Viden
Menneskets bedste ven er klimaets fjende: Gør Fido til vegetarDet koster i CO2-regnskabet, når de firbenede skal fodres. Men hunde kan sagtens leve uden kød, lyder det fra eksperter
6h
Ingeniøren
Mikrokapsler fra DTU skal levere sunde bakterier til tarmenDTU Nanotech er i gang med at udvikle beholdere på størrelse med sukkerkorn, som skal føre probiotika sikkert forbi mavesyren.
12h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hunting dogs as possible vectors for the infectious disease tularaemiaTularaemia is an infectious bacterial disease that is life-threatening for rodents, rabbits and hares, but which can also infect humans and dogs. While contact with contaminated blood or meat makes hunters a high-risk group, the frequency of infections among hunting dogs has not been much studied. Researchers have now confirmed a relevant prevalence of infections in Austrian hunting dogs following
3min
Wix
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A nanophenomenon that triggers the bone-repair processResearchers have resolved one of the great unknowns in bone self-repair: how the cells responsible for forming new bone tissue are called into action. Their work reveals the role of an electromechanical phenomenon at the nanoscale, flexoelectricity, as a possible mechanism for stimulating the cell response and guiding it throughout the fracture repair process.
31min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A survival lesson from bats: Eating variety keeps species multiplyingA new study reveals that omnivorous New World noctilionoid bats, those species with diets including both plant and animal materials, produce more new species in the long run than specialized vegetarian or insectivorous species.
31min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gabon says major ivory trafficking ring dismantled, 10 heldGabon says a major trafficking ring that smuggled six tons of ivory out of the country in 2017 has been dismantled, in a victory against poachers who have killed large numbers of forest elephants in the Central African country.
53min
Big Think
Should You Invest in these 10 Cryptocurrencies?Bitcoin started at $.008, and today is worth over $12,000. What's the deal with other cryptocurrencies? We're here to help. Read More
1h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Medusaceratops MysteryOld bones raise new questions about an enigmatic horned dinosaur -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
1h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Adhesives developed to prevent bracket stains on teethResearchers have performed research to develop adhesive materials that will prevent white stains from appearing on the teeth of people who use brackets.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Promising malaria vaccine testedAn international research team has conducted successful phase II clinical tests of a new anti-malaria medication. The treatment led to a cure in 83 cases.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The human body's golden gate to iron trafficNew findings could change how iron metabolism in the human body is understood, and open new horizons for research and therapeutics for inflammatory diseases and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson's disease.
4h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Infinite Optimism of Physicist David DeutschThe quantum theorist thinks we’ll solve war, global warming and consciousness—and that will be just the beginning -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
4h
The Atlantic
The Real Reasons Why the Government Shut DownWhen the government shuts down, the politicians pipe up. No sooner had a midnight deadline passed without congressional action on a must-pass spending bill than lawmakers launched their time-honored competition over who gets the blame for their collective failure. The Senate floor became a staging ground for dueling speeches early Saturday morning, and lawmakers of both parties — as well as the W
4h
Big Think
Winter Olympics 2018: How South Korea Learned the Hard Way Not to Mess with North KoreaCould the upcoming Winter Olympics stand as a turning point, or will it be more of the same? Read More
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Infant mortality rates in Texas vary dramatically from one zip code to the nextInfant mortality rates in Texas vary dramatically even across neighboring zip codes, according to a new analysis and mapping tool. The analysis and searchable map, which are the first of their kind in Texas, use data from Texas Vital Statistics Linked Birth and Death Records from 2011-2014.
6h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Hedgehog signaling proteins keep cancer stem cells aliveScientists have discovered that the survival of cancer stem cells is dependent on the 'Hedgehog signaling pathway'. Targeting this pathway had previously shown no effect on the growth of colorectal cancer. Now, scientists have demonstrated that using different drugs to target a specific aspect of the pathway may yield better treatment outcomes for patients.
6h
Feed: All Latest
Android Malware, Free Speech, and More Security News This WeekFalse alarms, free speech, and more of the week's top security news.
6h
Feed: All Latest
Space Photos of the Week: *You* Just Try to Snap a Pic at 100,000 MPHWhen NASA's Juno spacecraft whizzes by Jupiter's poles, it manages to snap clear photos at astounding speeds.
6h
Ingeniøren
Sådan bliver det nye radiohusHvert studie får sit eget fundament for at opnå den bedst mulige lydisolation i Statsradiofoniens nye radiohus på Rosenørns Allé.
6h
Popular Science
Social media is making you miserable. Here’s how to delete your accounts.DIY So long, and thanks for all the Likes. If you're tired of the social media whirlwind, you can opt out. Here's how to delete your Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, and other accounts.
6h
The Atlantic
What Happens to Astronauts During a Government Shutdown?As the wheels of the U.S. government ground to a halt Friday at midnight, thousands of federal employees prepared to face days or weeks without work or pay until their offices reopened. Some employees will continue working through the government shutdown, however, including the three with the longest commute: NASA astronauts Mark Vande Hei, Joseph Acaba, and Scott Tingle. Despite the political tu
6h
Feed: All Latest
Why Aren't There More Smart Americans?In the latest 'Geek's Guide to the Galaxy' podcast, author David Ignatius discusses the shortcomings in US education.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
Illusions from the National Archives in New York CityNational Archives of New York City archivist Christopher Zarr reveals how deeply the art form of camouflage was pursued 100 years ago during World War I -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Feed: All Latest
USC's New Class Shows It's All in on PatentsA look at one of the nation's first classes for undergraduates on intellectual property.
8h
Ingeniøren
FRB 121102: Et ekstremt underligt signal fra rummetSåkaldte fast radio bursts er meget atypiske signaler, og blandt disse skiller et enkelt sig ud i særlig grad.
8h
Ingeniøren
Fast radio bursts er svære at få fat påFast radio bursts blev opdaget med de store gamle radio­teleskoper. Nu sættes en ny type radioteleskop ind.
8h
Big Think
Daniel Alarcón – There's No Such Thing as Glamor, Really – Think Again - a Big Think Podcast #131The stories we wrap around ourselves, our neighbors. our children. The invisible stories we struggle against. Read More
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
5 Body Hacks to Instantly Calm Overwhelming EmotionSavvy Psychologist Dr. Ellen Hendriksen breaks the glass on 5 body hacks that pull the plug on overwhelming emotion -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
50 Years Ago, a US Military Jet Crashed in Greenland – with 4 Nuclear Bombs on BoardOn Jan. 21, 1968, the Cold War grew significantly colder -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
Feed: All Latest
Trump's First Year in Office: The Lasting Impacts on TechSaturday marks the one-year anniversary of Donald Trump's inauguration. And while he may not have his border wall yet, he's done plenty to impact innovation for years to come.
9h
Feed: All Latest
How to Pre-Order Both of Nintendo's Labo KitsOur guide to what's in the Nintendo Labo Variety Kit and Robot Kit for Switch, and how to pre-order.
9h
Feed: All Latest
Ford, GM Go All in on Electric Cars, but How Clean Are They?We did the math.
9h
The Atlantic
Why Aren't College Students Using Career Services?One summer, a group of students with research jobs on campus, including myself, met up at a Thai restaurant in our college’s small town. This was our third free dinner of the week. Our school’s career center was hiring a new member for its team and wanted each candidate on its short list to meet with actual students. Naturally, the staff enticed us with the promise of free meals. With our lists o
9h
The Atlantic
After 61 Years, America’s Busiest Highway Is Almost CompletePENNINGTON, N.J.—The past few years have been thick with promises of shiny new infrastructure and the revival of American greatness. Funny, then, that so little has been made of a quiet victory for U.S. infrastructure due later this year. By September 2018, one of the country’s most famous civil-engineering projects will finally complete construction, six decades after work on it began. Interstat
9h
The Atlantic
Do Super Bowl Hopefuls Still Need Star Quarterbacks?There has been no truism in sports more durable than this: A team with Super Bowl aspirations needs a great quarterback. Any segment of NFL history will demonstrate its rightness, but recent years have done so especially. Over the 21st century, the Lombardi Trophy has been granted almost exclusively to teams with the position’s best players. It has gone to Tom Brady five times, to Peyton Manning
9h
Ingeniøren
Frynsegoder er blevet en selvfølgeFrokostordning, sundhedsforsikring, bonus, frugt, kaffe, mobiltelefon, internet­adgang, fitness og massage. De privatansatte ingeniører har masser af personale­goder – de tager dem faktisk for givet.
10h
The Atlantic
The Ghost of Chae Chan PingI haven’t been able to find out when or where Chae Chan Ping died. American history records that this Chinese laborer was expelled from the United States—despite a written promise from the U.S. government that he would not be—on September 1, 1889. After that, he vanished. But his ghost haunts American immigration law, and the U.S. Supreme Court, more than 125 years later. As Michael Kagan of the
10h
Science : NPR
Saunas Are A Hot Trend, And They Might Even Help Your HealthSweating in a sauna feels good, and it's associated with health benefits including a lower risk of heart disease. But is that because of the heat, or because you're able to kick back and relax? (Image credit: bortonia/Getty Images )
10h
The Atlantic
America's Role in El Salvador's DeteriorationWhen Donald Trump said this month he would end temporary protected status for almost 200,000 Salvadorans, the number of immigrants standing to lose protections under this president approached the 1 million mark. This includes people, like those from El Salvador, that now stand to be deported to countries where their lives could be in danger. El Salvador has one of the world’s highest homicide rat
11h
New on MIT Technology Review
The Best of the Physics arXiv (week ending January 20, 2018This week’s most thought-provoking papers from the Physics arXiv.
11h
Viden
Mand får epileptisk anfald i virtual reality-verdenVerdenens andre beboere iler til undsætning, men står magtesløse
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spotted hyena returns to Gabon park after 20 years: researchersA spotted hyena has been sighted in a Gabon national park for the first time in 20 years, conservationists said Friday, the latest large predator to have returned to a region where many had gone locally extinct.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook to let users rank 'trust' in news sourcesFacebook Mark ZuckerbergFacebook announced Friday it will ask its two billion users to rank their trust in news sources, in its latest attempt to combat the spread of misinformation on the social network.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dutch shocked by call to ban EU electric pulse fishingThe black clouds hanging over the boats in Dutch ports Friday were not the remnants of wild winter gales, but harbingers of another devastating storm brewing for Dutch fishermen.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Europe brings on charm and blue skies to lure Chinese touristsChinese tourists are big spenders and with the numbers visiting Europe set to soar by nearly 70 percent over the next five years, the countries of the Old Continent are rolling out the red carpet to make the guests feel welcome.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chinese national sentenced to prison for stealing software codeA Chinese national was sentenced to five years in prison on economic espionage charges in connection with the theft of proprietary software code from a US technology company, officials said Friday.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Missouri offered about $2.5 billion in incentives to AmazonThe state of Missouri offered Amazon nearly $2.5 billion in incentives spread over 10 years in its failed bid to lure the company's second headquarters to the state, according to figures released Friday by the state Department of Economic Development.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Meteorite hunters find first fragments of Michigan meteorMeteorite hunters who flocked to Detroit from across the U.S. after a meteor exploded are finding the fragments.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cells lacking nuclei struggle to move in 3-D environmentsUniversity of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers have revealed new details of how the physical properties of the nucleus influence how cells can move around different environments - such as "soft" tissue like brain and fat, or "stiff" tissue like cartilage or bone.
12h
Dagens Medicin
Jeg vil behandle Vangsted med respekt på døgnvagtenI morgen vil jeg vise styrelseschefen den kliniske virkelighed og den ægte patientsikkerhed. Den, som ikke kan nedskrives i cirkulærer på Islands Brygge.
14h
Science | The Guardian
After the rescue: what does the future hold for California's Turpin children?Trauma experts are divided over the prospects of the 13 children who escaped alleged parental abuse – but recent survival stories offer some hope The 13 siblings are safe now, ensconced in the folds of California’s medical care, and it is their parents’ turn to be shackled. A family that inhabited its own secluded world in a tile-roofed suburban house, a world of alleged violence, suffering and d
14h
Scientific American Content: Global
Moon's Tug Doesn't Cause Big QuakesAn analysis of more than 200 earthquakes over the past four centuries concludes there's no connection between moon phases and big earthquakes. Christopher Intagliata reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
19h
Feed: All Latest
Facebook's Latest Fix for Fake News: Ask Users What They TrustFacebook said it will prioritize news sources by surveying users about their trust in media brands.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Factor that doubles the risk of death from breast cancer identifiedResearchers have discovered that the risk of death from breast cancer is twice as high for patients with high heterogeneity of the estrogen receptor within the same tumor as compared to patients with low heterogeneity. The study shows that the higher risk of death is independent of other known tumor markers and also holds true for Luminal A breast cancer.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Increasing number of adolescents receive a psychiatric or neurodevelopmental diagnosisAccording to a national register study comparing Finnish birth cohorts from 1987 and 1997, an increasing number of adolescents receive a psychiatric or neurodevelopmental diagnosis. The number of diagnosed adolescents increased especially for girls in the younger cohort.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Free online access to millions of documents on chemical toxicity made possible through ToxicDocsMillions of pages of internal corporate and trade association documents relating to the introduction of new products and chemicals into the workplace and commerce have been compiled into a free searchable online database called ToxicDocs.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How plants see lightThe proteins PCH1 and PCHL help plants adapt to their surroundings. Plants react sensitively to changes in their surroundings and possess the ability to adapt to them. They use the photoreceptor protein phytochrome B to see light and then regulate processes such as seed germination, seedling development, longitudinal growth and flower formation.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Thanks for the memory: Taking a deep look at memristorsScientists have now unveiled the long-mysterious inner workings of these semiconductor elements, which can act like the short-term memory of nerve cells.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Explosive evolution' of techniques to restore blood flow to the brainRecent decades have seen an 'explosive evolution' of techniques to restore blood flow to areas of the brain endangered by stroke or clogged arteries, according to a new report.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Radioactivity from oil and gas wastewater persists in Pennsylvania stream sedimentsMore than seven years after Pennsylvania officials requested that the disposal of radium-laden fracking wastewater into surface waters be restricted, a new study finds that high levels of radioactivity persist in stream sediments at three disposal sites. Radioactivity at these sites is 650 times higher than at unaffected sites upstream. The contamination comes from conventional, or non-fracked, oi
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers illustrate how muscle growth inhibitor is activated, could aid in treating ALSResearchers have identified how the inactive or latent form of GDF8, a signaling protein also known as myostatin responsible for limiting muscle, is activated.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Piecework at the nano assembly lineScientists have developed a novel electric propulsion technology for nanorobots. It allows molecular machines to move a hundred thousand times faster than with the biochemical processes used to date. This makes nanobots fast enough to do assembly line work in molecular factories.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
City lights setting traps for migrating birdsA new study has examined how light pollution lures birds into urban areas during fall migration, a trend that poses risk for the fowl that often fly into buildings and has increased with the addition of brighter LED lights. The researchers were interested in seeing what factors shape the birds' distributions and why they occur in certain areas.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Let's make a deal: Could AI compromise better than humans?Researchers developed an algorithm that teaches machines not just to win games, but to cooperate and compromise -- and sometimes do a little trash-talking too.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How metal scaffolds enhance the bone healing processScientists have shown how mechanically optimized constructs known as titanium-mesh scaffolds help optimize bone regeneration.
20h
The Atlantic
'He’s Chosen This Movement as His Own'Throughout Donald Trump’s first full year as president, his approval rating has plummeted. He’s offended and alarmed some Americans with his controversial tweets and remarks on race and immigration. Others have been dismayed by his response to the Russia investigation. He’s even lost a chunk of support within his own base. But Trump’s performance has at least one group collectively beaming: the p
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cells lacking nuclei struggle to move in 3-D environmentsA study examined the role of the physical structure of the nucleus in cell movement through different surfaces.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Programmable droplets' could enable high-volume biology experimentsResearchers have developed hardware that uses electric fields to move droplets of chemical or biological solutions around a surface, mixing them in ways that could be used to test thousands of reactions in parallel.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cystic fibrosis bacterial burden begins during first years of lifeCystic fibrosis shortens life by making the lungs prone to repeated bacterial infections and inflammation. Researchers have now shown for the first time that the lungs' bacterial population changes in the first few years of life as respiratory infections and inflammation set in. This research offers a way to predict the onset of lung disease in children with CF and suggests a larger role for preve
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Creation of synthetic horsepox virus could lead to more effective smallpox vaccineResearchers created a new synthetic virus that could lead to the development of a more effective vaccine against smallpox. The discovery demonstrates how techniques based on the use of synthetic DNA can be used to advance public health measures.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Virtual reality goes magneticThe success of Pokémon GO made many people familiar with the concept of 'augmented reality': computer-generated perception blends into the real and virtual worlds. So far, these apps largely used optical methods for motion detection. Physicists have now developed an ultrathin electronic magnetic sensor that can be worn on skin. Just by interacting with magnetic fields, the device enables a touchle
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breakthrough study shows how plants sense the worldPlants lack eyes and ears, but they can still see, hear, smell and respond to environmental cues and dangers. They do this with the aid of hundreds of membrane proteins that sense microbes or other stresses. Researchers now have created the first network map for 200 of these proteins. The map shows how a few key proteins act as master nodes critical for network integrity, and the map also reveals
21h
Scientific American Content: Global
Trump's New "Treatment Refusal" Rule Puts Discrimination Ahead of Patients' HealthA new proposed regulation from the Trump Administration is trying to elevate the personal beliefs of providers above the command to “do no harm”—and above civil rights laws -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
21h
Big Think
Study: Guys With More Testosterone Don’t Like "Sophisticated" MusicA new study find a connection between having more testosterone and not liking classical, jazz, or avant-garde music. Read More
21h
NYT > Science
Trump Passed a Cognitive Exam. What Does That Really Mean?The exam, called the Moca, is widely used in doctor’s offices, but it is not sophisticated enough to diagnose mental decline, experts say.
21h
The Atlantic
5 Questions About Facebook's Plan to Rate Media by 'Trustworthiness'Mark Zuckerberg announced Friday that Facebook will begin surveying users about which news sources they trust, in an effort to rank publications on “ trustworthiness .” This rating will help determine media companies’ placement in the News Feed, thereby materially changing the traffic that their stories receive. Zuckerberg provided only a cursory description of the survey methodology. “As part of
21h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Congress on Deadline, Unprecedented Oil Spill, Why One Trump Voter Feels DupedWhat We’re Following Down to the Wire: The House of Representatives voted Thursday night to pass a temporary spending bill, and President Trump met with Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer to discuss the issues holding up the Senate. But with hours to go before Congress’s midnight deadline, there’s still no sign of a deal to avert a government shutdown. We’ll have the latest updates here. Health
22h

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