Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The world's most powerful acoustic tractor beam could pave the way for levitating humansAcoustic tractor beams use the power of sound to hold particles in mid-air, and unlike magnetic levitation, they can grab most solids or liquids. For the first time University of Bristol engineers have shown it is possible to stably trap objects larger than the wavelength of sound in an acoustic tractor beam. This discovery opens the door to the manipulation of drug capsules or micro-surgical impl
6h
Live Science
Philippines Mayon Volcano Explodes, Violent Eruption ImminentExplosions shook the Mayon volcano, while fountains of lava spewed from its summit today (Jan. 22), causing the Philippines government to raise the hazard level from 3 to 4, indicating a violent eruption is imminent.
44min
Ingeniøren
Snyd igen-igen: Audi skal tilbagekalde 127.000 bilerTysklands transportmyndigheder har opdaget software til emissionssvindel i flere af Audis nyeste dieselmotorer.
6h

LATEST

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Heat loss from the Earth triggers ice sheet slide towards the seaIn North-East Greenland, researchers have measured the loss of heat that comes up from the interior of the Earth. This enormous area is a geothermal 'hot spot' that melts the ice sheet from below and triggers the sliding of glaciers towards the sea.
5min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Finding unravels nature of cognitive inflexibility in Fragile X syndromeMice with the genetic defect that causes Fragile X syndrome (FXS) learn and remember normally, but show an inability to learn new information that contradicts what they initially learned, shows a new study by a team of neuroscientists.
5min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New fuel cell technology runs on solid carbonAdvancements in a fuel cell technology powered by solid carbon could make electricity generation from coal and biomass cleaner and more efficient, according to a new article. Innovations in the anode, the electrolyte and the fuel allow the fuel cell to utilize more carbon, operate at lower temperatures and show higher maximum power densities than earlier direct carbon fuel cells (DCFCs).
5min
Futurity.org
Mice can mimic human breast cancer genesMice can mimic human breast cancer tissue and its genes, even more so than previously thought, as well as other cancers including lung, oral, and esophagus, a new study suggests. Cancer is the second leading cause of death among Americans next to heart disease, according to the Centers for Disease Control. “Just like human breast cancer, there are many subtypes that can be found in mice,” says Er
6min
Ingeniøren
Vestas-båd i nyt forlis: Kolliderede med kinesisk fiskerbådDen Cestas-sponsorerede sejlbåd i Volvo Ocean Race ligger stille med hul i siden. Denne gang kolliderede den med en fiskebåd ud for Hong Kongs havn. Arrangørerne tog ikke hensyn til de kritiske forhold i område, mener flere kilder.
6min
New on MIT Technology Review
China is already gene-editing a lot of humans
7min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Artificial intelligence predicts corruptionResearchers from the University of Valladolid (Spain) have created a computer model based on neural networks which provides in which Spanish provinces cases of corruption can appear with greater probability, as well as the conditions that favor their appearance. This alert system confirms that the probabilities increase when the same party stays in government more years.
8min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People with prosthetic arms less affected by common illusionPeople with prosthetic arms or hands do not experience the 'size-weight illusion' as strongly as other people, new research shows.
8min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Forest fire risk assessment using hotspot analysis in GISThis research identified and prioritized forest fire hotspots, highlighted the shortage of fire stations within the identified hotspots and suggested the suitable locations for new fire stations in Brunei Muara district.
8min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New long-acting approach for malaria therapy developedA new study, published in Nature Communications, conducted by the University of Liverpool and the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine highlights a new 'long acting' medicine for the prevention of malaria.
8min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
TU Wien develops new semiconductor processing technologyExtremely fine porous structures with tiny holes -- resembling a kind of sponge at nano level -- can be generated in semiconductors. This opens up new possibilities for the realization of tiny sensors or unusual optical and electronic components. There have already been experiments in this area with porous structures made from silicon. Now, researchers at TU Wien have succeeded in developing a met
8min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Combination of resistance genes offers better protection for wheat against powdery mildewUZH plant researchers have tested newly developed wheat lines with improved resistance in field trials. They have demonstrated that a combination of two variations of a resistance gene provides wheat with better protection against the fungal disease.
8min
Popular Science
This optical illusion creates a handy fake flashlightHead Trip Batteries not required. No one has a definitive explanation for this false illumination.
18min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Seabed mining could destroy ecosystemsMining on the ocean floor could do irreversible damage to deep-sea ecosystems, says a new study of seabed mining proposals around the world.
23min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Taking control at the junctionFine tuning the composition of nitride alloys can further the development of optical and electronic interface devices.
23min
The Scientist RSS
Liquid Biopsy Test May Help Screen Eight Types of CancerThe new diagnostic works by identifying cancer-associated proteins and DNA in patient blood.
27min
The Scientist RSS
As Government Suspends Operations, Science Projects Go on HoldThousands of federal employees go on furlough during the shutdown, which could put a stop to research.
27min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study of learning and memory problems in OCD helps young people unlock potential at schoolAdolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have widespread learning and memory problems, according to new research. The findings have already been used to assist adolescents with OCD obtain the help they needed at school to realize their potential -- including helping one individual go on to university.
34min
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Epilepsy linked to brain volume and thickness differencesEpilepsy is associated with thickness and volume differences in the grey matter of several brain regions, according to new research. The largest-ever neuroimaging study of people with epilepsy, shows that epilepsy involves more widespread physical differences than previously assumed, even in types of epilepsy that are typically considered to be more benign if seizures are under control.
34min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Quantum dot ring lasers emit colored lightResearchers have designed a new type of laser called a quantum dot ring laser that emits red, orange, and green light. The different colors are emitted from different parts of the quantum dot—red from the core, green from the shell, and orange from a combination of both—and can be easily switched by controlling the competition between light emission from the core and the shell.
35min
Dagens Medicin
Tidspres og fejl i Sundhedsplatformen udløste for meget kemo til børnEt notat fra Region Hovedstaden til Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed peger på, at det var hurtige og fejlfyldte tilpasninger i Sundhedsplatformen kombineret med manglende sikkerhedstjek, der førte til, at flere kræftramte børn for nylig fik forkerte doser kemo.
38min
The Atlantic
High Maintenance's Barbed Take on Mass MourningEveryone knows this dilemma, now. You wake up, check your phone, and find that something terrible has happened in the world. What do you do next? What are you allowed to do next? Go to work or call out? Self-medicate? Is it okay to meet friends for a drink? Is it insensitive to have sex? (Louis C.K.’s ever-more-infamous 9/11 joke comes to mind.) Can you try to profit from crisis? Can you ignore i
39min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Not just a stem cell markerThe protein CD34 is predominantly regarded as a marker of blood-forming stem cells but it helps with migration to the bone marrow too.
44min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lobachevsky University researchers obtain magnetic semiconductor layers of a new typeResearchers at the laboratory of spin and optical electronics of the Lobachevsky University (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia) have obtained a new type of magnetic semiconductor layers, which demonstrate spin-dependent phenomena in the transport of charge carriers at room temperature.
44min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Virus shown to be likely cause of mystery polio-like illnessA major review by UNSW Sydney medical researchers has identified strong evidence that a virus called Enterovirus D68 is the cause of a mystery polio-like illness that has paralysed children in the US, Canada and Europe. The study is published in the journal Eurosurveillance.
44min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Double trouble: Moisture, not just heat impacts sex of sea turtle hatchlingsMale sea turtles are disappearing and not just in Australia. FAU researchers found that 97 to 100 percent of hatchlings in southeast Florida have been female since 2002. They are the first to show why and how moisture conditions inside the nest in addition to heat affect the development and sex ratios of turtle embryos, using a novel technique they developed to estimate sex ratios with a male-spec
44min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cavity prevention approach effectively reduces tooth decayA scientifically based approach that includes a tooth-decay risk assessment, aggressive preventive measures and conservative restorations can dramatically reduce decay in community dental practices, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco.
44min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Phone-addicted teens are unhappyResearchers found that teens who spent a lot of time in front of screen devices -- playing computer games, using more social media, texting and video chatting -- were less happy than those who invested time in non-screen activities like sports, reading newspapers and magazines, and face-to-face social interaction. The happiest teens used digital media for less than an hour per day. But after a dai
44min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Developing the VTX-1 liquid biopsy system: Fast and label-free enrichment of circulating tumor cellsA new article in the February 2018 issue of SLAS Technology describes a new platform that could change the way cancer is diagnosed and treated by automating the isolation of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) directly from cancer patient blood. This article provides unique insight into the development of a commercial system that has the potential to change the standard of care in cancer diagnosis and
44min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
On the reboundNew research from the US Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and Stanford University has found that palladium nanoparticles can repair atomic dislocations in their crystal structure, potentially leading to other advances in material science.
44min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover a blazar-like narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxyResearchers have identified a new blazar-like narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy that emits gamma-ray radiation. The new galaxy, designated SDSS J211852.96−073227.5, could offer insights into formation and evolution of jets of radiation produced by massive galactic central black holes. The findings are reported January 11 in a paper published on arXiv.org.
59min
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Persistent photoconductivity used to stimulate neurotypic cellsResearchers have, for the first time, used a material's persistent photoconductivity to stimulate neurotype cells. The technique, which is relatively simple, should facilitate future research on using charge to influence cellular behavior.
59min
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The Tortured Deep-Focus Faces of Tournament Chess PlayersSpanish photographer David Lloda travels the world shooting tournaments.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Essential oil inhaler changes dynamics for painEven highly effective individual pain-relieving methods benefit from the use of this odor inhaler by changing pain dynamics and improving pain relief.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New bug helps in annual hay fever battleThe pollen from common ragweed Ambrosia artemisiifolia causes pollinosis, also known as hay fever and respiratory diseases. The dominance of this exotic and invasive ragweed in parts of central Europe ensures that many people have tablets and tissues at the ready when summer comes around. And climate change makes it likely that ragweed, which originates from the U.S., will spread even further.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How cells are able to turnResearchers have long wondered how our cells navigate inside the body. Two new studies, in which Lund University researcher Pontus Nordenfelt has participated, have now demonstrated that the cells use molecular force from within to steer themselves in a certain direction. This knowledge may be of great significance in the development of new drugs.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Smart rollator motivates elderly to exercise moreVTT Technical Research Centre of Finland and Orton are exploring the benefits and impacts of technology in motivating seniors to increase physical activity. This is being done in the new MoveRoll project, funded by the Academy of Finland, based on a smart rollator developed by VTT. The basic idea is that even a small increase in physical activity can have a major effect on the well-being of elderl
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Asteroid 2002 AJ129 to fly safely past Earth February 4Asteroid 2002 AJ129 will make a close approach to Earth on Feb. 4, 2018 at 1:30 p.m. PST (4:30 p.m. EST / 21:30 UTC). At the time of closest approach, the asteroid will be no closer than 10 times the distance between Earth and the Moon (about 2.6 million miles, or 4.2 million kilometers).
1h
Ingeniøren
Persondatalov: Danske virksomheder er på glatisMange danske virksomheder er stadig ikke klar til at håndtere de nye europæiske persondataregler, GDPR, som træder i kraft 25. maj
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Seabed mining could destroy ecosystemsMining on the ocean floor could do irreversible damage to deep-sea ecosystems, says a new study of seabed mining proposals around the world.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Finding unravels nature of cognitive inflexibility in Fragile X syndromeMice with the genetic defect that causes Fragile X syndrome (FXS) learn and remember normally, but show an inability to learn new information that contradicts what they initially learned, shows a new study by a team of neuroscientists.
1h
Feed: All Latest
Ralph Lauren's Olympic Jacket Uses Heat-Conducting InkRalph Lauren has created a jacket to keep US athletes warm in the chilly South Korean winter—and soon, you too could own one.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
In continuation of trend, 2017 was second warmest year on recordEarth's global surface temperatures in 2017 ranked as the second warmest since reliable instrumental records began in 1880, according to an analysis by NASA released today.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How blockchain is strengthening tuna traceability to combat illegal fishingIn a significant development for global fisheries, blockchain technology is now being used to improve tuna traceability to help stop illegal and unsustainable fishing practices in the Pacific Islands tuna industry.
1h
Ingeniøren
Trump forlænger NSA's kontroversielle masseovervågningMed et tweet meldte Donald Trump i fredags, at han har underskrevet lov, der forlænger NSA's masseovervågning af ikke-amerikanere med seks år.
1h
Science | The Guardian
Paw choice? Cats show right and left-hand preferencesFemales favour the right and males the left, say researchers, although reason is still unclear Whether stalking down the stairs or tiptoeing into the litter box, cats have a preference for which paw they put forward, according to new research, with females favouring their right paw and males their left. Scientists say that while such preferences are a matter of individual inclination, males gener
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The secret history of Facebook depressionTo early users, the internet held such promise for people and communities. Now, on the eve of Facebook's 15th birthday, social media is making people depressed. What happened?
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Depression education' effective for some teensIn an assessment of their 'depression literacy' program, which has already been taught to tens of thousands, Johns Hopkins researchers say the Adolescent Depression Awareness Program (ADAP) achieved its intended effect of encouraging many teenagers to speak up and seek adult help for themselves or a peer.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The new robotics technology set to change the construction industryMillennials, don't give up your smashed avo just yet. Hadrian the WA bricklaying robot is about to make construction of houses safer, faster and cheaper.
1h
Ingeniøren
Byggeri på Aarhus Universitet 80 millioner kroner over budgetRegn, funderingsproblemer og en problemfyldt tømrerentreprise knækkede både tidsplanen og budgettet på et nyt byggeri til Biomedicinsk Fakultet på Aarhus Universitet
1h
Science | The Guardian
Life begins at 24 … why being a teenager now lasts 15 yearsNew research says that adolescence in the developed world now lasts until your mid-20s. Does that make 24-year-olds Harry Kane and Ariana Grande mere kids? Name: 24. Appearance: Fresh-faced, ready for anything. Continue reading...
1h
The Atlantic
'An Assault on the Body of the Church’A woman fled El Salvador in fear of violence, just months before a deadly series of earthquakes destroyed many Salvadorans’ lives and homes. She settled in Maryland with her husband’s family and started to build a life. She worked first in hotel housekeeping, then as a teaching assistant at a neighborhood school. She had four children, who excelled in school. She invested deeply in her local Cath
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Combination of resistance genes offers better protection for wheat against powdery mildewUniversity of Zurich plant researchers have tested newly developed wheat lines with improved resistance in field trials. They have demonstrated that a combination of two variations of a resistance gene provides wheat with better protection against the fungal disease.
1h
Popular Science
This is why cutting weight is so dangerous for professional fightersFat Month Hospital trips and deaths aren’t uncommon in pro combat sports. Uriah Hall is just the latest UFC athlete to suffer from severe dehydration. Something has to change to keep fighters safe.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rocking the cradle of humankindIn the peaceful grasslands of northern Tanzania, a frenzy of research is occurring. The Olduvai area (from the Maasai name "Oldupai," for a native succulent plant) came to fame through the findings of Kenyan archaeologists and paleoanthropologists, Louis and Mary Leakey. Their research, beginning in the 1950s, uncovered numerous fossil hominins (the tribe of great apes, including modern humans) an
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fungi can help concrete heal its own cracksInfrastructure supports and facilitates our daily lives – think of the roads we drive on, the bridges and tunnels that help transport people and freight, the office buildings where we work and the dams that provide the water we drink. But it's no secret that American infrastructure is aging and in desperate need of rehabilitation.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Looking at the universe through very different 'eyes'We are bathed in starlight. During the day we see the Sun, light reflected off the surface of the Earth and blue sunlight scattered by the air. At night we see the stars, as well as sunlight reflected off the Moon and the planets.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Electrons in the waterIt's a popular tradition to throw coins into fountains in the hopes of having wishes granted. But what would happen if you could "throw" electrons into the water instead? That is, what happens shortly after an electron is injected into water?
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Maine airport moves to 100 percent recycled de-icing fluidOfficials with Maine's largest city say Portland International Jetport is the first airport in the country to use 100 percent recycled de-icing fluid for aircraft.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Taking control at the junctionFine tuning the composition of nitride alloys can further the development of optical and electronic interface devices.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The algorithms of our future thinking machinesBehind every self-driving car, self-learning robot and smart building hides a variety of advanced algorithms that control learning and decision making. Some of the mathematical models that make up the backbone of automated systems are currently under construction by researchers from Uppsala University and KTH.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Hubble's Cartwheel GalaxyThis is an image of the Cartwheel Galaxy taken with the NASA/ESA (European Space Agency) Hubble Space Telescope.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nanoparticle gel controls twisted light with magnetism"Help me, Obi Wan Kenobi. You're my only hope." For many of those around at the release of Star Wars in 1977, that scene was a first introduction to holograms—a real technology that had been around for roughly 15 years.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Life in the slow laneA new study from British Antarctic Survey shows how five common Antarctic marine invertebrates (animals without a backbone) use less energy to feed, grow and reproduce than their temperate and tropical relatives. The study is part of wider programme to understand how organisms might respond to future predicted climate change scenarios.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Comet stormPerhaps you live in a part of the world where you regularly experience snow storms or even dust storms. But for many of us, the weather forms a natural part of everyday conversation – more so when it is somewhat extreme, like a sudden blizzard that renders transport useless or makes you feel highly disoriented as you struggle to fix your sights on recognisable landmarks.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Reluctance to share innovations means lost opportunities for life sciences firms, experts writeThe life sciences industry is unwell.
2h
Dagens Medicin
Sundhedsdatastyrelsen får ny chefSteen Heilmann er ny afdelingschef i Sundhedsdatastyrelsens Direktionssekretariatet.
2h
Dagens Medicin
Lægeforeningsformand: Underskriftindsamling er et meget stærkt signalFormand for Lægeforeningen, Andreas Rudkjøbing, håber, at 9.035 lægers mistillidsvotum til Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed vil bringe sundhedsministeren på banen.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Nefertiti was no pharaoh, says renowned EgyptologistContrary to popular opinion, one of the most famous women in ancient history did not rule Egypt, according to a new book.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Prepping the Parker Solar Probe for spaceAt NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the Parker Solar Probe is lowered into the 40-foot-tall thermal vacuum chamber. Why?
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solar eclipse caused bow waves in Earth's atmosphereThe celebrated Great American Eclipse of August 2017 crossed the continental U.S. in 90 minutes, and totality lasted no longer than a few minutes at any one location. The event is well in the rear-view mirror now, but scientific investigation into the effects of the moon's shadow on the Earth's atmosphere is still being hotly pursued, and interesting new findings are surfacing at a rapid pace. The
2h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Are diesel cars always the most harmful?Some in the car industry claim that modern diesel engines have been unfairly maligned.
2h
Dagens Medicin
Gebyr-løsning rykker tættere påPLO og Danske Regioner har som aftalt sendt en redegørelse for vagtlægeordningen til Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed. Nu er det op til styrelsen at vurdere, om den påtænkte gebyr-løsning kan gennemføres.
2h
Scientific American Content: Global
When Scientists Preach to the ChoirIt doesn't directly change the minds of those who mistrust science, but the indirect effect can be powerful -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Making fuel cells for a fraction of the costIn a paper published today in Small, researchers at the University of California, Riverside, describe the development of an inexpensive, efficient catalyst material for a type of fuel cell called a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), which turns the chemical energy of hydrogen into electricity and is among the most promising fuel cell types to power cars and electronics.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Heat loss from the Earth triggers ice sheet slide towards the seaGreenland's ice sheet is becoming smaller and smaller. The melting takes place with increased strength and at a speed that no models have previously predicted.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thermo-triggered release of a genome-editing machinery by modified gold nanoparticles for tumor therapyGene editing is one of the hottest topics in cancer research. A Chinese research team has now developed a gold-nanoparticle-based multifunctional vehicle to transport the "gene scissors" to the tumor cell genome. As the authors report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, their nonviral transport and release platform of gene-editing systems has the additional advantage of combining hyperthermal cancer
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New input for quantum simulationsAn international group of researchers, including UvA physicist Michael Walter, have devised new methods to create interesting input states for quantum computations and simulations. The new methods can be used to simulate certain electronic systems to arbitrarily high accuracy. The results were published in the leading journal Physical Review X this week.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new bound on axionsAn axion is a hypothetical elementary particle whose existence was postulated in order to explain why certain subatomic reactions appear to violate basic symmetry constraints, in particular symmetry in time. The 1980 Nobel Prize in Physics went for the discovery of time-asymmetric reactions. Meanwhile, during the following decades, astronomers studying the motions of galaxies and the character of
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Kilopower—Pioneering space fission power system could provide up to 10 kilowatts of electrical powerWhen astronauts someday venture to the moon, Mars and other destinations, one of the first and most important resources they will need is power. A reliable and efficient power system will be essential for day-to-day necessities, such as lighting, water and oxygen, and for mission objectives, like running experiments and producing fuel for the long journey home.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Most powerful Dutch supercomputer boosts new radio telescopeEvery day, thousands of enormous explosions go off in the sky: so-called Fast Radio Bursts. To better understand the flashes and the gigantic energies behind them, ASTRON—the Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy, an NWO institute—recently installed new high-speed cameras on the radio telescope in Westerbork, the Netherlands. These cameras have just received new brains: the most powerful super
2h
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What Has Tech Done to Fix Its Harassment Problem?The national conversation about harassment started in tech, but other industries, like Hollywood, have leapt to the forefront.
2h
Feed: All Latest
Pixek App Encrypts Your Photos From Camera to CloudPixek, an end-to-end encrypted photo app, could point to the future of searchable cloud data storage.
2h
Feed: All Latest
The Second Coming of UltrasoundIt’s how thousands of expectant parents see their baby’s face for the first time. And one day soon, it may be how doctors cure disease.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists study mercury poisoning in Peruvian forest on pope's itineraryPope Francis' visit to Peru on Jan. 15-22 takes him to the epicenter of the country's informal and often illegal gold mining industry – the subject of groundbreaking environmental research by Wake Forest University scientists.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Successful promotion of giftedness as early as elementary school ageAssociations such as the National Association for Gifted Children (NAGC) and the European Council for High Ability (ECHA) have argued that the specific needs of gifted children are often neglected, resulting in a reduction of their abilities and potential. Consequently, they call for the implementation of programs that specifically aim to promote gifted children.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microsoft researchers build a bot that draws what you tell it toMicrosoft Education WindowsIf you're handed a note that asks you to draw a picture of a bird with a yellow body, black wings and a short beak, chances are you'll start with a rough outline of a bird, then glance back at the note, see the yellow part and reach for a yellow pen to fill in the body, read the note again and reach for a black pen to draw the wings and, after a final check, shorten the beak and define it with a r
2h
Latest Headlines | Science News
‘First Face of America’ explores how humans reached the New WorldNew documentary shows how an ancient teen and an infant have illuminated scientists’ understanding of the peopling of the Americas.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New material creates fuel cell catalysts at a hundredth of the costFuel cells have the potential to be a clean and efficient way to run cars, computers, and power stations, but the cost of producing them is limiting their use. That's because a key component of the most common fuel cells is a catalyst made from the precious metal platinum.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists reduce harmful emissions from HPPsA team of scientists from Siberian Federal University (SFU) and their colleagues from Novosibirsk and the Netherlands modeled the process of coal burning in HPP boilers and determined which type of fuel produced less harmful emissions. The study was published in Fuel.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
Is the Golden Age of Astronomy Nearly Over?The high cost of "flagship" missions like the James Webb Space Telescope are keeping other crucial missions stuck on the drawing boards -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Dagens Medicin
Styrelsesdirektør: Jeg skal hurtigt i gang med at skabe trygge rammer for jerÅrets mest omtalte døgnvagt gjorde stor indtryk på Anne-Marie Vangsted, direktør i Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed. Hun så ikke én eneste lovovertrædelse, selvom overlæge Kristian Rørbæk Madsen optalte over 500 mundtlige ordinationer, som ikke blev dokumenteret.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New metal-semiconductor interface for brain-inspired computingOne of the big challenges in computer architecture is integrating storage, memory and processing in one unit. This would make computers faster and more energy efficient. University of Groningen physicists have taken a big step towards this goal by combining a niobium doped strontium titanate (SrTiO3) semiconductor with ferromagnetic cobalt. At the interface, this creates a spin-memristor with stor
3h
Live Science
Do Worms Have Tongues?The short answer is no, but they do have a stylet. Here's how that works.
3h
Scientific American Content: Global
How to Hack an Intelligent MachineAI scientists try to trick smart systems into making dumb gaffes -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
3h
Live Science
In Photos: The Amazing Caves of ArizonaGorgeous caves, from winding networks of tunnels to lave tubes, are hidden across Arizona.
3h
Live Science
Fireball Finds! Meteorite Fragments from Dazzling Michigan Meteor Found on IceMeteorite hunters in Michigan found six rocks Thursday (Jan. 18) that likely came from a spectacular fireball that lit up local skies earlier this week.
3h
Ingeniøren
Linus Torvalds om Intel-patch: Helt og aldeles skraldIntel er ikke seriøse omkring fiks af CPU-sårbarheder, mener Linux-udvikleren.
3h
Ingeniøren
Techtopia #36: Tag en tur på app-oteketPodcast: Sundheds-apps på recept fra din læge er en af visionerne i den nyeste rapport fra SIRI-kommussionen. Du kan også høre om kryptopia – Techtopias egen kryptovaluta.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers produce 2-D sheets of tin atomsThe merits of graphene, a 2-D sheet of carbon atoms, are well established. In its wake have followed a host of post-graphene materials—structural analogues of graphene made of elements such as silicon or germanium.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thorium reactors may dispose of enormous amounts of weapons-grade plutoniumScientists from the School of Nuclear Science & Engineering of Tomsk Polytechnic University are developing a technology for the creation of high-temperature, low-power reactors with thorium fuel. The scientists propose to burn weapons-grade plutonium in these units, converting it into power and thermal energy. Thermal energy generated at thorium reactors may be used in hydrogen industrial producti
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Companies plan European network of car charging stationsTwo companies say they plan a network of fast-charging stations for battery-powered cars in Europe that will help drivers of electric vehicles travel among the region's main cities.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Oil spill disasters in the past 50 yearsConcerns are growing over an oil slick off China's east coast after an Iranian tanker, the Sanchi, exploded and sank a week ago following a collision at sea.
4h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Forskere: Her bør statens skove være urørte - for naturens skyldVi skal have mere urørt skov til gavn for naturen og biodiversiteten i Danmark. Det aftalte et...
4h
Ingeniøren
Danmark tøver med nye EU-supercomputereEU-Kommissionen vil sammen med en række medlemslande investere op mod 7,5 milliarder kroner i en ny europæisk supercomputerinfrastruktur kaldet EuroHPC. Danmark er indtil videre ikke med i samarbejdet, og det møder kritik fra professor Brian Vinther ved Niels Bohr Instituttet
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New metal-semiconductor interface for brain-inspired computingOne of the big challenges in computer architecture is integrating storage, memory and processing in one unit. This would make computers faster and more energy efficient. University of Groningen physicists have taken a big step towards this goal by combining a niobium doped strontium titanate (SrTiO3) semiconductor with ferromagnetic cobalt. At the interface, this creates a spin-memristor with stor
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Heat loss from the Earth triggers ice sheet slide towards the seaIn North-East Greenland, researchers have measured the loss of heat that comes up from the interior of the Earth. This enormous area is a geothermal 'hot spot' that melts the ice sheet from below and triggers the sliding of glaciers towards the sea.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists improve nanofluids for solar power plantsAn associate of Siberian Federal University (SFU) teamed up with his foreign colleagues to increase the efficiency of the heat transfer medium used in solar power plants. The results of the study were published in Renewable Energy journal.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers disprove one of the most widespread assumptions among geneticists regarding DNAEver since DNA was first isolated in 1869, the scientific community has constantly sought to determine how it works, and reveal its secrets. Despite advances in this field, a great deal still remains to be discovered. A good example is research published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) by a University of Córdoba research led by professors Rafael Rodríguez Ariza and
4h
Ingeniøren
Sådan bliver 150 meter gammel skorsten til ny genbrugsstationBetonen til en ny genbrugsstation i den københavnske Sydhavn skal laves af beton fra Amagerværkets gamle skorsten. Byggeprojektet sætter flere genbrugsrekorder
4h
Viden
Slut med at stå i kø: Amazon åbner supermarked uden kasserDet første kasseløse supermarked åbner i Seattle i dag. Kunstig intelligens holder øje med, hvad du tager fra hylderne.
4h
The Atlantic
Muslim Refugees Team Up With Anarchists To Shame GreeceATHENS—City Plaza Hotel is no longer a hotel. As a business, it shuttered years ago. But the abandoned seven-story building with faux art deco charms is now home to about 400 people. They’re made up of two groups: Greek anarcho-communist activists, and people who have fled war, poverty, or persecution in Muslim-majority countries. Bustling with political activity, City Plaza is now a squat organi
5h
Science : NPR
My Grandmother Was Italian. Why Aren't My Genes Italian?Popular DNA ancestry tests don't always find what people expect. That's due to how DNA rearranges itself when egg meets sperm, and also the quirks of genetic databases. (Image credit: Meredith Rizzo/NPR)
5h
Ingeniøren
Få styr på lønsamtalen med dig selvLønnen ender oftest nederst på prioriteringslisten, når man springer ud som selvstændig, men det kan være en dårlig strategi.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Oil slick off China coast trebles in sizeThe spill from a sunken Iranian tanker off China's east coast has more than trebled in size, just over a week after the ship sank in a ball of flames.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Barrier Reef funding boost to tackle predatory starfishA multimillion-dollar campaign to stop the predatory crown-of-thorns starfish devouring the Great Barrier Reef was announced by the Australian government Monday in a push to preserve the World Heritage-listed ecosystem.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook to train 65,000 in French job schemesFacebook said Monday that it will train 65,000 French people in digital skills in free schemes to help women set up businesses and the long-term unemployed get back to work.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Solar industry on edge as Trump weighs tariffs on panelsSome in the U.S. solar-power industry are hoping a decision this week by President Donald Trump doesn't bring on an eclipse.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon to debut cashier-less store in downtown SeattleAmazon Store AppAmazon employees have been testing it, but is the public ready for a cashier-less store?
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Island volcano in Papua New Guinea erupts with ash, steamAn island volcano in Papua New Guinea erupted again Sunday, sending plumes of steam and ash into the air.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Hong Kong engulfed in smog as fears grow over airHong Kong's famous skyline was engulfed in smog Monday, with residents urged to stay indoors.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Human smugglers operate as 'independent traders,' study findsLatest research shows a lack of overarching coordination or the involvement of any "kingpin"-style monopolies in the criminal operations illegally transporting people from the Horn of Africa into Northern Europe via Libya.
6h
Science-Based Medicine
“Integrative medicine” advocates: Co-opting the opioid crisis to promote funding for acupuncture by MedicaidThe opioid epidemic is a serious public health crisis in the U.S., and new tools and treatments to deal with chronic pain are urgently needed. Unfortunately, where public health officials see a crisis, advocates of "integrating" quackery with science-based medicine see an opportunity. In this case, promoters of pseudomedicine are taking advantage of the opioid crisis to persuade state Medicaid sys
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Vaccines not protecting farmed fish from diseaseThe vaccines used by commercial fish farmers are not protecting fish from disease, according to a new study.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New fuel cell technology runs on solid carbonAdvancements in a fuel cell technology powered by solid carbon could make electricity generation from resources such as coal and biomass cleaner and more efficient, according to a new paper published by Idaho National Laboratory researchers.
6h
Viden
Rådgivning om alternativ behandling hjælper kræftpatienterKræftpatienter har stor gavn af at kunne tale med læger og sygeplejersker om alternativ behandling.
6h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Ny forskning viser, hvad assyrisk læge skulle lære for 2.700 år sidenDet er første gang, det har været muligt at få så detaljeret viden om en enkelt...
6h
Ingeniøren
Ugens job: Rambøll, Ørsted og Novafos har flere ledige jobsPå dagens liste finder du job for ingeniører og naturvidenskabelige kandidater i flere forskellige firmaer. Blandt andet som specialist, projektleder, konsulent og mere endnu.
6h
Ingeniøren
FE's hackerakademi: Vi rekrutterer 18-årige direkte fra deres mor og farForsvarets Efterretningstjeneste har stor succes med at rekruttere unge medarbejdere igennem deres hackerakademi. Nu skifter akademiet fokus fra træning i klassisk offensiv efterretningstjeneste til et mere defensivt cyberforsvar
8h
Science | The Guardian
The billionaire's guide to surviving global warming – with Ian the Climate Denialist Potato | First Dog on the MoonHere are some things you can do to make climate change even less inconvenient – also fun! Sign up here to get an email whenever First Dog cartoons are published Get all your needs met at the First Dog shop if what you need is First Dog merchandise and prints Continue reading...
8h
Science | The Guardian
In its own ‘war on plastic’, the UK government is a deserter | Hugh Fearnley-WhittingstallThe 25-year deadline spells doom for many ocean species. One supermarket’s pledge to ban plastics puts the target to shame The prime minister has declared war on plastic , with an announcement that the government hopes to “eliminate all avoidable plastic waste” within 25 years. You could say that this week saw the first troops landing on our plastic-strewn beaches. But, rather than our ministers
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New fuel cell technology runs on solid carbonAdvancements in a fuel cell technology powered by solid carbon could make electricity generation from coal and biomass cleaner and more efficient, according to a paper published this week. Innovations in the anode, the electrolyte and the fuel allow the fuel cell to utilize more carbon, operate at lower temperatures and show higher maximum power densities than earlier direct carbon fuel cells (DCF
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vaccines not protecting farmed fish from diseaseThe vaccines used by commercial fish farmers are not protecting fish from disease, according to a new study.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers reveal new insights into how your brain keeps its balanceAn interdisciplinary team of scientists from The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST) and The Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK) discovered that two large protein kinases, ATM and ATR, cooperate to help establish the go/stop balance in human brains.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Siberian scientists learned how to reduce harmful emissions from HPPsA team of scientists from Siberian Federal University (SFU) and their colleagues from Novosibirsk and the Netherlands modeled the process of coal burning in HPP boilers and found out which type of fuel produced less harmful emissions. The study was published in Fuel journal.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals abnormalities in infants born in withdrawal after opioid exposure in uteroA new study of infants born in withdrawal due to opioid exposure in utero shows a dramatic increase in torticollis -- an abnormal twisting of the neck. Many of the infants also had plagiocephaly -- a flattening of the head often seen in conjunction with torticollis.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Depressive symptoms linked to shorter survival in patients with head and neck cancerIn a study of patients with head and neck cancer, even mild depressive symptoms were associated with poorer overall survival.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Want a healthier population? Spend less on health care and more on social servicesIncreased social spending was associated with health improvements at the population level, while health spending increases did not have the same effect, according to a large new Canadian study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal).
9h
Ingeniøren
Amerikansk superchefs overraskende råd til at lede skarpe vidensarbejdereEn af USAs mest anerkendte ledere inden for forskning leverer seks råd til at få det bedste ud af dygtige medarbejdere. Blandt andet skal de have mulighed for at lufte deres vildeste ideer. Og dumhed skal stoppes
10h
Ingeniøren
Rigsrevisionen skal kulegrave, om DTU blev offer for iscenesat udbudsteaterStatsrevisorerne vil efter alt at dømme bede om en omfattende undersøgelse af Fødevarestyrelsens udbud af det veterinære beredskab for at finde ud af, om forløbet var designet til at redde Statens Serum Institut.
11h
The Atlantic
The Shutdown Will Go OnThe federal government will not reopen on Monday morning. On Sunday night, Democratic leaders rejected an offer from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to consider immigration legislation in the next three weeks if they agreed to end the shutdown. A large bipartisan group representing more than one-fifth of the Senate had been working throughout the weekend to resolve, at least temporarily, t
11h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The world's most powerful acoustic tractor beam could pave the way for levitating humansAcoustic tractor beams use the power of sound to hold particles in mid-air, and unlike magnetic levitation, they can grab most solids or liquids even small insects. For the first time engineers have shown it is possible to stably trap objects larger than the wavelength of sound in an acoustic tractor beam. This discovery could enable the manipulation of drug capsules or micro-surgical implements w
11h
The Atlantic
Trust Is Collapsing in America“In God We Trust,” goes the motto of the United States. In God, and apparently little else. Only a third of Americans now trust their government “to do what is right”—a decline of 14 percentage points from last year, according to a new report by the communications marketing firm Edelman. Forty-two percent trust the media, relative to 47 percent a year ago. Trust in business and non-governmental o
11h
Futurity.org
Brightening neutron-star collision stumps astrophysicistsNew observations from NASA’s orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory suggest that the gamma ray burst unleashed by the distant neutron-star merger detected last August is more complex than scientists first believed. The afterglow from the collision has continued to brighten—much to the surprise of astrophysicists studying the aftermath of the massive collision that took place about 138 million light y
14h
Futurity.org
Genetic analysis clarifies stomach cancer risk factorsResearchers have used genomic technologies to better understand intestinal metaplasia (IM), a known risk factor for gastric (stomach) cancer. The research, which appears in the journal Cancer Cell , could also help detect patients with Helicobacter pylori infections, which are also linked to the disease. Patients with IM are six times more likely to develop stomach cancer than those without. This
14h
Futurity.org
Algorithm matches refugees with best place to resettleAs the world faces its largest crisis of displaced people since World War II, a new algorithm could help countries resettle refugees in a way that boosts their employment success and overall integration. Researchers used a machine-learning algorithm to analyze historical data on refugee resettlement in the United States and Switzerland. They found that the refugees’ eventual economic self-suffici
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Changing GP opening hours might be unlikely to ease rising burden of A&E visitsA new study has found no correlation between satisfaction with GP opening hours and the number of visits to A&E in England.
14h
Futurity.org
Book collects French monk’s forgotten animal drawingsMore than three centuries ago, a French monk named Father Charles Plumier made thousands of drawings of plants and animals, traveling under the authority of King Louis XIV to the French Antilles to collect and document the natural history of the islands. These drawings were often the first ever recorded for each species and feature remarkable detail. The illustrations were nearly lost forever dur
14h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
2d tin (stanene) without buckling: A possible topological insulatorResearchers produce 2D sheets of tin atoms predicted to have exotic uses in electronics.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The world's most powerful acoustic tractor beam could pave the way for levitating humansAcoustic tractor beams use the power of sound to hold particles in mid-air, and unlike magnetic levitation, they can grab most solids or liquids even small insects. For the first time University of Bristol engineers have shown it is possible to stably trap objects larger than the wavelength of sound in an acoustic tractor beam. This discovery could enable the manipulation of drug capsules or micro
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Epilepsy linked to brain volume and thickness differencesEpilepsy is associated with thickness and volume differences in the grey matter of several brain regions, according to new research led by UCL and the Keck School of Medicine of USC.The largest-ever neuroimaging study of people with epilepsy, published today in Brain, shows that epilepsy involves more widespread physical differences than previously assumed, even in types of epilepsy that are typic
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study of learning and memory problems in OCD helps young people unlock potential at schoolAdolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have widespread learning and memory problems, according to research published today. The findings have already been used to assist adolescents with OCD obtain the help they needed at school to realize their potential -- including helping one individual go on to university.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Human smugglers operate as 'independent traders,' study findsFirst study to model the organizations behind trade in illegal border crossings shows no 'Mafia-like' monopoly of routes from Africa into Europe. Instead, myriad independent smugglers compete in open markets that have emerged at every stage of the journey.
14h
Futurity.org
This parasitic plant hijacks its victim’s genesA parasitic plant called dodder can silence the expression of genes in the host plants from which it obtains water and nutrients, new research suggests. “…dodder passes microRNAs into its host plant that regulate the expression of host genes in a very direct way…” This cross-species gene regulation, which includes genes that contribute to the host plant’s defense against parasites, has never befo
14h
Futurity.org
Ocean ‘bathtub drains’ pull flotsam togetherMarine debris, or flotsam, clumps together as it moves on the surface of the ocean, new research featuring the largest flotilla of sensors ever deployed in a single area suggests. Researchers placed hundreds of drifting sensors in the Gulf of Mexico near the site of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill to observe how material moves on the ocean’s surface. Rather than spread out, as current calculation
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alcohol consumption in late teens can lead to liver problems in adulthoodAlcohol is the leading cause of liver cirrhosis and liver-related deaths. Results of a large long-term study in Sweden have confirmed that drinking during late adolescence could be the first step towards liver problems in adulthood and that guidelines for safe alcohol intake in men might have to be revised downwards, reports the Journal of Hepatology.
15h

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