expression in the future. An example of how risky fun
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Penn researchers identify new treatment target for melanomaResearchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have identified a new therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma. For decades, research has associated female sex and a history of previous pregnancy with better outcomes after a melanoma diagnosis. Now, a research team from Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania says it may have determine
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Insulating with microscopic bubblesBetter thermal insulation means lower heating costs -- but this should not be at the expense of exciting architecture. A new type of brick filled with aerogel could make thin and highly insulating walls possible in the future -- without any additional insulation layer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tiny dinosaur may have dazzled mates with rainbow ruff and a bony crestAncient dinosaurs were adorned in some amazing ways, from the horns of the triceratops to the plates and spikes of the stegosaurus. A newly discovered, bird-like dinosaur fossil from China contains evidence that could add a new accessory to the list: a shaggy ruff of rainbow feathers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bile acids fire up fat burningEPFL scientists have discovered a novel role for bile acids: converting energy-storing white fat depots into energy-expending beige fat. The study is published in Nature Communications.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The Fields Medal fallacy: Why this math prize should return to its rootsThe Fields Medal, whose origins date back to the 1930s, will be issued again this year in August to up to four of the world's most accomplished mathematicians under the age of 40. In a commentary for Nature, Michael Barany, a Society of Fellows post-doctoral fellow in history at Dartmouth, proposes that the Fields Medal return to its roots as a tool intended to shape the future of mathematics, rat
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New blood test for diagnosing heart attacks: A 'big deal,' with caveatsA longtime blood test that measures the likelihood of a cardiac event has become more sensitive and more precise. Why doctors and patients should be cautiously optimistic.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rising obesity rates in south leading to rapid increase in diabetes casesRising obesity rates in several Southern states are leading to a rapid increase in new cases of diabetes among both black and white adults. A new study helmed by investigators at the University of Texas Health Science Center and Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) found the risk of diabetes is double for black patients.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Pulsating dissolution found in crystalsWhen German researchers zoomed in to the nanometer scale on time-lapse images of dissolving crystals, they found a surprise: Dissolution happened in pulses, marked by waves that spread just like ripples on a pond.
5h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
The search for "aha!" moments | Matt GoldmanIn 1988, Matt Goldman and a few friends created Blue Man Group, an off-Broadway production that became a sensation known for its humor, blue body paint and wild stunts. The show works on the premise that certain conditions can create "aha moments" -- moments of surprise, learning and exuberance -- frequent and intentional rather than random and occasional. Now Goldman is working to apply the lesso
5h
Futurity.org
This enzyme squashes inflammation in ‘white’ fatNew research suggests that an enzyme called SNRK suppresses inflammation in obesity-related “white fat” while increasing metabolism in heat-producing “brown fat.” The human body has two primary kinds of fat—white fat, which stores excess calories and is associated with obesity, and brown fat, which burns calories in order to produce heat and has garnered interest as a potential means of combating
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Christianity Is Not Getting GreenerU.S. Christians’ concerns about the environment have not shifted much in the past two decades -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Young "Dreamer" Scientists in Legal LimboCourt temporarily revives protections for some as Trump and Congress clash over policy reform -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More evidence of link between severe gum disease and cancer riskA new study adds to accumulating research that gum disease is associated with some cancer risk. It reports a 24 percent increase in the risk of cancer among participants with severe gum disease. The highest risk was observed in cases of lung cancer, followed by colorectal cancer.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The innate immune system can also be trainedResearchers of the Faculty of Medicine Carl Gustav Carus of the TU Dresden identified that precursors of immune cells in the bone marrow can be trained to respond better to future challenges.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
School climate and diversity may affect students' delinquent behaviorsIn a Journal of School Health study, race, sex, perceived peer inclusion, and teacher discrimination were predictors of students' delinquent behaviors.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Previous influenza virus exposures enhance susceptibility in another influenza pandemicNew data analysis suggests that people born at the time of the 1957 H2N2 or Asian Flu pandemic were at a higher risk of dying during the 2009 H1N1 Swine Flu pandemic as well as the resurgent H1N1 outbreak in 2013-2014. And it is not the first time this has happened.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study on the impact of relatedness on grandmothers' desire to care for grandchildrenHistorically, grandmothers have been important to their grandchildren, and the help provided by grandmothers has increased grandchild survival during the times of high child mortality. However, there have been signs that in many populations, the impact of maternal grandmothers and paternal grandmothers on their grandchildren has been different. A recent study conducted at the University of Turku,
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research uncovers new link between head trauma, CTE and Lou Gehrig's diseaseResearchers at Western University have uncovered a unique neurobiological pathway triggered by head trauma which underlies both chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and Lou Gehrig's disease.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Perovskite solar cells: Perfection not requiredMetal-organic perovskite layers for solar cells are frequently fabricated using the spin coating technique on industry-relevant compact substrates. These perovskite layers generally exhibit numerous holes, yet attain astonishingly high levels of efficiency. The reason that these holes do not lead to significant short circuits between the front and back contact has now been discovered by a HZB team
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drought-stricken Cape Town faces dry taps by April 21As Cape Town suffers its worst drought in a century, residents were warned by the mayor on Tuesday that they face losing piped water to their homes by April 21.
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Science | The Guardian
The truth about why we don't use all our annual holiday leaveNo one is really too busy to take a break – so why do a third of Brits fail to take four days’ leave a year? It turns out the good people of British Airways are extremely concerned about the wellbeing of the nation’s employees, and have commissioned a study to raise awareness of the fact that we are working too hard. More specifically, the fact that we aren’t taking enough two-week holidays. Let
5h
New on MIT Technology Review
The Clock Is Ticking for Chip Flaw Fixes to Start Working
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mapping the social landscapeScientists have, in recent decades, pinpointed neurons called 'place cells' in our brains that encode our own location in the environment, but how our brains represent the positions of others has been a mystery. New research in bats, reveals a sub-population of neurons that encode the specific location of other bats that are flying nearby.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High performance CNT catalyst relating to its electroconductivityBiofuels were obtained from Jatropha Oil using carbon nanotube (CNT) catalyst, which showed efficient cracking activity. The performance was activated by the high stability, metal sites, acid sites, electroconductivity, and coking tolerance of CNT. Two cracking circulations were found in the hydroprocessing. Meanwhile, the sulphur-free process was eco-friendly.
5h
Futurity.org
Tiny dino may have used rainbow feathers to wow matesA newly-discovered bird-like dinosaur fossil from China offers evidence that could add a new accessory to the list of amazing dinosaur adornments: a shaggy ruff of bright rainbow feathers. Researchers dubbed the fossil Caihong juji —a name that means “rainbow with the big crest” in Mandarin—and think the dino used its flashy neck feathers and a bony crest on its snout to attract mates. “Iridescen
5h
Popular Science
Don't expect a personal robot butler any time soonTechnology CES 2018 showed us that we shouldn't fear robot takeover just yet. The robots of CES 2018 did a lot of falling over.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Centenarian elm falls in Seattle park, closing a chapter of historyIt stood for about a century, right at the center of this vast green sward, but a windstorm at the stub end of the year took it down, felling one of the biggest American elms left in Seattle's city parks.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Superfast' internet cable to cross Mediterranean seaA Cypriot company says its new sub-sea internet cable that will connect Israel with Spain will be powerful enough to handle up to 60 percent of the world's internet traffic at peak time.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers identify 'social place cells' in the brain that respond to the locations of othersWhether we're playing a team sport or just strolling with our family through the park, we're continually aware of the positions of those around us - and where each is heading. Scientists have, in recent decades, pinpointed neurons called "place cells" in our brains that encode our own location in the environment, but how our brains represent the positions of others has been a mystery. New Weizmann
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Flawed US-led world order to blame for American political crises at home and abroadAmerica's attempts to navigate challenges to its global leadership are hampered by a foreign policy mindset that is "Eurocentric, elitist and resistant to change", according to a new paper from a City, University of London academic.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Internet use may prompt religious 'tinkering' instead of belief in only one religionInternet use may decrease the likelihood of a person affiliating with a religious tradition or believing that only one religion is true, according to a Baylor University study.
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Darker Skies, Darker Behaviors-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
New on MIT Technology Review
$90 Billion Says Electric Cars Are the Future
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Rainbow' dinosaur had iridescent feathers like a hummingbirdScientists discovered a dinosaur fossil with feathers so well-preserved that they were able to see the feathers' microscopic color-bearing structures. By comparing the shapes of those feather structures with the structures in modern bird feathers, they're able to infer that the new dino, Caihong juji ('rainbow with the big crest') had iridescent rainbow feathers like a hummingbird.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How massive can neutron stars be?Astrophysicists set a new limit for the maximum mass of neutron stars: It cannot exceed 2.16 solar masses.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Being bilingual may help autistic childrenChildren with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) often have a hard time switching gears from one task to another. But being bilingual may actually make it a bit easier for them to do so, according to a new study.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers reveal high performance CNT catalyst relating to its electroconductivityRecent research published in a report in Nano showed biofuels were obtained from Jatropha Oil using carbon nanotube (CNT) catalyst, which showed efficient cracking activity. The performance was activated by the high stability, metal sites, acid sites, electroconductivity, and coking tolerance of CNT. Two cracking circulations were found in the hydroprocessing. The sulphur-free process was also eco
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study warns of enormous impact of evictions on mental healthA study led by the University of Granada reveals that among individuals who have been evicted, 88 percent suffer from anxiety and 91 percent from depression.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Computer-aided facial analysis helps diagnosisIn rare diseases, the computer-aided image analysis of patient portraits can facilitate and significantly improve diagnosis. This is demonstrated by an international team of scientists under the leadership of the University Hospital Bonn and the Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin on the basis of so-called GPI anchor deficiencies. Using data on genetic material, cell surface texture and typical f
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows how Olympic Games affect the stock marketNew research reveals how global sports events such as the Olympic Games can affect stock market activity. The study, by academics at the University of East Anglia (UEA) and Nottingham Trent University (NTU), finds that when a country wins many Olympic medals, national stock market activity in terms of trading volume decreases. However, stock market returns appear to be largely unaffected.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Internet use may prompt religious 'tinkering' instead of belief in only one religionInternet use may decrease the likelihood of a person affiliating with a religious tradition or believing that only one religion is true, according to a Baylor University study. The research is published in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Enzyme from briny deep resurrected in the labGenomes of single microbial cells isolated from the Red Sea could yield a goldmine for biotechnology.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Making waves for ultrahigh definition displaysWavy transistors that vertically gain width without increasing their on-chip footprint could drive future flexible displays.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Zoology: Luminescent lizardsChameleons are known to communicate with conspecifics by altering their surface coloration. Munich researchers have now found that the bony tubercles on the heads of many species fluoresce under UV light and form impressive patterns.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flawed US-led world order to blame for American political crises at home and abroadAmerica's attempts to navigate challenges to its global leadership are hampered by a foreign policy mindset that is 'Eurocentric, elitist and resistant to change,' according to a new paper from a City, University of London academic.Published in the Chatham House journal International Affairs, the paper also argues the United States' efforts to remain the dominant international power are causing po
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Futurity.org
There’s finally an option for soothing some colicky babiesThe probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri may help treat colicky breastfed babies less than 3 months old, report researchers. An international study has found that a specific probiotic group is twice as likely as a placebo to reduce crying by 50 percent after three weeks of treatment for colicky babies who are exclusively breastfed. While we don’t know what causes colic, we do know it can be hard to ha
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New Scientist - News
A capsized oil tanker is releasing invisible toxins into the seaThe slick of oil condensate from a stricken tanker in the East China Sea is a threat to all marine life, not least because it is invisible
6h
Futurity.org
Drug trio aims at two cell types in pancreatic cancerA three-drug combination can simultaneously target pancreatic cancer cells, as well as the other harmful, inflammatory cells within tumors, according to new research. “People with pancreatic cancer don’t have 10 years to wait for the next new drug…” The research may define a more personalized approach to treating pancreatic cancer. Ultimately, physicians could use information from the pancreas tu
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists unleash power of genetic data to identify disease riskMassive banks of genetic information are being harnessed to shed new light on modifiable health risks that underlie common diseases. University of Queensland researchers have pioneered a method to integrate data from multiple large-scale studies to assess risk factors such as body mass index (BMI) and cholesterol levels, and their association with diseases including type two diabetes and heart dis
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study offers insights on genetic indicators of COPD riskResearchers have discovered that genetic variations in the anatomy of the lungs could serve as indicators to help identify people who have low, but stable, lung function early in life, and those who are particularly at risk for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) because of a smoke-induced decline in lung function.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
X-rays reveal 'handedness' in swirling electric vorticesScientists used spiraling X-rays at Berkeley Lab to observe, for the first time, a property that gives left- or right-handedness to swirling electric patterns -- dubbed polar vortices -- in a layered material called a superlattice.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Rainbow' dinosaur had iridescent feathers like a hummingbirdScientists discovered a dinosaur fossil with feathers so well-preserved that they were able to see the feathers' microscopic color-bearing structures. By comparing the shapes of those feather structures with the structures in modern bird feathers, they're able to infer that the new dino, Caihong juji ('rainbow with the big crest') had iridescent rainbow feathers like a hummingbird.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Survival strategies for women in a youth-centric worldThe idea of aging well assumes that a mature individual remains active, healthy, and attractive. Society places this demand on women in particular. Researchers from the Higher School of Economics have published an article in Ageing & Society that looks at the strategies women over 50 choose.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The more competitive, the more passionate in romantic relationshipsAmericans are more passionate toward their romantic partners than Japanese people are because Americans live in social environments in which people have greater freedom to choose and replace their partners, a team of Japanese researchers suggest.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Long-term health conditions drive A&E visits, not lack of GP servicesRising accident and emergency attendance rates are driven by patients' long term health conditions, and are not related to lack of GP provision, according to a study by Queen Mary University of London of more than 800,000 patients in east London.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers reveal high performance CNT catalyst relating to its electroconductivityBiofuels were obtained from Jatropha Oil using carbon nanotube (CNT) catalyst, which showed efficient cracking activity. The performance was activated by the high stability, metal sites, acid sites, electroconductivity, and coking tolerance of CNT. Two cracking circulations were found in the hydroprocessing. Meanwhile, the sulphur-free process was eco-friendly.
6h
Dagens Medicin
Styrelsesdirektør skal på døgnvagt med bagmand til underskriftindsamlingAnne-Marie Vangsted fra Styrelsen fra Patientsikkerhed takker ja til at tage med overlæge Kristian Rørbæk Madsen på døgnvagt på intensivafdelingen på Odense Universitetshospital
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Dagens Medicin
Læger: IT-system øger markant risikoen for medicinfejlMedicinmodulet i Sundhedsplatformen er langsommeligt at arbejde, og fejl i systemet kan føre til, at patienterne kan få forkert medicin, skriver overlæge fra Køge i klage til sygehusledelsen.
6h
Ingeniøren
Norsk sundhedsmyndighed hacket: Vi er stadig ved at vurdere omfangetForeløbigt intet der tyder på, at patientjournaler er stjålet. Ifølge anonym kilde er filer blevet hentet ud.
6h
Futurity.org
Will state or federal pot laws come out on top?The doors to recreational pot dispensaries opened in California this month, bringing the number of states that have legalized recreational use of the drug to eight. More than 30 states allow for medical marijuana use. But in early January, US Attorney General Jeff Sessions rescinded an Obama-era policy that, in effect, allowed state laws regarding marijuana use, for medical and commercial, to tru
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Analysis shows lack of evidence that wearable biosensors improve patient outcomesWearable biosensors have grown increasingly popular as many people use them in wristbands or watches to count steps or track sleep. But there is not enough proof that these devices are improving patient outcomes such as weight or blood pressure, according to a study by Cedars-Sinai investigators published in the new Nature Partner Journal, npj Digital Medicine.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mapping the social landscapeScientists have, in recent decades, pinpointed neurons called 'place cells' in our brains that encode our own location in the environment, but how our brains represent the positions of others has been a mystery. New Weizmann Institute of Science research in bats, which was published today in Science, reveals a sub-population of neurons that encode the specific location of other bats that are flyin
6h
Ingeniøren
Bilgiganter investerer i teknologi-gurus ‘Jesus-batteri’Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi investerer milliarder i nye teknologier.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How chimp DNA techniques turned us into jungle detectivesFinding wild chimpanzees is not easy. In the first ten years we spent scouring the remote woodlands of western Tanzania in search of them, we caught only fleeting glimpses and brief views of their shadows avoiding our very presence. Chimpanzees are naturally clever and elusive. They seem to know where you will go before you known yourself. And they have an amazing way of blending into the forest o
6h
Big Think
Scientists Explain Love at First Sight56% of Americans believe in love at first sight, and every third person reports that he or she has experienced it. Read More
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bitcoin bombs, cryptocoins crash on regulation fearsBitcoin, the best known of hundreds of 'virtual' coins, slumped Tuesday to a six-week low below $12,000 as analysts blamed a rush by various jurisdictions to regulate the sector.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU parliament calls for ban on electric pulse fishingThe European Parliament called Tuesday for a ban on electric pulse fishing in the European Union, defying Brussels which wants the experimental practice in the North Sea done on a larger scale.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How robot math and smartphones led researchers to a drug discovery breakthroughFor us humans, a healthy brain handles all the minute details of bodily motion without demanding conscious attention. Not so for brainless robots – in fact, calculating robotic movement is its own scientific subfield.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GE takes one-off hit of $6.2 bn linked to insurance activitiesGeneral Electric said Tuesday it would book a one-off charge of $6.2 billion on its accounts for the fourth quarter of 2017, following a review of its insurance businesses.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Puzzle of the First Black HolesHow could the oldest black holes have grown so big so early in the universe? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
The Atlantic
The Story Behind the Poem on the Statue of LibertyThe words of Emma Lazarus’s famous 1883 sonnet “The New Colossus” have seemed more visible since Donald Trump’s election. They can be found on the news and on posters, in tweets and in the streets. Lines 10 and 11 of the poem are quoted with the most frequency—“Give me your tired, your poor,/ Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free”—and often by those aiming to highlight a contrast between L
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Futurity.org
Light controls variants of active ingredient in cannabisChemists have synthesized several variants of THC, the active ingredient in cannabis. The ability to alter its structure with light has led to a new tool for more effectively studying the body’s own cannabinoid system. When many people hear the abbreviation THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), they immediately think of smoking marijuana and intoxication. But the substance is also of interest to medicine—w
7h
New Scientist - News
Blindness treatment will insert algae gene into people’s eyesOptogenetic techniques that use light to control nerve cells are being tried in people at last – and could lead to treatments for several types of blindness
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers conduct detailed chemical analysis of eleven globular clustersAstronomers have performed abundance measurements for 11 globular clusters in the galaxies NGC 147, NGC 6822, and Messier 33. The new study, presented January 9 in a paper published on arXiv.org, could improve our knowledge about chemical composition of stellar populations in the universe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why Lego could be the key to productive business meetingsIt's 60 years since Lego patented their little plastic blocks and since then over 600 billion bricks have been produced. These bricks have been used to build cars, death stars and a multitude of creations born in the imagination of "legoists" all over the world.
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Dagens Medicin
Flyvbjerg: Danish Diabetes Academy skal holde højt internationalt niveauDanish Diabetes Academys nye femårige millionbevilling skal gå til at støtte diabetesforskning at international karat, siger bestyrelsesformand Allan Flyvbjerg. »Vi prøver at blive endnu mere internationale,« siger han.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
Depths of Space, Oceans and Politics-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Feed: All Latest
Now On Nintendo Switch, 'Furi' Embraces The Power of a Good Boss FightThe devious rhythmic combat game is a grueling meditation on what a boss fight is worth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Deadly California mudslides show the need for maps and zoning that better reflect landslide riskScenic hill slopes can be inspiring – or deadly, as we are seeing after the disastrous debris flows that have ravaged the community of Montecito, California in the wake of heavy rains on Tuesday, Jan. 9, 2018. At least 20 people are dead, and four remain missing. More than a hundred buildings have been destroyed or damaged by moving walls of mud and boulders that rumbled down creeks and canyons in
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The Scientist RSS
Opinion: Label Drugs That Are Tested on AnimalsTransparency about the role of animals in drug development could help raise awareness of and appreciation for preclinical research.
7h
The Scientist RSS
NOAA: Common Pesticides Threaten Endangered Salmon, Other Marine LifeOrganophosphates jeopardize dozens of species, a federal review finds.
7h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Muscle BouquetLab-grown muscle stem cells from mice mimic the formation of muscle fibers in vivo.
7h
Dagens Medicin
Samarbejde med hospital skal styrke diabetesindsats i KøbenhavnKøbenhavns Kommune og Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen indgår aftale om styrke forebyggelsen og behandlingen af diabetes.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Citigroup reports steep Q4 losses tied to US tax reformCitigroup on Tuesday reported steep fourth-quarter losses driven by a one-time charge from the recent US tax cuts.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GM takes $7 bn charge due to US tax reform, sees solid 2018General Motors announced Tuesday it will take a $7 billion hit due to the US tax reform but expects earnings this year to be comparable to the solid results in 2017.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How winter temps can affect your spring fishingCold winter weather can play a key role in what you're allowed to fish for next spring. That point was driven home when low temperatures in early January led North Carolina to temporarily bar fishing for spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus), one of the most popular targets for recreational anglers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Key player in cell metabolism identifiedResearchers have identified a key role for EXD2 in protein production in the mitochondria, the cellular organelles responsible for the majority of energy generation.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Automation, robots and the 'end of work' mythCan you imagine travelling to work in a robotic "Jonnycab" like the one predicted in the cult Arnold Schwarzenegger movie Total Recall? The image from 1990 is based on science fiction, but Mercedes Benz does have a semi-autonomous Driver Pilot system that it aims to install in the next five years and Uber is also waging on a self-driving future. Its partnership with Volvo has been seen as a boost
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study suggests human fleas and lice were behind Black Death, not rodentsA team of researchers with the University of Oslo has found evidence that suggests human fleas and lice, not rodents, were behind the spread of the plague that killed millions of people over the course of several centuries. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group reports using mathematical models from mortality records to demonstrate how the plague wo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
JUICE ground control gets green light to start development of Jupiter operationsESA's Jupiter Icy Moons Explorer – JUICE – passed an important milestone, the ground segment requirements review, with flying colours, demonstrating that the teams are on track in the preparation of the spacecraft operations needed to achieve the mission's ambitious science goals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Snapshot of DNA repairDNA is like the computer code of the body, and it must be preserved for our bodies to survive. Yet, as cells grow and change, DNA is vulnerable to defects, especially double strand breaks (DSBs). In fact, DSBs regularly occur throughout one's lifetime. The DNA is protected, however, by DNA repair machinery. A new study from scientists at Osaka University and The University of Tokyo describes the c
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Magnetic liquids improve energy efficiency of buildingsClimate protection and the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions have been on top of global development agendas. Accordingly, research and development projects have been conducted on national and international levels, which aim for the improvement of the CO2-footprint in diverse processes. Apart from particularly energy-intensive sectors of the industry, the building sector in particular is among
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
From flagship to spaceship—two experiments pushing the frontier of graphene's potentialDue to its distinctive properties graphene has been held out as a game-changing material for a range of industries and applications. The Graphene Flagship initiative was set up as Europe's biggest ever multi-stakeholder research initiative, to quite literally shape the future of the technology.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pheasant project has potential to advance land management researchA new web-based application from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln will allow the state's wildlife managers to examine how virtually manipulating land cover in a region could affect pheasant populations—and how much such efforts might cost.
7h
Dagens Medicin
#Detkuhaværetmig-læger utilfredse med ministersvarLægerne bag #detkuhaværetmig-kampagnen sender nyt brev til Ellen Trane Nørby. Sundhedsministeren forstår ikke kernen i problemet, mener lægerne.
7h
Dagens Medicin
Praktiserende læger: Ny digital strategi har for lidt fokus på patienters samtykkeRegeringens nye digitale strategi for sundhedssektoren har generelt stort fokus på primærsektoren og bygger på dialog med PLO, roser medlem af it-udvalg. Til gengæld er der ikke tilstrækkeligt fokus på inddragelse af patienten i spørgsmålet om deling af data.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solving the problem of surgical stainless steelStainless steel is widely used in surgical medicine: for medical devices such coronary stents, hip-implant stems and spinal-disc replacements, and for a variety of surgical tools such as scalpels and forceps, as well as operating tables.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists decipher key principle behind reaction of metalloenzymesWhat enables electrons to be transferred swiftly, for example during photosynthesis? An interdisciplinary team of researchers has worked out the details of how important bioinorganic electron transfer systems operate. Using a combination of very different, time-resolved measurement methods at DESY's X-ray source PETRA III and other facilities, the scientists were able to show that so-called pre-di
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Scientific American Content: Global
Searching for the Dark: The Hunt for AxionsThe Axion Dark Matter Experiment just entered the most sensitive phase yet in its search for invisible particles to explain the universe's hidden mass -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
The Atlantic
The New Age of AstrologyAstrology is a meme and it’s spreading in that blooming, unfurling way that memes do. On social media, astrologers and astrology meme machines amass tens or hundreds of thousands of followers, people joke about Mercury retrograde, and categorize “the signs as ...” literally anything: cat breeds , Oscar Wilde quotes , Stranger Things characters , types of French fries . In online publications, dai
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The Atlantic
When the Army Planned for a Fight in U.S. CitiesEditor’s Note: This is part of The Atlantic’s ongoing series looking back at 1968. All past articles and reader correspondence are collected here . New material will be added to that page through the end of 2018. In January 1968, Colonel Robert B. Rigg, a retired Army intelligence officer, published an article in ARMY magazine that captured the attention of an establishment reeling from recent ri
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Trust in ethnically diverse areas is improving, but there is more work to be doneIn modern Australia, trust sometimes seems to be a short supply. But our research shows there may be some cause for optimism.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Neutrons reveal hidden secrets of the hepatitis C virusThe hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a blood born virus that causes liver disease and cancer, with more than 300,000 people dying each year and 71 million people living with a chronic infection worldwide . While antiviral medicines are currently used, there is no vaccination currently available and side effects can results in a wrong diagnosis.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Balancing work and tertiary study is harder now than in 2012, says studyStudents know completing a university degree gives them a better chance of landing a high-paying job, often after surviving financial hardship while studying. But striking a balance between life, work and study appears to be getting tougher.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How mantis shrimp pack the meanest punchIn research published today in Advanced Materials, a group of researchers led by UC Riverside's David Kisailus has identified a unique structure that wraps around the mantis shrimp's club to protect it from self-inflicted damage as it crushes hard-shelled prey. The finding will help Kisailus' team develop ultra-strong materials for the aerospace and sports industries.
8h
The Atlantic
The Emotional Legacy of The Breakfast ClubWhen John Singleton—the groundbreaking filmmaker behind movies like Boyz n the Hood , and the first African American to get a Best Director Oscar nomination—first saw The Breakfast Club in 1985 , he was reviewing it for his high-school newspaper. “The various characters were teenage archetypes, but they were rooted in genuine human problems,” he later said . “I didn’t feel alienated by the fact t
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How massive can neutron stars be?Astrophysicists at Goethe University Frankfurt set a new limit for the maximum mass of neutron stars: They cannot exceed 2.16 solar masses.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Material surface mimics natural antimicrobial surfaces by binding and breaking bacterial cells openA powerful solution to the global spread of antimicrobial resistance could soon become available, thanks to A*STAR researchers, who have come up with a physical and green alternative to biochemically active antibacterial agents.
8h
Ingeniøren
Kinesiske myndigheder frygter miljøkatastrofe efter sunket tankskibSøndag sank det 247 meter lange tankskib Sanchi i det Østkinesiske hav. Nu frygter landene omkring en miljøkatastrofe.
8h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Jordan urged to end animal mistreatment at Petra siteDonkeys, horses and camels are beaten and forced to carry tourists in extreme heat, a group says.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Guru-turned-entrepreneur targets India's online marketBaba Ramdev, the popular yoga guru-turned-entrepreneur behind one of India's biggest brands, said Tuesday he was tying up with Amazon to target the country's $1 billion online market for consumer goods.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Multifaceted design of the mantis shrimp club is inspiring advanced composite materials for airplanes, football helmetsSmart boxers bind their hands with strips of cloth to avoid injury when they pack a punch. Millions of years ago, the "smasher" mantis shrimp, one of nature's feistiest predators, figured out a similar way to protect the hammer-like club it uses to pulverize prey with incredible speed and force.
8h
Feed: All Latest
The Astrophysicist Who Wants to Help Solve Baltimore's Urban BlightVacant buildings are more than just an economic threat. They're also a public safety concern. And it turns out they have their own sort of gravitational pull.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
Bees Gone WildFeral honeybees pose a danger to native bees and the ecosystems that depend on them -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Clever simulation scheme helps identify the most promising compositions of two-dimensional materialsA high-throughput scan of possible compositions for a new class of materials known as MXenes gives researchers invaluable direction for picking the best candidate from the millions of possible material recipes. The simulation study by researchers from the A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing is a significant advancement in the field of MXenes, which have exciting potential in next-genera
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Skeleton teeth and historical photography are retelling the story of the plagueNew portraits of the evolution of some of history's deadliest pandemics have been created through analysis of thousands of skeletons and new collections of historical photographs—and the results could indicate how similar diseases may evolve in the future.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Habitat fragmentation a bigger threat to Chile's güiña wildcat than persecution by humansResearch by conservationists at the University of Kent has found that habitat fragmentation, and the subdivision of large farms into smaller ones, are the biggest threats facing the güiña wildcat in Chile.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study debunks the theory of 'war-like' business competition in financial marketsThe perception of competition in business is often negatively skewed, with images of Wolf of Wall Street types running greedy firms who are out to win at any cost. In this world, competition is seen as war and retaliation, and financial markets are battlegrounds.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Communication methods do not work equally across diverse teamsMore recent thought on how to reach consensus among members of diverse teams for the best outcome has been to use text rather than face-to-face communication, but new research from the University of Michigan shows it's not that simple.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What's a mind without a body? New research adds physiology to computer modelsThough computers are becoming better programmed to process information like our brains do, the power of the human mind is unmatched. But what's the mind without a body?
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Weather anomalies accelerate the melting of sea iceIn the winter of 2015/16, something happened that had never before been seen on this scale: at the end of December, temperatures rose above zero degrees Celsius for several days in parts of the Arctic. Temperatures of up to eight degrees were registered north of Svalbard. Temperatures this high have not been recorded in the winter half of the year since the beginning of systematic measurements at
9h
Feed: All Latest
Ex-Uber Engineer Accused of Spying on Tesla, Stealing Trade SecretsAnthony Levandowski UberA lawsuit from a former nanny brings new allegations against Anthony Levandowski, the engineer at the heart of the Uber/Waymo dispute.
9h
Feed: All Latest
Job Alert: How Would You Like to Babysit Robots?For all their advances, robots still struggle with the human world. They get stuck. They get assaulted. But not to worry: Help is just a call center away.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ariane 5 rocket puts European GPS satellites into orbitAn Ariane 5 rocket put four GPS satellites into orbit on Tuesday for Europe's Galileo navigation project, Arianespace said.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists celebrate as vital component of global neutrino experiment arrives at CERNLiverpool physicists are celebrating after a vital component of the global neutrino experiment – the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) – which they have helped construct has been delivered to CERN for testing.
9h
Live Science
How Fast Can Quantum Computers Get?Turns out, there's a quantum speed limit.
9h
Live Science
What in the World Is Metallic Hydrogen?Hydrogen in extreme conditions, like below the cloud tops of Jupiter, starts acting…very strange.
9h
Live Science
Untouched 'Frozen Tomb' Discovered in SiberiaThe 2,800-year-old burial mound is hoped to contain the graves of Scythian royals.
9h
Latest Headlines | Science News
DNA solves the mystery of how these mummies were relatedTwo ancient Egyptian mummies known as the Two Brothers had the same mother, but different dads.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scholars develop new technology to decode gene transcription facilitating discovery of targeted therapy drugsA research team from the School of Chinese Medicine (SCM) of Hong Kong Baptist University (HKBU) has developed the world's first model framework and "LogicTRN" algorithm to accurately establish a gene regulatory route to analyse the genetic function and understand the biological processes that are responsible for the development of organs, progression of diseases and other complex biological event
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
X-rays reveal chirality in swirling electric vorticesScientists used spiraling X-rays at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) to observe, for the first time, a property that gives handedness to swirling electric patterns – dubbed polar vortices – in a synthetically layered material.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The impact of relatedness on grandmothers' desire to care for their grandchildrenHistorically, the help provided by grandmothers has increased grandchild survival during times of high child mortality. However, there have been signs that in many populations, the impact of maternal grandmothers and paternal grandmothers on their grandchildren has been different. A recent study conducted at the University of Turku, Finland, shows that X-chromosome relatedness between grandmothers
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Slow 'hot electrons' could improve solar cell efficiencyPhotons with energy higher than the band gap of the semiconductor absorbing them give rise to what are known as hot electrons. The extra energy in respect to the band gap is lost very fast, as it is converted into heat and does not contribute to the voltage. University of Groningen Photophysics and Optoelectronics Professor Maria Antonietta Loi has now found a material in which these hot electrons
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
What Americans Think of Body–Modification TechnologiesA new study from AARP Research shows that although some kinds of modification are acceptable, many people worry about how widespread adoption could affect society -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quan­tum physics turned into tan­gi­ble re­al­ityETH physicists have developed a silicon wafer that behaves like a topological insulator when stimulated using ultrasound. They have thereby succeeded in turning an abstract theoretical concept into a macroscopic product.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
School climate and diversity may affect students' delinquent behaviorsIn a Journal of School Health study, race, sex, perceived peer inclusion, and teacher discrimination were predictors of students' delinquent behaviors.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers use 3-D microtube platform to study lumen formationA team of scientists from Singapore and France, led by Professor Lim Chwee Teck, Principal Investigator at the Mechanobiology Institute, Singapore and the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the National University of Singapore, has described a novel 'microtube'-based platform to study how tubular organs, such as the heart and the kidneys, form under the various topographical restrictions comm
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher refutes theory regarding the dispersal of humans in EuropeIn a newly published study in the Journal of Paleolithic Archaeology, Senckenberg scientist Professor Dr. Ralf-Dietrich Kahlke, in conjunction with an international team of renowned Stone Age experts, refutes a recent publication regarding the dispersal of humans in Europe. This publication postulates that the first humans occurred in Northern and Central Europe as early as about one million years
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists use vibrations within cells to identify their mechanical propertiesScientists at Université de Montréal have developed a unique technique to map, on a scale of milliseconds, the elasticity of the components inside a cell.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists home in on a potential Anthropocene 'golden spike'The international working group, which includes geologists Jan Zalasiewicz, Mark Williams and Colin Waters, from the University of Leicester's School of Geography, Geology and the Environment and archaeologist Matt Edgeworth has, since 2009, been analysing the case for formalisation of the Anthropocene, a potential new epoch of geological time dominated by overwhelming human impact on the Earth.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research team determines how electron spins interact with crystal lattice in nickel oxideResearchers at UC Riverside used an unconventional approach to determine the strength of the electron spin interactions with the optical phonons in antiferromagnetic nickel oxide (NiO) crystals.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Key player in cell metabolism identifiedResearchers from the Genomic Instability and Cancer Laboratory at Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) have identified a key role for EXD2 in protein production in the mitochondria, the cellular organelles responsible for the majority of energy generation.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Insulating bricks with microscopic bubblesThe better a building is insulated, the less heat is lost in winter—and the less energy is needed to achieve a comfortable room temperature. The Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) regularly raises the requirements for building insulation.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop more efficient conversion method for solar energyResearchers at the University of Twente's MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology have made significant efficiency improvements to the technology used to generate solar fuels. This involves the direct conversion of energy from sunlight into a usable fuel (in this case, hydrogen). Using only earth-abundant materials, they developed the most efficient conversion method to date. The trick was to decouple
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biologists' new peptide could fight many cancersMIT biologists have designed a new peptide that can disrupt a key protein that many types of cancers, including some forms of lymphoma, leukemia, and breast cancer, need to survive.
9h
Scientific American Content: Global
Experimental Huntington's Therapy Shows Promise in a Small TrialDrugs that disrupt production of toxic proteins in the brain could work for various degenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ericsson to write down 1.4 billion euros in fourth quarterSwedish telecoms equipment maker Ericsson on Tuesday said it would write down 14.2 billion kronor (1.4 billion euros, $1.8 billion) in assets as the troubled company struggles to compete in a rapidly changing sector.
9h
Science | The Guardian
500 years later, scientists discover what probably killed the AztecsWithin five years, 15 million people – 80% of the population – were wiped out in an epidemic named ‘cocoliztli’, meaning pestilence In 1545 disaster struck Mexico’s Aztec nation when people started coming down with high fevers, headaches and bleeding from the eyes, mouth and nose. Death generally followed in three or four days. Within five years as many as 15 million people – an estimated 80% of
10h
NYT > Science
After a Debacle, How California Became a Role Model on MeaslesChanging minds on vaccination is very difficult, but it isn’t so important when a law can change behavior.
10h
Feed: All Latest
Meet Antifa's Secret Weapon Against Far-Right ExtremistsMegan Squire doesn’t consider herself to be antifa and pushes digital activism instead, passing along information to those who might put it to real-world use—who might weaponize it.
10h
Feed: All Latest
Yondr Wants to Neutralize Your Phone—and Un-change the WorldThe San Francisco startup helps restricts smartphone use in places where the people in charge don’t want it. But in allowing this, we may be compromising something about ourselves.
10h
Feed: All Latest
Why Cloudflare Let an Extremist Stronghold BurnThe story of how an internet infrastructure company get locked into a free-speech dispute starts in the cubicles of SoMa and the brothels of Istanbul.
10h
Feed: All Latest
Change My View: Why Our Best Hope for Civil Discourse Is on RedditDonald Trump White HouseWhat’s astounding about Kal Turnbull's brainchild is that no single radioactive topic—not Trump, Brexit, sex, guns—has overrun the subreddit.
10h
Feed: All Latest
Free Speech, Tech Turmoil, and the New CensorshipSpecial Issue: How technology is upending everything we thought we knew about public discourse.
10h
Feed: All Latest
6 Tales of Censorship in the Golden Age of Free SpeechBlocked by Trump, fired by Google, suspended by Facebook. The social internet gives everyone a voice, it also has countless ways of punishing us for speaking.
10h
Feed: All Latest
It's the (Democracy-Poisoning) Golden Age of Free SpeechAt a time when anyone can broadcast live or post their thoughts to a social network, we should be living in a utopia of public discourse. We're not.
10h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Hubble scores unique close-up view of distant galaxyThe Hubble telescope has scored an unprecedented close-up view of one of the Universe's oldest galaxies.
10h
Ingeniøren
Barcelona vil skifte fra Windows til LinuxI første omgang vil Barcelona udskifte bystyrets bruger-applikationer med open source-alternativer.
10h
Ingeniøren
Transportminister: For dyrt at forhindre stenkast med hegnHvis danske motorvejsbroer skal sikres mod stenkast, kræver det tre meter høje hegn i særligt stærkt materiale. Og det vil tage 60 år at få dem op.
10h
Ingeniøren
Havfruen er den nye dataforbindelse mellem USA og EsbjergHavfruen er et nyt transatlantisk fiberkabel mellem New Jersey og Danmark, og det skal transportere 108 terabits pr. sekund. Hun får snart selskab af Midgårdsormen.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Slow 'hot electrons' could improve solar cell efficiencyPhotons with energy higher than the 'band gap' of the semiconductor absorbing them give rise to what are known as hot electrons. The extra energy is lost very fast, as it is converted into heat so it does not contribute to the voltage. University of Groningen Professor of Photophysics and Optoelectronics Maria Antonietta Loi has now found a material in which these hot electrons retain their high e
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
BP hit by new $1.7bn Gulf oil spill chargeBritish energy giant BP said Tuesday it will take an additional charge of $1.7 billion (1.4 billion euros) in the fourth quarter of 2017 linked to the Gulf of Mexico oil spill disaster in 2010.
11h
Science : NPR
Food Stamp Program Makes Fresh Produce More AffordableA federally funded experimental program is partnering with a Latino grocery chain to reward people who use their food stamps to put more fresh produce on their tables. (Image credit: Courtney Perkes/Kaiser Health News )
11h
Ingeniøren
Nu skal der findes en løsning på vindmøllernes værste fejlSmå indre revner i lejerne har kostet verdens vindmølleproducenter milliarder af kroner. Innovationsfonden investerer nu i et nyt forskningsprojekt, der skal forsøge at finde en løsning på problemet.
11h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
120 millioner kroner til to SUND forskningsprojekter i big dataTo forskningsprojekter fra SUND modtager til sammen 120 millioner kroner fra Novo Nordisk Fondens Challenge...
11h
Science | The Guardian
Kew Gardens' Temperate House restoration - in picturesTemperate House, the Grade I listed building at Kew Gardens, is due to reopen in May after a five-year restoration project. It is home to some of the rarest and most threatened temperate zone plants from around the world Continue reading...
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bitcoin prices fall as South Korea says ban still an optionPrices of bitcoin and other digital currencies have skidded after South Korea's top financial policymaker said Tuesday that a crackdown on trading of crypto currencies was still possible.
11h
NYT > Science
The Parasite on the PlaygroundRoundworm eggs, shed by stray dogs, can be ingested by children playing outside. The worm’s larvae have been found in the brain, experts say, perhaps impairing development.
12h
Big Think
Life Is Common in the Universe, New Analysis of Meteorites SuggestsMeteorites could be sowing life throughout the galaxy. Read More
12h
Big Think
The Bilingual Brain: Why One Size Doesn’t Fit AllThere is more than one type of bilingualism. Read More
12h
Big Think
What If You Could Recall Forgotten Memories?New research from MIT is shedding light on how our brain forms and recalls memories. Read More
12h
Big Think
Why a “Genius” Scientist Thinks Our Consciousness Originates at the Quantum LevelDo our minds have quantum structures that give rise to consciousness? Sir Roger Penrose, one of the world's most famous scientists, believes this and can explain how it works. Read More
12h
Big Think
Top Vets Reject Homeopathic Treatment for Animals as Primary CareThe Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons issued a statement to remind its members of their fundamental obligation to science-based medicine and animal welfare. Read More
12h
Big Think
How the Mediterranean Diet Can Help You Live Live Longer and Think BetterNew studies support the benefits of the Mediterrean Diet. Read More
12h
Big Think
From Ho Chi Minh Street to Boris Nemtsov Plaza: a History of the Undiplomatic Street Name ChangeStreet names can cause diplomatic offence - and sometimes, that's exactly why they're there. Read More
12h
Big Think
U.S. Government Has a Top-Secret Airline That Flies to Area 51 and It's HiringA top-secret government airline that flies to locations like Area 51 is put in a spotlight by a recent ad and an unexpected connection to the Las Vegas shooting. Read More
12h
Big Think
4 Ways Blockchain, the Technology behind Bitcoin, Can Transform EducationA new study highlights how blockchain technology can be a game-changer in education. Read More
12h
Big Think
Hints of the 4th Dimension Have Been Detected by PhysicistsWhat would it be like to experience the 4 th dimension? Read More
12h
Big Think
Does the Story of Adam & Eve Work Scientifically?How much genetic diversity is actually needed to keep a population healthy? Read More
12h
Big Think
Google's Latest Acquisition? Sound Without SpeakersGoogle IT SupportGiven the premium placed on slender, lightweight mobile technology, the removal of speakers could free up space inside Google devices. No speakers necessary. Read More
12h
Big Think
Women Are More Likely to Survive a Crisis Than MenGirl babies may have one distinct advantage over boy babies. But what is it? Read More
12h
Big Think
Stunning New Paper Explains How Inequality in America Keeps GrowingComprehensive new study of economic history paints a frightening future. Read More
12h
Big Think
Mark Epstein, MD – I, Me, Mine – Think Again - a Big Think Podcast #130While the unchecked ego might be popular at parties, it can get us into all kinds of trouble. Mark Epstein, MD combines psychotherapy and Buddhism to help people live with the self. Read More
12h
Big Think
You May Be Using This Flying Taxi in Two YearsBell Helicopter has just premiered its electric, self-piloting air taxi design at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas. Read More
12h
Big Think
You Can Watch Carl Sagan's 'Cosmos' Marathon Right Now, For FreeYou can watch the Cosmos marathon right now, for free! Read More
12h
Big Think
Your Facebook News Feed Is about to Undergo a Massive ChangeFacebook News FeedThe social media behemoth wants you to use their platform less, not more, than before. Read More
12h
Big Think
This Ancient Mnemonic Technique Builds a Palace of MemoryImagined memory palaces are still used by memory champions and the few who practice the memory arts, but they are best known from Greco-Roman times. Read More
12h
Big Think
NASA Discovers Clean-Water Ice Just Below Mars' SurfaceThe thick sheets of ice at these eight sites could provide the reservoir of water necessary for human expeditions to Mars. Read More
12h
Science | The Guardian
Could biodiversity destruction lead to a global tipping point?We are destroying the world’s biodiversity. Yet debate has erupted over just what this means for the planet – and us. Just over 250 million years ago, the planet suffered what may be described as its greatest holocaust: ninety-six percent of marine genera (plural of genus) and seventy percent of land vertebrate vanished for good. Even insects suffered a mass extinction – the only time before or s
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
French carmaker PSA says global sales up 15% in 2017French carmaker PSA Peugeot Citroen said Tuesday that its global sales rose by 15.4 percent last year, powered by the first-time consolidation of the newly-acquired Opel and Vauxhall brands, while sales in China and Southeast Asia plunged.
13h
Dana Foundation
Gear Up for Brain Awareness Week 2018!With Brain Awareness Week 2018 (March 12-18) only a few short months away, it is time for BAW Partners to kick their planning into high gear and to take advantage of the resources we have to offer on the BAW website ! What is Brain Awareness Week , you might ask? BAW is the global campaign to increase public awareness about the progress and benefits of brain research. Around the world, BAW Partne
13h
NYT > Science
Global Health: ‘Smart Thermometers’ Track Flu Season in Real TimeGoogle IT SupportCan 500,000 thermometers transmitting 25,000 readings a day forecast the spread of flu more accurately than the C.D.C.?
13h
Viden
Ti millioner kroner for at redde verdens største koralrev: "Problemet er enormt"Forskere, der kan redde Great Barrier Reef, kan se frem til ti millioner kroner, lover australsk minister.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Australia offers cash for Great Barrier Reef rescue ideasAustralia is calling on the world's top scientific minds to help save the Great Barrier Reef, offering hundreds of thousands of dollars to fund research into protecting the world's largest living structure.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Daimler struggling with European emissions standardsThe chief executive of Daimler said Monday at the Detroit auto show that his company cannot currently guarantee it can meet tougher European CO2 emissions standards taking effect in several years.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US pickups craze all about toughness, luxuryWhen it came time to revamp the Chevrolet Silverado pickup truck, designers at General Motors knew they needed to beef up the look of the vehicle.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lifelike robots made in Hong Kong meant to win over humansDavid Hanson envisions a future in which AI-powered robots evolve to become "super-intelligent genius machines" that might help solve some of mankind's most challenging problems.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Glowing red lava causes more to flee from Philippine volcanoGlowing-red lava spurted in a fountain and flowed down the Philippines' most active volcano on Tuesday in a stunning display of its fury that has sent more than 34,000 villagers fleeing to safety and prompted police to set up checkpoints to stop tourists from getting too close.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Volcano in Papua New Guinea little known, hard to predictPeople in Papua New Guinea are being warned that an eruption of a volcano in the South Pacific nation could also cause a local tsunami.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Math can predict how cancer cells evolveApplied mathematics can be a powerful tool in helping predict the genesis and evolution of different types of cancers, a study from the University of Waterloo has found.
14h
Ingeniøren
Ny supercomputer på DTU skal sikre bedre vindenergimodelleringEn ny supercomputer til omkring 20 millioner kroner skal hjælpe forskere på DTU til at lave endnu bedre modellering af vindenergi
14h
Ingeniøren
Pape skal forsvare datalov, der lader myndigheder analysere borgerdata i smugOppositionspartier vil have justitsminister til at droppe kontroversiel paragraf i ny dansk databeskyttelseslov.
14h
Science | The Guardian
Strangest things: fossils reveal how fungus shaped life on EarthFossil fungi from over 400m years ago have altered our understanding of early life on land and climate change over deep time Much of the weirdness depicted in the TV show Stranger Things is distinctly fungal. The massive organic underground network, the floating spores, and even the rotting pumpkin fields all capture the “otherness” of fungi: neither plants nor animals, often bizarre-looking, and
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Being bilingual may help autistic childrenChildren with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) often have a hard time switching gears from one task to another. But being bilingual may actually make it a bit easier for them to do so, according to a new study which was recently published in Child Development.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Math can predict how cancer cells evolveApplied mathematics can be a powerful tool in helping predict the genesis and evolution of different types of cancers, a study from the University of Waterloo has found.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Declining trust in facts, institutions imposes real-world costs on US society, RAND report findsAmericans' reliance on facts to discuss public issues has declined significantly in the past two decades, leading to political paralysis and collapse of civil discourse.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in USThe profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Shale gas is one of the least sustainable ways to produce electricity, research findsShale gas is one of least sustainable options for producing electricity, according to new research from The University of Manchester.
16h
New on MIT Technology Review
Slack Hopes Its AI Will Keep You from Hating SlackThe fastest-growing business app is relying on machine-learning tricks to fend off a deluge of messages—as well as competition from Facebook and Microsoft.
16h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Declining trust in facts, institutions imposes real-world costs on US society, report findsAmericans' reliance on facts to discuss public issues has declined significantly in the past two decades, leading to political paralysis and collapse of civil discourse, according to a RAND Corporation report.
16h
Ingeniøren
Forsker: Elektromagnetisk stråling tredobler risikoen for at abortereResultatet står i direkte modstrid med langt hovedparten af forskningen i elektromagnetisk stråling i de doser, som vi alle bliver udsat for til hverdag
17h
Big Think
Life Is Common in the Universe, New Analysis of Meteorites SuggestsMeteorites could be sowing life throughout the galaxy. Read More
17h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Wallaby gives police slip on Sydney BridgeThe unusual sight of a wallaby bounding across the Sydney Harbour Bridge has surprised early-morning motorists.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shale gas is one of the least sustainable ways to produce electricity, research findsShale gas is one of least sustainable options for producing electricity, according to new research from The University of Manchester.
20h

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