Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Modern math sheds new light on long-standing debate about Viking-age Ireland conflictModern mathematical techniques - similar to those used to analyse social-networking websites - have allowed academics to shed new light on a centuries old debate surrounding the Viking age in Ireland and the famous battle of Clontarf in 1014.
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NYT > Science
Trilobites: Ancient Crocodiles Once Feasted on Giant Tortoises on This IslandBite marks on fossils found on an atoll near eastern Africa suggest that this paradise for the world’s most common giant tortoise may have once been a much scarier place.
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Futurity.org
Faster, more accurate HIV test just needs spitA new HIV test combines the convenience of spitting in a cup with the reliability of blood tests, researchers report. “The earlier you can detect, the better, because people can infect other people.” Currently, public health officials have a tough choice to make when it comes to screening people for HIV: administer a reliable blood test that can detect infections early on, but that few people wil
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NYT > Science
Bigger, Faster Avalanches, Triggered by Climate ChangeA deadly 2016 glacier collapse in Tibet surpassed scientists’ expectations — until it happened again. They worry it’s only the beginning.
2min
Live Science
Probiotic Milk May Help Reduce the Risk of Pregnancy ComplicationsDrinking probiotic-rich milk during pregnancy may decrease a woman's risk of developing two pregnancy-related problems, a new study from Norway suggests.
9min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Premature births linked to changes in mother's bacteriaChanges to the communities of microbes living in the reproductive tract of pregnant women could help to spot those at risk of giving birth prematurely.
19min
Big Think
Real acoustic tractor beams hold objects in the air with sound wavesUniversity of Bristol scientists find a way to levitate large objects with sound waves. Read More
24min
New on MIT Technology Review
The US government wants to speed gene-editing therapies to patients
42min
Science | The Guardian
Murky world of 'science' journals a new frontier for climate deniers | Graham ReadfearnDeniers have found a platform in emerging publications that publish without rigorous review There’s a new scientific journal you might not have heard of called the International Journal of Earth and Environmental Sciences . It says it “supports scientist who sweats for the real innovation & discovery”. If that’s a little too sweaty for you, then how about another new journal, also called the Inte
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Futurity.org
Aerosols don’t all affect weather the same wayDifferent kinds of aerosols released into the atmosphere can affect cloud formations and influence weather patterns, report researchers. The team found that not all aerosols act alike and different types produce variances in cloud formation, strength, and duration. “Aerosols indirectly affect cloud development. Since they serve as the basis of cloud droplet formation, they can influence cloud dro
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Insects took off when they evolved wingsNow buzzing and whizzing around every continent, insects were mysteriously scarce in the fossil record until 325 million years ago -- when they first took flight and, according to a new study, evolutionarily took off.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rare 450-million-year-old 'cone-shaped' fossil discoveryAn international team including University of Leicester researchers discover unique fossil of mysterious creature from the Ordovician period.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Modern math sheds new light on long-standing debate about Viking-age Ireland conflictModern mathematical techniques -- similar to those used to analyze social-networking websites -- have allowed academics to shed new light on a centuries old debate surrounding the Viking age in Ireland and the famous battle of Clontarf in 1014.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rethinking environmental legislation to include the conservation ideas of tomorrowRewilding has potential to help address the current global biodiversity crisis, but its impact will be limited unless agreed definitions can be reached, backed by further scientific research and helped by a policy backdrop that enables greater integration with current environmental legislation. These are the key findings of a new study into the controversial technique, led by international conserv
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gut instinct makes animals appear cleverAnimals, including humans, can make surprisingly good decisions just based on the food in their stomach, new research suggests.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Human skin pigmentation recreated -- with a 3-D bioprinterA new method for controlling pigmentation in fabricated human skin has been developed by researchers from A*STAR's Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology (SIMTech) and the Singapore Centre for 3-D Printing (SC3DP) at Nanyang Technological University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Frozen in time: Glacial archaeology on the roof of NorwayArtefacts revealed by melting ice patches in the high mountains of Oppland shed new light on ancient high-altitude hunting.
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Futurity.org
Light-bending gel makes holograms much cheaperInexpensive nanoparticles in a gel can replace traditional materials used to create holograms at a much lower cost, researchers report. Holograms can be created by using magnetic fields to alter the path of light, but the materials that can do that are expensive, brittle, and opaque. Some only work in temperatures as cold as the vacuum of space. The new approach, which works at room temperature,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rare 450-million-year-old 'cone-shaped' fossil discoveryResearchers from the University of Leicester, working with an international team of geologists, have discovered an enigmatic fossil of a 450 million year-old creature resembling a tiny ice-cream cone.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Insects took off when they evolved wingsThe evolution of wings not only allowed ancient insects to become the first creatures on Earth to take to the skies, but also propelled their rise to become one of nature's great success stories, according to a new study.
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Human skin pigmentation recreated—with a 3-D bioprinterA new method for controlling pigmentation in fabricated human skin has been developed by researchers from A*STAR's Singapore Institute of Manufacturing Technology (SIMTech) and the Singapore Centre for 3D Printing (SC3DP) at Nanyang Technological University.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Frozen in time: Glacial archaeology on the roof of NorwayClimate change is one of the most important issues facing people today and year on year the melting of glacial ice patches in Scandinavia, the Alps and North America reveals and then destroys vital archaeological records of past human activity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Gut instinct makes animals appear cleverAnimals, including humans, can make surprisingly good decisions just based on the food in their stomach, new research suggests.
1h
NYT > Science
For Tsunami Forecasters, Speed Is EverythingAlaska Tsunami WarningIn many major earthquakes, most destruction is caused by water. To warn the public, forecasters have to shoot first and ask questions later.
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States and Cities Keep the Battle for Net Neutrality AliveMontana FCC StateMontana's governor issued an executive order barring state agencies from doing business with internet providers that violate net neutrality.
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How the ‘Religious Freedom Division’ Threatens LGBT Health—and ScienceNew physician protections could cripple health care for LGBT people—as well as the data collection that’s been filling gaps in our medical understanding.
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Popular Science
Your weight affects how long you live—but it's extremely complicatedFat Month There's probably no perfect BMI. How much should I weigh to be healthy as I get older—or in other words, what weight will keep me alive the longest?
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Futurity.org
Neural ‘tug-of-war’ may explain Fragile X learning issuesMice with the genetic defect that causes Fragile X syndrome (FXS) learn and remember normally, but show an inability to learn new information that contradicts what they initially learned, a new study shows. FXS is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability and autism. “These findings suggest that neural circuits in FXS may be fundamentally intact but improperly tuned, which results
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cases of certain type of eyelid cancer have risen steadily over past 15 years in EnglandNew cases of a particular type of eyelid cancer (squamous cell carcinoma) have risen steadily over the past 15 years in England, reveals research published online in the British Journal of Ophthalmology.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women taking probiotics during pregnancy might have lower pre-eclampsia and premature birth riskProbiotics taken during pregnancy might help lower the risks of pre-eclampsia and premature birth, suggests observational research in the online journal BMJ Open. But timing may be crucial, the findings indicate.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Sugar tax on soft drinks might drive up alcohol consumptionA sugar tax levied on soft drinks might have the unintended consequence of driving up alcohol consumption, but the picture is mixed, finds research published online in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health.
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Futurity.org
‘Legos of life’ stack together to build proteinsAfter smashing and dissecting nearly 10,000 proteins to understand their component parts, scientists have discovered the “Legos of life”—four core chemical structures that can be stacked together to build the myriad proteins inside every organism. The four building blocks make energy available for humans and all other living organisms, according to a new study describing the discovery, which appe
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Election Fallout, Cabinet Criticism, Feeding the WorldWhat We’re Following Partisan Problems: A new report on the Twitter activity of Russian trolls illustrates the dangers of President Trump’s divisive rhetoric, writes Conor Friedersdorf. As Germany’s center-left Social Democratic Party begins negotiations to form a coalition with Angela Merkel’s conservative bloc, lawmakers must weigh a choice between conceding some party priorities and leaving ro
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Live Science
Dead Sea Scroll Remains a Puzzle After Scientists Crack its CodeThe scroll contains part of a 364-day calendar of holy days.
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Live Science
12 Sexy Camels Kicked Out of Beauty Contest for Using BotoxSaudi Arabia's King Abdulaziz Camel Festival kicked out a dozen camels from a beauty contest for receiving Botox injections.
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Futurity.org
Math model simulates growing melanomaCancer cells’ ability to tolerate crowded conditions may be key to understanding how tumors form and grow, applying a mathematical model to cancer cell growth reveals. The model can replicate patterns of melanoma cell growth seen in laboratory experiments by controlling the “exclusion area”—the amount of space required—around two types of simulated cells as they grow and spread. “When our collabo
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The Atlantic
No One Met the $20 Million Deadline for a Civilian Moon MissionA Google-sponsored competition to reach for the moon has fallen short. More than 10 years after the XPRIZE Foundation announced a contest for proposals to send a robot to the moon, none of the participating teams will meet their deadline. The grand prize for the winner, $20 million provided by Google in a partnership with XPRIZE, will go unclaimed. “After close consultation with our five finalist
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Off the WallToday in 5 Lines Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer rescinded his offer to increase funding for Trump’s proposed border wall as part of a broader DACA deal. The New York Times reported that Attorney General Jeff Sessions was interviewed last week by the special counsel as part of the Russia investigation, and former FBI Director James Comey was questioned by the office last year. Two students w
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Science : NPR
The Power HourThis week on Hidden Brain's radio show, we tackled a big topic: power. From our conflicted feelings toward the powerful, to the ways we gain and lose power ourselves, and how power really can corrupt. (Image credit: D Dipasupil/WireImage)
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Popular Science
You can't squash Nike's springy new sneaker solesTechnology The Nike Epic React sneaker has higher energy return to push you forward as you run. A luxurious running shoe that provides protection and support while also being lightweight and responsive. At $150, it falls on the pricier end, though it will not…
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Tencent Software Beats Go Champ, Showing China's AI GainsChina is making a national push in artificial intelligence. A program from one of its biggest internet companies, Tencent, just beat a world champion at Go.
2h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Beaches open after sewage spill on California Central CoastEight beaches on California's Central Coast reopened after nearly five million gallons of sewage spilled into the ocean over the weekend, official said Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows invading toads adjusting rapidly to different environmental conditionsA new paper published in Conservation Physiology examines the thermal tolerance of Cane Toads in Hawaii and Australia and finds that some of them are adapting very quickly to lower temperatures. This has serious implications for the spread of the toad within Australia, a major and persistent ecological problem.
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Big Think
10 quotes on scientific issues from 2018 political candidatesScience Debate asks 2018 candidates to discuss their views on 10 vital scientific policy issues. Read More
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Big Think
Mixing magic mushrooms and meditation has long-term benefits, Johns Hopkins study findsThe benefits of controlled psilocybin use and spiritual practice on people's well-being long outlast the high, researchers find. Read More
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Big Think
New Breakthrough in Organic Cells Will Make Solar Glass a RealityThese findings will revolutionize power production, lighting, semiconductors, and informational displays. Read More
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Big Think
How Sound and Smell Cues Can Enhance Learning While You SleepNeuroscientists are now starting to put TMR to work. Read More
3h
NYT > Science
Global Health: New Index Rates Drug Companies in Fight Against ‘Superbugs’Glaxo and Johnson & Johnson top a new measure of how drugmakers do against antibiotic-resistant bacteria, which are becoming a global emergency.
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NYT > Science
Science Group Ranks Evidence on E-Cigarette SafetyVaping may help smokers quit, and are safer than conventional cigarettes, but they’re not risk-free, a national public health panel says.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows invading toads adjusting rapidly to different environmental conditionsA new paper published in Conservation Physiology examines the thermal tolerance of Cane Toads in Hawaii and Australia and finds that some of them are adapting very quickly to lower temperatures. This has serious implications for the spread of the toad within Australia, a major and persistent ecological problem.
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Science | The Guardian
Two planets in unusual star system are very likely habitable, scientists sayExoplanets orbiting Trappist-1 have thrilled astronomers since their discovery last year thanks to their Earth-like potential to harbor water Scientists have identified two planets circling round a dim dwarf star as especially likely candidates to have habitable conditions, with probable water and a source of heat, attributes thought necessary for life beyond Earth. Since their discovery last yea
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Inside Science
Tipsy-Turvy: Does Dry January Do You Any Good?Tipsy-Turvy: Does Dry January Do You Any Good? The health benefits of a month without alcohol are unclear, and the British and Canadian medical authorities recommend several drink-free days per week. Winebottles.jpg Image credits: Guillaume Paumier via Flickr Rights information: CC BY-SA 2.0 Human Tuesday, January 23, 2018 - 16:30 Benjamin Plackett, Contributor (Inside Science) -- Around 5 millio
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Canada limits crab fishing to save right whalesSnow crab fishing in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence will be curtailed to protect endangered right whales from tangling in fishing gear, a Canadian official said Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Music firms sue to keep hit songs off fitness streaming appSome of the nation's largest recording studios have joined forces in an effort to stop a music streaming service aimed at fitness enthusiasts from using songs by Beyonce, Justin Bieber, Green Day and other stars.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Los Angeles Zoo puts baby okapi on displayThe Los Angeles Zoo has put on display a baby okapi (oh-KAH-pee), a reclusive species that in the wild is found deep in the now-vanishing dense rainforests of central Africa.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Flourishing under an abusive boss? You may be a psychopath, study showsWhen you hear the term "psychopath," you probably picture Charles Manson or Jeffrey Dahmer. Psychologists, however, define it as a personality trait, and we all fall somewhere along a scale from low to high levels of psychopathy.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists developing new, low-cost tool for detecting bacteria in food and waterFood scientist Lili He and colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Amherst report that they have developed a new, rapid and low-cost method for detecting bacteria in water or a food sample. Once commercially available, it should be useful to cooks using fresh fruits and vegetables, for example, and aid workers in the field responding to natural disasters, He says.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
All the buzz—bigger honeybee colonies have quieter combsWhen honeybee colonies get larger, common sense suggests it would be noisier with more bees buzzing around.
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Big Think
4 ways to find meaning in lifeIn her book, The Power of Meaning, Emily Esfahani Smith details the four pillars of meaning, arguing that they're much more important than chasing happiness. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How plants see lightThe proteins PCH1 and PCHL help plants adapt to their surroundings.
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Feed: All Latest
Meltdown and Spectre Patches From Intel and Others Have a Rough StartIntel Spectre MeltdownIn the haste to address the Meltdown and Spectre vulnerabilities that shook the computer industry, several clumsy patch attempts have had to be pulled.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Women with polycystic ovary syndrome have less bacterial diversity in gutWomen who have polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a common hormone condition that contributes to infertility and metabolic problems, such as diabetes and heart disease, tend to have less diverse gut bacteria than women who do not have the condition, according to researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, in collaboration with colleagues at Poznan University of Medical Sci
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Food scientists are developing a low-cost tool for detecting bacteria in food, waterFood scientist Lili He and colleagues at the University of Massachusetts Amherst report that they have developed a new, rapid and low-cost method for detecting bacteria in water or a food sample. Once commercially available, it should be useful to cooks using fresh fruits and vegetables, for example, and aid workers in the field responding to natural disasters, He says.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Live tissue vs synthetic tissue training for critical procedures: No difference in performanceTraining on the synthetic training model (STM) or live tissue (LT) model does not result in a difference in subsequent performance for five of the seven critical procedures examined: junctional hemorrhage wound packing, tourniquet, chest seal, nasopharyngeal airway, and needle thoracostomy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new theory on reducing cardiovascular disease risk in binge drinkersA new study shows that binge drinkers have increased levels of a biomarker molecule -- microRNA-21 -- that may contribute to poor vascular function.
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Blog » Languages » English
Addons: Player Scripts in EyewireA few wonderful Eyewire players have created scripts that add features and improve Eyewire. These scripts are so great that we’ve built a feature to make it easier to add them to your game, as well as a new set of menu options that will enable several of the best scripts by default. These Eyewire-hosted addons are toggled ON by default: Scripts by @crazyman4865: DLC (Downloadable Content) tabbed
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NYT > Science
The Google Lunar X Prize’s Race to the Moon Is Over. Nobody Won.Google Moon X Prize FoundationNone of the remaining competitors for the $20 million award will be able to get off the ground by March 31, a deadline that had already been extended multiple times.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New approach attacks 'undruggable' cancers from the outside inCancer researchers have made great strides in developing targeted therapies that treat the specific genetic mutations underlying a patient's cancer. However, many of the most common cancer-causing genes are so central to cellular function throughout the body that they are essentially 'undruggable'. Now, researchers at UC San Francisco have found a way to attack one of the most common drivers of lu
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Leading medical organizations update lung cancer guidelineRapid advancements in the molecular diagnostic testing of lung cancer have led to new treatments and greater hope for patients battling lung cancer, the most common cause of cancer death worldwide.To ensure that clinicians stay apace and provide optimal patient care, three leading medical societies-- the College of American Pathologists (CAP), the International Association for the Study of Lung Ca
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New on MIT Technology Review
Job of the future: Wind farmerWind energy is booming, making maintenance work on turbines one of the fastest-growing jobs in the US.
4h
TED Talks Daily (SD video)
The dangerous evolution of HIV | Edsel SalvañaThink we're winning the battle against HIV? Maybe not, as the next wave of drug-resistant viruses arrives. In an eye-opening talk, TED Fellow Edsel Salvana describes the aggressive HIV subtype AE that's currently plaguing his home of the Philippines -- and warns us about what might become a global epidemic.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
All the buzz -- bigger honeybee colonies have quieter combsWhen honeybee colonies get larger, common sense suggests it would be noisier with more bees buzzing around. But a study recently published in Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology reports that bigger honeybee colonies actually have quieter combs than smaller ones.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flourishing under an abusive boss? You may be a psychopath, study showsAccording to research from Notre Dame, certain types of 'psychopaths' actually benefit and flourish under abusive bosses.
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Popular Science
DJI’s Mavic Air Drone uses more than a dozen sensors to keep it from crashingDJI Mavic Air DroneTechnology Cameras, IR sensors, gyroscopes, and more help prevent you from smashing this aircraft. Take a look at the sensors DJI uses to keep its new Mavic Air drone in the sky and away from obstacles.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alaska quake shows complexity of tsunami warningsAlaska Tsunami EarthquakeThe powerful earthquake that struck beneath the Gulf of Alaska early Tuesday generated a tsunami, but before gauges could show that it was very small, warnings went out to a vast swath of the state and British Columbia, while a lower-level alert targeted the rest of the West Coast.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
TRAPPIST-1 system planets potentially habitableTwo exoplanets in the TRAPPIST-1 system have been identified as most likely to be habitable, a paper by PSI Senior Scientist Amy Barr says.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
AI can read! Tech firms race to smarten up thinking machinesSeven years ago, a computer beat two human quizmasters on a "Jeopardy" challenge. Ever since, the tech industry has been training its machines even harder to make them better at amassing knowledge and answering questions.
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The Atlantic
Trump's Red Line on North Korea Gets FuzzierIn January 2017, President-Elect Donald Trump tweeted , in response to news that North Korea was close to completing a nuclear weapon that could reach the United States, “It won’t happen!” One year later, in a talk at the American Enterprise Institute on Tuesday, Trump’s CIA director went into detail about what precisely the administration means by “it.” Within that definition are the potential t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two US spacewalkers replace latching end of robotic armTwo US astronauts floated outside the International Space Station on Tuesday for a seven-hour, 24-minute spacewalk to repair the orbiting outpost's aging robotic arm, NASA said.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists find oxidized iron deep within the Earth's interiorScientists digging deep into the Earth's mantle recently made an unexpected discovery.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study spotlights cultural barriers to student financial successPortland State study spotlights cultural barriers to student financial success
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New DNA database at Rutgers-Camden to strengthen forensic scienceForensic DNA evidence is a valuable tool in criminal investigations to link a suspect to the scene of a crime, but the process to make that determination is not so simple since the genetic material found at a crime scene often comes from more than one person.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineer says new study forces researchers to rethink how elderly break their bonesTo better understand why many elderly people are prone to break a bone in a fall (known as bone fragility fractures), perhaps doctors and researchers should look at the human skeleton in much the same way civil engineers analyze buildings and bridges, according to a new study from a University of Utah mechanical engineering professor.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research determines integration of plug-in electric vehicles should play a big role in future electric system planningAn influx of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) charging without coordination could prove challenging to the nation's electric grid, according to research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).
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Live Science
Could 'Zombie Deer' Disease Spread to Humans?Deer dying from a fatal neurological disease have been found in at least 22 states in the U.S. and in parts of Canada.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Worldwide Effort Says Together Science CanJeremy Farrar, director of the Wellcome Trust, talked about worldwide scientific collaboration today at the World Economic Forum. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Live Science
Man Bites Phone Battery, Exploding Battery WinsWhat happens when you bite down on a smartphone battery? The results are fairly shocking.
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The Scientist RSS
Flu Forecasters Predict This Years Season to Peak EarlyInfluenza cases normally top out in February. This year brought an early start and an early peak, but how long flu season will remain is uncertain.
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Popular Science
Alaska's giant earthquake didn't have the moves to cause a large tsunamiAlaska Tsunami EarthquakeScience The motion of the ocean(ic crust). It started in the early hours of the morning, 31 minutes after midnight in Alaska.
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Big Think
Elon Musk must make Tesla a $650 billion company, or forfeit his paycheckTesla Elon MuskCEO pay is based on...well, I don't really know what. But it's almost never based on performance, and many CEOs fail miserably while collecting a huge paycheck. Not Elon Musk. Read More
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The Atlantic
Russia's Retaliation Against a Doping WhistleblowerOn December 11, 2017, Russian authorities filed drug-trafficking charges against Grigory Rodchenkov, the whistleblower who exposed Russia’s state-sponsored doping program. It was his testimony, and the series of investigations it launched, that ultimately got the Russian national team banned from next month’s Olympic Games in South Korea. News of the charges against Rodchenkov was reported by sta
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The Atlantic
The Insanity of Downhill Ice Cross RacingImagine hurtling down a narrow, twisting, hilly ice track on skates at speeds up to 50 miles per hour, then trying to go even faster so you can outpace the competitors at your elbow. This is downhill ice cross. Beginning back in 2001, Red Bull has been sponsoring races and a world tour under the name “Red Bull Crashed Ice,” building enormous ice tracks in historic city centers to challenge the ra
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NREL research determines integration of plug-in electric vehiclesAn influx of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) charging without coordination could prove challenging to the nation's electric grid, according to research conducted by the US Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
When the eyes move, the eardrums move, tooSimply moving the eyes triggers the eardrums to move too, even in the absence of sound, says a new study by Duke University neuroscientists. The findings, which were replicated in both humans and rhesus monkeys, provide new insight into how the brain coordinates what we see and what we hear. It may also lead to new understanding of hearing disorders, such as difficulty following a conversation in
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reaching the breaking pointTo better understand why many elderly people are prone to break a bone in a fall (known as bone fragility fractures), perhaps doctors and researchers should look at the human skeleton in much the same way civil engineers analyze buildings and bridges, according to a new study from a University of Utah mechanical engineering professor.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find oxidized iron deep within the Earth's interiorScientists digging deep into the Earth's mantle recently made an unexpected discovery. Five hundred and fifty kilometres below the Earth's surface, they found highly oxidized iron, similar to the rust we see on our planet's surface, within garnets found within diamonds. The result surprised geoscientists around the globe because there is little opportunity for iron to become so highly oxidized dee
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Personality changes during transition to developing mild cognitive impairmentPersonality changes and behavior problems that come with Alzheimer's disease are as troubling as memory loss and other mental difficulties for caregivers and those living with the condition. Mayo Clinic researchers wondered if personality changes that begin early, when MCI memory loss becomes noticeable, might help predict Alzheimer's disease at its earliest stages. The researchers created a study
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Portland State study spotlights cultural barriers to student financial successThe college financial aid process ignores the cultural needs of minority students, causing many of them to not receive adequate financial aid and dropping out because they've run out of money, according to a Portland State University study.
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Live Science
The New Thinnest Mirrors in the World Use Quantum 'Excitons' to Reflect LightTwo separate teams of scientists have built the thinnest mirrors in the world: sheets of molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2), each just a single atom wide.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
PCOS may reduce gut bacteria diversityWomen who have a common hormone condition that contributes to infertility and metabolic problems tend to have less diverse gut bacteria than women who do not have the condition, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
C-sections linked to long-term risks and benefitsCompared to vaginal deliveries, caesarean deliveries are associated with a decreased risk of urinary incontinence and pelvic prolapse, but an increased risk of miscarriage or placenta previa in future pregnancies. Those are just some of the conclusions on a large literature review on the long-term risks and benefits associated with caesarean delivery, by Sarah Stock from the MRC Centre for Reprodu
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Science | The Guardian
We need a reality check: facts and figures alone won’t stop Brexit | Nicky HawkinsStats and studies are not enough. Progressives must realise that voters are won over by narratives, not numbers With the Brexit debate still raging and a stream of bewildering news emanating from the Trump administration, progressives on both sides of the Atlantic are floundering, struggling to make sense of a world that was unthinkable just a couple of years ago. Their failure to win over hearts
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The Atlantic
When the Religious Doctor Refuses to Treat YouIn 2014, a 27-year-old nurse-midwife named Sara Hellwege applied for a job at Tampa Family Health Centers, a federally qualified health center. She was a member of the American Association of Pro-Life Obstetricians and Gynecologists, a professional association that opposes abortion. “Due to religious guidelines,” Hellwege wrote to the clinic’s HR director, Chad Lindsey, in an email, “I am able to
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cognitive science
A paper in Current Directions looks at canine perception. It reviews lots of cool studies.submitted by /u/markmana [link] [comments]
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Live Science
How a Norwegian Jetliner Just Set a Trans-Atlantic Speed RecordAn unusually fast jet stream is offering commercial jets the chance make the crossing at unheard-of speeds.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple says delayed HomePod speaker ready to goApple HomePod SpeakerApple said Tuesday its HomePod speaker, the digital assistant device challenging rivals from Amazon and Google, was now ready after a delay of several months.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Viral probe gives ringside view of cell-to-cell combatA fascinating blow-by-blow account of the arms struggle between plants and viral pathogens, is revealed in new research.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Root microbiome valuable key to plants surviving droughtJust as the microorganisms in our gut are increasingly recognized as important players in human health and behavior, new research from the University of Toronto Mississauga demonstrates that microorganisms are equally critical to the growth and health of plants. For example, plants that are able to recruit particular bacteria to their root microbiomes are much more drought resistant than their fel
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First quantifiable observation of cloud seedingA University of Wyoming researcher contributed to a paper that demonstrated, for the first time, direct observation of cloud seeding—from the growth of the ice crystals through the processes that occur in the clouds to the eventual fallout of the ice crystals that become snow—and how the impacts could be quantified.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Brief exposure to charismatic career women inspires female students to pursue same fieldA low-budget field experiment to tackle the lack of women in the male-dominated field of economics has been surprisingly effective, says the study's author, an economist at Southern Methodist University, Dallas.
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Viden
Dit blodsukker-niveau afgør, hvad du skal spise for at tabe digSundhedsmagasinet fulgte seks kvinder på en slankekur tilrettelagt efter deres blodsukker. Og det ser ud til at virke.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
So much depends on a tree guardIn a big city, trees, like people, like their space. In a new study, researchers at Columbia University found that street trees protected by guards that stopped passersby from trampling the surrounding soil absorbed runoff water more quickly than trees in unprotected pits. The results are published online in the journal Ecological Engineering.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New filters could enable manufacturers to perform highly-selective chemical separation, cutting costs and emissionsA team of chemical and biological engineers has developed highly selective membrane filters that could enable manufacturers to separate and purify chemicals in ways that are currently impossible, allowing them to potentially use less energy and cut carbon emissions, according to findings published in print today in the journal ACS Nano.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microbial signal recognition stems from existing building blocksFreiburg biochemists show how evolution combines a nutrient sensor from existing elements.
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Quanta Magazine
A Domesticated Dingo? No, but Some Are Getting Less WildWhen workers first dug into the rusty dirt beneath the scrublands of Australia’s Tanami Desert to mine for gold in 2002, mining executives saw dollar signs. Locals saw jobs. Dingoes, however, just saw food. Unsecured rubbish heaps around the mines attracted the lean, golden wild dog with pointy ears that swivel on its skull like perfectly evolved satellite dishes. Like their fully domesticated co
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The Atlantic
A Root Cause of the Teacher-Diversity ProblemHaving just earned a teaching degree from Pennsylvania’s Millersville University, Rian Reed set out in 2011 to find a position working with special-needs students. Born and raised in a suburb outside of Philadelphia, she had built an enviable academic record, earning induction into the National Honor Society in high school and speaking at her university commencement. She sought to use her leaders
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The Atlantic
The Technological Shift Behind the World's First NovelBy Heart is a series in which authors share and discuss their all-time favorite passages in literature. See entries from Colum McCann, George Saunders, Emma Donoghue, Michael Chabon, and more. Doug McLean Great books shape lives, everyone knows that. This series explores the idea that even a single line of poetry or prose can rewire something in a person’s brain, changing the way they think or fe
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Forensic researchers find more accurate way to estimate age of deceasedForensic researchers at North Carolina State University have found a more accurate way to assess an individual's age at death, based on the bone mineral density of the femur. The technique could be used to help identify human remains.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
New device can transmit underwater sound to airA newly created metamaterial takes a shot at solving the problem of hearing underwater sounds from the surface.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Antarctica's Weddell Sea 'deserves protected status'Scientists dive into Antarctic waters to build the case for a vast new marine protected area.
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Blog » Languages » English
Comets vs. Asteroids: Out of This WorldDon’t worry, this isn’t a disaster movie! Starting at 11 AM EST on 1/25 and going for 24 hours, we’ll just be going on a little outer space adventure. Fancy a jaunt on one of these fast-flying puppies? Choose your favorite SSSB (that’s what astronomers call a Small Solar System Body). Comets Ice is nice! Comets are made of rock, dust, frozen water, and various frozen gases like CO2 and methane. W
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New DNA database at Rutgers-Camden to strengthen forensic scienceA new database at Rutgers University-Camden is now available to help to bring more reliability to the interpretation of complex DNA evidence. This innovative new resource was developed by a research team led by Rutgers University-Camden professors Catherine Grgicak and Desmond Lun, and Ken Duffy of the University of Ireland at Maynooth.
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Viden
Mars: Rød udenpå, men hvad er der indeni?Årets største Mars-mission, InSight, skal gøre forskerne klogere på Mars’ indre.
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Science : NPR
Philippine Volcano Erupts, Causing 56,000 To FleeAuthorities raised Mount Mayon's alert level to 4 out of a possible 5, indicating "intense unrest" and the possibility of a particularly violent, hazardous eruption within days. (Image credit: Bullit Marquez/AP)
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New on MIT Technology Review
The US is getting left behind as an innovator
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Dana Foundation
Science Communication: Dana ResourcesIn the past decade, I’ve seen more and more scientists step outside their labs—or invite people in—to share how science affects our daily lives and why basic and translational research is important. Spreading the science love isn’t just the purview of reporters and PR people anymore, and interest is high. Groups like the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) have included ple
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Survey results show Christians becoming less concerned about the environmentThere has been no "greening of Christianity" among people in the pews, despite efforts by some religious leaders to emphasize environmental stewardship, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cognitive training helps regain a younger-working brainNew research could provide new hope for extending our brain function as we age. In a randomized clinical study involving adults age 56 to 71, researchers found that after cognitive training, participants' brains were more energy efficient, meaning their brain did not have to work as hard to perform a task.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bitcoin wallet devices vulnerable to security hacksBitcoin Stripe CryptocurrencyDevices used to manage accounts using Bitcoin could be improved to provide better protection against hackers, according to new research.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientist unlocks gamma ray burst secretsScientists have recreated the first ever mini version of a gamma ray burst in a laboratory, opening up a whole new way to investigate their properties and potentially unlocking some of the mysteries around possible alien civilizations.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using epigenetic signatures and machine learning to improve diagnosisResearchers have identified unique epigenetic signatures for nine neurodevelopmental disorders lending to a better method of diagnosis for disorders with much clinical overlap. The epigenetic signatures were developed through methylation array analysis.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Forensic researchers find more accurate way to estimate age of deceasedForensic researchers have found a more accurate way to assess an individual's age at death, based on the bone mineral density of the femur. The technique could be used to help identify human remains.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Married veterans more at risk of suicide than single soldiersAmong recently returned veterans, a new study says those who are married or living with a partner are at higher suicide risk than soldiers who are single, and older married female veterans are at the greatest risk.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Adding graphene girders to silicon electrodes could double the life of lithium batteriesNew research led by WMG, at the University of Warwick has found an effective approach to replacing graphite in the anodes of lithium-ion batteries using silicon, by reinforcing the anode's structure with graphene girders. This could more than double the life of rechargeable lithium-ion based batteries and also increase the capacity delivered by those batteries.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Plotting the downward trend in traditional hysterectomyFewer women are getting hysterectomies in every state across the country.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New, forward-looking report outlines research path to sustainable citiesIn 1950, fewer than one-third of the world's people lived in cities. Today more than half do. By 2050, urban areas will be home to some two-thirds of Earth's human population.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Viral probe gives ringside view of cell-to-cell combatA fascinating blow-by-blow account of the arms struggle between plants and viral pathogens, is revealed in new research.
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Feed: All Latest
The Physics of Why Bigger Drones Can Fly LongerBigger isn't always better—but when it comes to drones, it kind of is.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drought defenseJust as the microorganisms in our gut are increasingly recognized as important players in human health and behavior, new research from the University of Toronto Mississauga demonstrates that microorganisms are equally critical to the growth and health of plants. For example, plants that are able to recruit particular bacteria to their root microbiomes are much more drought resistant than their fel
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
So much depends on a tree guardIn a big city, trees, like people, like their space. In a new study, researchers at Columbia University found that street trees protected by guards that stopped passersby from trampling the surrounding soil absorbed runoff water more quickly than trees in unprotected pits. The results are published online in the journal Ecological Engineering.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New filters could enable manufacturers to perform highly selective chemical separationA team of chemical and biological engineers from Tufts University has developed highly selective membrane filters that could enable manufacturers to separate and purify chemicals in ways that are currently impossible, allowing them to potentially use less energy and cut carbon emissions, according to findings published in print today in the journal ACS Nano.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Large study finds higher rates of early substance use among children with ADHDChildren with ADHD engaged in substance use at a younger age and had a significantly higher prevalence of regular marijuana and cigarette use as adults.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Deaf children learn words faster than hearing childrenEach year many deaf children get a cochlear implant to connect to the world of sounds. So far, it was not clear which processes take place in these children when they start to learn language -- and why they differ in the level of language they achieve. Now, the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences found that deaf children with a cochlear implant learn words even faster than
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study: Cells of 3 advanced cancers die with drug-like compounds that reverse chemo failureResearchers at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, report in the Nature journal Scientific Reports that they have discovered three drug-like compounds that successfully reverse chemotherapy failure in three of the most commonly aggressive cancers -- ovarian, prostate and breast. The molecules were first discovered computationally via SMU's ManeFrame high-performance supercomputer. Now their eff
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Enzyme with surprising dual functionScientists at the University of Bonn have clarified a surprising dual function of ceramide synthase. The enzyme not only catalyzes a central step of the production of vital lipids. It also has the ability to turn genes involved in lipid metabolism on or off. The study is being published in the renowned journal Cell Reports.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lifting the veil on 'valence,' brain study reveals roots of desire, dislikeFocusing on a particular section called the basolateral amygdala, researchers at MIT's Picower Institute for Learning and Memory show how valence-processing circuitry -- which determines whether we assign good or bad feelings about stimuli -- is organized and how key neurons in those circuits interact with others.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new therapeutic avenue for Parkinson's diseaseSystemic clearing of senescent astrocytes prevents Parkinson's neuropathology and associated symptoms in a mouse model of sporadic disease, the type implicated in 95 percent of human cases. Publishing in Cell Reports, researchers in the Andersen lab at the Buck Institute provide a new potential therapeutic avenue for the incurable, progressive neurological disorder that affects up to one million A
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Big Think
Want to fall asleep faster? Try this 5-minute techniqueBefore you reach for another glass of warm milk, read this. Read More
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Big Think
Why the U.S. just fell off the list of top 10 most innovative countriesIt’s the first time the U.S. has fallen off the top 10 list since Bloomberg began its index. Read More
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The Atlantic
Is Trump Becoming Self-Aware?Taking a job with Donald Trump means agreeing to sometimes be attacked by Donald Trump. This week’s victims are Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross. “These trade deals, they’re terrible,” Trump told Ross, according to Jonathan Swan at Axios . “Your understanding of trade is terrible. Your deals are no good. No good.” The president rejected a trade deal that Ross thoug
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The Scientist RSS
Do Human Pheromones Exist?Despite the prevalence of pheromone products on the market, substantial evidence that they can induce sexual attraction is lacking.
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Science | The Guardian
Flushing out 'zombie cells' could help stave off Parkinson's, study suggestsPossible approach to treating effects of neurodegenerative diseases – and even ageing – revealed by trial In work that could open a new front in the war on Parkinson’s disease, and even ageing itself, scientists have shown that they can stave off some of the effects of the neurodegenerative disease by flushing “zombie cells” from the brain. The research in mice raises hopes for a fresh approach t
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Viden
Chipproducenten Intel fraråder eget sikkerheds-fixDen løsning der skulle eliminere kritisk fejl i firmaets processorer, skaber nye problemer, lyder det fra firmaet selv.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Your phone is like a spy in your pocketSmartphones’ powers of perception make them more user-friendly and efficient. But they also open new opportunities for privacy invasions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New report one of the most comprehensive studies on health effects of e-cigarettesA new congressionally mandated report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine takes a comprehensive look at evidence on the human health effects of e-cigarettes. Although the research base is limited given the relatively short time e-cigarettes have been used, the committee that conducted the study identified and examined over 800 peer-reviewed scientific studies, reachi
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flexibility and arrangement -- the interaction of ribonucleic acid and waterRibonucleic acid (RNA) plays a key role in biochemical processes which occur at the cellular level in a water environment. Mechanisms and dynamics of the interaction between RNA and water were now revealed by vibrational spectroscopy on ultrashort time scales and analyzed by in-depth theory.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Opening the cavity floodgatesFreiburg biochemists investigate the transport of large proteins through bacterial cell membranes.
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Scientific American Content: Global
When a Mom Feels Depressed, Her Baby's Cells Might Feel It, TooAt just 18 months old, young children can show biological evidence of added stress -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian
Letter: Lord Quirk obituaryRandolph Quirk was a longstanding family friend. Whenever he and his wife, Jean, came to our house it was full of laughter and fun. He was also exceedingly competitive. On holiday in Northumberland in the 1960s he challenged a Roman Catholic priest, Alec Fraser, who was with us to a motor race on a two-lane, straight but switchback road. Quirk drove with his family in a Morris Minor and Fraser dr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New limit on the definition of a planet proposedA planet can be no bigger than about 10 times the size of Jupiter, an astrophysicist has calculated.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Feedback enhances brainwave control of a novel hand-exoskeletonScientists are developing a lightweight and portable hand exoskeleton that can be controlled with brainwaves. The device enhances performance of brain-machine interfaces and can restore functional grasps for the physically impaired.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Incentive to moveA researcher from the University of Freiburg demonstrates how single-cell archaea determine what direction to swim.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Do low-carb diets really do anything? (video)Some fads never die. Low-carb diets were a thing in the late '90s and they're still a thing now. But why does this fad have staying power? Is it because the touted benefits are real? Or is that greasy, low-carb burger fried in snake oil? Learn about the surprising medical benefits of ketogenic diets in this video from Reactions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brief exposure to charismatic career women inspires female students to pursue same fieldA simple, low-cost experiment to encourage women to enter the male-dominated field of economics was surprisingly effective, says economist Danila Serra, Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Top female college students were inspired to pursue economics when exposed very briefly to charismatic, successful women in the field, says co-author Serra. The successful results suggest that exposing young
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Quantum controlAn international team consisting of Russian and German scientists has made a breakthrough in the creation of seemingly impossible materials. They have managed to create the world's first quantum metamaterial which can be used as a control element in superconducting electrical circuits.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Updated guideline for molecular testing and targeted therapies in lung cancerA panel of leading experts in molecular pathology has issued new recommendations and updates to guidelines for molecular diagnostic testing of patients with lung cancer. They are intended to help guide the treatment of patients around the world, and help oncologists and pathologists match patients with the most effective therapies.
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Feed: All Latest
DJI Mavic Air: Specs, Price, Release DateThe DJI Mavic Air goes on sale this month for $799, and is packed with impressive automated tech.
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Live Science
Dumpster Rats! A Pile of Pests Swarm in a Paris BinIf you suffer from musophobia, a fear of rodents, this would be a scene out of your worst nightmare.
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Ingeniøren
Domstol: Nej til slutdepot for Forsmarks højradioaktive atombrændselSvensk Kärnbränslehanterings har i dag fået et nej fra den svenske miljødomstol om godkendelse til at deponere højradioaktivt affald i kobberkapsler langt under jordoverfladen. Domstolen mener ikke, at myndigheden tilstrækkeligt har bevist, at der ikke vil opstå korrosion i kobberkapslerne.
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The Atlantic
When Your Eyes Move, So Do Your EardrumsWithout moving your head, look to your left. Now look to your right. Keep flicking your eyes back and forth, left and right. Even if you managed to keep the rest of your body completely still, your eyeballs were not the only parts of your head that just moved. Your ears did, too. Specifically, your eardrums—the thin membranes inside each of your ears—wobbled. As your eyes flitted right, both eard
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Scientific American Content: Global
China Declared World's Largest Producer of Scientific ArticlesInternational competition is increasing, but the United States remains a scientific powerhouse -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren
Hollandsk godstog skal køre 100 km, uden at føreren rører en fingerToggiganten Alstom skal teste førerløs kørsel med godstog i Holland. Forventningen er øget kapacitet på strækningen og lavere energiforbrug. Der er dog lang vej, til lokomotivføreren kan undværes helt.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
UW researcher leads study of first quantifiable observation of cloud seedingFor the first time, direct observation of cloud seeding -- from the growth of the ice crystals through the processes that occur in the clouds to the eventual fallout of the ice crystals that become snow -- has been documented.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists emulate the human blood-retinal barrier on a microfluidic chipA team of scientists in Barcelona has developed a microfluidic device that mimics the human blood-retinal barrier. It enables to test molecules in vitro and to study diseases such as diabetic retinopathy.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Prosecuting background check and straw purchase violations depends on state lawsStudy examined prosecutions following tougher sentencing for 'straw arm' purchases in Pennsylvania and a Maryland court decision that redefined private firearm transfers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Parent misconceptions may hinder child organ donationParents' major concerns about child organ donation often included misunderstandings about medical care, potential suffering and cost.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Forensic researchers find more accurate way to estimate age of deceasedForensic researchers have found a more accurate way to assess an individual's age at death, based on the bone mineral density of the femur. The technique could be used to help identify human remains.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biomechanical mapping method aids development of therapies for damaged heart tissueResearchers have developed a new way to capture the detailed biomechanical properties of heart tissue. The high-resolution optical technique fills an important technology gap necessary to develop and test therapies that might eventually be used to heal heart damage after a heart attack.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cognitive training helps regain a younger-working brainResearchers at the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas say their research could provide new hope for extending our brain function as we age. In a randomized clinical study involving adults age 56 to 71 that recently published in Neurobiology of Aging, researchers found that after cognitive training, participants' brains were more energy efficient, meaning their brain did no
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Short-course treatment for combat-related PTSD offers expedited path to recoverySymptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can be debilitating and standard treatment can take months, often leaving those affected unable to work or care for their families. But, a new study demonstrated that many PTSD sufferers can benefit from an expedited course of treatment. In the first study of its kind, prolonged exposure (PE) therapy was found to be as effective when administered o
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study compares risks between methods of sterilizationHysteroscopic sterilization, a non-surgical procedure that involves placing small implants in the fallopian tubes to render a woman infertile, was associated with an increased risk of gynecological complications (most notably sterilization failure with subsequent pregnancy) compared to surgical sterilization, but there were no differences between the two approaches in medical outcomes.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Shrinking Mountain Glaciers Are Affecting People DownstreamMany glaciers seem to have already reached a tipping point, after which freshwater runoff will begin to decline -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Popular Science
China's new drone company is building a UAV with a 20-ton payloadEastern Arsenal That's akin to a medium-sized manned cargo plane. Among Tengoen's many projects: an eight-engine cargo drone with a payload akin to a medium-sized manned cargo plane.
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Futurity.org
Map reveals paths to and from brain’s ‘sadness center’A new, finely detailed map depicts the neural pathways leading to and from the “sadness center” of the brains of nonhuman primates. In the early 1900s, German neurologist Korbinian Brodmann began to study the architecture of the human brain. He divvied up the cerebral cortex—the outer, convoluted brain region that plays a key role in higher functions like memory, attention, and consciousness—into
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NYT > Science
Vaping Can Be Addictive and May Lure Teenagers to Smoking, Science Panel ConcludesA report from the National Academy of Sciences said that e-cigarettes are safer than smoking, but not quite safe, and may cause teens to take up tobacco.
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Live Science
Why 200,000 Antelope Dropped Dead in 3 WeeksA killer was lurking inside the rare saiga antelope.
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The Atlantic
The Internet Is Enabling a New Kind of Poorly Paid HellTechnology has helped rid the American economy of many of the routine, physical, low-paid jobs that characterized the workplace of the last century. Gone are the women who sewed garments for pennies, the men who dug canals by hand, the children who sorted through coal. Today, more and more jobs are done at a computer, designing new products or analyzing data or writing code. But technology is als
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The Atlantic
Larry Nassar and the Impulse to Doubt Female PainLarry Nassar USA GymnasticsAs a freshman on the Michigan State University softball team, Tiffany Thomas Lopez went to Larry Nassar, the school sports therapist, for back pain. Nassar’s “ special treatment ”—a technique he’s used on many of his patients, including U.S. Olympic gymnasts—involved him inserting his fingers into her vagina. Thomas Lopez thought something seemed off. But when she reported the behavior to Destiny
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The Atlantic
The 2018 Oscar Nominations Are InThe nominations for the 90th Academy Awards, announced Tuesday, rewarded a robust group of Best Picture contenders, including The Shape of Water , Dunkirk , Lady Bird, Get Out, Phantom Thread, and Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri. Notably competing in the top category are genres often snubbed by the Oscars, such as horror and teen coming-of-age comedies. In a politically charged year for
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Feed: All Latest
Snapchat Stories Can Now Live Outside the AppWhile Instagram and Facebook fine-tune their Stories features, Snapchat is moving some of its content beyond the app.
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Feed: All Latest
'Yume Nikki' Review: The Mysterious Japanese Game That Took 14 Years To Officially Come OutThe game, recently available on Steam, is the story of a young girl's dreams, but playing it is like a nightmare of its own.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Stars with too much lithium may have stolen itSome small stars have extra lithium before they grow old, suggesting they get extra amounts of the element from an external source.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Children view people's behavior, psychological characteristics as shaped by environmentsA new study has found that 5- to 6-year-olds view people's environments, not their skin color, as the most important determinant of their behavior and psychological characteristics. These findings contradict the idea that views of race that are known to lead to prejudice such as believing that race naturally divides the world into distinct kinds of people's inevitably develop early in childhood.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Curcumin improves memory and moodDaily consumption of a certain form of curcumin -- the substance that gives Indian curry its bright color -- improved memory and mood in people with mild, age-related memory loss.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Drones learn to navigate autonomously by imitating cars and bicyclesA new algorithm allows drones to fly completely by themselves through the streets of a city and in indoor environments. The algorithm had to learn traffic rules and adapt training examples from cyclists and car drivers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Marijuana use does not lower chances of getting pregnantMarijuana use -- by either men or women -- does not appear to lower a couple's chances of getting pregnant, according to a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Queen's University scientist unlocks gamma ray burst secretsA Queen's University Belfast scientist has recreated the first ever mini version of a gamma ray burst in a laboratory, opening up a whole new way to investigate their properties and potentially unlocking some of the mysteries around alien civilization.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Protecting piping ploversVisitors to Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore are often treated to tiny scurrying beachcombers -- piping plovers. Future visitors, however, could see fewer of these celebrated shorebirds. A Michigan State University study reveals that the endangered shorebird population could decline over the next 10 years and changes in management strategies are needed. The authors demonstrate that current c
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using epigenetic signatures and machine learning to improve diagnosisGreenwood Genetic Center (GGC) researchers in collaboration with scientists from Canada have identified unique epigenetic signatures for nine neurodevelopmental disorders lending to a better method of diagnosis for disorders with much clinical overlap. The epigenetic signatures were developed through methylation array analysis and were reported in the January issue of The American Journal of Human
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Bitcoin wallet devices vulnerable to security hacks, study showsDevices used to manage accounts using Bitcoin could be improved to provide better protection against hackers, according to research by University of Edinburgh scientists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Protecting piping ploversVisitors to Sleeping Bear Dunes National Lakeshore are often treated to tiny scurrying beachcombers - piping plovers. Future visitors, however, could see fewer of these celebrated shorebirds.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Big pay package for Musk, with even bigger goals for TeslaTesla Elon MuskElon Musk will remain at Tesla Inc. under a 10-year, all-or-nothing pay package that demands massive growth.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Palestinians get 3G internet after decade-long rowPalestinians in the occupied West Bank began receiving 3G mobile telecommunications services on Tuesday, after years of wrangling with the Israeli authorities.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
The business benefits of doing good | Wendy Woods"The only way we're going to make substantial progress on the challenging problems of our time is for business to drive the solutions," says social impact strategist Wendy Woods. In a data-packed talk, Woods shares a fresh way to assess the impact all parts of business can have on all parts of society, and then adjust them to not only do less harm but actually improve things. Learn more about how
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Bitcoin wallet devices vulnerable to security hacks, study showsBitcoin Stripe CryptocurrencyDevices used to manage accounts on the innovative payment system Bitcoin could be improved to provide better protection against hackers, research suggests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Princesses and action heroes are for boys and girlsGiven the chance, young boys will try out dolls, and girls will play with cars and building blocks. It's even possible to encourage the two sexes to play together without too much moaning, says Lauren Spinner of the University of Kent in the UK, lead author of a study in Springer's journal Sex Roles. She believes that if children's magazines could use more diverse photographs and articles, this co
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists suggest way to predict the behavior of invasive weedsIs it possible to predict which nonnative plant species will become invasive weeds and when? According to research featured in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management, the answer is "hopefully yes." And those predictions can lead to more effective and cost-efficient weed management.
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New on MIT Technology Review
The average American spends 24 hours a week online
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New on MIT Technology Review
Future surgeons could be trained by VR doctorsVR Game Training
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Astronomers produce first detailed images of surface of giant starAn international team of astronomers has produced the first detailed images of the surface of a giant star outside our solar system, revealing a nearly circular, dust-free atmosphere with complex areas of moving material, known as convection cells or granules, according to a recent study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists developed a new model of frequency combs in optical microresonatorsA team from the Faculty of Physics of the Lomonosov Moscow State University together with the scientists from the Russian Quantum Center developed a new mathematical model that describes the process of soliton occurrence in optical microresonators. After the physicists understand the existing effects and learn to predict new ones, they will be able to create high-precision devices and universal op
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Warning follows report into online child sexual abuse riskIf the public are serious about wanting to protect children from online sexual abuse more investment in skilled professionals is needed now.The stark warning comes from researchers following publication of a new report commissioned by the Independent Inquiry on Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA) which coincided with the first day of the public hearing into online child sexual abuse.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A video database for cellular tracking created, useful in the fight against cancerUniversidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), the University Hospital Gregorio Marañón (HGUGM) and Universidad de Navarra have, together with other international institutions, developed a video database for cellular tracking that can be used to determine alterations involved in illnesses such as cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lifesaving microbubblesSevere oxygen deficiency eventually leads to cardiac arrest. If the blood's oxygen content cannot be rapidly re-established, the patient may die within minutes. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, American scientists have introduced air-filled microbubbles that could be used as an intravenous oxygen carrier to increase the survival rate of such patients. Because they rapidly dissolve in blood, the r
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Only 1 in 10 patients with anxiety disorders receives the right treatmentThe results of an international study commissioned by the World Mental Health with a sample of more than 51,500 individuals from 21 different countries, reveals that 10 percent of people suffer anxiety. Of these, only 27.6 percent have received some type of treatment, and this was considered appropriate in only 9.8 percent of the cases. It is the first time a study has described the treatment gap
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Retrospective test for quantum computers can build trustResearchers in Singapore and Japan describe in Physical Review Letters two approaches that offer 'post-hoc verification' of quantum computations.
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The Atlantic
Trump and Russia Both Seek to Exacerbate the Same Political DivisionsLast week, nearly 700,000 Twitter users were told that they unwittingly interacted with the Internet Research Agency, a Russian troll farm that tried to influence the 2016 election. “Twitter said that it had identified 3,814 IRA-linked accounts, which posted some 176,000 tweets in the 10 weeks preceding the election, and another 50,258 automated accounts connected to the Russian government, which
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A discovery about the behavior of heat in electronic devices can improve their performanceResearchers at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB), in collaboration with Purdue University (USA), have shown that heat flow behaves similarly to a viscous fluid when studied at nanoscale. The discovery, published in Nature Communications, paves the way to a better thermal management in electronic devices.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Starving tumors: New target discoveredActively growing tumors have a high demand for oxygen and nutrients. Therefore, they stimulate the growth of blood vessels. This process is called angiogenesis. If tumor-associated angiogenesis is suppressed, this may limit tumor growth. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center and the European Center for Angioscience at Heidelberg University have now discovered a new target for anti-angi
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists suggest way to predict the behavior of invasive weedsIs it possible to predict which nonnative plant species will become invasive weeds and when? According to research featured in the journal Invasive Plant Science and Management, the answer is 'hopefully yes.' And those predictions can lead to more effective and cost-efficient weed management.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Princesses and action heroes are for boys and girlsGiven the chance, young boys will try out dolls, and girls will play with cars and building blocks. It's even possible to encourage the two sexes to play together without too much moaning, says Lauren Spinner of the University of Kent in the UK, lead author of a study in Springer's journal Sex Roles.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drones learn to navigate autonomously by imitating cars and bicyclesDeveloped by UZH researchers, the algorithm DroNet allows drones to fly completely by themselves through the streets of a city and in indoor environments. Therefore, the algorithm had to learn traffic rules and adapt training examples from cyclists and car drivers.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new family of aerodynamic configurations of hypersonic airplanesHow to design an advanced aerodynamic configuration of the next generation hypersonic airliners? Recently, a family of novel configurations named 'Hypersonic I-shaped Aerodynamic Configuration' is proposed. This kind of configurations can produce a high lift-to-drag value as well as a high lift coefficient simultaneously. In addition, it also holds a large volumetric efficiency.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Air quality is leading environmental threat to public health, EPI report showsThe 2018 Environmental Performance Index (EPI) finds that air quality is the leading environmental threat to public health. Now in its twentieth year, the biennial report is produced by researchers at Yale and Columbia Universities in collaboration with the World Economic Forum. The tenth EPI report ranks 180 countries on 24 performance indicators across 10 issue categories covering environmental
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Accurate estimation of biodiversity is now possible on a global scalePolicymakers are often concerned with the preservation of biodiversity at national, continental or global scales, but most biodiversity monitoring is conducted at very fine scales. This mismatch between the scales of our policies and of our data creates serious challenges, especially when assessing biodiversity change. In a new study, published in Ecological Monographs today, nearly the entire glo
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The big picture of Great Lakes mercury pollutionA transdisciplinary team examined regulatory impacts on Great Lakes mercury, focusing on an Upper Peninsula tribal community with high fish consumption.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Flu infection study increases understanding of natural immunityPeople with higher levels of antibodies against the stem portion of the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) protein have less viral shedding when they get the flu, but don't have fewer or less severe signs of illness, according to a new study. This NIAID study is the first of its kind to evaluate pre-existing levels of these antibodies as a predictor of protection against influenza. The findings co
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Energy storehouses in the brain may be source of Alzheimer's, targets of new therapyIn a new study, researchers at the ASU-Banner Neurodegenerative Disease Research Center examine the effects of the disease on the functioning of mitochondria -- structures performing a variety of essential tasks, including supplying cells with energy.
10h
Ingeniøren
Minister: Handicappede skal have bedre adgang til bygningerReglerne for handicappedes adgang til byggerier bliver ofte brudt. Nu er bedre information, flere anvisninger og stikprøvekontrol på vej.
10h
Science | The Guardian
Remember Pioneer 10? Test your knowledge of space probe missionsIt is 15 years since Nasa lost contact with mankind’s first interstellar probe. What can you remember about it and the missions that followed? Fifteen years ago today, scientists at Nasa received the final faint signals from Pioneer 10, the first manmade object to leave the solar system. Over the years, her sister ship Pioneer 11 and the two Voyager probes have also embarked on the long journey t
10h
Viden
Hundedyr iPhone går som varmt brødNye tal viser, at iPhone X er den bedst sælgende telefon i verden netop nu.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Accurate estimation of biodiversity is now possible on a global scaleWe know remarkably little about the diversity of life on Earth, which makes it hard to know with any certainty whether we're succeeding in our efforts to conserve it. The goal of the Intergovernmental Panel on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) is to provide policymakers with objective scientific assessments about the status of the planet's biodiversity and its services to people. The Con
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Air quality is leading environmental threat to public health, EPI report showsThe 2018 Environmental Performance Index (EPI) finds that air quality is the leading environmental threat to public health. Now in its twentieth year, the biennial report is produced by researchers at Yale and Columbia Universities in collaboration with the World Economic Forum. The tenth EPI report ranks 180 countries on 24 performance indicators across 10 issue categories covering environmental
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The big picture of Great Lakes mercury pollutionMercury is a widespread environmental toxicant and pollutant that travels up the food chain onto people's dinner plates. Although a global issue, mercury regulations vary worldwide. Depending on where one lives in relation to mercury emissions, regional remediation makes minimal impacts for local fish consumption advisories. This is particularly true in a sensitive landscape like Michigan's Upper
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
To Combat Loneliness, Promote Social HealthMounting evidence shows that relationships should be a public health priority -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
Scientific American Content: Global
222 Bird Species Worldwide Are Now Critically EndangeredAnd according to the latest IUCN Red List update, a dismaying 13 percent of species are endangered -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Function of protein 'smallish' unraveledTo make a fully grown organism in the right shape, the forms of many cells need to be changed in a coordinated way. Researchers from the Cluster of Excellence for Aging Research (CECAD) in Cologne identified a gene that is in charge of the shape of the cell. Their results have been published in the Journal of Cell Biology.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Curcumin improves memory and mood, new UCLA study saysDaily consumption of a certain form of curcumin -- the substance that gives Indian curry its bright color -- improved memory and mood in people with mild, age-related memory loss,
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new architecture for miniaturization of atomic clocksNICT developed a simple miniaturized atomic clock system, which does not require a complicated frequency multiplication, as an outcome of a collaboration with Tohoku University and Tokyo Institute of Technology. We propose a new microwave generator that exploits thickness extensional vibration in a piezoelectric thin film to miniaturize an atomic clock. By transferring this technology into practic
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Johns Hopkins scientist proposes new limit on the definition of a planetA planet can be no bigger than about 10 times the size of Jupiter, an astrophysicist has calculated.
10h
Big Think
Welcome to Muskworld, a map of Elon's interestsElon Musk Boring CompanyMusk is about more than Teslas and rockets. Read More
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Building a better polyethyleneEach year more than eight million tons of plastics pollute the ocean, forming mammoth, so-called "garbage patches" via strong currents. Even with new collection methods, only 0.5 percent out of that volume is currently removed from the seas. One solution to this growing crisis is to prevent plastic from becoming waste to begin with – and researchers from the University of Pittsburgh's Swanson Scho
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Science : NPR
Drought-Stricken Cape Town Braces For Water To Run Out In AprilOfficials in the South African city of 3.7 million are restricting water usage amid fears it will run out of water by April 21. Experts say the crisis has been exacerbated by rapid population growth. (Image credit: Rodger Bosch /AFP/Getty Images)
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spanish use is steady or dropping in U.S. despite high Latino immigrationHidden just beneath the surface of the ongoing heated debate about immigration in the United States lurks an often unspoken concern: language. Specifically, whether immigration from Spanish-speaking countries threatens the English language's dominance.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study reveals perceived gender bias against women is dominant factor in college major choiceCollege-bound women are not less likely to enter specific fields because more math or science is required, but rather because of the gender discrimination they are likely to encounter in those fields, finds a new nationally representative longitudinal study published in the American Educational Research Journal.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Twitter Operating Chief Anthony Noto resignsTwitter's chief operating officer is leaving the social media giant to lead another company.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronomers produce first detailed images of surface of giant starAn international team of astronomers has produced the first detailed images of the surface of a giant star outside our solar system, revealing a nearly circular, dust-free atmosphere with complex areas of moving material, known as convection cells or granules, according to a recent study.
10h
Viden
Ekspert: Sundhed handler ikke om at være tyndDet er faktisk sundere at være fysisk aktiv, kvitte smøgerne og have lidt sul på kroppen - end at være tynd, lyder det fra ekspert.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A weak heart due to metabolic changeThe heart derives its energy primarily from fatty acids. However, if a metabolic shift to other energy sources takes place, this can result in congestive heart failure, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) and Heidelberg University Hospital have now discovered. This underscores the role of metabolism in heart failure. In addition, these findings are relevant for the use of cert
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Hijacker' drives cancer in some patients with high-risk neuroblastomaResearchers in Memphis and Boston have collaborated to show c-MYC is an oncogene that drives neuroblastoma in some high-risk patients; the findings help set the stage for much-needed precision medicines.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists achieve high power with new smaller laserAn international team of scientists has produced the first high-powered, randomly polarised laser beam with a 'Q switch' laser, which typically emits pulses of light so brief that they're measured in nanoseconds. Lasers are a critical part of modern technology--they're used in everything from our automobiles to medical equipment to the satellites orbiting Earth. Now, researchers are broadening the
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study reveals perceived gender bias against women is dominant factor in college major choiceCollege-bound women are not less likely to enter specific fields because more math or science is required, but rather because of the gender discrimination they are likely to encounter in those fields, finds a new nationally representative longitudinal study published in the American Educational Research Journal.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Better predicting mountains' flora and fauna in a changing worldClimbing a mountain is challenging. So, too, is providing the best possible information to plan for climate change's impact on mountain vegetation and wildlife. Understanding how plant and animal species in mountainous areas will be affected by climate change is complicated and difficult.
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Healthy to eat, unhealthy to grow—Strawberries embody the contradictions of California agricultureAgricultural abundance is a pillar of the California dream. In 2016 the state turned out more than US$45 billion worth of meat, milk and crops. Long before nutritionists agreed that fresh fruits and vegetables should be the center of American diets, California farmers had planted much of their land in these products, and today they produce half of the nation's fruits, vegetables and nuts.
10h
Dagens Medicin
Medens vi venter på praksis- og sundhedsklyngerPraksisklynger er første skridt mod et fagligt styret, ambitiøst arbejde med at sikre faglig og organisatorisk kvalitet.
10h
Science : NPR
Welcome To The Age Of Digital TranscendenceSmartphones have become an extension of the owner; it is the closest we've ever become to being omnipresent and omniscient and — in a metaphorical sense, at least — divine, says Marcelo Gleiser. (Image credit: Poike/Getty Images/iStockphoto)
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The Finnøy polar bearImagine you are 12,400 years in the past. Much of Norway is covered with ice and the present-day island of Finnøy exists as only two small islets. The sea is 40 metres above the current level. A polar bear embarks on a long swim through the icy waters and never reaches land. Some 12,400 years later, the skeleton of that same polar bear is discovered under a basement floor in the village of Judaber
11h
Popular Science
What do refrigeration, DNA synthesis, and Lycra have in common?DIY They're all getting inducted into the National Inventors Hall of Fame. In 2018, the National Inventors Hall of Fame is adding the inventors who advanced refrigeration, OLEDs, DNA synthesis, and Lycra, among other innovations.
11h
Futurity.org
Tools that test for life in Arctic could work on MarsExisting miniature low-cost, low-weight instruments could detect and analyze micro-organisms in extreme environments like those on Mars and other places in the solar system, research in the Canadian high Arctic shows. By avoiding delays that come with having to return samples to a laboratory for analysis, the methodology could also detect and identify pathogens on Earth during epidemics in remote
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cancer tumours could help unravel the mystery of the Cambrian explosionCould tumours help us explain the explosion of life of Earth? Scientists have typically explained the period of history when large animal species became much more diverse very quickly as the result of the planet's rising oxygen levels. But my colleagues and I have developed a new idea that the change might have started within animals' own biology, based on evidence from proteins found in tumours.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How single-cell archaea determine what direction to swimDr. Tessa Quax has identified the structure of a central protein used by archaea to determine the direction to swim. Archaea are single-cell life forms without a nucleus. She also studied which molecular mechanisms are involved in the transmission of signals from the archaea's environment to its motility structure. Quax, who is a researcher in the lab of Prof. Dr. Sonja-Verena Albers at the Instit
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is the origin of life just cosmic dust in the wind?"The cosmos is within us. We're made of star stuff." Thanks to a new study, this famous phrase by iconic astronomer Carl Sagan, now has some more support.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biochemists investigate the transport of large proteins through bacterial cell membranesEvery cell is surrounded by a membrane, which ensures the internal biochemical milieu and regulates the exchange of substances with its surroundings. In every cell membrane, there are a large number of transporters that allow only one sort of molecule to pass through. In the case of very small molecules, such as water, the responsible transporters form tiny pores in the membrane, which disappear i
11h
The Atlantic
A Deadly Election Season in KenyaNAIROBI—Two days after her husband was shot in the head on a soggy October afternoon, Dorothy Achieng sat on a wood-framed sofa cradling their one-year-old daughter Maya. Around her sat a dozen friends and relatives, quietly commiserating. In front of her, two photographs of her handsome husband lay on a knee-high wooden table; in each picture, he’s posing and smiling directly at the camera. Thir
11h
Dagens Medicin
Jesper Fisker bliver ny direktør for Kræftens Bekæmpelse»Det er en fantastisk spændende udfordring,« siger departementschef Jesper Fisker om sit nye job som direktør for Kræftens Bekæmpelse. Han går til opgaven med ydmyghed.
11h
New on MIT Technology Review
Hackers stole $172 billion from people in 2017
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists elucidate molecular basis of myostatin activation, key process in muscle healthFor the first time, this new study defines at the molecular level the structural changes that take place in the protein during the activation process of myostatin. Myostatin (or GDF8) is a key signaling protein involved in regulation of muscle mass and function. The research elucidated the central role of the tolloid enzyme in generating active myostatin. These insights enable the targeting of myo
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Racial and ethnic disparities in live donor kidney transplantsDespite efforts over the past two decades to increase the number of black and Hispanic patients receiving kidney transplants from related or unrelated living donors, these racial/ethnic minority patients are still much less likely to undergo such transplants than white patients, Johns Hopkins researchers report. In fact, the investigators say, the disparities have worsened in the last 20 years.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Astronomers produce first detailed images of surface of giant starAn international team of astronomers has produced the first detailed images of the surface of a giant star outside our solar system, revealing a nearly circular, dust-free atmosphere with complex areas of moving material, known as convection cells or granules, according to a recent study.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Clarifying the interplay between bone cells in bone remodelingBone homeostasis is regulated by communication between bone-forming mature osteoblasts (mOB) and bone-resorptive mature osteoclasts (mOC). However, the interaction between them in vivo remains unclear. A team of Osaka-centered researchers developed an intravital two-photon microscopy technique which reveals mOB and mOC functions are regulated via direct cell-cell contact between these cell types.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Realizing highly efficient quantum dot LEDs with metallic nanostructures at low costKAIST researchers have discovered a technology that enhances the efficiency of Quantum Dot LEDs.Professor Yong-Hoon Cho from the Department of Physics and his team succeeded in improving the efficiency of Quantum Dot (QD) Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs) by designing metallic nanostructure substrates.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Algorithm identifies 10 times more naturally occurring antibioticsIn a paper published in Nature Microbiology on Jan. 22, a team of American and Russian computer scientists described a new algorithm that identified an order of magnitude, or roughly 10 times more, naturally occuring antiobiotics than all previous studies.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Better predicting mountains' flora and fauna in a changing worldClimbing a mountain is challenging. So, too, is providing the best possible information to plan for climate change's impact on mountain vegetation and wildlife. In PLOS ONE, Michigan State University scientists show that using several sources of climate measurements when modeling the potential future distributions of mountain vegetation and wildlife can increase confidence in the model results and
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Enzyme inhibitor combined with chemotherapy delays glioblastoma growthIn animal experiments, a human-derived glioblastoma significantly regressed when treated with the combination of an experimental enzyme inhibitor and the standard glioblastoma chemotherapy drug, temozolomide.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Blast, impact simulations could lead to better understanding of injuries and body armorSandia National Laboratories is developing specialized computer modeling and simulation methods to better understand how blasts on a battlefield could lead to traumatic brain injury and injuries to vital organs, like the heart and lungs.
11h
Ingeniøren
Danske mutant-tomater rykker tættere på din tallerkenPlanteforædling med dna-saksen er rykket et skridt nærmere. Er det manipulation, når man bare fjerner nogen gener?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Emerging 5G networks – new opportunities for drone detection?Researchers from Aalto University and Tampere University of Technology in Finland have addressed new possibilities for efficient detection of drones by relying on future 5G communication systems. There, mmWave base stations may act as multistatic radar system receivers, thus acquiring the reflected signal from nearby flying drones.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drones learn to navigate autonomously by imitating cars and bicyclesAll today's commercial drones use GPS, which works fine above building roofs and in high altitudes. But what, when the drones have to navigate autonomously at low altitude among tall buildings or in the dense, unstructured city streets with cars, cyclists or pedestrians suddenly crossing their way? Until now, commercial drones are not able to quickly react to such unforeseen events.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Five ways the arts could help solve the plastics crisisIt is becoming more and more obvious that we need to drastically change how we use plastics. While we need improve our recycling infrastructure, we also need to help communities reduce plastic packaging waste and plastic litter.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
There are better ways to foster solar innovation and save jobs than Trump's tariffsPresident Donald Trump's decision to impose punitive duties on imported solar panels and related equipment is rankling most of the industry.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Three 'super-Earths' orbiting a cool dwarf star discoveredUsing NASA's prolonged Kepler mission, known as K2, astronomers have found three new "super-Earth" exoplanets. The newly detected alien worlds orbit the cool dwarf star designated LP415-17. The finding is reported January 18 in a paper published on the arXiv pre-print server.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dutch turning off quake-zone gas for 200 firmsThe Dutch government has ordered more than 200 of the country's biggest businesses to stop using gas from the quake-prone northern Groningen region, Europe's largest gasfield, officials confirmed Tuesday.
11h
The Atlantic
How Far Can Germany's Social Democrats Bend Before They Break?BERLIN—For Germany’s beleaguered Social Democrats (SPD), party unity seems to be in short supply these days. Following a turbulent, six-hour special conference at Bonn’s World Conference Center on Sunday to decide whether the SPD should enter a coalition with Chancellor Angela Merkel, delegates of the center-left party stood together to sing “ When We Stride Side by Side,” their traditional hymn.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Astronauts go spacewalking to give new hand to robot armSpacewalking astronauts gave a hand to the International Space Station's big robot arm Tuesday.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How to stop violence against women in India—it starts with training police officersFrom the Woman's Marches in the US to the global #MeToo campaign, the issue of women's rights has well and truly permeated society's consciousness.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Can insurance premiums ensure we get through climate change in one piece?Insurance companies get a bad rap.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Genetic study of plains zebra finds that six subspecies made by appearance-only do not match genetic evidenceA team of researchers with members from Denmark, the U.S., Portugal and France has found that the six subspecies classifications currently used to categorize plains zebras living in Africa do not match with genetic evidence. In their paper published in the journal Nature Ecology & Evolution, the group describes their DNA analysis of zebras living in several parts of Africa and what they found by d
11h
Feed: All Latest
Tinder's Lack of Encryption Lets Strangers Spy on Your SwipesTinder Researchers ImagesThanks to Tinder's patchwork use of HTTPS, researchers found they could reconstruct someone's entire experience in the app.
11h
The Scientist RSS
Interim CNRS President Removed, Faces Data Manipulation AllegationsAnne Peyroche has been acting president of the French science organization since last October.
11h
The Scientist RSS
Sanofi and Celgene Spend $20 Billion in Major Biotech AcquisitionsPharmaceutical giant Sanofi to take over hemophilia drugmaker Biovertiv, while Celgene will buy cancer drugmaker Juno Therapeutics.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Internet use at home soars to more than 17 hours per weekSince the internet became mainstream less than 20 years ago, faith in traditional institutions and consumption of traditional media has also been displaced by faith in newer, digital institutions and consumption of newer, digital media, according to the 15th annual Digital Future Report recently produced by the USC Annenberg Center for the Digital Future.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Waving goodbye to slash-and-burnThe first time I flew into Punta Gorda, a town on the edge of the Maya Golden Landscape in southern Belize, I was struck with how intact the forest remained compared to adjacent Guatemala and Honduras. Where Belizean forests were a rolling green landscape of tall tropical forest canopy Guatemala was nearly the opposite: blocks of intact forest surrounded by extensive clearing, smoke and fire.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drones take off in agriculture industryCould the newest farmhand be a drone?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
American lobsters feeling the heat in the northwest AtlanticRising temperatures along the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean will force American lobsters farther offshore and into more northern waters, a new study finds.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Spacewalking from the comfort of your armchairVR Game TrainingMeet the Aussies behind a virtual reality application that is really out of this world.
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Dagens Medicin
Diabetescenter får ny forskningslederPaul Bloch er udnævnt som ny forskningsleder på Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen.
11h
Viden
Mobilafhængige unge er mindre lykkeligeBrug af mobilen falder sammen med unges følelse af lykke, viser ny amerikansk undersøgelse.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
A Meditation on the Anatomy LabA medical student notes how the white coat can normalize an exceptional amount of violence -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
11h
Futurity.org
Buckyballs give huge boost to see-through solar cellsResearchers have found a way to get electrons to travel much farther than was previously thought possible in materials for organic solar cells. This advance could make these solar cells much more useful than inorganic alternatives. “For years, people had treated the poor conductivity of organics as an unavoidable fact, and this shows that that’s not always the case,” says research leader Stephen
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
This is ice in Antarctica, flowing in slow motion like water going through river rapidsOne of the benefits of the Space Age is the way it has allowed human beings to see Earth in all of its complexity and splendor. In addition, it has allowed us to conduct studies of Earth's surface and atmosphere from orbit, which helps us to see the impact we have on our the planet. It is with this purpose in mind that NASA's Earth Observation Program has been monitoring the Arctic and Antarctic f
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How comet dust reveals the history of the solar systemWe are not used to considering dust as a valuable material – unless it comes from space. And more precisely, from the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. An analysis of its dust has provided valuable information about this celestial object, and, more generally, on the history of the solar system.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Realizing highly efficient quantum dot LEDs with metallic nanostructures at low costKAIST researchers have discovered a technology that enhances the efficiency of Quantum Dot LEDs. Professor Yong-Hoon Cho from the Department of Physics and his team succeeded in improving the efficiency of quantum dot (QD) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by designing metallic nanostructure substrates.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Toxin in centipede venom identifiedA team of researchers from several institutions in China has identified the toxin in golden head centipede venom. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes how they found the toxin that makes the venom so deadly to prey and also identified a possible antidote for it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A primer for understanding climate scienceClimate science and threats from climate change have been hot topics of conversation amongst the public as well as business and political leaders. And despite the fact that more than 90 percent of climate scientists attribute the majority of global mean temperature increase over the last few decades to human activity and warn that continued warming poses risks for mankind, doubt and misconceptions
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Harmful algal blooms can become airborneWaves lapping against the shoreline is always a pretty scene, but it may also be a way for toxins from harmful algal blooms to become airborne.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New data yields deeper understanding of poverty in IndiaA new international study led by UvA researchers Peter Sloot and Michael Lees has yielded extensive data on slums in Bangalore and provides a detailed insight into the problem of poverty in India. The highly granular data, which was collected through a field survey of 36 slums, could lead to a better understanding of poverty and to more effective strategies for managing and improving conditions fo
11h
Dagens Medicin
»Min vigtigste opgave er at knække koden for ulighed i sundhed«Ny Sundheds- og omsorgsborgmester i København, Sisse Marie Welling (SF), er glad for sin nye post, hvor hun kan påvirke københavnernes sundhed. Hun vil lægge vægt på at bekæmpe ulighed i sundhed og skabe bedre vilkår for mental sundhed.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Function of protein 'smallish' unraveledTo make a fully grown organism in the right shape, the forms of many cells need to be changed in a coordinated way. Researchers from the Cluster of Excellence for Aging Research (CECAD) in Cologne identified a gene that is in charge of the shape of the cell. Their results have been published in the Journal of Cell Biology.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Survival mode in a tiny worm's brainCaenorhabditis elegans, or C. elegans, are tiny worms with tiny brains—their whole bodies are the width of a pencil tip and contain only 302 neurons. These nematodes live out their two-week-long lifespans in rotting vegetation, eating bacteria, and avoiding predators. However, C. elegans does not always live such a simplistic lifestyle. Under environmental stress—such as when overcrowding leads to
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
e-Genie tool could grant energy saving wishes for businessesA new monitoring tool for businesses has been developed by researchers at the University of Nottingham to help reduce energy use and cut costs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Impact of religion and racial pride on classroom discriminationTwo important factors seem to explain black American adolescents' experiences with teacher-based racial discrimination – religiosity and racial pride, finds a new study from the Brown School at Washington University in St. Louis.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A bacterial powder for quickly stabilizing gravel surfacesEPFL's Laboratory of Soil Mechanics has developed an easily reproducible technique using bacteria and urea to reinforce sandy or gravelly terrain. A series of chemical reactions lead to the rapid formation of mineral crystals that bind the ground particles together.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Unique injector creates bunches of electrons to stimulate million-per-second X-ray pulsesEvery powerful X-ray pulse produced for experiments at a next-generation laser project, now under construction, will start with a "spark" – a burst of electrons emitted when a pulse of ultraviolet light strikes a 1-millimeter-wide spot on a specially coated surface.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Metal-reducing bacteria offer a greener route for producing copper catalystsCopper nanoparticles (Cu-NPs) have a wide range of applications as catalysts, in scientific fields as diverse as drug discovery and materials science. The natural abundance of copper, and its relatively low cost, makes it a viable alternative to catalysts made from rare and expensive precious metals, such as platinum and palladium. However, the synthesis of Cu-NPs usually involves high temperature
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Breaking new ground in hurricane modelingClimate scientists at Columbia University have developed a new, global hurricane model for estimating the long-term hazard of rare, high impact storms under different climate scenarios. The model uses a novel approach to efficiently simulate a large number of storms around the world, especially those that rapidly intensify, such as Hurricanes Maria, Irma and Harvey. The researchers hope the new sy
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Brain chemical differences suggest possible reason for humans having social edge over other primatesA team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.S. has found some key differences in brain chemicals between humans and other primates. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group suggests these differences could explain the social edge humans have over other primates.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dust storms linked to gas escape from Martian atmosphereSome Mars experts are eager and optimistic for a dust storm this year to grow so grand it darkens skies around the entire Red Planet. This type of phenomenon in the environment of modern Mars could be examined as never before possible, using the combination of spacecraft now at Mars.
12h
Popular Science
The 'science' of linking skull shape to personality has finally been tested, and boy is it as stupid as we thoughtScience Neuroscientists examine the dubious theory of phrenology. Neuroscientists put the dubious theory of ‘phrenology’ through rigorous testing for the first time…
12h
Futurity.org
How subpoenas work in the Russia investigationInvestigations by Congress and special counsel Robert Mueller looking into whether the Russian government interfered with the 2016 US presidential election took a dramatic turn last week when Steve Bannon, former chief strategist to President Trump, refused to comply with a subpoena from the US House Intelligence Committee to answer questions about his time in the White House. Here, David Sklansk
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Proton transport in graphene shows promise for renewable energyResearchers at The University of Manchester have discovered another new and unexpected physical effect in graphene – membranes that could be used in devices to artificially mimic photosynthesis.
12h
New Scientist - News
Huge volcano eruption in the Philippines forces mass evacuationMore than 50,000 villagers were forced to flee their homes after the most active volcano in the Phillipines, Mount Mayon, spewed lava and ash plumes
12h
Dagens Medicin
Nu kommer der skub i forhandlinger om overenskomstOverenskomstforhandlingerne mellem de offentligt ansatte herunder læger og arbejdsgiverne kan nu gå gang efter at have stået på standby.
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Opinion: Australia's 'electric car revolution' won't happen automaticallyElectric cars might finally be having their moment in Australia, after British billionaire Sanjeev Gupta approached the South Australian government about retooling Adelaide's defunct Holden factories into a new manufacturing hub.
12h
Feed: All Latest
How Smallsats Could Make a Big Difference for NASA and NOAASmall satellites used to be a way for scrappy startups and scientists to get orbital data on the cheap. But now they're powerful enough that the feds are taking an interest.
12h
The Atlantic
Can Planet Earth Feed 10 Billion People?A ll parents remember the moment when they first held their children—the tiny crumpled face, an entire new person, emerging from the hospital blanket. I extended my hands and took my daughter in my arms. I was so overwhelmed that I could hardly think. Afterward I wandered outside so that mother and child could rest. It was three in the morning, late February in New England. There was ice on the s
12h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Interacting Antarctic glaciers may cause faster melt and sea level contributionsA new study shows that a large and potentially unstable Antarctic glacier may be melting farther inland than previously thought and that this melting could affect the stability of another large glacier nearby – an important finding for understanding and projecting ice sheet contributions to sea-level rise.
12h
The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Glowing ChameleonThe lizards may be signaling one another using fluorescent cues that we can't see.
12h
The Scientist RSS
New Federal Policy for Human Research Subjects DelayedBoth higher education and industry associations were advocating for a later implementation date for the Common Rule, which governs human studies.
12h
Scientific American Content: Global
NASA Pushes for Nuclear-Powered Space MissionsThe space agency’s Kilopower project could end a half-century hiatus for U.S. reactors in space -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
12h
Science | The Guardian
‘Never get high on your own supply’ – why social media bosses don’t use social mediaDevelopers of platforms such as Facebook have admitted that they were designed to be addictive. Should we be following the executives’ example and going cold turkey – and is it even possible for mere mortals? Mark Zuckerberg doesn’t use Facebook like you or me. The 33-year-old chief executive has a team of 12 moderators dedicated to deleting comments and spam from his page, according to Bloomberg
13h
Dagens Medicin
Karin Friis Bach: Fagligt organ bør kunne uddele penge til forskningMedicinrådet – eller et andet fagligt organ – bør ifølge den kommende formanden for regionernes sundhedsudvalg, Karin Friis Bach, få hjemmel og midler til at iværksætte forskning, som kan levere den evidens, man i dag mangler for en stribe behandlinger.
13h
Scientific American Content: Global
The Soul of My PedagogyA biologist teaches students to believe they can be better than they ever imagined -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
13h
Live Science
Major Earthquake Strikes Off AlaskaA 7.9-magnitude earthquake struck off Kodiak, Alaska, this morning. A tsunami warning is in effect for parts of Alaska and British Columbia, Canada.
13h
Feed: All Latest
Demonized Smartphones Are Just Our Latest Technological ScapegoatA wave of concern about the ill effects of smartphones and their apps echoes fears of earlier innovations, including TV, the printing press, and writing itself.
13h
Latest Headlines | Science News
New technique could help spot snooping dronesThere may be a new way to tell if a drone is creeping on you or your home.
13h
Science : NPR
Tsunami Alert Is Downgraded Along Alaska's Coast After Powerful QuakeThe magnitude 7.9 earthquake struck about 175 southeast of Kodiak, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The U.S. Tsunami Warning System issued a tsunami warning before downgrading to an advisory. (Image credit: U.S. Tsunami Warning System)
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Stable, self-disrupting microbubbles as intravenous oxygen carriersSevere oxygen deficiency eventually leads to cardiac arrest. If the blood's oxygen content cannot be rapidly re-established, the patient may die within minutes. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, American scientists have introduced air-filled microbubbles that could be used as an intravenous oxygen carrier to increase the survival rate of such patients. Because they rapidly dissolve in blood, the r
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mystery solved for mega-avalanches in TibetAn international scientific effort determined the cause of a highly unusual and deadly glacier avalanche in Tibet in 2016, a new Nature Geoscience paper says.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientist proposes new definition of a planetPluto hogs the spotlight in the continuing scientific debate over what is and what is not a planet, but a less conspicuous argument rages on about the planetary status of massive objects outside our solar system. The dispute is not just about semantics, as it is closely related to how giant planets like Jupiter form.
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Two dimensional circuit with magnetic quasi-particlesWhether smart phone, computer or dialysis machine – there is no electronic device without chips and their electronic components inside. The individual circuit elements are therefore often wired using three dimensional so called bridge constructions. Currently, physicists at Technische Universität Kaiserslautern (TUK) are working on a more efficient variation, where specific quasiparticles named ma
13h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists create high-speed coding systemScientists of the National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russia) have proposed a scheme for optical encoding of information based on the formation of wave fronts, and which works with spatially incoherent illumination. This scheme is effective in creating highly secure, high-speed coding systems. Security is provided by the two-dimensionality of dynamically replaced coded keys. The study is p
13h
Scientific American Content: Global
Ask the Expert: Does Rising CO2 Benefit Plants?Climate change’s negative effects on plants will likely outweigh any gains from elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide levels -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
14h
BBC News - Science & Environment
The human-elephant conflict in India's tea state AssamHow expanding tea plantations in India's Assam state are putting humans in conflict with elephants.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists suggest a new method for synthesizing a promising magnetic materialScientists from Siberian Federal University (SFU) and the Russian Academy of Sciences have used a new method for synthesizing iron-dysprosium garnet. Magnetic materials of this class are used in microwave and magnetic photon equipment. Iron-dysprosium garnet is understudied and may have previously unknown properties. The article was published in Materials Science and Engineering.
14h
New Scientist - News
Tsunami warning for US west coast after magnitude-7.9 earthquakeAlaska Tsunami EarthquakeA tsunami alert has been issued for the US west coast after a major earthquake struck at sea off the coast of Alaska
14h
Ingeniøren
Kræftsyge børn fejlmedicineret efter hastværk med SundhedsplatformenBørn fik voksendoser af kræftmedicin som følge af en for hurtig indstilling af Sundhedsplatformen.
14h
Ingeniøren
To stationer lukket i London: Gamle rørledninger årsag til stort gaslækBritisk forsyningsselskab arbejder fortsat på at isolere naturgaslæk i det centrale London.
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Reduced attention to audiovisual synchrony in infancy predicts autism diagnosisAn ability to integrate information from different sensory modalities is important for infants' development and for their perception of the environment. A new study suggests that infants who pay little attention to synchronous sights and sounds may be at elevated risk for developing autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
14h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows how fetal infections may cause adult heart diseaseInfants born prematurely are known to have a higher risk of developing heart disease later in life. Now, a study led by researchers at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle shows that, in preterm animal models, inflammation due to infection can disrupt the activity of genes that are crucial for normal development of the heart. The findings point to the importance of developing
14h
Ingeniøren
Miljøstyrelsen strammer kravene til sprøjtemidlerNu skal producenter af sprøjtemidler fortælle om produkternes konsekvenser for arveanlæggene.
14h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Hele verden fulgte Puigdemonts besøg på Københavns UniversitetTV-seere og Facebook-brugere i hundredetusindevis så med, da den spanske politiker og leder af...
14h
Live Science
What Is 'Ice' Psychosis?A new study has looked at why some crystal meth users suffer psychosis and others don't.
14h
The Atlantic
Has the Tide Turned Against Partisan Gerrymandering?Across the nation, judges are discovering that if you look for it, partisan gerrymandering actually is all around you . Courts have historically been reluctant to strike down redistricting plans on the basis of political bias—unwilling to appear to be favoring one party—but Monday afternoon, the Pennsylvania state supreme court ruled that the state’s maps for U.S. House violate the state constitu
14h
The Atlantic
Living Through Death With Harry PotterLike many people who grew up in the ’90s and early aughts, my youth was indelibly shaped by J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series—by attending midnight-release parties, getting my hands on the latest books, and lining up to watch the new films. To a generation of fans, Harry can sometimes feel more like a childhood companion than a fictional character. Starting in 1997, Rowling followed the boy wiza
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Optical nanoscope images quantum dotsPhysicists have developed a technique based on optical microscopy that can be used to create images of atoms on the nanoscale. In particular, the new method allows the imaging of quantum dots in a semiconductor chip. Together with colleagues from the University of Bochum, scientists from the University of Basel reported the findings in the journal Nature Photonics.
14h
Feed: All Latest
Meet the Amateur Scientist Who Discovered Climate ChangeEighty years ago, Guy Callendar built the first climate change model that predicted the danger of greenhouse gases. Today his successors are plotting ways to re-engineer the air.
14h
Feed: All Latest
Riding a Wild Wind, a Norwegian 787 Breaks a Speed RecordA 200-mph jet stream has sent several passenger jets to nearly 800 mph, and helped break a (subsonic) speed record.
14h
Dagens Medicin
Syddanmark fordeler udvalgsformændPolitikerne i Region Syddanmark har ovenpå valget fordelt udvalgsformandsposterne mellem sig.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Biomarkers helped solving the mystery of 500-million-year-old macroorganismsResearchers have conducted chemical analysis of biomarkers remaining after the decomposition of the genus Beltanelliformis. These organisms populated the Earth in the Ediacaran period (about 575-541 million years ago), and their position on the evolutionary tree was unknown. The data show that Beltanelliformis were colonies of cyanobacteria. The results of the work were published in Nature Ecology
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers develop transportable optical atomic clockAtomic clocks are no longer based on a microwave transition in cesium, instead operating with other atoms that are excited using optical frequencies. Some of these new clocks are portable. At its QUEST Institute, PTB is currently developing a transportable optical aluminum clock in order to measure physical phenomena outside a laboratory. A prerequisite for this is that the required lasers are abl
14h
Ingeniøren
Liberal Alliance: Regeringens planer med borgerdata går for vidtMinistre skal ikke have den form for beføjelse, mener Liberal Alliances retsordfører.
15h
Viden
Fluefarmeren Lasse: Sorte soldaterfluer skal ændre vores indgroede spisevanerInsekter kan være løsningen på både klimaforandringer og forurenende fødevareproduktion.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Alaska earthquake prompts tsunami warningA magnitude 8.2 earthquake off Alaska's Kodiak Island prompted a tsunami warning for a large swath of coastal Alaska and Canada's British Columbia while the remainder of the U.S. West Coast was under a watch.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
16 skiers hurt by flying rocks, avalanche on Japan volcanoAt least 16 people skiing on the slopes of a volcano in central Japan were injured by flying rocks during a surprise eruption and a subsequent avalanche Tuesday, and one person later died.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artificial intelligence predicts corruptionResearchers from the University of Valladolid (Spain) have created a computer model based on neural networks that calculates the probability in Spanish provinces of corruption, as well as the conditions that favor it. This alert system confirms that the probabilities increase when the same party stays in government for more years.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
21st Century Fox/Sky takeover thrown into doubt by UK regulatorBritain's competition regulator provisionally ruled Tuesday that a planned takeover of pan-European satellite TV giant Sky by Rupert Murdoch's 21st Century Fox entertainment group was "not in the public interest".
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Japan's latest overtime example? Xiang Xiang the pandaBy popular demand, Tokyo's new panda cub Xiang Xiang is working extra hours from Tuesday, the latest example of overtime in a country famous for its hard-working "salarymen."
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Microsoft to open 4 data centres in FranceMicrosoft is to open four data storage centres in France to meet strong customer demand for cloud computing, the head of the software giant's French operations told AFP on Tuesday.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The seemingly unremarkable crystals that could help predict volcanic eruptionsSmall crystals that form inside magma change in composition as they are transported from depth to the surface. Reading the historical 'memories' in these crystals may lead to more effective volcanic hazard monitoring, including for dormant volcanoes.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tiny crystals could help predict volcanic eruptionsThey can be as small as a grain of salt, but tiny crystals that form deep in volcanoes may be the key for advance warnings before volcanic eruptions.University of Queensland volcanologist Dr. Teresa Ubide said the research provided new information that could lead to more effective evacuations and warning communications.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Team develops new semiconductor processing technologyExtremely fine porous structures with tiny holes, resembling a kind of sponge at nano level, can be generated in semiconductors. This opens up new possibilities for the realization of tiny sensors or unusual optical and electronic components. There have already been experiments in this area with porous structures made from silicon. Now, researchers at TU Wien have developed a method for the contro
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Arsenic and permafrost microbes help hunt for life on MarsStudying environments that are similar to Mars, and their microbial ecosystems, could help prepare biologists to identify traces of life in outer space.
15h
NYT > Science
Skin Deep: Making Age Spots a Thing of the PastThe Food and Drug Administration has approved a first-of-its-kind treatment to rid patients of these unsightly lesions.
15h
Ingeniøren
Krystal indikerer tidligt liv i rummetBanebrydende analyse af gammel meteorsten, der indeholder krystal med både vand og organisk materiale, giver ny næring til teori om liv i solsystemets barndom.
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The seemingly unremarkable crystals that could help predict volcanic eruptionsThey may look inconspicuous and unremarkable, and most people wouldn't notice them, but small crystals in volcanic rocks, such as lava, may hold the key to better understanding advance warnings of volcanic eruptions.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Number of older people with four or more diseases will double by 2035, say researchersA study published today in Age and Ageing, the scientific journal of the British Geriatrics Society, reports that the number of older people diagnosed with four or more diseases will double between 2015 and 2035.
16h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Massiv pengestøtte til nyskabende forskningHvordan sikrer vi vores vand bedre fremover? Kan vi blive klogere på fortidens og nutidens epidemier...
17h
Science-Based Medicine
Fake News About MargarineAn alarmist email is circulating with misinformation about margarine. A little fact-checking shows that both margarine and butter can be part of a healthy diet.
17h
Science | The Guardian
Why the climate of Game of Thrones is about more than the arrival of winterWe modelled the climate for George RR Martin’s series for fun, but there’s a serious side to predicting weather for a fictional world For fans disappointed that the next series of Game of Thrones won’t be on our screens until 2019 , here’s some food for thought: an attack on Westeros would be most likely to come from the south in winter and north in summer, according to a climate model of the wor
17h
Science | The Guardian
Indian education minister dismisses theory of evolutionScientists condemn Satyapal Singh for saying Darwin’s theory is ‘scientifically wrong’ India’s minister for higher education has been condemned by scientists for demanding that the theory of evolution be removed from school curricula because no one “ever saw an ape turning into a human being”. Satyapal Singh stood by his comments on Monday, saying his ministry was ready to host an international c
17h
Ingeniøren
Gaslæk lukker en del af det centrale LondonÅrsagen til, at en gasrørledning i nat sprang læk i London, er stadig ukendt. Den centrale Charing Cross Station er lukket.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Over 100 endangered turtles hatch in SingaporeOver 100 baby turtles have hatched on a Singapore beach before being released into the sea, authorities said Tuesday, in a boost for the critically endangered creatures.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Philippine volcano spews lava fountains, 40,000 people fleeThe Philippines' most active volcano continued to spew fountains of red-hot lava and massive ash plumes Tuesday in a dazzling but increasingly dangerous eruption that has sent 40,000 villagers to shelter in evacuation centers.
18h
Science : NPR
Several Injured After Volcanic Eruption At Japanese Ski ResortMount Kusatsu-Shirane suddenly erupted Tuesday morning, spewing volcanic rocks and belching a curtain of black smoke. An avalanche that followed injured at least 10 people.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ex-racing driver Lauda back at the controls of his airline NikiAustrian former racing driver Niki Lauda has been selected to buy the assets of Niki, the budget airline he founded in 2003, the administrators of the former Air Berlin subsidiary said Tuesday.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Netflix lifted by 'beautiful' quarterly reportNetflix US ContentNetflix shares raced higher in after-hours trade Monday as the streaming television giant reported better-than-expected gains in its global subscriber base and a quarterly profit that nearly tripled from a year ago.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Intel halts chip flaw fix due to problem with patchesIntel Spectre MeltdownIntel on Monday called for a halt in deployment of patches for a troubling vulnerability in its computer chips because they could cause "unpredictable" problems in affected devices.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google to open AI research centre in ParisGoogle on Monday announced it will open a research centre in Paris devoted to artificial intelligence, following a meeting between the tech giant's boss and French President Emmanuel Macron.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
At least 16 hurt in volcano eruption near Japan ski resortA volcanic eruption Tuesday injured at least 16 people at a ski resort in central Japan, including six soldiers hit by an avalanche during ski training, officials said.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
South Korea to start real-name trading of crypto currencySouth Korea plans to require local banks to launch a real-name system for crypto currency trading that will make the up-to-now anonymous transactions be traceable as the country seeks to curb speculation and criminal activities.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Strong quake rocks Jakarta, 6.0 magnitude: USGSIndonesia's capital Jakarta was rocked Tuesday by a strong earthquake which forced some buildings to be evacuated, but there was no immediate tsunami threat or reported injuries, a government agency said.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dietary fiber protects against obesity and metabolic syndrome, study findsConsumption of dietary fiber can prevent obesity, metabolic syndrome and adverse changes in the intestine by promoting growth of "good" bacteria in the colon, according to a study led by Georgia State University.
18h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New Eocene fossil data suggest climate models may underestimate future polar warmingA new international analysis of marine fossils shows that warming of the polar oceans during the Eocene, a greenhouse period that provides a glimpse of Earth's potential future climate, was greater than previously thought.
18h
Feed: All Latest
Elon Musk's Boring Company Wants to Dig a 6.5-Mile Tunnel Under LAElon Musk Boring CompanyAt a city council meeting, Musk's Boring Company made its case for what could be the future of transportation.
18h
Ingeniøren
Det har aldrig været nemmere at udvikle spil, og det kan føre til en guldalderGratis spilmotorer, timevis af tutorials i høj kvalitet og fri adgang til spilelementer har gjort det nemmere end nogensinde at lave spil.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Inherited IQ can increase in early childhoodWhen it comes to intelligence, environment and education matter -- more than we think.
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Researchers borrow from AIDS playbook to tackle rheumatic heart diseaseBillions of US taxpayer dollars have been invested in Africa over the past 15 years to improve care for millions suffering from the HIV/AIDS epidemic; yet health systems on the continent continue to struggle. What if the investments and lessons learned from HIV could be used to improve care for those with other serious chronic conditions?
19h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ancient rice heralds a new future for rice productionGrowing in crocodile infested billabongs in the remote North of the country, Australia's wild rice has been confirmed as the most closely related to the ancient ancestor of all rices. The unique genetics of the Australian rice may help breed disease resistance and climate adaptation into rice modern production species.
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery of the 'pioneer' that opens the genomeResearchers explain a cell differentiation mechanism in Nature Genetics.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists block the siren call of two aggressive cancersAggressive cancers like glioblastoma and metastatic breast cancer have in common a siren call that beckons the bone marrow to send along whatever the tumors need to survive and thrive.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Siberian scientists suggested a new method for synthesizing a promising magnetic materialScientists from Siberian Federal University (SFU) together with their colleagues from the Institute of Chemistry and Chemical Technology of Siberian Department of Russian Academy of Sciences and Kirensky Institute of Physics of Siberian Department of Russian Academy of Sciences used a new method for synthesizing iron-dysprosium garnet. Magnetic materials of this class are used in microwave and mag
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Civic engagement can help teens thrive later in lifeWant to help your teenagers become successful adults? Get them involved in civic activities -- voting, volunteering and activism.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Civic engagement in adolescence and young adulthood beneficial for adult developmentA new study sought to determine whether civic engagement during adolescence and young adulthood promotes better health, education, and income over the course of adulthood. The study found a pattern of positive associations of voting and volunteering with these important aspects of adult development, but a mix of positive and negative outcomes in adulthood for activism as a form of civic engagement
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Children view people's behavior, psychological characteristics as shaped by environmentsA new study has found that 5- to 6-year-olds view people's environments, not their skin color, as the most important determinant of their behavior and psychological characteristics. These findings contradict the idea that views of race that are known to lead to prejudice such as believing that race naturally divides the world into distinct kinds of people's inevitably develop early in childhood.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New Eocene fossil data suggest climate models may underestimate future polar warmingA new international analysis of marine fossils shows that warming of the polar oceans during the Eocene, a greenhouse period that provides a glimpse of Earth's potential future climate, was greater than previously thought.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists discover 'Legos of life'Scientists have found the “Legos of life” – four core chemical structures that can be stacked together to build the myriad proteins inside every organism – after smashing and dissecting nearly 10,000 proteins to understand their component parts. The four building blocks make energy available for humans and all other living organisms, according to a new study.
20h
Feed: All Latest
Under Armour's Olympic Speed Skating Suit Looks to Defeat PhysicsAfter its last suit flopped at the Sochi Olympics, Under Armour plans to outfit speed skaters in a faster, more technical suit in PyeongChang.
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rethinking environmental legislation to include the conservation ideas of tomorrowRewilding has potential to help address the current global biodiversity crisis, but its impact will be limited unless agreed definitions can be reached, backed by further scientific research and helped by a policy backdrop that enables greater integration with current environmental legislation. These are the key findings of a new study into the controversial technique, led by international conserv
20h
Ingeniøren
Eksperter: Tre tip til at få job via LinkedInLinkedIn er en central del af jobsøgeres værktøjer. Jobfinder fortæller, hvordan du bruger LinkedIn til at udvide dit netværk og blive fundet af dit drømmefirma uden selv at søge jobbet.
21h
Ingeniøren
Ny aftale tilskynder landmænd til at brænde gylle af: »Det er noget miljøsvineri«De grønne organisationer er oppe i det røde felt, fordi en ny aftale, der skal redde vandmiljøet, tillader landmænd at afbrænde den tørre fiberfraktion fra gylle. På den måde bliver det vanskeligt for planterne at optage værdifuld fosfor.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Screen-addicted teens are unhappyResearchers found that teens who spent a lot of time in front of screen devices -- playing computer games, using more social media, texting and video chatting -- were less happy than those who invested time in non-screen activities like sports, reading newspapers and magazines, and face-to-face social interaction. The happiest teens used digital media for less than an hour per day. But after a dai
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Female cats are more likely to be right-handed, researchers discoverResearchers have found that female cats are much more likely to use their right paw than males.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Want a healthier population? Spend less on health care and more on social services, Canadian study findsIncreased social spending was associated with health improvements at the population level, while health spending increases did not have the same effect, according to a large new Canadian study.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Speech analysis software predicted psychosis in at-risk patients with up to 83 percent accuracyComputer-based analyses of speech transcripts obtained from interviews with at-risk youths were able to predict which youths would later develop psychosis within two years, with an accuracy of up to 83 percent. In two independent cohorts of young people at risk for psychosis, a disturbance in the flow of meaning when speaking, otherwise known as being tangential or going off track, predicted who w
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Depressive symptoms linked to shorter survival in patients with head and neck cancerIn a study of patients with head and neck cancer, even mild depressive symptoms were associated with poorer overall survival.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vaccines not protecting farmed fish from diseaseThe vaccines used by commercial fish farmers are not protecting fish from disease, according to a new study.
21h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pathway opens to minimize waste in solar energy captureResearchers have made an important discovery with significant implications for the future of solar cell material design.
22h
New Scientist - News
Spy balloons flying 40km up track drug smugglers on the groundThe US military are testing uncrewed, hydrogen-filled balloons that can keep watch over a small area by catching different winds in the stratosphere
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New Scientist - News
AI that cracked ancient secret code could help robot translationBreaking ciphers is like learning to translate a language, so a technique that unscrambled one of the earliest known examples could assist machine translation
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New Scientist - News
Upstart Electron rocket has made it to orbit for the first timeSpace flight is getting more affordable. The Electron rocket, smaller and cheaper than most of its commercial competitors, has put three satellites into orbit
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New on MIT Technology Review
Trump’s solar tariffs shoot US clean energy in the foot
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Futurity.org
Once we geoengineer the climate, we can’t stop abruptlyIn the future, should we try to fight climate change by spraying sulfur dioxide into the upper atmosphere to form a cloud that cools the Earth (a process called geoengineering), ending that plan abruptly could have severe, planet-wide effects on animals and plants, researchers argue in a new paper. “Imagine large droughts or floods around the world that could be blamed on geoengineering, and dema
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Big Think
Why this government shutdown was unlike any otherThe U.S. government has shut down 18 times in the past four decades, but this most recent instance has proven unique. Read More
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Use evidence to inform Isle of Man draft abortion bill debate, urge researchersThe most up to date evidence shows that women in the Isle of Man need full spectrum, accessible abortion services, free of any age or timing restrictions, conclude researchers in an editorial, published online in BMJ Sexual and Reproductive Health.
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Futurity.org
New cellulose could cut fuel costs and treat infectionsResearchers have discovered a new type of cellulose in bacteria that has properties that could make it an improvement over traditional cellulose for fuels and other materials, or for better understanding and treating bacterial infections. Produced by plants, algae, and some bacteria, cellulose is an abundant molecule involved in the production of hundreds of products, from paper to fabrics to ren
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Futurity.org
Chameleon-like material could unleash more powerful computersResearchers have made advances in understanding a material that could be key to the next generation of computers, more powerful than today’s silicon-based machines. “…if you think about those two phases as being analogous to a zero and a one, you can come up with some interesting new ways of information processing.” The existing paradigm of silicon-based computing has given us a range of amazing
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Futurity.org
What does the law say about homeschooling?Last week, law enforcement officials in Riverside County, California discovered 13 siblings, malnourished and allegedly held captive, living in squalid circumstances in their parents’ home. The father had registered his home as a school and the children were reportedly homeschooled. “…many states do not require any assessments or have any means of ensuring that children are taught the required co
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Stopgap Deal, Risky Diplomacy, Grown-Ups' GrandparentsWhat We’re Following Open for the Public: Lawmakers have reached a deal to fund the government for three more weeks after disagreements over the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals ( DACA ) program, defense spending, and other matters led to a three-day shutdown over the weekend. Senate Democrats had been holding out for DACA protections in particular, but Monday’s agreement included only a pr
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Big Think
Why North Korean 'ghost ships' are washing up on Japan's shoresOver a 100 North Korean ships have washed up on Japan's shores since the start of 2017. Read More
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Live Science
Could This Newfound Cave Hold More Dead Sea Scrolls?Archaeologists have hopes of finding new fragments of these biblical manuscripts.
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Popular Science
10 pretty pictures from NASA to help you recover from the government shutdownSpace Some science grinds to a halt when the government shuts down. Parts of NASA were affected by the most recent government shutdown, and some remained unscathed.
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NYT > Science
Q&A: Why the Forest Doesn’t Fear the FirePlants are not “aware” of fire, but many species have developed adaptations to it.
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The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: Cashing in Their CHIPToday in 5 Lines A three-day shutdown of the federal government came to an end after Senate Democrats accepted an offer from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to pass a continuing resolution funding the government and the Children’s Health Insurance Program, while postponing debate on immigration legislation. The Senate voted 81-18 to pass the bill, which later passed in the House. In a stat
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Blog » Languages » English
Sign up for the first marathon of 2018!Now that the winter holidays are past and the new year has been rung in, what better than a marathon? Warm up, sign up, and let’s see how fast we can go! Think we’ll break a new record? The January Marathon will start at 8 PM EST on 1/24 , and for the first official time, you’ll have 24 hours to grow and complete up to two cells. Note that we’re also going back to an evening marathon start time f
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Big Think
Geneticists reverse engineer DNA of the first black Icelander, who left no remainsScientists can now virtually reconstruction certain long-dead individuals, without the need for DNA samples from physical remains. Read More
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Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
If Todd Hoffman Didn't Have Bad Luck, He'd Have No Luck At All | Gold Rush#GoldRush | Friday 9p Todd returns to Double Trouble to find half the plant gone. Team Hoffman just went from 10 steps behind to 100 steps behind. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://www.discovery.com/tv-shows/gold-rush/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Gold_Rush https://twi
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Big Think
What do you really believe? Take the Truth-Demon TestDo we really believe everything we say? Are you always trying to establish the truth when you argue? This thought experiment will help answer these questions. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Big energy savings: Building the world's smallest electro-optic modulatorResearchers at have designed and fabricated the world's smallest electro-optic modulator, which could mean major reductions in energy used by data centers and supercomputers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Inverse-design approach leads to metadevicesScientists have used inverse design principles and a 3-D printer to create highly efficient broadband metadevices at millimeter-wave frequencies that could prove revolutionary for consumer products, defense, and telecommunications.
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Popular Science
This is what determines the price of BitcoinBitcoin Stripe CryptocurrencyTechnology Understanding the source of those crazy numbers. Anyone who follows the price of Bitcoin is probably getting pretty tired. Here's where they actually come from.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Canada Geese Taking a Winter StaycationThe geese are wintering farther and farther north, in urban areas like Chicago—which may help them avoid hunters. Emily Schwing reports. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science | The Guardian
Canadian climate science faces crisis that may be felt globally, scientists warnIn a letter to Justin Trudeau, 250 scientists highlight their concern over the imminent end of a research program to better understand climate change Canadian climate science is facing a looming crisis whose repercussions could be felt far beyond the country’s borders, hundreds of scientists have warned, after the Canadian government failed to renew the country’s only dedicated funding program fo
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Here’s the key ingredient that lets a centipede’s bite take down preyA newly identified “spooky toxin” launches a broad attack but might be eased with a version of a known drug.
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Live Science
Einstein's Letter Defending Murderous Friend Up for AuctionWhen a close friend of Albert Einstein committed murder, Einstein rushed to defend his character, according to a letter the Nobel Prize winner wrote that is hitting the auction block.
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Big Think
Stop feeding your pets raw meat, scientists urge the publicResearchers now believe raw-meat-based pet food should be labeled extremely dangerous. Read More
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The Atlantic
The Alienist Is the Grisliest Period Drama YetIt says something about how fiercely The Alienist commits to discomfiting its audience that the most disturbing scene in the first two episodes isn’t when the camera disappears inside the darkness of a young boy’s mutilated eye socket, or even when it lingers on the syphilitic sores on the bloodied face of a shrieking asylum inmate. The new TNT series, based on the 1994 bestselling novel by Caleb
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New on MIT Technology Review
An artificial synapse could make brain-on-a-chip hardware a reality
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Dietary fiber protects against obesity and metabolic syndrome, study findsConsumption of dietary fiber can prevent obesity, metabolic syndrome and adverse changes in the intestine by promoting growth of 'good' bacteria in the colon, according to a study led by Georgia State University.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New Eocene fossil data suggest climate models may underestimate future polar warmingA new international analysis of marine fossils shows that warming of the polar oceans during the Eocene, a greenhouse period that provides a glimpse of Earth's potential future climate, was greater than previously thought.
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The Atlantic
What Does War Have To Do With Cheese? In Russia, EverythingAfter Russia annexed Crimea in 2014, both sides enacted stiff sanctions. Russia, for its part, banned the foreign import of cheese. That’s when Oleg Sirota found his calling. He quit his job in IT, sold his house and cars, took out a loan, and built himself the cheese factory of his dreams. Is he a patriotic entrepreneur or an opportunist? Does he harbor dangerously extreme views, or is he just a
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New neuron-like cells allow investigation into synthesis of vital cellular componentsA new method to create synthetic neurons allows researchers to investigate how the human brain makes metabolic building blocks essential for the survival of all living organisms. A new study describes a core enzyme involved in the synthesis of these building blocks, called purines, and how the enzyme might change during infection by herpes simplex virus.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sound waves used to advance optical communicationResearchers have demonstrated that sound waves can be used to produce ultraminiature optical diodes that are tiny enough to fit onto a computer chip. These devices, called optical isolators, may help solve major data capacity and system size challenges for photonic integrated circuits, the light-based equivalent of electronic circuits, which are used for computing and communications.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Engineers design artificial synapse for 'brain-on-a-chip' hardwareEngineers have designed an artificial synapse in such a way that they can precisely control the strength of an electric current flowing across it, similar to the way ions flow between neurons. The team has built a small chip with artificial synapses, made from silicon germanium. In simulations, the researchers found that the chip and its synapses could be used to recognize samples of handwriting,
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate engineering, once started, would have severe impacts if stoppedFacing a climate crisis, we may someday spray sulfur dioxide into the upper atmosphere to form a cloud that cools the Earth, but suddenly stopping the spraying would have a severe global impact on animals and plants, according to the first study on the potential biological impacts of geoengineering, or climate intervention.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New Caledonian crows extract prey faster with complex hooked toolsBiologists have discovered why some crows 'craft' elaborate hooked tools out of branched twigs.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Climate change and snowmelt -- turn up the heat, but what about humidity?Changes in humidity may determine how the contribution of snowpack to streams, lakes and groundwater changes as the climate warms. Surprisingly, cloudy, gray and humid winter days can actually cause the snowpack to warm faster, increasing the likelihood of melt during winter months when the snowpack should be growing, the authors report. In contrast, under clear skies and low humidity the snow can
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers find latent HIV reservoirs inherently resistant to elimination by CD8+ T-cellsA research team at GW School of Medicine and Health Sciences found that latent HIV reservoirs exhibit resistance to elimination by CD8+ T-cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How breast cancer survivors can increase their reduced life expectancyA USC study suggests regular exercise could add to the life expectancy of breast cancer survivors because it lowers their heightened risk of cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes and possibly breast cancer recurrence. 'Many people don't know the No. 1 cause of death for breast cancer survivors is heart disease, not cancer,' said Christina Dieli-Conwright, lead author of a study published in the
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Big Think
Five stark and glaring facts about income inequality from a major new report"We can have democracy in this country, or we can have great wealth concentrated in the hands of a few, but we can't have both." – Former US Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tall tail: Morocco casts doubt on Mexico 'dinosaur' fragmentAuthorities in Morocco said Monday they doubt the authenticity of an alleged dinosaur tail sold in Mexico, after launching a probe to see if it had been illegally exported from the North African country.
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The Atlantic
How Federal Workers Spent Their Unexpected Day OffIt was almost 60 degrees in Washington on Monday, without a hint of snow in the forecast, but some federal workers got the day off, anyway. One analyst working in the Government Accountability Office told me in an email that he was mentally preparing himself for a days- or even weeks-long period without pay due to the government shutdown. But now that a deal has been reached , he said, “today jus
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The Atlantic
Why Can't People Hear What Jordan Peterson Is Saying?My first introduction to Jordan B. Peterson, a University of Toronto clinical psychologist, came by way of an interview that began trending on social media last week. Peterson was pressed by the British journalist Cathy Newman to explain several of his controversial views. But what struck me, far more than any position he took, was the method his interviewer employed. It was the most prominent, s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Facebook acknowledges social media's risks to democracyFacebook acknowledged Monday that widespread use of social media can be harmful to democracy, while pledging to work to minimize these risks.
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Live Science
New Blood Test Can Detect 8 Types of CancerResearchers have developed a new blood test that can detect eight common types of cancer, including the notoriously elusive liver and pancreatic cancers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rupert Murdoch says Facebook should pay for 'trusted' newsMedia tycoon Rupert Murdoch said Monday that large online platforms like Facebook should pay "trusted" news organizations as part of efforts to improve credibility and stem misinformation.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SAP unveils big push into French tech start-upsEurope's biggest software company SAP on Monday said it will spend up to two billion euros investing in and nurturing French start-ups as part of its push into cutting-edge technologies like artificial intelligence.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Inverse-design approach leads to metadevicesImagine wafer-thin eyeglasses or a smartphone camera so small it is invisible to the naked eye.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
3-D printing improves cell adhesion and strength of PDMS polymerCombining two different polymer forms can switch manufacturing of silicone parts from molding, casting and spin coating of simple forms to 3-D printing of complex geometries with better mechanical characteristics and better biological adhesion, according to a team of Penn State researchers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Big energy savings: Researchers build the world's smallest electro-optic modulatorResearchers at Oregon State University have designed and fabricated the world's smallest electro-optic modulator, which could mean major reductions in energy used by data centers and supercomputers.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Mysterious high-energy particles could come from black hole jetsThree types of high-energy cosmic particles could all have the same source: black holes in galaxy clusters.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Digging deep into distinctly different DNAA new discovery has deepened our understanding of the genetic mutations that arise in different tissues, and how these are inherited. Researchers found the rates of genetic mutations in mitochondrial DNA vary across differing tissue types, with the highest rate occurring in reproductive cells.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Combined nutrients and warming massively increase methane emissions from lakesShallow lakes in agricultural landscapes will emit significantly greater amounts of methane, mostly in the form of bubbles (ebullition) in a warmer world, which is a potential positive feedback mechanism to climate warming. Submerged plants are key predictors of methane ebullition. The combination of warming with the loss of plants appears to transform shallow lakes into methane bubbling machines.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Kicking an old can of worms -- the origin of the head in annelidsResearchers have described an exceptionally well-preserved new fossil species of bristle worm called Kootenayscolex barbarensis. Discovered from the 508-million-year-old Marble Canyon fossil site in the Burgess Shale in Kootenay National Park, the new species helps rewrite our understanding of the origin of the head in annelids, a highly diverse group of animals which includes today's leeches and
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Small hydroelectric dams increase globally with little research, regulationsHydropower dams may conjure images of the massive Grand Coulee Dam in Washington state or the Three Gorges Dam in Hubei, China—the world's largest electricity-generating facility.
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Scientific American Content: Global
In the Search for Alien Life, "Everyone Is an Astrobiologist"Scientists are plotting new directions in the quest for cosmic company -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Placental accumulation of flame retardant chemical alters serotonin production in ratsAn NC State-led research team has shown a connection between exposure to a widely used flame retardant chemical mixture and disruption of normal placental function in rats, leading to altered production of the neurotransmitter serotonin.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Inverse-design approach leads to metadevicesA Northwestern University research team used inverse design principles and a 3-D printer to create highly efficient broadband metadevices at millimeter-wave frequencies that could prove revolutionary for consumer products, defense, and telecommunications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How very low birth weight affects brain developmentChildren born with very low birth weights are at an increased risk of cognitive, emotional and behavioral problems throughout their lives. But what exactly happens in the brain to cause these problems?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Big energy savings: OSU researchers build the world's smallest electro-optic modulatorResearchers at have designed and fabricated the world's smallest electro-optic modulator, which could mean major reductions in energy used by data centers and supercomputers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
3-D printing improves cell adhesion and strength of PDMS polymerCombining two different polymer forms can switch manufacturing of silicone parts from molding, casting and spin coating of simple forms to 3-D printing of complex geometries with better mechanical characteristics and better biological adhesion, according to a team of Penn State researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New neuron-like cells allow investigation into synthesis of vital cellular componentsA new method to create synthetic neurons allows researchers to investigate how the human brain makes metabolic building blocks essential for the survival of all living organisms. A new study describes a core enzyme involved in the synthesis of these building blocks, called purines, and how the enzyme might change during infection by herpes simplex virus.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First evidence of winds outside black holes throughout their mealtimesNew research shows the first evidence of strong winds around black holes throughout bright outburst events when a black hole rapidly consumes mass. The study sheds new light on how mass transfers to black holes and how black holes can affect the environment around them.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lab-made hormone may reveal secret lives of plantsA new synthetic hormone promises to tease apart the many different roles of the plant hormone auxin and could lead to a new way to ripen fruit.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Wild Sri Lankan elephants retreat from sound of disturbed Asian honey beesA new study using playbacks, has for the first time shown that Asian elephants in Sri Lanka are scared of honey bees, much like their African counterparts. The study showed that Asian elephants responded with alarm to the bee simulations. They also retreated significantly further away and vocalized more in response to the bee sounds compared to controls.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Role of cranial modification in identity formation: Did head shape encourage unity and cooperation in politics?It has long been recognized that the Inka incorporated diverse peoples into their empire, but how these ethnic groups developed historically during the political upheaval of the preceding Late Intermediate Period (LIP; AD 1100-1450) is only now receiving commensurate attention.
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The Atlantic
‘We’re Back at Square One’Pro-immigrant activists reacted to news of a bipartisan pact to reopen the federal government with disappointment, resignation, and in some cases, outright anger at Democrats for agreeing to the deal. “[Democrats] turned their back on us,” said Eliso Magos, a Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals beneficiary, and an organizer for CASA, a Maryland-based organization that focuses on Latinos and im
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers borrow from AIDS playbook to tackle rheumatic heart diseaseBillions of US taxpayer dollars have been invested in Africa over the past 15 years to improve care for millions suffering from the HIV/AIDS epidemic; yet health systems on the continent continue to struggle. What if the investments and lessons learned from HIV could be used to improve care for those with other serious chronic conditions?
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discrepancies between satellite and global model estimates of land water storageResearch led by The University of Texas at Austin has found that calculations of water storage in many river basins from commonly used global computer models differ markedly from independent storage estimates from GRACE satellites.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New NOAA research holds promise of predicting snowpack even before the snow fallsAs farmers in the American West decide what, when and where to plant, and urban water managers plan for water needs in the next year, they want to know how much water their community will get from melting snow in the mountains.This melting snow comes from snowpack, the high elevation reservoir of snow which melts in the spring and summer. New NOAA research is showing we can predict snow levels in
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rutgers scientists discover 'Legos of life'Rutgers scientists have found the 'Legos of life' -- four core chemical structures that can be stacked together to build the myriad proteins inside every organism -- after smashing and dissecting nearly 10,000 proteins to understand their component parts. The four building blocks make energy available for humans and all other living organisms, according to a study published online today in the Pro
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A better HIV testStanford researchers have developed a reliable, hassle-free HIV test -- just what public health officials need to screen large numbers of people and head off potential outbreaks.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genes contribute to biological motion perception and its covariation with autistic traitsDr. JIANG Yi, Dr. WANG Ying and their colleagues from the State Key Laboratory of Brain and Cognitive Science, Institute of Psychology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences have conducted a behavioral genetic study to find out the sources underlying the individual differences in biological motion perception.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The scent of the cityIn the scientific journal PNAS, researchers from Innsbruck, Austria, present the world's first chemical fingerprint of urban emission sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Accordingly, the abatement strategy for organic solvents is having an effect in Europe. At the same time, the data suggest that the total amount of man-made VOCs globally is likely to be significantly higher than previou
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate change and snowmelt -- turn up the heat, but what about humidity?Changes in humidity may determine how the contribution of snowpack to streams, lakes and groundwater changes as the climate warms. Surprisingly, cloudy, gray and humid winter days can actually cause the snowpack to warm faster, increasing the likelihood of melt during winter months when the snowpack should be growing, the authors report. In contrast, under clear skies and low humidity the snow can
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study: Industry conservation ethic proves critical to Gulf of Maine lobster fisheryA new study demonstrates how conservation practices championed by Maine lobstermen help make the lobster fishery resilient to climate change.
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The Atlantic
The New Way Your Computer Can Be AttackedOn January 3, the world learned about a series of major security vulnerabilities in modern microprocessors. Called Spectre and Meltdown, these vulnerabilities were discovered by several different researchers last summer, disclosed to the microprocessors’ manufacturers, and patched—at least to the extent possible. This news isn’t really any different from the usual endless stream of security vulne
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New on MIT Technology Review
The ICO craze is making cybercriminals rich, too
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Live Science
Nobody Knows Why These Bees Built a Spiral NestThis Australian stingless bee builds spiral towers of its unborn young. That may be the least weird thing about it.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New research holds promise of predicting snowpack even before the snow fallsAs farmers in the American West decide what, when and where to plant, and urban water managers plan for water needs in the next year, they want to know how much water their community will get from melting snow in the mountains.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
'Legos of life': Deep dive into the 3-D structures of proteins reveals key building blocksRutgers scientists have found the "Legos of life" - four core chemical structures that can be stacked together to build the myriad proteins inside every organism - after smashing and dissecting nearly 10,000 proteins to understand their component parts.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A better HIV testPublic health officials have a tough choice to make when it comes to screening people for HIV: administer a reliable blood test that can detect infections early on, but that few people will volunteer for, or give people a convenient test using saliva that is less reliable during the first stages of infection.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change and snowmelt—turn up the heat, but what about humidity?It's said on sticky summer days: "It's not the heat, it's the humidity." That holds true in the winter too, and could hold the key to the future of snowpack and water resources in the American West.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Discrepancies between satellite and global model estimates of land water storageResearch led by The University of Texas at Austin has found that calculations of water storage in many river basins from commonly used global computer models differ markedly from independent storage estimates from GRACE satellites.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study: Industry conservation ethic proves critical to Gulf of Maine lobster fisheryA new study, led by scientists at the Gulf of Maine Research Institute and colleagues at the University of Maine and NOAA, demonstrates how conservation practices championed by Maine lobstermen help make the lobster fishery resilient to climate change.
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The Atlantic
How the Government Shutdown Disrupted SpaceX's PlansFor a few stressful days, the massive rocket that Elon Musk hopes will someday launch humans toward the moon and Mars got caught in the crossfire of the government shutdown. After Congress missed a deadline to keep the federal government funded and running Friday night, various facilities around the country started scaling down. When Monday rolled around, hundreds of thousands of employees stayed
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cavity prevention approach effectively reduces tooth decayA scientifically based approach that includes a tooth-decay risk assessment, aggressive preventive measures and conservative restorations can dramatically reduce decay in community dental practices, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A method to measure diagnostic errors could be key to preventing disability and death from misdiagnosisIn an effort to reduce patient misdiagnoses and associated poor patient outcomes from lack of prompt treatment, researchers are providing hospitals a new approach to quantify and monitor diagnostic errors in their quality improvement efforts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Transportable laserPhysicists have developed a frequency-doubling unit for transportable, optical atomic clock that will even continue to operate when it has been shaken at three times the Earth's gravitational acceleration.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Emissions of volatile organic compounds higher than previously assumedIn the scientific journal PNAS, researchers from Innsbruck, Austria, present the world's first chemical fingerprint of urban emission sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Accordingly, the abatement strategy for organic solvents is having an effect in Europe. At the same time, the data suggest that the total amount of man-made VOCs globally is likely to be significantly higher than previou
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Quanta Magazine
Fossil Discoveries Challenge Ideas About Earth’s StartIn the arid, sun-soaked northwest corner of Australia, along the Tropic of Capricorn, the oldest face of Earth is exposed to the sky. Drive through the northern outback for a while, south of Port Hedlund on the coast, and you will come upon hills softened by time. They are part of a region called the Pilbara Craton, which formed about 3.5 billion years ago, when Earth was in its youth. Look close
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Combination chemotherapy may significantly improve treatment for deadly brain tumorA team led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found that adding the chemotherapy drug hydroxyurea to the current chemotherapy protocol for glioblastoma significantly increased survival in animal models.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Small hydroelectric dams increase globally with little research, regulationsUniversity of Washington researchers have published the first major assessment of small hydropower dams around the world -- including their potential for growth -- and highlight the incredibly variability in how dams of varying sizes are categorized, regulated and studied.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Bioinformaticians compute gene sequences inherited from each parentIn the analysis of the human genome, one question researchers have so far left unanswered is how to differentiate the variants of a gene inherited from the mother and father. Such information would increase the likelihood of treating certain diseases successfully. The so-called third generation of sequencing technologies is now making this possible.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How cells are able to turnResearchers have long wondered how our cells navigate inside the body. Two new studies have now demonstrated that the cells use molecular force from within to steer themselves in a certain direction. This knowledge may be of great significance in the development of new drugs.
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Big Think
Why cutting-edge braneworld theories say our universe began in a white holeCosmologists behind braneworld theories see our universe as being a part of a complex inter-dimensional world. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Anemia discovery offers new targets to treat fatigue in millionsResearchers have discovered an unknown biological process that controls the production of vital cells that carry oxygen throughout the body. The discovery could help doctors develop new treatments for anemias that affect millions of people.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Seabed mining could destroy ecosystemsMining on the ocean floor could do irreversible damage to deep-sea ecosystems, says a new study of seabed mining proposals around the world.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Combination of resistance genes offers better protection for wheat against powdery mildewPlant researchers have tested newly developed wheat lines with improved resistance in field trials. They have demonstrated that a combination of two variations of a resistance gene provides wheat with better protection against the fungal disease.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New semiconductor processing technology developedExtremely fine porous structures with tiny holes -- resembling a kind of sponge at nano level -- can be generated in semiconductors. This opens up new possibilities for the realization of tiny sensors or unusual optical and electronic components.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New long-acting approach for malaria prophylaxis developed using nanomedicine approachA new study highlights a novel long-acting medicine for the prevention of malaria. The approach uses nanotechnology to improve the delivery of an existing antimalarial drug via a novel injectable format that can maintain blood concentration of the drug for weeks or months following a single dose.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Artificial intelligence predicts corruptionResearchers from Spain have created a computer model based on neural networks which provides in which Spanish provinces cases of corruption can appear with greater probability, as well as the conditions that favor their appearance. This alert system confirms that the probabilities increase when the same party stays in government more years.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
People with prosthetic arms less affected by common illusionPeople with prosthetic arms or hands do not experience the 'size-weight illusion' as strongly as other people, new research shows.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Overall in-hospital cardiac arrest survival improves, lower survival on nights, weekendsOverall survival has improved for the approximately 200,000 patients experiencing in-hospital cardiac arrest in the US each year, but patients who arrest during nights or weekends continue to experience lower survival compared to patients who arrest during daytime hours. Survival to discharge in patients who arrested during 'off-hours' was an absolute 3.8 percent lower compared to patients who arr
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Housing instability negatively affects the health of children and caregiversWhen families don't have stable housing, their risk of struggling with poor health outcomes and material hardships, such as food insecurity, increases, according to a new study. Researchers surveyed over 22,000 families and found that one third of low-income renters were housing unstable, which was associated with negative impacts on their health.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New for three types of extreme-energy space particles: Theory shows unified originOne of the biggest mysteries in astroparticle physics has been the origins of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, very high-energy neutrinos, and high-energy gamma rays. Now, a new theoretical model reveals that they all could be shot out into space after cosmic rays are accelerated by powerful jets from supermassive black holes. The model may set a new milestone on the path toward solving the half-cent
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Persistent photoconductivity used to stimulate neurotypic cellsResearchers have, for the first time, used a material's persistent photoconductivity to stimulate neurotype cells. The technique, which is relatively simple, should facilitate future research on using charge to influence cellular behavior.
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Viden
‘Smart-jakke’ vil oplade din telefon, mens du er på fartenEn jakke med indbygget trådløs mobiloplader vil løse problemet med telefoner, der løber tør for strøm.
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Popular Science
Last week in tech: Let’s get back to (post-CES) businessTechnology Nintendo has a new toy, a new camera captures 400-megapixel photos, and there's a $200,000 smartwatch. Seriously, we want a Nintendo Labo.
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Live Science
1.7-Billion-Year-Old Chunk of North America Found Sticking to AustraliaRocks from opposite sides of the globe reveal that part of Australia was once attached to North America.
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The Atlantic
How Do You Grandparent a 20-Year-Old?“Is that your grandbaby?” asked the gate agent who checked Rachel through to the area for departing passengers. “Sure is,” I said. For long seconds, my husband and I remained at the gate in John F. Kennedy International Airport, waving goodbye. And then she was gone. Hard to believe that our firstborn grandchild was now a 20-year-old student heading back to the University of Edinburgh. Otherwise,
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The Atlantic
Republicans Claim Victory in the Shutdown FightThis story was updated on Monday, January 22 at 2:15pm On Monday afternoon, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer addressed a scrum of reporters in the Capitol to announce that Democrats would provide the votes to keep the government open until February 8, given Mitch McConnell’s agreement to address “Dreamers” on the Senate floor next month. The White House was quick to boast that Democrats had “
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New on MIT Technology Review
The tricks propagandists use to beat scienceA model of the way opinions spread reveals how propagandists use the scientific process against itself to secretly influence policy makers.
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Live Science
Flat-Earth Rocketeer Says He Will Launch in Two Weeks"Mad" Mike Hughes, a flat-Earth conspiracy theorist, appears to have a new rocket and a new launch date for his mission to prove our oblate spheroid world is actually a disc.
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Science | The Guardian
Racism is creeping back into mainstream science – we have to stop it | Angela Saini‘Scientific’ eugenics is on the rise, and grabbing a foothold in respected journals. The claim that these theories are a credible part of a general discussion should worry us all In the fallout from Toby Young’s resignation from the Office for Students this month, it emerged that University College London has been unwittingly hosting an annual conference attended by race scientists and eugenicists
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NYT > Science
SpaceX’s Big Rocket, the Falcon Heavy, Finally Reaches the LaunchpadAfter years of delay, the Falcon Heavy — a beefed-up version of SpaceX’s workhorse Falcon 9 — could launch in the weeks ahead.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The ins and outs of Area 25Neuroscientists have charted the incoming and outgoing connections of a brain region located deep within the monkey prefrontal cortex that has important roles in emotion and memory processes. The comprehensive, high-resolution map reported in JNeurosci provides new insight into how emotional regulation may become disrupted in psychiatric disorders.
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Live Science
Why Flesh-Eating Bacteria Can Look Like the FluAn Arizona woman who was initially diagnosed with the flu turned out to have a life-threating infection with "flesh eating" bacteria, according to news reports.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cryo-EM reveals critical protein-modifying complex and potential drug targetScientists have revealed the atomic-level structure of a molecular complex responsible for modifying proteins, possibly paving the way for the development of new medications for cancer and a host of other diseases.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
User experiment at BESSY II: Complex tessellations, extraordinary materialsResearchers have discovered a reaction path that produces exotic layers with semiregular structures. These kinds of materials are interesting because they frequently possess extraordinary properties. In the process, simple organic molecules are converted to larger units which form the complex, semiregular patterns.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A race against pine: Wood-boring wasp in North America threatened by a Eurasian invaderInvasive species have diverse impacts in different locations, including biodiversity loss, as a result of native species being outcompeted for similar resources. A US research team studied the case of an aggressive Eurasian woodwasp that has recently established in North America and poses a threat to a native competitor species.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using social and risk networks helps identify people undiagnosed with HIVConducting HIV testing among the social and risk networks of those recently diagnosed with HIV helps identify undiagnosed cases of HIV at significantly higher rates and at a lower cost than other testing approaches, finds a new study conducted in Ukraine by an international research team.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Research helps break ground to clean up landResearchers have been exploring the intricate shapes that emerge when air is injected into soil. These findings could one day be used to speed up the decontamination of industrial brownfield sites.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Improving vaccines for the elderly by blocking inflammationBy identifying why skin immunity declines in old age, a research team has found that an anti-inflammatory pill could help make vaccines more effective for elderly people. The study found that an excessive inflammation reaction in older people can obstruct the immune system.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Alcohol consumption in late teens can lead to liver problems in adulthoodAlcohol is the leading cause of liver cirrhosis and liver-related deaths. Results of a large long-term study in Sweden have confirmed that drinking during late adolescence could be the first step towards liver problems in adulthood and that guidelines for safe alcohol intake in men might have to be revised downwards.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The role of cranial modification in identity formationIt has long been recognized that the Inka incorporated diverse peoples into their empire, but how these ethnic groups developed historically during the political upheaval of the preceding Late Intermediate Period (LIP; AD 1100-1450) is only now receiving commensurate attention.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Marine vegetation can mitigate ocean acidification, UCI study findsMarine plants and seaweeds in shallow coastal ecosystems can play a key role in alleviating the effects of ocean acidification, and their robust population in shoreline environments could help preserve declining shellfish life, according to a study by University of California, Irvine ecologists.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The role of cranial modification in identity formationBefore the expansion of the Inka empire, the Late Intermediate Period was marked by political upheaval and the emergence of new cultural practices. In "Ethnogenesis and Social Difference in the Andean Late Intermediate Period (AD 1100-1450): A Bioarchaeological Study of Cranial Modification in the Colca Valley, Peru," published in Current Anthropology, Matthew C. Velasco examines how the prevalenc
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Marine vegetation can mitigate ocean acidification, study findsMarine plants and seaweeds in shallow coastal ecosystems can play a key role in alleviating the effects of ocean acidification, and their robust population in shoreline environments could help preserve declining shellfish life, according to a study by University of California, Irvine ecologists.
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The Atlantic
The Democrats RelentUpdated on January 22 at 6:15 p.m. ET Senate Democrats have given in. A three-day shutdown of the federal government ended on Monday after Senate Democrats dropped their filibuster of a stopgap spending bill and accepted an offer from the Republican leadership to debate an immigration proposal by early February. An overwhelming majority of the Senate voted, 81-18, early Monday afternoon to advanc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
TSRI researchers identify gene responsible for mesenchymal stem cells' stem-ness'Researchers at The Scripps Research Institute recently published a study in the journal Cell Death and Differentiation identifying factors crucial to mesenchymal stem cell differentiation, providing insight into how these cells should be studied for clinical purposes.
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Big Think
What it's like to shop at Amazon Go's futuristic convenience storeAmazon has opened a new store in Seattle, one that may represent the future of what the retail giant is calling 'Just Walk Out' shopping. Read More
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Optical nanoscope allows imaging of quantum dotsPhysicists have developed a technique based on optical microscopy that can be used to create images of atoms on the nanoscale. In particular, the new method allows the imaging of quantum dots in a semiconductor chip.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A 'hot Jupiter' with unusual windsThe hottest point on a gaseous planet near a distant star isn't where astrophysicists expected it to be -- a discovery that challenges scientists' understanding of the many planets of this type found in solar systems outside our own.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Boosting cancer therapy with artificial moleculesResearchers have created artificial molecules that can help the immune system to recognize and attack cancer tumors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists discover material ideal for smart photovoltaic windowsResearchers have discovered that a form of perovskite, one of the hottest materials in solar research currently due to its high conversion efficiency, works surprisingly well as a stable and photoactive semiconductor material that can be reversibly switched between a transparent state and a non-transparent state, without degrading its electronic properties.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Amazon opens store with no cashiers, lines or registersNo cashiers, no lines, no registers—this is how Amazon sees the future of in-store shopping.
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The Atlantic
What School-Funding Debates IgnoreSupporters of urban education frequently make the case that city schools are underfunded . Hampered by reliance on local property taxes , they contend, urban schools lack the resources they need to ensure their students succeed. In most states, though, spending on education in rich and poor neighborhoods is relatively equal . And in states including Minnesota , New Jersey , and Ohio , city school
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The Atlantic
Photos of a Women's March WeekendOver this weekend, organizers staged approximately 200 demonstrations around the world to commemorate the one-year anniversary of the massive 2017 Women's March on Washington. Hundreds of thousands of protesters marched once again in continued opposition to the administration of President Donald Trump, to promote women's rights, health issues, equality, diversity, and inclusion, and to mobilize v
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The Atlantic
The Disappearing DealmakerIf ever there were a time for a dealmaker in Washington, this weekend was it. Friday, as a shutdown loomed, it seemed as though Republicans and Democrats would be able to reach some accommodation to fund the government, but in the wake of that failure, the mood turned bitter over the weekend . With leaders in Congress at an impasse, the most logical person to step in and broker an arrangement was
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Separation lineFor patients in need of blood, it's fatally important that they receive the right type. That's why doctors will often give emergency room patients universal donor blood, rather than waiting for the results of a blood test. Blood tests take a long time to process, are expensive, and leave room for human error—putting a vial of blood in the wrong rack, mislabeling it, or sending the chart to the wro
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
US approves land exchange for road through Alaska refugeAlaska Tsunami EarthquakeInterior Secretary Ryan Zinke signed a land trade agreement Monday that could lead to construction of a road through a national wildlife refuge in Alaska, portraying the exchange as a people-versus-wildlife issue.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Have Brexit and the US presidential election made you more radical?Political disillusionment leads to more extreme political views, according to studies carried out by researchers at University of Limerick (UL), Ireland.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers reveal how microbes cope in phosphorus-deficient tropical soilA team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has uncovered how certain soil microbes cope in a phosphorus-poor environment to survive in a tropical ecosystem. Their novel approach could be applied in other ecosystems to study various nutrient limitations and inform agriculture and terrestrial biosphere modeling.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
BU: Marijuana use does not lower chances of getting pregnantMarijuana use -- by either men or women -- does not appear to lower a couple's chances of getting pregnant, according to a new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new approach to rechargeable batteriesA new battery technology developed at MIT, based on a metal-mesh membrane and electrodes made of molten sodium, could open the way for more intermittent, renewable power sources on the grid.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wild Sri Lankan elephants retreat from the sound of disturbed Asian honey beesA new study using playbacks, has for the first time shown that Asian elephants in Sri Lanka are scared of honey bees, much like their African counterparts.The study, led by Dr. Lucy King, a Research Associate with the Department of Zoology at Oxford University, showed that Asian elephants responded with alarm to the bee simulations. They also retreated significantly further away and vocalized more
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Kicking an old can of worms -- the origin of the head in annelidsResearchers at the Royal Ontario Museum and the University of Toronto have described an exceptionally well-preserved new fossil species of bristle worm called Kootenayscolex barbarensis. Discovered from the 508-million-year-old Marble Canyon fossil site in the Burgess Shale in Kootenay National Park, the new species helps rewrite our understanding of the origin of the head in annelids, a highly di
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Have Brexit and the US presidential election made you more radical?New Irish research suggests that political disillusionment leads to more extreme political views. The research, published this week in Social Psychological and Personality Science, found that the experience of disillusionment is likely to occur when people's political goals are not realised or their strong convictions are proved inaccurate or false. The authors warn that the rise of political pola
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Wild Sri Lankan elephants retreat from the sound of disturbed Asian honey beesFor the first time, researchers have shown that Asian elephants in Sri Lanka are scared of honey bees, much like their African counterparts.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Your brain responses to music reveal if you're a musician or notHow your brain responds to music listening can reveal whether you have received musical training, according to new research. By applying methods of computational music analysis and machine learning on brain imaging data collected during music listening, the researchers we able to predict with a significant accuracy whether the listeners were musicians or not.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Two-dimensional circuit with magnetic quasi-particlesWhether smart phone, computer or dialysis machine -- there is no electronic device without chips and their electronic components inside. The individual circuit elements are therefore often wired using three dimensional so called bridge constructions. Physicists are now working on a more efficient variation, where specific quasiparticles named magnons instead of electrons are being used. They have
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new assessment method for active agingResearchers have developed a new indicator for assessing active aging. Active aging refers to having initiative and doing things the aging person considers important. The indicator consists of a series of questions, which can be presented either in an interview or as a questionnaire. A score describing active ageing is calculated based on the responses.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
GoJelly project officially kicks offWhile the number of fish in our oceans continues to decrease, changing environmental conditions seem to favour jellyfish. They occur more often in large blooms. So far, they are considered annoying, if not dangerous. The project GoJelly aims to change that perception and to investigate the suitability of the organisms as microplastic filters, fertilizers or fish feed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Global temperature targets will be missed within decades unless carbon emissions reversedNew projections by researchers could be the catalyst the world has sought to determine how best to meet its obligations to reduce carbon emissions and better manage global warming as defined by the Paris Agreement.
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The Atlantic
The Astonishing Success of The Greatest ShowmanThe hottest box-office story in Hollywood right now isn’t Star Wars: The Last Jedi, which made more than $600 million in the U.S. and became the sixth biggest hit in movie history. It isn’t the surprising success of Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle , an unambiguous smash that has cemented the star power of Dwayne Johnson and Kevin Hart. No, the most interesting film in last weekend’s returns was Th
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Live Science
Photos: 508-Million-Year-Old Bristly Worm Looked Like a Kitchen BrushThe fossils of an ancient, eyeless worm show it was covered in so many bristles that it looked like a kitchen brush. The finds are helping researchers solve an evolutionary mystery.
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Live Science
508-Million-Year-Old Bristly Worm Helps Solve an Evolutionary PuzzleAn eyeless, alien-like worm with two tentacles sprouting out of its head and covered in so many bristles it looked like a kitchen brush would have been quite a sight during its heyday as it scarfed down seafloor mud some 508 million years ago.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How climate change weakens coral 'immune systems'If this winter finds you stressed out and fighting a sinus infection, then you know something of what coral will endure in the face of climate change.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study may improve strategies for reducing nutrient runoff into Mississippi RiverEvery summer, the Gulf of Mexico is flooded with excess nitrogen and phosphorus from wastewater treatment plants and farm fields along the Mississippi River basin. And every summer, those nutrients create a "dead zone" in the Gulf. To address the issue, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency formed a task force and required 12 states to develop strategies to reduce agricultural runoff.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Cryo-EM reveals critical protein-modifying complex and potential drug targetScientists have revealed the atomic-level structure of a molecular complex responsible for modifying proteins, possibly paving the way for the development of new medications for cancer and a host of other diseases.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New 508-million-year-old bristle worm species from British Columbia's Burgess Shale wiggles into evolutionary historyResearchers at the Royal Ontario Museum and the University of Toronto have described an exceptionally well-preserved new fossil species of bristle worm called Kootenayscolex barbarensis. Discovered from the 508-million-year-old Marble Canyon fossil site in the Burgess Shale in Kootenay National Park, British Columbia, the new species helps rewrite our understanding of the origin of the head in ann
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New on MIT Technology Review
We’re about to kill a massive, accidental experiment in reducing global warmingA forthcoming UN regulation will slash shipping industry pollution but may also speed up climate change.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers reveal how microbes cope in phosphorus-deficient tropical soilA team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has uncovered how certain soil microbes cope in a phosphorus-poor environment to survive in a tropical ecosystem. Their novel approach could be applied in other ecosystems to study various nutrient limitations and inform agriculture and terrestrial biosphere modeling.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
FRAX intervention and assessment thresholds for seven Latin American countriesNewly published Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX®) -based intervention thresholds for the following seven Latin American countries represent a substantial advance in the detection of individuals at high risk of fracture: Argentina, Brazil, Colombia, Chile, Ecuador, Mexico and Venezuela.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research helps break ground to clean up landResearchers at Swansea University's Complex Flow Lab have been exploring the intricate shapes that emerge when air is injected into soil. Published in Physical Review Applied, these findings could one day be used to speed up the decontamination of industrial brownfield sites—which the United Kingdom currently has over 400,000 hectares of.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Microbiome predicts blood infections in pediatric cancer patientsPatients who developed bloodstream infections had significantly reduced microbiome diversity than patients who remained free of infection.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers identify a protein that keeps metastatic breast cancer cells dormantA study headed by ICREA researcher Roger Gomis at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) has identified the genes involved in the latent asymptomatic state of breast cancer metastases. The work sheds light on the molecular basis underlying how the expression of certain genes facilitates the spread of metastatic lesions.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Use of dirty heating oil in NYC concentrated uptownResidential buildings that continued to burn residual fuel oil were concentrated in Northern Manhattan and the Bronx, as of late 2015. Compared to cleaner heating sources such as natural gas, these dirty fuels produce high levels of particulate matter, exposure to which is linked to asthma, obesity, developmental delays, and other health problems.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cryo-EM reveals critical protein-modifying complex and potential drug targetScientists have revealed the atomic-level structure of a molecular complex responsible for modifying proteins, possibly paving the way for the development of new medications for cancer and a host of other diseases.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Powerful food-derived antioxidant can halt, prevent fatty liver disease in miceAs obesity continues to rise in the US, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become a major public health issue, increasingly leading to cancer and liver transplants.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Feedback enhances brainwave control of a novel hand-exoskeletonEPFL scientists are developing a lightweight and portable hand exoskeleton that can be controlled with brainwaves. The device enhances performance of brain-machine interfaces and can restore functional grasps for the physically impaired.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Facebook admits that the internet can be bad for democracy
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How climate change weakens coral 'immune systems'Researchers at The Ohio State University and their colleagues have demonstrated how two separate effects of climate change combine to destabilize different populations of coral microbes -- that is, unbalance the natural coral 'microbiome.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Multifunctional platform for the delivery of gene therapeuticsGene editing is one of the hottest topics in cancer research. A Chinese research team has now developed a gold-nanoparticle-based multifunctional vehicle to transport the 'gene scissors' to the tumor cell genome. As the authors report in the journal Angewandte Chemie, their nonviral transport and release platform of gene-editing systems has the additional advantage of combining hyperthermal cancer
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study may improve strategies for reducing nutrient runoff into Mississippi RiverEvery summer, the Gulf of Mexico is flooded with excess nitrogen and phosphorus from wastewater treatment plants and farm fields along the Mississippi River basin. And every summer, those nutrients create a 'dead zone' in the Gulf. To address the issue, the US Environmental Protection Agency formed a task force and required 12 states to develop strategies to reduce agricultural runoff.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cutting edge technology reveals how to digMusculoskeletal modeling applied to horticultural workers engaged in digging to predict risk of injury.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Swansea University research helps break ground to clean up landResearchers at Swansea University's Complex Flow Lab have been exploring the intricate shapes that emerge when air is injected into soil. Published in Physical Review Applied, these findings could one day be used to speed up the decontamination of industrial brownfield sites?which the United Kingdom currently has over 400,000 hectares of.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Using social and risk networks helps identify people undiagnosed with HIVConducting HIV testing among the social and risk networks of those recently diagnosed with HIV helps identify undiagnosed cases of HIV at significantly higher rates and at a lower cost than other testing approaches, finds a new study conducted in Ukraine by an international research team.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Biomarkers helped solving the mystery of 500-million-year-old macroorganismsA postgraduate student of the Faculty of Geology of MSU, working with an international scientific group, participated in chemical analysis of biomarkers -- compounds that remained after the decomposition of organic remains of the genus Beltanelliformis. These organisms populated the Earth in the Ediacaran period (about 575-541 million years ago), and their position on the evolutionary tree was unk
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study examines differences in hip fracture rates among nursing homesIn a nationally representative study, researchers found considerable variation in the rates of hip fractures across US nursing home facilities. The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study identified a number of modifiable facility-level characteristics that might be addressed, but the majority of the variation in the risk of hip fracture remained unexplained.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New for three types of extreme-energy space particles: Theory shows unified originOne of the biggest mysteries in astroparticle physics has been the origins of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, very high-energy neutrinos, and high-energy gamma rays. Now, a new theoretical model reveals that they all could be shot out into space after cosmic rays are accelerated by powerful jets from supermassive black holes. The model may set a new milestone on the path toward solving the half-cent
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Global temperature targets will be missed within decades unless carbon emissions reversedIn their latest paper, published in the February issue of Nature Geoscience, Dr Philip Goodwin from the University of Southampton and Professor Ric Williams from the University of Liverpool have projected that if immediate action isn't taken, the earth's global average temperature is likely to rise to 1.5°C above the period before the industrial revolution within the next 17-18 years, and to 2.0°C
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists find mechanisms to avoid telomere instability found in cancer and aging cellsResearchers from Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM) João Lobo Antunes have found that a functional component of telomeres called TERRA has to constantly be kept in check to prevent telomeric and chromosomal instability, one of the underlying anomalies associated with cancer.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Optical nanoscope allows imaging of quantum dotsPhysicists have developed a technique based on optical microscopy that can be used to create images of atoms on the nanoscale. In particular, the new method allows the imaging of quantum dots in a semiconductor chip. Together with colleagues from the University of Bochum, scientists from the University of Basel's Department of Physics and the Swiss Nanoscience Institute reported the findings in th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ancient rice heralds a new future for rice productionGrowing in crocodile infested billabongs in the remote North of the country, Australia's wild rice has been confirmed as the most closely related to the ancient ancestor of all rices. The unique genetics of the Australian rice may help breed disease resistance and climate adaptation into rice modern production species.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A 'hot Jupiter' with unusual windsThe hottest point on a gaseous planet near a distant star isn't where astrophysicists expected it to be -- a discovery that challenges scientists' understanding of the many planets of this type found in solar systems outside our own.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists discover material ideal for smart photovoltaic windowsResearchers at Berkeley Lab discovered that a form of perovskite, one of the hottest materials in solar research currently due to its high conversion efficiency, works surprisingly well as a stable and photoactive semiconductor material that can be reversibly switched between a transparent state and a non-transparent state, without degrading its electronic properties.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Engineers design artificial synapse for 'brain-on-a-chip' hardwareEngineers at MIT have designed an artificial synapse in such a way that they can precisely control the strength of an electric current flowing across it, similar to the way ions flow between neurons. The team has built a small chip with artificial synapses, made from silicon germanium. In simulations, the researchers found that the chip and its synapses could be used to recognize samples of handwr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers use sound waves to advance optical communicationIllinois researchers have demonstrated that sound waves can be used to produce ultraminiature optical diodes that are tiny enough to fit onto a computer chip. These devices, called optical isolators, may help solve major data capacity and system size challenges for photonic integrated circuits, the light-based equivalent of electronic circuits, which are used for computing and communications.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study shows first evidence of winds outside black holes throughout their mealtimesNew research shows the first evidence of strong winds around black holes throughout bright outburst events when a black hole rapidly consumes mass. The study, published in Nature, sheds new light on how mass transfers to black holes and how black holes can affect the environment around them. The research was conducted by an international team of researchers, led by scientists in the University of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Combined nutrients and warming massively increase methane emissions from lakesShallow lakes in agricultural landscapes will emit significantly greater amounts of methane, mostly in the form of bubbles (ebullition) in a warmer world, which is a potential positive feedback mechanism to climate warming. Submerged plants are key predictors of methane ebullition. The combination of warming with the loss of plants appears to transform shallow lakes into methane bubbling machines.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Boosting cancer therapy with cross-dressed immune cellsResearchers at EPFL have created artificial molecules that can help the immune system to recognize and attack cancer tumors. The study is published in Nature Methods.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Digging deep into distinctly different DNAA University of Queensland discovery has deepened our understanding of the genetic mutations that arise in different tissues, and how these are inherited.Researchers from UQ's Queensland Brain Institute, led by Dr. Steven Zuryn, found the rates of genetic mutations in mitochondrial DNA vary across differing tissue types, with the highest rate occurring in reproductive cells.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
What effect did the ACA have on out-of-pocket and premium spending?The Affordable Care Act (ACA) two years after implementation was associated with reduced out-of-pocket spending overall, particularly among low-income Americans, but spending on premiums also increased.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Computational method speeds hunt for new antibioticsA team of American and Russian computer scientists has developed an algorithm that can rapidly search massive databases to discover novel variants of known antibiotics -- a potential boon in fighting antibiotic resistance. In just a few hours, the algorithm identified 10 times more variants of peptidic natural products (PNPs) than all previous PNP discovery efforts combined, the researchers report
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
User experiment at BESSY II: Complex tessellations, extraordinary materialsAn international team of researchers lead by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has discovered a reaction path that produces exotic layers with semiregular structures. These kinds of materials are interesting because they frequently possess extraordinary properties. In the process, simple organic molecules are converted to larger units which form the complex, semiregular patterns. With exper
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pathway opens to minimize waste in solar energy captureResearchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Exciton Science have made an important discovery with significant implications for the future of solar cell material design.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lab-made hormone may reveal secret lives of plantsA new synthetic hormone promises to tease apart the many different roles of the plant hormone auxin and could lead to a new way to ripen fruit.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Climate engineering, once started, would have severe impacts if stoppedFacing a climate crisis, we may someday spray sulfur dioxide into the upper atmosphere to form a cloud that cools the Earth, but suddenly stopping the spraying would have a severe global impact on animals and plants, according to the first study on the potential biological impacts of geoengineering, or climate intervention.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Crows 'hooked' on fast foodBiologists at the universities of St. Andrews and Edinburgh have discovered why some crows 'craft' elaborate hooked tools out of branched twigs.
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New Scientist - News
Black holes are firing a triple-threat of speedy particles at usBlack holes have the weirdest kids. Three types of the highest energy particles in the cosmos could all be born in the chaos near a supermassive black hole
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New Scientist - News
Ruptured Tibetan glaciers triggered massive speedy avalanchesIn 2016, a pair of glaciers suddenly collapsed and sent huge chunks of ice hurtling downhill. The events suggest such disasters are more common than we thought
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New Scientist - News
Apocalypse not now but the fate of civilisation is in our handsIf societal collapse is coming, we have the means to prevent it. Let’s not mess it up like we did with climate change
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Why you can't judge a zebra by its stripesLooking at a zebra's stripes may not be a good way to tell different types apart, say scientists.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
ISS cosmonaut does 'test flight' on a vacuum cleanerRussian cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov said he had many questions from people asking if it was possible.
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Popular Science
These drones plant trees by firing seed pods at the groundNexus Media News Startups are tapping into the business potential of ecosystem restoration. Ecosystem restoration not only fights climate change, it is also an emerging business opportunity.
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Big Think
Are we really still eating egg whites?New research shows protein synthesis is 40 greater post-workout when eating the whole egg. Read More
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BBC News - Science & Environment
New Caledonian crows show how technology evolvesClever, tool-making crows show scientists the first foundations of technological development.
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
An economic case for protecting the planet | Naoko IshiiWe all share one planet -- we breathe the same air, drink the same water and depend on the same oceans, forests and biodiversity. Economist Naoko Ishii is on a mission to protect these shared resources, known as the global commons, that are vital for our survival. In an eye-opening talk about the wellness of the planet, Ishii outlines four economic systems we need to change to safeguard the global
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Scientific American Content: Global
Cleaning Up Air Pollution May Strengthen Global WarmingNew research is helping quantify just how big that effect might be -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Futurity.org
We say these relationships are our most difficultParticipants surveyed for a new study were more apt to report that the most difficult people in their lives were female family members such as wives, mothers, and sisters, researchers report. “With female relatives, it can be a two-sided thing. They may be the people you most depend on, but also the people who nag you the most.” Close female kin may be disproportionately named as difficult becaus
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New on MIT Technology Review
Here’s the reason we’d never halt a geoengineering project midway throughSuddenly stopping geoengineering would be dangerous. Which is why doing so is unlikely.
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The Atlantic
The Precarious Politics of the Joint Korean Hockey TeamOn January 9, roughly 30 years after North Korea bombed a Korean Air passenger plane in protest of the 1988 Seoul Olympics, Seoul and Pyongyang announced a stunning diplomatic breakthrough : North Korea would send athletes and performers to participate in the Winter Olympics, which begin on February 9 in Pyeongchang, South Korea. Then, 11 days later, the International Olympics Committee approved
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The Atlantic
This Is Not the Israel Trip Mike Pence Had PlannedMike Pence IsraeliJERUSALEM—Mike Pence was greeted in Israel’s center of government on Monday in the way of a dear friend. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu beamed as he stood with the American vice president in his offices. “I have had the privilege over the years of standing here with hundreds of leaders and welcomed them, all of them, to Israel’s capital, Jerusalem,” he said. “This is the first time that I stan
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Virus shown to be likely cause of mystery polio-like illnessA major review has identified strong evidence that a virus called Enterovirus D68 is the cause of a mystery polio-like illness that has paralyzed children in the US, Canada and Europe.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Massive dust storms are robbing Mars of its waterMars was once lush with water. A new analysis of Martian climate data shows a mechanism that might have helped dehydrate the planet.
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How Engineering Earth’s Climate Could Seriously Imperil LifeSeeding the atmosphere with sulfur could keep temperature from rising—but once we stop, the backlash could destroy entire species.
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Futurity.org
DNA is key ingredient in color-changing metamaterialResearchers have developed a technique for creating new kinds of optical materials and devices that could lead to light-bending and cloaking devices. “Chemists and physicists will be able to build an almost infinite number of new structures with all sorts of interesting properties…” Using DNA as a key tool, the team took gold nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes and arranged them in two an
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Anemia discovery offers new targets to treat fatigue in millionsUVA has discovered an unknown biological process that controls the production of vital cells that carry oxygen throughout the body. The discovery could help doctors develop new treatments for anemias that affect millions of people.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Persistent photoconductivity used to stimulate neurotypic cellsResearchers have, for the first time, used a material's persistent photoconductivity to stimulate neurotype cells. The technique, which is relatively simple, should facilitate future research on using charge to influence cellular behavior.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Gene delivery of drugs directly into arthritic joints is making the leap to patientsLocalized gene delivery to diseased joints to achieve sustained drug production at the site of osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis is gaining momentum, with clinical trials underway in the US and the first arthritis gene therapy recently approved in Korea.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Housing instability negatively affects the health of children and caregiversWhen families don't have stable housing, their risk of struggling with poor health outcomes and material hardships, such as food insecurity, increases, according to a new study from Children's HealthWatch. Researchers surveyed over 22,000 families and found that one third of low-income renters were housing unstable, which was associated with negative impacts on their health.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Digging deep into distinctly different DNAA University of Queensland discovery has deepened our understanding of the genetic mutations that arise in different tissues, and how these are inherited.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study shows first evidence of winds outside black holes throughout their mealtimesNew research shows the first evidence of strong winds around black holes throughout bright outburst events when a black hole rapidly consumes mass.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New for three types of extreme-energy space particles: Theory shows unified originNew model connects the origins of very high-energy neutrinos, ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, and high-energy gamma rays with black-hole jets embedded in their environments.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers design artificial synapse for 'brain-on-a-chip' hardwareWhen it comes to processing power, the human brain just can't be beat.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate engineering, once started, would have severe impacts if stoppedFacing a climate crisis, we may someday spray sulfur dioxide into the upper atmosphere to form a cloud that cools the Earth, but suddenly stopping the spraying would have a severe global impact on animals and plants, according to the first study on the potential biological impacts of geoengineering, or climate intervention.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New Caledonian crows extract prey faster with complex hooked toolsBiologists at the Universities of St Andrews and Edinburgh have discovered why some crows 'craft' elaborate hooked tools out of branched twigs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
User experiment at BESSY II—complex tessellations, extraordinary materialsAn international team of researchers lead by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has discovered a reaction path that produces exotic layers with semiregular structures. These kinds of materials are interesting because they frequently possess extraordinary properties. In the process, simple organic molecules are converted to larger units which form the complex, semiregular patterns. With exper
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists discover material ideal for smart photovoltaic windowsSmart windows that are transparent when it's dark or cool but automatically darken when the sun is too bright are increasingly popular energy-saving devices. But imagine that when the window is darkened, it simultaneously produces electricity. Such a material - a photovoltaic glass that is also reversibly thermochromic - is a green technology researchers have long worked toward, and now, scientist
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Puzzling finding raises new questions about atmospheric physics of giant planetsThe hottest point on a gaseous planet near a distant star isn't where astrophysicists expected it to be - a discovery that challenges scientists' understanding of the many planets of this type found in solar systems outside our own.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Global temperature targets will be missed within decades unless carbon emissions reversed: new studyNew projections by researchers from the Universities of Southampton and Liverpool, and the Australian National University in Canberra, could be the catalyst the world has sought to determine how best to meet its obligations to reduce carbon emissions and better manage global warming as defined by the Paris Agreement.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ancient rice heralds a new future for rice productionWild rice growing in northern Australia's crocodile-infested waters could help boost global food security, say University of Queensland researchers who have mapped its genetic family tree.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pathway opens to minimize waste in solar energy captureResearchers at the ARC Centre of Excellence in Exciton Science have made an important discovery with significant implications for the future of solar cell material design.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lab-made hormone may reveal secret lives of plantsA lab-designed hormone may unlock mysteries harbored by plants.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Combined nutrients and warming massively increase methane emissions from lakesShallow lakes in agricultural landscapes will emit significantly greater amounts of methane, mostly in the form of bubbles (ebullition) in a warmer world, which is a potential positive feedback mechanism to climate warming.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers use sound waves to advance optical communicationIllinois researchers have demonstrated that sound waves can be used to produce ultraminiature optical diodes that are tiny enough to fit onto a computer chip. These devices, called optical isolators, may help solve major data capacity and system size challenges for photonic integrated circuits, the light-based equivalent of electronic circuits, which are used for computing and communications.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Computational method speeds hunt for new antibioticsA team of American and Russian computer scientists has developed an algorithm that can rapidly search massive databases to discover novel variants of known antibiotics—a potential boon in fighting antibiotic resistance.
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Scientific American Content: Global
"Dark Matter" DNA Influences Brain DevelopmentResearchers are finally figuring out the purpose behind some genome sequences that are nearly identical across vertebrates -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren
Dansk forsker observerer ny eksotisk partikel med superfokuseret lysSøren Ulstrup fra Aarhus Universitet har ved hjælp af en ny metode været i stand til at observere en såkaldt trion, som kan blive et springbræt inden for spintronics.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover that female cats are more likely to be right-handedResearchers at Queen's University Belfast have found that female cats are much more likely to use their right paw than males.
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Science | The Guardian
UK jobs at risk as EC warns on safety standards post-BrexitMore than 200 UK agencies that provide ‘CE’ safety labels may lose recognition after March 2019 Highly specialised jobs in Britain assessing whether products ranging from MRI scanners to phones can carry the “CE” safety label could be at risk post-Brexit after the European commission put manufacturers on notice over future standards. In an official notice, the EC said the agencies that provide th
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Science | The Guardian
A cold nose shows you’re stressed – what else does?A study at the University of Nottingham has shown that blood drains from someone’s face when they are under stress. Here are the other bodily signs to look out for Touch your nose. If it is cold, you may need to calm down. Science, by using thermal imaging cameras and stressing the hell out of students, has discovered that stress causes a cold nose (and face). Blood moves from the face to other pa
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Improving vaccines for the elderly by blocking inflammationBy identifying why skin immunity declines in old age, a UCL-led research team has found that an anti-inflammatory pill could help make vaccines more effective for elderly people.The study, published today in The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, found that an excessive inflammation reaction in older people can obstruct the immune system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Direct patient care experience necessary for better transgender care'There are simply are not enough physicians comfortable with treating transgender patients,' according to Joshua D. Safer, M.D., F.A.C.P., associate professor of medicine at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM). To begin to address this issue, BUSM has created a medical school elective that combines the standard approach of teaching about transgender medical topics with sensitivity and appr
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers discover that female cats are more likely to be right-handedResearchers at Queen's University Belfast have found that female cats are much more likely to use their right paw than males.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
BU: Young men who have sex with men receive less HIV educationYoung men who have sex with men (MSM) are at much higher risk of HIV infection compared to their peers, but a new study led by a Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researcher suggests young MSM are less likely to receive school-based HIV education than young men who only have sex with women.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Transportable laserPTB physicists have developed a frequency-doubling unit for transportable, optical atomic clock that will even continue to operate when it has been shaken at three times the Earth's gravitational acceleration. The results have been published in the current issue of the Review of Scientific Instruments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A method to measure diagnostic errors could be key to preventing disability and death from misdiagnosisIn an effort to reduce patient misdiagnoses and associated poor patient outcomes from lack of prompt treatment, a Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality researcher is helping to lead the way in providing hospitals a new approach to quantify and monitor diagnostic errors in their quality improvement efforts. The approach, called Symptom-Disease Pair Analysis of Diagnostic
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How cells are able to turnResearchers have long wondered how our cells navigate inside the body. Two new studies, in which Lund University researcher Pontus Nordenfelt has participated, have now demonstrated that the cells use molecular force from within to steer themselves in a certain direction. This knowledge may be of great significance in the development of new drugs.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Largest Nordic bank Nordea bans employees' bitcoin tradeNordea, the Nordic region's biggest bank, said Monday it would bar employees from trading in bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies as of February 28 due to the unregulated nature of the market.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A race against pine: Wood-boring wasp in North America threatened by a Eurasian invaderInvasive species have diverse impacts in different locations, including biodiversity loss, as a result of native species being outcompeted for similar resources. A U.S. research team, led by Dr. Ann Hajek, Cornell University, studied the case of an aggressive Eurasian woodwasp that has recently established in North America and poses a threat to a native species. Their study is published in the ope
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day:Cold HeartedCardiologists have found a way to cool the human heart in a localized way to help reduce muscle damage from heart attacks.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Particle receivers to get first commercial trial—in Saudi ArabiaA new solar technology is twice as efficient, cutting the cost of solar thermal energy, by raising operating temperatures to 1,000°C, almost twice the 565°C molten salt temperature in current concentrated solar power (CSP) tower plants.
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The Atlantic
The Entirely Rational Basis For Turkey's Move Into SyriaIn the 19th century, Britain, France, and Russia occupied or fostered the independence of Greece, Serbia, Romania, Montenegro, Bulgaria, Tunisia, and Egypt—each one part of the Ottoman Empire. In 1920, the victors of World War I forced the Ottomans to sign the Treaty of Sèvres, which detached what would become Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, and Israel from the House of Osman. The agreement also granted
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Viden
Ny spiller sender unik raket i kredsløbRocket Lab sender tre nanosatellitter i kredsløb om Jorden efter kun anden testflyvning med deres Electron raket.
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Science : NPR
Scientific Theory And The Multiverse MadnessAn increasing number of theoretical physicist think that our universe is only one among infinitely many — but this speculation is not based on sound logic, says guest commentator Sabine Hossenfelder. (Image credit: Serge Brunier/ESO)
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New on MIT Technology Review
Retraining could help most people avoid job loss at the hands of automation
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A race against pine: Wood-boring wasp in North America threatened by a Eurasian invaderInvasive species have diverse impacts in different locations, including biodiversity loss, as a result of native species being outcompeted for similar resources. A US research team studied the case of an aggressive Eurasian woodwasp that has recently established in North America and poses a threat to a native competitor species. In their paper, published in the open-access journal Neobiota, the sc
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Saarland University bioinformaticians compute gene sequences inherited from each parentIn the analysis of the human genome, one question researchers have so far left unanswered is how to differentiate the variants of a gene inherited from the mother and father. Such information would increase the likelihood of treating certain diseases successfully. The so-called third generation of sequencing technologies is now making this possible.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Speech analysis software predicted psychosis in at-risk patients with up to 83 percent accuracyComputer-based analyses of speech transcripts obtained from interviews with at-risk youths were able to predict which youths would later develop psychosis within two years, with an accuracy of up to 83 percent. In two independent cohorts of young people at risk for psychosis, a disturbance in the flow of meaning when speaking, otherwise known as being tangential or going off track, predicted who w
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New insights into how your brain keeps its balanceAn interdisciplinary team of scientists has discovered that two large protein kinases, ATM and ATR, cooperate to help establish the go/stop balance in human brains.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
'Depression education' effective for some teensIn an assessment of their 'depression literacy' program, which has already been taught to tens of thousands, researchers say the Adolescent Depression Awareness Program achieved its intended effect of encouraging many teenagers to speak up and seek adult help for themselves or a peer.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New metal-semiconductor interface for brain-inspired computingOne of the big challenges in computer architecture is integrating storage, memory and processing in one unit. This would make computers faster and more energy efficient. Physicists have taken a big step towards this goal by combining a niobium doped strontium titanate (SrTiO3) semiconductor with ferromagnetic cobalt. At the interface, this creates a spin-memristor with storage abilities, paving th
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Making fuel cells for a fraction of the costResearchers now describe the development of an inexpensive, efficient catalyst material for a type of fuel cell called a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell, which turns the chemical energy of hydrogen into electricity and is among the most promising fuel cell types to power cars and electronics.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Sea turtle crisis: Moisture, not just heat impacts sex of sea turtle hatchlingsMale sea turtles are disappearing and not just in Australia. Researchers found that 97 to 100 percent of hatchlings in southeast Florida have been female since 2002. They are the first to show why and how moisture conditions inside the nest in addition to heat affect the development and sex ratios of turtle embryos, using a novel technique they developed to estimate sex ratios with a male-specific
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Double trouble: Moisture, not just heat impacts sex of sea turtle hatchlingsAlarming results from a recent gender ratio study revealed that 99 percent of young green turtles from Australia's Northern Great Barrier Reef are female and that male sea turtles are disappearing. Closer to home, researchers from Florida Atlantic University have documented a similar trend in sea turtle hatchlings in southeast Florida. Since 2002, they have studied sea turtles in Palm Beach County
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
On the reboundOur bodies have a remarkable ability to heal from broken ankles or dislocated wrists. Now, a new study has shown that some nanoparticles can also "self-heal" after experiencing intense strain, once that strain is removed.
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