EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Factor that doubles the risk of death from breast cancer identifiedResearchers at Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have discovered that the risk of death from breast cancer is twice as high for patients with high heterogeneity of the oestrogen receptor within the same tumour as compared to patients with low heterogeneity. The study, published in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute, shows that the higher risk of death is independent of other known tumour m
7h
Live Science
Pineapple: Health Benefits, Risks & Nutrition FactsSpiny on the outside, sweet on the inside, pineapples are one fantastic fruit.
1h
Ingeniøren
Alexa overvåger børnene: Her er kommunernes digitale visionKommunernes Landsforening har sendt teknologiske visioner på gaden, med elementer fra den eksponentielle tænkning.
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Fat is sooo good and science can't do a dang thing about itFat Month Fat, I wish I knew how to quit you. One of my most vivid childhood memories revolves around willfully subjecting myself to stomach cramps and explosive diarrhea.
3min
Live Science
Stand Back, Way Back: Flu Virus Can Be Spread Just by BreathingSimply standing back when someone coughs or sneezes won't necessarily protect you from the flu — the virus can spread just by breathing.
14min
Popular Science
The Labo STEM toy is Nintendo's latest bit of creative weirdnessTechnology The video game company has a history of making consoles about more than just a controller. Nintendo's new STEM toy looks continues its tradition of trying to make console gaming more creative.
17min
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Threat Level MidnightToday in 5 Lines Hours before the government is set to shut down, senators scrambled to reach a deal to keep the government funded. President Trump met with Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, saying on Twitter that he had an “excellent preliminary meeting in Oval with” the Democratic senator. The Senate is expected to vote on a short-term spending bill tonight. Trump addressed activists gath
17min
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We Put The Entire Internet On The Blockchain—and You Can TooA reporter's suggestion prompts a startup executive to create a browser extension that adds the words "on the blockchain" to every sentence.
25min
The Atlantic
A Government Shutdown Is NearCongress is on the verge of shutting down the federal government on the anniversary of President Trump’s inauguration. Hours before a midnight deadline, negotiations between the president and Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer had failed to yield a breakthrough in an impasse over immigration. The Senate was sitting on a House-passed bill to keep the government open for nearly another month an
39min
The Atlantic
NASA's Lovely Tribute to the Teacher Who Perished on ChallengerIn the summer of 1985, Christa McAuliffe was preparing to fly aboard the space shuttle Challenger to become the first private citizen in space. McAuliffe had been selected from more than 11,400 applicants for the government’s Teacher in Space program. While in orbit, she planned to film science lessons that would be distributed to classrooms around the country after she returned. McAuliffe was ne
39min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook 'fix' needed, early investor Roger McNamee saysFacebook Mark ZuckerbergRoger McNamee, founding partner of Elevation Partners and an early investor in Facebook, is making lots of noise about how to "fix" Facebook.
46min
Live Science
How Did These Kids Make a Towering Bubble Bath Igloo?A GIF shows kids playing inside a huge tower of bubbles.
59min
The Atlantic
Babe Turns a Movement Into a RacketFifteen years ago, Hollywood’s glittering superstars—among them Meryl Streep— were on their feet cheering for Roman Polanski, the convicted child rapist and fugitive from justice, when he won the 2003 Academy Award for Best Director. But famous sex criminals of the motion picture and television arts have lately fallen out of fashion, as the industry attempts not just to police itself but—where wo
1h
Big Think
3Q: D. Fox Harrell on His Video Game for the #Metoo EraThree questions for the designer of a video game in line with the times. Read More
1h
BBC News - Science & Environment
The man risking his life to save pink dolphinsFernando Trujillo works in dangerous areas of the Amazon to save the rare species.
1h
The Atlantic
Is Money-Laundering the Real Trump Kompromat?So far, the release of transcripts of Fusion GPS founder Glenn Simpson’s interviews with the House Intelligence and Senate Judiciary committees have provided rich detail to obsessives but few major headlines for the average reader. The interviews give some more clarity on how Fusion came to investigate Donald Trump, who was paying the company, and how it gathered information, but they offer much
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using Hawkeye from the Avengers to communicate on the eyeSuperheroes can be used to communicate learning objectives to students in an interesting, fun, and accessible manner.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Neutron-star merger yields new puzzle for astrophysicistsThe afterglow from the distant neutron-star merger detected last August has continued to brighten - much to the surprise of astrophysicists studying the aftermath of the massive collision that took place about 138 million light years away and sent gravitational waves rippling through the universe. New observations indicate that the gamma ray burst unleashed by the collision is more complex than sc
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Atomic-level changes in ALS-linked proteinA new study details the minute changes -- down to the level of individual atoms -- that cause a particular protein to form cell-damaging clumps associated with ALS and other diseases.
1h
New Scientist - News
Medieval gamblers turned their back on fate and made dice fairDice from archaeological digs in the Netherlands and the UK became fairer 600 years ago – 250 years before we began to really understand probability
1h
New Scientist - News
No, the worst-case climate change futures haven’t been ruled outA single study has been hailed for narrowing the range of possible climate change scenarios, but figuring out how the world will warm is more complicated than headlines suggest
1h
New Scientist - News
Deadly solar flares may have helped seed life on Mars and beyondHigh-energy particles that can strip away planetary atmospheres and cause biological damage might also forge the complex organic molecules that give rise to life
1h
New Scientist - News
Your boss not saying ‘thank you’ could be bad for your healthIf you love your job and work hard but feel you get little recognition or reward, you could be on the road to chronic stress, burnout and other health issues
1h
New Scientist - News
Good news: animals won’t shrink as the climate gets warmerA 19th-century ‘rule’ connecting animal body size and environmental temperature has been challenged, allaying fears that animals may decrease in size as the climate gets warmer
1h
New Scientist - News
New CRISPR method could take gene editing to the next levelWhile CRISPR is great at turning off and disabling genes, it isn’t very good at fixing faulty ones. But a powerful new method could change that
1h
Live Science
His and Her Hookworm: Same Rash Strikes Couple on the RearA husband and wife returned home from a Caribbean cruise with identical souvenirs from their vacation: parasitic infections that caused itchy, red rashes on the couple's backsides.
1h
Live Science
Tableware from the Toilet: Colonial Pottery from Philly Privy on DisplayIt may look pretty, but you don't want to know where it's been.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Programmable droplets' could enable high-volume biology experimentsMIT researchers have developed hardware that uses electric fields to move droplets of chemical or biological solutions around a surface, mixing them in ways that could be used to test thousands of reactions in parallel.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First look at pupil size in sleeping mice yields surprisesWhen people are awake, their pupils regularly change in size. Those changes are meaningful, reflecting shifting attention or vigilance, for example. Now, researchers have found in studies of mice that pupil size also fluctuates during sleep. They also show that pupil size is a reliable indicator of sleep states.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Flu vaccine could get a much-needed boostMore than 700,000 Americans were hospitalized due to illnesses associated with the seasonal flu during the 2014-15 flu season, according to federal estimates. A radical new approach to vaccine development may help lower that figure for future flu seasons.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Recent advances in understanding coral resilience are essential to safeguard coral reefsThe most urgent course of action to safeguard coral reefs is to reduce global greenhouse gas emissions, but concurrently there is also a need to consider novel management techniques and previously over-looked reef areas for protective actions under predicted climate change impacts. The conclusions were reached following a comprehensive review of the literature on the mechanisms of potential coral
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Network model of the musculoskeletal system predicts compensatory injuriesA new study is the first to convert the entire human body's network of bones and muscles into a comprehensive mathematical model.
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Two new breast cancer genes emerge from lynch syndrome gene studyResearchers have identified two new breast cancer genes that also cause Lynch syndrome.
1h
Live Science
The History of Russia's 'Plague Fort,' Where Scientists Battled Death (and Lost)A military outpost jutting from the Gulf of Finland has an eerie history.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Infant mortality rates in Texas vary dramatically from one zip code to the nextInfant mortality rates in Texas vary dramatically even across neighboring zip codes, according to a new analysis and mapping tool from researchers at The University of Texas System and UT Health Northeast. The analysis and searchable map, which are the first of their kind in Texas, use data from Texas Vital Statistics Linked Birth and Death Records from 2011-2014.
1h
The Atlantic
Who Is Selling Hacking Subscriptions to Governments?BEIRUT—Just north of a perennially jammed arterial, sandwiched between the French embassy complex and a university administration building, a beige monolith with a vertical slash of reflective windows is set back from the road, guarded by a row of high barriers and men in fatigues with long guns. The building belongs to Lebanon’s General Directorate of General Security, one of the country’s sever
2h
Popular Science
In photos: updating New York's vast and fragile telecom backboneTechnology The cables that keep information flowing through the Big Apple are undergoing a transformation, from aging copper to strong and fast fiber. The cables that keep information flowing through the Big Apple are undergoing a transformation, from aging copper to strong and fast fiber.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New method to stop cells dividing could help fight cancerResearchers have used a new strategy to shut down specific enzymes to stop cells from dividing. The method can be used as a strategy to fight cancer.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fox Creek earthquakes linked to completion volume and location of hydraulic fracturingThe volume of hydraulic fracturing fluid and the location of well pads control the frequency and occurrence of measurable earthquakes, new research has found.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Can mice really mirror humans when it comes to cancer?A new study is helping to answer a pressing question among scientists of just how close mice are to people when it comes to researching cancer. The findings reveal how mice can actually mimic human breast cancer tissue and its genes, even more so than previously thought, as well as other cancers including lung, oral and esophagus.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists find microbes on the skin of mice promote tissue healing, immunityBeneficial bacteria on the skin of lab mice work with the animals' immune systems to defend against disease-causing microbes and accelerate wound healing, according to new research. Researchers say untangling similar mechanisms in humans may improve approaches to managing skin wounds and treating other damaged tissues.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Zika virus damages placenta, which may explain malformed babiesNew researcher shows how Zika virus infection in five pregnant rhesus monkeys caused placental tissues to become thickened and inflamed, resulting in less oxygen being transported across the placenta and to the baby.
2h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
What comes after tragedy? Forgiveness | Azim Khamisa and Ples FelixOn one awful night in 1995, Ples Felix's 14-year-old grandson murdered Azim Khamisa's son in a gang initiation fueled by drugs, alcohol and a false sense of belonging. The deadly encounter sent Khamisa and Felix down paths of deep meditation, to forgive and to be forgiven -- and in an act of bravery and reconciliation, the two men met and forged a lasting bond. Together, they've used their story a
2h
Latest Headlines | Science News
New twist on a flu vaccine revs up the body’s army of virus killersA new approach to flu vaccine development makes influenza virus extra sensitive to a powerful antiviral system.
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
Researchers Create 3-D Printable Tools for Drug Production
2h
New on MIT Technology Review
Forget Viruses or Spyware—Your Biggest Cyberthreat Is Greedy Cryptocurrency MinersSoftware that hijacks your computer to mine has become the most popular malware on the planet.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cells lacking nuclei struggle to move in 3-D environmentsA study led by UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers and published in the Journal of Cell Biology examined the role of the physical structure of the nucleus in cell movement through different surfaces.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dallas-based Skratch app helps busy teens find jobs in their neighborhoodsMiranda Alfaro said she's had a difficult time finding a part-time job that fits her busy academic schedule.
2h
Science : NPR
U.S. Set To Decide In Trade Dispute Threatening Booming Solar IndustryPresident Trump is facing a Jan. 26 deadline to decide whether to impose tariffs on solar imports. While tariffs could help level the playing field for U.S. manfacturers, they could also raise prices. (Image credit: Mark Lennihan/AP)
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breakthrough study shows how plants sense the worldPlants lack eyes and ears, but they can still see, hear, smell and respond to environmental cues and dangers—especially to virulent pathogens. They do this with the aid of hundreds of membrane proteins that can sense microbes or other stresses.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Breakthrough study shows how plants sense the worldPlants lack eyes and ears, but they can still see, hear, smell and respond to environmental cues and dangers. They do this with the aid of hundreds of membrane proteins that sense microbes or other stresses. Researchers now have created the first network map for 200 of these proteins. The map shows how a few key proteins act as master nodes critical for network integrity, and the map also reveals
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SEC letter shows bitcoin funds won't happen soon, if everIt may be a while, if ever, before investors can buy an exchange-traded fund made up of bitcoin and other digital currencies.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Radioactivity from oil and gas wastewater persists in Pennsylvania stream sedimentsMore than seven years after Pennsylvania officials requested that the disposal of radium-laden fracking wastewater into surface waters be restricted, a new Duke University study finds that high levels of radioactivity persist in stream sediments at three disposal sites.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Superconducting X-ray laser takes shape in Silicon ValleyAn area known for high-tech gadgets and innovation will soon be home to an advanced superconducting X-ray laser that stretches 3 miles in length, built by a collaboration of national laboratories. On January 19, the first section of the machine's new accelerator arrived by truck at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in Menlo Park after a cross-country journey that began in Batavia, Illinois, at
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How cancer metastasis happens: Researchers reveal a key mechanismCancer metastasis, the migration of cells from a primary tumor to form distant tumors in the body, can be triggered by a chronic leakage of DNA within tumor cells, according to new research.
3h
Live Science
This Spiny Plant Is Sending People to the Emergency RoomThe sharp, spiny leaves of the yucca - a trendy plant found in gardens the world over - has caused serious ear injuries that have sent more than two dozen people to the emergency room, a new report from Australia finds.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team takes a deep look at memristorsIn the race to build a computer that mimics the massive computational power of the human brain, researchers are increasingly turning to memristors, which can vary their electrical resistance based on the memory of past activity. Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have now unveiled the long-mysterious inner workings of these semiconductor elements, which can act
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Length of opioid prescription spell highest risk for misuse after surgeryWith opioid overdoses now a leading cause of nonintentional death in the United States, data show most of these deaths can be traced back to an initial prescription opioid. A new study led by investigators at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and Harvard Medical School (HMS) sheds light on the possible link between physicians' opioid prescription patterns and subsequent abuse.
3h
Popular Science
We're getting better at screening for cancer, and that could be a problemHealth Opinions vary among medical professionals. Finding out you have cancer is a bell you can’t unring. As doctors increasingly have the tools to find cancers before they actually pose a problem, we’re going to have…
3h
Live Science
Don't Poo-Poo This: Why Dogs Feast on FecesFor poop-eating dogs, not just any old poo will do.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Root discovery may lead to crops that need less fertilizerBean plants that suppress secondary root growth in favor of boosting primary root growth forage greater soil volume to acquire phosphorus, according to researchers, who say their recent findings have implications for plant breeders and improving crop productivity in nutrient-poor soils.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Protein designed entirely from scratch functions in cells as a genuine enzymeArtificial biology is working toward creating a genuinely new organism. Researchers are designing and building proteins that can fold and mimic the chemical processes that sustain life. Now they have confirmed that at least one of their new proteins can catalyze biological reactions in E. coli, meaning that a protein designed entirely from scratch functions in cells as a genuine enzyme.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Visa joins other major credit cards in getting rid of signature requirementThe days of signing the receipt after a credit card purchase are numbered.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Radioactivity from oil and gas wastewater persists in Pennsylvania stream sedimentsMore than seven years after Pennsylvania officials requested that the disposal of radium-laden fracking wastewater into surface waters be restricted, a new Duke study finds that high levels of radioactivity persist in stream sediments at three disposal sites. Radioactivity at these sites is 650 times higher than at unaffected sites upstream. The contamination comes from conventional, or non-fracke
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Explosive evolution' of techniques to restore blood flow to the brainRecent decades have seen an 'explosive evolution' of techniques to restore blood flow to areas of the brain endangered by stroke or clogged arteries, according to a report by Loyola Medicine neurologists and neurosurgeons.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Thanks for the memory: NIST takes a deep look at memristorsScientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have now unveiled the long-mysterious inner workings of these semiconductor elements, which can act like the short-term memory of nerve cells.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Virtual reality goes magneticThe success of Pokémon GO made many people familiar with the concept of 'augmented reality': computer-generated perception blends into the real and virtual worlds. So far, these apps largely used optical methods for motion detection. Physicists from HZDR, IFW Dresden and the University Linz have now developed an ultrathin electronic magnetic sensor that can be worn on skin. Just by interacting wit
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Charge order and electron localization in a molecule-based solidCharge ordering in cationic mixed-valence compounds is of crucial importance for materials science. The prototypic example for a transition from a charge-disordered to a charge-ordered state has been magnetite, Fe3O4, where Evert Verwey observed a sudden jump in resistivity near -150°C. In the journal Science Advances now a research team of scientists from Germany and Slovenia reports a Verwey-typ
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bio-renewable process could help 'green' plasticPlastics are often derived from petroleum, contributing to reliance on fossil fuels and driving harmful greenhouse gas emissions. To change that, Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center (GLBRC) scientists are trying to take the pliable nature of plastic in another direction, developing new and renewable ways of creating plastics from biomass.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel genomic tools provide new insight into human immune systemLa Jolla Institute researchers provide new insights into how so-called CD4 cytotoxic T cells arise in humans and thus could facilitate improved vaccine design to protect against chronic viral infections such as cytomegalovirus, HIV, and hepatitis C.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mice immunized with synthetic horsepox protected against vaccinia virusImmunization with a synthetic horsepox virus offers mice similar protection to immunization with vaccinia virus against a lethal dose of vaccinia, according to a study published Jan. 19, 2018, in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Ryan Noyce from the University of Alberta, Canada, and colleagues.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Creation of synthetic horsepox virus could lead to more effective smallpox vaccineUAlberta researchers created a new synthetic virus that could lead to the development of a more effective vaccine against smallpox. The discovery demonstrates how techniques based on the use of synthetic DNA can be used to advance public health measures.
3h
The Scientist RSS
EU Advisor Recommends Regulatory Exemption for Gene EditingCrops produced using mutagenic technologies such as CRISPR should generally be exempt from regulatory laws governing GMOs, according to the published opinion.
4h
The Atlantic
Photos of the Week: Transport Mishaps, Epiphany Blessings, Sheep RidingThe pope’s visit to South America, big surf in Portugal, ski jumping in Japan, bull wrestling in India, a false alarm in Hawaii, animal blessings in Spain, a massive oil spill in the East China Sea, and much more.
4h
Live Science
Can Hobbits Swim? 'Mordor Under the Sea' Found Off AustraliaOne does not simply swim into Mordor.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new, dynamic view of chromatin movementsIn cells, proteins tightly package the long thread of DNA into pearl necklace-like complexes known as chromatin. Scientists now show for the first time how chromatin moves, answering longstanding questions about how its structure helps regulate gene expression.
4h
New on MIT Technology Review
Every Study We Could Find on What Automation Will Do to Jobs, in One ChartThere are about as many opinions as there are experts.
4h
Live Science
Surprise! California Man Finds Huge Tapeworm in His GutA California man pulled a shockingly large tapeworm from his body, which he may have contracted from eating sushi, according to his doctors.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bio-renewable process could help 'green' plasticWhen John Wesley Hyatt patented the first industrial plastic in 1869, his intention was to create an alternative to the elephant tusk ivory used to make piano keys. But this early plastic also sparked a revolution in the way people thought about manufacturing: What if we weren't limited to the materials nature had to offer?
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Do moon phases produce big earthquakes? Study debunks that ideaHuge earthquakes are not significantly influenced by the moon, a new study says.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Charge order and electron localization in a molecule-based solidCharge ordering in mixed-valence compounds, which usually contain positively charged cations in more than one formal charge state, is of crucial importance for materials science. Many functional properties of materials like magnetism, magnetoresistance, ionic conductivity and superconductivity are found in mixed valence compounds.
4h
The Atlantic
What Foreigners Don't Get About Emmanuel MacronForeigners are fascinated by French President Emmanuel Macron. And why shouldn’t they be? He’s the youngest-ever president of the French Republic, elected with no party and no previous electoral experience, a virtual nobody just two years before he leaped to the forefront of the French political scene. Of course people are curious. But there’s another reason my non-French friends bombard me with
4h
The Atlantic
The American Health-Care System Increases Income InequalityFor most people, a single doctor’s visit can be a financial obstacle course. Many patients throughout the year pay hundreds or thousands of dollars in premiums, most often through workplace contributions. Then, at the doctor’s office, they are faced with a deductible, and they may need to pay coinsurance or make a copayment. If they have prescriptions, they’ll likely fork over cash for those, too
4h
The Atlantic
‘Least Racist Person’ Is Scared of Great WhitesThe President of the United States of America once lambasted the reality TV show Shark Tank . It would seem that he’s not too keen on actual shark tanks, either. Based on an interview with the adult actress Stephanie Clifford, who performs under the name Stormy Daniels, it appears that Donald Trump is afraid of sharks. That the self-avowed least racist person is deathly scared of great whites. “Y
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
California congressman wants to ask Intel, AMD and ARM about Meltdown and SpectreA California congressman wants to meet with the Top 3 microchip makers to better understand the implications of two security flaws that affect almost all computing devices in the world.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cystic fibrosis bacterial burden begins during first years of lifeCystic fibrosis shortens life by making the lungs prone to repeated bacterial infections and inflammation. UNC School of Medicine researchers have now shown for the first time that the lungs' bacterial population changes in the first few years of life as respiratory infections and inflammation set in. This research offers a way to predict the onset of lung disease in children with CF and suggests
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Workers at Apple supplier complain of unsafe conditionsFor the second time in three months, Apple is facing questions about working conditions at its Chinese suppliers.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers create first stem cells using CRISPR genome activationIn a scientific first, researchers have turned skin cells from mice into stem cells by activating a specific gene in the cells using CRISPR technology. The innovative approach offers a potentially simpler technique to produce the valuable cell type and provides important insights into the cellular reprogramming process.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New instrument lets doctors view the entire eye with unprecedented level of detailResearchers have developed the first instrument that can provide a detailed image of the entire eye that can produce higher quality images than currently available.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Packing a genome, step-by-stepFor the first time, scientists can see in minute-time resolution how cells package chromosomes into highly condensed structures prior to cell division.
4h
Big Think
Frozen in a Swamp, Fearsome Ancient Warrior’s Hidden Tomb Is RevealedArcheologists find the largest frozen Scythian burial site ever found in Siberia. Read More
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microsoft, Alibaba AI programs beat humans in a Stanford reading testFirst, they beat us at chess. Then it was Go. Now it's basic reading comprehension.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Caffeine’s sport performance advantage for infrequent tea and coffee drinkersSports scientists have found that the performance enhancing benefits of caffeine are more apparent in athletes who do not drink caffeine-rich drinks such as tea, coffee, and energy drinks on a daily basis.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How did a deadly tropical fungus get to the temperate environs of the Pacific Northwest?In what is being described as 'The Teddy Roosevelt effect,' a deadly fungus in the Pacific Northwest may have arrived from Brazil via the Panama Canal, according to a new study. Cryptococcus gattii -- which until a 1999 outbreak in British Columbia's Vancouver Island was considered primarily a tropical fungus -- can cause deadly lung and brain infections in both people and animals.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fragile X finding shows normal neurons that interact poorlyNeurons in mice afflicted with the genetic defect that causes Fragile X syndrome (FXS) appear similar to those in healthy mice, but these neurons fail to interact normally, resulting in the long-known cognitive impairments, shows a new study.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Certain flu virus mutations may compensate for fitness costs of other mutationsSeasonal flu viruses continually undergo mutations that help them evade the human immune system, but some of these mutations can reduce a virus's potency. According to new research, certain mutations in the genome of influenza A may help counteract the weakening effects of other mutations.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mexico shaken by 6.3 magnitude earthquakeTourist hotspots in Mexico's Baja California Peninsula were shaken Friday by a 6.3 magnitude earthquake—but no injuries or damage were reported, authorities said.
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fanconi anemia: Insight from a green plantFanconi anemia is a human genetic disorder with severe effects, including an increased risk of cancer and infertility. Research in plants helps us understand the disease in humans, showing how a key protein functions in the exchange of genetic material.
5h
Latest Headlines | Science News
Cilia in the brain may be busier than previously thoughtA hairlike appendage sticking out of brain cells may be much more important in the brain than scientists realized.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Early Trump support climbed in areas with recent Latino population growth: studyDonald Trump announced his presidential candidacy in June 2015 with a bold, double-edged promise: that he would build a "great wall" on the border separating the United States and Mexico, and that he would make Mexico pay for it.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fanconi anemia: Insight from a green plantFanconi anemia is a human genetic disorder with severe effects, including an increased risk of cancer and infertility. Work in animal systems has identified many factors involved in Fanconi anemia and showed that these factors function in repair of DNA. However, despite extensive analysis in mammalian somatic cell lines, in-depth studies on the germ cells, which make egg and sperm cells, have been
5h
Quanta Magazine
Simpler Math Tames the Complexity of Microbe NetworksOver the past century, scientists have become adept at plotting the ecological interactions of the diverse organisms that populate the planet’s forests, plains and seas. They have established powerful mathematical techniques to describe systems ranging from the carbon cycles driven by plants to the predator-prey dynamics that dictate the behavior of lions and gazelles. Understanding the inner wor
5h
Scientific American Content: Global
Gone in 2017: 12 Trailblazing Women in STEMA tribute to a dozen trailblazers who made the world a better place through their discoveries, advancements, and inventions. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Piecework at the nano assembly lineScientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a novel electric propulsion technology for nanorobots. It allows molecular machines to move a hundred thousand times faster than with the biochemical processes used to date. This makes nanobots fast enough to do assembly line work in molecular factories. The new research results will appear as the cover story on 19th January in
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Early Trump support climbed in areas with recent Latino population growthAccording to three political scientists from the University of California, Riverside, Donald Trump's promise to build a 'great wall' spanning the border separating the United States and Mexico, as well as subsequent remarks describing Mexican immigrants as 'criminals' and 'rapists,' had a galvanizing effect on his voter base in the initial stages of his campaign, particularly in areas of the count
5h
The Atlantic
Hostiles Is a Brutal, Shallow WesternThe first two scenes of Hostiles , Scott Cooper’s harsh and uncompromising western, depict a familiar cycle of cruelty. In the first, a white family living deep in New Mexico Territory are attacked by a Comanche war party, with only the mother, Rosalie (Rosamund Pike), surviving. In the second, the hard-faced Captain Joseph Blocker (Christian Bale) rounds up an Apache family and drags them to an
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More self-driving tech in VW's next-generation GolfThe world's biggest carmaker Volkswagen said Friday it would stuff even more technology into the next generation of its top-selling Golf model, bringing so-called "connected driving" deeper into the mainstream.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA bumps astronaut off space station flight in rare moveNASA has bumped an astronaut off an upcoming spaceflight, a rare move for the space agency so close to launch.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Instagram, Google+ join EU group fighting hate speechFacebook's Instagram and the Google+ social network have agreed to join an EU-sponsored group of US internet giants to combat online extremism, EU officials said Friday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows pitfalls of using the term middle classMiddle class describes an economic tier between rich and poor. It implies upward mobility and a break from poverty.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technique for finding life on MarsResearchers demonstrate for the first time the potential of existing technology to directly detect and characterize life on Mars and other planets. The study, published in Frontiers in Microbiology, used miniaturized scientific instruments and new microbiology techniques to identify and examine microorganisms in the Canadian high Arctic -- one of the closest analogs to Mars on Earth.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
City lights setting traps for migrating birdsA University of Delaware study has examined how light pollution lures birds into urban areas during fall migration, a trend that poses risk for the fowl that often fly into buildings and has increased with the addition of brighter LED lights. The researchers were interested in seeing what factors shape the birds' distributions and why they occur in certain areas.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: They Hunt. They Gather. They’re Very Good at Talking About Smells.A study of hunter-gatherers on the Malay Peninsula suggests that culture plays a role in how we describe the odors all around us.
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NYT > Science
Drilling Off Florida Is Still On the Table, Interior Official SaysA surprise statement on Friday undercut last week’s announcement that Florida had been granted an exemption from President Trump’s offshore-drilling plan.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate change linked to more flowery forestsNew research has revealed a surprising relationship between surging atmospheric carbon dioxide and flower blooms in a remote tropical forest.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The Pentagon built with mineralized microbes predating dinosaursA new study has found that some of the building blocks of the Pentagon and Empire State Building were made by microbes that lived up to 340 million years ago, predating the dinosaurs.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Structure of herpes virus linked to Kaposi's sarcomaScientists have shown in the laboratory that an inhibitor can be developed to break down the herpes virus. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus, or KSHV, is one of two viruses known to cause cancer in humans.
5h
The Atlantic
What Israel, Liberia, Belarus, and Macedonia Have in Common“U.S. slumps in global poll after Trump’s 1st year,” ran a typical headline when Gallup released its world leadership survey on Thursday. The survey, conducted across 134 countries in 2017, did indeed show a steep drop in median global approval for U.S. leadership—and it saw Germany replace the U.S. at the top of the rankings. But it also showed some surprising exceptions to the global trend. Spe
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers illustrate how muscle growth inhibitor is activated, could aid in treating ALSResearchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine are part of an international team that has identified how the inactive or latent form of GDF8, a signaling protein also known as myostatin responsible for limiting muscle, is activated.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Older hospitalized adults are infrequently tested for influenzaThis year's flu season is shaping up to be an especially serious one, and it's important for clinicians to promptly recognize, diagnosis, and treat influenza in hospitalized patients, especially in vulnerable populations such as older individuals.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kaiser Permanente study finds cognitive behavioral therapy is cost-effectiveCognitive behavioral therapy (or CBT) delivered in a primary care setting is a cost-effective way to treat adolescents with depression who decline or quickly stop using antidepressants, according to a Kaiser Permanente study published today in the journal Pediatrics.
5h
The Atlantic
A 'White Woman's Voice' Interrogates ItselfThe story of the new album from the Oakland pop experimentalists Tune-Yards is that their singer Merrill Garbus went to work to better the world—by, first, bettering herself. Her letter to journalists reviewing i can feel you creeping into my private life describes the learning process with a series of active verbs: Trump was elected. I went to a meeting of SURJ (Showing Up for Racial Justice) an
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Portland State study shows pitfalls of using the term middle classMiddle class describes an economic tier between rich and poor. It implies upward mobility and a break from poverty. But a recent article co-authored by Portland State University anthropologist Charles Klein shows that the term does little to shine a light on the real lives of people who make it into this social classification.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
Squirrel Sex Is ComplicatedOnly 35 Mount Graham squirrels remain in the wild, but five captive squirrels could hold the key to their long-term survival—if we can get them to breed -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
6h
The Atlantic
One Year Later, NASA Still Doesn't Have a New AdministratorOn Saturday afternoon, NASA will mark an anniversary with little cause for celebration: One year since the Trump administration took office, the space agency still doesn’t have an administrator. This is the longest NASA has gone without a permanent chief—who is nominated by the president and must be confirmed by Congress—in the transition between two administrations. Since the inauguration last J
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hedgehog signaling proteins keep cancer stem cells aliveResearchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have discovered that the survival of cancer stem cells is dependent on the 'Hedgehog signaling pathway.' Targeting this pathway had previously shown no effect on the growth of colorectal cancer. Now, Charité scientists have demonstrated that using different drugs to target a specific aspect of the pathway may yield better treatment outcomes for
6h
New on MIT Technology Review
China Publishes More Scientific Articles Than the U.S.
6h
Scientific American Content: Global
New Climate Censorship Tracker Comes OnlineThe project has so far assembled 96 entries of federal restrictions or prohibitions on climate science since November 2016 -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Postoperative wound monitoring app can reduce readmissions and improve patient careA new smartphone app called WoundCare is successfully enabling patients to remotely send images of their surgical wounds for monitoring by nurses.
7h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Want to change the world? Start by being brave enough to care | Cleo WadeArtist and poet Cleo Wade recites a moving poem about being an advocate for love and acceptance in a time when both seem in short supply. Woven between stories of people at the beginning and end of their lives, she shares some truths about growing up (and speaking up) and reflects on the wisdom of a life well-lived, leaving us with a simple yet enduring takeaway: be good to yourself, be good to ot
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Newark's Amazon HQ2 Bid Reveals What's at Stake For Every Finalist CityNewark, New Jersey has the highest unemployment rate of any Amazon HQ2 finalist—and the highest tax incentives.
7h
New Scientist - News
Commercial electric pulse fishing should be banned for nowThe growing use in Europe of trawl nets that stun fish with electricity has divided opinion. It should be scaled back and properly researched, says Lesley Evans Ogden
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Popular Science
Canaries in the coal emissions: why climate change makes birds change their tuneNexus Media News Birdsongs may hold invaluable climate clues. Scientists are listening to the mating calls of migratory birds for shifts in breeding patterns as a result of climate change.
7h
Live Science
China's Quantum-Key Network, the Largest Ever, Is Officially OnlineThe Chinese satellite Micius has once again shattered records, this time enabling practical quantum encryption between Beijing and Austria.
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Science | The Guardian
Headless body is not C18th Scottish clan chief, say expertsTests show remains were those of woman and not Bonnie Prince Charlie supporter Simon Fraser Human remains thought to belong to a notorious 18th-century Jacobite-supporting Scottish clan chief have been found to be those of an unknown headless woman, according to experts. Official accounts maintain the remains of Simon Fraser, the 11th Lord Lovat known as the Old Fox, were buried under a chapel fl
7h
Feed: All Latest
The Magnetohydrodynamic Drive Is Real—and You Can Build OneAll you need is a battery, a magnet, and some wires to build your own quasi-fictional submarine drive.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
National school lunch program aces safety testThe National School Lunch Program's (NSLP) strict safety standards work, according to a new University of Connecticut study that found food safety standards for ground beef supplied to the program are highly effective in keeping harmful bacteria out of school lunches nationwide. However, ground beef that fails NSLP inspection can be sold to other vendors, eventually making its way onto consumers'
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Conserving our biodiversity: Priorities for well-connected protected areasThe Joint Research Centre (JRC), the European Commission's science and knowledge service, has measured progress and shortfalls in the connectivity of protected areas in countries across the world, identifying the main priorities to sustain or improve connectivity in each country.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Increasing number of adolescents receive a psychiatric or neurodevelopmental diagnosisAccording to a national register study comparing Finnish birth cohorts from 1987 and 1997, an increasing number of adolescents receive a psychiatric or neurodevelopmental diagnosis. The number of diagnosed adolescents increased especially for girls in the younger cohort. The results of the study conducted by the University of Turku, Finland, and the National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL)
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon raises monthly Prime membership fees by 20 percentAmazon is raising the price of its Prime membership monthly plan by nearly 20 percent. The fee of $99 for an annual membership will not change, the company said Friday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A stopwatch for nanofluids: NIST files provisional patent for microflowmeterThe National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has filed a provisional patent application for a microflow measurement system, about the size of a nickel, that can track the movement of extremely tiny amounts of liquids—as small as nanoliters (nL, billionth of a liter) per minute. If water were flowing at that rate from a 1-liter bottle of water, it would take about 200 years to drain.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change linked to more flowery forests, study showsNew research from a Florida State University scientist has revealed a surprising relationship between surging atmospheric carbon dioxide and flower blooms in a remote tropical forest.
7h
New on MIT Technology Review
China Publishes More Scientific Articles Than America
7h
New on MIT Technology Review
A New Breed of Cyberattack Uses Remote-Control Malware to Sabotage Industrial Safety Systems
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change linked to more flowery forests, FSU study showsNew research from a Florida State University scientist has revealed a surprising relationship between surging atmospheric carbon dioxide and flower blooms in a remote tropical forest.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mortality of surgery vs. targeted radiation in early lung cancer patientsAmong patients older than 80 years, 3.9 percent receiving surgery passed away within the 30-day post-treatment window, compared with 0.9 percent of patients receiving focused radiation.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How metal scaffolds enhance the bone healing processIn cooperation with colleagues from the Wyss Institute at Harvard, researchers from the Julius Wolff Institute, the Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies, and Charité's Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery have shown how mechanically optimized constructs known as titanium-mesh scaffolds help optimize bone regeneration. The researchers' findings have been reported in the current issue
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Adaptive immune response: New cofactor of roquin identifiedRoquin has a key role in the adaptive immune response. It controls the activation and differentiation of T cells and thus helps to make the decisions whether or not and which type of immune response will be mounted. Now, a team of scientists of Helmholtz Zentrum München in cooperation have identified NUFIP2, a protein with a previously unknown function, as cofactor of Roquin and discovered that NU
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Real-world intercontinental quantum communications enabled by the Micius satelliteA joint China-Austria team has performed quantum key distribution between the quantum-science satellite Micius and multiple ground stations located in Xinglong (near Beijing), Nanshan (near Urumqi), and Graz (near Vienna). Such experiments demonstrate the secure satellite-to-ground exchange of cryptographic keys with ?kHz rate during the passage of the satellite Micius over a ground station. Using
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Beyond drugs for IBD: Improving the overall health of IBD patients1.6 million Americans suffer from IBD. Identifying the best medical treatment leads to improved disease management, but IBD patients also experience mental, emotional and other physical side effects that need to be understood and managed to improve the overall health of IBD patients. Research presented at the Crohn's & Colitis Congress™ helps health care providers understand how to better manage t
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New strategies to improve the quality of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) care1.6 million Americans suffer. As with many chronic conditions, IBD patients often require frequent hospital visits due to rapid changes in their illness and can struggle with finding the balance between their health and their work/social life. Doctors and researchers will come together at the Crohn's & Colitis Congress™ to explore new strategies to improve the care provided to IBD patients, which
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New drugs for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD)1.6 million Americans suffer from IBD. There is no cure for these chronic, life-long conditions. While several effective treatments are available, 40 to 55 percent of patients have no response to current therapies. There is a dire need for new drugs for all patients that are highly safe and effective. Based on research being presented at the Crohn's & Colitis Congress™, we are hopeful that future
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Pentagon built with mineralized microbes predating dinosaursA new study led by The Australian National University (ANU) has found that some of the building blocks of the Pentagon and Empire State Building were made by microbes that lived up to 340 million years ago, predating the dinosaurs.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Animal carnivores could be our powerful alliesAnimal carnivores living in and around human habitation are declining at an unprecedented rate -- but they may provide crucial benefits to human societies. Researchers have revealed that predators and scavengers ranging from bats to leopards and vultures are valuable to human health and well-being.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study ends debate over role of steroids in treating septic shockThe results from the largest ever study of septic shock could improve treatment for critically ill patients and save health systems worldwide hundreds of millions of dollars each year. Researchers studied whether the use of steroids as an additional treatment to septic shock -- a severe life threatening infection -- would improve survival.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Challenging existing models of black holesA new study expands the scientific community's understanding of black holes in our galaxy and the magnetic fields that surround them.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Women run faster after taking newly developed supplement, study findsA new study found that women who took a specially prepared blend of minerals and nutrients for a month saw their 3-mile run times drop by almost a minute. The women who took the supplement also saw improvements in distance covered in 25 minutes on a stationary bike and a third test in which they stepped on and off a bench, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Key to willpower lies in believing you have it in abundanceAmericans believe they have less stamina for strenuous mental activity than their European counterparts -- an indication that people in the US perceive their willpower or self-control as being in limited supply, suggests a new study.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New input for quantum simulationsResearchers have devised new methods to create interesting input states for quantum computations and simulations. The new methods can be used to simulate certain electronic systems to arbitrarily high accuracy.
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Futurity.org
Blood test screens for 8 common kinds of cancerResearchers have developed a single blood test that screens for eight common cancer types and helps identify the location of the cancer. The test, called CancerSEEK, is a unique noninvasive, multianalyte test that simultaneously evaluates levels of eight cancer proteins and the presence of cancer gene mutations from circulating DNA in the blood. The test is aimed at screening for eight common can
7h
Feed: All Latest
Why This Quantum-Encrypted Video Hangout Is a Big DealJust what we all wanted: super secret, super long meetings that span the entire world.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Real-world intercontinental quantum communications enabled by the Micius satelliteA joint China-Austria team has performed quantum key distribution between the quantum-science satellite Micius and multiple ground stations located in Xinglong (near Beijing), Nanshan (near Urumqi), and Graz (near Vienna). Such experiments demonstrate the secure satellite-to-ground exchange of cryptographic keys during the passage of the satellite Micius over a ground station. Using Micius as a tr
7h
Inside Science
Is China the Leader in Quantum Communications?Technology Chinese scientists have built two major quantum infrastructure projects, and the race is on to take the next step. 01/19/2018 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer https://www.insidescience.org/news/china-leader-quantum-communications
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Inside Science
Is China the Leader in Quantum Communications?Is China the Leader in Quantum Communications? Chinese scientists have built two major quantum infrastructure projects, and the race is on to take the next step. chinasatellite.gif Image credits: Abigail Malate, Staff Illustrator Rights information: Copyright American Institute of Physics ( reprinting information ) Technology Friday, January 19, 2018 - 10:30 Yuen Yiu, Staff Writer (Inside Science
7h
New on MIT Technology Review
A New Breed of Cyber Attack Uses Remote-Control Malware to Sabotage Industrial Safety Systems
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Ingeniøren
SIRI-kommissionen: Bedre brug af sundhedsdata og mere AI, takFlere kronisk syge og færre sengepladser nødvendiggør bedre udnyttelse af patientdata og kunstig intelligens, lyder det i nyt udspil fra tænketanken SIRI-kommissionen.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover how treating eczema could also alleviate asthmaScientists from VIB-UGent have discovered insights for a possible new therapy for eczema that also reduces the severity of asthma. The findings are an important next step in understanding the relationship between the two inflammatory diseases and to developing effective therapies. The results of the study are published in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A nanophenomenon that triggers the bone-repair processResearchers at the Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia have resolved one of the great unknowns in bone self-repair: how the cells responsible for forming new bone tissue are called into action. Their work reveals the role of an electromechanical phenomenon at the nanoscale, flexoelectricity, as a possible mechanism for stimulating the cell response and guiding it throughout the fractur
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Algorithm increases employment opportunities for refugeesA data-driven approach could help increase employment levels for asylum seekers in Switzerland from 15 to 26 percent. Social scientists from Switzerland and the US, in collaboration with ETH's Public Policy Group, reached this conclusion in the journal Science.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Thorium reactors may dispose of enormous amounts of weapons-grade plutoniumScientists from Tomsk Polytechnic University are developing a new technology for multipurpose application of large amounts of weapons-grade plutonium accumulated in Russia and across the world. Instead of expensive storage of this nuclear material, TPU physicists propose to burn weapons-grade plutonium in reactors with thorium fuel, converting it into power and thermal energy. The units are capabl
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Occupational therapy improves health, quality of life of young adults with diabetesNew results from a University of Southern California-led research study demonstrates the distinct value of occupational therapy for improving the health and quality of life of young adults living with diabetes. Research participants who completed the occupational therapy intervention program significantly improved their average blood glucose levels, diabetes-related quality of life and habits for
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How treating eczema could also alleviate asthmaScientists have discovered insights for a possible new therapy for eczema that also reduces the severity of asthma. The findings are an important next step in understanding the relationship between the two inflammatory diseases and to developing effective therapies.
8h
New on MIT Technology Review
A New Cyber Attack Can Remotely Control Industrial Safety Systems
8h
The Atlantic
A Week Around the World With The AtlanticWhat We’re Writing The dynamics of North Korea: North and South Korean officials announced this week that they would march under the same flag at the upcoming Winter Olympics and, for the first time, field a joint women’s ice-hockey team. Some analysts viewed this as a major diplomatic breakthrough. H.R. McMaster, the U.S. National Security Adviser, has emerged as the Trump administration’s most
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Futurity.org
Babies do stuff in bursts but actually learn over timeWhile babies often amaze their parents when they seemingly learn new skills overnight—how to walk, for example—but new research suggests that their brains were probably prepping for those tasks long before those first steps occurred. “…it looks like (kids) learn all these words overnight, but they’ve been listening and thinking and processing for a long time.” Researchers used new statistical ana
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Brexit costs Britain data center for Europe's satnav systemOfficials have decided to move a data center for the European Union's new satellite navigation system out of Britain because of Brexit.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
Preparing for the Next Influenza PandemicA better flu vaccine is crucial, but so is a robust seasonal immunization program in all countries -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find link between breast cancer and two gene mutationsIndividuals with Lynch syndrome, a genetic condition that has long been known to carry dramatically increased risk of colorectal cancer and uterine cancer, now also have an increased risk of breast cancer. This is the conclusion of a study in the journal Genetics in Medicine which is published by Springer Nature.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Hunting dogs as possible vectors for the infectious disease tularaemiaThe zoonosis Tularaemia is life-threatening for rodents, rabbits and hares, but which can also infect humans and dogs. While contact with contaminated blood or meat makes hunters a high-risk group, the frequency of infections among hunting dogs has not been much studied. Researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna now confirmed a relevant prevalence of infections in Austrian hunting dogs. This could intensi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Free online access to millions of documents on chemical toxicity made possible through ToxicDocsMillions of pages of internal corporate and trade association documents relating to the introduction of new products and chemicals into the workplace and commerce have been compiled into a free searchable online database called ToxicDocs. The history and future outlook for this database is now the subject of a free to view special section in the Journal of Public Health Policy which is a Palgrave
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The Pentagon built with mineralized microbes predating dinosaursA new study led by The Australian National University (ANU) has found that some of the building blocks of the Pentagon and Empire State Building were made by microbes that lived up to 340 million years ago, predating the dinosaurs.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Let's make a deal: Could AI compromise better than humans?BYU researchers developed an algorithm that teaches machines not just to win games, but to cooperate and compromise -- and sometimes do a little trash-talking too.
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Popular Science
Using your smartphone is better with a stylusDIY We're bringing stylus back (yeah). Stop stabbing at your smartphone with your fingers—this method is both uncomfortable and imprecise. You heard us. It's time to revisit the humble stylus.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Melted nuclear fuel seen inside second Fukushima reactorThe operator of Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant said Friday that a long telescopic probe successfully captured images of what is most likely melted fuel inside one of its three damaged reactors, providing limited but crucial information for its cleanup.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Christa McAuliffe's lost lessons finally taught in spaceChrista McAuliffe's lost lessons are finally getting taught in space.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hippo-y birthday to Fiona! The popular preemie is turning 1Some days, it's more like being a Hollywood star's agent than a communications official for the zoo. That's what happens when your prematurely born hippopotamus becomes a global celebrity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
India's Reliance posts 25% rise in profits, Jio turns profitableIndian oil-to-telecom conglomerate Reliance Industries on Friday beat analyst estimates to post a 25 percent rise in consolidated net profit, aided by its telecom start-up Jio turning profitable within 17 months of its launch.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study describes structure of herpes virus linked to Kaposi's sarcomaUCLA researchers have provided the first description of the structure of the herpes virus associated with Kaposi's sarcoma, a type of cancer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Successful promotion of giftedness as early as elementary school ageExperts have argued that the specific needs of gifted children are often neglected, resulting in a shriveling of their abilities and potential. Consequently, they call for the implementation of programs that specifically aim to promote gifted children.
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Science | The Guardian
Lab notes: talkin' 'bout a resolution (sounds like some science)We’re far enough into January for most resolutions to have been tested somewhat. I’m one of the many hoping that doggedly sticking to Dry January will atone for December’s sins, and if that rings a bell with you, then here’s what the experts have to say about the efficacy of temporary abstinence. For those of you freshly committing to pursuits such as yoga, you might be interested in a new vascul
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Copernicus Sentinel-2A satellite captures northern Brazil's Marajó islandThe Copernicus Sentinel-2A satellite takes us over part of northern Brazil's Marajó island in Pará state.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers disprove one of the most widespread assumptions among geneticists regarding DNAA study by a Córdoba research team, just published in Proceedings of the USA National Academy of Sciences, shows that spontaneous DNA gaps are not -- as hitherto believed -- equivalent to those produced during DNA repair.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Artificial agent designs quantum experimentsOn the way to an intelligent laboratory, physicists from Innsbruck and Vienna present an artificial agent that autonomously designs quantum experiments. In initial experiments, the system has independently (re)discovered experimental techniques that are nowadays standard in modern quantum optical laboratories. This shows how machines could play a more creative role in research in the future.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The Down syndrome 'super genome'Only 20 percent of fetuses with trisomy 21 reach full term. But how do they manage to survive the first trimester of pregnancy despite this heavy handicap? Researchers from UNIGE and UNIL have found that children born with Down syndrome have an excellent genome -- better than the average genome of people without the genetic abnormality. It is possible that this genome offsets the disabilities caus
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NMRCloudQ: A quantum cloud experience on a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum computerCloud-based quantum computing is the most useful form for public users to experience with the power of quantum. Recently, a joint team led by G. Long at Tsinghua University, B. Zeng at University of Guelph and D. Lu at SUSTech launched a new cloud quantum computing service-NMRCloudQ which is based on 4-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance and aims to be freely accessible to either amateurs that keep p
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Children's career aspirations limited by gender stereotypes and backgroundChildren's career aspirations are too often based on gender stereotypes, socio-economic backgrounds and TV, film and radio, according to a report involving UCL academics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study of distant galaxies challenges the understanding of how stars formThe most massive galaxies in our neighbourhood formed their stars billions of years ago, early in the history of the universe. At the present day, they produce very few new stars. Astronomers have long believed that is because they contain very little gas – a key ingredient necessary to produce stars. But our new study, published in Nature Astronomy, is now challenging this long held view.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How plants see lightPlants react sensitively to changes in their surroundings and possess the ability to adapt to them. They use the photoreceptor protein phytochrome B to see light and then regulate processes such as seed germination, seedling development, longitudinal growth and flower formation. A team led by Prof. Dr. Andreas Hiltbrunner from the Institute of Biology II at the University of Freiburg has recently
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Ingeniøren
Udløbet certifikat sendte Ingeniøren og Version2 i sortProblemer tidligere på dagen med at tilgå Ingeniørens og Version2's hjemmesider skyldtes et udløbet SSL-certifikat.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Information engine operates with nearly perfect efficiencyPhysicists have experimentally demonstrated an information engine—a device that converts information into work—with an efficiency that exceeds the conventional second law of thermodynamics. Instead, the engine's efficiency is bounded by a recently proposed generalized second law of thermodynamics, and it is the first information engine to approach this new bound.
8h
Ingeniøren
Brændeovne forurener fire gange mere, end de er godkendt tilEuropæisk typetest er for urealistisk og lader brænde­ovne på markedet udlede mere i virkeligheden end i laboratoriet. I Danmark er typetesten gyldig, men bruges sjældent alene.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Global warming decreases the reliability of weather forecasting toolsFor Californians from Crescent City to Chula Vista, the second week of 2018 brought rain showers. Was it merely a fluke in the middle of an ongoing dry spell, or does it mean we're on the verge of another wet winter, similar to last year's? The answer, according to a UC Irvine climatologist, is up in the air—literally and figuratively.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
2-D tin (stanene) without buckling: A possible topological insulatorAn international research team led by Nagoya University synthesized planar stanene: 2-D sheets of tin atoms, analogous to graphene. Tin atoms were deposited onto the Ag(111) surface of silver. The stanene layer remained extremely flat, unlike in previous studies wherein stanene was buckled. This leads to the formation of large area, high quality samples. Stanene is predicted to be a topological in
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change affects fish reproductive phenology in plateau area: StudyThe Research Group of Biological Invasion and Adaptive Evolution (BIAE; PI: CHEN Yifeng) at Institute of Hydrobiology (IHB) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently answered how reproductive phenology of Gymnocypris selincuoensis, an endemic fish in Lake Selicuo in Tibetan Plateau, associated with climate changes.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Conserving our biodiversity—priorities for well-connected protected areasThe Joint Research Centre (JRC), the European Commission's science and knowledge service, has measured progress and shortfalls in the connectivity of protected areas in countries across the world, identifying the main priorities to sustain or improve connectivity in each country.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change and weather extremes—both heat and cold can killClimate change is increasing the frequency and strength of some types of extreme weather in the United States, particularly heat waves. Last summer the U.S. Southwest experienced life-threatening heat waves, which are especially dangerous for elderly people and other vulnerable populations.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Dreamers' could give US economy – and even American workers – a boostEarlier this month, hopes were high that a bipartisan deal could be reached to resolve the fate of the "Dreamers," the millions of undocumented youth who were brought to the U.S. as children.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Asocial mediaThe incidence of abusive commentary on social media is rising. Media specialists Carsten Reinemann and Christoph Neuberger are exploring the grounds for this development, and have invited journalist Dunja Hayali to discuss the issue.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using electric fields to manipulate droplets on a surface could enable high-volume, low-cost biology experimentsMIT researchers have developed hardware that uses electric fields to move droplets of chemical or biological solutions around a surface, mixing them in ways that could be used to test thousands of reactions in parallel.
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Ingeniøren
OK18-krav: Væk med skæv lønreguleringParallel lønudvikling for ­offentligt og ­privatansatte er et af IDAs mål i overenskomstforhandlingerne på det offentlige område.
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The Atlantic
'It’s Our Responsibility to Put More Guardrails Around the President'Jeff Flake seems intent on finishing his Senate career without any friends left in Washington. Ever since announcing his impending retirement last year with a blistering speech that called out President Trump’s “reckless, outrageous, and undignified behavior,” the generally genial Arizona Republican has repeatedly made himself a target of condemnation on both sides of the aisle. His decision to e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How light pollution lures birds into urban areas during fall migrationOn their fall migration south in the Northern Hemisphere, scores of birds are being lured by artificial light pollution into urban areas that may be an ecological trap, according to the University of Delaware's Jeff Buler.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the legacy of dirty coal could create a clean energy futureEnergy from coal is now being linked to global warming and pollution on a global level. In fact, it has been estimated that coal contributes to 25% of green house gases.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to achieve extreme productivityRobert Pozen is a very productive person: An MIT Sloan senior lecturer, he served as the former president of Fidelity Investments, executive chairman of MFS Investment Management, and as an associate general counsel of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. His latest book is "Extreme Productivity: Boost Your Results, Reduce Your Hours," and he teaches the MIT Sloan executive education cours
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Want to eat healthy? Try an eco-friendly dietDrone Australia RescueFollowing our annual Christmas overindulgence, many of us have set ambitious goals for the year ahead. But eating healthy shouldn't just mean cutting down on snacks; given the environmental impact of food production, a more sustainable diet should feature high on everyone's list of New Year's resolutions.
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Science | The Guardian
Would-be parents moving house to get free IVF on NHSDoctor at hospital with UK’s largest sperm bank says discriminatory funding system behind relocation Many would-be parents are moving house in order to access free IVF on the NHS, sometimes saving themselves £10,000, according to the lead fertility doctor at the UK’s largest sperm bank. Dr Raj Mathur, a consultant gynaecologist at Saint Mary’s hospital in Manchester, said he “constantly” saw pati
9h
Futurity.org
Hydrogels for future drug delivery use Boolean logicScientists have long sought specificity in drug delivery systems: A package that can encase a therapeutic and will not disgorge its toxic cargo until it reaches the site of treatment—be it a tumor, a diseased organ, or a site of infection. Researchers have now built and tested a new biomaterial-based delivery system—known as a hydrogel—that will encase a desired cargo and dissolve to release its
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UCLA study describes structure of herpes virus tumor linked to Kaposi's sarcomaUCLA team shows in the laboratory that an inhibitor can be developed to break down the herpes virus. Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus, or KSHV, is one of two viruses known to cause cancer in humans.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A Russian scientist improved nanofluids for solar power plantsAn associate of Siberian Federal University (SFU) teamed up with his foreign colleagues to increase the efficiency of the heat transfer medium used in solar power plants. The results of the study were published in Renewable Energy journal.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reviled animals could be our powerful alliesAnimal carnivores living in and around human habitation are declining at an unprecedented rate -- but they may provide crucial benefits to human societies. An international review led by University of Queensland researchers has revealed that predators and scavengers ranging from bats to leopards and vultures are valuable to human health and well-being.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Experiment into how voters think shows that they go with their gutsExperts were famously made unwelcome in the final run up to the Brexit referendum of 2016. Leave campaigner Michael Gove said people had had enough of them.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists are breeding super-nutritious crops to help solve global hungerAn incredible 155m children around the world are chronically undernourished, despite dramatic improvements in recent decades. In view of this, the UN's Sustainable Development Goals include Zero Hunger. But what do we understand by the word hunger?
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nature provides more to people than material benefitsThe role of culture and diverse knowledge systems needs to be recognized when assessing nature's contributions to people, a new policy forum paper in Science states. Alexander van Oudenhoven and thirty global experts present a new approach that will increase the effectiveness and legitimacy of policies and decisions relating to nature and environmental change.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Light pollution can prolong the risk of sparrows passing along West Nile virusNighttime lighting prolongs time that birds can pass along virus to mosquitoes that bite people.
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Ingeniøren
Lavere løn og færre goder demotiverer offentlige ingeniørerLøngabet mellem offentligt og privatansatte IDA-medlemmer vokser. Samtidig forsvinder nogle af de goder, der retfærdiggør en forskel, mener IDA.
9h
Feed: All Latest
Amazon's New Home, Ford's Electric Plan, and More This Week in the Future of CarsPlus lots of news from CES and the Detroit Auto Show.
9h
Feed: All Latest
This Year's Sundance Lineup Might Be Its Most Crucial YetWith slate full of movies by and about women, the festival is poised to start a lot of conversations.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A nanophenomenon that triggers the bone-repair processResearchers of the ICN2 Oxide Nanophysics Group led by ICREA Prof. Gustau Catalan have resolved one of the great unknowns in bone remodelling: how the cells responsible for forming new bone tissue are called into action. Their work reveals the possible role of an electromechanical phenomenon at the nanoscale, flexoelectricity, not only in stimulating the cell response, but in precisely guiding it
9h
NYT > Science
The New Old Age: One Day Your Mind May Fade. At Least You’ll Have a Plan.A doctor has developed an advance directive specifically to plan for medical care in the event of dementia.
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Dagens Medicin
Lægevagter kan vente med at betale gebyrMens vi venter på en løsning på organisering af lægevagtordningen, kan virksomheder, der tilbyder lægevagt, vente med at betale vagtlægegebyret til Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Developing tools for climate-conscious investmentProfessor Sir John Beddington of the Oxford Martin School explains the Oxford Martin Principles for Climate-Conscious Investment:
9h
Dagens Medicin
Lægerne ruster sig til overenskomstkonfliktAlt er næsten på plads, hvis ok-forhandlingerne ender i konflikt, siger Lisbeth Lintz, formand for Overlægeforeningen. Hun håber dog, at de kommer over knasterne og får en aftale i hus uden en konflikt.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hunting dogs as possible vectors for the infectious disease tularaemiaTularaemia is an infectious bacterial disease that is life-threatening for rodents, rabbits and hares, but which can also infect humans and dogs. While contact with contaminated blood or meat makes hunters a high-risk group, the frequency of infections among hunting dogs has not been much studied. Researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna have now confirmed a relevant prevalence of infections in Austrian
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artificial agent designs quantum experimentsOn the way to an intelligent laboratory, physicists from Innsbruck and Vienna present an artificial agent that autonomously designs quantum experiments. In initial experiments, the system has independently (re)discovered experimental techniques that are standard in modern quantum optical laboratories. This shows how machines could play a more creative role in research in the future.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mass starvation as a political weaponMass starvation killed more than three million people in Stalin-era Ukraine in the 1930s and more than 18 million in China during Mao Zedong's Great Leap Forward in the late 1950s and early 1960s. Yet by the start of this century, famines like those were all but eliminated, Alex de Waal says in his new book, Mass Starvation: The History and Future of Famine. The number of people dying in famines a
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Detect locally, protect globallyWhen infectious diseases strike, the World Health Organization acts swiftly, coordinating with the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and its foreign counterparts to contain the threat. But there is no equivalent international organization similarly dedicated to identifying and mitigating a cyberattack.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microbial communities demonstrate high turnoverWhen Mark Twain famously said "If you don't like the weather in New England, just wait a few minutes," he probably didn't anticipate MIT researchers would apply his remark to their microbial research. But a new study does just that.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using haptic feedback joysticks to fly dronesA new joystick developed by startup MotionPilot lets users fly drones with just one hand in a fun, intuitive way. One version of this device includes a haptic feedback mechanism that gives users a sense of the drone's position as it moves through the air. Drone aficionados were recently impressed by a prototype, and the device could hit the market soon.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Diamonds' flaws hold promise for new technologiesDespite their charm and allure, diamonds are rarely perfect. They have tiny defects that, to assistant professor Nathalie de Leon, make them ever so appealing. These atom-sized mistakes have enormous potential in technologies for high-resolution imaging and secure communication lines.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Simulations show how atoms behave inside self-healing cementResearchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have developed a self-healing cement that could repair itself in as little as a few hours. Wellbore cement for geothermal applications has a life-span of only 30 to 40 years. When the cement inevitably cracks, repairs can easily top $1.5 million dollars per well. Scientists are developing cement that fixes itself, sidestepping enormously
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bacterial biofilm cellulose found to differ from plant celluloseA team of researchers with members from the U.S., Germany and Sweden has discovered that the cellulose found in bacterial biofilms differs from the cellulose in plants. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes how they found the difference and what their findings might mean for developing new ways to combat bacterial infections. Michael Galperin with NIH in the U.S. and
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hot weather is bad news for bird spermDrone Australia RescueA new study led by Macquarie University and spanning Sydney and Oslo has shown that exposure to extreme temperatures, such as those experienced during heatwave conditions, significantly reduces sperm quality in zebra finches, an iconic Australian bird adapted to life in arid environments. These findings, published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, suggest that rising global temperat
9h
Ingeniøren
Hør ugens podcast om global opvarmning, nye batteriteknologier og liv i universetIngeniørens ugentlige podcast, Transformator, sætter i denne uge fokus på ny og mere præcis viden om den såkaldte klimafølsomhed, som angiver relationen mellem CO2-koncentration og temperaturstigning. Ingeniørernes løn er også på programmet sammen med ‘The Jesus Battery’ og en meteorit med bygges...
9h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Nasa removes US astronaut from ISS missionJeanette Epps would have been the first African-American astronaut on the space station crew.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
100 million dead trees in the Sierra are a massive risk for unpredictable wildfiresTo drive through parts of the Sierra Nevada these days is to witness a morbid reminder of California's extreme drought: Vast landscapes of standing dead trees, a brown tide sweeping across the green landscape. It's more than eerie; it's a dangerously combustible situation, argues a new publication from Berkeley fire scientists.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How the Elwha dam removals changed the river's mouthFor decades, resource managers agreed that removing the two dams on the Elwha River would be a big win for the watershed as a whole and, in particular, for its anadromous trout and salmon. The dams sat on the river for more than 100 years, trapping approximately 30 million tonnes of sediment behind their concrete walls. As the dams were removed between 2012 and 2014, much of this sediment was rele
9h
Ingeniøren
Italien efterforsker Apple og Samsung for planlagt forældelse af smartphonesSamsung bliver nu også efterforsket for af kommercielle hensyn at sænke hastigheden på smartphones gennem softwareopdateringer.
10h
Ingeniøren
I 2040 skal alle korte norske flyruter være elektriskeDen norske satsning på elbiler skal nu kopieres i luftfarten. Den offentlige ejer af de norske indenrigslufthavne forventer, at alle korte flyruter i 2040 kan betjenes af elektriske fly.
10h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Mouse PupilPupil constriction during sleep may protect the murine brain from being awakened by sudden flashes of light.
10h
The Scientist RSS
CRISPR Trial for Cancer Patients ProposedUS researchers could become the first outside China to use the gene-editing technique in the clinic.
10h
Popular Science
2017 beat the odds to be the second hottest year on recordEnvironment Second place is scarier than it sounds. 2017 was hot enough to melt most of the ice in the Arctic, but not hot enough to break the record for hottest year ever recorded.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fast computer control for molecular machinesScientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have developed a novel electric propulsion technology for nanorobots. It allows molecular machines to move a hundred thousand times faster than with the biochemical processes used to date. This makes nanobots fast enough to do assembly line work in molecular factories. The new research results will appear as the cover story on 19th January in
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Sticking to the schedule was difficult for Apollo astronautsNo one plans like NASA, and when it came to exploring the moon, the Apollo program was no different. However, even despite their best efforts, the astronauts consistently demonstrated the challenges of keeping to schedule.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Large volcanic island flank collapses trigger catastrophic eruptionsNew research, published today in Nature Scientific Reports, not only implies a link between catastrophic volcanic eruptions and landslides, but also suggests that landslides are the trigger.
10h
Viden
Soya-, ris- og havredrik: Traditionel komælk får nu kamp til stregenFlere danskere vælger at købe erstatningsmælk som soya- og risdrikke, oplyser virksomheder.
10h
Feed: All Latest
Gadget Lab Podcast: Navigating Facebook's News-Free FutureFacebook Mark ZuckerbergNews consumption habits are changing, and not only because of Facebook. But mostly because of Facebook.
10h
Feed: All Latest
Lil Uzi Vert and the Rest of Soundcloud Rap Will Continue to Dominate Music in 2018Call it "emo rap," call it "Soundcloud rap," but its iconoclasm fuels unbounded creativity.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Satellites paint a detailed picture of maritime activityESA has helped coastal authorities to track up to 70% more ships and pick up nearly three times more ship positions via satellite than was possible before.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Machine intelligence on the ISSArtificial intelligence already helping astronauts on the International Space Station is also providing a promising approach for solving crimes. In an era of security concerns across Europe, the smart use of police data is critical for uncovering leads.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Atomically resolving images of beam-sensitive materials using transmission electron microscopyStaff members at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST) have devised a methodology for the procurement of atomically resolved images of beam-sensitive materials using transmission electron microscopy. They published their findings as a first release in Science on January 18, 2018.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Using Hawkeye from the Avengers to communicate on the eyePop culture figures like Iron Man, Captain America and Hawkeye can provide a unique and engaging platform for the communication of difficult scientific concepts. In the classroom, these characters can be used to communicate learning objectives to students in an interesting, accessible manner by taking advantage of student familiarity with these superhero characters. Barry Fitzgerald of Delft Unive
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
More genes are active in high-performance maizeWhen two maize inbred lines are crossed with each other, an interesting effect occurs: The hybrid offspring have a significantly higher yield than either of the two parent plants. Scientists at the University of Bonn have now investigated a number of genetically distinct hybrids. They showed that the offspring had many more active genes than the original parents. These results may help in the cult
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novel hypothesis on why animals diversified on EarthCan tumors teach us about animal evolution on Earth? Researchers believe so, and now present a novel hypothesis of why animal diversity increased dramatically on Earth about a half-billion years ago. A biological innovation may have been key.
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Data behind the Women's MovementCharts highlight some of the key issues Women’s March activists are fighting for -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Identifying structural defects during driving electronic devicesA research team from Korea has discovered the blocking phenomenon of electrons generated during high-speed driving of oxide semiconductors and proved its causes for the first time in the world. It is expected to be used for the commercialization of next-generation intelligent electronic devices.
10h
NYT > Science
He Traded a Tortoise for a Turtle. He Got 6 Months in Jail.A Queens man who traded a 95-pound tortoise stolen from a nature center for $300 and a musk turtle has always been “an animal lover,” his mother says. “That’s really his downfall.”
10h
Viden
Kræftens Bekæmpelse kalder ny kræftscreening 'overbevisende' og 'fantastisk'Forskerhold på et amerikansk universitet har lavet en blodprøve, der kan opspore kræft.
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Futurity.org
Energy-efficient LEDs are just a few atoms thickScientists have developed energy efficient, ultra-thin light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for next-generation communication technologies. Light sources that reliably convert electrical to optical signals are of fundamental importance to information processing technologies. Energy-efficient and high-speed LEDs that can be integrated onto a microchip and transmit information are one of the key elements i
10h
Ingeniøren
Norsk minister efter cyberangreb: Jeg kan ikke udelukke, at patientdata er på afvejeNorske myndigheder efterforsker på livet løs, hvad der er hoved og hale i cyberangrebet mod Helse Sør-Øst. Patientdata kan være kompromiteret under angrebet, fortæller den norske sundhedsminister.
10h
Dagens Medicin
Tænketank vil have danskernes sundhedsoplysningerne samlet ét stedEn central enhed bør samle alle danskernes sundhedsdata – også dem de selv indsamler, lyder en af hovedanbefalingerne til regeringen fra tænketank.
10h
Science | The Guardian
World's longest underwater cave system discovered in Mexico by diversDiscovery of 347km-long cave by the Gran Acuifero Maya project could shed light on Mayan history Related: Unique underwater caves link Mexico's Caribbean coast to the jungle – in pictures A group of divers has connected two underwater caverns in eastern Mexico to reveal what is believed to be the biggest flooded cave on the planet. Continue reading...
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Does Gender Matter?The suggestion that women are not advancing in science because of innate inability has been taken seriously by some high-profile academics over the years. Neuroscientist Ben A. Barres, who died in... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
The Atlantic
Craft Beer Is the Strangest, Happiest Economic Story in AmericaThe monopolies are coming. In almost every economic sector , including television, books, music, groceries, pharmacies, and advertising, a handful of companies control a prodigious share of the market. The beer industry has been one of the worst offenders. The refreshing simplicity of Blue Moon, the vanilla smoothness of Boddingtons, the classic brightness of a Pilsner Urquell, and the bourbon-ba
11h
Latest Headlines | Science News
50 years ago, IUDs were deemed safe and effective50 year ago, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration declared intrauterine devices safe and effective, though officials didn’t know how the IUDs worked.
11h
Feed: All Latest
The Lightning Network Could Make Bitcoin Faster—and CheaperA new layer of code could address two problems that inhibit use of bitcoin in transactions.
11h
Feed: All Latest
For Contraception, Natural Cycles’ Guess Is as Good as YoursWhen use of a contraceptive app results in an unwanted pregnancy, don't blame the technology.
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Feed: All Latest
Why Airports Rename Runways When the Magnetic Poles MoveMagnetic north changes by as much as 40 miles per year, and that means signage updates.
11h
Live Science
Boy's Strange Choking Episode: What Is Eosinophilic Esophagitis?A 14-year old boy in Missouri who appeared to choke on a ham and cheese sandwich turned out to have a rare immune condition that can injure the esophagus.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
I Am a Roboticist in a Cheese FactoryYou probably think them AI-driven, autonomous humanlike machines, but that's far too limited a view -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Ingeniøren
Passagerfly sætter verdensrekord over AtlantenPå en tur over Atlanten i mandags fangede et Norwegian-fly en aldeles gunstig jetstrøm, som bar flyet fra New York til London på lidt over fem timer. Selvom hastigheden nåede 1.248 km/t, brød det aldrig lydmuren.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mesoporous interface mitigates the impact of defects in perovskite solar cellsThe nominal cell operating life of perovskite solar cells is strongly influenced by their inner architecture. This was shown by two scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin and the Technical University of Munich. They combined experiments with numerical simulations in order to explain this observation.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers identify a new chromatin regulatory mechanism linked to SirT6Researchers from the Epigenetics and Cancer Biology Program of the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL), led by Dr. Àlex Vaquero, have proposed a new regulation mechanism of the NF-κB pathway, which is associated with accelerated cellular aging, based on the analysis of the function of the SirT6 protein. The results of their work, published in Nature Communications, indicate a double
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smartphones come in handy for the rare cosmic particles searchResearchers from the Laboratory of Methods for Big Data Analysis (LAMBDA) at the Higher School of Economics have improved their method of analyzing ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) with the use of mobile phones. The work has been carried out as part of the CRAYFIS experiment and the results were presented at the 22nd International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
2017 was the warmest year on record for the global ocean2017 was the warmest year on record for the global ocean, according to an updated ocean analysis from Institute of Atmospheric Physics/Chinese Academy of Science (IAP/CAS).
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lifespan of fuel cells maximized using small amount of metalsFuel cells are a key future energy technology emerging as eco-friendly and renewable energy sources. In particular, solid oxide fuel cells composed of ceramic materials can directly convert fuels such as biomass, LNG, and LPG to electric energy. KAIST researchers have described a new technique to improve the chemical stability of electrode materials that can extend the lifespan by employing minima
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mobility patterns influence the spread and containment of an epidemicContrary to expectations, recurring mobility between different cities or districts of a large city (for example, work-home commutes) can minimise the spread of an epidemic. This is the finding of research carried out by researchers from the Universitat Rovira i Virgili (Àlex Arenas) and the University of Zaragoza (Jesús Gómez and David Soriano) and which has just been published in the journal Natu
12h
Science | The Guardian
Does dry January work? We ask the expertsMillions pledge to start the new year alcohol-free, but how much difference can a month off booze make to our health or drinking behaviour in the long term? Read more: ‘I now sleep straight through until my alarm rings’: your experiences of dry January Millions of people pledge to ditch the booze every January, but experts are divided over whether going dry for a month is the answer to the UK’s t
12h
Dagens Medicin
Ny forskning gør det muligt at vaccinere målrettet mod meningitisNyt studie fra Hvidovre Hospital viser, at børn med kroniske sygdomme har en øget risiko for at få meningokok-infektioner. Vaccination af denne gruppe vil efter alt at dømme kunne mindske risikoen for at blive ramt af den frygtede infektion, siger hun.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers invent tiny vision processing chip for ultra-small smart vision systems and IoT applicationsA team of researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) has developed a novel microchip named EQSCALE that can capture visual details from video frames with extremely low power consumption. The video feature extractor uses 20 times less power than existing best-in-class chips, so it only requires a tiny battery. It could reduce the size of smart vision systems down to the millimetre
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Winter is off to late start in normally frigid rural AlaskaWinter is off to a late start in parts of rural Alaska.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
UK retail sales slide in December after Black Friday boostBritish retail sales slid 1.5 percent in December from the previous month after consumers had brought forward their Christmas shopping, official data showed Friday.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Marine scientists steer trawlers away from sensitive sea floorsBottom trawling, where fishing boats drag a heavy net along the seafloor, can devastate marine habitats and cause fish stocks to plummet, but scientists have developed new eco-friendly techniques to support the sustainability of an industry employing tens of thousands of people.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Classroom to boardroom – how to turn a school science project into a businessWhen, as a 16-year-old, Adam Noble began measuring nanosilver pollution in his local river, he could hardly have foreseen that it would make him CEO of a 40-strong company before his 24th birthday.
13h
Ingeniøren
Blå partier: Staten skal ikke have penge i Københavns LetbaneFlertal vil undgå problemerne med Aarhus Letbane, hvor staten først trak sig ud, efter at projektets økonomi var løbet løbsk.
13h
The Atlantic
The World Has Never Seen an Oil Spill Like ThisOver the last two weeks, the maritime world has watched with horror as a tragedy has unfolded in the East China Sea. A massive Iranian tanker, the Sanchi, collided with a Chinese freighter carrying grain. Damaged and adrift, the tanker caught on fire, burned for more than a week, and sank. All 32 crew members are presumed dead. Meanwhile, Chinese authorities and environmental groups have been try
13h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study ends debate over role of steroids in treating septic shockThe results from the largest ever study of septic shock could improve treatment for critically ill patients and save health systems worldwide hundreds of millions of dollars each year.Researchers at The George Institute for Global Health studied whether the use of steroids as an additional treatment to septic shock -- a severe life threatening infection -- would improve survival.
13h
Ingeniøren
Fire småting, der kan løfte din karriereDet kræver meget at sparke din karriere fremad, men enkelte hverdagsaktiviteter kan fremme din karriere uden meget arbejde. Jobfinder giver dig fire småtricks, som kan bringe din professionelle karriere fremad.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US to overtake Saudi as crude oil producer: IEAThe United States are set to overtake Saudi Arabia as the world's number two oil producer this year, as shale companies, attracted by rising prices, ramp up drilling, the International Energy Agency said on Friday.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Storm caused 90 mn euros in damage: Dutch insurersDutch insurers said Friday that fierce storms that whipped across The Netherlands caused 90 million euros ($111 million) in devastation, as the country's train service slowly creaked back into gear.
13h
Viden
Blodprøve kan afsløre kræft: 'Det er den hellige gral vi har fundet'Forskningsgruppe har haft held med at opspore kræft med blodprøver.
14h
Viden
NASA: 2017 er det næstvarmeste år siden 18802016 var det varmeste. Og ifølge NASA ville 2017 være det varmeste år, hvis man så bort fra klimafænomenerne El Niño og La Niña.
14h
Ingeniøren
Alexa overvåger børnene: Her er kommunernes digitale visionKommunernes Landsforening har sendt teknologiske visioner på gaden, med elementer fra den eksponentielle tænkning.
14h
Science | The Guardian
Georgetown in northern Queensland once part of North America – geologistsResearchers found rocks in the area 412km west of Cairns were unlike any others in Australia, but similar to those in Canada Geologists in northern Australia have made a discovery that suggests the area around Georgetown in northern Queensland was once part of North America, more than a billion years ago. Researchers from Curtin University discovered that rocks in the area, 412km west of Cairns,
15h
Science : NPR
Iowa Boys Charged In Connection With Deaths Of Half A Million HoneybeesThe unidentified boys, ages 12 and 13, are accused of ransacking a Sioux City honey farm, knocking over hives and exposing the bees to frigid winter temperatures. (Image credit: Andy Duback/AP)
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Craving carbs? Blame your brain, Japan study findsUnder pressure and gobbling pizza or chocolate? It may not be your fault, according to Japanese researchers who have isolated the neurons that drive a craving for carbs.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
HSBC in $100 million forex fraud settlementBritish financial giant HSBC has agreed to pay more than $100 million to US authorities after admitting to defrauding clients during multi-billion-dollar foreign exchange transactions, the Justice Department announced Thursday.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
China's birthrate dropped despite allowing 2-child familiesThe birthrate in China fell last year despite the country easing its family planning policies and allowing all couples to have two children, a result parents say of the stresses of urban life.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon's potential HQ2 sites leaves many cities disappointedAmazon Prime SubscriptionAmazon's move to whittle its list for a second headquarters leaves more than 200 municipalities disappointed. Here are statements from some of the places that didn't make the tech giant's cut to 20 contenders:
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Maybe next time: Cities see failed Amazon bids as trial runsAmazon Prime SubscriptionFor some of the 200-plus cities knocked out of the running for Amazon's second headquarters, the effort may turn out to be a trial run for other opportunities. But they're advised not make the same kind of promises to just anyone.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook top choice for Philippines wildlife traders: monitorFacebook Mark ZuckerbergFacebook has emerged as the top site for wildlife trafficking in the Philippines, a watchdog said Friday, with thousands of endangered crocodiles, snakes and turtles illegally traded in just three months.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google, Tencent eye collaboration on new technologiesInternet titans Google and Tencent on Friday signalled possible future collaboration on developing new technologies as the US and Chinese firms announced a long-term patent-sharing agreement.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research challenges existing models of black holesChris Packham, associate professor of physics and astronomy at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), has collaborated on a new study that expands the scientific community's understanding of black holes in our galaxy and the magnetic fields that surround them.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility delivers beam to all four of its experimental areas simultaneouslyJust months after completing a nine-year construction project to upgrade its research capabilities, the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has delivered its next technological success: For the first time, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) has delivered electron beams simultaneously to all four experimental halls. This achievement maximizes
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Temporary 'bathtub drains' in the ocean concentrate flotsamAn experiment featuring the largest flotilla of sensors ever deployed in a single area provides new insights into how marine debris, or flotsam, moves on the surface of the ocean.
15h
Ingeniøren
Leder: Overvågning af borgerne må ikke overlades til embedsmændene
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New research collaboration with UTSA professor challenges existing models of black holesChris Packham, associate professor of physics and astronomy at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), has collaborated on a new study that expands the scientific community's understanding of black holes in our galaxy and the magnetic fields that surround them.
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prescription drug labels provide scant dosing guidance for obese kidsDespite the US Congress providing incentives to drug manufacturers to encourage the study of medications in children, few approved drugs include safe dosing information for obese kids.
17h
The Atlantic
Radio Atlantic: Bricks, Clicks, and the Future of ShoppingThe 'retail apocalypse' is upon us, they say. In the United States, 2017 saw emptied malls, shuttered department stores, and once-iconic brands falling into bankruptcy. Yet retail spending continues to grow, in strange new directions that could have significant effects. What will shopping look like in the future? How will these changes reverberate throughout the country? Atlantic editor Gillian W
18h
Ingeniøren
Underbetalte ingeniører i det offentlige kan blive dyrt for samfundetOffentligt ansatte ingeniører er blevet hægtet af i lønkapløbet med ansatte i det private erhvervsliv, viser lønstatistik fra IDA. Men det kan koste samfundet dyrt, og konsekvensen kan blive dårligere myndigheds­behandling pga. medarbejderflugt, mener forskere.
19h
The Atlantic
Science Is Giving the Pro-Life Movement a BoostThe first time Ashley McGuire had a baby, she and her husband had to wait 20 weeks to learn its sex. By her third, they found out at 10 weeks with a blood test. Technology has defined her pregnancies, she told me, from the apps that track weekly development to the ultrasounds that show the growing child. “My generation has grown up under an entirely different world of science and technology than
20h
Scientific American Content: Global
Social Media Helps ID Belch SourceSurveillance of Yelp restaurant reviews for terms like vomit led researchers to the sources of foodborne illness outbreaks. Karen Hopkin reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
20h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Scapa Flow microplastics levels 'similar to Forth and Clyde'Researchers at Heriot-Watt University took more than 100 sediment samples from 13 Orkney beaches.
21h
Feed: All Latest
How Did President Trump Do on His Physical? It’s ComplicatedThe answers to impolite but salient questions about personal health aren’t, it turns out, straightforward—for anyone, not just a president.
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Science | The Guardian
New blood test could help detect eight common cancers before they spreadResearchers believe CancerSEEK will save thousands of lives and hope it will be widely available in a few years Researchers have said a groundbreaking new blood test that can detect eight common types of cancer before they spread will save countless lives. They said “liquid biopsy” – developed in the US – would be a game-changer in the fight against cancer, and hoped it could be widely available
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Hope for threatened 'little tiger cat'Habitat fragmentation is a bigger threat to Chile's wildcat than human persecution, say conservationists.
21h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Don't sweat it: Bikram yoga is no more effective than yoga practiced at room temperatureBikram yoga, a hot yoga style, is no more effective at improving health than the same yoga postures at room temperature -- that's what research published in Experimental Physiology and carried out by Texas State University and the University of Texas at Austin, USA, has found.
21h
Science | The Guardian
Hot or not? Bikram no more beneficial than any other yoga, says vascular studyYoga could help to improve function of artery linings regardless of room temperature, researchers conclude While the popularity of practising yoga in sweltering rooms is booming around the world, researchers say benefits to blood vessels are the same whether the moves are performed in the heat or not. Bikram yoga was founded by controversial instructor Bikram Choudhury and involves 26 poses and t
22h
New Scientist - News
Hot yoga’s high temperature may not have any health benefitsDespite all the extra effort and sweat, a study suggests that the high temperature used in hot yoga classes may not have any useful effect
22h
New Scientist - News
Some exoplanets orbiting red giant stars may just be a mirageRed giant stars may be tricking us into thinking they have planets when they don’t. Instead, sunspots or atmospheric ripples might be distorting their light
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using data mining to make sense of climate changeExperts have developed a new way of mining data from climate data sets that is more self-contained than traditional tools. The methodology brings out commonalities of data sets without as much expertise from the user, allowing scientists to trust the data and get more robust -- and transparent -- results.
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Futurity.org
Most ancient methane doesn’t escape Arctic Ocean depthsNew research pinpoints a source of methane in the Arctic Ocean—and finds that ancient methane trapped deep below the surface isn’t escaping into the atmosphere. “…we found that this ancient methane signal largely disappears and is replaced by a different methane source the closer you get to the surface waters.” Ocean sediments are a massive storehouse for the potent greenhouse gas methane. Trappe
22h
The Atlantic
The House Voted to Avert a Shutdown—but It Might Not Be EnoughUpdated on January 18 at 10:02 p.m. ET The House on Thursday evening narrowly passed a bill that would keep the federal government open for nearly another month amid an impasse over immigration. But the proposal may be doomed in the Senate, where Democrats and a small contingent of Republicans could block the bill and send the government into a shutdown beginning at midnight Friday. After an anxi
22h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Temporary 'bathtub drains' in the ocean concentrate flotsamAn experiment using hundreds of plastic drifters in the Gulf of Mexico shows that rather than simply spread out, as current calculations would predict, many of them clumped together in a tight cluster.
22h
Feed: All Latest
Triton Malware Details Show the Dangers of Industrial System SabotageNew details about Triton malware should put industrial systems and critical infrastructure on notice.
22h
Futurity.org
People report the most stress about this climate worryWhile some people have little anxiety about the Earth’s changing climate, others are experiencing high levels of stress, and even depression, based on their perception of the threat of global climate change, according to new research. “People who worry about animals and nature tend to have a more planetary outlook and think of bigger picture issues…” Significant research has explored the environm
23h
Futurity.org
Longer lives for obese patients after bariatric surgeryIn a new study, obese, middle aged men and women who had bariatric surgery had half the death rate of patients who had traditional kinds of treatment over a 10-year period. “We showed that a long-term effect of bariatric surgery is a longer life for obese patients,” says coauthor Philip Greenland, professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “They had h
23h
Science | The Guardian
Falling forensic science standards 'making miscarriages of justice inevitable'Regulator says UK forces failing to meet standards, with routine outsourcing of great concern Police forces are failing to meet the official standards for forensic science, making miscarriages of justice inevitable, the government’s forensic regulator has said. In her annual report, Gillian Tully highlighted her growing concerns about the failure of some forensic firms used by the police to meet
23h
Futurity.org
Varied diets mean more new kinds of batsOmnivorous New World noctilionoid bats, whose diets include both plant and animal materials, produce more generations in the long run than specialized vegetarian or insectivorous species, a new study indicates. Past research has shown that when species evolve from being a predator or insectivore to being a vegetarian, the rate at which new species arise increases. Study coauthor Liliana Dávalos,
23h
Futurity.org
Too much noise really stresses birds outBirds exposed to noise pollution created by natural gas compressors show symptoms similar to those humans exhibit when suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, researchers report. In a new study, researchers found that adults and nestlings of three species showed multiple signs of chronic stress caused by noise pollution, including skewed stress hormone levels, possibly due to increased anx
23h
Science-Based Medicine
Legislative Alchemy 2017: AcupunctureAcupuncture is nothing more than a theatrical placebo. Yet acupuncturists, defined as primary care practitioners in some states, are succeeding in licensing and practice expansion efforts in state legislatures.
23h
Futurity.org
Future astronauts could get water from ice on MarsResearchers have found eight sites where thick deposits of ice beneath the surface of Mars are exposed in faces of eroding slopes. These eight scarps, with slopes as steep as 55 degrees, reveal new information about the internal layered structure of previously detected underground ice sheets in Mars’ middle latitudes. The researchers located and studied the scarp sites with the HiRISE, or High Re
23h
Futurity.org
Head injury, not concussion, may cause CTEChronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) results from head injuries, not concussions, new research suggests. The research explains why 20 percent of athletes who exhibited the early stages of the progressive brain illness postmortem never had a diagnosed concussion. “It’s the hits to the head, not concussion, that trigger CTE,” says study coauthor Lee Goldstein, an associate professor of psychiatry
23h
Feed: All Latest
FCC Won't Redefine 'Broadband;' Move Could Have Worsened Digital DivideThe FCC backed away from an earlier proposal that would have lowered the threshold for connections to be considered "broadband," and said it had rejected the idea of labeling mobile internet a replacement for home broadband.
23h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Trump's Accomplishments, Troops in Syria, Shutdown CountdownWhat We’re Following The Scandal-Plagued Presidency: Reports that Donald Trump paid an adult-film star to keep silent about an affair she claims they had in 2006—and the fact that a gossip magazine plans to release a detailed interview about their encounters—might seem more fit for a tabloid cover than for the White House briefing room. In Trump’s case, however, the alleged hush money fits into a
23h
Big Think
Whatever You Think, You Don’t Necessarily Know Your Own MindPeople think that stereotypes are true but also that it is not acceptable to admit this and therefore say they are false. Moreover, they say this to themselves too, in inner speech. Read More
23h
Dagens Medicin
Rebelsk overlæge holder pressemøde efter døgnvagt med styrelseschefKristian Rørbæk Madsen vil berette om døgnvagten og overrække underskrifter fra mindst 9.200 læger, som protesterer mod Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed.
23h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: It's the Final CountdownToday in 5 Lines President Trump undermined Republicans’ plan to avert a shutdown by tweeting that an extension of the Children’s Health Insurance Program shouldn’t be included in a short-term spending bill. The House is expected to vote on it tonight. Senate Democrats reportedly have the votes to stop the bill, raising the likelihood of a government shutdown. The Department of Health and Human S
23h
Popular Science
Nuclear reactors the size of wastebaskets could power our Martian settlementsSpace Small, but mighty. The cylinder of uranium is the size of a coffee can. But one day, its successors could power humanity's future on Mars.
23h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Americans are getting more ZZZZsAlthough more than one in three Americans still don't get enough sleep, a new analysis shows first signs of success in the fight for more shut eye.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Why animals diversified on Earth: Cancer research provides cluesCan tumors teach us about animal evolution on Earth? Researchers believe so and now present a novel hypothesis of why animal diversity increased dramatically on Earth about half a billion years ago. A biological innovation may have been key.
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Live Science
Mystery Solved: Here's What Caused a Massive Epidemic in Colonial MexicoResearchers have cracked a nearly 500-year-old mystery about the germ that caused the so-called cocoliztli outbreak, an epidemic that killed countless indigenous people in Mesoamerica shortly after the Spaniards arrived in the New World.
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Live Science
Day Zero: Cape Town Could Become 1st Major City To Run Out of WaterCape Town authorities are pleading with residents to save water, warning that the city's taps could go dry by April.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Long-term warming trend continued in 2017: NASA, NOAAContinuing the planet's long-term warming trend, globally averaged temperatures in 2017 were 1.62 degrees Fahrenheit (0.90 degrees Celsius) warmer than the 1951 to 1980 mean, according to scientists.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Method uses DNA, nanoparticles and lithography to make optically active structuresResearchers have developed a first-of-its-kind technique for creating entirely new classes of optical materials and devices that could lead to light bending and cloaking devices -- news to make the ears of Star Trek's Spock perk up. Using DNA as a key tool, the scientists took gold nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes and arranged them in two and three dimensions to form optically active su
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The Atlantic
Rex Tillerson's Syria Policy Is Sensible—But It's FancifulSecretary of State Tillerson’s speech on U.S. Syria policy, delivered at Stanford on Wednesday, was both sensible and fanciful. It was sensible in that it gave a history of Syria’s grisly war, stated clearly America’s interest in continued involvement even as ISIS is defeated, and outlined policies consistent with those interests. It was fanciful in that the policies outlined would require a much
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NYT > Science
Young Women Are Using A.D.H.D. Drugs in Greater Numbers, C.D.C. ReportsSince 2003, the percentage of women filling prescriptions for drugs like Ritalin has increased nearly fivefold in some age groups.
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
Making Mush Melon Moonshine#Moonshiners | Tuesdays 9p Mark and Digger prepare to make a moonshine first: Mush Melon Liquor. Is cantaloupe the best flavor we've been missing? Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/moonshiners/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/MoonshinersTV Follow on Twitter: https:/
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Science : NPR
Scientists Peek Inside The 'Black Box' Of Soil Microbes To Learn Their SecretsMicroorganisms play a vital role in growing food and sustaining the planet, but they do it anonymously. Scientists haven't identified most soil microbes, but they are learning which are most common. (Image credit: PeopleImages/Getty Images)
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