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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
AI 'scientist' finds that toothpaste ingredient may help fight drug-resistant malariaAn ingredient commonly found in toothpaste could be employed as an anti-malarial drug against strains of malaria parasite that have grown resistant to one of the currently used drugs. This discovery, led by researchers at the University of Cambridge, was aided by Eve, an artificially intelligent 'robot scientist.'
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Science current issue
Chiromagnetic nanoparticles and gelsChiral inorganic nanostructures have high circular dichroism, but real-time control of their optical activity has so far been achieved only by irreversible chemical changes. Field modulation is a far more desirable path to chiroptical devices. We hypothesized that magnetic field modulation can be attained for chiral nanostructures with large contributions of the magnetic transition dipole moments
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Scientific American Content: Global
Trump's "Fake News Awards" Are Both Absurd and DangerousBehavioral science research suggests they could actually give weight to his media-bashing agenda -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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LATEST

The Atlantic
How Trump Will Try to Minimize a Government ShutdownA government shutdown under Donald Trump might look very different from the one that occurred under Barack Obama. When conservatives in Congress refused to fund the government in 2013, among the first and most visible victims were tourists who had planned trips to national parks, museums, and monuments. Vacations were ruined and weddings cancelled. The Obama administration even placed barricades
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Big Think
10 Science Books That Will Make You See the World DifferentlyTo better understand our place in the world, check out these groundbreaking books. Read More
37min
Big Think
Four Myths about Creative People That It's Time to DebunkLike any stereotype, there are some elements of truth in all of them, but they oversimplify reality and create a lot of roadblocks to healthy collaboration. Read More
37min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reminding people about vaccinations can increase rates of immunizationRates of immunization against infectious diseases in children and adults are improving, but under-vaccination remains a problem that results in vaccine-preventable deaths and illnesses.
38min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women run faster after taking newly developed supplement, study findsA new study found that women who took a specially prepared blend of minerals and nutrients for a month saw their 3-mile run times drop by almost a minute. The women who took the supplement also saw improvements in distance covered in 25 minutes on a stationary bike and a third test in which they stepped on and off a bench, according to research from The Ohio State University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Americans are getting more ZZZZsAlthough more than one in three Americans still don't get enough sleep, a new analysis shows first signs of success in the fight for more shut eye.
58min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Temporary 'bathtub drains' in the ocean concentrate flotsamAn experiment using hundreds of plastic drifters in the Gulf of Mexico shows that rather than simply spread out, as current calculations would predict, many of them clumped together in a tight cluster.
58min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Patients who live alone can safely be sent home after joint replacementMost patients who live alone can be safely discharged home from the hospital to recover after hip or knee replacement surgery, suggests a study in the Jan. 17, 2018 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery. The journal is published in partnership with Wolters Kluwer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
20 percent more trees in megacities would mean cleaner air and water, lower carbon and energy usePlanting 20 percent more trees in our megacities would double the benefits of urban forests, like pollution reduction, carbon sequestration and energy reduction. The authors of the study say city planners, residents and other stakeholders should start looking within cities for natural resources and conserve the nature in our urban areas by planting more trees.
59min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First evidence of sub-Saharan Africa glassmakingScholars have found the first direct evidence that glass was produced in sub-Saharan Africa centuries before the arrival of Europeans, a finding that the researchers said represents a 'new chapter in the history of glass technology.'
59min
Big Think
Could Modern Humans Survive An Asteroid Impact, Like What Killed the Dinosaurs?If the bolide had hit just 30 seconds later, we’d be looking at a very different Earth. Read More
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The Atlantic
Trump's Quietly Growing List of VictoriesNothing comes easy in the Trump presidency, but over the last few months the White House has shown fitful but real progress toward more effective policymaking. From domestic policy to foreign affairs, President Trump has notched more real victories over the fall and winter months than during the rest of his administration combined. This includes the passage of a large tax-cut package, the long de
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Forget the Robot Singularity Apocalypse. Let's Talk About the *Multiplicity*The robot revolution we're in the midst of is way more interesting and way less murder-y than science fiction. Call it the multiplicity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SoftBank's acquisition of 15 percent of Uber closesJapanese technology conglomerate SoftBank says it has closed a deal to acquire 15 percent of Uber.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Challenges and research for an evolving aviation systemA comprehensive aviation safety system as envisioned by NASA would require integration of a wide range of systems and practices, including building an in-time aviation safety management system (IASMS) that could detect and mitigate high-priority safety issues as they emerge and before they become hazards, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. An IASMS
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Moms, sisters, wives rank among more 'difficult' kinMost of us put up with whiners, naggers, control freaks and other annoying people in our lives for good reason - we're related to them.
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Scientific American Content: Global
2017 Ranked Among Three Hottest Years EverThe average amount of heat absorbed and trapped in the upper ocean last year was also higher than ever seen before -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
20 percent more trees in megacities would mean cleaner air and water, lower carbon and energy usePlanting 20 percent more trees in our megacities would double the benefits of urban forests, like pollution reduction, carbon sequestration and energy reduction, according to a study in Ecological Modelling. The authors of the study, which was carried out at Parthenope University of Naples in Italy, say city planners, residents and other stakeholders should start looking within cities for natural
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Science Says: That Michigan meteor could have been meatierThe fireball that streaked through the Michigan sky put on quite a show but as far as potentially killer space rocks, it was merely a flash in the pan.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find first evidence of sub-Saharan Africa glassmakingScholars from Rice University, University College London and the Field Museum have found the first direct evidence that glass was produced in sub-Saharan Africa centuries before the arrival of Europeans, a finding that the researchers said represents a "new chapter in the history of glass technology."
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers create first stem cells using CRISPR genome activationIn a scientific first, researchers at the Gladstone Institutes turned skin cells from mice into stem cells by activating a specific gene in the cells using CRISPR technology. The innovative approach offers a potentially simpler technique to produce the valuable cell type and provides important insights into the cellular reprogramming process.
1h
Science : NPR
Moscow Sees Only 6 Minutes Of Sunlight During All Of DecemberMoscow experienced the darkest month in its recorded history in December. There was a total of six minutes of sunlight. NPR's Mary Louise Kelly speaks with reporter Charles Maynes, who lived through this dark month.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel hypothesis on why animals diversified on EarthCan tumors teach us about animal evolution on Earth? Researchers believe so and now present a novel hypothesis of why animal diversity increased dramatically on Earth about half a billion years ago. A biological innovation may have been key.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mothers and young struggle as Arctic warmsA new study from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) and partners reveals for the first time the ways in which wild weather swings and extreme icing events are negatively impacting the largest land mammal of the Earth's polar realms -- the muskoxen. The paper demonstrates that while this denizen of the Arctic and other cold-adapted species have spectacular adaptations, the previously unknown effec
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Challenges and research for an evolving aviation systemA comprehensive aviation safety system as envisioned by NASA would require integration of a wide range of systems and practices, including building an in-time aviation safety management system (IASMS) that could detect and mitigate high-priority safety issues as they emerge and before they become hazards, says a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Moms, sisters, wives rank among more 'difficult' kinMost of us put up with whiners, naggers, control freaks and other annoying people in our lives for good reason - we're related to them. While female kin are more likely to be viewed as difficult, they are also seen as being more supportive and involved in family life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Health care financing system deepens poverty and income inequalityHouseholds' payments for medical premiums, copayments and deductibles pushed more than 7 million Americans into poverty in 2014, according to a study in the American Journal of Public Health. Medical payments also dramatically worsened overall income inequality among Americans.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds shift in patterns of glutamate and GABA in visuospatial working memory networkA new study in Biological Psychiatry has characterized the patterns of brain neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA in a network of regions that temporarily maintain and process visual information about the location of objects in space, a cognitive ability referred to as visuospatial working memory. The study reports that the patterns are altered in people with schizophrenia, suggesting a potential
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
20 percent more trees in megacities would mean cleaner air and water, lower carbon and energy usePlanting 20 percent more trees in our megacities would double the benefits of urban forests, like pollution reduction, carbon sequestration and energy reduction, according to a study in Ecological Modelling. The authors of the study say city planners, residents and other stakeholders should start looking within cities for natural resources and conserve the nature in our urban areas by planting mor
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Method uses DNA, nanoparticles and lithography to make optically active structuresNorthwestern University researchers have developed a first-of-its-kind technique for creating entirely new classes of optical materials and devices that could lead to light bending and cloaking devices—news to make the ears of Star Trek's Spock perk up.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bovine tuberculosis shows genetic diversity throughout AfricaBovine tuberculosis (BTB) is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium bovis that affects cattle as well as other animals and humans. Now, by combining genotyping M. bovis samples from cows across African countries, researchers have been able to study the diversity and evolution of the disease.
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Popular Science
TK evergreen Bitcoin cryptocurrency price article blog postTechnology Crypto currency prices change too fast for real blogging. Here's a template to get that crypto content out quickly. Follow this easy format for all your crypto currency blogging needs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Key to willpower lies in believing you have it in abundanceAmericans believe they have less stamina for strenuous mental activity than their European counterparts -- an indication that people in the US perceive their willpower or self-control as being in limited supply, suggests a study by University of Illinois educational psychologist Christopher Napolitano. The purpose of the study was to test the validity of the widely used Implicit Theory of Willpowe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Paleolithic diet healthier for overweight womenOverweight women after menopause who eat a Paleolithic diet can maintain weight loss in the long term. The levels of risk factors of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases also decrease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Global analysis reveals how sharks travel the oceans to find foodYou’ve heard of “you are what you eat” - this research shows that for sharks, the more relevant phrase is “you are where you ate.”
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First vaccine in the world developed against grass pollen allergyAround 400 million people world-wide suffer in some form or other from a grass pollen allergy (rhinitis) – with the usual symptoms such as a runny nose, cough and severe breathing problems. Medical researchers have now shown in a Phase II-b study with 180 patients in 11 European centers, that four injections of the synthetically manufactured vaccine BM32 in the first year and a top-up in the secon
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Postmortem schizophrenia study identifies shifts in patterns of glutamate and GABA in visuospatial working memory networkDisruptions in certain regions of the visuospatial working memory network may lead to its impairment in schizophrenia, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
AI 'scientist' finds that toothpaste ingredient may help fight drug-resistant malariaAn ingredient commonly found in toothpaste could be employed as an anti-malarial drug against strains of malaria parasite that have grown resistant to one of the currently used drugs. This discovery was aided by Eve, an artificially intelligent 'robot scientist.'
1h
Feed: All Latest
What's Actually Inside a Tide Pod?What exactly is happening when you wash your clothes with fatty acid salts in a candylike package?
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
See how the rest of the world lives, organized by income | Anna Rosling RönnlundWhat does it look like when someone in Sweden brushes their teeth or when someone in Rwanda makes their bed? Anna Rosling Rönnlund wants all of us to find out, so she sent photographers to 264 homes in 50 countries (and counting!) to document the stoves, bed, toilets, toys and more in households from every income bracket around the world. See how families live in Latvia or Burkina Faso or Peru as
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Flu may be spread just by breathingIt is easier to spread the influenza virus (flu) than previously thought, according to a new study. People commonly believe that they can catch the flu by exposure to droplets from an infected person's coughs or sneezes or by touching contaminated surfaces. But, new information about flu transmission reveals that we may pass the flu to others just by breathing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Babies' babbling betters brains, languageBabies are adept at getting what they need -- including an education. New research shows that babies organize mothers' verbal responses, which promotes more effective language instruction, and infant babbling is the key.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Convergent evolution of gene regulation in humans and miceOrganisms that aren't closely related may evolve similar traits as they adapt to similar challenges. It's called convergent evolution, and familiar examples include the wings of birds, bats, and insects, and echolocation in bats and dolphins. Now, molecular biologists have found evidence of convergent evolution in an important mechanism of gene regulation in humans and mice.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Single blood test screens for eight cancer typesResearchers have developed a single blood test that screens for eight common cancer types and helps identify the location of the cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How did we evolve to live longer?Researchers show that a collection of small adaptations in proteins that respond to stress, accumulated over millennia of human history, could help to explain our increased natural defenses and longer lifespan.
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Live Science
Did Researchers Just Take a Big Step Toward a Universal Flu Vaccine?A single vaccine seemingly protects against multiple strains of flu.
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Feed: All Latest
AI Beat Humans at Reading! Maybe NotMicrosoft and Alibaba claimed software could read like a human. There's more to the story than that.
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The Atlantic
The Hollywood Tide Turns on Woody AllenDylan Farrow W. AllenWoody Allen won an Academy Award, the fourth of his career, just six years ago for writing Midnight in Paris . He was nominated again two years later for Blue Jasmine , a film that won Cate Blanchett a Best Actress Oscar. The last year that Allen didn’t release a movie in theaters that he wrote and directed was 1981. Despite the controversy that has dogged him since the early 1990s—when he was re
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How did a deadly tropical fungus get to the temperate environs of the Pacific Northwest?In what is being described as 'The Teddy Roosevelt effect,' a deadly fungus in the Pacific Northwest may have arrived from Brazil via the Panama Canal, according to a new study led by the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen). Cryptococcus gattii -- which until a 1999 outbreak in British Columbia's Vancouver Island was considered primarily a tropical fungus -- can cause deadly lung and
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Low-income immigrants face barriers to US citizenshipNew research shows that lowering application fees for naturalization could help more U.S. immigrants gain the benefits of citizenship.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Algorithm improves integration of refugeesA new machine learning algorithm developed by Stanford researchers could help governments and resettlement agencies find the best places for refugees to relocate, depending on their particular skills and backgrounds.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers create first stem cells using CRISPR genome activationIn a scientific first, researchers at the Gladstone Institutes turned skin cells from mice into stem cells by activating a specific gene in the cells using CRISPR technology. The innovative approach offers a potentially simpler technique to produce the valuable cell type and provides important insights into the cellular reprogramming process.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find first evidence of sub-Saharan Africa glassmakingScholars from Rice University, University College London and the Field Museum have found the first direct evidence that glass was produced in sub-Saharan Africa centuries before the arrival of Europeans, a finding that the researchers said represents a 'new chapter in the history of glass technology.'
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hunter-gatherers have a special way with smellsWhen it comes to naming colors, most people do so with ease. But, for odors, it's much harder to find the words. One notable exception to this rule is found among the Jahai people, hunter-gatherers living in the Malay Peninsula. For them, odors are just as easy to name as colors. Now a new study suggests that the Jahai's special way with smell is related to their hunting and gathering lifestyle.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First global atlas of the bacteria living in your dirtWhat lives in your dirt? Researchers are one step closer to finding out after compiling the first global atlas of soil bacterial communities and identifying a group of around 500 key species that are both common and abundant worldwide.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
North, east, south, west: The many faces of Abell 1758Resembling a swarm of flickering fireflies, this beautiful galaxy cluster glows intensely in the dark cosmos, accompanied by the myriad bright lights of foreground stars and swirling spiral galaxies. A1758N is a sub-cluster of Abell 1758, a massive cluster containing hundreds of galaxies. Although it may appear serene in this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image, the sub-cluster actually comprise
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using crumpled graphene balls to make better batteriesThe paper ball-like graphene particles stack into a porous scaffold to suppress filament growth of lithium metal that degrades the battery.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Meteoritic stardust unlocks timing of supernova dust formationDust is everywhere -- not just in your attic or under your bed, but also in outer space. To astronomers, dust can be a tool to study the history of our universe, galaxy, and Solar System. For example, observations indicate that type II supernovae -- explosions of stars more than ten times as massive as the Sun -- produce copious amounts of dust, but how and when they do so is not well understood.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
human impact on forest still evident after 500 yearsResearchers have used high-tech tools to more precisely view where these cleared sites were and how much lasting impact they had on the rainforest in the Amazon Basin in South America.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
College branding makes beer more salient to underage studentsMajor beer companies have rolled out marketing campaigns and products -- such as 'fan cans,' store displays, and billboard ads -- that pair beer with university colors, mascots, and logos. Research shows that such campaigns may enhance the motivational significance of marketed beer brands, especially for students who identify strongly with their university. The researchers conclude that this effec
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Large volcanic island flank collapses trigger catastrophic eruptionsNew research not only implies a link between catastrophic volcanic eruptions and landslides, but also suggests that landslides are the trigger. At the heart of Tenerife and standing almost 4 km high, Teide is one of the largest volcanoes on Earth. Over a period of several hundred thousand years, the previous incarnations of Teide have undergone a repeated cycle of very large eruptions, collapse, a
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Live Science
The Scientific Reason People Love Pimple-Popping VideosTurns out a little disgust is good for you.
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Live Science
How Many Drinks Could You Have If the Blood Alcohol Limit Is Lowered?To help combat drunk-driving deaths, the legal limit for a person's blood alcohol level while driving should be lowered, according to new recommendations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Method uses DNA, nanoparticles and lithography to make optically active structuresNorthwestern University researchers have developed a first-of-its-kind technique for creating entirely new classes of optical materials and devices that could lead to light bending and cloaking devices -- news to make the ears of Star Trek's Spock perk up. Using DNA as a key tool, the scientists took gold nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes and arranged them in two and three dimensions to
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The Scientist RSS
Canadian Science Community Gathers Momentum in Improving Gender EquityInstitutions document the effects of unconscious bias and set specific goals for gender balance.
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The Atlantic
What if H.R. McMaster Is Right About North Korea?In the increasingly urgent, dramatic debate about the North Korean nuclear threat, National Security Adviser H.R. McMaster stands out in the Trump administration as the strongest advocate of a hawkish position. But where do H.R. McMaster’s views on North Korea really come from? Why, to pose a question The Atlantic ’s Uri Friedman recently did , is he so worried about North Korea? Notwithstanding
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The Atlantic
Photos From the 2018 Dakar RallyWith a ceremonial start in Lima, Peru, on January 6, a group of 335 competitors started the 40th annual Dakar Rally: a two-week off-roading adventure through Peru, Bolivia, and Argentina. The vehicles—which include specialized cars, trucks, motorcycles, and quad bikes—are currently on stage 12 of 14 stages between Lima and Córdoba, Argentina. Bad weather conditions have forced organizers to cance
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Popular Science
We’re doing a great job of creating renewable energy—but we don’t have the infrastructure to actually use itEnergy Better storage batteries and the framework to support them is key. We're adding more renewable energy to the grid, but we don't yet have the infrastructure in place to capture and transport that clean energy to where it needs to go.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer gene screening more cost effective in the general population than high-risk groupsA study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that screening the general population for mutations in specific genes is a more cost effective way to detect people at risk and prevents more breast and ovarian cancers compared to only screening patients with a personal or family history of these diseases.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Endangered whale's calving season peaks, but no babies seenScientists watching for baby right whales off the Southeast U.S. coast have yet to spot a single newborn seven weeks into the endangered species' calving season—the longest researchers have gone without any sightings in nearly 30 years.
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Science : NPR
Scientists Edge Closer To A Blood Test To Detect CancersThis blood test detected signs of cancer in 70 percent of people with eight common forms of the disease. But it was much less good at identifying cancer in people in the early stages. (Image credit: Andrew Lichtenstein/Getty Images )
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researcher simulates how climate change can affect crop production in the rural AndesKenneth Feeley, the Smathers Chair of Tropical Tree Biology in the University of Miami's Department of Biology, is an expert in studying the effects of climate change on tropical forests. From the mountains of Peru to the lowlands of the Amazon, Feeley examines the ramifications of climate change on the trees and other species that comprise the diverse forests of these regions. Yet, recently, Feel
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Latest Headlines | Science News
The secret to icky, sticky bacterial biofilms lies in the microbes’ celluloseBacteria use a modified form of cellulose to form sticky networks that can coat various surfaces.
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Science : NPR
That Smells Like ... Um, I Can't Think Of A Word For It!A new study looks at the way we identify smells. English speakers kind of stink at it. But that's not the case in every language. (Image credit: From left Jay Reed/NPR, Dorling Kindersley/Getty Images, TS Photography/Getty Images)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study says the world's most vilified and dangerous animals may be humankind's best allyAn international review led by the University of Queensland and WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) says that many native carnivores that live in and around human habitation are declining at an unprecedented rate - spelling bad news for humans who indirectly rely on them for a variety of beneficial services.
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Big Think
Getting More Sleep Curbs Sugar Cravings, Study FindsStudies have also shown that two weeks of sleep deprivation increases the consumption of excess calories, particularly from energy-dense, high-carbohydrate snacks. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Counting chromosomes: Plant scientists solve a century-old mystery about reproductionCounting is vital in nature. Counting chromosomes is something that most animals, plants and even single-celled organisms need to know how to do to assure viability and to reproduce. Today, a team of geneticists reveals a remarkable mechanism that enables plants to count their chromosomes, solving a century-old mystery.
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Live Science
This Otherworldly Maze Is Now the World's Longest Underwater CaveA labyrinth of underwater passageways lined with chandelier-like rocky features and lit by sparse sunrays is the world's largest flooded cave system.
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Live Science
Maya Underworld: Peek Inside the World's Longest Flooded CaveThe underwater cave is otherworldy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More evidence of link between severe gum disease and cancer riskData collected during a long-term health study provides additional evidence for a link between increased risk of cancer in individuals with advanced gum disease, according to a new collaborative study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center and Tufts University School of Medicine and Cancer Center.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New robot can help treat rare birth defectResearchers at the University of Sheffield and Boston's Children Hospital, Harvard Medical School have created a robot that can be implanted into the body to aid the treatment of oesophageal atresia, a rare birth defect that affects a baby's oesophagus.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Single blood test screens for eight cancer typesJohns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers developed a single blood test that screens for eight common cancer types and helps identify the location of the cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Crop failure in the AndesAs co-author of a study published in Global Change Biology, Kenneth Feeley, along with fellow biologist, Richard Tito, a native Quechua Indian from the region and the study's first author, discovered that tough times lie ahead for rural farmers growing the Andes' staple crops -- corn and potatoes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Crystal clearAtomic-resolution transmission electron microscopy of electron beam-sensitive crystalline materials.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can mice really mirror humans when it comes to cancer?A new Michigan State University study is helping to answer a pressing question among scientists of just how close mice are to people when it comes to researching cancer. The findings reveal how mice can actually mimic human breast cancer tissue and its genes, even more so than previously thought, as well as other cancers including lung, oral and esophagus.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
DNA study casts light on century-old mystery of how cells divideScientists have solved a longstanding puzzle of how cells are able to tightly package lengthy strands of DNA when they divide -- an essential process for growth, repair and maintenance in living organisms.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bacteria under your feetIn cooperation with Universidad Rey Juan Carlos - URJCAn international team of researchers, including ERC grantee Fernando T. Maestre from Universidad Rey Juan Carlos (URJC), pieced together a global atlas of soil bacteria. The study, published today in Science, identifies some five hundred species of dominant bacteria living in soils worldwide. The findings, based on EU-funded research, could ope
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Network model of the musculoskeletal system predicts compensatory injuriesA new study led by Danielle Bassett at The University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science is the first to convert the entire human body's network of bones and muscles into a comprehensive mathematical model. A study of the network is publishing on Jan. 18 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The flu vaccine could get a much-needed boostMore than 700,000 Americans were hospitalized due to illnesses associated with the seasonal flu during the 2014-15 flu season, according to federal estimates. A radical new approach to vaccine development at UCLA may help lower that figure for future flu seasons.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fox Creek earthquakes linked to completion volume and location of hydraulic fracturingThe volume of hydraulic fracturing fluid and the location of well pads control the frequency and occurrence of measurable earthquakes, new Alberta Geological Survey and UAlberta research has found.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Controlling nanoscale DNA robots from the macroscaleBy powering a DNA nanorobotic arm with electric fields, scientists have achieved precise nano-scale movement that is at least five orders of magnitude faster than previously reported for DNA-driven robotic systems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A handful of bacteria dominate the Earth's soil globallyAn assessment of soils across six continents reveals that very few bacterial taxa are consistently found in soils globally. The work represents the first global atlas of soil bacteria - comparable to atlases of plants and animals that have been available for decades.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Where are individual refugees most likely to succeed professionally?A machine learning-based algorithm can substantially improve employment prospects for refugees over current approaches, easing their transition as they become accustomed to a new home. After experiencing war and years of displacement, refugees arrive in a new country with few resources and must adjust to an unfamiliar society.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CancerSEEK: Generalized screening for multiple cancer typesResearchers have developed a noninvasive blood test based on combined analysis of DNA and proteins that may allow earlier detection of eight common cancer types. In more than 1,000 patients, their method, dubbed CancerSEEK, detected cancer with a sensitivity of 69 to 98 percent (depending on cancer type).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Packing a genome, step-by-stepFor the first time, scientists can see in minute-time resolution how cells package chromosomes into highly condensed structures prior to cell division.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers create first global atlas of the bacteria living in your dirtWhat lives in your dirt? University of Colorado Boulder researchers are one step closer to finding out after compiling the first global atlas of soil bacterial communities and identifying a group of around 500 key species that are both common and abundant worldwide.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Not just commodities: World needs broader appreciation of nature's contributions to peopleIn Science, 30 experts with the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) advocate consideration of a fuller, more comprehensive range of 'nature's contributions to people' in policy- and decision-making. Says IPBES Chair Sir Robert Watson: 'This new inclusive framework demonstrates that while nature provides a bounty of essential goods and services, such as food, f
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
An algorithm for refugee resettlement could boost employment and integrationResearchers designed an algorithm to match refugees with the resettlement location where they have the best chance of finding a job and putting down roots. When tested, the algorithm showed tremendous potential to increase refugees' employment rates--by 41 percent in the United States and by 73 percent in Switzerland. This is a potential policy innovation that would be practical to implement and c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Certain flu virus mutations may compensate for fitness costs of other mutationsSeasonal flu viruses continually undergo mutations that help them evade the human immune system, but some of these mutations can reduce a virus's potency. According to new research published in PLOS Pathogens, certain mutations in the genome of influenza A may help counteract the weakening effects of other mutations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
HIV-1 genetic diversity is higher in vaginal tract than in blood during early infectionA first-of-its-kind study has found that the genetic diversity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is higher in the vaginal tract than in the blood stream during early infection. This finding, published in PLOS Pathogens, supports the existence of a genetic bottleneck between the vaginal tract and the bloodstream.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Launch of 'DeWorm3' collectionPLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases is happy to announce the publication of a new collection, 'DeWorm3' on Jan. 18, 2018.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bovine tuberculosis shows genetic diversity throughout AfricaBovine tuberculosis (BTB) is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium bovis that affects cattle as well as other animals and humans. Now, by combining genotyping M. bovis samples from cows across African countries, researchers have been able to study the diversity and evolution of the disease. The new results are published this week in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Volume of fracking fluid pumped underground tied to Canada quakesStudy links volume of fracking fluid injected underground with hundreds of quakes in central Canada, and not the rate at which the fluids were injected.
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New on MIT Technology Review
AI Is Continuing Its Assault on Radiologists
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Scientific American Content: Global
What a U.S. Government Shutdown Would Mean for ScienceThe National Institutes of Health would stop processing grants, but astronauts in space would keep working -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian
Blood test could use DNA to spot early-stage cancers, study showsDNA and biomarkers could be used to detect and identify cancers, including five types for which there is currently no screening test Scientists have made a major advance towards developing a blood test for cancer that could identify tumours long before a person becomes aware of symptoms. The new test, which is sensitive to both mutated DNA that floats freely in the blood and cancer-related protei
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The Atlantic
The ‘Ice Tsunami’ That Buried a Whole Herd of Weird Arctic MammalsThe biologist Marci Johnson spent the daylight hours of Valentine’s Day 2011 in a helicopter, high over the Alaskan coastline, searching for musk oxen. It was part of her job. Through the winter, she regularly went to check in on animals that she and her fellow researchers had outfitted with radio collars the year before. On this particular flight, she quickly found what she was looking for: a pa
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Live Science
Why the UK Just Appointed a Minister of LonelinessThere's a new minister in the United Kingdom, and the position's theme song might as well be The Beatles' hit song "Eleanor Rigby," which implores the public to "look at all the lonely people."
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Feed: All Latest
Cancer Diagnosis from a Blood Draw? Liquid Biopsies Are Still a DreamBlood tests can detect eight of the most common cancers—but their accuracy still isn’t high enough to be used clinically.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Increased scientific rigor will improve wildlife research and managementWildlife management relies on rigorous science that produces reliable knowledge because it increases accurate understanding of the natural world and informs management decisions. A new Journal of Wildlife Management article evaluates the prevalence of scientific rigor in wildlife research and outlines the components of a rigorous scientific method.
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Recent advances in understanding coral resilience are essential to safeguard coral reefsCoral reefs are under threat on multiple fronts, due to the effects of climate change, with the latest predictions suggesting that 'coral bleaching' events (when corals lose the symbiotic algae they need for energy production), are already happening so frequently that it will be increasingly difficult for corals to recover.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Viruses are everywhere, maybe even in spaceViruses are the most abundant and one of the least understood biological entities on Earth. They might also exist in space, but as of yet scientists have done almost no research into this possibility.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover new enzymes central to cell functionDoctors have long treated heart attacks, improved asthma symptoms, and cured impotence by increasing levels of a single molecule in the body: nitric oxide.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using data mining to make sense of climate changeGeorgia Techhas developed a new way of mining data from climate data sets that is more self-contained than traditional tools. The methodology brings out commonalities of data sets without as much expertise from the user, allowing scientists to trust the data and get more robust -- and transparent -- results.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fanged friends: World's most vilified and dangerous animals may be humankind's best allyAn international review led by the University of Queensland and WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society) says that many native carnivores that live in and around human habitation are declining at an unprecedented rate - spelling bad news for humans who indirectly rely on them for a variety of beneficial services.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Counting chromosomes: Plant scientists solve a century-old mystery about reproductionGeneticists have solved a century-old mystery by discovering a remarkable mechanism that enables plants to count their chromosomes. Their ability to detect imbalances in male and female contributions to the next generation determines their progeny's viability and fertility.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Research reveals atomic-level changes in ALS-linked proteinA new study details the minute changes -- down to the level of individual atoms -- that cause a particular protein to form cell-damaging clumps associated with ALS and other diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Babies' babbling betters brains, languageBabies are adept at getting what they need -- including an education. New research shows that babies organize mothers' verbal responses, which promotes more effective language instruction, and infant babbling is the key.
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Inside Science
BRIEF: Soil Atlas Exposes the Bacteria that Dominate Global SoilsBRIEF: Soil Atlas Exposes the Bacteria that Dominate Global Soils Soil bacteria are staggeringly diverse, but a few types are abundant nearly everywhere. Soil_topNteaser.jpg Image credits: Oregon Department of Transportation via Flickr Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Earth Thursday, January 18, 2018 - 14:00 Nala Rogers, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- A single soil sample can contain hundreds to t
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Latest Headlines | Science News
A robotic arm made of DNA moves at dizzying speedA DNA machine with a high-speed arm could pave the way for nanoscale factories.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An algorithm for refugee resettlement could boost employment and integrationThe global refugee crisis has ignited debate in nearly every country that has seen an influx of refugees and asylum seekers. In most countries, the conversation surrounding refugees has tended to focus on whether or not they should be allowed to enter. As policymakers and the press spar over quotas and security concerns, they have less often considered what happens to refugees after they arrive.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA team studies middle-aged Sun by tracking motion of MercuryLike the waistband of a couch potato in midlife, the orbits of planets in our solar system are expanding. It happens because the Sun's gravitational grip gradually weakens as our star ages and loses mass. Now, a team of NASA and MIT scientists has indirectly measured this mass loss and other solar parameters by looking at changes in Mercury's orbit.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Packing a genome, step-by-stepGenome folding now has a playbook. A new step-by-step account spells out in minute-time resolution how cells rapidly pack long tangles of chromosomes into the tiny, tightly wound bundles needed for cell division. Cells reel chromosomes into loops, and then wind the loops into spiral staircase structures, Howard Hughes Medical Institute researchers report January 18, 2018, in the journal Science.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers create first global atlas of the bacteria living in your dirtWhat lives in your dirt? University of Colorado Boulder researchers are one step closer to finding out after compiling the first global atlas of soil bacterial communities and identifying a group of around 500 key species that are both common and abundant worldwide.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fox Creek earthquakes linked to completion volume and location of hydraulic fracturingThe volume of hydraulic fracturing fluid and the location of well pads control the frequency and occurrence of measurable earthquakes, new Alberta Geological Survey and UAlberta research has found.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Neutron-star merger yields new puzzle for astrophysicistsThe afterglow from the distant neutron-star merger detected last August has continued to brighten - much to the surprise of astrophysicists studying the aftermath of the massive collision that took place about 138 million light years away and sent gravitational waves rippling through the universe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Berguitta soaking Mauritius and Reunion IslandNASA found heavy rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Berguitta as it closed in on Mauritius and Reunion Islands.
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New on MIT Technology Review
A Cheap and Easy Blood Test Could Catch Cancer Early50,000 healthy people will be screened in an effort to detect hidden tumors.
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New on MIT Technology Review
AI Continues Its Assault on Radiologists
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New on MIT Technology Review
Dueling AIs Dream Up New Online Shopping Patterns for Amazon
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Scientific American Content: Global
Scientists Move Closer to a Universal Flu VaccineResearchers hope their new approach, which works well in lab animals, may save more lives -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News
NASA may finally have a new boss after a year-long waitNASA El Niño WarmingTrump’s pick to head NASA may soon be confirmed. The US President has said he wants the space agency to focus on a mission to the moon
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New Scientist - News
Some people identify smells as easily as if they were coloursMost people are much better at identifying colours than smells, but one group of hunter-gatherers from the Malay Peninsula shows the opposite pattern
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Popular Science
Hackers are attacking the electric gridEnergy And computer scientists are trying to stop them. If hackers can bring down the century-old U.S. electric grid, they would disrupt every sector of the economy. Here's how computer scientists are fighting back…
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Viruses are everywhere, maybe even in spaceViruses are the most abundant and one of the least understood biological entities on Earth. They might also exist in space, but as of yet scientists have done almost no research into this possibility. Portland State University biology professor Ken Stedman and colleagues are trying to change this through their article "Astrovirology: Viruses at Large in the Universe," published in the February 201
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA team studies middle-aged sun by tracking motion of MercuryLike the waistband of a couch potato in midlife, the orbits of planets in our solar system are expanding. It happens because the Sun's gravitational grip gradually weakens as our star ages and loses mass. Now, a team of NASA and MIT scientists has indirectly measured this mass loss and other solar parameters by looking at changes in Mercury's orbit.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic sequencing points to endemic origin of monkeypox virus outbreak in NigeriaScientists working to control a human outbreak of monkeypox virus (MXPV) in Nigeria performed genetic sequencing of patient samples, revealing that the outbreak likely originated from a source within the country. Their results emphasize the value of local surveillance for the early detection of viral spillovers and the need for advanced genetic characterization to help determine the origins of out
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Live Science
Scorcher! 2017 Ranked Among Three Hottest Years EverLast year was one of the three warmest years on record, according to a new report by NASA and NOAA.
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Genome-wide identification of interferon-sensitive mutations enables influenza vaccine designIn conventional attenuated viral vaccines, immunogenicity is often suboptimal. Here we present a systematic approach for vaccine development that eliminates interferon (IFN)–modulating functions genome-wide while maintaining virus replication fitness. We applied a quantitative high-throughput genomics system to influenza A virus that simultaneously measured the replication fitness and IFN sensiti
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Science current issue
A self-assembled nanoscale robotic arm controlled by electric fieldsThe use of dynamic, self-assembled DNA nanostructures in the context of nanorobotics requires fast and reliable actuation mechanisms. We therefore created a 55-nanometer–by–55-nanometer DNA-based molecular platform with an integrated robotic arm of length 25 nanometers, which can be extended to more than 400 nanometers and actuated with externally applied electrical fields. Precise, computer-cont
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Science current issue
Quantum liquid droplets in a mixture of Bose-Einstein condensatesQuantum droplets are small clusters of atoms self-bound by the balance of attractive and repulsive forces. Here, we report on the observation of droplets solely stabilized by contact interactions in a mixture of two Bose-Einstein condensates. We demonstrate that they are several orders of magnitude more dilute than liquid helium by directly measuring their size and density via in situ imaging. We
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Science current issue
Hydraulic fracturing volume is associated with induced earthquake productivity in the Duvernay playA sharp increase in the frequency of earthquakes near Fox Creek, Alberta, began in December 2013 in response to hydraulic fracturing. Using a hydraulic fracturing database, we explore relationships between injection parameters and seismicity response. We show that induced earthquakes are associated with completions that used larger injection volumes (10 4 to 10 5 cubic meters) and that seismic pr
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Science current issue
Digitization of multistep organic synthesis in reactionware for on-demand pharmaceuticalsChemical manufacturing is often done at large facilities that require a sizable capital investment and then produce key compounds for a finite period. We present an approach to the manufacturing of fine chemicals and pharmaceuticals in a self-contained plastic reactionware device. The device was designed and constructed by using a chemical to computer-automated design (ChemCAD) approach that enab
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Science current issue
A global atlas of the dominant bacteria found in soilThe immense diversity of soil bacterial communities has stymied efforts to characterize individual taxa and document their global distributions. We analyzed soils from 237 locations across six continents and found that only 2% of bacterial phylotypes (~500 phylotypes) consistently accounted for almost half of the soil bacterial communities worldwide. Despite the overwhelming diversity of bacteria
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Science current issue
Improving refugee integration through data-driven algorithmic assignmentDeveloped democracies are settling an increased number of refugees, many of whom face challenges integrating into host societies. We developed a flexible data-driven algorithm that assigns refugees across resettlement locations to improve integration outcomes. The algorithm uses a combination of supervised machine learning and optimal matching to discover and leverage synergies between refugee ch
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Science current issue
Dicer uses distinct modules for recognizing dsRNA terminiInvertebrates rely on Dicer to cleave viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), and Drosophila Dicer-2 distinguishes dsRNA substrates by their termini. Blunt termini promote processive cleavage, while 3' overhanging termini are cleaved distributively. To understand this discrimination, we used cryo–electron microscopy to solve structures of Drosophila Dicer-2 alone and in complex with blunt dsRNA. Where
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Science current issue
Phosphoethanolamine cellulose: A naturally produced chemically modified celluloseCellulose is a major contributor to the chemical and mechanical properties of plants and assumes structural roles in bacterial communities termed biofilms. We find that Escherichia coli produces chemically modified cellulose that is required for extracellular matrix assembly and biofilm architecture. Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the intact and insoluble material elucidat
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Science current issue
Structural mechanisms of centromeric nucleosome recognition by the kinetochore protein CENP-NAccurate chromosome segregation requires the proper assembly of kinetochore proteins. A key step in this process is the recognition of the histone H3 variant CENP-A in the centromeric nucleosome by the kinetochore protein CENP-N. We report cryo–electron microscopy (cryo-EM), biophysical, biochemical, and cell biological studies of the interaction between the CENP-A nucleosome and CENP-N. We show
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Science current issue
Multiplexed gene synthesis in emulsions for exploring protein functional landscapesImproving our ability to construct and functionally characterize DNA sequences would broadly accelerate progress in biology. Here, we introduce DropSynth, a scalable, low-cost method to build thousands of defined gene-length constructs in a pooled (multiplexed) manner. DropSynth uses a library of barcoded beads that pull down the oligonucleotides necessary for a gene’s assembly, which are then pr
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Toward dynamic structural biology: Two decades of single-molecule Förster resonance energy transferClassical structural biology can only provide static snapshots of biomacromolecules. Single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) paved the way for studying dynamics in macromolecular structures under biologically relevant conditions. Since its first implementation in 1996, smFRET experiments have confirmed previously hypothesized mechanisms and provided new insights into many fund
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Membrane protein insertion through a mitochondrial {beta}-barrel gateThe biogenesis of mitochondria, chloroplasts, and Gram-negative bacteria requires the insertion of β-barrel proteins into the outer membranes. Homologous Omp85 proteins are essential for membrane insertion of β-barrel precursors. It is unknown if precursors are threaded through the Omp85-channel interior and exit laterally or if they are translocated into the membrane at the Omp85-lipid interface
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover new enzymes central to cell functionDoctors have long treated heart attacks, improved asthma symptoms, and cured impotence by increasing levels of a single molecule in the body: nitric oxide. The tiny molecule can change how proteins function. But new research featured in Molecular Cell suggests supplementing nitric oxide--NO--is only the first step. Researchers have discovered previously unknown enzymes in the body that convert NO
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Berguitta soaking Mauritius and Reunion IslandNASA found heavy rainfall in Tropical Cyclone Berguitta as it closed in on Mauritius and Reunion Islands. On Jan. 18, NASA's Terra satellite captured an early morning visible image that showed the center of the storm just south of Mauritius and the storm blanketing both islands. Warnings were in effect for both islands. A tropical cyclone alert class 3 is in effect for Mauritius and La Reunion is
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Neutron-star merger yields new puzzle for astrophysicistsThe afterglow from the distant neutron-star merger detected last August has continued to brighten - much to the surprise of astrophysicists studying the aftermath of the massive collision that took place about 138 million light years away and sent gravitational waves rippling through the universe. New observations from NASA's orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory, reported in Astrophysical Journal Le
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Increased scientific rigor will improve wildlife research and managementWildlife management relies on rigorous science that produces reliable knowledge because it increases accurate understanding of the natural world and informs management decisions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using Hawkeye from the Avengers to communicate on the eyeSuperheroes can be used to communicate learning objectives to students in an interesting, fun, and accessible manner. Hawkeye, a member of the Avengers, is one such superhero, as Barry Fitzgerald of Delft University of Technology (TU Delft, The Netherlands) argues in the article 'Using Hawkeye from the Avengers to communicate on the eye', published in the journal Advances in Physiology Education.
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New Scientist - News
Stars that devour their planets get brighter and fasterWhen the sun expands and engulfs Earth, our planet's ashes will brighten the sun and spin it faster. We might be able to watch this happen across the universe
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New Scientist - News
The higher your testosterone levels, the more you love soft rockA study suggests that men with higher testosterone levels are more likely to prefer genres like heavy metal and soft rock to classical music or jazz
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Quanta Magazine
A Neurobiologist Thinks Big — and SmallEd Boyden has grand dreams. The aims of this neuroscientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology include decoding all of biology and achieving human enlightenment. But he also has his eye on the path that will get him to each goal. As he dives into an explanation of a world-changing idea, he frequently declares, “Step one!” Seeing the micro and macro at the same time is what Boyden’s late
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Science | The Guardian
Tomayto or tomahto? That is the question I wrestle with | Emma BrockesWorking on UK and US versions of my book made me realise how much living in New York has affected my pronunciation I have lived in the US for 10 years, and although I take the elevator down to the lobby from my apartment, when I go outside I walk on the pavement. My children wear diapers but, by and large, I fill the tank with petrol, not gas, and throw out the rubbish not the trash. I wish I stil
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The Atlantic
America Quietly Starts Nation-Building in Parts of SyriaAnnouncing his new Afghanistan strategy in August, President Donald Trump insisted “we are not nation-building again.” The pledge—made while increasing indefinitely the American commitment to the government in Kabul—put him in the company of former presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, who like Trump campaigned in part on rejecting the idea of nation-building. They also, like Trump, promptl
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The Atlantic
A Genetic Clue to Why Stress Makes People SleepyFrom an evolutionary perspective, you’d think stressful experiences would require high alertness. But sometimes, stress means going to sleep. One relevant situation you’ve probably experienced—and that you share with a lot of the animal kingdom—is the overwhelming snooziness that comes with fighting off an infection. In some creatures, even overheating triggers a nap. And for certain people, the
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Live Science
How Do You Die from the Flu?This year's flu season is off to a killer start — literally.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Recent advances in understanding coral resilience are essential to safeguard coral reefsThe most urgent course of action to safeguard coral reefs is to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions, but concurrently there is also a need to consider novel management techniques and previously over-looked reef areas for protective actions under predicted climate change impacts. The conclusions were reached following a comprehensive review of the literature on the mechanisms of potential coral
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Big Think
A Dazzling Map of the Earth’s AntineutrinosThe National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency releases a dazzling map of the earth’s antineutrinos. Read More
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Facial Exercises Make You Look Younger, Study ShowsGet out of the way expensive facial creams and treatments. Read More
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Ingeniøren
Er neuroevolution vejen til Uber-intelligens?I Ubers laboratorium lader forskere sig inspirere af dyreavl til at lave et avlsprogram for kunstig intelligens.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Synthetic Species Designed to Shun Sex with Wild OrganismsEngineered organisms that cannot breed with wild counterparts could prevent transgenic plants from spreading genes -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Bitcoin and Ethereum Have a Hidden Power Structure, and It’s Just Been RevealedClose examination reveals how power is being consolidated across their networks.
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Italy probes Apple, Samsung over cuts to product lifeItaly's antitrust authority said Thursday it had launched a probe into tech giants Apple and Samsung for allegedly shortening the lives of their products so clients would buy newer models.
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France and Germany to propose bitcoin regulationsFrance and Germany said Thursday plan to make a joint proposal on regulating bitcoin at a meeting of finance ministers from the G20 countries in March.
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Root discovery may lead to crops that need less fertilizerBean plants that suppress secondary root growth in favor of boosting primary root growth forage greater soil volume to acquire phosphorus, according to Penn State researchers, who say their recent findings have implications for plant breeders and improving crop productivity in nutrient-poor soils. The increase in the length of the root is referred to as primary growth, while secondary growth is th
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Study finds convergent evolution of gene regulation in humans and miceOrganisms that aren't closely related may evolve similar traits as they adapt to similar challenges. It's called convergent evolution, and familiar examples include the wings of birds, bats, and insects, and echolocation in bats and dolphins. Now, molecular biologists have found evidence of convergent evolution in an important mechanism of gene regulation in humans and mice.
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Hires Natasha Bertrand as Staff Writer, James Somers as Contributing EditorWashington, D.C. (January 18, 2018)-- The Atlantic is expanding its politics and technology coverage with two new editorial hires. Natasha Bertrand will join The Atlantic in mid-February as a staff writer, covering national security and the intelligence community with a focus on developments in the Trump-Russia investigation. Bertrand, who has covered the same beat as a political correspondent fo
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The Atlantic
The Problem With Courting AmazonAmazon Cities ListSince Amazon announced last year that it is going to build a second corporate campus, cities— 238 of them in North America, in three countries—quickly started courting the company. They scrambled to propose the most generous package of financial incentives they could muster, in hopes of luring the online-retailing and cloud-computing giant. On Thursday, Amazon announced that it had whittled its l
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The Atlantic
Trump Backs Health-Care Workers Who Object to Providing AbortionsDonald Trump CareThe Department of Health and Human Services announced a new office dedicated to investigating conscience objections and religious-freedom concerns in health care on Thursday. The initiative doesn’t change the law. Rather, it strongly signals the focus of the department’s Office of Civil Rights, which is responsible for investigating civil-rights violations in health-care contexts. Roger Severino,
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Science : NPR
Sugar And Sleep: More Rest May Dull Your Sweet ToothWhen study participants who routinely got less than seven hours of sleep were coached to extend their sleep time, they also changed their diets, without being asked — taking in less sugar each day. (Image credit: Jenny Dettrick/Getty Images)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Zika virus damages placenta, which may explain malformed babiesNew researcher shows how Zika virus infection in five pregnant rhesus monkeys caused placental tissues to become thickened and inflamed, resulting in less oxygen being transported across the placenta and to the baby.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Two new breast cancer genes emerge from lynch syndrome gene studyColumbia University researchers have identified two new breast cancer genes that also cause Lynch syndrome.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds convergent evolution of gene regulation in humans and miceOrganisms that aren't closely related may evolve similar traits as they adapt to similar challenges. It's called convergent evolution, and familiar examples include the wings of birds, bats, and insects, and echolocation in bats and dolphins. Now, molecular biologists have found evidence of convergent evolution in an important mechanism of gene regulation in humans and mice.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Root discovery may lead to crops that need less fertilizerBean plants that suppress secondary root growth in favor of boosting primary root growth forage greater soil volume to acquire phosphorus, according to Penn State researchers, who say their recent findings have implications for plant breeders and improving crop productivity in nutrient-poor soils.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
College branding makes beer more salient to underage studentsMajor beer companies have rolled out marketing campaigns and products -- such as 'fan cans,' store displays, and billboard ads -- that pair beer with university colors, mascots, and logos. Research published in the January 2018 issue of Psychological Science shows that such campaigns may enhance the motivational significance of marketed beer brands, especially for students who identify strongly wi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NIH scientists find microbes on the skin of mice promote tissue healing, immunityBeneficial bacteria on the skin of lab mice work with the animals' immune systems to defend against disease-causing microbes and accelerate wound healing, according to new research from scientists at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, part of the National Institutes of Health. Researchers say untangling similar mechanisms in humans may improve approaches to managing skin wo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Meteoritic stardust unlocks timing of supernova dust formationDust is everywhere—not just in your attic or under your bed, but also in outer space. To astronomers, dust can be a nuisance by blocking the light of distant stars, or it can be a tool to study the history of our universe, galaxy, and Solar System.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find human impact on forest still evident after 500 yearsTropical forests span a huge area, harbor a wide diversity of species, and are important to water and nutrient cycling on a planet scale. But in ancient Amazonia, over 500 years ago, clearing tropical forests was a way of survival to provide land for families to farm and villages to prosper. Researchers at the University of New Hampshire used high-tech tools to more precisely view where these clea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Huge storms hit northern Europe, leave three deadViolent gales battered northern Europe and beyond Thursday, snapping air and train links and leaving three people dead, all killed by falling trees.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Protein designed entirely from scratch functions in cells as a genuine enzymeA dawning field of research, artificial biology, is working toward creating a genuinely new organism. At Princeton, chemistry professor Michael Hecht and the researchers in his lab are designing and building proteins that can fold and mimic the chemical processes that sustain life. Their artificial proteins, encoded by synthetic genes, are approximately 100 amino acids long, using an endlessly var
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NYT > Science
Prague Journal: One of the World’s Oldest Clocks Stops Ticking, BrieflyThe Astronomical Clock in Prague has been taken apart for maintenance. The city’s clock master has until August to finish restoring it.
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Emirates throws Airbus A380 a lifeline with jumbo orderEmirates Airlines said Thursday it has struck a $16 billion deal to buy 36 Airbus A380 superjumbos just days after the European manufacturer said it would have to halt production without new orders.
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Good and Bad News about Rising TemperaturesScientists believe they can better pinpoint how much future warming the world can expect -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Protein designed entirely from scratch functions in cells as a genuine enzymeArtificial biology is working toward creating a genuinely new organism. At Princeton, Chemistry Professor Michael Hecht and the researchers in his lab are designing and building proteins that can fold and mimic the chemical processes that sustain life. Now, Hecht and his colleagues have confirmed that at least one of their new proteins can catalyze biological reactions in E. coli, meaning that a p
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UNH researchers find human impact on forest still evident after 500 yearsResearchers at the University of New Hampshire used high-tech tools to more precisely view where these cleared sites were and how much lasting impact they had on the rainforest in the Amazon Basin in South America.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How cancer metastasis happens: Researchers reveal a key mechanismCancer metastasis, the migration of cells from a primary tumor to form distant tumors in the body, can be triggered by a chronic leakage of DNA within tumor cells, according to a team led by Weill Cornell Medicine and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flu may be spread just by breathing, new UMD-led study showsIt is easier to spread the influenza virus (flu) than previously thought, according to a new study released today. People commonly believe that they can catch the flu by exposure to droplets from an infected person's coughs or sneezes or by touching contaminated surfaces. But, new information about flu transmission reveals that we may pass the flu to others just by breathing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Meteoritic stardust unlocks timing of supernova dust formationDust is everywhere -- not just in your attic or under your bed, but also in outer space. To astronomers, dust can be a tool to study the history of our universe, galaxy, and Solar System. For example, observations indicate that type II supernovae -- explosions of stars more than ten times as massive as the Sun -- produce copious amounts of dust, but how and when they do so is not well understood.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More genes are active in high-performance maizeWhen two maize inbred lines are crossed with each other, an interesting effect occurs: The hybrid offspring have a significantly higher yield than either of the two parent plants. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now investigated a number of genetically distinct hybrids. They showed that the offspring had many more active genes than the original parents. These results may help in the cult
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
USC stem cell scientists chew on the mysteries of jaw developmentScientists in the USC Stem Cell laboratory of Gage Crump have revealed how key genes guide the development of the jaw in zebrafish. These findings may offer clues for understanding craniofacial anomalies in human patients, who sometimes carry a mutation in equivalent genes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New method to stop cells dividing could help fight cancerResearchers at Uppsala University, Karolinska Institutet, and the University of Oxford, have used a new strategy to shut down specific enzymes to stop cells from dividing. The method, published in Cell Chemical Biology, can be used as a strategy to fight cancer.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First look at pupil size in sleeping mice yields surprisesWhen people are awake, their pupils regularly change in size. Those changes are meaningful, reflecting shifting attention or vigilance, for example. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on Jan. 18 have found in studies of mice that pupil size also fluctuates during sleep. They also show that pupil size is a reliable indicator of sleep states.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hunter-gatherers have a special way with smellsWhen it comes to naming colors, most people do so with ease. But, for odors, it's much harder to find the words. One notable exception to this rule is found among the Jahai people, hunter-gatherers living in the Malay Peninsula. For them, odors are just as easy to name as colors. Now a new study reported in Current Biology suggests that the Jahai's special way with smell is related to their huntin
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fragile X finding shows normal neurons that interact poorlyNeurons in mice afflicted with the genetic defect that causes Fragile X syndrome (FXS) appear similar to those in healthy mice, but these neurons fail to interact normally, resulting in the long-known cognitive impairments, shows a new study by a team of neuroscientists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Report links hacking campaign to Lebanese security agencyLookout Dark CaracalA major hacking operation tied to one of the most powerful security and intelligence agencies in Lebanon has been exposed after careless spies left hundreds of gigabytes of intercepted data exposed to the open internet, according to a report published Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
German chemical giant BASF sees 'significant' profit leapGerman chemicals and pharmaceuticals giant BASF said it expects to post a 50-percent leap in net profits for 2017 on strong demand and a tax windfall due to lower levies in the United States.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU clears Qualcomm megabuyout of semiconductor rival NXPThe EU's anti-trust authority on Thursday approved US semiconductor maker Qualcomm's $47-billion purchase of Dutch rival NXP, the biggest ever in the sector.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Giant pandas arrive in Finland in Chinese charm offensiveFinland on Thursday welcomed a panda pair after a long plane ride from their native China, which leased the fluffy animals to the Nordic nation to strengthen ties.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stem cell scientists chew on the mysteries of jaw developmentScientists in the USC Stem Cell laboratory of Gage Crump have revealed how key genes guide the development of the jaw in zebrafish. These findings may offer clues for understanding craniofacial anomalies in human patients, who sometimes carry a mutation in equivalent genes.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drought-stricken Cape Town tightens water restrictionsThe South African city of Cape Town announced new water restrictions Thursday to combat drought, saying it was looking more likely that it will have to turn off most taps on "Day Zero," or April 21.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon narrows list of 'HQ2' candidates to 20Amazon HQ2 CitiesAmazon said Thursday it had narrowed to 20 its options for a second headquarters for the sprawling technology and lifestyle company headed by Jeff Bezos, the world's richest individual.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Even without El Nino last year, Earth keeps on warmingNASA El Niño WarmingEarth last year wasn't quite as hot as 2016's record-shattering mark, but it ranked second or third, depending on who was counting.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Army researchers make explosive discoveryScientists from the U.S. Army Research Laboratory and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory found a solution to a significant challenge in making high-energy explosives. They safely improved the overall chemical yield derived from diaminoglyoxime, known as DAG, and significantly increased the amount of material made per reaction.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Hunter-gatherer lifestyle could help explain superior ability to ID smellsHunter-gatherers in the forests of the Malay Peninsula prove more adept at naming smells than their rice-farming neighbors, possibly because of their foraging culture.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
North, east, south, west: The many faces of Abell 1758NASA El Niño WarmingResembling a swarm of flickering fireflies, this beautiful galaxy cluster glows intensely in the dark cosmos, accompanied by the myriad bright lights of foreground stars and swirling spiral galaxies. A1758N is a sub-cluster of Abell 1758, a massive cluster containing hundreds of galaxies. Although it may appear serene in this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image, the sub-cluster actually comprise
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The Atlantic
How #MeToo Can Probe Gray Areas With Less BacklashAziz Ansari #MeTooMillions are talking about the comic actor Aziz Ansari’s actions during a sexual encounter with an anonymous woman who felt wronged on their date night. Her grievances were publicized by an article in the online magazine Babe . And as many have noted, the article is similar, in its subject matter and public reception, to another recent viral sensation––the fictional New Yorker story “Cat Person.”
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The Atlantic
An Exit From TrumpocracyElection 2016 looked on paper like the most sweeping Republican victory since the Jazz Age. Yet there was a hollowness to the Trump Republicans’ seeming ascendancy over the federal government and in so many of the states. The Republicans of the 1920s had drawn their strength from the country’s most economically and culturally dynamic places. In 1924, Calvin Coolidge won almost 56 percent of the v
5h
Live Science
A Space Magnet, Hunting Dark Matter, Turns Up Juicy Secrets of Cosmic RaysAn experiment based on the International Space Station has turned up new results about the shape and character of mysterious cosmic rays.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using crumpled graphene balls to make better batteriesThe paper ball-like graphene particles stack into a porous scaffold to suppress filament growth of lithium metal that degrades the battery.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Army researchers make explosive discoveryScientists from the US Army Research Laboratory and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory found a solution to a significant challenge in making high-energy explosives.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
North, east, south, west: The many faces of Abell 1758Resembling a swarm of flickering fireflies, this beautiful galaxy cluster glows intensely in the dark cosmos, accompanied by the myriad bright lights of foreground stars and swirling spiral galaxies. A1758N is a sub-cluster of Abell 1758, a massive cluster containing hundreds of galaxies. Although it may appear serene in this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image, the sub-cluster actually comprise
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First look at pupil size in sleeping mice yields surprisesWhen people are awake, their pupils regularly change in size. Those changes are meaningful, reflecting shifting attention or vigilance, for example. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on January 18 have found in studies of mice that pupil size also fluctuates during sleep. They also show that pupil size is a reliable indicator of sleep states.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hunter-gatherers have a special way with smellsWhen it comes to naming colors, most people do so with ease. But, for odors, it's much harder to find the words. One notable exception to this rule is found among the Jahai people, a group of hunter-gatherers living in the Malay Peninsula. An earlier study showed that, for them, odors are just as easy to name as colors. Now a new study reported in Current Biology on January 18 suggests that the Ja
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New method to stop cells dividing could help fight cancerResearchers at Uppsala University, Karolinska Institutet, and the University of Oxford, have used a new strategy to shut down specific enzymes to stop cells from dividing. The method, published in Cell Chemical Biology, can be used as a strategy to fight cancer.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New technique for finding life on MarsResearchers demonstrate for the first time the potential of existing technology to directly detect and characterize life on Mars and other planets. The study, published in Frontiers in Microbiology, used miniaturized scientific instruments and new microbiology techniques to identify and examine microorganisms in the Canadian high Arctic—one of the closest analogs to Mars on Earth. By avoiding dela
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new polymer raises the bar for lithium-sulfur batteriesLithium-sulfur batteries are promising candidates for replacing common lithium-ion batteries in electric vehicles since they are cheaper, weigh less, and can store nearly double the energy for the same mass. However, lithium-sulfur batteries become unstable over time, and their electrodes deteriorate, limiting widespread adoption.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Did Michigan Meteor Really Cause an Earthquake?The fireball’s sonic boom sparked a 2.0-magnitude seismic event -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Big Think
Creative People's Brains Are Uniquely Wired, Scientists DiscoverCould these findings be used to boost creativity? Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Inspired by biology, scientists created new tiny tubes that could help with water purification and tissue engineeringMaterials scientists, led by a team at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, designed a tiny tube that rolls up and zips closed.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study suggests coastal and deep ocean sharks have different feeding patternsAn international team of researchers studying globally declining shark populations report today that they used carbon isotopes as biochemical markers in shark muscle tissue to identify where in the oceans the mobile predators have been feeding, in the hope that such analyses provide a useful tool for conservation. Details appear in the current issue of Nature Ecology & Evolution.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists identify potential target genes to halt progression of thyroid cancerResearch shows that expression of 52 microRNAs falls as the disease becomes more aggressive. Restoring levels of these molecules in the tumor could be a novel therapeutic strategy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Statins to help prevent scar tissue in the eye?Statin medication seems to reduce the risk of repeated surgery in patients who undergo a vitrectomy to treat a detached retina, shows the new study. The researchers believe that statins might prevent the formation of scar tissue inside the eye.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hold the salt: Gut reaction may impair the brains of miceIn a new mouse study, scientists link changes in the gut caused by a high-salt diet to impaired blood flow in the brain. This reduced blood flow can eventually lead to impaired cognition that could be reversed by changing back to a normal diet. The study, published in Nature Neuroscience, also provides molecular clues for treating these problems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Boston University study: Hits, not concussions, cause CTEResearchers have identified evidence of early Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) brain pathology after head impact -- even in the absence of signs of concussion. Early indicators of CTE pathology not only persisted long after injury but also spread through the brain, providing the best evidence to date that head impact, not concussion, causes CTE.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find post-fire logging harms spotted owlsPost-fire logging, rather than the wildfires themselves, is responsible for the steep decline in territory occupancy of the rare spotted owls living in the forests of California. The study's results coincide with the strong consensus among hundreds of US scientists opposing post-fire logging operations due to a wide range of ecological harms. The research is published in the open-access journal Na
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Natural environments promote positive body imageNew research shows that the natural environment has a powerful effect on promoting positive body image -- and you don't even have to set foot outdoors to experience the benefits.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
From healthcare to warfare: How to regulate brain technologyEthicists have outlined a new biosecurity framework specific to neurotechnology. While the researchers declare an outright ban of dual-use technology ethically unjustified, they call for regulations aimed at protecting the mental privacy and integrity of humans.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Efficacy of antibody targeting Devic's disease proven in new animal modelNeuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune disease associated with NMO immunoglobulin G (NMO-IgG). A cure for NMO remains elusive. Researchers recently established a localized NMO rat model by injecting NMO-IgG into the spinal cord, and assessed the efficacy of anti-repulsive guidance molecule-a (RGMa) antibody in treating NMO. They found anti-RGMa antibody delayed the onset and attenuated the se
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Default setting in electronic medical records 'nudged' emergency department physicians to limit opioid prescriptions to 10 tabletsFor patients who have never been prescribed opioids, larger numbers of tablets given with the initial prescription is associated with long-term use and more tablets leftover that could be diverted for misuse or abuse. Implementing a default option for a lower quantity of tablets in the electronic medical records (EMR) discharge orders may help combat the issue by “nudging” physicians to prescribe
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New robot can help treat rare birth defectResearchers have created a robot that can be implanted into the body to aid the treatment of esophageal atresia, a rare birth defect that affects a baby's esophagus.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Statins to help prevent scar tissue in the eye?According to a new study, statin medication seems to reduce the risk of repeated surgery in patients who undergo a vitrectomy to treat a detached retina. The researchers believe that statins might prevent the formation of scar tissue inside the eye.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
World’s oldest known oxygen oasis discoveredIn the Earth’s early history, several billion years ago, only traces of oxygen existed in the atmosphere and the oceans. Today’s air-breathing organisms could not have existed under those conditions. The change was caused by photosynthesizing bacteria, which created oxygen as a by-product – in vast amounts. 2.5-billion-year-old rock layers on several continents have yielded indications that the fi
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A centuries-old math equation used to solve a modern-day genetics challengeResearchers developed a new mathematical tool to validate and improve methods used by medical professionals to interpret results from clinical genetic tests.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Blasting dental plaque with microbubblesResearchers have found a way to remove plaque from dental implants to improve oral hygiene.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genomics reveals key macrophages' involvement in systemic sclerosisA new international study has made an important discovery about the key role of macrophages, a type of immune cell, in systemic sclerosis (SSc), a chronic autoimmune disease which currently has no cure.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Distorted view amongst smokers of when deadly damage caused by smoking will occurSmokers have a distorted perception on when the onset of smoking-related conditions will occur, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using electricity to switch magnetismScientists have managed to use electrical fields to control the magnetic oscillations of certain ferrous materials. This has opened up huge potential for computer technology applications, as data is currently transferred in the form of electrical signals but stored magnetically.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cellular mechanism for severe viral hepatitis identifiedMedical scientists identified a cellular mechanism causing inflammatory changes in regulatory T cells that can lead to severe viral hepatitis. Research on this mechanism will help further understand the nature of various inflammatory diseases and lead to the development of relevant clinical treatments.
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The Atlantic
Better Than WillpowerWillpower, reason, and executive-functioning skills all seem like ingredients in the recipe for success. So why, then, have so many of us already abandoned our New Year’s resolutions, and it’s not even February yet? According to Emotional Success , a new book by the Northeastern University psychology professor David DeSteno, it’s because we’re going about pursuing our goals in the wrong way. Inst
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Smartphones come in handy for the rare cosmic particles searchResearchers from the Laboratory of Methods for Big Data Analysis (LAMBDA) at the Higher School of Economics have improved their way of analyzing ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) with the use of mobile phones. The work has been carried out as part of the CRAYFIS experiment and the results were presented at the 22nd International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study suggests coastal and deep ocean sharks have different feeding patternsA research team studying globally declining shark populations report that they used carbon isotopes as biochemical markers in shark muscle tissue to identify where in the oceans the mobile predators feed. They hope that such analyses provide a useful tool for conservation. Michelle Staudinger, an expert in large pelagic foraging ecology at UMass Amherst, worked with lead author Christopher Bird at
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Are inflammation-causing diets associated with risk of colorectal cancer?A diet high in foods with the potential to cause inflammation, including meats, refined grains and high-calorie beverages, was associated with increased risk of developing colorectal cancer for men and women.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel hypothesis on why animals diversified on EarthCan tumors teach us about animal evolution on Earth? Researchers believe so and now present a novel hypothesis of why animal diversity increased dramatically on Earth about half a billion years ago. A biological innovation may have been key.
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NYT > Science
Warming, Water Crisis, Then Unrest: How Iran Fits an Alarming PatternA water crisis — whether caused by nature, human mismanagement, or both — can be an early warning signal of conflict ahead. Iran is the latest example.
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Ingeniøren
Plastindustrien roser EU’ nye strategi for genbrug af plastEfter flere års forhandlinger er det nu endelig lykkedes EU at få en strategi på plads for genbrug af plast. Nye standarder skal gøre genbrugsplast attraktivt for markedet, hvis målet om at genanvende halvdelen af al plast skal nås.
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Popular Science
Courts use algorithms to help determine sentencing, but random people get the same resultsScience Numbers aren’t always as impartial as they appear. There's lots of things you shouldn't leave up to people's best guesses, and determining which criminals are likely to reoffend is one of them.
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Science | The Guardian
Gene edited crops should be exempted from GM food laws, says EU lawyerTechnology can help foster specific positive traits in plants but can also have potentially dangerous ‘off-target’ effects, say critics Gene editing technologies should be largely exempted from EU laws on GM food, although individual states can regulate them if they choose, the European court’s advocate general has said . The opinion may have far-reaching consequences for new breeding techniques
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Feed: All Latest
A New Way to Track Down Bugs Could Help Save IoTNew research advances techniques for finding and exploiting known vulnerabilities in IoT devices automatically.
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The Economist: The world this week
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The Economist: The world this week
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The Economist: The world this week
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Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Vil havstigninger vippe kontinentalpladerne?En læser vil gerne vide, hvilken effekt vandstigninger og oversvømmelser vil få på kontinentalpladerne. Det svarer NBI og DTU Space på.
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Live Science
'Inflammatory Diet' May Boost Colorectal Cancer RiskAn "inflammatory diet" may increase a person's risk of colorectal cancer, a new study suggests.
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The Atlantic
The Assassination of Gianni Versace's Flawed BeautyAmerican Crime Story: The Assassination of Gianni Versace tries to test the viewer’s appetite for classical beauty. In long, slow, largely wordless sequences, Ryan Murphy’s camera pans over the ornate tiling of the Versace villa, over the sun-kissed pastel facades of ’90s Miami Beach, and over the speedo-clad bodies that inhabited both. The lens will swoop and dive through a cavernous club popula
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Science : NPR
2017 Among Warmest Years On RecordNASA El Niño WarmingThe planet's global surface temperature last year was the second warmest since 1880, NASA says. Scientists say the five warmest years on record have been since 2010. (Image credit: NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio)
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Let the good tubes rollPNNL scientists have created new tiny tubes that could help with water purification and tissue engineering studies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A novel method of isolating infecting organisms after joint replacementNext-generation Genomic Sequencing could help identify infecting organisms and guide treatment for patients with joint-replacement infection.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Perovskite solar cells: Mesoporous interface mitigates the impact of defectsThe nominal cell operating life of perovskite solar cells is strongly influenced by their inner architecture.This was shown by two scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin and the Technical University of Munich. They combined experiments with numerical simulations in order to explain this observation.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
American bipartisan politics can be saved -- here's how | Bob InglisFormer Republican member of the U.S. Congress Bob Inglis shares an optimistic message about how conservatives can lead on climate change and other pressing problems -- and how free enterprise (and working together across ideologies) hold the solutions. "The United States was not built by those who waited and wished to look behind them," Inglis says. "Lead now ... Tell the American people that we s
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NeuWrite San Diego
I Feel Your Pain – The Social Transmission of Pain in MiceWe all know that emotions are contagious. Your trip to the DMV might see you infected with that peculiar emotion – something halfway between apathy and misanthropy – that is endemic to the DMV. On the other hand, your ray-of-sunshine coworker just may brighten up your day (unless you happen to work at the DMV). […]
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Coupling experiments to theory to build a better batteryResearchers has reported that a new lithium-sulfur battery component allows a doubling in capacity compared to a conventional lithium-sulfur battery, even after more than 100 charge cycles.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New technique for finding life on MarsMiniaturized scientific instruments and new microbiology techniques successfully identified and characterized microorganisms living in Arctic permafrost -- one of the closest analogs to Mars on Earth. By avoiding delays that come with having to return samples to a laboratory for analysis, the methodology could also be used on Earth to detect and identify pathogens during epidemics in remote areas.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Building blocks to create metamaterialsEngineers have created a method to systematically design metamaterials using principles of quantum mechanics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Effect of general anesthesia on developing brainScientists have reviewed scientific studies on the potentially adverse effects of exposing developing brains to general anesthesia.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lifespan of fuel cells maximized using small amount of metalsResearchers have described a new technique to improve chemical stability of electrode materials which can extend the lifespan by employing a very little amount of metals. Using computational chemistry and experimental data, the team observed that local compressive states around the Sr atoms in a perovskite electrode lattice weakened the Sr-O bond strength, which in turn promote strontium segregati
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Warming Arctic climate constrains life in cold-adapted mammalsA new study has uncovered previously unknown effects of rain-on-snow events, winter precipitation and ice tidal surges on the muskoxen.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Are Earthquakes More Likely During Full Moons? That’s a Myth, Study FindsA seismologist scrutinized hundreds of strong earthquakes over four centuries and found no relationship to lunar cycles.
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NYT > Science
Questions and Answers About This Year’s Flu SeasonThe virus is widespread, and the vaccine is a poor match. But while some areas are hit hard, others have been spared, and deaths are not unusually common this season.
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Trump Administration Abandons Science Advice--but at What Cost?A new report from the Union of Concerned Scientists suggests suggests the problem is even worse than previously recognized -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hybridization can give rise to different genome combinationsResearchers have for the first time determined that hybridization between two bird species can give rise to several novel and fully functional hybrid genomic combinations. This could potentially be because hybrid species emerged through independent hybridisation events between the same parent species on different islands.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New blood protein markers help track premature ageing diseaseHutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is an extremely rare fatal genetic disorder which causes sufferers to age prematurely. In a new study in the journal Pediatric Research, which is published by Springer Nature, scientists have identified protein biomarkers which can be used to assess how HGPS patients have reacted to treatment. The research was led by Leslie B. Gordon of the Hasbro Childr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How did we evolve to live longer?Researchers at Newcastle University, UK show that a collection of small adaptations in proteins that respond to stress, accumulated over millennia of human history, could help to explain our increased natural defences and longer lifespan.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new, dynamic view of chromatin movementsIn cells, proteins tightly package the long thread of DNA into pearl necklace-like complexes known as chromatin. Scientists at EPFL show for the first time how chromatin moves, answering longstanding questions about how its structure helps regulate gene expression. The study is published in Nature Communications.
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Science | The Guardian
2017 was the hottest year on record without El Niño boostData shows the year was also one of the hottest three ever recorded, with scientists warning that the ‘climate tide is rising fast’ 2017 was the hottest year since global records began that was not given an additional boost by the natural climate cycle El Niño, according to new data. Even without an El Niño, the year was still exceptionally hot, being one of the top three ever recorded. The three
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mobility patterns influence the spread and containment of an epidemicContrary to expectations, recurring mobility between different cities or districts of a large city (for example, from home to work and back again) can minimize the spread of an epidemic.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Aid for oceans and fisheries in developing world drops by 30 percentFinancial aid to fisheries in developing countries has declined by 30 percent, finds a new study. Projects focusing on climate issues in fisheries had a 77 percent decline over the five years studied.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
2017 'warmest year without El Niño'NASA El Niño WarmingEven with no natural climate boost, last year was the second or third hottest on record.
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Inside Science
BRIEF: 5G Internet is the Next Big Thing in Light PollutionBRIEF: 5G Internet is the Next Big Thing in Light Pollution The fast-growing next-gen mobile network may threaten future radio astronomers' ability to detect signals from space. radio-interference.jpg Image credits: Composite image by Yuen Yiu, source image by John Fowler Rights information: CC BY 2.0 Space Thursday, January 18, 2018 - 08:45 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science) -- During last
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify a new chromatin regulatory mechanism linked to SirT6Researchers IDIBELL, led by Dr. Àlex Vaquero, have proposed a new double mechanism of inhibition of the NF-κB pathway linked to the action of SirT6 on chromatin.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers begin isolating blood-feeding and non-biting genes in mosquitoesResearchers have taken the first step on a path that eventually could result in female mosquitoes that no longer bite and spread diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mobility patterns influence the spread and containment of an epidemicContrary to expectations, recurring mobility between different cities or districts of a large city (for example, from home to work and back again) can minimise the spread of an epidemic. This is the finding of research carried out by researchers from the Universitat Rovira i Virgili (Àlex Arenas) and the University of Zaragoza (Jesús Gómez and David Soriano) and which has just been published in th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using electricity to switch magnetismTU Wien has managed to use electrical fields to control the magnetic oscillations of certain ferrous materials. This has opened up huge potential for computer technology applications, as data is currently transferred in the form of electrical signals but stored magnetically.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technique for finding life on MarsMiniaturized scientific instruments and new microbiology techniques successfully identified and characterized microorganisms living in Arctic permafrost -- one of the closest analogs to Mars on Earth. By avoiding delays that come with having to return samples to a laboratory for analysis, the methodology could also be used on Earth to detect and identify pathogens during epidemics in remote areas.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
From healthcare to warfare: How to regulate brain technologyEthicists from the University of Basel have outlined a new biosecurity framework specific to neurotechnology. While the researchers declare an outright ban of dual-use technology ethically unjustified, they call for regulations aimed at protecting the mental privacy and integrity of humans. The journal Neuron has published the study.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Coupling experiments to theory to build a better batteryA Berkeley Lab-led team of researchers has reported that a new lithium-sulfur battery component allows a doubling in capacity compared to a conventional lithium-sulfur battery, even after more than 100 charge cycles.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New instrument lets doctors view the entire eye with unprecedented level of detailResearchers have developed the first instrument that can provide a detailed image of the entire eye that can produce higher quality images than currently available.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China says air quality 'improved' in 2017China's air quality improved across the country in 2017, the environmental protection ministry said Thursday, after the problem was so dire in previous years that some periods were dubbed an "airpocalypse".
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Science : NPR
Repeated Head Hits, Not Just Concussions, May Lead To A Type Of Chronic Brain DamageScientists believe they have solid evidence that repeated direct hits to the head can cause the degenerative brain disease seen in some athletes, even if there are no signs of concussion. (Image credit: Elsa/Getty Images)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Building blocks to create metamaterialsEngineers at Caltech and ETH Zürich in Switzerland have created a method to systematically design metamaterials using principles of quantum mechanics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Gaia avionics modelESA's Gaia observatory was launched in December 2013, and is now surveying our Milky Way, creating one of the most accurate-ever maps of the stars in our home galaxy and helping to answer questions about its origin and evolution.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New instrument lets doctors view the entire eye with unprecedented level of detailResearchers have developed the first instrument that can provide a detailed image of the entire eye. By incorporating a lens that changes optical parameters in response to an electric current, the innovative technology can produce higher quality images than currently available and could make eye examinations faster and more comfortable for patients by avoiding the need to undergo imaging with mult
7h
The Atlantic
Donald Trump’s Very 1990s Tabloid ScandalNothing like a good old-fashioned Donald Trump tabloid scandal. And if that’s not 1990s enough for you, this time it’s a presidential sex scandal, too. The celebrity gossip magazine InTouch Weekly says it’s planning to run an extensive interview, conducted in 2011, with an adult-film star who claims she had an affair with Donald Trump in 2006. The Wall Street Journal reported last week that Trump
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Science : NPR
Cat Lovers, Is Your Cat Right- Or Left-Pawed?Do you know which paw your cat uses first when coming down the stairs? Anthropologist and cat lover Barbara J. King discusses with researchers why a new finding of paw preference matters for our pets. (Image credit: MirasWonderland/Getty Images/iStockphoto)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Warming Arctic climate constrains life in cold-adapted mammalsDespite the growth in knowledge about the effects of a warming Arctic on its cold-adapted species, how these changes affect animal populations is poorly understood. Research efforts have been hindered by the area's remoteness and complex logistics required to gain access.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unusually sophisticated prehistoric monuments and technology revealed in the heart of the AegeanNew excavations on the remote island of Keros reveal monumental architecture and technological sophistication at the dawn of the Cycladic Bronze Age.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Crater Neukum named after Mars Express founderA fascinating martian crater has been chosen to honour the German physicist and planetary scientist, Gerhard Neukum, one of the founders of ESA's Mars Express mission.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers at Sandia work on new way to image brainSandia National Laboratories researchers want to use small magnetic sensors to image the brain in a way that's simpler and less expensive than the magnetoencephalography system now used.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Computer codes make sweet music for self-playing pianoUnique computer codes have been used to create an interactive self-playing piano performance that is part of a new videogame music and audio festival taking place in Nottingham this weekend.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Distorted view amongst smokers of when deadly damage caused by smoking will occurSmokers have a distorted perception on when the onset of smoking-related conditions will occur, a new study in the Journal of Cognitive Psychology reports.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
0.6 percent soy isoflavone in the diet decrease muscle atrophyScientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have discovered a means of reducing muscle atrophy by the addition of the soy-derived isoflavone aglycone (AglyMax) to the diet of mice. This attenuation by soy isoflavone is attributable to block the apoptosis-dependent pathway in muscle fiber. The AglyMax supplement also anticipate to attenuate age-related muscle loss, sarcopenia.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Efficacy of antibody targeting Devic's disease proven in new animal modelNeuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune disease associated with NMO immunoglobulin G (NMO-IgG). A cure for NMO remains elusive. Osaka University researchers recently established a localized NMO rat model by injecting NMO-IgG into the spinal cord, and assessed the efficacy of anti-repulsive guidance molecule-a (RGMa) antibody in treating NMO. They found anti-RGMa antibody delayed the onset and
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
The 16 "Billion-Dollar Disasters" That Happened in 20172017 was the U.S.’s most expensive year for climate disasters on record -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org
These very subtle movements line up with autismA new study provides the strongest evidence yet that nearly imperceptible changes in how people move can be used to diagnose neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism. The study’s results, reported in Scientific Reports , suggest a more accurate method to diagnose autism. Current assessments depend on highly subjective criteria, such as a lack of eye movement or repetitive actions. There is
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research traces roots of 'prisoners of war'Research by a historian at the University of Southampton shows the term 'prisoner of war' was first used in the 14th century, around three centuries earlier than previously thought.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Long-lived physicsNew particles produced in the LHC's high-energy proton-proton collisions don't hang around for long. A Higgs boson exists for less than a thousandth of a billionth of a billionth of a second before decaying into lighter particles, which can then be tracked or stopped in our detectors. Nothing rules out the existence of much longer-lived particles though, and certain theoretical scenarios predict t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hybridization can give rise to different genome combinationsResearchers have for the first time determined that hybridization between two bird species can give rise to several novel and fully functional hybrid genomic combinations. This could potentially be because hybrid species emerged through independent hybridisation events between the same parent species on different islands.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New power generation and propulsion system for satellitesResearchers at the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid have designed and patented a new propellantless system for satellites that allows generation of electric power and on-board thrust. This innovation, which has led to two national patents, has attracted the interest of the European Space Agency and of the space industry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New ways scientists can help put science back into popular cultureHow often do you, outside the requirements of an assignment, ponder things like the workings of a distant star, the innards of your phone camera, or the number and layout of petals on a flower? Maybe a little bit, maybe never. Too often, people regard science as sitting outside the general culture: A specialized, difficult topic carried out by somewhat strange people with arcane talents. It's some
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genomics reveals key macrophages' involvement in systemic sclerosisA new international study has made an important discovery about the key role of macrophages, a type of immune cell, in systemic sclerosis (SSc), a chronic autoimmune disease which currently has no cure.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A centuries-old math equation used to solve a modern-day genetics challengeResearchers developed a new mathematical tool to validate and improve methods used by medical professionals to interpret results from clinical genetic tests. The work was published this month in Genetics in Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lifespan of fuel cells maximized using small amount of metalsKAIST researchers described a new technique to improve chemical stability of electrode materials which can extend the lifespan by employing a very little amount of metals. Using computational chemistry and experimental data, the team observed that local compressive states around the Sr atoms in a perovskite electrode lattice weakened the Sr-O bond strength, which in turn promote strontium segregat
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Popular Science
24 hidden Android settings you should know aboutDIY Master your Android phone. The customizable Android operating system gives users more flexibility than iOS does. We collected 24 settings that let you tweak the software as needed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Have scientists really found the germ responsible for killing 15m Aztecs?This week, dozens of media outlets declared that scientists had solved the mystery of what wiped out the Aztecs. Traces of a pathogen that can cause a typhoid-like enteric fever have been found in skeletons from a cemetery linked to the catastrophic epidemics of 1545-50, which killed millions of indigenous people in 16th century Mexico.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How did we evolve to live longer?Research shows a collection of small adaptations in stress activated proteins, accumulated over millennia of human history, could help to explain our increased natural defences and longer lifespan.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Massive spike in football shirt advertising by betting companies raises health concernsThere has been a massive spike in football shirt advertising by betting companies leading to public health concerns, research by the University of Glasgow and Healthy Stadia published today (18 January 2018) has revealed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Explainer: the evidence for the Tasmanian genocideAustralian Drone New South WalesAt a public meeting in Hobart in the late 1830s, Solicitor-General Alfred Stephen, later Chief Justice of New South Wales, shared with the assembled crowd his solution for dealing with "the Aboriginal problem". If the colony could not protect its convict servants from Aboriginal attack "without extermination", said Stephen, "then I say boldly and broadly exterminate!"
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists find clues to the origins of high-temperature superconductivityEver since cuprate (copper-containing) superconductors were first discovered in 1986, they have greatly puzzled researchers. Cuprate superconductors have critical superconducting temperatures—the point at which their electrical resistance drops to zero—of up to 138 K at ambient pressure, which far exceeds the critical temperatures of other superconductors and is even higher than what is thought po
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Dagens Medicin
Rigshospitalet indskærper rygeforbudTo påbud fra Arbejdstilsynet har fået Rigshospitalets ledelse til at indskærpe rygeforbuddet for medarbejdere. Flere overtrædelser kan i værste fald kan ende i en afskedigelsessag.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Warming Arctic climate constrains life in cold-adapted mammalsA new study led by Joel Berger has uncovered previously unknown effects of rain-on-snow events, winter precipitation and ice tidal surges on the muskoxen.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blasting dental plaque with microbubblesResearchers have found a way to remove plaque from dental implants to improve oral hygiene.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cellular mechanism for severe viral hepatitis identifiedKAIST medical scientists identified a cellular mechanism causing inflammatory changes in regulatory T cells that can lead to severe viral hepatitis. Research on this mechanism will help further understand the nature of various inflammatory diseases and lead to the development of relevant clinical treatments.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
2017 was the warmest year on record for the global ocean2017 was the warmest year on record for the global ocean according to an updated ocean analysis from Institute of Atmospheric Physics/Chinese Academy of Science.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
APA releases new journal article reporting standardsAs part of its promotion of greater transparency and the assessment of rigor in psychological science, the American Psychological Association has released new Journal Article Reporting Standards for researchers seeking to publish in in scholarly journals.
8h
Feed: All Latest
'CS:GO' in Your Facebook Feed: One of the Biggest Esports Leagues Is Moving to Facebook. Why?ESL is bringing two of its leagues exclusively to Facebook Watch. Are no-scope 360 headshots the new "meaningful interaction"?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What science tells us about the pros and cons of grunting in tennisOne of tennis' perennial debates has ignited early at this year's Australian Open, after Belarusian player Aryna Sabalenka was accused of grunting too loudly during her first-round loss to Australian Ash Barty.
8h
Ingeniøren
Ny supercomputer sætter turbo på vindforskningEn ny 'High Performance' supercomputer er på vej til DTU. Den skal øge hastigheden på de matematiske beregninger der bruges til bedre at forstå vindens bevægelser om en vindmøllevinge og kortlægge vindforhold i Europa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Glacial moulin formation triggered by rapid lake drainageScientists are uncovering the mystery of how, where and when important glacial features called moulins form on the Greenland Ice Sheet. Moulins, vertical conduits that penetrate through the half-mile-deep ice, efficiently funnel the majority of summer meltwater from the ice surface to the base of the ice sheet. The lubricating effects of the draining water can lead to faster sliding of the ice she
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Australia's 'deadliest natural hazard'—what's your heatwave plan?Australian Drone New South WalesHeatwaves are Australia's deadliest natural hazard, but a recent survey has found that many vulnerable people do not have plans to cope with extreme heat.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Crowds within crowd found to outperform 'wisdom of the crowd'A team of researchers affiliated with institutions in Argentina, the U.S. and Germany has found that there is a way to improve on the "wisdom of the crowd"—separate the people in a given crowd into smaller groups and let them talk about an issue at hand before an answer is given. In their paper published in the journal Nature Human Behavior, the group describes an experiment they carried out with
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists monitor volcanic gases with digital cameras to forecast eruptionsScientists have shown for the first time that volcanoes emit distinctive pulses of gas a few hours before erupting, which could lead to real-time forecasting of dangerous volcanic eruptions that are difficult to predict, according to the researchers.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CU researcher reviews effect of general anesthesia on developing brainThe head of the CU School of Medicine Department of Anesthesiology has written a review of scientific studies on the potentially adverse effects of exposing developing brains to general anesthesia.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Building blocks to create metamaterialsAn international team, led by Chiara Daraio, uses techniques from quantum mechanics to create a system for engineering how metamaterials will interact with waves.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NYC is selling off its fossil fuel investments—here's why that mattersThis has been a dizzying year for those anxious about climate change. On the policy front, President Trump has worked to unravel President Obama's progress on climate, reversing two of his signature achievements first by withdrawing from the Paris Climate Agreement in June and then scrapping the Clean Power Plan in October.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Detecting chemical agents with confidenceThe Joint Chemical Agent Detector (JCAD) has become an important defense tool on battlefields and in war-torn cities over the last few years. About the size and shape of a VHS tape or a hardcover bestselling novel, JCADs sound an alarm and begin to light up if nerve agents such as sarin or blister agents such as mustard gas are present.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mealworms may turn infected wheat into cashThe potential solution discovered by University of Saskatchewan researchers for producers stuck with unsellable fusarium-infected wheat may actually put cash in the farmers' pockets and open up a new worm-based niche market in the feed industry.
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Dagens Medicin
Nordjylland vil tiltrække læger med nye uddannelsesforløbEn samlet uddannelsespakke med KBU, intro- og hoveduddannelse med geografisk sikring i Nordjylland skal gøre det mere attraktivt for uddannelsessøgende læger at søge mod Region Nordjylland.
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New Scientist - News
Cute cats the size of kittens are seeing their homes destroyedGüiñas are the smallest cats in the Americas, smaller than most domestic cats, and they are becoming increasingly rare
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists create quantum state detectorPhysicists from MIPT have teamed up with their colleagues in Russia and Great Britain and developed a superconducting quantum state detector. The new device can detect magnetic fields at low temperatures and is useful to both researchers and quantum computer engineers.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Mustachioed MonkeyA scientist confirms a new species of patas monkey in Ethiopia.
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The Scientist RSS
Founder of amfAR and Champion of AIDS Research DiesMathilde Krim devoted her life to researching the disease and fighting the stigma associated with it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drastic phase changes in topologically engineered planar absorbers improve sensitivity of optical sensorsNon-invasive optical temperature sensing is essential for remote monitoring of fabrication processes, in situations where the sample needs to be insulated from the environment, at extreme or rapidly changing temperatures, and in the presence of strong and varying magnetic fields. Optical temperature sensors measure frequency shifts of optical resonances and often require long optical paths to comp
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How smart monitoring is helping an urban farm to flourishAn innovative and award-winning urban farming facility is creating energy-efficient growing conditions in tunnels 120ft below the busy streets of Clapham in London. Micro greens and salad leaves are thriving with the help of a smart monitoring programme that records temperature, humidity and CO2 levels.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Expert says major eruption in Papua New Guinea could be soonSeismic activity beneath a Papua New Guinea volcano could mean that a major eruption was imminent, a scientist said Thursday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why some of your old work commitments never seem to go awayYou can quit work commitments if you want - but some of them never really leave you, new research suggests.
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Dagens Medicin
Fedmeforsker: SST bør rangliste lægemidler mod fedmeDen anbefaling, som Sundhedsstyrelsen har lavet for at støtte praktiserende læger i deres valg af medicin mod fedme, mangler det afgørende i form af en prioriteret liste over markedets produkter. Det mener fedmeforsker Bjørn Richelsen.
9h
Popular Science
This tiny shark eats grass and it’s doing just fineAnimals The world’s only omnivorous shark doesn’t just poop grass for fun. Bonnethead sharks are the only omnivorous sharks, rivaling sea turtles in their ability to digest seagrass.
9h
Ingeniøren
Google Home og Chromecast kan overbelaste wifi i hjemmetFlere brugere melder om overbelastede wifi-netværk på grund af en bug i Google Home og Chromecast.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research finds drinking 100 percent fruit juice does not affect blood sugar levelsNew research demonstrates that 100 percent fruit juice has no impact on blood sugar levels.
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Futurity.org
Topographic map reveals Titan’s highs and lowsAstronomers have created a global topographic map of Saturn’s moon Titan using the now-complete Cassini data set. The map opens new avenues for understanding the moon’s liquid flows and terrain. Two papers, both in Geophysical Review Letters , describe the map and discoveries arising from it. Creating the map took about a year, according to Paul Corlies, a doctoral student at Cornell University a
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The Atlantic
The DNA of Iceland's First Known Black Man, Recreated from His Living DescendantsHans Jonatan was born into slavery on a Caribbean sugar plantation, and he died in a small Icelandic fishing village. In those intervening 43 years, he fought for the Danish Navy in the Napoleonic Wars, lost a landmark case for his freedom in The General’s Widow v. the Mulatto , then somehow escaped to become a peasant farmer on the Nordic island. No one knows how he got there. No one knows where
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
World's oldest known oxygen oasis discoveredIn the Earth's early history, several billion years ago, only traces of oxygen existed in the atmosphere and the oceans. Today's air-breathing organisms could not have existed under those conditions. The change was caused by photosynthesizing bacteria, which created oxygen as a by-product – in vast amounts. 2.5-billion-year-old rock layers on several continents have yielded indications that the fi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ethical design is the answer to some of social media's problemsTwitter Way D. TrumpFacebook last week announced a redesign of its news feed to prioritise posts from friends and family over those of news publishers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A survival lesson from bats—eating variety keeps species multiplyingDiet is an important factor influencing the survival and evolution of all species. Many studies have shown that when species evolve from being a predator or insectivore to being a vegetarian, the rate at which new species arise increases. But a new study published in Ecology Letters reveals that omnivorous New World noctilionoid bats, those species with diets including both plant and animal materi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Employees who work in open-plan offices feel worse and are more dissatisfied with their workIt is becoming increasingly common for employees to share the workplace with their colleagues in large open-plan office areas. In this way, companies and organizations want to save money, but also facilitate the interaction between the employees. However, a new study from CTF, Service Research Center at Karlstad University, Sweden, shows the opposite. The more co-workers that share the workplace,
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Ingeniøren
Pris på vanddata sender forbrugere på dobbeltarbejde i hele landetUenighed om prisen på målerdata for vandforbrug tvinger tusindvis af forbrugere i hele landet til selv at aflæse den digitale og fjernaflæste vandmåler.
9h
Live Science
Rare Snowfall in Sahara Desert Seen from SpaceStunning views show the snow-covered dunes on the edge of the Sahara Desert — an area known to be one of the hottest places on Earth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hanging with the locals pays off for tropical invadersAustralian Drone New South WalesStudying the behaviour of tropical fish in a temperate environment can help predict who might be winners and losers in a warmer future, and how resources such as fish stocks may be impacted, researchers say.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Y chromosome is disappearing – so what will happen to men?The Y chromosome may be a symbol of masculinity, but it is becoming increasingly clear that it is anything but strong and enduring. Although it carries the "master switch" gene, SRY, that determines whether an embryo will develop as male (XY) or female (XX), it contains very few other genes and is the only chromosome not necessary for life. Women, after all, manage just fine without one.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The rise of turfs—flattening of global kelp forestsResearch published today into the state of kelp forests around the world shows they are being degraded into flat seascapes carpeted by short, unwanted turf-algae – and the Western Australian coastline is one of the worst-affected areas.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Meteorites brought water to Earth during the first two million yearsA new study of a rare basaltic meteorites called angrites suggests that volatiles, which are elements with relatively low boiling points such as water, could have been brought to our planet by meteorites during the first two million years of the solar system.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why cyberattacks don't work as weaponsDigitalisation will fundamentally alter many aspects of our lives – in many cases for the better. However, our increasing dependence on computers and networks for data exchange and storage is creating new vulnerabilities for both individuals and society. The key word here is: cybersecurity. This encompasses more than just technical solutions: it involves not only security in cyberspace, but also s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biodiversity conservation should be a core value of China's 'Belt and Road Initiative'Environment and conservation experts from the University of Nottingham Malaysia (UNMC) and the University of Nottingham Ningbo China (UNNC) are challenging decision-makers, infrastructure planners and conservationists to work together to mitigate the negative impacts of China's "Belt and Road Initiative' (BRI) and look for opportunities for biodiversity conservation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
And now for something completely different—a worm with three sexesDiane Shakes shakes her head. A trisexual arrangement is really not so different. Three sexes—male, female and hermaphrodite—are "part of the plan" for many organisms. There's even a word for it: trioecious.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New patented system could prevent motion sickness while riding in self-driving carsOne of the selling points of autonomous vehicles is the chance for drivers to be more productive while traveling. But some, suffering from motion sickness, won't be able to take advantage of relinquishing the wheel.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers seek an end to child marriageIn addition to secondary education, girls need access to decent jobs and increased security in public to avoid child marriage and change perceptions of traditional gender norms.
10h
Live Science
Watch This Bottle of Water Freeze Over in the Blink of an EyeA way-cool clip posted on Reddit shows the strange phenomenon of a "snap freeze."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The economic legacy of the Great MigrationWhen black Americans migrated out of the South in the 1930s and '40s, their children benefited by leaps and bounds, according to a University of Michigan study using U.S. Census data.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Looking to the sun to create hydrogen fuelWhen Lawrence Livermore scientist Tadashi Ogitsu leased a hydrogen fuel-cell car in 2017, he knew that his daily commute would change forever. There are no greenhouse gases that come out of the tailpipe, just a bit of water vapor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers make advances in control of chameleon-like material for next-generation computersResearchers from Texas A&M University report significant advances in their understanding and control of a chameleon-like material that could be key to next-generation computers that are even more powerful than today's silicon-based machines.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new, dynamic view of chromatin movementsIn cells, proteins tightly package the long thread of DNA into pearl necklace-like complexes known as chromatin. Scientists at EPFL show for the first time how chromatin moves, answering longstanding questions about how its structure helps regulate gene expression. The study is published in Nature Communications.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why some of your old work commitments never seem to go awayYou can quit work commitments if you want - but some of them never really leave you, new research suggests. In a study of 420 employees representing a wide variety of occupations and work settings at three organizations, researchers found that commitments that workers no longer had were still lingering in their minds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists study the powers of tiny crystalsWhen it comes to the way scientists react to their discoveries, "That's interesting" falls somewhere between "Eureka!" and "Uh-oh."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using data mining to make sense of climate changeBig data and data mining have provided several breakthroughs in fields such as health informatics, smart cities and marketing. The same techniques, however, have not delivered consistent key findings for climate change.
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Feed: All Latest
What CES and Detroit Taught Us About The Future Of CarsBoth CES and the Detroit Auto Show happen early in the year, and while they suggest an electric and autonomous future, there’s mileage left in gas.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
Can Robots Tighten the Bolts on a Rickety Caregiver Sector?Robotic aides could relieve the burden of caring for a growing elderly and disabled population—if we can take advantage of technological advances without ignoring human needs -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The early bits of lifeHow can life originate before DNA and genes? One possibility is that there are natural processes that lead to the organisation of simple physical objects such as small microcapsules that undergo rudimentary forms of interaction, self-organisation and information processing.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: ESA's Large Space SimulatorThis circular enclosure, made to appear larger still by an array of mirrors at its end, is ESA's Large Space Simulator. Some 15 m high and 10 m in diameter, it is cavernous enough to accommodate an upended double decker bus.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists uncover secret of mass antelope mortality event in remote steppe grassland of Central AsiaThe sudden death of over 200,000 saiga antelopes in Kazakhstan in May 2015, more than 80 percent of the affected population and more than 60 percent of the global population of this species, baffled the world.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
Why People Dislike Really Smart LeadersThose with an IQ above 120 are perceived as less effective, regardless of actual performance -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Dagens Medicin
Betablokkere kan forbedre effekten af immunterapiSpecifik type af de blodtrykssænkende betablokkere ser ifølge amerikansk undersøgelse ud til at øge effekten af immunterapí blandt patienter med malignt melanom.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Popular tool for drug discovery just got 10 times fasterResearchers at Purdue University just made high throughput screening, a process often used in drug discovery, 10 times faster than previous methods.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study reveals secrets of 'fluid-like' heat flow in solid semiconductor at nanoscaleResearchers are applying the same "hydrodynamic transport model" used to study flow in fluids to explain heat transport in a solid semiconductor, with potential implications for the design of high-speed transistors and lasers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Metal nanoparticles for imaging guided phototherapyNational University of Singapore chemists have recently discovered that gold-silver (Au-Ag) nanoparticles can be used to image and provide concurrent treatment for bacterial infections.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers warn of deadly parvovirus strain spreading in Australian dogsAustralian Drone New South WalesVets and dog owners are being warned that canine parvovirus – a contagious and often fatal disease – is spreading rapidly among Australian dogs.
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Dagens Medicin
Egen læge henviser oftest til kræftpakkeforløbMere end halvdelen af pakkeforløb for kræftområdet bliver startet efter en henvisning fra egen læge, viser nye tal.
11h
Viden
Masser af små satellitter på vej over dit hovedSatellitter mindre end en liter mælk har givet let adgang til rummet. Deres antal vokser kraftigt.
11h
NYT > Science
Matter: In the Arctic, More Rain May Mean Fewer Musk OxenWinter rain makes it more difficult for the animals to feed, particularly pregnant females, researchers find.
11h
Feed: All Latest
YouTube's Latest Shake-Up Hits Up-and-Coming Creators the HardestYouTube has taken new steps to limit who can profit from views—which may leave the next generation of creators in the lurch.
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Feed: All Latest
Why a $38 Billion Tax Payment Is a Good Deal for AppleApple said it will pay an estimated $38 billion in tax to bring back to the US some of the $252 billion it has stashed overseas, following passage of the new tax law.
11h
Feed: All Latest
The GE9X Jet Engine Is About to Get a Blast of Ice (For Safety's Sake)When temperatures drop below -6 degrees F, engineers in Manitoba will bring the freeze to Boeing's new engine.
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Science | The Guardian
Complex engineering and metal-work discovered beneath ancient Greek 'pyramid'Latest find on Cyclades’ Keros includes evidence of metal-working and suggests the beginnings of an urban centre, say archaeologists More than 4,000 years ago builders carved out the entire surface of a naturally pyramid-shaped promontory on the Greek island of Keros. They shaped it into terraces covered with 1,000 tonnes of specially imported gleaming white stone to give it the appearance of a g
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Science | The Guardian
Dementia study adds to calls for more funding of music therapyMusic can help reduce symptoms but only 5% of care homes are using it effectively, finds report The symptoms of hundreds of thousands of vulnerable people with dementia could significantly improve by listening to and playing music, according to a report. The study, which compiled existing evidence as well as talking to experts, found music can help people with dementia recall information and redu
11h
Ingeniøren
Ny prognose: Ingeniørmanglen er langtfra afblæstTrods en stigning i nye studerende inden for teknologi, naturvidenskab og it kommer Danmark til at mangle 10.000 kandidater inden for områderne i 2025, viser analyse fra Engineer the future. Opgaverne risikerer at ende i udlandet.
11h
The Atlantic
'The Purpose of This From the Beginning Has Been to Cut Legal Immigration'President Trump and his Senate allies are now presenting their goal for immigration reform as increasing the number of high-skilled immigrants allowed into the United States. But the immigration legislation from Senators Tom Cotton of Arkansas and David Perdue of Georgia that Trump has endorsed would almost certainly reduce the total number of high-skilled immigrants. That stark contradiction has
11h
Ingeniøren
Forskere: Kryptovaluta-kurser er for lette at manipulereKryptovaluta-markederne er lette at manipulere med bots ifølge forskningsgruppe.
11h
Ingeniøren
Overrasket læser: Nordkorea er ikke et teknologisk ingenmandslandLÆSERINDLÆG: Særligt en lokalt produceret smartphone har imponeret en læser, der rejste til Nordkorea med noget andre forventninger til landets teknologiske udvikling.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The chemical evolution of DNA and RNA on early EarthRNA was probably the first informational molecule. Now, chemists from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have demonstrated that alternation of wet and dry conditions could have sufficed to drive the prebiotic synthesis of the RNA nucleosides found in all domains of life.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop a new material for manipulating moleculesA scientist at the University of Córdoba, working with an international research team, has created a new porous single-crystal material that could have many applications in nanotechnology and catalysis.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First surface-based estimation of the aerosol indirect effect over ChinaThe aerosol indirect effect (AIE) can significantly affect climate change and is one of the largest uncertainties in climate change studies. To date, only a few AIE studies using satellite measurements have been carried out in China, and no such study has been done using ground-based measurements. The AIE can only be assessed accurately from aircraft or ground-based measurements. The first compreh
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chemists improve hydrogen sensorsA group of scientists from the Siberian Federal University (SFU, Krasnoyarsk, Russia) and the Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry (NIIC, Novosibirsk, Russia) have combined the useful properties of metal phthalocyanines and palladium membranes in order to create active layers in hydrogen detectors. This operation significantly increases the sensitivity of the sensors. The study is reported in
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The world's first all-silicon laserIntegrated silicon photonics incorporates microelectronics and optoelectronics, a combination expected to revolutionize a variety of fields such as communication, sensing, lighting, displays, imaging and detection. Silicon lasers are the key to achieve integrated silicon photonics. However, the optical gains of silicon are lower than those of III-V compound semiconductors by one order of magnitude
12h
Science | The Guardian
Why 'bird-brained' may not be such an insult after allBirds show remarkable levels of intelligence, something that may have given them the edge following the K-T extinction event Even though I am better with dead birds than with living ones, I do enjoy watching them. Their behaviour is fascinating, and as Jennifer Ackerman points out in her book , birds are a lot more intelligent than we often give them credit for. But what do we know about the evol
12h
Ingeniøren
Vanddreven boremaskine skal slukke skibsbrandeFor fjerde år i træk uddeler Industriens Fond iværksætterprisen 2017, også kaldet Danish Tech Challenge. Vinderen blev Rosenby Engineering fra Læsø, der har opfundet en boremaskine, der kan slukke brand i skibscontainere.
12h
The Atlantic
The 'Underground Railroad' To Save AtheistsLubna Yaseen was a student in Baghdad when death threats forced her into exile. Her crime was to think the unthinkable and question the unquestionable—to state, openly, that she was an atheist. Growing up in Hillah, a city in central Iraq, she developed an independent mind at a young age. “My mother is an atheist intellectual person, and she brought up me and my siblings to think for ourselves an
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Australia lifesaving drone makes first rescueAustralian Drone New South WalesA pair of Australian swimmers on Thursday became the first people to be rescued in the ocean by a drone when the aerial lifesaver dropped a safety device to distressed teens caught in rough seas.
13h
Science : NPR
Photographer Says He Lost His Job After Leaking Pictures Of Rick Perry And Coal CEOFormer Department of Energy photographer Simon Edelman is filing a federal whistleblower suit after he leaked the photos of a private meeting between the energy secretary and Robert Murray. (Image credit: Simon Edelman/AP)
13h
cognitive science
225 Machine learning/AI Conferences in 2018submitted by /u/wgarwood [link] [comments]
13h
Dagens Medicin
Kræftpakke for uspecifikke symptomer virker efter hensigtenDe kræftpatienter, der bliver henvist til den nye kræftpakke for uspecifikke symptomer, har omtrent samme prognose som dem, der bliver udredt og får behandling via andre kanaler. Det viser en ny ph.d.-afhandling fra Aarhus Universitet.
13h
Ingeniøren
Har den kryptering, vi allesammen bruger, en bagdør?AES-krypteringsalgoritmen, der bliver brugt alle steder, er i udgangspunktet til at stole på, mener flere med indsigt i området. .
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Archaeologists in Mexico claim world's longest flooded caveArchaeologists and divers on Mexico's Yucatan peninsula announced Wednesday that they found a passage connecting two underwater caves, creating what they say is the world's longest continuous flooded cave.
13h
Dagens Medicin
USA advarer mod anafylaksi ved kræftlægemiddelKræftlægemidlet Varubi kan give anafylaksi og andre overfølsomhedsreaktioner, advarer amerikansk lægemiddelmyndighed.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Worst-case global warming scenarios not credible: studyEarth's surface will almost certainly not warm up four or five degrees Celsius by 2100, according to a study released Wednesday which, if correct, voids worst-case UN climate change predictions.
14h
Dagens Medicin
Betablokkere kan forbedre effekten af immunterapi for patienter med modermærkekræftSpecifik type af de blodtrykssænkende betablokkere ser ifølge amerikansk undersøgelse ud til at øge effekten af immunterapí blandt patienter med malignt melanom.
14h
Ingeniøren
Ny metode afblæser de værste klimascenarier – og de bedsteSkønnet for relationen mellem CO2-koncentration og temperaturstigning har været meget usikkert. En ny analysemetode reducerer usikkerheden betragteligt – og giver håb.
14h
Science : NPR
Photographer Says He Lost His Job After Leaking Pictures Of Rick Perry And Coal CEOThe former Department of Energy photographer, Simon Edelman is filing a federal whistleblower suit after he leaked the photos of a private meeting between the energy secretary and Robert Murray. (Image credit: Simon Edelman/AP)
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China spots four oil slicks from sunken tankerThe spill from a sunken Iranian tanker off China's east coast has spawned four oil slicks as authorities prepared to send robots to the wreckage to assess the environmental damage.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nintendo thinks inside the box with cardboard Switch accessoryNintendo Switch Cardboard SwitchNintendo sparked fierce debate Thursday with a new line of cardboard DIY accessories for its smash-hit Switch console, delighting some fans, but leaving others bemused by the low-tech offering.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
France's PSA Group to offer 40 electric vehicles by 2025The CEO of France-based automaker PSA Group says it will offer 40 electric models across its lineup by 2025, and it plans to sell vehicles in the U.S. within 10 years.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Use of primate 'actors' misleading millions of viewersMore needs to be done to educate audiences, including viewers at home and filmmakers, on the unethical nature of using primates in the film industry, says a leading expert in a new study.
15h
Science | The Guardian
Stuart Wenham: scientists pay tribute to 'Einstein of solar world'University of New South Wales colleagues pay tribute to pioneer with ‘Crocodile Dundee persona’ who died age 60 from malignant melanoma Australia’s scientific community has paid tribute to Prof Stuart Wenham, a solar energy pioneer described as the “Einstein of the solar industry”, whose research increased the efficiency of solar cells a hundredfold. Wenham passed away on 23 December, age 60, aft
16h
Viden
Kunstig intelligens læser nu bedre end menneskerMen indtil videre er der kun tale om et lille forspring.
16h
NYT > Science
Fed Up With Drug Companies, Hospitals Decide to Start Their OwnA group of large hospital systems plans to create a nonprofit generic drug company to battle shortages and high prices.
16h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reminding people about vaccinations can increase rates of immunizationRates of immunization against infectious diseases in children and adults are improving, but under-vaccination remains a problem that results in vaccine-preventable deaths and illnesses.
17h
Ingeniøren
Forskere: Hjælpestoffer med tungmetaller dræber ukrudtet – ikke glyphosatFranske genetikere konkluderer i nyt studie, at verdens mest solgte pesticid, glyphosat, i sig selv stort set er uskadeligt. Giftigheden af sprøjtemidler skyldes derimod hjælpestofferne. Dansk forsker og Miljøstyrelsen er skeptiske.
18h
Science | The Guardian
Climate sensitivity study suggests narrower range of potential outcomesFindings should not be seen as taking pressure off need to tackle climate change, authors warn Earth’s surface will almost certainly not warm up four or five degrees Celsius by 2100, according to a study which, if correct, voids worst-case UN climate change predictions. A revised calculation of how greenhouse gases drive up the planet’s temperature reduces the range of possible end-of-century out
19h
Scientific American Content: Global
Salmonella Could Have Caused 16th-Century EpidemicUsing a new algorithm, geneticists uncovered the pathogen that could have caused a massive epidemic in the Aztec empire: Salmonella bacteria. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
19h
Science | The Guardian
Japan breakthrough could improve weather forecasts and save livesData collected by Himawari-8 weather satellite paired with supercomputer programme A project harnessing data from a Japanese satellite could improve weather forecasting and allow officials to issue life-saving warnings before natural disasters , researchers say. The project is the first time “infrared radiation luminance data” has been used to model weather patterns in areas under heavy cloud cov
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Release of ancient methane due to changing climate kept in check by ocean watersOcean sediments are a massive storehouse for the potent greenhouse gas methane. But methane only acts as a greenhouse gas if and when it reaches the atmosphere. Environmental scientists recently set out to discover whether or not this ancient-sourced methane, which is released due to warming ocean waters, survives the journey from the seafloor and reaches the atmosphere.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers explore psychological effects of climate changeWhile some people have little anxiety about the Earth's changing climate, others are experiencing high levels of stress, and even depression, based on their perception of the threat of global climate change, researchers found. Psychological responses to climate change seem to vary based on what type of concern people show for the environment, with those highly concerned about the planet's animals
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Prospective birth control pill for men has its origin in an arrow poisonWomen have many options for oral contraceptives that are safe, effective and reversible, but despite decades of research, men have none. Now, scientists report a rat study that shows they finally have a good lead for a male birth control pill. It's based on ouabain, a plant extract that African warriors and hunters traditionally used as a heart-stopping poison on their arrows.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Slower walking speed in the elderly may be explained by loss of muscle strength and massResearch recently published in The Journal of Physiology has found that elderly people walk at a slower speed and tire more quickly because of loss of strength and mass in leg muscles. Using computer simulations they found that these physiological changes explain the slower walking speed preferred by the elderly, and that a focus on building up these leg muscles may be the only effective way to im
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microwaves could be as bad for the environment as cars suggests new researchMicrowaves usage across the EU alone emits as much carbon dioxide as nearly seven million cars according to a new study by the University of Manchester. Researchers at the university have carried out the first ever comprehensive study of the environmental impacts of microwaves, considering their whole life cycle, from 'cradle to grave.'
21h
NYT > Science
Trapped on an Island With Wolves, the Only Way Out for These Caribou Was UpNine caribou on an island in Lake Superior were helicoptered to safety in a bid to save a once thriving herd from dying out.
21h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microwaves could be as bad for the environment as cars, suggests new researchMicrowaves usage across the EU alone emits as much carbon dioxide as nearly seven million cars according to a new study by The University of Manchester.
21h
Science : NPR
Pioneering HIV Researcher Mathilde Krim Remembered For Her ActivismMathilde Krim, who died this week, was a vocal pioneer in HIV treatment and research at a time when discrimination against people with AIDS in the U.S. was rampant, even in medical care. (Image credit: Theo Wargo/WireImage)
22h
Popular Science
These companies claim blockchain could help fight climate changeNexus Media News Is it a breakthrough, or just a buzzword? Blockchain technology could be an important tool in solving climate change—at least according to a crop of new companies.
22h
Big Think
If Money Can Make You Happy, Does Debt Make You Sad?Does money, even when borrowed, make us happier – or does the state of owing money add to our dissatisfaction and stress? Read More
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Whole-population testing for breast and ovarian cancer gene mutations is cost effectiveScreening the entire population for breast and ovarian cancer gene mutations, as opposed to just those at high-risk of carrying this mutation, is cost effective and could prevent more ovarian and breast cancers than the current clinical approach, according to research published today in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Use of primate 'actors' misleading millions of viewersMore needs to be done to educate audiences, including viewers at home and filmmakers, on the unethical nature of using primates in the film industry, says a leading expert in a new study.
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New drug combination helps kickstart the immune system to fight back against cancerScientists from King's College London have found a way to boost the immune system to help it fight back against cancer. The breakthrough involves the first ever use of a combination of chemotherapy and a drug being trialed as a treatment for neonatal jaundice, that together help kick start the body's natural defenses.
22h
The Atlantic
Donald Trump's Long History of Paying for SilenceBreaking up is hard to do. A pile of money and some crack legal help can’t heal a broken heart, but they can go a long way to guaranteeing that whatever bad feelings emerge from the relationship don’t make it to the public. At various times in the past, Donald Trump has struck deals with women in his life, or formerly in his life, exchanging money for silence. It’s not a perfect solution. Over th
22h
Science-Based Medicine
Cancer quack Colleen Huber sues Britt Hermes over criticismNaturopathic cancer quack Colleen Huber is attempting to silence criticism of her practices by suing Britt Hermes. Help Britt fight back with a donation to help defray legal expenses.
22h
Live Science
Woman Coughs So Hard, She Breaks a RibA woman in Massachusetts with "whooping cough" broke her rib in a fit of spasmodic coughing, according to a new report of the case.
22h
Futurity.org
Lower mortality for those who go to religious servicesA new paper links regular attendance at religious services with improved health and lowered mortality. The researchers conducted an empirical study on data collected 2004-2014 through the University of Michigan’s Health and Retirement Study (HRS), which surveyed social and economic determinants of mortality in middle-aged and older adults, including religious factors. “We wanted to link the resea
22h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Investigating ISIS, Interviewing Steve Bannon, Parenting Teen IdolsWhat We’re Following Bannon’s Testimony: President Trump’s former chief strategist, Steve Bannon, has reportedly agreed to be interviewed by Special Counsel Robert Mueller. The news comes just a day after Bannon stonewalled questioners on the House Intelligence Committee, suggesting that Mueller’s investigation of the 2016 election is making more progress than Congress’s. Bannon, like his populis
22h
Futurity.org
Water-based air conditioner cools without harmful chemicalsA new water-based air-conditioning system cools air to as low as 18 degrees Celsius (about 64 degrees Fahrenheit) without using energy-intensive compressors and environmentally harmful chemical refrigerants. “…our technology has immense potential to disrupt how air-conditioning has traditionally been provided…” This technology could potentially replace the century-old air-cooling principle that i
22h
Futurity.org
To better focus on a new task, try this planWhen you have to switch tasks at work, making a plan to return to and finish the task you’re leaving can help you better focus on the new, interrupting work, according to new research. “It’s like Windows staying open in our brains, and it makes it hard to focus on the intervening work.” Taking a minute when interrupted to create a “ready-to-resume” plan can help you disengage and move on, avoidin
22h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bioengineered soft microfibers improve T-cell productionColumbia Engineering researchers have developed a new method for improving T cell manufacture by focusing on the materials involved in this process. Their study uses a polymer mesh to activate the T cells, a critical step for their production. This approach simplifies processing compared to systems in use today. In addition, making the fibers out of a mechanically soft material improved T cell gro
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Presurgical targeted therapy delays relapse of high-risk stage 3 melanomaA pair of targeted therapies given before and after surgery for melanoma produced at least a six-fold increase in time to progression compared to standard-of-care surgery for patients with stage 3 disease, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in Lancet Oncology. Patients who had no sign of disease at surgery after combination treatment did not progress to metasta
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Should all patients be asked about their sexual orientation?In late 2017, NHS England released guidelines recommending that health professionals ask all patients about their sexual orientation in order to improve services for non-heterosexual patients, but should they? Experts debate the issue in The BMJ today.
23h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Duration of treatment rather than dose more strongly associated with opioid misuse after surgeryPrescribing higher opioid doses for shorter durations may be a more effective way to treat pain after surgery, while minimizing the risk of longer term misuse and addiction, suggest US researchers in The BMJ today.
23h
Futurity.org
Baby brain response to touch sets stage for empathySafe, new brain imaging techniques provide one of the first looks inside the infant’s brain to show where the sense of touch is processed—not just when a baby feels a touch to the hand or foot, but also when the baby sees an adult’s hand or foot being touched, as well. Although touch is the first of the five senses to develop, scientists know far less about the baby’s brain response to touch than
23h
Live Science
Surgeon Left Scalpel in Veteran's Abdomen, Lawsuit ClaimsA veteran in Connecticut is suing a Veterans Affair Hospital, claiming that someone left a scalpel handle inside of his abdomen after surgery, according to news reports.
23h
Futurity.org
These fish eat the scales they ram or pry off othersNew research clarifies how the odd diet of scale-eating fish influences their body evolution and behavior. This small group of fishes—possibly the world’s cleverest carnivorous grazers—feeds on the scales of other fish in the tropics. Their approaches differ: some ram their blunt noses into the sides of other fish to prey upon sloughed-off scales, while others open their jaws to gargantuan widths
23h
Popular Science
That giant fireball in Michigan last night did not trigger an earthquakeSpace But it was gorgeous. It brightened the cold Michigan night in an instant, a brilliant burst of light that streaked across the sky.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Big swings continue as bitcoin briefly dips below $10,000The volatility of the digital currency markets was on display again Wednesday, as bitcoin briefly fell below $10,000 before rebounding back above $11,000 in the U.S. afternoon.
23h
Feed: All Latest
Nintendo Labo: Price, Details, Release DateLabo is a set of cardboard, build-it-yourself accessories for Nintendo's super-popular Switch gaming console.
23h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Chemistry 'Van Gogh' could help with cancerScientists capture "incredible" images of instructions contained in DNA being read
23h
The Atlantic
Ta-Nehisi Coates on Cornel West’s One-Sided WarIf there’s real beef between the Harvard philosopher Cornel West and The Atlantic ’s Ta-Nehisi Coates, Coates says he doesn’t understand it. West is a vocal critic of Coates and his status as a public intellectual. Coates addressed the controversy at a panel Tuesday hosted by The Atlantic , saying he remains confused why the feud started in the first place, and that he can’t seem to find a huge d
23h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Et Tu, Kelly?Today in 5 Lines Republicans are hoping to vote on a stopgap proposal to fund the government for another month on Thursday. White House Chief of Staff John Kelly reportedly told lawmakers that the U.S. will never build President Trump’s proposed border wall, and that some of his campaign promises were “uninformed.” During an interview with Reuters, Trump said that Russia is hindering U.S. efforts
23h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Paris, LondonA partnership between Imperial College London and a major French agency will keep access to European research funding.
23h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Crunch questionInsects are often portrayed as a sustainable superfood - and many are delicious.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uber close to scrapping human backups in self-driving carsUber Travis KalanickUber plans to carry passengers in autonomous vehicles without human backup drivers in about the same time frame as competitors, which expect to be on the road at the latest sometime next year, the service's autonomous vehicle chief said Wednesday.
23h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Heed old shelter signs? If nuke is REALLY coming, maybe notA generation of Americans knew just what to do in the event of a nuclear attack—or during a major false alarm, like the one over the weekend in Hawaii. Take cover in a building bearing a yellow fallout shelter symbol.
23h
Live Science
New Threat to Extremely Endangered Cat: Deadly Dog VirusA critically endangered Amur leopard turned up along the side of a road suffering from canine distemper virus (CDV) — a disease that typically infects domestic dogs.
1d
NYT > Science
Trilobites: A Wet and Warm Spring, Then 200,000 Dead SaigasScientists identified bacteria that caused a mass die-off of the endangered antelopes in Kazakhstan in 2015. But the mechanism that made the bacteria so deadly is not understood.
1d
NYT > Science
Mind: Given Medicine, the Patients Got Better. They Remained in Shackles Anyway.In West Africa, people with psychoses are often chained at prayer camps. Giving them psychiatric drugs lessened their symptoms, but did not shorten their captivity.
1d
Big Think
How Precision-Loving Economists Make "Rigor Distortis" ErrorsHere's the psychology that explains why many economists prefer to be narrowly right yet broadly wrong (they suffer from professional "rigor distortis"). Read More
1d
Feed: All Latest
Startups Race to Create Cancer Screens from DNAEntrepreneurs are selling VCs a vision of cheap, surgery-free cancer screening based on blood tests, even before symptoms appear.
1d
Science : NPR
U.K. Lawmakers Want To Battle Waste With A 'Latte Levy' On Disposable CupsThe British Parliament is considering a 34-cent tax on to-go cups to encourage diners to bring their own reusable containers. The goal is to replicate the success of Britain's tax on plastic bags. (Image credit: Ben Pruchnie/Getty Images)
1d
Science : NPR
Aetna Agrees To Pay $17 Million In HIV Privacy BreachHealth insurer Aetna has reached a settlement with people whose privacy was compromised when their HIV status was visible through the clear address windows on envelopes sent to them. (Image credit: Elana Gordon/WHYY)
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study validates clotting risk factors in chronic kidney diseaseIn late 2017, researchers from Boston University School of Medicine discovered and published a potential treatment target to prevent chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients from developing thrombosis (blood clots) without causing bleeding complications. They found that boosting a regulatory protein named STUB1 decreased the abundance of tissue factor (TF) and prevented blood vessel blockages in expe
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Default setting in electronic medical records 'nudged' emergency department physicians to limit opioid prescriptions to 10 tabletsFor patients who have never been prescribed opioids, larger numbers of tablets given with the initial prescription is associated with long-term use and more tablets leftover that could be diverted for misuse or abuse. Implementing a default option for a lower quantity of tablets in the electronic medical records (EMR) discharge orders may help combat the issue by 'nudging' physicians to prescribe
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Antibodies show effectiveness for HIV prevention and promise for treatment and cureRecent studies testing multivalent combinations of three broadly neutralizing antibodies, or bnAbs, have yielded promising results in animal models of HIV prevention. Two investigators at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill describe the potential of bnAbs to inform HIV prevention, treatment and cure strategies in a recent article in the New Journal of Medicine.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Patients with blood cancer precursor at risk of developing cancer even after 30 yearsPatients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance are at risk of progressing to multiple myeloma or a related cancer -- even after 30 years of stability. These are the findings of a study by Mayo Clinic researchers published in the Wednesday, Jan. 17, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mammogram rates increase after ACA eliminates co-paymentsA new study finds that screening mammogram rates increased after the Affordable Care Act eliminated out-of-pocket costs.
1d
Live Science
Amoebae Give Black Death Bacteria a Safe Place to HideThe simple amoeba — a single-celled organism found in the water and soil — may provide a safe haven for the deadly bacteria that cause the plague, a new study finds.
1d
Big Think
When You Lose Weight, Where Does the Fat Go?While the concept of “burning” fat is not altogether wrong, the process of losing fat probably isn't what you imagine. Read More
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Mystery deepens over mass die-off of antelopesA mass die-off of antelopes in Kazakhstan was triggered by environmental factors, scientists believe.
1d
The Atlantic
When Will Astronauts Launch From U.S. Soil Again?In 2010, as the United States prepared to wind down the Space Shuttle program that carried Americans into orbit for three decades, NASA asked some commercial companies to start thinking about what came next. The space agency gave them a combined $50 million to design the transportation technologies of the future. Until then, NASA would pay Russia to send American astronauts to their shared home a
1d
The Atlantic
This Is Not a Sex PanicAziz Ansari #MeTooThe story of Aziz Ansari and “Grace” is playing out as a sort of Rorschach test. One night in the lives of two young people with vintage cameras is crystallizing debate over an entire movement. Depending on how readers were primed to see the ink blot, it can be taken as evidence that the ongoing cultural audit is exactly on track—getting more granular in challenging unhealthy sex-related power dy
1d
Big Think
What Cognitive Abilities Did Donald Trump's Mental Assessment Test For?We break down the eight specific brain functions that were evaluated by the President's recent cognitive assessment. Read More
1d
Big Think
Researchers Figure Out How Anesthesia WorksPropofol does more than knock a patient out — it blocks neural connections. Read More
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The brain's creativity controlsScientists studying brain scans of people who were asked to come up with inventive uses for everyday objects found a specific pattern of connectivity that correlated with the most creative responses. Researchers were then able to use that pattern to predict how creative other people's responses would be based on their connections in this network.
1d
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dulling cancer therapy's double-edged swordResearchers have discovered a very promising new pathway to preventing tumor recurrence -- 'resolvins' could be used in complement with chemotherapy, radiation and targeted therapies to stave off the tumor-promoting effects of dead cancer cell debris.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Aid for oceans and fisheries in developing world drops by 30 percentFinancial aid to fisheries in developing countries has declined by 30 percent, finds a new study from UBC and Stockholm Resilience Centre researchers, published in Marine Policy. Projects focusing on climate issues in fisheries had a 77 percent decline over the five years studied.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers explore psychological effects of climate changeWildfires, extreme storms and major weather events can seem like a distant threat, but for those whose lives have been directly impacted by these events, the threat hits much closer to home.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel chip-based gene expression tool analyzes RNA quickly and accuratelyA University of Illinois and Mayo collaboration has demonstrated a novel gene expression analysis technique that can accurately measure levels of RNA quickly and directly from a cancerous tissue sample while preserving the spatial information across the tissue —something that conventional methods cannot do. The team's gene expression technique is described in a paper published in the online editio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ocean waters prevent release of ancient methaneOcean sediments are a massive storehouse for the potent greenhouse gas methane.
1d
Latest Headlines | Science News
Ultrathin 2-D metals get their own periodic tableA new atlas of atom-thick metals could help researchers figure out how these 2-D materials might be used.
1d
New on MIT Technology Review
U.S. Doctors Plan to Treat Cancer Patients Using CRISPRGene-edited immune cells could help wipe out deadly tumors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find simple key to risk of severe peat firesThe scrawny black spruce trees that push up through the peat bogs of Canada's boreal forest are valuable indicators of fire risk, say researchers who studied a burned-over area just outside Fort McMurray, Alberta, where a devastating wildfire struck in 2016.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A step toward ridding register receipts of BPAAlthough the U.S and other countries have banned or restricted the use of bisphenol A (BPA) because of environmental and health concerns, it is still used in thermally printed receipts and labels. Now researchers report in a study in the ACS journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research that they have developed potentially safer polymers that could replace BPA for printed papers.
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Prospective birth control pill for men has its origin in an arrow poisonWomen have many options for oral contraceptives that are safe, effective and reversible, but despite decades of research, men have none. Now, scientists report a rat study in ACS' Journal of Medicinal Chemistry that shows they finally have a good lead for a male birth control pill. It's based on ouabain, a plant extract that African warriors and hunters traditionally used as a heart-stopping poiso
1d
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gorilla Glass debuts in car windshieldsChemically toughened glass already keeps cell phone screens (mostly) crack-free, and now this type of glass is starting to make its mark in the auto industry in car windshields. According to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, Gorilla Glass and similar strong, transparent materials could soon make an appearance in even more co
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
MDI Biological Laboratory develops Anecdata citizen science mobile appThe MDI Biological Laboratory is riding the growing wave of interest in citizen science with the development of a new, easily accessible mobile phone app to help community organizations track and analyze crowd-sourced data from citizen volunteers on critical environmental questions.
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Science : NPR
Review Of U.S. Nuclear Weapons Paints A Picture Of A More Dangerous Nuclear WorldThe Trump administration appears close to finalizing a review of the nation's nuclear posture. It calls for the U.S. to develop new nuclear systems and capabilities at a time of heightened tensions between America and other world powers.
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Science : NPR
Night Became Day In Detroit As Meteor Lit Up SkyA meteor streaked over southeast Michigan Tuesday night, creating a sonic boom so loud it shook houses. After seeing the spectacle in the night sky, thousands of people took to social media to share what they witnessed.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain protein changes could explain how concussions affect patientsTraumatic brain injuries, whether suffered from a blow on the football field or the battle field, can be devastating, leading to disability and shortened lives. However, little is known about how different levels of injury and time affect the brain, hindering efforts to develop effective treatments. Scientists now report results from rodent studies in ACS' Journal of Proteome Research showing that
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How your brain remembers what you had for dinner last nightConfirming earlier computational models, researchers at University of California San Diego and UC San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues in Arizona and Louisiana, report that episodic memories are encoded in the hippocampus of the human brain by distinct, sparse sets of neurons.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A step toward ridding register receipts of BPAAlthough the US and other countries have banned or restricted the use of bisphenol A (BPA) because of environmental and health concerns, it is still used in thermally printed receipts and labels. Now researchers report in a study in the ACS journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research that they have developed potentially safer polymers that could replace BPA for printed papers.
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Live Science
Chameleons' Secret Glow Comes from Their BonesPreviously unknown glow-in-the-dark patterns in chameleons have a bony origin.
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Popular Science
Here's where your new car lands on the self-driving scaleTechnology Most modern rides rank around level 2 of 5 when it comes to automation. Our cars are getting better and better at helping us drive, but it's a long road ahead until they can truly drive themselves.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prospective birth control pill for men has its origin in an arrow poisonWomen have many options for oral contraceptives that are safe, effective and reversible, but despite decades of research, men have none. Now, scientists report a rat study in ACS' Journal of Medicinal Chemistry that shows they finally have a good lead for a male birth control pill. It's based on ouabain, a plant extract that African warriors and hunters traditionally used as a heart-stopping poiso
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers explore psychological effects of climate changeWhile some people have little anxiety about the Earth's changing climate, others are experiencing high levels of stress, and even depression, based on their perception of the threat of global climate change, researchers found. Psychological responses to climate change seem to vary based on what type of concern people show for the environment, with those highly concerned about the planet's animals
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fort McMurray researchers find simple key to risk of severe peat firesThe scrawny black spruce trees that push up through the peat bogs of Canada's boreal forest are valuable indicators of fire risk, say researchers who studied a burned-over area just outside Fort McMurray, Alberta, where a devastating wildfire struck in 2016.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel chip-based gene expression tool analyzes RNA quickly and accuratelyA University of Illinois and Mayo collaboration has demonstrated a novel gene expression analysis technique that can accurately measure levels of RNA quickly and directly from a cancerous tissue sample while preserving the spatial information across the tissue -- something that conventional methods cannot do.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why we keep difficult people in our livesChances are someone in your life causes a lot of tension and stress. Difficult relationships are common and hard to evade. New research suggests that difficult people are likely to be found in contexts where people have less freedom to pick and choose their associates. Often it's family and co-workers - people you're stuck with, either because you need them or because you can't ignore them -- maki
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Self-healing fungi concrete could provide sustainable solution to crumbling infrastructureA new self-healing fungi concrete could help repair cracks in aging concrete permanently, and help save America's crumbling infrastructure.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Novel candidate for antidepressant treatmentA recent article explores how a protein named CK2 could play a key role in the formulation of new antidepressants that work more efficiently and faster for more people.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists on the road to discovering impact of urban road dustIn an attempt to better understand the urban environment and its components, scientists have discovered that sunlight causes chemical reactions in the dust found on Edmonton roads.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Reimbursing ranchers for livestock killed by predators supports conservation effortsAlberta's predator compensation program offsets costs of conserving wildlife habitat on private lands in the province.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Exposure to water that is both salty and fresh is key to future successAccording to Charles Darwin the ability to adapt to new conditions is essential for survival of species. The capacity to cope with altered conditions is becoming increasingly important in the face of climate change. New evidence on salt water tolerance in spawning migrating pike from the Baltic Sea suggests that not being adapted to specific local environments may promote persistence in an uncerta
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nearly imperceptible fluctuations in movement correspond to autism diagnosesA new study led by researchers at Indiana University and Rutgers University provides the strongest evidence yet that nearly imperceptible changes in how people move can be used to diagnose neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Aid for oceans and fisheries in developing world drops by 30 percentFinancial aid to fisheries in developing countries has declined by 30 percent, finds a new study from UBC and Stockholm Resilience Centre researchers, published in Marine Policy. Projects focusing on climate issues in fisheries had a 77 percent decline over the five years studied.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Release of ancient methane due to changing climate kept in check by ocean watersOcean sediments are a massive storehouse for the potent greenhouse gas methane. But methane only acts as a greenhouse gas if and when it reaches the atmosphere. Environmental scientists at the University of Rochester and their collaborators recently set out to discover whether or not this ancient-sourced methane, which is released due to warming ocean waters, survives the journey from the seafloor
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CCNY study explores a novel candidate for antidepressant treatmentA recent paper published in the journal Molecular Psychiatry explores how a protein named CK2 could play a key role in the formulation of new antidepressants that work more efficiently and faster for more people.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Self-healing fungi concrete could provide sustainable solution to crumbling infrastructureA new self-healing fungi concrete, co-developed by researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York, could help repair cracks in aging concrete permanently, and help save America's crumbling infrastructure.
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Viden
Fra rumstation til månebase: 3 fremtidsscenarier for ISSDen internationale rumstation skal snart skiftes ud - men med hvad? Her er tre bud fra førende danske eksperter.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Exposing hypocrisy can effectively reduce collective blame of Muslims for individual violent actsWhite Americans were less likely to blame all Muslims for acts of terror committed by a Muslim when they were first asked to think about how much they were responsible for terrorist acts committed by other Whites. By highlighting the hypocrisy in a non-threatening way, the participants' prejudice toward Muslims declined, even a month after the intervention.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cutting the cord is easier said than doneChances are someone in your life causes a lot of tension and stress. Difficult relationships are common and hard to evade. New research suggests that difficult people are likely to be found in contexts where people have less freedom to pick and choose their associates. Often it's family and co-workers - people you're stuck with, either because you need them or because you can't ignore them -- maki
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple to build 2nd campus, hire 20,000 in $350B pledgeApple US TaxApple is planning to build another corporate campus and hire 20,000 workers during the next five years as part of a $350 billion commitment to the U.S. that will be partially financed by an upcoming windfall from the country's new tax law.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Verizon pushes further into sports streaming with NBA dealYahoo users will be able to stream eight basketball games for free under a new deal with the NBA.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Exposing hypocrisy can effectively reduce collective blame of Muslims for individual violent actsFollowing the terrorist attacks in Paris in November 2015, Emile Bruneau noticed a pattern: howls from the far right condemning all Muslims for the attack, followed by passionate counterarguments defending the vast majority of Muslims who are blameless. The tactics were all over the map: heartstring-tugging stories of Muslim refugees overcoming adversity, logical statistics detailing the miniscule
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Live Science
Trash-Blasting Lasers Could Help Clean Up Space Junk, China SaysLasers: the ultimate cleaning solution.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New research could significantly accelerate drug discoveryMany drugs work by inhibiting protein enzymes associated with a particular disease. Unfortunately, the same drugs can inhibit protein enzymes unrelated to the disease, resulting in harmful side effects. A team of computational biologist has developed a way to identify the features that distinguish one enzyme from similar enzymes. This research has the potential to significantly accelerate drug dis
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Better evidence needed on appropriate screen time for kidsMuch of the evidence for the negative effects of screen use in children and teenagers is not based on robust enough science.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New way to target the growth of breast cancer cellsResearchers have found a new way of halting the growth of breast cancer cells. The researchers explored a new way to starve cancer cells from their molecular energy source. They hope that their discoveries can be further developed into a new way of treating breast cancer, and possibly other types of cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Former elite athletes live longer than their brothersOn average, former elite athletes survive longer than their brothers. In addition, their self-rated health and health-related habits are better in comparison to their brothers at an older age. The study included in total 900 former elite athletes and their brothers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reimbursing ranchers for livestock killed by predators supports conservation effortsAlberta's predator compensation program offsets costs of conserving wildlife habitat on private lands in the province.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists on the road to discovering impact of urban road dustIn an attempt to better understand the urban environment and its components, scientists have discovered that sunlight causes chemical reactions in the dust found on Edmonton roads.
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NYT > Science
Treatment Offers Hope for Imprisoned California SiblingsCases of children isolated and abused by parents are rare but not unheard-of, say experts. Many recover.
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The Atlantic
Republicans Scramble for Unity Ahead of a Government ShutdownUpdated on January 18 at 10:29 a.m. ET If ever there was a moment when House Republicans could use some much-needed party unity, this is it. The federal government is on the brink of shutting down Friday at midnight, and the GOP wants, first, to keep it open, and second, to blame Democrats if it can’t. But both of those goals depend on Speaker Paul Ryan wrangling 216 of his 238 members to vote fo
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Small but fast: A miniaturized origami-inspired robot combines micrometer precision with high speedThe milliDelta robot integrates a new microfabrication technique with high-performance composite materials that can incorporate flexural joints and bending actuators, the milliDelta can operate with high speed, force, and micrometer precision, which make it compatible with a range of micromanipulation tasks in manufacturing and medicine.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nearly imperceptible fluctuations in movement correspond to autism diagnosesA new study provides the strongest evidence yet that nearly imperceptible changes in how people move can be used to diagnose neurodevelopmental disorders, including autism.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Uncovering decades of questionable investmentsOne of the key principles in asset pricing—how we value everything from stocks and bonds to real estate—is that investments with high risk should, on average, have high returns.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA IMERG reveals rainfall rates of Tropical Cyclone BerguittaNASA El Niño WarmingHeavy rain surrounded Tropical Cyclone Berguitta as it continued to move toward the island of Mauritius in the Southern Indian Ocean. NASA calculated the rate in which rain was falling within the hurricane-strength storm in the Southern Indian Ocean.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA IMERG reveals rainfall rates of Tropical Cyclone BerguittaHeavy rain surrounded Tropical Cyclone Berguitta as it continued to move toward the island of Mauritius in the Southern Indian Ocean. NASA calculated the rate in which rain was falling within the hurricane-strength storm in the Southern Indian Ocean.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Uncovering decades of questionable investmentsResearchers used the Wrangler supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center to uncover the root cause of the 'beta anomaly' -- a discrepancy between the expected return on high-risk assets and their actual return. The team found that investors who are attracted to the lottery-like characteristics of these stocks push their prices higher than theory would predict, thereby lowering their futu
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Science : NPR
Strange Weather Triggered Bacteria That Killed 200,000 Endangered AntelopeOver a three-week span in 2015, more than 200,000 saiga antelope suddenly died in Kazakhstan. The animals would be grazing normally, then dead in three hours. A new study points to heat and humidity. (Image credit: Courtesy of the Joint saiga health monitoring team in Kazakhstan (Association for the Conservation of Biodiversity, Kazakhstan, Biosafety Institute, Gvardeskiy RK, Royal Veterinary Col
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The Atlantic
How to Save the African National CongressSouth Africa is desperate for change. On December 18, the African National Congress party elected businessman Cyril Ramaphosa as its president. Ramaphosa, who had served as deputy president since 2012, won the position on a good governance and anti-corruption platform. His victory seemed, at least in part, a rebuke to the scandal-plagued incumbent Jacob Zuma, who has led the country for the past
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New on MIT Technology Review
New “Rotational” 3-D Printing Gives Objects Impressive Strength
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple says will pay $38 bn in taxes on repatriated profitsApple announced Wednesday it would pay about $38 billion in taxes—likely the largest payment of its kind—on profits repatriated from overseas as it boosts investments in the United States.
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Popular Science
Lightning, meet snowstorm: The makings of thundersnowEnvironment Nobody expects to see lightning while a blizzard is raging Thundersnow struck again during the bomb cyclone…
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How massive can neutron stars be?Since their discovery in the 1960s, scientists have sought to answer an important question: How massive can neutron stars actually become? By contrast to black holes, these stars cannot gain in mass arbitrarily; past a certain limit there is no physical force in nature that can counter their enormous gravitational force. For the first time, astrophysicists at Goethe University Frankfurt have succe
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Patients benefit from one-on-one PT education before joint replacementHospital for Special Surgery study finds that patients who had an education session with a physical therapist and access to a web-based microsite prior to joint replacement achieved physical therapy goals more quickly compared to those who did not have the session or access to the site.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reimbursing ranchers for livestock killed by predators supports conservation effortsAlberta's predator compensation program offsets costs of conserving wildlife habitat on private lands in the province.'Our research shows that private ranchlands provide important habitats for carnivorous wildlife, including wolves, cougars, bears and eagles,' explained Mark Boyce, professor in the Department of Biological Sciences and the Alberta Conservation Association Chair in Fisheries and Wi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Modulating moleculesBetween sights, sounds, smells and other senses, the brain is flooded with stimuli on a moment-to-moment basis. How can it sort through the flood of information to decide what is important and what can be relegated to the background? Though popularly known as the 'love hormone,' a team of Harvard researchers found evidence that oxytocin actually plays a crucial role in helping the brain process a
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists on the road to discovering impact of urban road dustIn an attempt to better understand the urban environment and its components, scientists have discovered that sunlight causes chemical reactions in the dust found on Edmonton roads.'We found that when you shine light on road dust, it produces a reactive form of oxygen called singlet oxygen,' said environmental chemist Sarah Styler. 'It acts as an oxidant in the environment and can cause or influenc
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Low fitness is associated with larger waist size and higher degree of inflammationLow fitness is associated with a larger waist size and a higher degree of inflammation, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New report calls into question effectiveness of pregnancy anti-nausea drugPreviously unpublished information from the clinical trial that the US Food and Drug Administration relied on to approve the most commonly prescribed medicine for nausea in pregnancy indicates the drug is not effective, a new report says.
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Viden
Kan kunstig intelligens og kringlede algoritmer erstatte det søde smil og frække blik?Om få år kan et computersystem sætte dig sammen med den perfekte partner, spår professor.
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Viden
Rumstationen: 20 år, slidt og færdig?Den aldrende internationale rumstation ISS udløber snart. Vi har spurgt fire eksperter om, hvad der så skal ske.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scale-eating fish adopt clever parasitic methods to surviveThink of them as extra-large parasites. A small group of fishes—possibly the world's cleverest carnivorous grazers—feeds on the scales of other fish in the tropics. The different species' approach differs: some ram their blunt noses into the sides of other fish to prey upon sloughed-off scales, while others open their jaws to gargantuan widths to pry scales off with their teeth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New details emerge on temperature, mobility of earth's lower crust in Rocky MountainsEverything on the surface of the Earth rests on massive tectonic plates that resemble a jelly sandwich, with two rigid pieces—the upper crust and the upper mantle—enclosing a gooey middle layer of very hot rocks, which is the lower crust. The plates move ever so slowly around the globe over a deeper hot layer called the asthenosphere.
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A Popular Crime-Predicting Algorithms Performed Worse Than Mechanical Turks in One StudyWhen researchers put a popular criminal justice algorithm up against a bunch of Mechanical Turks, they came out about even.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
DIPG tumor patterns offer new insight on survivalA small subset of patients with tumors that bear mutations in a gene in the basic packaging of DNA (known as histone mutations) may have better outcomes than others, suggests new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scale-eating fish adopt clever parasitic methods to surviveA small group of fishes -- possibly the world's cleverest carnivorous grazers -- feeds on the scales of other fish in the tropics. Biologists are trying to understand these scale-feeding fish and how this odd diet influences their body evolution and behavior.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New details emerge on temperature, mobility of earth's lower crust in Rocky MountainsA research team has mapped the temperature and viscosity of earth's lower crust for the first time.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Himawari-8 data assimilated simulation enables 10-minute updates of rain and flood predictionsUsing the power of Japan's K computer, scientists have shown that incorporating satellite data at frequent intervals -- 10 minutes in the case of this study -- into weather prediction models can significantly improve the rainfall predictions of the models and allow more precise predictions of the rapid development of a typhoon.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Minority trainees are up, but not minority facultyDespite increasing numbers of underrepresented minority (URM) trainees in the biomedical sciences, there is a persistent shortage of URM faculty who are involved in basic biomedical research at medical schools. Investigators examined the entire training pathway of potential faculty candidates to identify points of greatest loss of URM trainees. Two key points of loss: during undergraduate educatio
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mantis shrimp size each other up before ceding a fightTo a mantis shrimp, walking away from a fight doesn't mean being a wimp. It means recognizing who they're up against and knowing when to bail rather than drag out a doomed battle, researchers say. Mantis shrimp use sparring matches to decide when to fight and when to fold.
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Big Think
Bill and Melinda Gates Agree to Pay Off Nigeria’s $76 Million Polio DebtNigeria, which accounted for more than half of all polio cases in 2012, reported zero new cases of the infectious disease in 2017. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Commercial software no more accurate than untrained people in predicting recidivismA new study suggests that a commercial software widely used to predict which criminals will commit crimes again is no more accurate than untrained people, at foreseeing recidivism. Previous research has suggested that the criminal risk assessment tool, Correctional Offender Management Profiling for Alternative Sanctions, or COMPAS, which incorporates
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Small but fast: A miniaturized origami-inspired robot combines micrometer precision with high speedReported in Science Robotics, a new design, the milliDelta robot, developed by Robert Wood's team at Harvard's Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) integrates their microfabrication technique with high-performance composite materials that can incorporate flexural joints and bending actuators, the milliDelta can o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers develop swallowable test to detect pre-cancerous Barrett's esophagusInvestigators at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center have developed a simple, swallowable test for early detection of Barrett's esophagus that offers promise for preventing deaths from esophageal adenocarcinoma.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How living systems compute solutions to problemsNo individual fish or bee or neuron has enough information by itself to solve a complex problem, but together they can accomplish amazing things. In research published in Science Advances, researchers address how this is possible through a study of the emergence of social structure in primate social groups.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Court software may be no more accurate than web survey takers in predicting criminal riskNew study challenges thinking that algorithms outperform humans when making important criminal justice decisions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mass. General study reveals how MRSA infection compromises lymphatic functionMassachusetts General Hospital investigators find that MRSA infection impairs the ability of lymphatic vessels to pump lymphatic fluid to lymph nodes in mouse models, which may contribute to the frequent recurrences of MRSA infection experienced by patients.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Double stranded RNA treatment can reduce fertility of adult house fly pestsDouble stranded RNA (dsRNA) can effectively reduce house fly fertility, and shows promise as a pest control method, according to a study published Jan. 17, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Neil Sanscrainte from the USDA/ARS Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology, US, and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Low fitness is associated with larger waist size and higher degree of inflammationLow fitness is associated with a larger waist size and a higher degree of inflammation, according to a study published Jan. 17, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Anne-Sophie Wedell-Neergaard from the University of Copenhagen, Denmark, and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New report calls into question effectiveness of pregnancy anti-nausea drugPreviously unpublished information from the clinical trial that the US Food and Drug Administration relied on to approve the most commonly prescribed medicine for nausea in pregnancy indicates the drug is not effective, a new report says.
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Viden
Vidste du.. at astronauter går med voksenble?Voksenble, køleundertøj og håndledsspejl er nødvendige redskaber, når astronauter tager på rumvandring. Se her hvordan den amerikanske rumdragt faktisk virker.
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New Scientist - News
Breathing in a nanoparticle spray could prevent heart damageAn inhalable drug is designed to move straight from the lungs to the heart, where it is hoped it will prevent the organ from deteriorating after heart attacks
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The Atlantic
A Pair of Fiery FestivalsIn the past couple of days, festivals were held in two villages separated by language, culture, religion, and great distance, but both centered on the use of fire as a method of purification and blessing—and both were carried out with a liberal partaking in alcohol. In San Bartolome de Pinares, Spain, on the eve of Saint Anthony's Day—to honor Spain's patron saint of animals—people ride horses th
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The Atlantic
Why Did Two-Thirds of These Weird Antelope Suddenly Drop Dead?It took just three weeks for two-thirds of all the world’s saiga to die. It took much longer to work out why. The saiga is an endearing antelope, whose bulbous nose gives it the comedic air of a Dr. Seuss character. It typically wanders over large tracts of Central Asian grassland, but every spring, tens of thousands of them gather in the same place to give birth. These calving aggregations shoul
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The Atlantic
A Popular Algorithm Is No Better at Predicting Crimes Than Random PeopleIn February 2013, Eric Loomis was found driving a car that had been used in a shooting. He was arrested, and pleaded guilty to eluding an officer. In determining his sentence, a judge looked not just to his criminal record, but also to a score assigned by a tool called COMPAS. Developed by a private company called Equivant (formerly Northpointe), COMPAS—or the Correctional Offender Management Pro
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Science : NPR
Black Holes: Where Reality Beats FictionWe know that at the heart of pretty much every galaxy, there is a giant black hole. There is a lot that we know about black holes — and a lot that we don't know, says astrophysicist Marcelo Gleiser. (Image credit: L. Calçada/ESO)
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists zoom in to watch DNA code being readScientists have unveiled incredible images of how the DNA code is read and interpreted -- revealing new detail about one of the fundamental processes of life.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Semiconductor breakthrough may be game-changer for organic solar cellsIn an advance that could push cheap, ubiquitous solar power closer to reality, researchers have found a way to coax electrons to travel much further than was previously thought possible in the materials often used for organic solar cells and other organic semiconductors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Future climate change revealed by current climate variationsUncertainty surrounding the extent of future climate change could be dramatically reduced by studying year-on-year global temperature fluctuations, new research has shown.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Coping with climate stress in AntarcticaSome Antarctic fish living in the planet's coldest waters are able to cope with the stress of rising carbon dioxide levels the ocean. They can even tolerate slightly warmer waters. But they can't deal with both climate change stressors at the same time, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Recording a thought's fleeting trip through the brainRecording brain activity via electrodes placed directly on the cortical surface (ECoG) provides much clearer views of thinking activity and how the prefrontal cortex coordinates the brain's response to a perception. With the help of 16 epilepsy patients, neuroscientists tracked the brain's activity as it detects, interprets, settles on a response and activates motor areas to respond. The brain pre
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Prebiotics in infant formula could improve learning and memory and alter brain chemistryAmong other benefits, breast milk contains natural sources of prebiotics: small, indigestible fiber molecules that promote the growth of good bacteria in the baby's gut. Yet for many families, breastfeeding is difficult or impossible. Fortunately, modern infant formulas are getting closer to the real thing with the help of University of Illinois researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fresh approach to TB vaccine offers better protectionA unique platform that resulted in a promising HIV vaccine has also led to a new, highly effective vaccine against tuberculosis that is moving toward testing in humans. The new vaccine completely protected 41 percent and reduced overall TB disease by 68 percent in vaccinated rhesus macaques, according to a new study.
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Science | The Guardian
Software 'no more accurate than untrained humans' at judging reoffending riskProgram used to assess more than a million US defendants may not be accurate enough for potentially life-changing decisions, say experts The credibility of a computer program used for bail and sentencing decisions has been called into question after it was found to be no more accurate at predicting the risk of reoffending than people with no criminal justice experience provided with only the defe
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Global Warming Predictions May Now Be a Lot Less UncertainResearchers claim they’ve reduced the uncertainty in a key metric of climate change by 60 percent. That could have implications for how humanity arrives at climate goals like it did in Paris.
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Live Science
Fireball Over Michigan: Did Meteor Really Cause an Earthquake?The earthshaking rumblings felt in Michigan last night weren't an earthquake, but rather vibrations from a booming noise caused by a meteor whizzing overhead, according to the National Earthquake Information Center.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Double stranded RNA treatment can reduce fertility of adult house fly pestsDouble stranded RNA (dsRNA) can effectively reduce house fly fertility, and shows promise as a pest control method, according to a study published January 17, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Neil Sanscrainte from the USDA/ARS Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology, US, and colleagues.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How living systems compute solutions to problemsHow do decisions get made in the natural world? One possibility is that the individuals or components in biological systems collectively compute solutions to challenges they face in their environments. Consider that fish navigate complex environments to find food and escape predators. Some fish do this by moving together as a unit, sometimes forming incredibly organized schools. The members of a b
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Court software may be no more accurate than web survey takers in predicting criminal riskA widely-used computer software tool may be no more accurate or fair at predicting repeat criminal behavior than people with no criminal justice experience, according to a Dartmouth College study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New details emerge on temperature, mobility of Earth's lower crust in Rocky MountainsA research team led by Colorado State University has mapped the temperature and viscosity of Earth's lower crust for the first time.
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Viden
Fra mælkepulver til støvsuger: 5 NASA-opfindelser, du bruger i din hverdagOg 5 påfund, som NASA ofte får æren for (plus en enkelt, som simpelthen var for dum til at sende ud i rummet).
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The Atlantic
The Rise and Fall of Steve Bannon and Nigel FarageSteve Bannon and Nigel Farage are both populist figureheads known for championing their own brands of nationalism that had historic implications for their countries in 2016—in the U.S., the election of Donald Trump; in the U.K., the historic decision to leave the European Union. But two years later, these men, who rose from relative political obscurity to the center of power, appear to be falling
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scale-eating fish adopt clever parasitic methods to surviveA small group of fishes -- possibly the world's cleverest carnivorous grazers -- feeds on the scales of other fish in the tropics. A team led by biologists at the University of Washington is trying to understand these scale-feeding fish and how this odd diet influences their body evolution and behavior.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Titan topographic map unearths cookie-cutter holes in moon's surfaceUsing the now-complete Cassini data set, Cornell University astronomers have created a new global topographic map of Saturn's moon Titan that has opened new windows into understanding its liquid flows and terrain. Two papers, recently published in Geophysical Review Letters, describe the map and discoveries arising from it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Children's awarded $2.6M to study stem cells for CHD-related neurological complicationsThe National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarded researchers at Children's National Health System $2.6 million to expand their studies into whether human stem cells could someday treat and even reverse neurological damage in infants born with congenital heart disease (CHD).
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Latest Headlines | Science News
The mystery of vanishing honeybees is still not definitively solvedThe case has never been fully closed for colony collapse disorder, and now bees face bigger problems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Key driver of atopic dermatitis discoveredSevere eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis, is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that is driven by an allergic reaction. In a new study, researchers reveal an important player that promotes skin inflammation in atopic dermatitis and the characteristic thickening of the skin.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Gaining or losing weight alters molecular profile in humansThe human body undergoes dramatic changes during even short periods of weight gain and loss, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Modular gene enhancer promotes leukemia and regulates effectiveness of chemotherapyEvery day, billions of new blood cells are generated in the bone marrow. The gene Myc is known to play an important role in this process, and is also known to play a role in cancer. Scientists have now found that just how big a role Myc plays is determined by a distant section of DNA that contains a cluster of gene enhancers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Midbrain 'start neurons' control whether we walk or runStrolling around or running to catch the train similarly requires us to move. However, the neuronal mechanisms in the brain that allow us to initiate and control these movements are different, a new study reveals. 'Start neurons' in the midbrain are essential to take the first step to initiate locomotion and control the speed, mice models show.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Secrets of longevity protein revealed in new studyNamed after the Greek goddess who spun the thread of life, Klotho proteins play an important role in the regulation of longevity and metabolism. In a recent study, researchers revealed the three-dimensional structure of one of these proteins, beta-Klotho, illuminating its intricate mechanism and therapeutic potential.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chemical evolution: Progenitors of the living worldRNA was probably the first informational molecule. Now chemists have demonstrated that alternation of wet and dry conditions could have sufficed to drive the prebiotic synthesis of the RNA nucleosides found in all domains of life.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists develop a new material for manipulating moleculesScientists have created a new porous single-crystal material which could have numerous applications in nanotechnology and catalysis.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New research to help reduce number of algae blooms that form annuallyA new study shows that sampling headwaters where streams form can identify which landscapes are resilient enough to handle the rigors of farming and which are vulnerable to leaching toxic residue into waterways.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Group pinpoints riches hidden in Europe's mountains of wasteResearchers have completed the first survey of valuable materials they say are waiting to be mined from Europe's vast landfills and scrapyards.
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The Atlantic
Real Life or Black Mirror?Technological progress, like authoritarian regimes, is insidious. Nothing big changes all at once; instead, a steady stream of smaller, less threatening changes occur over time. These alterations don’t sound alarm bells precisely because they blend into the fabric of our everyday lives. It is only when viewed en masse, through the prism of history, that it all appears to have been leading to an u
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The Atlantic
The Larger Lessons of Mark Wahlberg's Inflated SalaryWhen All the Money in the World was fast-tracked into reshoots to replace scenes featuring Kevin Spacey (who has been accused of sexual assault), Michelle Williams saw it as a powerful sign that Hollywood was changing. At the director Ridley Scott’s insistence, the studio was spending upwards of $10 million to recast Spacey with Christopher Plummer in the role of the oil tycoon J. Paul Getty. As
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The Scientist RSS
EPO Revokes Broads CRISPR PatentShortly after ruling out the earliest priority dates on a foundational patent for CRISPR gene-editing technology, the European Patent Office rescinded the patent entirely-and more are likely to follow.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
DIPG tumor patterns offer new insight on survivalA small subset of patients with tumors that bear mutations in a gene in the basic packaging of DNA (known as histone mutations) may have better outcomes than others, suggests new research from Michigan Medicine's Pediatric Brain Tumor Research Initiative.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Modular gene enhancer promotes leukemia and regulates effectiveness of chemotherapyEvery day, billions of new blood cells are generated in the bone marrow. The gene Myc is known to play an important role in this process, and is also known to play a role in cancer. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and the HI-STEM have now found that just how big a role Myc plays is determined by a distant section of DNA that contains a cluster of gene enhancers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Future climate change revealed by current climate variationsUncertainty surrounding the extent of future climate change could be dramatically reduced by studying year-on-year global temperature fluctuations, new research has shown.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover structure of anti-aging hormoneA new study reveals the structure of a key protein, and how it helps to transmit a hormonal signal that slows aging.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Semiconductor breakthrough may be game-changer for organic solar cellsIn an advance that could push cheap, ubiquitous solar power closer to reality, University of Michigan researchers have found a way to coax electrons to travel much further than was previously thought possible in the materials often used for organic solar cells and other organic semiconductors.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Secrets of longevity protein revealed in new studyNamed after the Greek goddess who spun the thread of life, Klotho proteins play an important role in the regulation of longevity and metabolism. In a recent Yale-led study, researchers revealed the three-dimensional structure of one of these proteins, beta-Klotho, illuminating its intricate mechanism and therapeutic potential.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists zoom in to watch DNA code being readScientists have unveiled incredible images of how the DNA code is read and interpreted -- revealing new detail about one of the fundamental processes of life.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Midbrain 'start neurons' control whether we walk or runStrolling around or running to catch the train similarly requires us to move. However, the neuronal mechanisms in the brain that allow us to initiate and control these movements are different, a new study in the Journal Nature from University of Copenhagen and Karolinska Institutet reveals. 'Start neurons' in the midbrain are essential to take the first step to initiate locomotion and control the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China, Europe jointly test technology for storm satelliteChina and Europe are jointly testing new technology that could help satellites peer through clouds and analyze storms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Humans will review video from most popular YouTube creatorsGoogle says humans will now review video from its most popular YouTube creators after recent complaints.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Massive' infrastructure spending needed in Africa, says reportEconomic growth in Africa picked up steam last year and is set to accelerate strongly in 2018, but "massive investments" are needed in infrastructure, the African Development Bank (ADB) said Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rolls-Royce deepens restructuring, may sell marine unitRolls-Royce, the British maker of engines, announced further restructuring Wednesday that could result in the sale of its commercial marine business.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple facing slew of Russian lawsuits over slow iPhonesSeven lawsuits have been launched in Russia and "hundreds" dozens more are in the pipeline against US tech giant Apple which has already admitted to slowing the performance of older iPhone models, a lawyer for some of the plaintiffs said Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook, Twitter, YouTube pressed over terror contentTerrorists and hate groups continue to get their propaganda onto social media platforms despite efforts by Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube to shut them down, a US Senate panel heard Wednesday.
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New Scientist - News
How ‘stem cell’ clinics became a Wild West for dodgy treatmentsAustralian Drone New South WalesHundreds of clinics offering unregulated stem cell therapies have sprung up across the US and Australia thanks to lax oversight
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New Scientist - News
Algorithms that change lives should be trialled like new drugsAn algorithm used by US courts to predict reoffenders turns out to be no more accurate than random people on the internet. Why wasn’t it properly tested before now?
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New Scientist - News
Swollen eye is setback for blindness treatment using stem cellsA man in a flagship stem cell trial for age-related macular degeneration has swelling in his eye, but the cause is probably surgery – not stem cells
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
California sea lion population rebounded to new highsCalifornia sea lions have fully rebounded under the protection of the Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA), with their population on the West Coast reaching carrying capacity in 2008 before unusually warm ocean conditions reduced their numbers, according to the first comprehensive population assessment of the species.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research could significantly accelerate drug discoveryMany drugs work by inhibiting protein enzymes associated with a particular disease. Unfortunately, the same drugs can inhibit protein enzymes unrelated to the disease, resulting in harmful side effects. One potential solution is to better identify structural features that determine a protein enzyme's function.
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Live Science
What Do Trump's Cognitive Test Results Show?President Donald Trump aced a cognitive test designed to detect early signs of dementia, White House physician and Navy Rear Adm. Dr. Ronny Jackson told reporters yesterday (Jan. 16).
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Live Science
The Weird Tale of a Larger-Than-Life Wolf That Outran the Law, AlmostAt the dawn of the 20th century, a lone — and furry — figure cut a criminal swath across South Dakota's Badlands.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Being Antisocial Leads to a Longer Life. For Marmots.Unlike most mammals, yellow-bellied marmots with more active social lives died younger than those that kept to themselves, scientists found after tracking them for 13 years.
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NYT > Science
Fireball Cuts Through the Sky Over Michigan as Meteor FallsNASA Michigan MeteorVideos showed a bright flash of light, followed by a pop almost like a light bulb burning out.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
To maximize sugarcane harvesting, use the right bladeYou wouldn't use the same knife to cut through a thick steak as you would to slice an angel food cake, right? Although that may be a ridiculous comparison, the same principle holds true when harvesting various crops. One blade doesn't slice all. Researchers at the University of Illinois tested four blades to find the one that most efficiently cuts sugarcane.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ultra-thin memory storage device paves way for more powerful computingEngineers worldwide have been developing alternative ways to provide greater memory storage capacity on even smaller computer chips. Previous research into two-dimensional atomic sheets for memory storage has failed to uncover their potential—until now.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover structure of anti-aging hormoneA new study reveals the molecular structure of a protein called alpha(α)Klotho, and how it helps to transmit a hormonal signal that slows aging.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Future climate change revealed by current climate variationsUncertainty surrounding the extent of future climate change could be dramatically reduced by studying year-on-year global temperature fluctuations, new research has shown.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Semiconductor breakthrough may be game-changer for organic solar cellsIn an advance that could push cheap, ubiquitous solar power closer to reality, University of Michigan researchers have found a way to coax electrons to travel much further than was previously thought possible in the materials often used for organic solar cells and other organic semiconductors.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds minority trainees are up, but not minority facultyDespite increasing numbers of underrepresented minority (URM) trainees in the biomedical sciences, there is a persistent shortage of URM faculty who are involved in basic biomedical research at medical schools.
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Scientific American Content: Global
How to Stop Sex Changes in Turtles on the Great Barrier ReefClimate change led to more female eggs, so scientists are trying to ensure males are made in the shade -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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BBC News - Science & Environment
ICEYE's 'suitcase space radar' returns first imageFinnish start-up ICEYE releases a "first light" picture from its novel radar satellite.
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New on MIT Technology Review
At the Detroit Auto Show, the Autonomous Car Dream Is Still a Way Off
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research to help reduce number of algae blooms that form annuallyThe massive algal blooms caused by excess fertilizer from farms and cities running off into water supplies are having severe human health and economic consequences.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Artificial Lighting Is Hurting Ecosystems, and Tech Tweaks Can Fix It
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The Atlantic
Congress Produces Drama While Mueller Produces ResultsOn Tuesday, Steve Bannon spent hours behind closed doors with the House Intelligence Committee. It was rough. The former White House chief strategist stonewalled lawmakers, they said, even after members from both parties issued a subpoena. Then, on Wednesday, CNN reported that Bannon has struck a deal with Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s team for an interview. The disparate results obtained from
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The Atlantic
The Koreas' Olympic Unity Could Be FleetingIt looked like a breakthrough, and in a way it was. North and South Korea announced Wednesday they would not only march together under one flag at next month’s Winter Olympics in South Korea’s PyeongChang, but also, for the first time at the games, field a joint women’s ice-hockey team. This announcement came after a year of high anxiety on the Korean peninsula, as North Korean leader Kim Jong Un
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists develop a new material for manipulating moleculesA scientist at the University of Córdoba, working with an international research team, has created a new porous single-crystal material which could have numerous applications in nanotechnology and catalysis.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chemical evolution: Progenitors of the living worldRNA was probably the first informational molecule. Now chemists from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have demonstrated that alternation of wet and dry conditions could have sufficed to drive the prebiotic synthesis of the RNA nucleosides found in all domains of life.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
California sea lion population rebounded to new highsCalifornia sea lions have fully rebounded under the protection of the Marine Mammal Protection Act, with their population on the West Coast reaching carrying capacity in 2008 before unusually warm ocean conditions reduced their numbers, according to the first comprehensive population assessment of the species.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Patient-derived organoids may help personalize the treatment of gastrointestinal cancersA new review highlights the potential of 3-D organoid models derived from patient cells to help personalize therapy for individuals with gastrointestinal cancers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ultra-thin memory storage device paves way for more powerful computingA team of electrical engineers has developed the thinnest memory storage device with dense memory capacity, paving the way for faster, smaller and smarter computer chips for everything from consumer electronics to big data to brain-inspired computing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Women who have gestational diabetes in pregnancy are at higher risk of future health issuesWomen who have gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) during pregnancy have a higher than usual risk of developing type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and ischemic heart disease in the future, according to new research.
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The Scientist RSS
How Gaining and Losing Weight Affects the BodyMillions of measurements from 23 people who consumed extra calories every day for a month reveal changes in proteins, metabolites, and gut microbiota that accompany shifts in body mass.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research to help reduce number of algae blooms that form annuallyThe study shows that sampling headwaters where streams form can identify which landscapes are resilient enough to handle the rigors of farming and which are vulnerable to leaching toxic residue into waterways.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Timothy Ray Brown, cured of HIV, rallies public to support research fundingIn the 10th anniversary year since a bone marrow stem cell transplant cured Timothy Ray Brown of his HIV infection, despite disappointment over decreasing public desire to find a cure for HIV, Timothy Ray Brown remains optimistic that the scientific and medical communities can and will achieve this if properly funded.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Weight flux alters molecular profile, Stanford-led study findsThe human body undergoes dramatic changes during even short periods of weight gain and loss, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine.
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NYT > Science
U.K. Appoints a Minister for LonelinessPrime Minister Theresa May said an under secretary would work across government departments to tackle the issue.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Accelerating progress to reduce alcohol-impaired driving fatalitiesDespite progress in recent decades, more than 10,000 alcohol-impaired driving fatalities occur each year in the US. To address this persistent problem, stakeholders -- from transportation systems to alcohol retailers to law enforcement -- should work together to implement policies and systems to eliminate these preventable deaths, says a new report.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why don't turtles still have tail spikes?In a study covering 300 million years of evolutionary history, researchers have found four necessary components to tail weapon development: size, armor, herbivory and thoracic stiffness.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Morbid obesity: Gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy are comparableIn Switzerland, 5,500 operations to combat morbid obesity are conducted every year. Gastric bypasses and sleeve gastrectomy operations perform similarly: patients lose two-thirds of their excess weight in the long term. When it comes to gastric acid reflux, the bypass clearly shows better results.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Alzheimer's disease: Neuronal loss actually very limitedFrequently encountered in the elderly, Alzheimer's is considered a neurodegenerative disease, which means that it is accompanied by a significant, progressive loss of neurons and their nerve endings, or synapses. A new study now challenges this view.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Magnetically applied MicroRNAs could one day help relieve constipationMicro metal beads and magnets help deliver a biologic where it's needed to improve constipation or rectoanal incontinence in animal models of the disorders.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Patients receive most opioids at the doctor's office, not the ERA close examination of federal survey data shows that while many settings including ERs cut back on prescribing opioids for more than a decade, physicians' offices continued to prescribe them.
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Science | The Guardian
How do we smell? Terrible! Food sources might affect how we describe scentHumans have long been considered poor at describing smells, but research on hunter-gatherers shows this is not the case for everyone If describing a smell leaves you struggling to find the right words, it might be down to how you put food on the table. Researchers studying two communities living in tropical rainforests have found that while a hunter-gatherer group could easily describe different
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Science | The Guardian
John Young obituaryAmerican astronaut who led the first US space shuttle mission and was the ninth man to walk on the moon The astronaut John Young, who has died aged 87, was the ninth man to walk on the moon, as commander of Nasa’s Apollo 16 mission in 1972, and landed the first US space shuttle in 1981. Young epitomised the indomitable spirit of his era; after the space shuttle landing, he said: “We’re really not
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The Atlantic
When the South Was the Most Progressive Region in AmericaOne hundred and fifty years ago, on January 14, 1868, an extraordinary convention opened in Charleston, South Carolina, the cradle of the Confederacy. That afternoon, a biracial group of men—most of whom were black and some of whom had recently been enslaved—gathered at the elegant Charleston Club House, which had only recently been the refuge of city elite. They came to redraft South Carolina’s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hepatitis therapy: Kupffer cells adjust the balance between pathogen control and hepatocyte regenerationScientists from TWINCORE have now published new insights on the processes involved in liver inflammation in the Journal of Hepatology: Type I interferons, on the one hand, limit viral replication and thereby help the immune cells to control the viral pathogen. On the other hand, type I interferons delay the regeneration of immune cells, which are important to adjust and maintain the immune balance
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lessons in nature boost classroom engagement afterward, researchers reportThird-graders who spend a class session in a natural outdoor setting are more engaged and less distracted in their regular classroom afterward than when they remain indoors, scientists found in a new study. The effect was large and occurred week after week, regardless of teacher expectations.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Review examines the pros and cons of surgery to reduce the risk of cancerGenetic testing is commonplace for many inheritable cancer syndromes, and with that comes the knowledge of being a gene carrier for some patients. Many guidelines recommend that gene carriers take certain steps, such as surgery, to reduce their risk of developing cancer. A new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) review explores the quality-of-life consequences of genetic testing and risk-reducing sur
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research could significantly accelerate drug discoveryMany drugs work by inhibiting protein enzymes associated with a particular disease. Unfortunately, the same drugs can inhibit protein enzymes unrelated to the disease, resulting in harmful side effects. Computational biologists have a way to identify the features that distinguish one enzyme from similar enzymes. This research has the potential to significantly accelerate drug discovery, allowing s
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
California sea lion population rebounded to new highsCalifornia sea lions have fully rebounded under the protection of the Marine Mammal Protection Act, with their population on the West Coast reaching carrying capacity in 2008 before unusually warm ocean conditions reduced their numbers, according to the first comprehensive population assessment of the species.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Patient-derived organoids may help personalize the treatment of gastrointestinal cancersA new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) review highlights the potential of 3-D organoid models derived from patient cells to help personalize therapy for individuals with gastrointestinal cancers.
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Scientific American Content: Global
We Asked, They're Answering: the 2018 Candidates Are Talking about Science PolicyThe organization Science Debate is gearing up for the November midterms by pushing those seeking office to tell the public about their views on STEM issues -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News
Bitcoin’s utopia has failed as big players hold all the powerCryptocurrencies are built on the idea that no one institution holds the power. But for bitcoin and ethereum, that’s no longer true
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New Scientist - News
Trump, this ‘shithole’ continent pioneered heart swaps and moreSeeking to understand other people is better than dismissing them with insults. Trump needs lessons in African history, culture and science, says Curtis Abraham
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New Scientist - News
Chit-chat makes humans and robots work together betterIntroducing some chatter between humans and artificial intelligence improved the amount of collaboration – and results – across hundreds of games
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nearly 25 percent of chronic ischemic heart disease patients dead or hospitalized in 6 monthsNearly a quarter of patients with chronic ischemic cardiovascular disease are dead or hospitalized within six months, reports a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Some nursing homes gaming the system to improve their Medicare star ratingsA new study of nursing homes in California, the nation's largest system found that some nursing homes inflate their self-assessment reporting to improve their score in the Five-Star Quality Rating System employed by Medicare to help consumers.
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Futurity.org
This time of day may be riskiest for overeatingPeople who are overweight may be at higher risk for overeating in the evening hours, especially when experiencing stress, a new study suggests. The experiments add to evidence that “hunger hormone” levels rise and hormones that make us feel full decline during evening hours. “…having this knowledge, people could take steps to reduce their risk of overeating by eating earlier in the day…” The find
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mantis shrimp size each other up before ceding a fightTo a mantis shrimp, walking away from a fight doesn't mean being a wimp. It means recognizing who they're up against and knowing when to bail rather than drag out a doomed battle, Duke University researchers say. Mantis shrimp use sparring matches to decide when to fight and when to fold, finds a study published Jan. 17 in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ultra-thin memory storage device paves way for more powerful computingA team of electrical engineers at The University of Texas at Austin, in collaboration with Peking University scientists, has developed the thinnest memory storage device with dense memory capacity, paving the way for faster, smaller and smarter computer chips for everything from consumer electronics to big data to brain-inspired computing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds minority trainees are up, but not minority facultyDespite increasing numbers of underrepresented minority (URM) trainees in the biomedical sciences, there is a persistent shortage of URM faculty who are involved in basic biomedical research at medical schools. Vanderbilt investigators examined the entire training pathway of potential faculty candidates to identify points of greatest loss of URM trainees. They report Jan. 16 in PLOS ONE two key po
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Recording a thought's fleeting trip through the brainRecording brain activity via electrodes placed directly on the cortical surface (ECoG) provides much clearer views of thinking activity and how the prefrontal cortex coordinates the brain's response to a perception. With the help of 16 epilepsy patients, UC Berkeley neuroscientists tracked the brain's activity as it detects, interprets, settles on a response and activates motor areas to respond. T
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What can be done to prevent alcohol-impaired driving fatalities?A new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) outlines a framework for preventing alcohol-impaired driving fatalities.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fresh approach to TB vaccine offers better protectionA unique platform that resulted in a promising HIV vaccine has also led to a new, highly effective vaccine against tuberculosis that is moving toward testing in humans. The new vaccine completely protected 41 percent and reduced overall TB disease by 68 percent in vaccinated rhesus macaques, according to a study published as an Advanced Online Publication of Nature Medicine.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breakthrough enables screening millions of human antibodies for new drug discoveryA new article outlines a pioneering method of screening a person's diverse set of antibodies for rapid therapeutic discovery. Antibody proteins are an important part of the human immune system that specifically target foreign viruses and bacteria, and they have been the fastest-growing class of approved drugs in the past several decades.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Physicists succeed in measuring mechanical properties of 2-D monolayer materialsPhysicists have for the first time succeeded in characterizing the mechanical properties of free-standing single-atom-thick membranes of graphene.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Canine distemper confirmed in Far Eastern leopard, world's most endangered big catThe Far Eastern or Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis) is already among the rarest of the world's big cats, but new research reveals that it faces yet another threat: infection with canine distemper virus (CDV).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ultrathin black phosphorus for solar-driven hydrogen economyResearchers combined two different types of 2-D materials -- black phosphorus and bismuth vanadate -- to form a biologically inspired water-splitting catalyst. Normal sunlight could drive the reactions and careful design of the catalyst enabled the expected ratio of hydrogen and oxygen production.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Designing the next generation of hair dyesA public database of more than 300 substances used to dye hair will help accelerate research and development work on more sustainable hair color. Researchers say computer modeling can save years of lab work and millions of dollars.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanowrinkles could save billions in shipping and aquacultureBiofouling costs shipping billions in increased fuel costs and affects aquaculture. A nanostructured surface inspired by the carnivorous pitcher plant could slash those costs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Building molecular wires, one atom at a timeResearchers have found a simple way to construct and deconstruct molecular metal chains, atom-by-atom.
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The Atlantic
The Specter of a Chinese Mole in AmericaThe arrest of former CIA case officer Jerry Chun Shing Lee sheds light on a shadowy counterintelligence drama that has been playing out for nearly eight years. Starting around 2010, the Central Intelligence Agency saw some of its most valuable spies inside China go down. And I don’t mean “going down” in a perp-walk-to-the-courthouse sort of way. This is China: They were executed. One was reported
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The Atlantic
When Pop Culture Sells Dangerous Myths About RomanceAziz Ansari #MeTooEdward Cullen. Chuck Bass. Lloyd Dobler. Spike from Buffy the Vampire Slayer . That guy from Love Actually with the sign. The lead singers of emo bands with their brooding lyrics. Many of the romantic heroes that made me swoon in my youth followed a pattern and, like a Magic Eye picture, only with a little distance did the shape of it pop out to me. All of these characters in some way crossed, or
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Scientific American Content: Global
New Satellite Mission Would Benefit Climate Science and the Energy IndustryThe GeoCARB satellite will map the concentrations of key greenhouse gases over the Americas -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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The Scientist RSS
Sensors Journal Pulls Planned Special Issue Due to Guest Editors Fake CredentialsAshutosh Tiwari, who falsely claimed to be affiliated with Linköping University, is also under investigation for alleged scientific misconduct and fraud.
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The Scientist RSS
Diphtheria Outbreak Worsens Amid Humanitarian Crisis in YemenMore than 8 million people are on the brink of starvation, according to aid agencies.
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Popular Science
Why cities where it definitely snows continue to act like they’ve never seen snowEnvironment Adapting to snow on the road is a long, cold process. Southern cities are increasingly forced to consider if they will invest in becoming a city where it snows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Accelerating progress to reduce alcohol-impaired driving fatalitiesDespite progress in recent decades, more than 10,000 alcohol-impaired driving fatalities occur each year in the US. To address this persistent problem, stakeholders -- from transportation systems to alcohol retailers to law enforcement -- should work together to implement policies and systems to eliminate these preventable deaths, says a new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineer
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
To maximize sugarcane harvesting, use the right bladeYou wouldn't use the same knife to cut through a thick steak as you would to slice an angel food cake, right? Although that may be a ridiculous comparison, the same principle holds true when harvesting various crops. One blade doesn't slice all. Researchers at the University of Illinois tested four blades to find the one that most efficiently cuts sugarcane.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Symptoms of depression before undergoing heart procedure and outcomesSymptoms of depression were common among older adults undergoing a procedure to replace a damaged aortic valve of the heart, and having those symptoms was associated with a higher rate of death up to one year later.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reducing sessions of trauma-focused psychotherapy does not affect effectivenessPosttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients treated with as few as five sessions of trauma-focused psychotherapy find it equally effective as receiving 12 sessions.
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New on MIT Technology Review
At the Detroit Auto Show, the Autonomous Car Dream Is Still a Ways Off
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Big Think
Meet Tabarnia, Catalonia's Counter-Separatist NightmareOnce you start seceding, who's to say where it will stop? Read More
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Big Think
DNA Analysis May Have Finally Revealed What Killed 15 Million Aztecs15 million Aztecs were probably killed by a form of salmonella the Spanish brought from Europe. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Not just for Christmas: Study sheds new light on ancient human-turkey relationshipFor the first time, research has uncovered the origins of the earliest domestic turkeys in ancient Mexico. The study also suggests turkeys weren't only prized for their meat -- with demand for the birds soaring with the Mayans and Aztecs because of their cultural significance in rituals and sacrifices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Asymptomatic atrial fibrillation poses challenges for cardiac careResearchers have found that asymptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) patients are more likely to be older, male, and have more comorbidities and a higher risk of stroke than symptomatic patients. In an analysis of a sustained AF (SAF) group, the prevalence of major comorbidities and stroke risk were comparable in both asymptomatic and symptomatic patients.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Female rugby players shows a regular season of play results in changes in brainResearchers have shown that a regular season of play can cause changes in the brain that are similar to changes caused by concussion, though less severe. Using sophisticated Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy the researchers looked at metabolite levels in the brains of female varsity rugby players at the beginning of their season, after suffering a concussion, and again at the end of the season.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Will there be enough public health workers when baby boomers retire?Researchers estimate that over one quarter of the governmental public health workforce will disappear. They further project that while enough students graduate each year to replace retirees and others who voluntarily quit, they question whether the public health sector can compete with the private sector to hire qualified candidates.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ultra-thin optical fibers offer new way to 3-D print microstructuresFor the first time, researchers have shown that an optical fiber as thin as a human hair can be used to create microscopic structures with laser-based 3-D printing. The innovative approach might one day be used with an endoscope to fabricate tiny biocompatible structures directly into tissue inside the body.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New light on the mysterious origin of Bornean elephantsHow did Borneo get its elephant? This could be just another of Rudyard Kipling's just so stories. The Bornean elephant is a subspecies of Asian Elephants that only exist in a small region of Borneo. Their presence on this southeastern Asian island has been a mystery. Scientists have discovered that elephants might have arrived on Borneo at a time of the last land bridge between the Sunda Islands i
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Heart-on-a-chip' process aims to speed up drug testingTesting new clinical drugs' effect on heart tissue could become quicker and more straightforward, thanks to new research. The study sets out a new, faster method for manufacturing a 'heart-on-a-chip,' which can be used to test the reaction of heart tissue to external stimuli.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Quick quick slow is no-go in crab courtship danceFemale fiddler crabs are sensitive to changes in the speed of a male's courtship display, significantly preferring displays that accelerate to those that are performed at a constant speed or slow down.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prebiotics in infant formula could improve learning and memory and alter brain chemistryAmong other benefits, breast milk contains natural sources of prebiotics: small, indigestible fiber molecules that promote the growth of good bacteria in the baby's gut. Yet for many families, breastfeeding is difficult or impossible. Fortunately, modern infant formulas are getting closer to the real thing with the help of University of Illinois researchers.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Cryptocurrencies Plummeted Amid Talk of Clampdowns—But We Don’t Really Know Why
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Europe's space agency braces for Brexit falloutThe European Space Agency (ESA) is drawing up contingency plans for projects, commercial deals, and staffing that may be adversely affected by Brexit, senior officials said Wednesday.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
The hidden role informal caregivers play in health care | Scott WilliamsOnce a cared-for patient and now a caregiver himself, Scott Williams highlights the invaluable role of informal caregivers -- those friends and relatives who, out of love, go the extra mile for patients in need. From personal care to advocacy to emotional support, unpaid caregivers form the invisible backbone of health and social systems all over the world, Williams says -- and without them, these
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Hidden Depth in Math's Simple PuzzlesMathematician Richard Schwartz explains why he loves problems he can start solving right away, and how computers can help -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Inside Science
The Physics of FireThe Physics of Fire Scientists battle fires with science. The Physics of Fire Video of The Physics of Fire Earth Wednesday, January 17, 2018 - 10:00 Karin Heineman, Executive Producer (Inside Science) -- On average, about 8 million acres of land burns each year from wildfires. Big fires can reduce forests and grasslands to ash and can destroy homes and lives. Sadly, up to 90 percent of wildland f
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Ingeniøren
Elektriske pramme skal overtage lastbilernes containereDen belgiske havneby Antwerpen bliver det første sted i verden, hvor elektriske pramme tages i brug.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
At Detroit auto show, future high tech is presentFor the technology phobic, the Einride T-Pod autonomous cargo truck could be the stuff of nightmares.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Indiana health network pays about $55,000 ransom to hackersA central Indiana health network says it has paid a roughly $55,000 ransom to hackers to regain access to hospital computer systems.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breakthrough enables screening millions of human antibodies for new drug discoveryA paper just published in Nature Biotechnology outlines a pioneering method of screening a person's diverse set of antibodies for rapid therapeutic discovery. Antibody proteins are an important part of the human immune system that specifically target foreign viruses and bacteria, and they have been the fastest-growing class of approved drugs in the past several decades.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists shed light on a key molecular mechanism of autoimmune and inflammatory diseasesAn international team of researchers has unraveled a crucial aspect of the molecular basis of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease. Focusing on the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-23 they discovered that its pro-inflammatory activity, which underlies a wide range of inflammatory diseases, critically depends on structural activation of the cy
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New 'Buck' naked barley: Food, feed, brewResearchers are giving an ancient grain a new life: 'Buck' barley is naked, but not in an indecent way. Naked barley does not require pearling, allowing it to hold onto the bran and whole grain status.
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Science | The Guardian
Meteor flashes across the sky in Michigan – videoA meteor swept over parts of the US midwest and Canada on Tuesday, weather and geology agencies said. It then caused a powerful explosion that rattled homes, according to several residents Flash of light and loud bang in Michigan was meteor, experts say Continue reading...
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Science | The Guardian
Flash of light and loud bang in Michigan was meteor, experts sayHundreds of people said they say fireball light up the sky US Geological Service says it registered as 2.0 magnitude earthquake Experts say a bright light and what sounded like thunder in the sky above Michigan was a meteor. The American Meteor Society says it received hundreds of reports of a fireball Tuesday night over the state, including many in the Detroit area. Reports also came in from sev
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tolerance to saltwater and freshwater is key to survivalAccording to Charles Darwin the ability to adapt to new conditions is essential for survival of species. The capacity to cope with altered conditions is becoming increasingly important in the face of climate change. New evidence on salt water tolerance in spawning migrating pike from the Baltic Sea, published in the journal Scientific Reports, suggests that not being adapted to specific local envi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists shed light on a key molecular mechanism of autoimmune and inflammatory diseasesAn international team of researchers led by prof. Savvas Savvides (VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research) has unraveled a crucial aspect of the molecular basis of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease. Focusing on the immunomodulatory cytokine IL-23 they discovered that its pro-inflammatory activity, which underlies a wide range of in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Will there be enough public health workers when baby boomers retire?In a study in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, researchers estimate that over one quarter of the governmental public health workforce will disappear. They further project that while enough students graduate each year to replace retirees and others who voluntarily quit, they question whether the public health sector can compete with the private sector to hire qualified candidates.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Magnetic liquids improve energy efficiency of buildingsNext-generation smart windows and facade devices are the main subjects in the research project Large-Area Fluidic Windows which has been coordinated at the University Jena, Germany. A new type of such smart windows was now presented in Advanced Sustainable Systems. In their paper the Jena materials researchers introduce prototypes of a window that changes its light permeability at the touch of a b
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breakthrough enables screening millions of human antibodies for new drug discoveryA new paper in Nature Biotechnology outlines a pioneering method of screening a person's diverse set of antibodies for rapid therapeutic discovery. Antibody proteins are an important part of the human immune system that specifically target foreign viruses and bacteria, and they have been the fastest-growing class of approved drugs in the past several decades.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists still hoping to serve up insects as food sourceAn abundant food source in a time of food insecurity, just one snag – how can we break the 'yuck' barrier and get insects onto our plates?
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New Scientist - News
Source of world’s biggest listeria outbreak still unknownThere have been almost 750 cases of listeriosis in South Africa so far, and the source of the food poisoning infection remains unknown
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Political corruption scandals may be predicted by network scienceAccording to the World Bank, corruption scandals siphon more than $2 trillion per year from the global economy, making corruption one of the major causes of slow economic growth and socioeconomic inequality. Now in a new study, researchers have demonstrated that it may be possible to predict who will play a role in future scandals by modeling current scandals using networks. The results may provid
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ten 'stealth microplastics' to avoid if you want to save the oceansTheresa May's new environment plan sets ambitious goals for plastic waste reduction. But there's lots of room for slippage. One goal is to eradicate all "avoidable" plastic waste, though it's not clear how "avoidable" will be defined. A few concrete measures are now in place, such as the 5p plastic bag charge being extended to cover all businesses in England. And, in order to tackle the spread of
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Futurity.org
Kids are pretty flexible about gender identityChildren may think more flexibly about gender identities than previously thought, according to new research. The first-of-its kind study that examined children’s reactions to a genderless character on the Amazon children’s television program Annedroids . The live-action series features “PAL,” a human-like android programmed to choose its own gender by a young scientist named Anne. In a series of
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Japan forecasting breakthrough could improve weather warningsA new project harnessing data from a Japanese satellite could improve weather forecasting and allow officials to issue life-saving warnings before natural disasters, researchers say.
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Live Science
'Castle Cloud' Caught in Spectacular Astronaut PhotoIt looks like a ghostly medieval tower — like something out of "Game of Thrones" — looming over the crystal-blue Caribbean waters of the Bahamas.
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The Scientist RSS
Learning Opens the GenomeResearchers map learning-induced chromatin alterations in mouse brain cells, and find that many affect autism-associated genes.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Odd behavior of star reveals lonely black hole hiding in giant star clusterAstronomers using ESO's MUSE instrument on the Very Large Telescope in Chile have discovered a star in the cluster NGC 3201 that is behaving very strangely. It appears to be orbiting an invisible black hole with about four times the mass of the sun -- the first such inactive stellar-mass black hole found in a globular cluster and the first found by directly detecting its gravitational pull.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study with female rugby players shows a regular season of play results in changes in the brainResearchers at Western University have shown that a regular season of play can cause changes in the brain that are similar to changes caused by concussion, though less severe. Using sophisticated Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy the researchers looked at metabolite levels in the brains of female varsity rugby players at the beginning of their season, after suffering a concussion, and again at the e
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ultra-thin optical fibers offer new way to 3-D print microstructuresFor the first time, researchers have shown that an optical fiber as thin as a human hair can be used to create microscopic structures with laser-based 3-D printing. The innovative approach might one day be used with an endoscope to fabricate tiny biocompatible structures directly into tissue inside the body.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Himawari-8 data assimilated simulation enables 10-minute updates of rain and flood predictionsUsing the power of Japan's K computer, scientists from the RIKEN Advanced Institute for Computational Science and collaborators have shown that incorporating satellite data at frequent intervals -- 10 minutes in the case of this study -- into weather prediction models can significantly improve the rainfall predictions of the models and allow more precise predictions of the rapid development of a t
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Michigan's sugar maples will struggle in a warmer, drier future despite help from nitrogen pollutionThough Michigan's sugar maples benefit from the growth-promoting effects of nitrogen compounds in the environment, those gains will not fully offset the added stresses of growing under a drier climate in the future, according to a new University of Michigan-led study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New EU 'urban mining' tools map valuable resources in e-waste, scrap vehicles, mine wasteExpert European organizations have united to create the world's first database of valuable materials available for 'urban mining' from scrap vehicles, spent batteries, waste electronic and electrical equipment, and mining wastes.The Urban Mine Platform (urbanmineplatform.eu), created by 17 partners in project ProSUM (Prospecting Secondary Raw Materials in the Urban Mine and Mining Wastes), present
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Ingeniøren
Op mod 379 IDA-medlemmers job flyttes ud af KøbenhavnI dag præsenterede regeringen den næste runde af udflytningen af statslige arbejdspladser. I alt skal 1.824 stillinger flyttes, og ifølge IDA kan op mod 379 af dem være blandt foreningens egne medlemmer.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using electricity to switch magnetismAt TU Wien, researchers have taken a major step toward linking electrical and magnetic material properties, which is crucial for possible applications in electronics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ultra-thin optical fibers offer new way to 3-D print microstructuresFor the first time, researchers have shown that an optical fiber as thin as a human hair can be used to create microscopic structures with laser-based 3D printing. The innovative approach might one day be used with an endoscope to fabricate tiny biocompatible structures directly into tissue inside the body. This capability could enable new ways to repair tissue damage.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China says Iranian oil tanker wreck locatedThe wreck of an Iranian oil tanker that collided with a cargo ship off China this month has been located, Beijing said Wednesday, but gave no new details about the environmental impact of the disaster.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dutch hi-tech group ASML notches up 'fantastic year'Dutch computer chip maker and global hi-tech bellwether ASML Wednesday reported "a fantastic" 12 months with year-on-year profits almost doubling in 2017, sales on the increase and thousands of new jobs being created.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Canine distemper confirmed in Far Eastern leopard, world's most endangered big catThe Far Eastern or Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis) is already among the rarest of the world's big cats, but new research reveals that it faces yet another threat: infection with canine distemper virus (CDV). A new study published in the Journal of Wildlife Diseases describes the first documented case of CDV in a wild Far Eastern leopard.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New, forward-looking report outlines research path to sustainable citiesIn 1950, fewer than one-third of the world's people lived in cities. Today more than half do. By 2050, urban areas will be home to some two-thirds of Earth's human population.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China has a plan to clean up space junk with lasersOrbital debris (aka. space junk) is one of the greatest problems facing space agencies today. After 60 years of sending rockets, boosters and satellites into space, the situation in the low Earth orbit (LEO) has become rather crowded. Given how fast debris in orbit can travel, even the tiniest bits of junk can pose a major threat to the International Space Station and threaten still-active satelli
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why don't turtles still have tail spikes?We're all familiar with those awesome armored giants of the Jurassic and Cretaceous periods - Stegosaurus and Ankylosaurus - and their amazing, weaponized tails. But why aren't similar weaponized tails found in animals living today? In a study covering 300 million years of evolutionary history, researchers from North Carolina State University and the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences found
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High tolerance for wildlife exists around Indian reserves despite continued lossesA new study from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), Duke University, and the Centre for Wildlife Studies in India finds that communities living near wildlife reserves in Rajasthan, India, show a high tolerance for wildlife. This is despite them having experienced losses in crops and livestock as a result of interaction with wildlife like nilgai, jackal and wild pig, as well as larger carnivores
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanowrinkles could save billions in shipping and aquacultureA team of chemistry researchers from the University of Sydney Nano Institute has developed nanostructured surface coatings that have anti-fouling properties without using any toxic components.
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Science | The Guardian
Questioning AI: what can scientists learn from artificial intelligence? – Science Weekly podcastIn this episode of our new mini-series, Ian Sample explores how AI is providing insights into cancer diagnosis, intelligence, and physics Subscribe and review on Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud and Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter In October 2017, researchers at Google DeepMind published a paper on an artificial intelligence (AI) program called AlphaGo Ze
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New on MIT Technology Review
The Fight to Save Net Neutrality Is Heating Up
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Designing the next generation of hair dyesNorth Carolina State University researchers have created the largest publicly available chemical database of hair dye substances as a resource for developing a new generation of hair color products that are safer for consumers, stylists and the environment.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Michigan's sugar maples will struggle in a warmer, drier future despite help from nitrogen pollutionThough Michigan's sugar maples benefit from the growth-promoting effects of nitrogen compounds in the environment, those gains will not fully offset the added stresses of growing under a drier climate in the future, according to a new University of Michigan-led study.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study sheds new light on ancient human-turkey relationshipFor the first time, research has uncovered the origins of the earliest domestic turkeys in ancient Mexico. The study also suggests turkeys weren't only prized for their meat—with demand for the birds soaring with the Mayans and Aztecs because of their cultural significance in rituals and sacrifices.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to avoid a sucker bet – with a little help from mathsSitting in a bar, you start chatting to a man who issues you a challenge. He hands you five red and two black cards. After shuffling, you lay them on the bar, face down. He bets you that you cannot turn over three red cards. And to help you, he explains the odds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists measure mechanical properties of 2-D monolayer materialsThe thinnest materials that can be produced today have the thickness of a single atom. These materials – known as two-dimensional materials – exhibit properties that are very different compared with their bulk three-dimensional counterparts. Until recently, 2-D materials were produced and manipulated as films on the surface of some suitable 3-D substrate. Working in collaboration with a team from
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Asymptomatic atrial fibrillation poses challenges for cardiac careIn a study published in the journal CHEST®, researchers found that asymptomatic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) patients are more likely to be older, male, and have more comorbidities and a higher risk of stroke than symptomatic patients. In an analysis of a sustained AF (SAF) group, the prevalence of major comorbidities and stroke risk were comparable in both asymptomatic and symptomatic pati
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Canine distemper confirmed in Far Eastern leopard, world's most endangered big catThe Far Eastern or Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis) is already among the rarest of the world's big cats, but new research reveals that it faces yet another threat: infection with canine distemper virus (CDV).
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improved home care services and reduced workload for carers with a new work modelImproved home care services and reduced workload for carers with a new work model. Aalto University researchers have developed the model for several years together with carers and home care administration. The model has also reduced the need for stand-in workers by up to 60 per cent.
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Ingeniøren
Rigspolitiet: Dansk børneporno lå på Facebooks servere i to årFacebook har ifølge Rigspolitiet haft børneporno liggende på deres servere i to år, hvor unge flittigt har delt det. Spørgsmålet er nu, hvor stort medansvar Facebook har i distributionen af børneporno.
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The Guardian's Science Weekly
Questioning AI: what can scientists learn from artificial intelligence? – Science Weekly podcastIn this episode of our new mini-series, Ian Sample explores how AI is providing insights into cancer diagnosis, intelligence, and physics
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Why many click farm jobs should be understood as digital slaveryThe digital economy has created new opportunities and ways of working. But it has also created millions of tasks or jobs that involve intense competition, unregulated working conditions and extremely low rates of pay.
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Popular Science
Seven apps and tools to organize your lifeDIY Restore order to your days. Sick of always running late? These seven organizational apps will help you track your time, build better habits, receive reminders, and more.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The cruel trade-off at your local produce aisleWhen we decide what fresh produce to buy, we check our fruits and vegetables for colour and blemishes, and we make sure the price seems fair.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mantis shrimp size each other up before giving up a fightTo a mantis shrimp, walking away from a fight doesn't mean being a wimp. It means recognizing who they're up against and knowing when to bail rather than drag out a doomed battle, Duke University researchers say.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pigments in oil paintings linked to artwork degradationExperts have long known that as oil paintings age, soaps can form within the paint, degrading the appearance of the artworks. The process significantly complicates the preservation of oil paintings—and cultural manifestations, which the paintings themselves help to preserve.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solid and liquid at the same timeMicroscopically small particles can spontaneously self-assemble into complex layered structures with remarkable properties, according to calculations performed at the TU Wien.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earth observations are helping countries manage their water securityThe largest contiguous irrigation system on Earth, the Indus Basin provides water to 100 million people across South Asia. This basin is estimated to irrigate 45 million acres of farm land, and it's considered the bread basket of Pakistan—essential for sustaining the agriculture and economy of the nation.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lobachevsky University scientists are studying nervous system adaptation to ischemic damageLobachevsky University researchers are working to explore the mechanisms of adaptation of the nervous system to ischemic damage. Scientists say that under certain conditions, the brain's protective forces can be activated, even in some severe cases.According to Maria Vedunova, Director of the Institute of Biology and Biomedicine at Lobachevsky University, a large number of stressors affect the bod
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
First surface-based estimation of the aerosol indirect effect over ChinaAerosol indirect effect (AIE) can significantly affect climate change and is one of the largest uncertainties in climate change studies. To date, only a few AIE studies using satellite measurements have been carried out in China, and no such study has been done using ground-based measurements. The AIE can only be assessed accurately from aircraft or ground-based measurements. The first comprehensi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clean and green: A moss that removes lead from waterResearchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) in Japan have demonstrated that that moss can be a green alternative for decontaminating polluted water and soil. Published in PLOS ONE, the study shows that in particular, the moss Funaria hygrometrica tolerates and absorbs an impressive amount of lead (Pb) from water.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physicists succeed in measuring mechanical properties of 2-D monolayer materialsWorking in collaboration with a team from the Leibniz Institute for New Materials, a group of physicists at Saarland University, led by Professor Uwe Hartmann, has for the first time succeeded in characterizing the mechanical properties of free-standing single-atom-thick membranes of graphene.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Not just for Christmas: Study sheds new light on ancient human-turkey relationshipFor the first time, research has uncovered the origins of the earliest domestic turkeys in ancient Mexico.The study also suggests turkeys weren't only prized for their meat -- with demand for the birds soaring with the Mayans and Aztecs because of their cultural significance in rituals and sacrifices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Siberian chemists have improved hydrogen sensorsA group of scientists from the Siberian Federal University (SFU, Krasnoyarsk, Russia) and the Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry (NIIC, Novosibirsk, Russia) combined the useful properties of metal phthalocyanines and palladium membranes in order to create active layers in hydrogen detectors. This operation significantly increases the sensitivity of the sensors. The study is reported in the
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sweat torso to become international standardEmpa's sweat torso now meets the ISO standard. How protective clothing affects the human body can be investigated in future with Empa's torso in a standardized way.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fishing for one bad cell out of trillions of good onesCancer cells can break away from a tumor and circulate through the blood. There are few of the cancer cells compared to the trillions of blood cells. Current methods to find and extract these circulating tumor cells (CTC) are expensive and may be out of reach for medical facilities in rural areas.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UFO believers got one thing right—here's what they get wrongThe past few weeks have been good for UFO believers. For decades they've clamored for "disclosure"—an admission by the government that it knows of galactic gatecrashers, and that aliens are irrefutably here. This always struck me as a classic argument from ignorance: We lack good evidence to prove our case because it's been hidden.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Superconducting tokamaks are standing tallA persistent problem has dogged the largest fusion device in South Korea. The Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device has run successfully since 2008. However, controlling the vertical position of the ultra-hot plasma has proven difficult. Stable control of the vertical position allows precise shaping and positioning of the plasma boundary, vital to a reactor's performance.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Moustached monkey is separate speciesA monkey from Ethiopia and Sudan with a distinctive "handlebar moustache" has been identified as a distinct species.
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Ingeniøren
Nu kommer de detaljerede krav til landmændenes gødningEn politisk aftale baner vejen for at indføre den såkaldt målrettede regulering, som deler landet op i 3000 områder med hver deres krav til begrænse mængden af kvælstof. De ramte landmænd får 84 mio. kr. i erstatning, og landbruget får desuden grønne tilskud for 115 mio. kr.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Future electronics may ride on new three-in-one particle"Trion" may sound like the name of one of the theoretical particles blamed for mucking up operations aboard the Starship Enterprise.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
To end share-bike dumping, focus on how to change people's behaviourWhile most cities are keen to promote bike use, few foresaw the problems caused by dockless bike-sharing schemes such as oBike and Reddy Go. The advantage of dockless bikes is that users needn't find dedicated stations to pick up and return the bikes. Instead, the user leaves the bike in a public place for the next rider to use. But the disadvantage turns out to be that these bikes are littering s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Timing neutrinos with White RabbitBeing on time is important – just ask Lewis Carroll's leporine friend – and one group who knows this more than most are particle physicists, whose work revolves around keeping track of near-light speed blips of matter.
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Dagens Medicin
Vangsteds svanesang?Er Anne Marie Vangsted fredet for en tid eller snart fortid som chef for Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed? Det er dagens spørgsmål i kølvandet på den nyeste opsplitning af de øverste myndigheder i sundhedssektoren.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Baby boomers use too much energy in their homesMany people live at home up to a ripe old age without needing much outside help. In a study conducted for the National Research Programme "Managing Energy Consumption," researchers have examined how much energy could be saved in elderly people's households and why this saving potential is not being exploited.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Arctic photosynthetic capacity and carbon dioxide assimilation underestimated by terrestrial biosphere modelsCarbon uptake and loss from the Arctic is highly sensitive to climate change, and these processes are poorly represented in computational models of the Earth. A key challenge is representing carbon dioxide uptake by plants in the Arctic. These models rely on details developed in warmer climates. This study provided the first Arctic dataset of two key photosynthetic parameters. The parameters were
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Open-source software simulates river and runoff resourcesFreshwater resources are finite, unevenly distributed, and changing through time. The demand—and competition—for water is expected to grow both in the United States and in the developing/developed world. To examine the connection between supply and demand and resulting regional and global water stresses, a team developed Xanthos. The open-source hydrologic model is available for free and helps res
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reaching rural America with broadband internet serviceAll across the U.S., rural communities' residents are being left out of modern society and the 21st century economy. I've traveled to Kansas, Maine, Texas and other states studying internet access and use – and I hear all the time from people with a crucial need still unmet. Rural Americans want faster, cheaper internet like their city-dwelling compatriots have, letting them work remotely and use
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A material that superconducts continuously up to extreme pressuresResearchers have discovered a metal alloy that can conduct electricity with zero resistance, or superconduct, from ambient pressure up to pressures similar to those that exist near the center of the Earth. The material, which is likely the first to show this kind of robust superconductivity, is described in a paper in the December 12, 2017, edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sci
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Minecraft teaches kids about tech, but there's a gender imbalance at playArguments about "screen time" are likely to crop up in many households with children these holidays. As one of the best-selling digital games of all time, Minecraft will be a likely culprit.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ultrathin black phosphorus for solar-driven hydrogen economyHydrogen as a fuel source, rather than hydrocarbons like oil and coal, offers many benefits. Burning hydrogen produces harmless water with the potential to eliminate carbon dioxide emissions and their environmental burden. In pursuit of technologies that could lead to a breakthrough in achieving a hydrogen economy, a key issue is making hydrogen cheaply. Using catalysts to split water is the ideal
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Building molecular wires, one atom at a timeElectronic devices are getting smaller and smaller. Early computers filled entire rooms. Today you can hold one in the palm of your hand. Now the field of molecular electronics is taking miniaturization to the next level. Researchers are creating electronic components so tiny they can't be seen with the naked eye.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hawaii's missile alert gaffe—why good human-machine design is criticalHawaii Alert WarningA ballistic missile warning alarm that was wrongly triggered in Hawaii recently rams home the importance of the way interfaces are designed to prevent such major bloopers from happening in the first place.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
App for keeping an eye on the kids at the poolFor many, it would not be summer without a day at the public swimming pool. Now a design student has created a concept for an app that prompts parents and guardians to keep an eye on their kids.
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Good Is Star Trek's Record at Predicting the Future of Tech?-- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Why don't turtles still have tail spikes?In a study covering 300 million years of evolutionary history, researchers from North Carolina State University and the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences found four necessary components to tail weapon development: size, armor, herbivory and thoracic stiffness.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Morbid obesity: Gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy are comparableIn Switzerland, 5,500 operations to combat morbid obesity are conducted every year. Gastric bypasses and sleeve gastrectomy operations perform similarly: patients lose two-thirds of their excess weight in the long term, as researchers from the University of Basel at the St. Claraspital report in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). When it comes to gastric acid reflux, the bypas
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The world's first all-Si laserAll-Si laser is the missing piece of integrated Si photonics. Recently, a joint research team led by Professor X. Wu, Professor M. Lu and Associate Professor S.-Y. Zhang from Fudan University developed the world's first all-Si laser using Si nanocrystals with high optical gains. The high-gain thin film was achieved by passivating hydrogen silsesquioxane under high pressure. Distributed feedback re
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Building molecular wires, one atom at a timeResearchers at OIST have found a simple way to construct and deconstruct molecular metal chains, atom-by-atom.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Protonation induced high-Tc phases in iron-based superconductorsThe research teams led by Dr. Weiqiang Yu at Renmin University of China and Dr. Pu Yu at Tsinghua University succeeded in implanting protons into iron-based superconductors by using ionic liquids. Various bulk high-Tc phases were found in the protonated materials. This technique not only provides an efficient carrier doping method, but also allows for rich bulk spectroscopy studies. This work is h
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ultrathin black phosphorus for solar-driven hydrogen economyOsaka University researchers combined two different types of 2-D materials -- black phosphorus and bismuth vanadate -- to form a biologically inspired water-splitting catalyst. Normal sunlight could drive the reactions and careful design of the catalyst enabled the expected ratio of hydrogen and oxygen production.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanowrinkles could save billions in shipping and aquacultureBiofouling costs shipping billions in increased fuel costs and affects aquaculture. A nanostructured surface inspired by the carnivorous pitcher plant could slash those costs.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Designing the next generation of hair dyesA public database of more than 300 substances used to dye hair will help accelerate research and development work on more sustainable hair color. North Carolina State University researchers say computer modeling can save years of lab work and millions of dollars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Just a small piece of paper can make water consumption saferA revolutionary microbial-based paper sensor has been developed by researchers at the University of Bath, creating a cheap, sustainable and recyclable device for detecting toxic compounds in water.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Berguitta heading toward MauritiusOn Jan.14, Tropical cyclone Berguitta formed and triggered warnings A class III tropical cyclone alert is in force for Rodrigues Island.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Century-old botany records may hold key to monarch butterfly survivalNaturalists' records dating back more than 100 years may be instrumental in determining the fate of the monarch butterfly in the 21st century.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Google’s Self-Training AI Turns Coders into Machine-Learning MastersAutomating the training of machine-learning systems could make AI much more accessible.
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Dagens Medicin
Nye anbefalinger for fire fedmemidler sendes i høringSundhedsstyrelsen klar med anbefalinger for medicinsk behandling af fedme og overvægt. Fire lægemidler vurderes i et nyt udkast til et baggrundsnotat for Den Nationale Rekommandationsliste.
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Dagens Medicin
Novo giver 60 mio. kr. til diabetesprojektEt forskningsprojekt om, hvordan data kan hjælpe til en større forståelse for sygdomme, særligt diabetes, har fået bevilliget 60 mio. kr. fra Novo Nordisk Fonden.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers explore anti-inflammatory activity of curcuminExtracts of the plant turmeric—the spice that gives Indian curries a yellow color—have been used as an anti-inflammatory treatment in traditional Asian medicine for centuries. Clinical trials of curcumin (the active chemical compound in turmeric), however, have produced mixed results. A molecular understanding of curcumin's biological effects is needed.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tiger shark sex life fuels sustainability riskTiger sharks appear to be genetically monogamous – and it could be putting the species at risk.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds strategy to recover from interruptions at workGet interrupted at work much? Making a quick plan for returning to and completing the task you're leaving will help you focus better on the interrupting work, according to new research from the University of Washington.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Clean and green—a moss that removes lead from waterResearchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) in Japan have demonstrated that that moss can be a green alternative for decontaminating polluted water and soil. Published in PLOS ONE, the study shows that in particular, the moss Funaria hygrometrica tolerates and absorbs an impressive amount of lead (Pb) from water.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study suggests ways to encourage homeowners to save energyAs winter temperatures plummet into the single digits, plenty of homeowners wish they could keep their home energy costs down—and help the environment to boot!—but often fail to take action. A new study led by Kathryn Caldwell, an assistant professor of psychology at Ithaca College, demonstrates that homeowners can be encouraged to make changes to their energy use with a simple education plan and
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Feed: All Latest
Gadget Lab Podcast: How 'Shine Theory' Improves Diversity in DesignA discussion about diversity in product design with Google's Lilian Rincon. Recorded live at CES 2018.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Radar adds technological twist to age-old cranberry counting processIt's a quintessential cranberry scene: Thigh-deep in a flooded bog full of millions of floating berries, two farmers extol the merits of products made from the tart red fruit.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
LJI researchers discover key driver of atopic dermatitisSevere eczema, also known as atopic dermatitis, is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that is driven by an allergic reaction. In their latest study, researchers at La Jolla Institute reveal an important player that promotes skin inflammation in atopic dermatitis and the characteristic thickening of the skin.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: High tolerance for wildlife exists around Indian reserves despite continued lossesA new study from WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society), Duke University, and the Centre for Wildlife Studies in India finds that communities living near wildlife reserves in Rajasthan, India, show a high tolerance for wildlife. This is despite them having experienced losses in crops and livestock as a result of interaction with wildlife like nilgai, jackal and wild pig, as well as larger carnivores
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Robot Math and Smartphones Led Researchers to a Drug Discovery BreakthroughAn algorithm originally designed to help robots move was useful in tackling an entirely different problem -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Nyt forskningsprojekt skal omsætte algoritmer og kunstig intelligens til state-of-the-art kundesupportOver de næste to år skal KU-forskere i algoritmer, informationssøgning og machine...
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Volcanologist suggests Mt. Etna is actually a giant hot springCarmelo Ferlito, a volcanologist at Università di Catania, in Sicily, has suggested in a paper published in the journal Earth-Science Reviews that Mt. Etna behaves more like a giant hot spring than a volcano. He is not, as some publications have suggested, claiming to have found evidence showing that Mt. Etna is not a volcano, but suggests that it has some properties that are different than other
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chronic disease care: Family helpers play key roles, but feel left out by providersPeople with chronic diseases often live independent lives, without a traditional 'caregiver.' But many of them have a family member or friend who plays a key supporting role in their health care. A new study finds that many of these 'health supporters' wish they could understand their loved one's condition better, or get more involved in helping them navigate a long-term illness.
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Viden
Fiskeforbud kan redde truede pingvinerOmråder med fiskeforbud kan forbedre levevilkårene for Sydafrikas brillepingviner, viser ny undersøgelse.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
60 millioner kroner til udvikling af supercellerForskere på Københavns Universitet vil ved hjælp af særlige lysstråler...
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Science | The Guardian
Tetrodotoxin: the poison behind the Japanese pufferfish scareThe accidental sale of potentially deadly fugu in Japan has sparked a health scare – and the same poison is now found in European species Gamagori city in Japan was put on alert this week after toxic fish went on sale in a local supermarket. Pufferfish are considered a delicacy in Japan, often eaten raw as sashimi or cooked in soups. But if the fish are not carefully prepared they can be deadly.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Crumpling reduces rigidity in an otherwise stiff material, making it less prone to catastrophic failureGas pressure was applied to a crumpled graphene membrane to cause it to bulge and stiffen. The result? The gas pressure revealed that this atomically thin carbon material—universally assumed to be strong and stiff—has a "softer side." The greater than expected reduction of rigidity with increased crumpling caused researchers to refine their understanding of the material's mechanics.
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Ingeniøren
Meteorit indeholder både vand og organiske molekylerNærmere granskning af meteorsten har ført til det første fund af materiale fra rummet, der på samme tid indeholder vand og de indledende byggesten til liv.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Second giant panda cub born in MalaysiaA giant panda loaned to Malaysia from China has given birth to a second cub during its stay in the Southeast Asian country, zoo officials said Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Measuring metabolism in dolphins to calculate their caloric needsA team of researchers from several institutions in the U.S. and one in Spain has measured the metabolism of wild bottlenose dolphins in an effort to better understand their caloric needs. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes measuring the dolphins, what they found, and explain how their findings can help with conservation efforts.
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Dagens Medicin
Ny ledende overlæge på Medicinsk Afdeling i GlostrupBodil Ørkild tiltræder 1. februar som ny ledende overlæge på Medicinsk Afdeling i Glostrup. Hun håber på flere digitale løsninger i fremtiden.
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Futurity.org
Tiniest wearable sticks on your nail to monitor UV raysThe smallest wearable device in the world fits on a fingernail and precisely measures exposure to UV light from the sun. The device, as light as a raindrop and smaller in circumference than an M&M, is powered by the sun and contains the world’s most sophisticated and accurate UV dosimeter. It debuted Sunday, January 7 at the 2018 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas and will be called UV Sense.
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Live Science
4,000-Year-Old Mummies Are Half Brothers, DNA Analysis ShowsThe finding settles a 111-year-old mystery that began when excavators exhumed the two mummies in Deir Rifeh.
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Science-Based Medicine
Infiltrative PseudoscienceIf you don't think that CAM is the enemy of science in medicine, then you don't understand CAM and its proponents. Don't be fooled by their marketing. They want a return to the pre-scientific days when health gurus could sell any snake oil they want at exorbitant prices, with any hyped claims that they want, without going through all that tedious science.
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The Scientist RSS
South Korean Universities Make Deal with ElsevierA consortium of 300 universities and college libraries had taken a strong stance against the publishing giant's price hikes.
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Keep a Cool HeadScientists take a close look at how cloven hoofed mammals use selective brain cooling to survive in the heat.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study says some nursing homes gaming the system to improve their Medicare star ratingsA new study of nursing homes in California, the nation's largest system, by faculty at Florida Atlantic University and the University of Connecticut, found that some nursing homes inflate their self-assessment reporting to improve their score in the Five-Star Quality Rating System employed by Medicare to help consumers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Majority of US physicians say they're burned out or depressedThis release concerns the first-ever Medscape National Report on Physician Burnout and Depression. This survey includes more than 15,000 physicians in the USA, finding that more than half experience depression, burnout, or both, and that this has an impact on patient care.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
UK firm contracts to service satellitesEffective Space says it will launch "space drones" to prolong the life of telecommunications satellites in orbit.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Are Nonstick Pans Safe?Nonstick pans allow you to cook with less oil and clean-up is a breeze. But are they safe? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science
The strange side effect of gastric bypass that helps diabeticsFat Month We don't really understand how bariatric surgery improves type 2 diabetes. Obese patients can lose over 50 percent of their body weight following gastric bypass surgery, but the biggest outcome isn't the weight loss.
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Futurity.org
Is there a ‘bilingual advantage’ for kids with autism?Being bilingual may make it easier for children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) to switch gears from one task to another, according to a new study. “This is a novel and surprising finding,” says senior paper author Aparna Nadig of the School of Communication Sciences and Disorders at McGill University. “Over the past 15 years there has been a significant debate in the field about whether the
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Feed: All Latest
The Physics of the 69-Degree Intersection That Kills Cyclists in the UKSet up an intersection the wrong way, and an oncoming car can be completely blind to an approaching biker—with fatal consequences.
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Feed: All Latest
Nissan's Brain Wave Project Could Help You Drive by Reading Your MindJust put on this goofy helmet, and the car could know what you'll do before you do it.
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The Atlantic
Camila Cabello, Pop's Understated New StarThe No. 2 song in the country, Camila Cabello’s “Havana,” stands out in the charts in a few ways. There’s the sauntering, salsa-adjacent piano line. There’s the fact that Havana gets rhymed with East Atlanta repeatedly. And there’s Cabello’s singing, sultry but also unconcerned. It’s like she’s telling a story while lying on the couch and fiddling with her phone. Yet she’s also enunciating compre
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds topological materials could boost the efficiency of thermoelectric devicesWhat if you could run your air conditioner not on conventional electricity, but on the sun's heat during a warm summer's day? With advancements in thermoelectric technology, this sustainable solution might one day become a reality.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds children think flexibly about gender identityChildren may think more flexibly about gender identities than previously thought, according to a study by Vanderbilt researchers.
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Scientific American Content: Global
NASA Test Proves Pulsars Can Function as a Celestial GPSExperiment shows how spacecraft could use stellar signals to navigate in deep space without human instruction -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
Mini 'Gamma Ray Burst' Created in Lab for 1st TimeGamma ray bursts, intense explosions of light, are the brightest events ever observed in the universe – lasting no longer than seconds or minutes.
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Live Science
Gene Location for Paranoia FoundResearchers identified a genetic location linked to paranoia by studying a rare neurogenetic disorder.
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cognitive science
Chatbots are exciting and use the power of machine learning. Here is a small video which will help you understand how and where chatbots can be used. From product recommendations, service booking, inquiries, eCommerce, life and health advice, investing, entertainment to even just talking to.submitted by /u/getengati [link] [comments]
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Dagens Medicin
Styrelse for Patientsikkerhed splittes op i to deleEn ny styrelse for patientklager skal oprettes i Aarhus. Dermed bliver Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed opdelt i to.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: European Columbus module packed up and loaded for transportThe European Columbus module is packed up and loaded for transport to the US in this image from 2006. Built in Turin, Italy, and Bremen, Germany, the completed module was shipped to NASA's facilities in Cape Canaveral, Florida ahead of its February 2008 launch aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research reveals religious profanity and homophobic terminology among the most common swearwords used onlineReligious swear words and homophobic phrases are among the most common profanity used in online blogs, new research suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hormone keys plant growth or stress tolerance, but not bothPlants that grow well tend to be sensitive to heat and drought, and plants that can handle those stresses often have stunted growth. A Purdue University plant scientist has found the switch that creates that antagonism, opening opportunities to develop plants that exhibit both characteristics.
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Dagens Medicin
Patienter indberetter markant flere bivirkningerTidligere stod læger suverænt for flest indberetninger af bivirkninger til Lægemiddelstyrelsen, men nu er omfanget af indberetninger fra patienter og det øvrige sundhedspersoner steget markant, viser en opgørelse.
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Science : NPR
Bright Light, Sonic Boom As Meteor Streaks Across Southern MichiganThe space rock punched through the clouds near Detroit just after 8 p.m. with a boom that shook houses and registered magnitude 2.0 on U.S. Geological Survey instruments. (Image credit: Youtube Mike Austin/via Reuters)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Can being too social take years off your life? Yes, biologists report, if you're a marmotLarge ground squirrels called yellow-bellied marmots live much longer, on average, if they are less social and more isolated than if they are more social and less isolated, a UCLA-led long-term study has found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DNA uncovers humans as the main source of faecal pollution in the DanubeDespite wastewater management and treatment plants, human waste remains the main source of microbial faecal pollution in the river Danube. This is the most notable finding of a comprehensive analysis of faecal pollution in the Danube. The study used a new molecular genetics method that enables the clear differentiation of human microbial faecal pollution from that of animal origin. The currently p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists digitally preserve important Arkansas dinosaur tracksScientists using laser-imaging technology have documented and digitally preserved the first known set of theropod dinosaur tracks in the state of Arkansas.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Montmaurin-La Niche mandible reveals the complexity of the Neanderthals' originA team of scientists from the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH) has just published a paper in the journal PLOS ONE on the Middle Pleistocene Montmaurin-La Niche mandible, which reveals the complexity of the origin of the Neanderthals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists synthesize nanoparticle-antioxidants to treat strokes and spinal cord injuriesAn international science team has developed an innovative therapeutic complex based on multi-layer polymer nanostructures of superoxide dismutase (SOD). The new substance can be used to effectively rehabilitate patients after acute spinal injuries, strokes, and heart attacks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Physicists look for ways to protect satellites' electronic equipment in spaceThe Department of Micro- and Nano-Electronics at the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russia) has presented a new method of predicting integrated microcircuit failures in outer space. An article on the research has been published by IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New light on the mysterious origin of Bornean elephantsThe Bornean elephant is a subspecies of the Asian elephant that only exists in a small region of Borneo. Their presence on this southeastern Asian island has been a mystery. Now, in a study published in Scientific Reports, a research team led by Lounès Chikhi and Benoit Goossens has found that elephants might have arrived on Borneo via the last land bridge between the Sunda Islands in Southeast As
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The Atlantic
How Colleges Foretold the #MeToo MovementAziz Ansari #MeTooSince the fall, the staggering cascade of sexual-misconduct allegations waged against powerful men—from Hollywood moguls to prominent politicians—has mostly centered on the workplace. But as the nation fixated on the downfalls of Harvey Weinstein, John Conyers, and countless others, what has come to be known as the #MeToo movement has been reverberating on college campuses across the country, too
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The Atlantic
Raising a Social-Media StarYouTube Tide VideoWhen then-14-year-old Jonas Bridges ran down the stairs of his Atlanta home shouting, “Dad, I’ve got 1,000 fans!” his father, Rob Bridges, hardly took notice. A few days later Jonas barreled into the living room again, saying, “Dad, I’ve got 3,000 fans now.” Again, his father brushed him off. Several days later, Jonas told his father, “I have 5,000 fans now and if I get to 10,000 I’ll get paid fo
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Big Data Can Help Rebuild America's Aging InfrastructureWireless sensor networks could tell engineers when key structural elements of bridges, highways and buildings are dangerously weak -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Circadian regulation in the honey bee brainCircadian clocks regulate the behaviour of all living things. Scientists from the University of Würzburg have now taken a closer look at the clock's anatomical structures and molecular processes in the honeybee.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
International study identifies the process of rock formation by meteor strikes or nuclear blastsCoesite is a polymorph of silica that only forms under extremely high pressure—10,000 times more, on average, than normal atmospheric pressure. The presence of coesite indicates either that material has pushed up through Earth's crust from the mantle, or that a comet, meteor or meteorite struck the site. Coesite can also be created in nuclear explosions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Critically endangered Sumatran elephant gives birth in IndonesiaA critically endangered Sumatran elephant has given birth to a new calf in Indonesia, the country's conservation agency said Wednesday.
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Brain's Marauder's MapNeurons in the hippocampi of rats and bats fire in response to their fellow animals’ movements -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Odd behavior of star reveals lonely black hole hiding in giant star clusterAstronomers using ESO's MUSE instrument on the Very Large Telescope in Chile have discovered a star in the cluster NGC 3201 that is behaving very strangely. It appears to be orbiting an invisible black hole with about four times the mass of the sun -- the first such inactive stellar-mass black hole found in a globular cluster and the first found by directly detecting its gravitational pull.
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Ingeniøren
Redegørelse: Kaotiske vilkår ledte op til tabt udbud på DTUUniversitetet fastholder i en redegørelse at være blevet udsat for urimelige vilkår under konkurrenceudsættelsen af veterinærberedskabet. Fødevarestyrelsen mener, det er noget vrøvl.
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The Atlantic
Ali Smith Spins Modernity Into Myth in WinterNothing is more cyclical in Ali Smith’s half-finished quartet of seasonal novels than history, condemned to repeat itself over and over. In both 2017’s Autumn and this year’s Winter , Arthurian legend foreshadows Shakespeare, which predicts the horrors of World War II, whose traumas portend the anti-immigrant sentiment that led to Brexit. Somehow, though, there’s comfort as well as despair in the
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The Atlantic
Turning the Hill's 'Me Too' Moment Into LegislationDrip. Representative John Conyers. Drip. Senator Al Franken. Drip. Representative Joe Barton. Drip. Representative Trent Franks. Drip. Representative Blake Farenthold. Drip. Representative Ruben Kihuen. Drip? Congress knows it has a sexual harassment problem. Big time. And members are braced for it to continue plaguing them through the midterms. For weeks, in fact, political Washington has been a
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Feed: All Latest
Ford Is Finally Getting Serious About Making Electric CarsStarting with an $11 billion investment and an SUV to rival Tesla's Model X, called the Mach 1.
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Feed: All Latest
NASA Just Proved It Can Navigate Space Using Pulsars. Where to Now?NASA El Niño WarmingFor years it's been the stuff of science fiction. Now NASA's shown that pulsar navigation works.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Odd behavior of star reveals lonely black hole hiding in giant star clusterAstronomers using ESO's MUSE instrument on the Very Large Telescope in Chile have discovered a star in the cluster NGC 3201 that is behaving very strangely. It appears to be orbiting an invisible black hole with about four times the mass of the Sun—the first such inactive stellar-mass black hole found in a globular cluster and the first found by directly detecting its gravitational pull. This impo
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop new class of underwater adhesivesA Korean research team affiliated with UNIST has presented a new type of underwater adhesive that is tougher than the natural biological glues that mussels normally use to adhere to rocks, ships and larger sea creatures. This has attracted much attention as a technology to surpass the limits of conventional chemical-based adhesives that lose adhesion when exposed to moisture or when reused.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers reveal how the MRSA bacterium handles stressAn international team of researchers has revealed a fundamental mechanism responsible for handling stress in staphylococci when they are exposed to antibiotics. It is expected that the research results can eventually be used to develop new antibiotics that circumvent such stress mechanisms.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Redshift space distortions measured via quasars in scientific firstThe Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS), the world's largest galaxy survey, is part of Phase IV of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), a major multi-spectral imaging and spectroscopic redshift survey.
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Ingeniøren
Spørg Scientariet: Hvorfor springer mine sparepærer?Flere læsere spørger til holdbarheden af sparepærer. Dels hvorfor de springer, dels hvad der bliver slidt i dem. Dansk Center for Lys svarer.
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Science : NPR
Majority Of National Park Service Board Resigns, Citing Administration IndifferenceThe chairman of the board, former Alaska Gov. Tony Knowles, said in a letter that the Department of the Interior showed no interest in engaging with board members. (Image credit: Andrew Harnik/AP)
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Ingeniøren
Nordea om API til åbne bankdata: Det nedbryder vores siloerMed API til open banking kan vi undgå forfærdeligt komplekse afhængigheder i it-systemer, fortæller Nordea-chef.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thames paddle-boarders try to turn the tide on plasticFloating on the murky waters of the River Thames in London, activist paddle-boarders are trying to rid the waterway of a plague of plastic waste and draw attention to the problem.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Perovskite solar cells: Perfection not requiredMetal-organic perovskite layers for solar cells are often fabricated using the spin-coating technique on compact substrates. These perovskite layers generally exhibit holes, yet attain astonishingly high levels of efficiency. The reason that these holes do not cause significant short circuits between the front and back contact has now been discovered by a HZB team headed by Dr.-Ing. Marcus Baer in
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study: Pulsating dissolution found in crystalsWhen German researchers examined time-lapse images of dissolving crystals at the nanoscale, they found a surprise: Dissolution happened in pulses, marked by waves that spread just like ripples on a pond.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alzheimer's disease: Neuronal loss very limitedFrequently encountered in the elderly, Alzheimer's is considered a neurodegenerative disease, which means that it is accompanied by a significant, progressive loss of neurons and their nerve endings, or synapses. A joint French and Canadian study published in Scientific Reports now challenges this view.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New light on the mysterious origin of Bornean elephantsIn a study published in Scientific Reports, a research team led by Lounes Chikhi from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciencia (IGC, Portugal) and CNRS, Universite Paul Sabatier (France), and Benoit Goossens, from Cardiff University (Wales), and Sabah Wildlife Department (Malaysia), found that elephants might have arrived on Borneo at a time of the last land bridge between the Sunda Islands in Southeast As
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Dagens Medicin
Fire læger skal drive klinik på LæsøRegion Nordjylland har sikret sig en aftale om bemanding af regionsklinik på Læsø.
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Science : NPR
Home Care Agencies Often Wrongly Deny Medicare Help To The Chronically IllHome health firms sometimes turn away Medicare beneficiaries who have chronic health problems by incorrectly claiming Medicare won't pay for their services, say advocates for patients. (Image credit: Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News)
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Dagens Medicin
Rudkjøbing kolporterer fake newsTør man begynde at håbe på et bedre humør hos lægerne angående 1813?
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Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsministeriet siger ja til almenmedicinsk klinik på sygehusRegion Syddanmark får grønt lys til etablere regionsklinik på Sydvestjysk Sygehus, der skal sikre lægedækning i Esbjerg.
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Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Grønlands gletschere smelter ekstremt hurtigtDanske forskere har netop kortlagt yderligere 350 grønlandske gletschere og dokumenteret deres...
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Ingeniøren
Radarproducent har knækket robotkodenEn fuldautomatisk bearbejdningscelle har givet radarproducenten Weibel appetit på flere robotter. I jagten på yderligere markedsandele er næste skridt at indføre kollaborative robotter i elektronikmontagen, lagerautomater og virtuel monitorering af samtlige CNC-maskiner.
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Dagens Medicin
Borgere i Odden vil forvandle børnehave til lægehusBorgerforening i Odden har samlet 270.000 kr. ind til ejendom, der skal renoveres for bl.a. at huse en praktiserende læge og et kommunalt sygeplejecenter.
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Ingeniøren
Kæmpe mangel på ingeniører i Jylland og på FynFlere store virksomheder, organisationer og kommuner jagter kompetent arbejdskraft. Find drømmejobbet på Fyn eller i Jylland med Jobfinder månedlige liste.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No adverse health impacts from long term vaping -- StudyA new peer-reviewed clinical trial to be published in the February edition of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology shows that regular use of e-cigarettes does not have any negative health impact on smokers.
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Ingeniøren
Faktatjek: Udbredt analyse om argentinsk ubåds implodering er ikke bekræftetMange medier gengiver en historie om, at den forsvundne ubåd San Juan imploderede på 400 meters dybde. Men kilden arbejder slet ikke for det amerikanske forsvar.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Volkswagen clinches record sales in 2017German carmaker Volkswagen said Wednesday it sold a record number of vehicles in 2017, putting it on track to hold on to the title of world's largest carmaker two years after its "dieselgate" emissions scandal.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU car sales top 15-mn barrier in 2017: dataThe number of new cars sold in Europe topped the 15-million mark for the first time in a decade in 2017, the bloc's industry body calculated in new data published Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China to step up cryptocurrency crackdownChina is preparing for a new crackdown on cryptocurrency, planning to stamp out remaining trading in the country, according to state media.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Motion-sensing cameras capture candid wildlife shotsHow does a bighorn sheep say "cheese?"
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nearly 25 percent of chronic ischemic heart disease patients dead or hospitalized in 6 monthsNearly a quarter of patients with chronic ischemic cardiovascular disease are dead or hospitalized within six months, reports a European Society of Cardiology study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Multiplex mass spec assay for small-molecule inhibitors of CD73 with diverse modalitiesA new original research article in SLAS Discovery presents a fast, sensitive, and robust methodology for screening small molecule inhibitors against CD73/Ecto-5'-Nucleotidase, a promising target for developing anti-cancer drugs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Meteor credited for bright light, noise rattling Michigan (Update)Experts say a bright light and what sounded like thunder in the sky above Michigan was a meteor.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hazardous contamination found around lead battery recycling plants in seven African countriesExtensive lead contamination was found in lead battery recycling plants and surrounding communities in seven African countries. The contamination levels in soil ranged up to 14% lead with average concentrations of 2% lead.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New 'Buck' naked barley: Food, feed, brewResearchers at Oregon State University (OSU) are giving an ancient grain a new life: this barley is naked, but not in an indecent way.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
DR Congo revises mining code to make most of battery-driven cobalt boomAs demand for batteries drives a surge in the price of cobalt, the Democratic Republic of Congo is gearing up to overhaul its mining regulations to harvest more profit from the coveted metal.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New defenses sought against GPS spoofing attacksCyberattacks with the potential to expose sensitive information and cripple basic services could start with what would seem to be the most harmless of computer functions.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Groundbreaking experiment will test the limits of quantum theoryScientists from three UK universities are to test one of the fundamental laws of physics as part of a major Europe-wide project awarded more than £3m in funding.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Most new cars must be electric by 2030, ministers toldThree-fifths of new cars must be electric by 2030 to meet climate change targets, ministers are told.
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Ingeniøren
Nemt at dele børneporno på Facebook uden at blive opdagetSmå ændringer i billeder og videoer er alt, der skal til, så Facebook ikke opdager, at du deler dybt ulovligt materiale. Det skyldes, at de genkender videoer på hash-værdier.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
California governor considers one-tunnel water planGov. Jerry Brown's administration is proposing scaling back his troubled plans to redo California's water system, releasing a new plan that would build only one tunnel to ship water from Northern California instead of two, and put Southern and central California water agencies directly in charge of designing and building it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Autonomous cars loom, but the Detroit auto show goes onThe North American International Auto Show in Detroit opened to the press this week with one big question hanging in the air: How will autonomous vehicles change the industry?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Alien attack' in Tokyo as Space Invaders turns 40Block graphic aliens dropped down the window panes of a Tokyo skyscraper before being blasted into oblivion by enthusiastic gamers celebrating 40 years of the arcade sensation "Space Invaders".
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
S. Korea's 'kimchi deficit' hits record highSouth Korea's trade deficit in kimchi, its proud traditional side dish of fermented cabbage, reached an all-time high last year as low-priced Chinese imports flooded the market, statistics showed Wednesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
YouTube toughens rules regarding which videos get adsYouTube on Tuesday announced ramped-up rules regarding when it will run ads with videos as it scrambled to quell concerns by brands about being paired with troublesome content.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic discovery may help better identify children at risk for type 1 diabetesSix novel chromosomal regions identified by scientists leading a large, prospective study of children at risk for type 1 diabetes will enable the discovery of more genes that cause the disease and more targets for treating or even preventing it.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New 'Buck' naked barley: Food, feed, brewResearchers are giving an ancient grain a new life: 'Buck' barley is naked, but not in an indecent way. Naked barley does not require pearling, allowing it to hold onto the bran and whole grain status.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hazardous contamination found around lead battery recycling plants in 7 African countriesWe collected 118 soil samples from seven African countries and analyzed them for lead. Contamination levels ranged up to 14 percent lead. As the lead battery industry continues to expand, it is expected that the number and size of lead battery recycling plants will increase. There is an immediate need to address ongoing exposures, restrict emissions, and to regulate site closure financing procedur
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Baby brains help infants figure it out before they try it outResearchers at Penn State are using new statistical analysis methods to compare how we observe infants develop new skills with the unseen changes in electrical activity in the brain, or electroencephalography (EEG) power. They found that most babies appear to learn new skills in irregular bursts, while their EEG power grows steadily behind the scenes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Timing of spring birdsong provides climate insightsClimate change has scientists worried that birds' annual migration and reproduction will be thrown out of sync with the seasons. Because birds' songs are correlated with their breeding behavior and are easily identifiable to species, monitoring birdsong can be a good way to keep tabs on this possibility, and a new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications takes advantage of this approach
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic drift caught in action in invasive birdsStudies of island bird populations have taught us a lot about evolution, but it's hard to catch birds in the act of naturally colonizing new islands. Instead, a new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances examines what's happened by looking at the genetics of a species that arrived in Hawaii in the 20th century through decidedly unnatural means -- us.
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NYT > Science
Citing ‘Inexcusable’ Treatment, Advisers Quit National Parks PanelThe majority of members of the National Parks System Advisory Board have jointly resigned in protest of Trump administration policies.
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The Atlantic
The Resurgent Threat of White-Supremacist ViolenceAlthough the leaders of the white-supremacist alt-right insist their movement is nonviolent, racist rhetoric and hateful ideas can inspire violence if taken to their logical conclusion. A lone individual, encountering white-supremacist propaganda, can become convinced that it is a cause worth fighting for. Timothy McVeigh read The Turner Diaries , a story of a race war written by a notorious whit
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Timing of spring birdsong provides climate insightsClimate change has scientists worried that birds' annual migration and reproduction will be thrown out of sync with the seasons. Because birds' songs are correlated with their breeding behavior and are easily identifiable to species, monitoring birdsong can be a good way to keep tabs on this possibility, and a new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications takes advantage of this approach
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genetic drift caught in action in invasive birdsStudies of island bird populations have taught us a lot about evolution, but it's hard to catch birds in the act of naturally colonizing new islands. Instead, a new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances examines what's happened by looking at the genetics of a species that arrived in Hawaii in the twentieth century through decidedly unnatural means—us.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers find post-fire logging harms spotted owlsWildlife ecologists studying the rare spotted owl in the forests of California have discovered that large, intense wildfires are not responsible for abandonment of breeding territories. Instead, the researchers found that post-fire logging operations, which are common on both private and National Forest lands, most likely caused declines in territory occupancy of this imperiled wildlife species. I
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Ingeniøren
Sådan scorer du dit drømmejob på under fem minutterEn skarp præsentation er et vigtigt værktøj til jobsamtalen, når du skal sælge dig selv. Karrierekonsulent giver tips til, hvad du bør og bestemt ikke bør gøre, når du på kort tid skal levere en salgstale.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biodegradable sensor could help doctors monitor serious health conditionsEngineers have created a biodegradable pressure sensor that could help doctors monitor chronic lung disease, swelling of the brain, and other medical conditions before dissolving harmlessly in a patient's body.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tracking the impact of early abuse and neglectMaltreatment experienced before age 5 can have negative effects that continue to be seen nearly three decades later, according to a new study.
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Ingeniøren
Landbrugsjord kan lagre lige så meget kulstof, som alle verdens biler, tog og busser udlederVerdens landmænd kan mindske global opvarmning, hvis de ændrer dyrkningsmetoder, så der bliver lagret mere kulstof i jorden, hævder nyt studie. Dansk forsker anerkender metoden, men er skeptisk over for potentialet.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Weather anomalies accelerate the melting of sea iceResearchers reveal why Arctic sea ice began to melt in the middle of winter two years ago -- and that the increased melting of ice in summer is linked to recurring periods of fair weather.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
No-fishing zones help endangered penguinsSmall no-fishing zones around colonies of African penguins can help this struggling species, new research shows.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ancient DNA results end 4,000-year-old Egyptian mummy mysteryUsing 'next generation' DNA sequencing scientists have found that the famous 'Two Brothers' mummies of the Manchester Museum have different fathers so are, in fact, half-brothers. The Two Brothers are the Museum's oldest mummies and amongst the best-known human remains in its Egyptology collection. They are the mummies of two elite men -- Khnum-nakht and Nakht-ankh -- dating to around 1800 BC.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bright light therapy improves sleep in people treated for cancerResults of a randomized controlled trial suggest that systematic bright light exposure can improve sleep for fatigued people who have been treated for cancer.
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Big Think
What Is the Physiological Basis of the Healing Touch?Around 100 million adults in the United States are affected by chronic pain. What can we do about it? Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ancient DNA results end 4,000-year-old Egyptian mummy mysteryUsing 'next generation' DNA sequencing scientists have found that the famous 'Two Brothers' mummies of the Manchester Museum have different fathers so are, in fact, half-brothers. The Two Brothers are the Museum's oldest mummies and amongst the best-known human remains in its Egyptology collection. They are the mummies of two elite men -- Khnum-nakht and Nakht-ankh -- dating to around 1800 BC.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Dolphin diet study gives conservation cluesWild dolphins burn up to 33,000 calories a day, say researchers - equivalent to about 60 salmon portions.
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Live Science
910 Carats! African Diamond Is Fifth Largest EverThe find is the fifth-largest gem-quality diamond ever discovered.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient DNA results end 4,000-year-old Egyptian mummy mysteryUsing 'next generation' DNA sequencing scientists have found that the famous 'Two Brothers' mummies of the Manchester Museum have different fathers so are, in fact, half-brothers.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Where Did Animals With Tail Weapons Go? Here’s a Back StoryNew California State USScientists have identified traits that may have been related to dinosaurs like stegosaurus and ankylosaurus and other animals developing fearsome rear-end weapons.
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Popular Science
Scientists just uncovered the cause of a massive epidemic using 500-year-old teethScience Why is it so hard to pinpoint ancient diseases? Nearly 500 years ago, in what we know call Mexico, a disease started rippling through the population.
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Futurity.org
To cut smoking’s harm, switch to vaping?Alternative nicotine products like e-cigarettes are emerging as a promising option for people who are trying to quit smoking, a new article that focuses on harm minimization and smoking cessation suggests. “…a harm minimization approach recognizes that demanding absolute perfection is often counterproductive…” Harm minimization recognizes that while quitting smoking altogether is ideal, reducing
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quick quick slow is no-go in crab courtship danceFemale fiddler crabs are sensitive to changes in the speed of a male's courtship display, significantly preferring displays that accelerate to those that are performed at a constant speed or slow down.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Heart-on-a-chip' process aims to speed up drug testingTesting new clinical drugs' effect on heart tissue could become quicker and more straightforward, thanks to new research from Harvard University.The study, published today in the journal Biofabrication, sets out a new, faster method for manufacturing a 'heart-on-a-chip,' which can be used to test the reaction of heart tissue to external stimuli.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
No-fishing zones help endangered penguinsSmall no-fishing zones around colonies of African penguins can help this struggling species, new research shows.
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The Atlantic
Trump Is Transparent About His Health—So Why Not His Finances?During the first year of the Trump administration, the James Brady Briefing Room turned into an arena for excitement unseen since at least the days of Ron Ziegler . Yet Tuesday was still an especially surprising day—in large part because a White House official stepped to the lectern and proceeded to calmly, extensively, and openly answer questions at length from reporters. That official was not P
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New Scientist - News
All other primates live their lives according to a simple ruleHundreds of species of primate all form groups of the same five sizes, suggesting that the ecosystems in which they live strongly shape their lifestyles
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quick quick slow is no-go in crab courtship danceFemale fiddler crabs are sensitive to changes in the speed of a male's courtship display, significantly preferring displays that accelerate to those that are performed at a constant speed or slow down.
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Frances Ashcroft (Oxford) 2: ATP-sensitive potassium channels & neonatal diabetesFrances Ashcroft and her colleagues have identified mutations in a potassium channel as the cause of neonatal diabetes. Their discovery vastly improved treatment for patients. https://www.ibiology.org/human-disease/neonatal-diabetes/ Talk Overview: Diabetes is a devastating disease which takes an enormous toll on both human life and healthcare spending worldwide. Dr. Frances Ashcroft begins her t
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Frances Ashcroft (Oxford) 1: Diabetes: a global pandemicFrances Ashcroft and her colleagues have identified mutations in a potassium channel as the cause of neonatal diabetes. Their discovery vastly improved treatment for patients. https://www.ibiology.org/human-disease/neonatal-diabetes/ Talk Overview: Diabetes is a devastating disease which takes an enormous toll on both human life and healthcare spending worldwide. Dr. Frances Ashcroft begins her t
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Futurity.org
Jet stream changes linked to Europe’s extreme weatherIncreased fluctuations in the path of the North Atlantic jet stream since the 1960s coincide with more extreme weather events in Europe such as heat waves, droughts, wildfires, and flooding, researchers report. “The heat waves and drought that are related to such jet stream extremes happen on top of already increasing temperatures and global warming…” The new research is the first reconstruction
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Live Science
Rats May Not Be to Blame for Spreading the 'Black Death'Rats get a bad rap for spreading the plague, or Black Death, that killed millions of people in medieval Europe. But they may not be to blame.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
No-fishing zones help endangered penguinsSmall no-fishing zones around colonies of African penguins can help this struggling species, new research shows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Heart-on-a-chip' process aims to speed up drug testingTesting new clinical drugs' effect on heart tissue could become quicker and more straightforward, thanks to new research from Harvard University.
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Futurity.org
Fresh, frozen embryos offer very similar birth ratesResearchers have found that there is an insignificant difference in live birth rates between in vitro fertilization methods using frozen or fresh embryos. Many women struggling to have a baby turn to in vitro fertilization to improve their chances, but then face further uncertainty and anxiety when confronted with the decision of whether to use frozen or fresh embryos. Researchers monitored 2,157
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Hawaii's False Alarm, Trump's Bill of Health, Astrology's ComebackWhat We’re Following ‘THIS IS NOT A DRILL’: A mistakenly sent emergency warning that a ballistic missile was headed for Hawaii caused terror and anger among the state’s residents on Saturday morning. Alia Wong describes the scene. Officials said the alert went out because “somebody clicked the wrong thing on a computer.” The situation could have been worse —a cyberattack or a sensor error. Still,
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The Atlantic
Trump Is Surprisingly HealthyOn Tuesday, the White House physician Ronny L. Jackson announced the results of President Donald Trump’s annual physical at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. After a four-hour exam on Friday, Jackson found that “all clinical data indicates that the president is currently very healthy and that he will remain so for the duration of his presidency.” “He would benefit from a diet that is
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Futurity.org
This ‘highway’ caused an oddly melty Arctic winterNew research identifies the cause of unusual warmth in the Arctic in the winter of 2015-16. During that December, temperatures rose above zero degrees Celsius for several days in parts of the Arctic. Temperatures of up to eight degrees were registered north of Svalbard. Temperatures that high have not been recorded in the winter half of the year since the beginning of systematic measurements at t
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The Atlantic
The President Can Draw a ClockAmid growing speculation about President Trump’s unfitness to hold the nuclear codes he has threatened to use , anyone who was suspicious that he could not identify a camel or draw the face of a clock can rest more easily tonight. This afternoon the president’s physician, Navy Rear Admiral Ronny L. Jackson, said that the president “did exceedingly well” on a test called the Montreal Cognitive Ass
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Live Science
6-Year-Old Hallucinates After Taking Tamiflu: Why You Shouldn't PanicTamiflu can sometimes cause psychosis. You should probably still take it if your doctor prescribes it.
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The Scientist RSS
Human Fleas and Lice Spread Black DeathA new study suggests that the plague, which killed millions of people, was not transmitted by rats.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Todd Hoffman Is Out Of Luck And Out Of Ground | Gold Rush#GoldRush | Friday 9p Todd can't pay his crew with the little gold they've been finding in Sacramento and Fairplay shut down. Can Freddy come up with a plan to save the season? Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twi
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NeuWrite West
A Series of Incremental StepsA Day in the Life of a Neuroscience Graduate Student When I first got to graduate school, I spent most of each day in one building on campus. Each morning I left my apartment, got on my bike, and followed the same route to the building. At the end of the day it was back onto my bike and down the route home. If a seminar was in an unfamiliar building, I left plenty of time to find my way there, or
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New Scientist - News
Bowel cancer test may be a much better way to screen for polypsA new blood test seems to be more than twice as good at detecting bowel cancer than the method currently used to screen for polyps and early bowel cancer
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New Scientist - News
Johann Hari doesn’t know depression’s real causes – no one doesTaking a view on unsettled science is always likely to cause controversy, but the fiery debate Johann Hari's new book has sparked is worth having, says Samantha Murphy
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Healthy, Wealthy, and FriesToday in 5 Lines During a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing, lawmakers questioned Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen about a White House meeting where President Trump allegedly made vulgar comments about certain countries. South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham said the debate over Trump’s comments has become “a s-show,” and later told reporters that White House staffers g
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Science : NPR
Turning Soybeans Into Diesel Fuel Is Costing Us BillionsThe law that requires America to turn some of its soybeans into diesel fuel for trucks has created a new industry. But it's costing American consumers about $5 billion each year. (Image credit: Eitan Abramovich/AFP/Getty Images)
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New on MIT Technology Review
Pairing AI with Humans Has Made Glassdoor a Success Story in the War on Trolls
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Live Science
Archaeologists Begin Search for Tomb of King Tut's WifeNobody knows when King Tut's wife died, or even how she died, but they have an idea about where she was buried.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Magnetically applied MicroRNAs could one day help relieve constipationMicro metal beads and magnets help deliver a biologic where it's needed to improve constipation or rectoanal incontinence in animal models of the disorders.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stronger, able older adults have better outcomes when hospitalized with critical illnessesUntil now, the role of strength before hospitalization has not been well-studied. To fill this knowledge gap, a research team created a study. The study was to learn how older adults' strength before they became ill affected how long they stayed in the hospital after being admitted to an ICU. They also learned whether or not the older adults died while in the hospital or within a year after discha
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biodegradable sensor could help doctors monitor serious health conditionsUniversity of Connecticut engineers have created a biodegradable pressure sensor that could help doctors monitor chronic lung disease, swelling of the brain, and other medical conditions before dissolving harmlessly in a patient's body.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tracking the impact of early abuse and neglectMaltreatment experienced before age 5 can have negative effects that continue to be seen nearly three decades later, according to a new study led by Lee Raby, an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Utah.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bright light therapy improves sleep in people treated for cancerResults of a randomized controlled trial suggest that systematic bright light exposure can improve sleep for fatigued people who have been treated for cancer.
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Science | The Guardian
Plantwatch: from snowdrops to rare orchids – plant theft is a crimeSome of our favourite wildflowers are threatened by thieves digging up the bulbs, and thieves have made at least one orchid extinct in Britain Snowdrops are appearing, but in recent years they have become so popular it’s led to snowdrop bulbs being stolen from the wild and from gardens to sell on the black market. This is part of a much wider trend. From the theft of snowdrops and bluebells to ra
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