Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is your sandwich bad for the environment?Do you take a packed lunch to work or buy a sandwich from the shop? The carbon footprint of your sandwich could be having a major impact on greenhouse gas emissions according to new research.
30min
Big Think
So who is really affected by the new tariffs on solar panels and washing machines from China?New tariffs enacted on solar panels and washing machines are coming under fire from some around the globe, while others are calling the move a positive step for jobs in the United States. Read More
57min
Futurity.org
Synthetic neurons may reveal clues to herpes infectionResearchers have optimized a new method to create synthetic neurons, neuron-like cells created from a readily available cell line. They also used these cells to investigate a core enzyme involved in the synthesis of purines—a component of DNA that is involved in many other cellular and metabolic processes—and how the enzyme might change during infection by herpes simplex virus. An early version o
45min
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New Scientist - News
Just one cigarette a day can cause serious heart problemsAmong men, half of the risk associated with smoking a pack of 20 comes from just the first cigarette
10min
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is your sandwich bad for the environment?The carbon footprint of your sandwich could be having a major impact on greenhouse gas emissions according to new research.Researchers at the University of Manchester have carried out the first ever study looking at the carbon footprint of 40 sandwich varieties, both homemade and pre-packaged.
10min
New on MIT Technology Review
Alphabet and Amazon want to protect you from hackers. That’s a blessing and a curse
33min
Futurity.org
Hungry? You could eat (and digest) an insectAlmost all primates today, including people, can still eat and digest insects, the food choice for our early primate ancestors, thanks to an enzyme that can break down insect exoskeletons, a new study indicates. Insects are part of the traditional diet of 2 billion people around the world, but some people can’t imagine letting a cricket, grasshopper, or beetle get anywhere near their dinner table
59min
Futurity.org
Babies know that other languages are for communicatingInfants recognize that speech in a language not their own is used for communication, a new study indicates. The results offer new insights into how language is processed at a young age. “By their first birthday, babies understand that foreign languages can communicate information between people, even though the babies themselves don’t understand the foreign language,” explains Athena Vouloumanos,
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New technology standard could shape the future of electronics designScientists at the University of Southampton have discovered a way of enhancing the capabilities of an emerging nanotechnology that could open the door to a new generation of electronics.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vitamin D supplements could ease painful IBS symptomsVitamin D supplements could help to ease painful Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) symptoms, a new study from the University of Sheffield has found.Scientists from the University's Department of Oncology and Metabolism reviewed and integrated all available research on vitamin D and IBS -- a condition which affects two in 10 people in the UK.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New study sheds light on teenagers' online habitsTeenagers are far more critical users of social media than we give them credit for, and need to be better supported in reaping the benefits social media can have.
1h
Futurity.org
Tidal cycles may warn us about volcanoes ready to eruptSignals associated with tidal cycles could potentially provide advanced warning of certain types of volcanic eruptions. “…tides could provide a probe for telling us whether or not a volcano has entered a critical state…” A new study shows that just before a surprise eruption of New Zealand’s Ruapehu volcano in 2007, seismic tremors near its crater became tightly correlated with twice-monthly chan
1h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New study sheds light on teenagers' online habitsTeenagers are far more critical users of social media than we give them credit for, and need to be better supported in reaping the benefits social media can have.
1h
Futurity.org
Our eardrums move in sync with our eyesSimply moving our eyes triggers our eardrums to move too, a new study suggests. Researchers discovered that keeping the head still but shifting the eyes to one side or the other sparks vibrations in the eardrums, even in the absence of any sound. Surprisingly, these eardrum vibrations start slightly before the eyes move, indicating that motion in the ears and the eyes are controlled by the same m
1h
NYT > Science
New Findings Could Save Lives of More Stroke PatientsDoctors have more time than they thought to prevent death and disability from stroke, by removing blood clots that block circulation to the brain, a study shows.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Simple breathing training with a physiotherapist before surgery prevents postoperative pneumoniaPneumonia, and other serious lung complications, after major abdominal surgery were halved when patients were seen by a physiotherapist before surgery and taught breathing exercises that the patient needed to start performing immediately on waking from the operation, finds a trial published by The BMJ today.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Substantial inequalities in cesarean births persist in many countriesA study published by The BMJ today shows that cesarean section rates have increased in most countries during the past decade, particularly among the richest fifth, indicating an increase in wealth related inequality over time.
1h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Just one cigarette a day carries greater risk of heart disease and stroke than expected, warn expertSmoking just one cigarette a day has a much higher risk of developing coronary heart disease and stroke than expected -- about half the risk of smoking 20 per day -- concludes a review of the evidence published by The BMJ today.
1h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Daily: Mueller's Probe, a New Fed Chair, Immigration NegotiationsWhat We’re Following Investigation Updates: Special Counsel Robert Mueller is reportedly moving forward in his probe of the 2016 election and its aftermath: He’s interviewed numerous members of President Trump’s inner circle, and is said to be negotiating a meeting with Trump himself. The president and his allies have sought to cast doubt on the investigators. The histories at play—President Trum
1h
Science | The Guardian
Even one cigarette a day greatly raises cardiovascular risk, experts warnImpact of one daily cigarette on risk of heart disease and stroke greater than previously thought Smoking just one cigarette a day is more dangerous than commonly thought, say researchers who have found it still raises the risk of coronary heart disease or stroke to about half the risk from smoking 20 a day. The team behind the study say that the findings emphasise that cutting out cigarettes, ra
1h
Popular Science
The world's strongest athletes benefit from some extra body fatFat Month A belly isn't a big deal when you're eating 5,000 calories a day over 1,000 pounds. Bodybuilding and strength competitors look very different, and there's good reason.
2h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Four in 10 cardiomyopathies -- a major cause of sudden death in young people -- are geneticFour in 10 cardiomyopathies -- a major cause of sudden cardiac death and heart failure in young people -- are genetic, according to a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) study published today in European Heart Journal. Family screening is urgently needed to prevent early death in apparently healthy relatives, the paper says.
2h
The Atlantic
The Sex-Abuse Victims America IgnoredIt was an arresting moment, even on a day full of them. The Olympic gymnast Aly Raisman stood in front of a courtroom last Friday and addressed Larry Nassar, the former Michigan State University doctor who’s been accused by upwards of 150 women of sexually abusing them over more than two decades. “Larry,” she said from the podium in the Lansing, Michigan, courtroom, “you do realize now that we, t
2h
Popular Science
Watch SpaceX’s massive Falcon Heavy rocket pass an explosive milestoneFalcon Heavy SpaceXSpace 27 engines all roaring and ready to go. We’ve been waiting for so long. SpaceX has managed to keep anticipation high for its Falcon Heavy debut basically since it was first announced back in 2011.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Century of data shows sea-level rise shifting tides in Delaware, Chesapeake baysThe warming climate is expected to affect coastal regions worldwide as glaciers and ice sheets melt, raising sea level globally. For the first time, an international team has found evidence of how sea-level rise already is affecting high and low tides in both the Chesapeake and Delaware bays, two large estuaries of the eastern United States.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
15 years later, PEPFAR continues to save livesExperts from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases have authored a perspective recognizing the United States President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) for 15 years of implementing an innovative program to prevent, treat, and care for persons living with HIV and AIDS.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Link between flu and heart attack confirmed in new researchChances of a heart attack are increased six-fold during the first seven days after detection of laboratory-confirmed influenza infection, according to a new study by researchers in Canada.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Finding the root cause of bronchiolitis symptomsEvery winter, doctors' offices and hospital emergency rooms fill with children who have bronchiolitis, an inflammation of the small airways in the lung. It's responsible for about 130,000 admissions each year. Sometimes these young patients have symptoms reminiscent of a bad cold with a fever, cough and runny nose. Other times, bronchiolitis causes breathing troubles so severe that these children
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Augmented reality system lets doctors see under patients' skin without the scalpelNew technology is bringing the power of augmented reality into clinical practice. The system, called ProjectDR, allows medical images such as CT scans and MRI data to be displayed directly on a patient's body in a way that moves as the patient does.
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
tRNA fragments in mosquitoes may play role in spreading diseasetRNA fragments -- small sections of transfer RNA molecules -- have recently been discovered to play active roles in the biology of diverse organisms. Now, these tRNA fragments (tRFs) have been found to have important functions in the mosquito Aedes aegypti, according to a article.
2h
Discovery (uploads) on YouTube
These Moonshiners Are Under Attack By Deadly Snakes#Moonshiners | Tuesdays 9p Down in the Bayou State, Patti and David's water source is crawling with cottonmouths. Full Episodes Streaming FREE: https://discovery.com/tv-shows/moonshiners/ Subscribe to Discovery: http://bit.ly/SubscribeDiscovery Join us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Discovery https://www.facebook.com/MoonshinersTV Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Discovery https://tw
2h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Alzheimer's drug targeting soluble amyloid falls short in a large clinical trialResearchers report that solanezumab, a monoclonal antibody-based treatment for Alzheimer's disease developed by Eli Lilly that targets amyloid plaques, did not significantly slow cognitive decline.
2h
Big Think
Why Collective Narcissists Are so Politically VolatileResearch from my PrejudiceLab at Goldsmiths, University of London shows that people who score high on the collective narcissism scale are particularly sensitive to even the smallest offences to their group’s image. Read More
2h
NYT > Science
Yes, They’ve Cloned Monkeys in China. That Doesn’t Mean You’re Next.Dolly Cloning ChineseResearchers at the Chinese Academy of Sciences have created the first primate clones with a technique like the one used to create Dolly the sheep more than 20 years ago.
2h
The Atlantic
The Atlantic Politics & Policy Daily: ‘I Just Signed Your Death Warrant’Today in 5 Lines The Justice Department threatened to subpoena 23 jurisdictions if they fail to provide documents to show that they’re cooperating with federal immigration authorities. Mayors from across the country boycotted a White House infrastructure meeting in protest of the administration’s crackdown on so-called “sanctuary cities.” A judge sentenced Larry Nassar, the former team doctor for
2h
Live Science
How Getting the Flu May Put You at Risk of a Heart AttackThe flu can be a serious illness itself, but it may also increase the risk of having a heart attack, a new study from Canada finds.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Alzheimer's drug targeting soluble amyloid falls short in a large clinical trialA paper published today in the New England Journal of Medicine reports that solanezumab, a monoclonal antibody-based treatment for Alzheimer's disease developed by Eli Lilly that targets amyloid plaques, did not significantly slow cognitive decline.
3h
Live Science
Little Legs, Big Impact: Baby's Kicks Pack a Punch in Mom's WombBabies aren't so wimpy after all - here's how much force is behind a baby's kick.
3h
Science : NPR
Are There Zombie Viruses In The Thawing Permafrost?There's a new fear from climate change: Bacteria and viruses buried in frozen ground coming back to life as the Arctic warms up. We went digging in permafrost to find out how worried we should be. (Image credit: Varham Muradyan for NPR)
3h
The Atlantic
A Glimpse of a Canadian-Led International OrderPresident Donald Trump did not kill the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Although he withdrew the U.S. from the trade deal in the first week of his presidency, on Tuesday—exactly a year after the American withdrawal—the remaining 11 countries announced that they had completed renegotiating a new TPP without Washington. That sets up a perfect natural experiment about American influence in the world. And
3h
The Atlantic
In 100 Texts, the Story of Love, Heartbreak, and an Unplanned BabyWhen Victoria Mapplebeck found her decades-old Nokia phone hidden in the back of a kitchen drawer, she was forced to relive a story she had worked hard to forget. “I realized I’d unwittingly archived a three-year message thread between myself and my son’s father,” Mapplebeck told The Atlantic . “The story of our relationship unfolded in just 100 texts: how we met, dated for a few months, broke up
3h
Popular Science
Exclusive: House Science Committee members say President Trump's lack of science advisers leaves us vulnerable to disasterScience The Office of Science and Technology Policy exists to provide the President with objective scientific advisement. There's neither a director nor an official mandate in the White House's Office of Science and Technology Policy—not since President Donald Trump took office.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Will supplements help your workout or diet routine?Many people may turn to dietary supplements for a boost to their weight loss and fitness routines. To help cut the confusion, two new resources have been produced to help people understand what is known about the effectiveness and safety of many ingredients in dietary supplements promoted for fitness and weight loss.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
An Achilles heel discovered in viruses could fuel new antiviral approachesScientists have discovered a new Achilles heel in the replication process of positive-strand RNA viruses, a class responsible for health threats such as Zika, polio, chikungunya and hepatitis C.
3h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Report shows United States leads in science and technology as China rapidly advancesAccording to the National Science Foundation's new Science and Engineering Indicators 2018 report, the United States is the global leader in science and technology. However, the U.S. global share of science and technology activities is declining as other nations -- especially China -- continue to rise.
3h
Science : NPR
Flu Virus Can Trigger A Heart AttackThe rate of hospitalizations due to influenza is continuing to rise. Now, a study finds the risk of having a heart attack also spikes in the days after a confirmed diagnosis of flu. (Image credit: laflor/Getty Images)
3h
The Atlantic
The Rise of the Brazilian EvangelicalsHope is in short supply in Brazil. The country is struggling to recover from the worst recession in its history and more than 12 million Brazilians are unemployed . Violent crime is on the rise. A slew of scandals is sending an endless parade of politicians to prison for corruption. The latest major figure to fall in the ongoing anti-corruption purge is Brazil’s beloved former president Luiz Inác
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Century of data shows sea-level rise shifting tides in Delaware, Chesapeake baysThe warming climate is expected to affect coastal regions worldwide as glaciers and ice sheets melt, raising sea level globally. For the first time, an international team has found evidence of how sea-level rise already is affecting high and low tides in both the Chesapeake and Delaware bays, two large estuaries of the eastern United States.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Finding the root cause of bronchiolitis symptoms'By treating all bronchiolitis patients with a single agent, we could be comparing apples with oranges,' says Robert J. Freishtat, M.D., M.P.H., chief of emergency medicine at Children's National Health System. The necessary treatment may differ, depending on the underlying cause: Respiratory syncytial virus, rhinovirus or another virus.
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Augmented reality system lets doctors see under patients' skin without the scalpelNew technology is bringing the power of augmented reality into clinical practice. The system, called ProjectDR, allows medical images such as CT scans and MRI data to be displayed directly on a patient's body in a way that moves as the patient does.
3h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Latest Alphabet 'moonshot' aims to thwart cyber attacksChronicle Alphabet GoogleGoogle parent Alphabet's "moonshot" lab unveiled a new "graduate" on Wednesday which aims to make a business out of preventing cyber attacks.
3h
New on MIT Technology Review
Here’s what we could do with the first-ever cloned monkeys
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Link found between genes in mosquitos and the spread of diseasesResearchers at the University of Missouri have found a link between genetic molecules in mosquitos and dengue fever. The results of the study, conducted by Susanta K. Behura and his colleagues, could lead to future breakthroughs in combating destructive tropical diseases like dengue fever, Zika virus and yellow fever. The researchers focused their efforts on a single species of mosquito, Aedes aeg
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
More stroke patients may receive crucial treatments under new guidelineA new guideline for treating acute ischemic stroke recommends an increased treatment window for mechanical clot removal from six hours to up to 24 hours in certain patients with clots in large vessels. New recommendations also mean more patients will have access to a clot-dissolving drug proven to lower chances for disability.
3h
Big Think
A chunk of North America found sticking to AustraliaResearchers find that an ancient chunk of North America is now a part of Australia, shedding light on Earth's first supercontinent Nuna. Read More
3h
The Atlantic
Is the Mueller Probe Heating Up?Donald Trump R. MuellerSpecial Counsel Robert Mueller remains as tight-lipped as ever, but a flurry of information about his probe into Russian interference in the election and what role the Trump campaign played has produced new developments in the last few days. Attempting to divine the meaning of these moves remains opaque, but the scope of what the public has learned is significant. On Tuesday, The Washington Post
3h
Inside Science
BRIEF: Plant-Inspired Robots Inch Forward by Absorbing and Releasing WaterBRIEF: Plant-Inspired Robots Inch Forward by Absorbing and Releasing Water Some of the so-called “hygrobots” can spontaneously advance across a wet surface. Inching robot.gif Image credits: Shin et al., Sci. Robot. 3, eaar2629 (2018) Technology Wednesday, January 24, 2018 - 14:00 Catherine Meyers, Editor (Inside Science) -- Researchers have created robots that wriggle forward when the humidity in
3h
Inside Science
Annie RothContributor Annie Roth is a freelance journalist based in Santa Cruz, California. She uses journalism to put a spotlight on marginalized conservation issues. Follow her on Twitter @ AnnieRoth_AtSea .
3h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Drug may help those with dementia with Lewy bodiesNew help may be on the way for people with dementia with Lewy bodies, which is the second most common neurodegenerative type of dementia after Alzheimer's disease. The disease can cause movement problems and issues such as hallucinations in addition to thinking and memory problems. But the drug used to treat the movement problems can also exacerbate the hallucinations, delusions and other psychiat
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Excavations show remote Greek islet was early industrial hubExcavations next to the uninhabited Greek islet of Keros, already identified as the enigmatic hub of a forgotten religion, have now revealed traces of intense industrial activity more than 4,500 years ago, Greece's Culture Ministry said Wednesday.
4h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA covers wildfires from many sourcesNASA's satellite instruments are often the first to detect wildfires burning in remote regions, and the locations of new fires are sent directly to land managers worldwide within hours of the satellite overpass. Together, NASA instruments, including a number built and managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, detect actively burning fires, track the transport of smoke fr
4h
Feed: All Latest
A VR Movie Set in Space Just Landed a 7-Figure Deal at Sundance. This Is HugeVR Reality VideoFor the first time, VR has scored the kind of film-festival deal usually accorded to conventional movies.
4h
Quanta Magazine
The Era of Quantum Computing Is Here. Outlook: CloudyAfter decades of heavy slog with no promise of success, quantum computing is suddenly buzzing with almost feverish excitement and activity. Nearly two years ago, IBM made a quantum computer available to the world: the 5-quantum-bit (qubit) resource they now call (a little awkwardly) the IBM Q experience. That seemed more like a toy for researchers than a way of getting any serious number crunchin
4h
Big Think
Why this Bitcoin investment philosophy is a 4-letter memeThe term “hodl” originated in a drunken post about Bitcoin from 2013, but it’s evolved into a movement in the cryptocurrency community. Read More
4h
Popular Science
U.S. Olympic skiers have been swooshing in VR to prep for the winter gamesVR Reality VideoTechnology Digital practice for PyeongChang 2018. U.S. Olympic athletes have been using footage from the men’s and women’s downhill ski events to practice the course in VR.
4h
NYT > Science
Trilobites: This Is How You Escape a Cheetah, if You’re an ImpalaYears of study in Botswana yielded the first stride-by-stride data on how lions and cheetahs hunt zebras and impalas, and how these prey flee their predators.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rise in severity of hottest days outpaces global average temperature increaseWhile our planet's average annual temperature has increased at a steady pace in recent decades, there has been an alarming jump in the severity of the hottest days of the year during that same period, with the most lethal effects in the world's largest cities.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Better than a hologram: Research produces 3-D images floating in 'thin air'In the original Star Wars film, R2D2 projects an image of Princess Leia in distress. The iconic scene includes the line still famous 40 years later: 'Help me Obi Wan Kenobi, you're my only hope.' Electrical and computer engineering professor and holography experts have long had a goal to create the same type of 3-D image projection. Now, researchers detail a newly developed method to do so.
4h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Racism linked to uptake of smoking in young peopleAdolescents who have experienced some form of racism between the ages of 11 and 23 are more likely to take up smoking than those who have not, according to a new study.
4h
The Atlantic
The Syrian Battlefield Grows Yet More ComplicatedWhat does it mean when NATO’s two biggest militaries find themselves on opposite sides of a conflict? That’s what’s happening in Syria, where the United States and Turkey have for years differed over Washington’s backing of armed Kurdish groups Turkey sees as terrorists—and where that rift took on a violent new dimension last weekend. Following a U.S. announcement—later hastily walked back—that t
4h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA covers wildfires from many sourcesNASA's satellite instruments are often the first to detect wildfires burning in remote regions, and the locations of new fires are sent directly to land managers worldwide within hours of the satellite overpass.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brain-scan guided emergency stroke treatment can save more livesAdvances in brain imaging can identify a greater number of stroke patients who can receive therapy later than previously believed, according to a new study. The results of the Endovascular Therapy Following Imaging Evaluation for the Ischemic Stroke (DEFUSE 3) trial demonstrated that physically removing brain clots up to 16 hours after symptom onset in selected patients led to improved outcomes co
5h
Feed: All Latest
How #ReleaseTheMemo Relies on Basic Misunderstandings of FISA LawCongressman Devin Nunes has fired up his fellow Republicans over a mysterious memo, taking advantage of a secretive legal process to sow confusion.
5h
The Atlantic
Weird, Wonderful Photos From the ArchivesWhile doing my job researching photos for various stories, I always come across more interesting images than I need, or photos that are unrelated to the story yet are still remarkable, strange, hilarious, or just great shots. The best of those, I’ve been tucking into a folder without a clear plan for future use. Today, I offer a sampling from that folder—a grab bag of historic images depicting sp
5h
Popular Science
E-cigarettes could help you quit smoking—and help your kids startHealth All aboard the nicotine train. Ever since they came on the scene in 2006, electronic cigarettes, more commonly known as e-cigs or vapes, have been the subject of a rather lethargic debate.
5h
The Atlantic
Sorry, Alexa Is Not a FeministIf you ask Alexa, the voice-assistant software in Amazon Echo devices, if it’s a feminist, it will respond in the affirmative. “I am a feminist. As is anyone who believes in bridging the inequality between men and women in society,” it continues. At Quartz , Leah Fessler recently noted that it’s a vast improvement over just a year ago, when Alexa would take abuse like “you’re a bitch” or “you’re
5h
The Atlantic
Who Bankrupted Toys 'R' Us? Blame Private Equity and Millennial ParentsToys R Us USToys “R” Us announced on Wednesday that it will close about 180 stores in the U.S., or about one-fifth of its domestic locations, as the company emerges from bankruptcy proceedings to restructure $5 billion in debt. On one level, this is just the latest chapter in the never-ending saga of brick-and-mortar calamity as the retail industry focuses more on online sales. The first half of 2017 was amo
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Stanford-led clinical trial shows broader benefits of acute-stroke therapyA 38-center clinical trial sponsored by the National Institutes of Health and led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine has shown that far more people than previously thought can benefit from an emergency procedure for acute ischemic stroke.
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Better than a hologram: Research produces 3-D images floating in 'thin air'In the original Star Wars film, R2D2 projects an image of Princess Leia in distress. The iconic scene includes the line still famous 40 years later: 'Help me Obi Wan Kenobi, you're my only hope.'BYU electrical and computer engineering professor and holography expert Daniel Smalley has long had a goal to create the same type of 3-D image projection. In a paper published this week in Nature, Smalley
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Will supplements help your workout or diet routine?The new year is a time to set new goals, and for many people this means losing weight and improving fitness. Many people may turn to dietary supplements for a boost to their routines. To help cut the confusion, the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the National Institutes of Health has two new resources to help people understand what is known about the effectiveness and safety of many ingredi
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NY decrees net neutrality for web firms with state contractsNew York state will require internet providers to observe net neutrality or risk losing eligibility for state contracts under an executive order issued Wednesday by Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Federal safety board is investigating Tesla freeway crashThe U.S. National Transportation Safety Board is investigating the California crash of a Tesla Model S electric car that may have been operating under its semi-autonomous "Autopilot" system.
5h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Rise in severity of hottest days outpaces global average temperature increaseWhile our planet's average annual temperature has increased at a steady pace in recent decades, there has been an alarming jump in the severity of the hottest days of the year during that same period, with the most lethal effects in the world's largest cities.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
High-resolution imaging gives an unparalleled view of how fungi growMany fungus species grow through a process of vesicle secretion that can be applied in a biotechnology setting to make commercial or medical products. However, the details of this process are unclear. Researchers in Japan used a high-speed imaging technique to visualize hyphal growth in the fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Several new features were uncovered, including the discovery that different ves
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Coyotes and red foxes may coexist within urban landscapesCoyotes and red foxes may select different types of habitats for their home ranges, helping them to coexist in urban environments, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Zebrafish study hints at possible connection between autism and migraine medsExposure to a compound used to treat migraines and seizures causes characteristics associated with autism, groundbreaking research with zebrafish has demonstrated.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Predator control can have unintended consequencesIntroduced predators pose threats to biodiversity and are implicated in the extinction of many native species.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Optical biopsy tool detects disease in secondsA recent article reports how Resonance Raman spectroscopy, a tool previously used to provide molecular information in science, is now being used in medicine and biomedicine to provide an optical biopsy that offers more detailed, faster detection.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Lyosomes and mitochondria chat each other up in cellScientists have discovered that two key cellular structures, called mitochondria and lysosomes, come into direct contact with each other in the cell to regulate their respective functions. This rare discovery has implications for the research of many diseases, including Parkinson's and cancer, as well as for the understanding of normal aging.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Breakthrough could lead to better antipsychotic drugsAlthough antipsychotic drugs are among the most widely prescribed medications, individuals with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and autism-spectrum disorders often experience severe side effects because the drugs interact with dozens of other brain receptors. Now, scientists have solved the first high-resolution crystal structure of the dopamine 2 receptor (DRD2) bound to the antipsychotic drug ri
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First complete genome assembly of planarian flatworm reveals treasure trove on function and evolution of genesThe planarian flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea is an extraordinary animal. Even when cut into tiny pieces, each piece can regenerate back into a complete and perfectly proportioned miniature planarian. Key to this ability are fascinating adult stem cells, a single one of which can restore a complete worm. But how Schmidtea mediterranea achieves these feats is so far poorly understood. An important
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Eating insects might seem yucky, but they are nutritious and there is no reason you can'tAlmost all living primates still have working versions of the gene needed to produce a stomach enzyme that breaks down exoskeletons. This means that the 'yuck' factor when it comes to eating insects has nothing to do with nutrition, digestion or evolution.
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Science | The Guardian
SpaceX fires up its biggest rocket, paving way for a test flightElon Musk says Falcon Heavy, his company’s newest rocket, will launch ‘in a week or so’ after test at Kennedy Space Center SpaceX fired up its newest, biggest rocket in a critical launch pad test on Wednesday, advancing toward a long-anticipated test flight possibly in just a week. The Falcon Heavy briefly roared to life for the first time at Nasa’s Kennedy Space Center. All three boosters – 27 e
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Big cats in evolutionary arms race with prey: studyLions and cheetah are faster, stronger and no less agile than their prey, but zebras and impalas compensate with a surprising tactic, researchers said Wednesday: slow down, and keep the big cats guessing.
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Feed: All Latest
Exclusive: How Elton John's VR Retirement Announcement Hit Your HeadsetFrom his 1970 Troubadour shows to his work on The Lion King, the nearly six-minute retrospective is a result of some stunning technical wizardry.
5h
Live Science
If Your Cat Swats with Its Left Paw, It's Probably MaleCats have dominant paws (and will probably slap you with them).
5h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Brain-scan guided emergency stroke treatment can save more livesAdvances in brain imaging can identify a greater number of stroke patients who can receive therapy later than previously believed, according to a new study. The results of the Endovascular Therapy Following Imaging Evaluation for the Ischemic Stroke (DEFUSE 3) trial demonstrated that physically removing brain clots up to 16 hours after symptom onset in selected patients led to improved outcomes co
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new 'atmospheric disequilibrium' could help detect life on other planetsA new study has found a simple approach to look for life that might be more promising than just looking for oxygen.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Making milestones against non-small cell lung cancerProgress concerning lung cancer has been enormous in the past 20 years, according to a new review from researchers.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Earth's core and mantle separated in a disorderly fashionPlumes of hot rock surging upward from the Earth's mantle at volcanic hotspots contain evidence that the Earth's formative years may have been even more chaotic than previously thought, according to new work.
5h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Decoding the Axolotl genome: Insights into tissue regenerationThe sequencing of the largest genome to date lays the foundation for novel insights into tissue regeneration.
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Popular Science
There's still a piece of Canada stuck to AustraliaScience It's hot down here, eh? Researchers at Curtin University in Australia think this could help find out more about super old supercontinents.
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The Atlantic
Free Checking Is Basically a Thing of the PastIt’s getting harder and harder to avoid paying for one of the most basic and necessary banking services: a checking account. And that could make it even harder for low-income customers to access the services of mainstream banks. Just this week, Bank of America finished converting an unspecified number of customers still using its eBanking checking account to a different kind of checking account t
5h
Live Science
No Needles: Contact Lens Could Monitor Glucose for People with DiabetesMany people with diabetes need to prick their finger for a drop of blood up to eight times a day to monitor their glucose levels, an uncomfortable and cumbersome task. It can all add up to tens of thousands of finger pricks over a person's lifetime.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Lasers trace a new way to create hovering hologram-like imagesHovering 3-D images pave the way for futuristic displays that could be used for education or entertainment.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Nanoparticle vaccine offers universal protection against influenza A viruses, study findsResearchers have developed a universal vaccine to combat influenza A viruses that produces long-lasting immunity in mice and protects them against the limitations of seasonal flu vaccines, according to a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Blast, bubble and brain injuryResearchers have used supercomputers to simulate how bubbles caused by explosions may damage neurons in the brain. Using similar methods, the team reported how nanoparticles affect the fragility of ceramic materials used in space shuttles. They found that the conventional wisdom that nanoparticles improve material strength is not necessarily guaranteed.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Calculating the CO2 emissions of biofuels is not enoughA new EU regulation aims to shrink the environmental footprint of biofuels starting in 2021. But a scientist thinks we should go one step further and take into account all compounds produced at biorefineries, not just biofuel. And he has developed a model for doing just that.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brief exposure to charismatic career women inspires female students to pursue same fieldA simple, low-cost experiment to encourage women to enter the male-dominated field of economics was surprisingly effective, says an economist. Top female college students were inspired to pursue economics when exposed very briefly to charismatic, successful women in the field. The successful results suggest that exposing young women to an inspiring female role model could spark similar interventio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rise in severity of hottest days outpaces global average temperature increaseWhile our planet's average annual temperature has increased at a steady pace in recent decades, there has been an alarming jump in the severity of the hottest days of the year during that same period, with the most lethal effects in the world's largest cities.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study links gut-homing protein levels with HIV infection risk, disease progressionFor the first time, scientists have shown a relationship between the proportion of key immune cells that display high levels of a gut-homing protein called alpha-4 beta-7 at the time of HIV infection and health outcomes. Previous research illustrated this relationship in monkeys infected with a simian form of HIV.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Viral gene therapy could improve results from breast reconstruction after cancer treatmentA new treatment helps healthy tissue protect itself from radiotherapy damage.Viral therapy reduced damage to skin and underlying tissues in rats -- and improved their outcomes from treatment.A new type of gene therapy delivered using a virus could protect healthy tissues from the harmful side-effects of radiotherapy after cancer treatment, a new study reports.In the future, the treatment could be
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Racism linked to uptake of smoking in young peopleAdolescents who have experienced some form of racism between the ages of 11 and 23 are more likely to take up smoking than those who have not, according to a new study led by King's College London.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ultrathin needle can deliver drugs directly to the brainMIT researchers have devised a miniaturized system that can deliver tiny quantities of medicine to brain regions as small as 1 cubic millimeter. This type of targeted dosing could make it possible to treat diseases that affect very specific brain circuits without interfering with the normal function of the rest of the brain.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
'Smart' contact lenses monitor glucose levels in tearsA soft, flexible contact lens can monitor glucose levels in tears and deliver sensing results through the lens display, according to a new report, alerting the user if glucose levels are too high by turning off a tiny embedded LED light. The authors say their approach, tested in rabbits, is the first to apply the display pixel into a soft contact lens to visualize glucose sensing.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tracking down T cell targets to tamp down HIV infectionScientists have narrowed in on a group of gut-residing immune cells that might predispose women to increased HIV infection risk and more severe disease.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
High-res imaging gives an unparalleled view of how fungi growMany fungus species grow through a process of vesicle secretion that can be applied in a biotechnology setting to make commercial or medical products. However, the details of this process are unclear. Researchers at the University of Tsukuba (Japan) used a high-speed imaging technique to visualize hyphal growth in the fungus Aspergillus nidulans. Several new features were uncovered, including the
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Viral replication discovery could spur new broad-spectrum antiviralsScientists at the Morgridge Institute for Research have discovered a new Achilles heel in the replication process of positive-strand RNA viruses, a class responsible for health threats such as Zika, polio, chikungunya and hepatitis C.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new 'atmospheric disequilibrium' could help detect life on other planetsA new study has found a simple approach to look for life that might be more promising than just looking for oxygen.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Coyotes and red foxes may coexist within urban landscapesCoyotes and red foxes may select different types of habitats for their home ranges, helping them to coexist in urban environments, according to a study published Jan. 24, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Marcus A. Mueller from the University of Wisconsin, USA, and colleagues.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
tRNA fragments in mosquitos may play role in spreading diseasetRNA fragments -- small sections of transfer RNA molecules -- have recently been discovered to play active roles in the biology of diverse organisms. Now, these tRNA fragments (tRFs) have been found to have important functions in the mosquito Aedes aegypti, according to a new paper published this week in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Apple will give users control over slowdown of older iPhonesApple's next major update of its mobile software will include an option that will enable owners of older iPhones to turn off a feature that slows the device to prevent aging batteries from shutting down.
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New Scientist - News
Smart contact lens monitors sweetness of diabetics’ tearsThe contact lens measures glucose levels in tears and alerts the wearer to dangerous levels using a tiny light that looks like a speck of glitter
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New Scientist - News
First monkeys, and then us? Human cloning must stay off limitsHuman Monkeys Hua HuaThe ability to clone monkeys will rekindle speculation about doing the same with humans. There are many reasons to oppose it, says Marcy Darnovsky
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists study optical biopsy tool that detects disease in secondsToday, it is standard practice to detect many diseases through MRIs, PETs, X-rays, or CAT scans. But all of these medical imaging methods include some risk of radiation and take hours - if not days - to get results. Most importantly, the level of information they provide is lacking because it is not at the molecular level.
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The Atlantic
Waco Skims a Very American TragedyThe story of the siege in Waco, Texas, in 1993 is such a fundamentally American one—such a charged and tragic conflict between dogmatic believers and overbearing authorities—that it’s hard to grasp how it hasn’t been dramatized into a television series before. It’s a tale of men bearing arms, of charismatic and damaged hucksters, of lost souls putting their faith in a man who promised them both j
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new 'atmospheric disequilibrium' could help detect life on other planetsAs NASA's James Webb Space Telescope and other new giant telescopes come online they will need novel strategies to look for evidence of life on other planets. A University of Washington study has found a simple approach to look for life that might be more promising than just looking for oxygen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Coyotes and red foxes may coexist within urban landscapesCoyotes and red foxes may select different types of habitats for their home ranges, helping them to coexist in urban environments, according to a study published January 24, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Marcus A. Mueller from the University of Wisconsin, USA, and colleagues.
6h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
High-resolution imaging gives an unparalleled view of how fungi growFungi are a diverse group of organisms that are ever-present in daily life; from the yeast used to ferment beer and the mushrooms at the supermarket to the pathogen responsible for athlete's foot. Many species of fungus grow by secreting enzymes-a process that can be co-opted as a biotechnology to make industrial and medical products.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Human brains rounded into shape over 200,000 years or moreAncient humans’ brains slowly but surely became round, scientists say.
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Scientific American Content: Global
A New Recipe for Hunting Alien LifeFor most life in the universe, oxygen might be a deadly poison. Surprisingly, that might make such creatures easier for astrobiologists to find -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
CCNY IUSL scientists study optical biopsy tool that detects disease in secondsA recent IUSL paper published in the Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology reports how Resonance Raman spectroscopy, a tool previously used to provide molecular information in science, is now being used in medicine and biomedicine to provide an optical biopsy that offers more detailed, faster detection.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new theory on reducing cardiovascular disease risk in binge drinkersA new study shows that binge drinkers have increased levels of a biomarker molecule -- microRNA-21 -- that may contribute to poor vascular function.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Genetic lung disease's molecular roots identifiedPeople with the rare genetic disease primary ciliary dyskinesia suffer repeated lung infections because they lack functional cilia, hairlike structures that sweep mucus through the airways. Most people have errors in the molecular motor that powers the cilia. But some have errors in non-motor proteins. Now, researchers report that mutated non-motor proteins cause disease by assembling the motor in
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Endangered woodpeckers persist, but still struggle, on private landThe US Fish and Wildlife Service's Safe Harbor was established to encourage private landowners to take steps to benefit endangered Red-cockaded Woodpeckers on their land. The program has reduced conflict over conservation and the abandonment of nest clusters, but a new study shows that while the program may have raised landowners' awareness of and tolerance for their feathered neighbors, it has la
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Fat cat? Here's how much to feed to lose weightDoes your cat lay around all day, only getting up to eat and visit the litter box? Chances are, he's overweight. Maybe you've switched to the 'diet' cat food or tried feeding him less, but you might have noticed it's not easy to get that weight off. A new study explains what it takes to get kitty to slim down.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Engineers develop flexible, water-repellent graphene circuits for washable electronicsNanoengineers are finding new ways to use graphene printing technology. A new research paper describes how they're treating printed graphene with lasers to create electronic circuits that repel water. That could lead to washable electronics and better biological sensors.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New biosensor could monitor glucose levels in tears and sweatConstantly tracking a person's glucose levels through their tears or sweat could be one step closer to providing people with diabetes an improved monitoring tool. Researchers report the development of an ultra-thin, flexible sensor that could be incorporated into contact lenses or on the backs of watches for real-time glucose tracking.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Advances in lasers get to the long and short of itSince lasers were first developed, the demand for more adaptable lasers has only increased. Chiral nematic liquid crystals (CLCs) are an emerging class of lasing devices that are poised to shape how lasers are used in the future because of their low thresholds, ease of fabrication, and ability to be tuned across wider swaths of the electromagnetic spectrum. New work on how to select band-edge mode
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New 'big-armed fly' species named after former California governor Arnold SchwarzeneggerA new fly species with bulging forelegs is named after former California governor and famous bodybuilder and actor Arnold Schwarzenegger. Measuring 0.395 mm in body length, it is also now the smallest known fly.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Study provides new guidelines for assessing severity of head and neck cancersResearchers have developed a new, more accurate set of guidelines for assessing the severity of head and neck cancers and predicting patient survival. The new guidelines center around counting the number of malignant lymph nodes found in each patient.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Using wild rice to predict health of Minnesota lakes and streamsBy studying wild rice in lakes and streams, a team of researchers has discovered that sulfate in waterways is converted into toxic levels of sulfide and increases other harmful elements. This includes methylmercury, the only form of mercury that contaminates fish.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Air pollution may shorten telomeres in newborns -- a sign of increased health risksA study conducted before and after the 2004 closure of a coal-burning power plant in Tongliang, China, found children born before the closure had shorter telomeres than those conceived and born after the plant stopped polluting the air.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
All the buzz: Bigger honeybee colonies have quieter combsWhen honeybee colonies get larger, common sense suggests it would be noisier with more bees buzzing around. But a study now reports that bigger honeybee colonies actually have quieter combs than smaller ones.
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Live Science
Monkeys Have Been Cloned, Paving the Way for Human CloningFor the first time, scientists have cloned non-human primates.
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The Atlantic
All Systems Go for SpaceX's Falcon HeavyElon Musk TeslaA roar pierced the air at Cape Canaveral in Florida for a few seconds Wednesday. The sound was the cry of the engines on the Falcon Heavy, a massive launch vehicle developed by Elon Musk’s SpaceX. The Heavy had been hauled to the launchpad at Kennedy Space Center for a brief but crucial test that will determine whether the rocket is ready for its maiden flight, which Musk has said will take place
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Science | The Guardian
Questioning AI: does artificial intelligence need an off switch? - Science Weekly podcastOur final mini-series episode asks what impact might AI have on society – and who decides when to turn it off? Subscribe and review on Apple Podcasts , Soundcloud , Audioboom , Mixcloud and Acast , and join the discussion on Facebook and Twitter In 1997, Garry Kasparov famously lost his rematch with IBM’s Deep Blue, marking the first time a reigning world champion had been defeated by a program u
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Big Think
Facebook introduces the flick, a new unit of timeFacebook News CompanyFacebook announces a new unit of time called the “flick” that simplifies the creation of VR content. Read More
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Predator control can have unintended consequencesIntroduced predators pose threats to biodiversity and are implicated in the extinction of many native species. A new Mammal Review analysis of published studies highlights unintended outcomes of predator control programs that are implemented to mitigate these effects.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA GOLD Mission to image Earth's interface to spaceOn Jan. 25, 2018, NASA launches Global-scale Observations of the Limb and Disk, or GOLD, a hosted payload aboard SES-14, a commercial communications satellite. GOLD will investigate the dynamic intermingling of space and Earth's uppermost atmosphere—and is the first NASA science mission to fly an instrument as a commercially hosted payload.
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The Guardian's Science Weekly
Questioning AI: does artificial intelligence need an off switch? - Science Weekly podcastOur final mini-series episode asks what impact might AI have on society – and who decides when to turn it off?
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New Scientist - News
YouTube’s bots aren’t protecting kids from all its nasty videosYouTube has become the top source of videos for kids of all ages, but without transparency on its algorithms, it is hard for parents to trust
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New Scientist - News
3D ‘holograms’ made with lasers by moving one particle at a timeBy moving a single particle with an invisible laser beam, we can create three-dimensional images like the holograms in sci-fi movies that float in thin air
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New Scientist - News
Scientists have cloned monkeys and it could help treat cancerHuman Monkeys Hua HuaMeet the first of a possible army of cloned monkeys that could treat many diseases, but is this a step to human cloning, and will anyone but China accept them?
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New Scientist - News
The origin of insect wings has been revealed by gene editingWings have helped insects to dominate the skies for 400 million years, and now CRISPR is revealing exactly how the first wings evolved
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google Lunar X Prize competition ends without a winnerMillions of dollars offered in the Google Lunar X Prize competition will go unclaimed despite a decade of work.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Philippines braces for long emergency as volcano eruptsAn erupting Philippine volcano belched red-hot lava and clouds of ash and debris at least four times Wednesday, prompting the number of displaced villagers to swell to more than 74,000 and causing officials to brace for a humanitarian emergency they fear could last for months.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Predator control can have unintended consequencesIntroduced predators pose threats to biodiversity and are implicated in the extinction of many native species.
6h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
NASA GOLD Mission to image Earth's interface to spaceOn Jan. 25, 2018, NASA launches Global-scale Observations of the Limb and Disk, or GOLD, a hosted instrument aboard SES-14 that will inspect the dynamic intermingling of space and Earth's uppermost atmosphere.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
SpaceX fires engines on big new rocket in launch pad testSpaceX has fired up its newest, biggest rocket in a critical launch pad test.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Disco nights? Rocket Lab launches glinting sphere into orbitLook into the night sky at the right time and you might see what amounts to a giant disco ball shimmering and glinting back.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
What would happen if the Earth were actually flat?Welcome to the new year, 2018. The Earth has yet again made a revolution about the sun. But not so fast. If you subscribe to the idea of a flat Earth, then you'd believe that no such thing happened, because the sun rotates in a circle around the sky.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Don't automate the fun out of lifeImagine you are about to go on vacation. You have been looking forward to it for some time. But your robotic personal assistant has other ideas. It calmly explains to you that it will be cheaper, safer and more efficient for it to take your place on the holiday trip.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Positive attitude toward math predicts math achievement in kidsFor the first time, scientists have identified the brain pathway that links a positive attitude toward math to achievement in the subject. In a study of elementary school students, researchers found that having a positive attitude about math was connected to better function of the hippocampus, an important memory center in the brain, during performance of arithmetic problems.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New type of virus found in the oceanResearchers have identified a new type of virus that is abundant in the world's oceans but has escaped detection until now. The unusual characteristics of these bacteria-killing viruses could lead to evolutionary insights, the researchers report in a new study.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rare type of stroke increasing among pregnant womenStrokes caused by various reasons including a ruptured vessel on the brain's surface are increasingly being recognized among pregnant women. African-American women and those age 20-29 had the highest proportion of this rare stroke known as spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Augmented and virtual reality will involve human senses in verifying the operations of information systemsMany new applications aim to make information systems and machines identify their users and take their individual needs and emotions into account.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Artificial sweetener could someday provide cancer treatments with fewer side effectsArtificial sweeteners are used in diet drinks and foods but also could someday be used as treatments targeting carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), a protein associated with aggressive cancers. Although several drugs have been approved that target similar forms of CA, they aren't selective and may cause side effects, including vomiting and fatigue. Now researchers report that an artificial sweetener cou
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Pearly material for bendable heating elementsThe iridescent shimmer of a string of pearls may one day be more than pretty adornment. Scientists now report a hybrid material consisting of imitation pearl combined with silver nanowires that works as a heater, with the added benefit of high flexibility, suggesting a potential role in wearable devices.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Ultralow power consumption for data recordingResearchers have made a discovery that could see a drastic reduction in power consumption for data recording.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Optimizing recycling of scrap car parts yields big savingsDetailed sorting of scrap car parts could boost recycling rates to over 97 percent, saving billions and slashing greenhouse gas emissions.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Unexpected helpers in wound healingNerve cells in the skin help wounds to heal. When an injury occurs, cells known as glial cells change into repair cells and disseminate into the wound, where they help the skin to regenerate, researchers have shown.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Vitamin C in the body can be tracked by fluorescenceA Japanese research team bio-imaged vitamin C in mice. A probe chemical emitted red fluorescent light after reacting with vitamin C in the mice's bloodstream. When a dose of exogenous vitamin C was injected, it accumulated in vital organs. This is the first bioimaging of vitamin C in living tissue, showing high sensitivity and good selectivity, paving the way toward the use of this vitamin to trea
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Solid-state lighting: Scientists reveal the fundamental limitation in key materialResearchers have revealed the core mechanism that limits the indium content in indium gallium nitride thin films -- the key material for blue light emitting diodes (LEDs).
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Chasing dark matter with oldest stars in the Milky WayJust how quickly is the dark matter near Earth zipping around? The speed of dark matter has far-reaching consequences for modern astrophysical research, but this fundamental property has eluded researchers for years. Researchers have now provided the first clue: The solution to this mystery, it turns out, lies among some of the oldest stars in the galaxy.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Is species richness increasing? Insight into an intense ecological debateScientists are debating whether and why it appears that the number of species at sites worldwide is holding steady (even increasing at many), as biodiversity declines globally.
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The Scientist RSS
Cellular Senescence in Astrocytes May Play Central Role in Parkinsons DiseaseThe elimination of these glia in the mouse brain ameliorated the development of Parkinsonian neuropathologies induced by the pesticide toxin paraquat.
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NYT > Science
This Robot Can Walk and Swim — Inside YouA tiny robot with moves inspired by caterpillars and jellyfish is small enough to crawl, walk and swim inside the human body.
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NYT > Science
ScienceTake: This Tiny Robot Walks, Crawls, Jumps and Swims. But It Is Not Alive.Researchers have created a tiny robot, small enough to navigate a stomach or urinary system, that one day may be used to deliver drugs inside the body.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Ursula K. Le Guin, Influential Science Fiction Writer, Dies at 88The prolific author leaves behind a rich, genre-spanning legacy -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Memory remains elusive, but the search continuesActing Editor in Chief Elizabeth Quill explores the history of memory and scientists' search for its physical trace in our brains.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Readers wonder about the universe's expansion and moreReaders had questions about the universe's accelerating expansion, a hidden void in the Great Pyramid of Giza and what happens to human waste in space.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Baby macaques are the first primates to be cloned like Dolly the SheepScientists have cloned two baby macaque monkeys with the same technique used to clone Dolly. The research could help advance the cloning of other species.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
How to escape from a lion or cheetah - the scienceScientists work out how prey can escape much faster predators when hunting in the African savannah.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Donald Trump's 'hatred of sharks' benefits conservation charitiesShark conservationists see donations rise after claims the US president hates the animals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Better than holograms: A new 3-D projection into thin airOne of the enduring sci-fi moments of the big screen—R2-D2 beaming a 3-D image of Princess Leia into thin air in "Star Wars"—is closer to reality thanks to the smallest of screens: dust-like particles.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Pictures in the Air: 3-D Printing with LightSuspended in midair like science fiction holograms, a new technology can create high-resolution 3-D light displays. Nature Video finds out how it works. This video was reproduced with permission and... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Record jump in 2014-2016 global temperatures largest since 1900Global surface temperatures surged by a record amount from 2014 to 2016, boosting the total amount of warming since the start of the last century by more than 25 percent in just three years, according to new University of Arizona-led research.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Zebrafish study provides new insights into autism spectrum disorder researchExposure to a compound used to treat migraines and seizures causes characteristics associated with autism, groundbreaking research with zebrafish has demonstrated.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New sensor for measuring electric field strengthStandard Sensors for measuring electrical fields have one big problem: they usually distort the electric field they are supposed to measure. The problem gets worse if the sensor has to be grounded to provide a reference point. The new sensor developed in Vienna works in a different way. Two tiny silicon structures are displaced relative to each other, their movement is measured with light.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Decoding the axolotl genomeThe sequencing of the largest genome to date lays the foundation for novel insights into tissue regeneration.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new genome for regeneration researchThe first complete genome assembly of planarian flatworm reveals a treasure trove on the function and evolution of genes.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Earth's core and mantle separated in a disorderly fashionPlumes of hot rock surging upward from the Earth's mantle at volcanic hotspots contain evidence that the Earth's formative years may have been even more chaotic than previously thought, according to new work from a team of Carnegie and Smithsonian scientists published in Nature.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New type of virus found in the oceanResearchers at MIT and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine have identified a new type of virus that is abundant in the world's oceans but has escaped detection until now. The unusual characteristics of these bacteria-killing viruses could lead to evolutionary insights, the researchers report in a new study.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientific breakthrough could lead to better antipsychotic drugs'If we want to create better medications, the first step is to see what the D2 receptor looks like in high-resolution detail when it's bound tightly to a drug,' said senior author Bryan L. Roth, M.D., Ph.D., at the UNC School of Medicine. 'We now have the structure, and we're exploring it to find new compounds we hope can help the millions of people in need of better treatments.'
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Making milestones against non-small cell lung cancerProgress concerning Lung cancer has been enormous in the past 20 years, according to a new review from researchers at Yale Cancer Center.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Previously unknown ocean virus family may also populate the human gutA newly discovered family of viruses appears to play a major role in killing marine bacteria and maintaining the ocean's ecology. Preliminary evidence suggests that related bacterial viruses also occur in the human gut. The study, by researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), was published online today in the journal Nature.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Lyosomes and mitochondria chat each other up in cellNorthwestern Medicine scientists have discovered that two key cellular structures, called mitochondria and lysosomes, come into direct contact with each other in the cell to regulate their respective functions. This rare discovery has implications for the research of many diseases, including Parkinson's and cancer, as well as for the understanding of normal aging.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Third of households -- double previous estimates -- struggle to get food, Ohio study findsThe struggle to get enough nutritious food could be far worse than previously understood, according to a new study examining the intersection between hunger and the types of foods found at nearby stores.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
People with tetraplegia gain rapid use of brain-computer interfaceA new approach to calibrating the pioneering BrainGate brain-computer interface allowed three clinical trial participants with tetraplegia to gain control of a computer cursor after just one simple calibration step.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
For global invasion, Argentine ants use chemical weaponsResearchers show how Argentine ants use chemical secretions as weapons in their interactions with harvester ants, which are native to California. The findings could help in the development of new pest control strategies.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Fat cat? Here's how much to feed to lose weightDoes your cat lay around all day, only getting up to eat and visit the litter box? Chances are, he's overweight. Maybe you've switched to the "diet" cat food or tried feeding him less, but you might have noticed it's not easy to get that weight off. A new study from the University of Illinois explains what it takes to get kitty to slim down.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mathematicians develop model for how new ideas emergeResearchers from Queen Mary University of London have developed a mathematical model for the emergence of innovations.
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The Atlantic
This Is Us: When Death Becomes a TeaseThis post contains spoilers through Season 2, Episode 13 of This Is Us . Early on in the life of This Is Us , the show’s writers and other creators made a key narrative decision: to make Jack Pearson’s death its central mystery, the core question around which so many of its other questions would revolve. Week after week, as a result, audiences have braced themselves not just for cathartic feels—a
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SpaceX Test Fires Its Falcon Heavy Rocket for the First TimeElon Musk’s personal Tesla Roadster was perched on top the triple-booster rocket as its 27 Merlin engines roared to life.
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Science | The Guardian
'Floating 3D printing' brings sci-fi-style projections closer‘Optical trap display’ projects graphics into the air, where they are visible from all angles We still don’t have flying cars, brain-computer interfaces, or an artificial intelligence (AI) you can hold a conversation with, but one classic science-fiction technology is on our doorstep: true 3D displays which are capable of projecting an image into “thin air”. A new paper in the journal Nature repo
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Many stroke survivors don't receive timely rehabWhether they are referred to home-based or outpatient rehabilitation after hospital discharge, many stroke patients don't receive rehabilitation services, according to preliminary research presented at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2018, a world premier meeting dedicated to the science and treatment of cerebrovascular disease for researchers and clinicians.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers use simulations to study brain damage from bomb blasts and materials for space shuttlesExplosions produce unique patterns of injury seldom seen outside combat. They have the potential to cause life-threatening injuries and take a particular toll on the brain.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Decoding the Axolotl genomeA team of researchers led by scientists in Vienna, Dresden and Heidelberg has decoded the entire genetic information of the Mexican salamander axolotl. The axolotl genome, which is the largest genome ever to be sequenced, will be a powerful tool to study the molecular basis for regrowing limbs and other forms of regeneration.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New type of virus found in the oceanA type of virus that dominates water samples taken from the world's oceans has long escaped analysis because it has characteristics that standard tests can't detect. However, researchers at MIT and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine have now managed to isolate and study representatives of these elusive viruses, which provide a key missing link in virus evolution and play an important role in
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Earth's core and mantle separated in a disorderly fashionPlumes of hot rock surging upward from the Earth's mantle at volcanic hotspots contain evidence that the Earth's formative years may have been even more chaotic than previously thought, according to new work from a team of Carnegie and Smithsonian scientists published in Nature.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research revealed the first-ever crystal structure of the dopamine 2 receptor bound to an antipsychotic drugAlthough antipsychotic drugs are among the most widely prescribed medications, individuals with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and autism-spectrum disorders often experience severe side effects because the drugs interact with dozens of other brain receptors. Now, scientists at the UNC School of Medicine and UC San Francisco (UCSF) have solved the first high-resolution crystal structure of the dop
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lyosomes and mitochondria chat each other up in cellNorthwestern Medicine scientists have discovered that two key cellular structures, called mitochondria and lysosomes, come into direct contact with each other in the cell to regulate their respective functions. This rare discovery has implications for the research of many diseases, including Parkinson's and cancer, as well as for the understanding of normal aging.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
First complete genome assembly of planarian flatworm reveals treasure trove on the function and evolution of genesThe planarian flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea is an extraordinary animal. Even when cut into tiny pieces, each piece can regenerate back into a complete and perfectly proportioned miniature planarian. Key to this ability are fascinating adult stem cells, a single one of which can restore a complete worm. But how Schmidtea mediterranea achieves these feats is so far poorly understood. An important
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BBC News - Science & Environment
Falcon Heavy: Big SpaceX rocket lights 27 enginesFalcon Heavy SpaceXUS firm SpaceX conducts a key test ahead of the debut flight of its new rocket - the Falcon Heavy.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Ex-Prize: Google's $30 Million Moon Race Ends with No WinnerAfter more than a decade of activity, the Google Lunar X Prize is concluding—but the race to the moon continues -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tidal cycles could help predict volcanic eruptions, study suggestsJust before a surprise eruption of New Zealand's Ruapehu volcano in 2007, seismic tremor near its crater became tightly correlated with twice-monthly changes in the strength of tidal forces, a new study has found. The research, published in the journal Scientific Reports, suggests that signals associated with tidal cycles could potentially provide advanced warning of certain types of volcanic erup
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Working in female-dominated workplaces means worse access to flexible working arrangementsWorkers in female-dominated workplaces have worse access to flexible working arrangements than those in gender-neutral and even male-dominated workplaces, new research from the University of Kent has found.
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The Atlantic
It's the Year of the Auteur at the 2018 OscarsAfter every Oscar-nomination morning, pundits scour the list for important milestones and bit of trivia. Sometimes the landmarks or patterns are obvious, like the slate of all-white acting nominees in 2015 and 2016 that drove the #OscarsSoWhite protest and a serious effort to reform the Academy’s voter body. Among this year’s honorees, though, a more unusual (and encouraging) statistic emerged: T
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The Atlantic
I Got Hypnotized Over Skype and It Actually WorkedWhenever a friend tells me they’re considering undergoing hypnosis to quit X bad habit (and in Brooklyn I hear it a lot), I think about the hypnotist my college hired at the beginning of every year to humiliate my classmates in front of each other. It was the high point of every homecoming: A guy wearing a Britney Spears–style hands-free microphone would invite a few of the bravest and most annoy
7h
Live Science
Interstellar Influenza? Space Viruses Could Reveal Alien LifeYou probably think about viruses only when you're sick, but there's a group of microbiologists who want to change that. In fact, they want you to consider the possibility that viruses may be found in space.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Meet Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua, the first monkey clones produced by method that made DollyHuman Monkeys Hua HuaThe first primate clones made by somatic cell nuclear transfer are two genetically identical long-tailed macaques have recently been born. Researchers named the newborns Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua after the Chinese adjective 'Zhonghua,' which means Chinese nation or people. The technical milestone makes it a realistic possibility for labs to conduct research with customizable populations of genetical
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Record jump in 2014-2016 global temperatures largest since 1900Global surface temperatures surged by a record amount from 2014 to 2016, boosting the total amount of warming since the start of the last century by more than 25 percent in just three years, according to a new University of Arizona-led paper. The research is the first to quantify the record temperature spike of an additional 0.43 degrees F (0.24 C) in just three years and to identify the fundament
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Could underwater sound waves be the key to early tsunami warnings?Mathematicians have devised a way of calculating the size of a tsunami and its destructive force well in advance of it making landfall by measuring fast-moving underwater sound waves, opening up the possibility of a real-time early warning system.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Weather patterns, farm income, other factors, may be influencing opioid crisisThe overprescribing of opioid-based painkillers may be the main driver of the increased abuse of opioids in rural America, but economists say that other factors, including declining farm income, extreme weather and other natural disasters, may affect a crisis that is killing thousands of citizens and costing the country billions of dollars.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mathematicians develop model for how new ideas emergeResearchers have developed a mathematical model for the emergence of innovations.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Working in female-dominated workplaces means worse access to flexible working arrangementsWorkers in female-dominated workplaces have worse access to flexible working arrangements than those in gender-neutral and even male-dominated workplaces, new research has found.
7h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Implantable medical devices bolstered by next-gen surface modificationA new discovery could underpin a new class of implantable devices that provide biological signals to surrounding tissue for better integration with the body and reduced risk of infection. The team has developed low-cost, practical techniques to guide and attach peptides to surfaces. Medicine increasingly relies on biomedical devices but their effectiveness is often limited because of unsuccessful
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New sensor for measuring electric field strengthScientists have developed a sensor for measuring the strength of electric fields, which is much smaller, simpler and less prone to distortion than comparable devices.
7h
Scientific American Content: Global
Science Suffers from HarassmentA leading organization has said that sexual harassment is scientific misconduct. Where are the others? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study finds a third of households—double previous estimates—struggle to get foodThe struggle to get enough nutritious food could be far worse than previously understood, according to a new study examining the intersection between hunger and the types of foods found at nearby stores.
7h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
State of US science enterprise report shows US leads in S&E as China rapidly advancesAccording to the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Science and Engineering Indicators2018 report released today, the United States is the global leader in science and technology (S&T). However, the U.S. global share of S&T activities is declining as other nations—especially China—continue to rise.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Fat cat? Here's how much to feed to lose weightDoes your cat lay around all day, only getting up to eat and visit the litter box? Chances are, he's overweight. Maybe you've switched to the 'diet' cat food or tried feeding him less, but you might have noticed it's not easy to get that weight off. A new study from the University of Illinois explains what it takes to get kitty to slim down.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Eating insects might seem yucky, but they are nutritious and there is no reason you can'tAlmost all living primates still have working versions of the gene needed to produce a stomach enzyme that breaks down exoskeletons. This means that the 'yuck' factor when it comes to eating insects has nothing to do with nutrition, digestion or evolution.
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Blast, bubble and brain injuryResearchers from the University of Texas at Arlington used supercomputers at the Texas Advanced Computing Center to simulate how bubbles caused by explosions may damage neurons in the brain. Using similar methods, the team reported in the Journal of the American Ceramic Society how nanoparticles affect the fragility of ceramic materials used in space shuttles. They found that the conventional wisd
7h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Record jump in 2014-2016 global temperatures largest since 1900Global surface temperatures surged by a record amount from 2014 to 2016, boosting the total amount of warming since the start of the last century by more than 25 percent in just three years, according to a new University of Arizona-led paper. The research is the first to quantify the record temperature spike of an additional 0.43 degrees F (0.24 C) in just three years and to identify the fundament
7h
Ingeniøren
Endnu værre end frygtet: Salg af vaccineproduktion kostede statskassen ca. 1,5 milliarderRigsrevisionen retter hård kritik af Sundhedsministeriet for at fumle gevaldigt med salget af Statens Serum Instituts vaccineproduktion. Det endte som en økonomisk katastrofe for staten.
7h
The Atlantic
At Amazon's New Checkout-Free Store, Shopping Feels Like ShopliftingSEATTLE—I entered Amazon Go, the company’s checkout-less convenience store in Seattle, at 10:23 a.m. Monday and spent precisely 11 minutes and 59 seconds browsing before I walked out with a sandwich and a yogurt cup. This information was available because the moment I scanned a personalized QR code at the store’s subway-style gate, myriad cameras on the ceiling started tracking me. Every time I p
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Pearly material for bendable heating elementsThe iridescent shimmer of a string of pearls may one day be more than pretty adornment. Scientists now report in ACS Applied Nano Materials a hybrid material consisting of imitation pearl combined with silver nanowires that works as a heater, with the added benefit of high flexibility, suggesting a potential role in wearable devices.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Targeting bladder cancer's Achilles heel: Stem cellsTwo different proteins work separately as well as synergistically to feed a small pool of stem cells that help bladder cancer resist chemotherapy, research suggests. The finding could lead to new targets to fight this deadly disease and potentially other cancers as well.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Brittle stars may 'see' with their skinScientists have discovered the first evidence that brittle stars living in vibrant coral reefs use thousands of light sensors to navigate their way through their complex environments.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Energy drink use in teens has adverse effectsNew research shows why many teenagers consume energy drinks, how often, the age they started and what influences their choice of brands.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Imagining a successful future can help students overcome everyday difficultiesHaving a clear picture in mind of what their future will look like can motivate students to keep going despite the challenges of college life. This strategy seems to be particularly effective for female students from relatively low socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Adipose tissue depots compromise heart healthResearchers have shown that the release of fatty acids from body fat has a major impact on heart health. By interfering with the body's lipid metabolism, the researchers successfully reduced the risk of heart failure.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
How wind turbines annoy residents and how to reduce itWhen falling asleep, relaxing or undertaking recreational activities, nearly a third of residents living near a wind farm are not at all annoyed or only slightly annoyed by the noise of wind turbines. One in ten people experience symptoms of stress. However, noise is not the only problem. In particular, a critical attitude towards a wind farm stimulates the experience of stress. A better informati
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iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Florian Engert (Harvard) 3: Neural circuits governing operant conditioningFlorian Engert and his lab can measure neuronal activity in the whole brains of live, awake zebrafish larvae allowing them to link neuronal activity with behavior and learning. https://www.ibiology.org/neuroscience/neuronal-activity/ Talk Overview: How does the brain translate sensory stimuli into a behavior? In his first iBiology talk, Dr. Florian Engert explains that larval zebrafish are an exc
8h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Florian Engert (Harvard) 2: Gain control: neuronal activity & behavior in virtual environmentsFlorian Engert and his lab can measure neuronal activity in the whole brains of live, awake zebrafish larvae allowing them to link neuronal activity with behavior and learning. https://www.ibiology.org/neuroscience/neuronal-activity/ Talk Overview: How does the brain translate sensory stimuli into a behavior? In his first iBiology talk, Dr. Florian Engert explains that larval zebrafish are an exc
8h
iBiology (uploads) on YouTube
Florian Engert (Harvard) 1: Fish in the matrix: neuronal activity & behavior in virtual environmentsFlorian Engert and his lab can measure neuronal activity in the whole brains of live, awake zebrafish larvae allowing them to link neuronal activity with behavior and learning. https://www.ibiology.org/neuroscience/neuronal-activity/ Talk Overview: How does the brain translate sensory stimuli into a behavior? In his first iBiology talk, Dr. Florian Engert explains that larval zebrafish are an exc
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mathematicians develop model for how new ideas emergeResearchers from Queen Mary University of London have developed a mathematical model for the emergence of innovations.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Changes to nursing home quality ratings system caused consumers to choose better providersHealth care report cards and quality ratings are intended to give consumers more information when choosing a care provider like a hospital or nursing home. Health economist Marcelo Perraillon of the Colorado School of Public Health at CU Anschutz evaluated whether a simplified rating system used by the website Nursing Home Compare motivated consumers to choose better-rated nursing homes.It has bee
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Positive attitude toward math predicts math achievement in kids, Stanford study findsFor the first time, scientists have identified the brain pathway that links a positive attitude toward math to achievement in the subject. In a study of elementary school students, researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine found that having a positive attitude about math was connected to better function of the hippocampus, an important memory center in the brain, during performance
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
People with tetraplegia gain rapid use of brain-computer interfaceA new approach to calibrating the pioneering BrainGate brain-computer interface allowed three clinical trial participants with tetraplegia to gain control of a computer cursor after just one simple calibration step.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Meet Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua, the first monkey clones produced by method that made DollyThe first primate clones made by somatic cell nuclear transfer are two genetically identical long-tailed macaques born recently at the Chinese Academy of Sciences Institute of Neuroscience in Shanghai. Researchers named the newborns Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua after the Chinese adjective 'Zhonghua,' which means Chinese nation or people. The technical milestone, presented in the journal Cell, makes it
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rare type of stroke increasing among pregnant womenStrokes caused by various reasons including a ruptured vessel on the brain's surface are increasingly being recognized among pregnant women.African-American women and those age 20-29 had the highest proportion of this rare stroke known as spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New biosensor could monitor glucose levels in tears and sweatConstantly tracking a person's glucose levels through their tears or sweat could be one step closer to providing people with diabetes an improved monitoring tool. Researchers report in the journal ACS Nano the development of an ultra-thin, flexible sensor that could be incorporated into contact lenses or on the backs of watches for real-time glucose tracking.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Lab-grown horns and tusks could stop poaching—or notScientists are making mimics of rhino horns and elephant tusks, hoping to drive down the prices of these items on the black market and discourage poaching. But many conservation groups argue that it could have the opposite effect, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
First monkey clones created in Chinese laboratoryHuman Monkeys Hua HuaTwo monkeys cloned using the 'Dolly the sheep' technique could bring the world a step closer to human cloning.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
'Disco ball' put into space from NZUS start-up Rocket Lab says its recent launch put a reflective sphere in orbit.
8h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Artificial sweetener could someday provide cancer treatments with fewer side effectsArtificial sweeteners are used in diet drinks and foods but also could someday be used as treatments targeting carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), a protein associated with aggressive cancers. Although several drugs have been approved that target similar forms of CA, they aren't selective and may cause side effects, including vomiting and fatigue. Now researchers report in ACS' Journal of Medicinal Che
8h
The Atlantic
Chinese Scientists Have Successfully Cloned MonkeysDolly Cloning ChineseSHANGHAI—For the past decade, Mu-Ming Poo , the director of the Institute of Neuroscience in Shanghai, has been on a quest to make monkeys that can be used to study human disease. Today, researchers in his institute announced a major milestone: the births of Zhongzhong and Huahua, the first two monkey clones created using the same technique behind Dolly the sheep. Their names together form “Zhong
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Science | The Guardian
Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua: first primates born using Dolly the sheep cloning methodCloning of macaque monkeys a breakthrough, but researchers insist work will not be extended to humans Two baby macaque monkeys have become the first primate clones to be produced using the same approach that gave rise to Dolly the sheep , researchers have revealed. Big eyed, fuzzy-furred and spindly-limbed, the macaques have been named Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua. Zhonghua is the official name for Ch
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Science-Based Medicine
Mental Illness DenialThis is really hard, and we have limited knowledge, but we have accumulated enough knowledge about mental health and illness to take a practical approach to many patients and to help them improve their lives. This should include the full range of options available, including medication and counseling. To deny the role of medication can do great harm to those who may need it.
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Feed: All Latest
Darpa Wants to Build an Image Search Engine out of DNAAnd your photos could end up in its database.
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New on MIT Technology Review
Microsoft is learning how to biologically search for images stored in DNAMicrosoft Windows 10
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Science : NPR
Chinese Scientists Clone Monkeys Using Method That Created Dolly The SheepHuman Monkeys Hua HuaA team of researchers has produced two macaque monkey clones using a technique called somatic cell nuclear transfer. It's a first for primates. The advance could hasten research into human diseases. (Image credit: Qiang Sun and Mu-ming Poo/Chinese Academy of Sciences/Cell Press)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Meet Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua, the first monkey clones produced by method that made DollyHuman Monkeys Hua HuaThe first primate clones made by somatic cell nuclear transfer are two genetically identical long-tailed macaques born recently at the Chinese Academy of Sciences Institute of Neuroscience in Shanghai. Researchers named the newborns Zhong Zhong and Hua Hua—born eight and six weeks ago, respectively—after the Chinese adjective "Zhonghua," which means Chinese nation or people. The technical mileston
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
First Primate Clones Produced Using the "Dolly" MethodThe success with monkeys could ignite new ethical debates and medical research -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Weather patterns, farm income, other factors, may be influencing opioid crisisThe overprescribing of opioid-based painkillers may be the main driver of the increased abuse of opioids in rural America, but economists say that other factors, including declining farm income, extreme weather and other natural disasters, may affect a crisis that is killing thousands of citizens and costing the country billions of dollars.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Could underwater sound waves be the key to early tsunami warnings?Mathematicians have devised a way of calculating the size of a tsunami and its destructive force well in advance of it making landfall by measuring fast-moving underwater sound waves, opening up the possibility of a real-time early warning system.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study finds a third of households -- double previous estimates -- struggle to get foodThe struggle to get enough nutritious food could be far worse than previously understood, according to a new study examining the intersection between hunger and the types of foods found at nearby stores.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New measurement technology helps to determine NO concentrations in the oceanNitrogen monoxide (NO) belongs to the group of nitrogen oxides which are infamous as toxic emissions in urban agglomerations. But NO is also produced in nature and plays a role in the nitrogen cycle. However, from earth's largest ecosystem, the ocean, we have hardly any NO measurements.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Cloud seeding for snow: Does it work? Scientists report first quantifiable observationsFor the first time, scientists have obtained direct, quantifiable observations of cloud seeding for increased snowfall -- from the growth of ice crystals, through the processes that occur in clouds, to the eventual snowfall.
8h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tidal cycles could help predict volcanic eruptionsA study of a New Zealand volcano suggests that a volcanic system's response to tidal forces could provide a tool for predicting a certain type of eruption.
8h
New on MIT Technology Review
VR is the US Olympic ski team’s secret weaponVR Reality Video
8h
Live Science
Watch a Monster Spider Abduct a Cricket in a Horrifying Sneak AttackA horror-movie-like GIF shows an African trapdoor spider ambush.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cloud seeding for snow: Does it work? Scientists report first quantifiable observationsFor the first time, scientists have obtained direct, quantifiable observations of cloud seeding for increased snowfall -- from the growth of ice crystals, through the processes that occur in clouds, to the eventual snowfall.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New biosensor could monitor glucose levels in tears and sweatConstantly tracking a person's glucose levels through their tears or sweat could be one step closer to providing people with diabetes an improved monitoring tool. Researchers report in the journal ACS Nano the development of an ultra-thin, flexible sensor that could be incorporated into contact lenses or on the backs of watches for real-time glucose tracking.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Rare traces of a volatile gasNitrogen monoxide (NO) belongs to the group of nitrogen oxides which are infamous as toxic emissions in urban agglomerations. But NO is also produced in nature and plays a role in the nitrogen cycle. However, from earth's largest ecosystem, the ocean, we have hardly any NO measurements. Marine Scientists from Kiel (Germany) now have published new marine NO concentration data in the journal Deep-Se
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tidal cycles could help predict volcanic eruptions, study suggestsA study of a New Zealand volcano suggests that a volcanic system's response to tidal forces could provide a tool for predicting a certain type of eruption.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Pearly material for bendable heating elements (video)The iridescent shimmer of a string of pearls may one day be more than pretty adornment. Scientists now report in ACS Applied Nano Materials a hybrid material consisting of imitation pearl combined with silver nanowires that works as a heater, with the added benefit of high flexibility, suggesting a potential role in wearable devices.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
State of US science enterprise report shows US leads in S&E as China rapidly advancesAccording to the National Science Foundation's Science and Engineering Indicators 2018 report released today, the United States is the global leader in science and technology (S&T). However, the US global share of S&T activities is declining as other nations -- especially China -- continue to rise.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Working in female-dominated workplaces means worse access to flexible working arrangementsWorkers in female-dominated workplaces have worse access to flexible working arrangements than those in gender-neutral and even male-dominated workplaces, new research from the University of Kent has found.
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Advances in lasers get to the long and short of itChiral nematic liquid crystals are an emerging class of lasing devices that are poised to shape how lasers are used in the future. New work on how to select band-edge modes in these devices, which determine the lasing energy, may shine light on how lasers of the future will be tuned, and researchers have demonstrated a technique that allows the laser to electrically switch emission between the lon
8h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Augmented and virtual reality will involve human senses in verifying the operations of information systemsMany new applications aim to make information systems and machines identify their users and take their individual needs and emotions into account.
8h
Scientific American Content: Global
New Real-Time Tsunami Early Warning System Calculates Size and Distance Using Underwater Sound WavesAcoustic waves that radiate from an earthquake can travel much faster than the tsunami they have triggered -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
8h
The Atlantic
How Consent Is Modeled in FictionFictional portrayals of sexual encounters offer a more constructive way to discuss the nuances of consent than journalistic probes of behavior by celebrities, I argued last week. My article closed by asking what existing fiction might facilitate such discussion. I’m following up to pass along several suggestions offered by others. First, my colleague Julie Beck’s article, “ When Pop Culture Sells
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The Atlantic
Paul Nehlen Is an Anti-Semitic ClownPaul Nehlen is not an important political figure. According to his LinkedIn account, he’s had a successful career working in equipment manufacturing. He ran against Paul Ryan in the Wisconsin Republican primary in 2016 and got trounced; the speaker of the House won nearly 85 percent of the vote. And now, having declared for a second time his intention to unseat Ryan, Nehlen has become a caricatur
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Novel device and staff education lead to lower blood culture contamination ratesA Medical University of South Carolina study found that use of a mechanical initial specimen diversion device (ISDD®) and staff education led to a nearly four-fold decrease in contaminated blood cultures that was sustained over 20 months.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Artificial sweetener could someday provide cancer treatments with fewer side effectsArtificial sweeteners are used in diet drinks and foods but also could someday be used as treatments targeting carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX), a protein associated with aggressive cancers. Although several drugs have been approved that target similar forms of CA, they aren't selective and may cause side effects, including vomiting and fatigue. Now researchers report in ACS' Journal of Medicinal Che
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
European-Russian space mission steps up the search for life on MarsIn 2013, the European Space Agency and Roscosmos -- the Russian governmental body responsible for space research -- agreed to cooperate on ExoMars, the first joint interplanetary mission between ESA and Russia. This project now involves scientists from 29 research organizations, including MIPT and the Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, which is the leading contributor of
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Targeting bladder cancer's Achilles heel: stem cellsTwo different proteins work separately as well as synergistically to feed a small pool of stem cells that help bladder cancer resist chemotherapy, research led by a Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center scientist suggests. The finding, published online in Cancer Research, could lead to new targets to fight this deadly disease and potentially other cancers as well.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Medicaid expansion linked with better, more timely surgical careThe Affordable Care Act's Medicaid expansion was linked to better access to surgery and higher quality surgical care, according to a new study from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. The study will be published online Jan. 24, 2018 in JAMA Surgery.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
ACA's Medicaid expansion associated with greater likelihood of patients receiving optimal care for serious surgical conditionsBottom Line: The Affordable Care Act's (ACA's) Medicaid expansion was associated with significant increases in insurance coverage among patients with serious surgical conditions such as appendicitis or aortic aneurysm, and a greater likelihood of these patients receiving timely, optimal care.
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The Atlantic
The Epistemic Quandary of the FBI and TrumpThe ongoing story of Russian interference in the 2016 election, as well as whether the Trump campaign colluded, seems almost too wild to believe. A foreign power, using low-tech and often laughably simplistic techniques, apparently managed to meddle with the American electorate, even organizing real-life rallies . Meanwhile, members of the Trump campaign surreptitiously tried to work with them, a
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Imagining a successful future can help students overcome everyday difficultiesHaving a clear picture in mind of what their future will look like can motivate students to keep going despite the challenges of college life. This strategy seems to be particularly effective for female students from relatively low socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds says Mesmin Destin of Northwestern University in the US. He is the lead author of a study in Springer's journal Motivation and Em
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Star-gazing on the reef: First evidence that brittle stars may 'see' with their skinScientists have discovered the first evidence that brittle stars living in vibrant coral reefs use thousands of light sensors to navigate their way through their complex environments.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Implantable medical devices bolstered by next-gen surface modificationA discovery by University of Sydney researchers could underpin a new class of implantable devices that provide biological signals to surrounding tissue for better integration with the body and reduced risk of infection.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How smelly is your rubbish?A new method is being developed to assess the odorous impact of composting.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Adipose tissue depots compromise heart healthResearchers from the Institute of Pharmacology of the Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have shown that the release of fatty acids from body fat has a major impact on heart health. By interfering with the body's lipid metabolism, the researchers successfully reduced the risk of heart failure. The results of this study have been published in the journal PLOS Genetics.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Energy drink use in teens has adverse effectsA Chapman University faculty member has published new research showing why many teenagers consume energy drinks, how often, the age they started and what influences their choice of brands.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Genetic lung disease's molecular roots identifiedPeople with the rare genetic disease primary ciliary dyskinesia suffer repeated lung infections because they lack functional cilia, hairlike structures that sweep mucus through the airways. Most people have errors in the molecular motor that powers the cilia. But some have errors in non-motor proteins. Now, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis researchers report that mutated non-m
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Scientific American Content: Global
How Brittlestars "See" without EyesThe starfish relatives use light-sensitive cells throughout their bodies to sense their surroundings -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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New Scientist - News
Our best way to geoengineer the climate may well trash EarthA key plan to reduce global warming is to grow crops for fuel then capture and bury the carbon released when it's burned. This risks ecocide, says Olive Heffernan
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TED Talks Daily (SD video)
Photos of Africa, taken from a flying lawn chair | George SteinmetzGeorge Steinmetz's spectacular photos show Africa from the air, taken from the world's slowest, lightest aircraft. Join Steinmetz to discover the surprising historical, ecological and sociopolitical patterns that emerge when you go low and slow in a flying lawn chair.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Optimizing recycling of scrap car parts yields big savingsSorting scrap car parts into just eight classes could increase recycling rates of alloy elements to over 97% in Japan, according to a study by Tohoku University researchers and their colleagues. Their analysis found that optimizing recycling could save Japanese steelmakers 31.6 billion yen ($287 million USD) on raw materials, and cut greenhouse gas emissions associated with obtaining new material
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Saving sharks with trees: researchers aim to save key branches of shark and ray tree of lifeTo shine light on and conserve rare shark, ray, and chimaera species (chondrichthyans), SFU researchers have developed a fully-resolved family tree and ranked every species according to the unique evolutionary history they account for.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists create a 3-D model of molecules in yeast linked to enzyme that lengthens chromosome tipsThrough the haze of a sonogram screen, an expectant mother catches a glimpse of the growing baby within her. The outline of a nose, chin and head, instantly recognizable as a tiny human, brings to life what parents, until then, could only imagine. Biologists, too, aim to bring their scientific discoveries to life by creating three-dimensional models -- at the atomic level -- of the inner workings
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Mitigation techniques fall short of preventing electrocution of golden eagles on power polesDespite efforts to retrofit power poles and to build new poles to avian-friendly standards, electrocution remains a substantial cause of death for the golden eagle. The global conservation problem results in an estimated 504 eagles electrocuted annually in North America alone. A new article examines the risk factors and mitigation techniques from literature published from 1940-2016 and provides ne
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Rare 450-million-year-old 'cone-shaped' fossil discoveryResearchers have discover a unique fossil of a mysterious creature from the Ordovician period.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
When the eyes move, the eardrums move, tooSimply moving the eyes triggers the eardrums to move too, even in the absence of sound, says a new study by neuroscientists. The findings, which were replicated in both humans and rhesus monkeys, provide new insight into how the brain coordinates what we see and what we hear. It may also lead to new understanding of hearing disorders, such as difficulty following a conversation in a crowded room.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Deaf children with cochlear implant learn words faster than hearing childrenEach year many deaf children get a cochlear implant to connect to the world of sounds. So far, it was not clear which processes take place in these children when they start to learn language - and why they differ in the level of language they achieve. Now, researchers have found that deaf children with a cochlear implant learn words even faster than those with normal hearing.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Clarifying the interplay between bone cells in bone remodelingBone homeostasis is regulated by communication between bone-forming mature osteoblasts (mOB) and bone-resorptive mature osteoclasts (mOC). However, the interaction between them in vivo remains unclear. Researchers have developed an intravital two-photon microscopy technique which reveals mOB and mOC functions are regulated via direct cell-cell contact between these cell types. The findings may pav
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists achieve high power with new smaller laserAn international team of scientists has produced the first high-powered, randomly polarised laser beam with a 'Q switch' laser, which typically emits pulses of light so brief that they're measured in nanoseconds. Lasers are a critical part of modern technology -- they're used in everything from our automobiles to medical equipment to the satellites orbiting Earth. Now, researchers are broadening t
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
The big picture of Great Lakes mercury pollutionA transdisciplinary team examined regulatory impacts on Great Lakes mercury, focusing on an Upper Peninsula tribal community with high fish consumption.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Engineers develop flexible, water-repellent graphene circuits for washable electronicsNew graphene printing technology can produce electronic circuits that are low-cost, flexible, highly conductive and water repellent.
9h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
For global invasion, Argentine ants use chemical weaponsFrom their native home on the banks of South America's Paraná River, Argentine ants have conquered six continents and many oceanic islands. Their success is explained by several factors: they have more than one queen per colony, making them difficult to eradicate, and they adapt to changes in their environments by living transiently rather than building permanent nests.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New discovery could improve organic solar cell performanceWhile there is a growing market for organic solar cells—they contain materials that are cheaper, more abundant, and more environmentally friendly than those used in typical solar panels - they also tend to be less efficient in converting sunlight to electricity than conventional solar cells.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Star-gazing on the reefScientists have discovered the first evidence that brittle stars living in vibrant coral reefs use thousands of light sensors to navigate their way through their complex environments.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Imagining a successful future can help students overcome everyday difficultiesHaving a clear picture in mind of what their future will look like can motivate students to keep going despite the challenges of college life. This strategy seems to be particularly effective for female students from relatively low socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds says Mesmin Destin of Northwestern University in the US. He is the lead author of a study in Springer's journal Motivation and Em
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Implantable medical devices bolstered by next-gen surface modificationA discovery by Australian researchers could underpin a new class of implantable devices that provide biological signals to surrounding tissue for better integration with the body and reduced risk of infection. The team has developed low-cost, practical techniques to guide and attach peptides to surfaces. Medicine increasingly relies on biomedical devices but their effectiveness is often limited be
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How expectations impact actual exam scoresConfidence in good results is related to academic progress, as confirmed by the results of a study conducted by researchers from the Higher School of Economics, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam and Tinbergen Institute.
9h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Is species richness increasing? Insight into an intense ecological debateCould biodiversity be remaining steady at locations around the world, even as species go extinct and biodiversity declines globally? This question has created a stir among conservation biologists and ecologists that has lasted for 15 years. New insights into the debate are critically reviewed in an editorial by the editors of the international scientific journal Biological Conservation, and a sepa
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Science | The Guardian
Antidepressants: Please, PLEASE, do not just abandon your meds!Despite what you may have read in the furore surrounding Johann Hari’s new book, it’s very dangerous to stop antidepressants without professional advice Please, do not just abandon your medication. If you’ve been prescribed drugs to treat an illness, suddenly dropping it altogether – for whatever reason – is invariably a very bad move. And this is as true for things like antidepressants as it is
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A superficial relationship: Soap on waterNew research shows with unprecedented accuracy what happens to soap as it spreads on water.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
New discovery could improve organic solar cell performanceScientists have solved a mystery that could lead to gains in efficiency for organic solar cells.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Scientists culture human placenta stem cells for first timeScientists have derived and grown trophoblast stem cells for the first time, which will lead to better understanding of the human placenta.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Discovery may advance neural stem cell treatments for brain disordersNew research reveals a novel gene regulatory system that may advance stem cell therapies and gene-targeting treatments for neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and mental health disorders that affect cognitive abilities.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Interacting Antarctic glaciers may cause faster melt and sea level contributionsTwo of the most rapidly changing glaciers in Antarctica, which are leading contributors to sea-level rise, may behave as an interacting system rather than separate entities, according to a new analysis of radar data.
9h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Saving key branches of shark and ray tree of lifeNew study identifies conservation priorities based on evolutionary history and biogeography.
9h
Science : NPR
New Report Shows Weather Disasters In 2017 Cost More Than $300 BillionHurricanes, fires and even hail contributed to billions of dollars in damages. The government study also finds that it was among the warmest years on record. (Image credit: Emily Kask/AFP/Getty Images)
10h
The Atlantic
Trump's Biggest Economic Victory YetOn Tuesday, the Senate quickly and easily made Jerome Powell the 16th head of the Federal Reserve Board with an 84 to 13 vote. Powell will officially begin his stint as the leader of the nation’s central bank in February. The speed and ease of the confirmation of Trump’s nominee isn’t much of a surprise: Selecting Powell, instead of more conservative or hawkish options such as Kevin Warsh and Joh
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The Atlantic
The Delusions and Realities of the Immigration DebateTwo weeks ago, President Trump reportedly stunned several U.S. senators attempting to negotiate an agreement on immigration when he wondered out loud why America was taking immigrants from nations like Haiti and El Salvador and referred to African states as “shithole countries,” expressing a preference for immigrants from Norway. The dispute over what to do with the hundreds of thousands of young
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Futurity.org
‘Feedback loop’ with mom turns baby babble into languageBabies organize mothers’ verbal responses, which promotes more effective language instruction, and infant babbling is the key, new research shows. It’s long been known that babies modify their sounds to become more speech-like in response to feedback from their caregivers, and that they learn things have names because caregivers name objects. But how do specific types of babbling elicit particula
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Futurity.org
Dirt from ocean floor could boost quake predictionOcean floor sediment could offer a way to better predict future undersea earthquakes, new research suggests. Geologist Michael Strasser, who until 2015 was an assistant professor for sediment dynamics at ETH Zurich and is now a professor at the University of Innsbruck, traveled with colleagues to Japan to study dynamic sediment remobilization processes triggered by seismic activity. At a depth of
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
How wind turbines annoy residents and how to reduce itWhen falling asleep, relaxing or undertaking recreational activities, nearly a third of residents living near a wind farm are not at all annoyed or only slightly annoyed by the noise of wind turbines. One in ten people experience symptoms of stress. However, noise is not the only problem. In particular, a critical attitude towards a wind farm stimulates the experience of stress.A better informatio
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers from Basel and Bochum achieve resolutions in the 30 nanometer rangeObjects smaller than half the wavelength of the utilised light cannot be viewed with the aid of traditional light microscopes. A research team from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB) and the University of Basel has succeeded in enhancing the resolution for microscopic analysis of solid state systems to 1/31 of the wavelength of the utilised light. To this end, the researchers used quantum dots which th
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Which bone measures predict fractures in postmenopausal women?When investigators compared initial bone parameters with changes in those parameters over time in postmenopausal women, they found that initial measurements were significantly associated with women's risk of fracture. Rates of changes in bone density, microarchitecture, and strength were similar between the fracture and non-fracture groups.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists culture human placenta stem cells for first timeScientists have derived and grown trophoblast stem cells for the first time, which will lead to better understanding of the human placenta.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New discovery could improve organic solar cell performanceScientists who are members of a new energy materials-related science center based at Berkeley Lab have solved a mystery that could lead to gains in efficiency for organic solar cells.
10h
Ingeniøren
Smuthul for genredigerede fødevarer får både tilhængere og modstandere til at gå agurkIfølge en rådgiver for EU-domstolen er der intet juridisk til hinder for at europæiske bønder begynder at dyrke genredigerede grøntsager. Både tilhængere og kritikere af genredigering mener, at udmeldingen underminerer markedet for fødevarer i hele Europa.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Feelings determine from which side we embrace each otherHugs are part of social interactions between humans since birth. The express affection and love, and they occur in both positive and neutral contexts: we hug when we are sad or afraid, or simply when saying hello.
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Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Tiny crystals could help predict volcanic eruptionsThey can be as small as a grain of salt, but tiny crystals that form deep in volcanoes may be the key for advance warnings before volcanic eruptions. Volcanologists have said the research provided new information that could lead to more effective evacuations and warning communications.
10h
The Atlantic
The Peril of Privatizing PrepaThe plan for the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (Prepa) has been contested hotly for months now, in a power struggle that started even before Hurricane Maria plunged the island into darkness for months. But the ultimate fate for the commonwealth-owned power company has always trended in one direction: privatization. On Monday, Governor Ricardo Rosselló formalized that fate, announcing that
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Futurity.org
Planets don’t get bigger than thisPlanets can be no bigger than about 10 times the mass of Jupiter, a new paper concludes. “While we think we know how planets form in a big-picture sense, there’s still a lot of detail we need to fill in…” Of course, that’s pretty massive. Jupiter carries almost 318 times the mass of Earth, making the most massive planets possible the equivalent of nearly 3,200 Earths. Most of the public controver
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New on MIT Technology Review
Want to code? You better start teaching yourself
10h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Does the urban morphology have influence on the noise levels provoked by aircrafts?A team of researchers from UPM and CNR has conducted a study of acoustic measurements in places with aircraft noise exposure. This study aims to determine any significant differences among the sound levels measured on the different façades according to their orientation regarding the flight trajectory, the type of road where the facade is found and the fraction of the flight path in direct transmi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Advances in lasers get to the long and short of itSince lasers were first developed, the demand for more adaptable lasers has only increased. Chiral nematic liquid crystals (CLCs) are an emerging class of lasing devices that are poised to shape how lasers are used in the future because of their low thresholds, ease of fabrication, and ability to be tuned across wider swaths of the electromagnetic spectrum. New work on how to select band-edge mode
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Decision support systems may improve quality of patient surgical careNew research published in the February issue of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), illustrates how physician anesthesiologists are investigating the challenges and opportunities of integrating patient data, to aid clinicians in patient management, through clinical decision support technologies.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Optimizing recycling of scrap car parts yields big savingsDetailed sorting of scrap car parts could boost recycling rates to over 97 percent, saving billions and slashing greenhouse gas emissions.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Feelings determine from which side we embrace each otherIn emotionally charged situations, we tend to hug each other from the left side more often than in neutral contexts. Biopsychologists at Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB), headed by Julian Packheiser, Noemi Rook and assistant professor Dr. Sebastian Ocklenburg, established this fact by evaluating more than 2,500 hugs. They attribute this ratio to the way emotions are processed in the respective brain
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Vitamin C in the body can be tracked by fluorescenceA Japanese research team led by The University of Tokyo's Institute of Industrial Science bio-imaged vitamin C in mice. A probe chemical emitted red fluorescent light after reacting with vitamin C in the mice's bloodstream. When a dose of exogenous vitamin C was injected, it accumulated in vital organs. This is the first bioimaging of vitamin C in living tissue, showing high sensitivity and good s
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: ESA centrifugeA decade ago, as Europe's Columbus laboratory module was attached to the International Space Station for microgravity research, ESA's Large Diameter Centrifuge began offering lengthy experiments in hypergravity.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The next big breakthrough in roboticsWhile drones and driverless cars dominate the headlines, another breakthrough—robot dexterity—is likely to have an even greater impact in both business and everyday life.
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Popular Science
How to train your Facebook News Feed to give you the info you wantFacebook News CompanyDIY Feed the news need of the new Facebook News Feed. Facebook has announced that, going forward, it will show you fewer posts from news sources. Here's how to train it so you can still stay up to date.
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Futurity.org
Juvenile justice system may miss mental health issuesA tool used by many jurisdictions within the juvenile justice system to help recognize and assess the effects of adversity and trauma in children’s lives may not be the best way to evaluate mental health issues faced by at-risk youth, a new study indicates. “While the adverse childhood experience tool has done wonderful things… there is still room for improvement…” The research, which lead author
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Calculating the CO2 emissions of biofuels is not enoughA new EU regulation aims to shrink the environmental footprint of biofuels starting in 2021. But an EPFL scientist thinks we should go one step further and take into account all compounds produced at biorefineries, not just biofuel. And he has developed a model for doing just that.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Is species richness increasing? Insight into an intense ecological debateScientists are debating whether and why it appears that the number of species at sites worldwide is holding steady (even increasing at many), as biodiversity declines globally.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Noise pollution forces Canadian songbirds to change their tunesSome Canadian songbirds have to change their tunes because noise pollution from things like oil and gas drilling equipment otherwise drowns out important parts of their songs, University of Manitoba researchers have found.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Detecting tsunamisMathematicians have devised a way of calculating the size of a tsunami and its destructive force well in advance of it making landfall by measuring fast-moving underwater sound waves, opening up the possibility of a real-time early warning system.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Ultralow power consumption for data recordingResearchers have made a discovery that could see a drastic reduction in power consumption for data recording.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Unexpected helpers in wound healingNerve cells in the skin help wounds to heal. When an injury occurs, cells known as glial cells change into repair cells and disseminate into the wound, where they help the skin to regenerate, researchers from the University of Zurich have shown.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists reveal the fundamental limitation in the key material for solid-state lightingFor the first time an international research group has revealed the core mechanism that limits the indium content in indium gallium nitride thin films -- the key material for blue light emitting diodes (LED).
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers use wild rice to predict health of Minnesota lakes and streamsBy studying wild rice in lakes and streams, a team of researchers led by the University of Minnesota has discovered that sulfate in waterways is converted into toxic levels of sulfide and increases other harmful elements. This includes methylmercury, the only form of mercury that contaminates fish.
10h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
New 'big-armed fly' species named after former California governor Arnold SchwarzeneggerA new fly species with bulging forelegs is named after former California governor and famous bodybuilder and actor Arnold Schwarzenegger. Measuring 0.395 mm in body length, it is also now the smallest known fly. Entomologist Brian Brown explains he named it for Schwarzenegger, apart from its 'bulging legs,' in tribute to the inspirational role the celebrity had in the scientist's teenage years. Hi
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Developing bots that talk more like peopleBefore coming to MIT, Jeff Orkin SM '07, Ph.D. '13 spent a decade building advanced, critically acclaimed artificial intelligence (AI) for video games.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The structure of an active galactic nucleusThe nuclei of most galaxies host supermassive black holes containing millions to billions of solar-masses of material. The immediate environments of these black holes typically include a tori of dust and gas and, as material falls toward the black hole, the gas radiates copiously at all wavelengths. Although the models for these active galactic nuclei (AGN) work reasonably well, it is difficult to
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How animals follow the starsThe stars have fascinated humankind throughout history, and we have developed ever more sophisticated means of interpreting them and using their positions to guide us (at least in a navigational, rather than an astrological capacity). A number of night-active animals also use the stars as a compass reference, ranging from songbirds and seals to dung beetles and moths. While it is now established t
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When birds collide with high-speed railIf a high-speed train runs at 185 mph through small urbanized areas, it is possible that some animals will be surprised in their path, including magpies, pigeons, crows and buzzards. These collisions have not been scientifically analyzed or quantified to date. A new study now reports obtaining the first estimates in Spain.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Synthetic virus to tackle antimicrobial resistanceThe National Physical Laboratory (NPL) and UCL (University College London) have engineered a brand new artificial virus that kill bacteria on first contact, as published in Nature Communications.
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New on MIT Technology Review
A new Autopilot crash is a reminder: driverless cars aren’t here yet
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
New 'big-armed fly' species named after Arnold SchwarzeneggerNew species can be named for all types of attributes, but Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County entomologist Brian Brown knew exactly what name to give a bizarre new fly species he discovered in the Brazilian Amazon.
11h
The Scientist RSS
Book Excerpt from Swearing is Good for YouIn chapter 1, 'The Bad Language Brain: Neuroscience and Swearing,' author Emma Byrne sets the scene for her book by telling the story of the hapless and potty-mouthed Phineas Gage.
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BBC News - Science & Environment
NTAs: David Attenborough on Blue Planet II's ImpactSir David Attenborough's impassioned speech at the NTAs was all about protecting "our beautiful world".
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Dagens Medicin
Nye kurser skal gøre yngre læger klogere på journalføringFor at give en større forståelse for bl.a. regler om journalføring afholder Yngre Læger og Styrelsen for Patientsikkerhed en række kurser landet over om sundhedsjura. Første kursus finder sted i dag.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
For global invasion, Argentine ants use chemical weaponsIn a paper published today in Scientific Reports, researchers at the University of California, Riverside show how Argentine ants use chemical secretions as weapons in their interactions with harvester ants, which are native to California. The findings could help in the development of new pest control strategies.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Discovery may advance neural stem cell treatments for brain disordersNew research from SBP reveals a novel gene regulatory system that may advance stem cell therapies and gene-targeting treatments for neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and mental health disorders that affect cognitive abilities.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Scientists create a 3-D model of molecules in yeast linked to enzyme that lengthens chromosome tipsThrough the haze of a sonogram screen, an expectant mother catches a glimpse of the growing baby within her. The outline of a nose, chin and head, instantly recognizable as a tiny human, brings to life what parents, until then, could only imagine. Biologists, too, aim to bring their scientific discoveries to life by creating three-dimensional models--at the atomic level--of the inner workings of c
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A superficial relationship: Soap on waterNew research shows with unprecedented accuracy what happens to soap as it spreads on water.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Engineers develop flexible, water-repellent graphene circuits for washable electronicsJonathan Claussen and the nanoengineers in his research group continue to find new ways to use graphene printing technology. A new research paper describes how they're treating printed graphene with lasers to create electronic circuits that repel water. That could lead to washable electronics and better biological sensors.
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Ingeniøren
Svensk it-skandale vokser: 80 udenlandske it-teknikere kunne se hemmelige dataBetydeligt flere uautoriserede it-teknikere i Øst- og Centraleuropa, end man tidligere har haft kendskab til, fik adgang til hemmelig information, i forbindelse med at den svenske Transportstyrelse lagde følsom it-drift ud til andre aktører.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Climate change as seen from spaceThe French National Centre for Space Research recently presented two projects for monitoring greenhouse gas emissions (CO2 and methane) using satellite sensors. The satellites, which are to be launched after 2020, will supplement measures carried out in situ.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Ethiopia could be sitting on one of world's great untapped gold depositsTo the west of Ethiopia near the Sudanese border lies a place called the Asosa zone. This may be the location of the oldest gold mine in the world. Dating back some 6,000 years, it provided a key source of gold to the ancient Egyptian empire, whose great wealth was famous throughout the known world. It may even have supplied the Queen of Sheba with her lavish gifts of gold when she visited King So
11h
New on MIT Technology Review
An AI gave a Go champ a head start—and still beat him
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Latest Headlines | Science News
The X-ray glow keeps growing after the recent neutron star collisionX-rays from a neutron star collision have been getting brighter, and scientists are debating why.
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Dagens Medicin
Styrelse giver svar på spørgsmål om journalføringStyrelsen for Patientsikkerhed har lagt en række spørgsmål og svar om journalføring på sin hjemmeside for at skabe klarhed om reglerne.
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Dagens Medicin
YL-formand: Styrelsens svar om journalføring er uklareStyrelsen for Patientsikkerhed har lagt en række svar på tvivlsspørgsmål om journalføringspligt på sin hjemmeside. Men svarene er ikke tilstrækkeligt klare, mener YL-formand.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Interacting Antarctic glaciers may cause faster melt and sea level contributionsTwo of the most rapidly changing glaciers in Antarctica, which are leading contributors to sea-level rise, may behave as an interacting system rather than separate entities, according to a new analysis of radar data.
11h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Researchers aim to save key branches of shark and ray tree of lifeNew study identifies conservation priorities based on evolutionary history and biogeography.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thoughts of God make fear-based advertising less effectiveA burglar can be a powerful image to help sell an alarm system, but not if the viewer is thinking about God, according to new research from Duke University's Fuqua School of Business.
11h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers use wild rice to predict health of Minnesota lakes and streamsBy studying wild rice in lakes and streams, a team of researchers led by the University of Minnesota has discovered that sulfate in waterways is converted into toxic levels of sulfide and increases other harmful elements. This includes methylmercury, the only form of mercury that contaminates fish.
11h
Scientific American Content: Global
Fungi Can Help Concrete Heal Its Own CracksOne promising candidate is eco-friendly and poses no known risks to human health -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Science : NPR
Google's Space Race To The Moon Ends, And Nobody Wins Lunar X PrizeWhen it was announced in 2007, the prize's organizers said they expected it to be claimed before the original deadline of Dec. 31, 2014. One team raised more than $90 million. (Image credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/Arizona State University)
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists reveal the fundamental limitation in the key material for solid-state lightingFor the first time an international research group has revealed the core mechanism that limits the indium (In) content in indium gallium nitride ((In, Ga)N) thin films – the key material for blue light emitting diodes (LED). Increasing the In content in InGaN quantum wells is the common approach to shift the emission of III-Nitride based LEDs towards the green and, in particular, red part of the o
11h
Ingeniøren
Ny minesøger lader soldater se under jordenNy håndholdt minesøger erstatter de traditionelle metaldetektorers lydsignaler med et visuelt display.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How scientific evidence can be a powerful tool for insight, accountability and changeThe organisation Sense about Science advocates for openness and honesty about research, and works to ensure that the importance of sound science and evidence is recognised in public debates and policymaking.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
$60 million to save the Great Barrier Reef is a drop in the ocean, but we have to tryThe Great Barrier Reef has never faced such a dire future. Amid increasingly doom-laden headlines, the federal government this week unveiled a recovery package aimed at securing the reef's prospects. The question is whether this is indeed a rescue, or just a smokescreen of false hope.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Companies that pay more tax deliver shareholders better returns, says studyTreasurer Scott Morrison is quick to spruik the shareholder benefits of cutting corporate tax rates further, as the usual logic goes that if a corporation pays less tax, shareholders should get a greater return.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
The moral value of wildernessLet us imagine that humanity has almost died out and only a few people remain. Out of resentment or despair, the survivors cater to their destructive urges by destroying as much of the natural world as they can. They poison rivers and lakes, drop napalm on forests, set off a few nuclear warheads. They are at ease with their conscience because no one will ever be in the position to use or appreciat
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Maps reveal the truth about population density across EuropeIt's often said that England is the most densely populated large country in Europe – typically in discussions about the nation's rising population, and the growing strain on public services. But it's not true.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Giant tortoises on Aldabra Atoll may have been had to ward off crocodiles during the late PleistoceneAn international team of researchers has found evidence that suggests the giant tortoises living on the Aldabra Atoll in the Seychelles may have once had to watch out for crocodile attacks. In their paper published in the journal Royal Society Open Science, the group describes fossil evidence they found on the atoll that suggests crocodiles large enough to cause harm may have once feasted on the g
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The Scientist RSS
Image of the Day: Ectopic WingsInsect wings may have evolved from multiple origins, say researchers.
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The Scientist RSS
Neuroscientist Rusty Gage Named Interim President of Salk InstituteElizabeth Blackburn announced in December that she would step down from the role following gender discrimination lawsuits brought by faculty.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How many toes on a horse? More than you thinkSeabiscuit, Secretariat and every nag to ever pull a plough had five toes on each foot, says a study released Wednesday that stomps on the notion modern horses only have one toe.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
GE reports 4Q loss of $9.8 bn on insurance, tax chargesGeneral Electric reported a $9.8 billion fourth-quarter loss Wednesday due to hefty charges linked to its insurance business and US tax reform.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Owning a home may not be in the cards for many millennialsIn the mid-20th century, it was a common expectation that just about every working 20-something could purchase a home.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
When it comes to keeping streams cool, buffer strips help but geology rulesLeaving a strip of trees along headwater streams during logging operations helps to keep the water cool, but researchers have now shown that the downstream impacts of such practices have more to do with geology than with the presence or width of buffer strips.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Research shows with unprecedented accuracy what happens to soap as it spreads on waterA bowl of water sprinkled with pepper flakes sits ready on Mahesh Bandi's kitchen countertop. Bandi, a professor of physics at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), wets the tip of a chopstick with liquid soap, amusement written on his face, and asks his dinner guests their predictions: what will the flakes do when the soap meets the water's surface?
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Algorithm proves voter ID law's discriminating intentIn 2011, the Texas state legislature passed a bill requiring that residents present certain types of identification before being allowed to vote. The U.S. Department of Justice filed a lawsuit against Texas, arguing that the intent and effect of the bill was to discriminate against minority voters.
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EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Infants recognize foreign languages as a form of communicationInfants recognize that speech in a language not their own is used for communication, finds a new psychology study. The results offer new insights into how language is processed at a young age.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
How policymakers should approach AIArtificial intelligence poses a range of challenges to policymakers. As a technology that is now pervasive, it is impacting on democracy, security and the global economy in ways that are not yet well-known to publics around the world – and, being covert, these impacts are generally not balanced against strong political will to shape them with effective policymaking. Equally, it is a field of techn
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Battery research to super-charge electric vehicle revolutionThe University of Bath is part of a consortium of academic and industry partners awarded Government funding to conduct research aimed at overcoming battery challenges to accelerate the electric vehicle (EV) revolution.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Shedding light on Australia's polar dinosaursDinosaurs that lived in what is now known as Victoria more than 120 million years ago would have dealt with prolonged periods of darkness and below freezing temperatures, a new study reveals.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Drying and dehydration—solutions to address global food shortageIn the University of Nottingham Malaysia, a team of chemical and food engineers from the Food and Pharmaceutical Engineering Research Group are investigating drying and dehydration of various food materials using advance dryers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
On the road again: Vehicle ownership, miles driven continue to riseOwnership of cars and light trucks are on the upswing, says a University of Michigan researcher.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Networking urban water to adapt to a changing climate"When it comes to sustainability, I think the train left the station. We didn't do it. So now I'm more concerned with resilience and adaptation."
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Poverty is not a life sentence in AustraliaResearchers say almost half of Australian families tracked in a 30-year study have experienced poverty at least once.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Combating data breach fatigueIf you shop online or swipe a credit or debit card when out to eat, you've likely received a notice your personal information was compromised in a data breach. And if you're like most consumers, chances are you did nothing in response, says an Iowa State University researcher.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Signs of ships in the cloudsShips churning through the Atlantic Ocean produced this patchwork of bright, criss-crossing cloud trails off the coast of Portugal and Spain. The narrow clouds, known as ship tracks, form when water vapor condenses around tiny particles of pollution that ships emit as exhaust or that form from gases in the exhaust. Ship tracks typically form in areas where low-lying stratus and cumulus clouds are
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Dust on snow controls springtime river rise in WestA new study has found that dust, not spring warmth, controls the pace of spring snowmelt that feeds the headwaters of the Colorado River. Contrary to conventional wisdom, the amount of dust on the mountain snowpack controls how fast the Colorado Basin's rivers rise in the spring regardless of air temperature, with more dust correlated with faster spring runoff and higher peak flows.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA's next Mars lander spreads its solar wingsNASA's next mission to Mars passed a key test Tuesday, extending the solar arrays that will power the InSight spacecraft once it lands on the Red Planet this November.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Study says humans can digest bugs, assuming they want toThe thought of eating an insect makes most people cringe – at least those who live in America, Canada and Europe, a minority of the world's population who would not let a cricket, grasshopper or beetle near their dinner table.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Opinion: Don't shoot the climate change messengerToday, when our weather forecasters tell us a heatwave is coming, we can be quietly confident of the time it will arrive and the temperatures that will be reached. When western Sydney broke records on January 7, hitting 47 degrees, the Bureau of Meteorology had warned us, enabling individuals and organisations to prepare. While analysis of this event is ongoing, researchers at the Australian Resea
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
CubeSats for hunting secrets in lunar darknessImagine sending a spacecraft the size of an airline cabin bag to the moon – what would you have it do? ESA issued that challenge to European teams last year, and two winners have now been chosen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Image: Columbus module to scaleThe focus of this image is the suspended European Columbus module being moved onto a work stand in a cleanroom at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, USA.
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Live Science
Ursula K. Le Guin, Influential Science-Fiction Writer, Dies at 88Writer Ursula K. Le Guin, whose work spanned multiple genres including science fiction, fantasy, poetry and essays, died on Monday (Jan. 22) at the age of 88.
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Feed: All Latest
Why Robots Should Shake the Bejeezus Out of Cherry TreesA tree-shaking robot wouldn't be as dramatic as the machine-driven apocalypse, but it’s an intriguing vision of agriculture.
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cognitive science
Have you seen Engati yet? Here are 15 ways how a chatbot can help you to get ahead in Automobile Industry. Try it for free @ www.engati.comsubmitted by /u/getengati [link] [comments]
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Scientific American Content: Global
For Florida Panthers, Extinction Comes on 4 Wheels2017 was another deadly year for the panthers. How much longer can this critically endangered species survive? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Scientific American Content: Global
Could Artificial Wombs Be a Reality?But what if babies born prematurely could be put into an artificial womb-like environment to complete their gestation? -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Ingeniøren
Chip-producenten Qualcomm får gigantisk EU-bødeEU-Kommissionen har givet chipproducenten en bøde på 997 millioner euro for at misbruge sin dominerende markedsposition inden for produktion af LTE baseband-chips til smartphones og tablets.
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Dagens Medicin
Homo- og biseksuelle drenge får gratis HPV-vaccineNu bliver homo- og biseksuelle drenge i en bestemt aldersgruppe også tilbudt gratis HPV-vaccine. Det sker på grund af øget risiko for analkræft.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Polymer movement: key to next-generation coatingsResearchers in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at Texas A&M University, led by doctoral student Victor Selin and Dr. Svetlana Sukhishvili, are making headway in understanding fundamental principles that will help to create the next generation of biomedical coatings.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Panic and blame as Cape Town braces for water shut-offFor some residents of drought-stricken Cape Town, the prospect of the taps running dry is almost too much to bear.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Comcast hopes for a TV windfall from Super Bowl, OlympicsComcast's NBC is airing both the Super Bowl and the Olympics in February, a double-whammy sports extravaganza that the company expects to yield $1.4 billion in ad sales, helping it justify the hefty price it's paying for both events.
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Live Science
Tractor Beam Levitates Large Orbs with SoundScientists are figuring out how to make larger and larger objects float on sound waves.
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Live Science
Photos: The Reconstruction of Teen Who Lived 9,000 Years AgoSwedish sculptor Oscar Nilsson reconstructed the face of an 18-year-old young woman, dubbed Avgi, whose 9,000-year-old bones were found in a cave in central Greece.
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Live Science
Stunning Re-Creation Shows What Stone Age Woman Looked Like 9,000 Years AgoBones from the 18-year-old woman dubbed Avgi were left in the Theopetra cave in Greece 9,000 years ago.
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Scientific American Content: Global
The Lost Art of Looking at PlantsAdvances in genomics and imaging are reviving a fading discipline -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Your phone may soon know when you're stressed – and help you copeEuropean businesses lose hundreds of work hours each year to stress-related absences, but an app that monitors stress levels and a device to teach relaxation exercises could help provide an answer.
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Viden
Facebook-chef: Bedre overblik over dine private data er på vejNy EU-lovgivning tvinger Facebook til at give brugerne mere kontrol over deres private oplysninger.
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Feed: All Latest
Tesla’s Latest Crash and DUI Incident Reveal the Issue with AutopilotTwo recent incidents are a reminder of the pitfalls of semi-autonomous driving systems.
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Latest Headlines | Science News
Somewhere in the brain is a storage device for memoriesNew technology and new ideas spur the hunt for the physical basis of memory.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
European-Russian space mission steps up the search for life on MarsIn 2013, the European Space Agency and Roscosmos—the Russian governmental body responsible for space research—agreed to cooperate on ExoMars, the first joint interplanetary mission between ESA and Russia. This project now involves scientists from 29 research organizations, including MIPT and the Space Research Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, which is the leading contributor of hardwa
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
NASA tests new alloy to fold wings in flightNASA has successfully applied a new technology in flight that allows aircraft to fold their wings to different angles while in the air.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Researchers discover a piece of America in northern AustraliaCurtin University researchers have discovered rocks in northern Queensland that bear striking similarities to those found in North America, suggesting that part of northern Australia was actually part of North America 1.7 billion years ago.
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Scientific American Content: Global
More Than Meets the Eye: The Evolution of Personality TestingA new generation of personality tests taps into what we humans are best at: visual processing -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Explorer 1—the beginning of American space scienceSixty years ago next week, the hopes of Cold War America soared into the night sky as a rocket lofted skyward above Cape Canaveral, a soon-to-be-famous barrier island off the Florida coast.
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Live Science
Medieval Text Resolves Mystery of Viking-Irish BattleThe famous Irish king, Brian Boru, is credited with defeating the Vikings at the Battle of Clontarf in 1014. But not everyone heaps praise on the king. Historians have cast doubt on whether Boru's main enemies were the Vikings, or his own countrymen.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists develop quantum metamaterial from complex twin qubitsAn international team consisting of Russian and German scientists has made a breakthrough in the creation of seemingly impossible materials. They have created the world's first quantum metamaterial that can be used as a control element in superconducting electrical circuits.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Flexibility and arrangement—the interaction of ribonucleic acid and waterRibonucleic acid (RNA) plays a key role in biochemical processes that occur at the cellular level in a water environment. Mechanisms and dynamics of the interaction between RNA and water were now revealed by vibrational spectroscopy on ultrashort time scales and analyzed by in-depth theory.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Edmunds recommends 15 used cars for under $15KDepreciation may be the bane of new-car buyers, but it's also the reason so many shoppers buy used. We scoured our annual Edmunds New Car Buying Guides from years past to see what cars we loved back in the day can now be had for $15,000 or less. For each vehicle, we've provided a range of years offering the best selection and value. In certain cases, getting an even older model is a viable option,
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
EU fines chipmaker Qualcomm 1 bn euros for Apple dealQualcomm Apple EUThe EU on Wednesday hit US chipmaking giant Qualcomm with an antitrust fine of 997 million euros ($1.2 billion) for paying Apple to use its chips exclusively in iPhones and iPads.
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Scientific American Content: Global
Cocktail of Brain Chemicals May Be a Key to What Makes Us HumanA study that compares us with other primates finds a brain region linked to social behavior that may offer a biological explanation for why humans, not chimps, produced Shakespeare, Gandhi and... -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com
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Dagens Medicin
Intensivlæge: Langt størstedelen af de ting, vi gør, er ikke testetAnders Perner, der er professor og overlæge i intensiv medicin ved Rigshospitalet advarer om, at en stor del af hospitalernes arsenal af udstyr og interventioner ikke er afprøvet i gode forsøg før brug.
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Dagens Medicin
Nordjylland ansætter direktør for diabetescenterPoul Erik Jakobsen er ansat som centerdirektør for Steno Diabetes Center Nordjylland.
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Ingeniøren
Million-kampagne skal få flere kvinder på tekniske it-uddannelserIT-Universitetet lancerer ny kampagne, der skal vække kvinders interesse for en it-uddannelse, efter stigning i antal optagne kvinder i 2017.
14h
Ingeniøren
Australsk megabatteri har indtjent millioner på få dageUdsving i elpriser i Australien har på få dage givet ejeren en million-indtægt på det Tesla-producerede megabatteri i provinsen South Australia. Dansk netoperatør tror, at batterier også kan bruges i Danmark, men med noget lavere profit.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
An enzyme with a surprising dual functionScientists at the University of Bonn have clarified a surprising dual function of ceramide synthase. The enzyme not only catalyzes a central step of the production of vital lipids, it also has the ability to turn genes involved in lipid metabolism on or off. The study is published in Cell Reports.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Retrospective test for quantum computers can build trustTech companies are racing to make commercial quantum computers. A new scheme from researchers in Singapore and Japan could help customers establish trust in buying time on such machines—and protect companies from dishonest customers.
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Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new model of frequency combs in optical microresonatorsA team from the Faculty of Physics of the Lomonosov Moscow State University, together with scientists from the Russian Quantum Center, have developed a new mathematical model that describes the process of soliton occurrence in optical microresonators. In the future, this could lead to universal optical oscillators and other advancements. The work was published in Optics Express.
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Feed: All Latest
The Science of Why Swearing Physically Reduces PainResearch has shown that cursing allows you to handle suffering and actually diminishes the sensation of pain.
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Feed: All Latest
Elon Musk's $0 Salary Encapsulates the Legend of TeslaIn a rapidly changing world, Musk's combination of prescience, persuasion, and a taste for challenges makes him feel like a good bet.
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Impaired lymphoid extracellular matrix impedes antibacterial immunity in epidermolysis bullosa [Medical Sciences]Genetic loss of collagen VII causes recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa (RDEB), a skin fragility disorder that, unexpectedly, manifests also with elevated colonization of commensal bacteria and frequent wound infections. Here, we describe an unprecedented systemic function of collagen VII as a member of a unique innate immune-supporting multiprotein complex in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Ibuprofen alters human testicular physiology to produce a state of compensated hypogonadism [Medical Sciences]Concern has been raised over increased male reproductive disorders in the Western world, and the disruption of male endocrinology has been suggested to play a central role. Several studies have shown that mild analgesics exposure during fetal life is associated with antiandrogenic effects and congenital malformations, but the effects on...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Phenotypic selection as the biological mode of epigenetic conversion and reversion in cell transformation [Medical Sciences]Exposure of certain cell lines to methylcholanthrene, X-rays, or physiological growth constraint leads to preneoplastic transformation in all or most of the treated cells. After attaining confluence, a fraction in those cells progress to full transformation, as evidenced by their ability to form discrete foci distinguishable from the surrounding cells...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Tolerogenic nanoparticles restore the antitumor activity of recombinant immunotoxins by mitigating immunogenicity [Medical Sciences]Protein-based drugs are very active in treating cancer, but their efficacy can be limited by the formation of neutralizing antidrug antibodies (ADAs). Recombinant immunotoxins are proteins that are very effective in patients with leukemia, where immunity is suppressed, but induce ADAs, which compromise their activity, in patients with intact immunity....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Fenofibrate prevents skeletal muscle loss in mice with lung cancer [Medical Sciences]The cancer anorexia cachexia syndrome is a systemic metabolic disorder characterized by the catabolism of stored nutrients in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue that is particularly prevalent in nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Loss of skeletal muscle results in functional impairments and increased mortality. The aim of the present study...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Linking secondary metabolites to gene clusters through genome sequencing of six diverse Aspergillus species [Microbiology]The fungal genus of Aspergillus is highly interesting, containing everything from industrial cell factories, model organisms, and human pathogens. In particular, this group has a prolific production of bioactive secondary metabolites (SMs). In this work, four diverse Aspergillus species (A. campestris, A. novofumigatus, A. ochraceoroseus, and A. steynii) have been...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Faulty neuronal determination and cell polarization are reverted by modulating HD early phenotypes [Neuroscience]Increasing evidence suggests that early neurodevelopmental defects in Huntington’s disease (HD) patients could contribute to the later adult neurodegenerative phenotype. Here, by using HD-derived induced pluripotent stem cell lines, we report that early telencephalic induction and late neural identity are affected in cortical and striatal populations. We show that a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
TRPM4 and TRPM5 are both required for normal signaling in taste receptor cells [Neuroscience]Peripheral taste receptor cells use multiple signaling pathways to transduce taste stimuli into output signals that are sent to the brain. Transient receptor potential melastatin 5 (TRPM5), a sodium-selective TRP channel, functions as a common downstream component in sweet, bitter, and umami signaling pathways. In the absence of TRPM5, mice...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural heterogeneity and intersubȷect variability of A{beta} in familial and sporadic Alzheimer’s disease [Neuroscience]Point mutations in the amyloid-β (Aβ) coding region produce a combination of mutant and WT Aβ isoforms that yield unique clinicopathologies in familial Alzheimer’s disease (fAD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (fCAA) patients. Here, we report a method to investigate the structural variability of amyloid deposits found in fAD, fCAA, and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Mechanism-specific assay design facilitates the discovery of Nav1.7-selective inhibitors [Pharmacology]Many ion channels, including Nav1.7, Cav1.3, and Kv1.3, are linked to human pathologies and are important therapeutic targets. To develop efficacious and safe drugs, subtype-selective modulation is essential, but has been extremely difficult to achieve. We postulate that this challenge is caused by the poor assay design, and investigate the...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
From in silico hit to long-acting late-stage preclinical candidate to combat HIV-1 infection [Pharmacology]The HIV-1 pandemic affecting over 37 million people worldwide continues, with nearly one-half of the infected population on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Major therapeutic challenges remain because of the emergence of drug-resistant HIV-1 strains, limitations because of safety and toxicity with current HIV-1 drugs, and patient compliance for lifelong,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
IKK{alpha} inactivation promotes Kras-initiated lung adenocarcinoma development through disrupting maȷor redox regulatory pathways [Pharmacology]Lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are two distinct and predominant types of human lung cancer. IκB kinase α (IKKα) has been shown to suppress lung SCC development, but its role in ADC is unknown. We found inactivating mutations and homologous or hemizygous deletions in the CHUK locus,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Growth is required for perception of water availability to pattern root branches in plants [Plant Biology]Water availability is a potent regulator of plant development and induces root branching through a process termed hydropatterning. Hydropatterning enables roots to position lateral branches toward regions of high water availability, such as wet soil or agar media, while preventing their emergence where water is less available, such as in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Women live longer than men even during severe famines and epidemics [Population Biology]Women in almost all modern populations live longer than men. Research to date provides evidence for both biological and social factors influencing this gender gap. Conditions when both men and women experience extremely high levels of mortality risk are unexplored sources of information. We investigate the survival of both sexes...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction for Liu et al., Earliest hydraulic enterprise in China, 5,100 years ago [Corrections]ANTHROPOLOGY, ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Correction for “Earliest hydraulic enterprise in China, 5,100 years ago,” by Bin Liu, Ningyuan Wang, Minghui Chen, Xiaohong Wu, Duowen Mo, Jianguo Liu, Shijin Xu, and Yijie Zhuang, which was first published December 4, 2017; 10.1073/pnas.1710516114 (Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 114:13637–13642). The authors note that on...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Correction to Supporting Information for Carlson et al., Effect of oil palm sustainability certification on deforestation and fire in Indonesia [SI Correction]SUSTAINABILITY SCIENCE, ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES Correction to Supporting Information for “Effect of oil palm sustainability certification on deforestation and fire in Indonesia,” by Kimberly M. Carlson, Robert Heilmayr, Holly K. Gibbs, Praveen Noojipady, David N. Burns, Douglas C. Morton, Nathalie F. Walker, Gary D. Paoli, and Claire Kremen, which was first...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In This Issue [This Week in PNAS]Gene variants tied to human facial features Average faces for 14 East Asian females (A); upper 10% (more East Asian) (B) and lower 10% (more European) (C) extremes. Facial similarities tend to run in families, and genetically identical twins raised together or apart exhibit striking facial resemblance, suggesting strong genetic...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Questioning the inevitability of aging [Biological Sciences]Paul Nelson and Joanna Masel (1) are the most recent theorists to bypass evolution and seek an abstract answer to the question, “What is the cause of aging?” Their mathematics is not in question, but the process of somatic evolution that they model bears no obvious relation to aging as...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Mitteldorf and Fahy: Aging is still inevitable [Biological Sciences]We stand by our claim that aging is inevitable in multicellular organisms. However, our model of somatic evolution uses sign arguments and so does not inform the rate of aging nor the extent to which aging can be delayed. While we use the term “somatic mutation,” we explicitly define this...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Uncovering an electrically heterogeneous cardiomyocyte by FRAP-quantified diffusion in the T-tubules [Biological Sciences]A recent elegant study in PNAS by Scardigli et al. (1) provides a subcellular look at the electrical properties within the cardiomyocyte transverse T-tubular system [transverse-axial tubular system (TATS)] by extrapolation from FRAP-based diffusion measurements of fluorescent dextran and geometric considerations. It was shown that the disarray of the T-tubules...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reply to Entcheva: The impact of T-tubules on action potential propagation in cardiac tissue [Biological Sciences]Since our observation that T-tubules can fail to propagate action potentials in diseased hearts (1), our studies have focused on understanding the consequences of these electrical defects for local Ca2+ release (2) and force production (3). More recently, we have started to explore the causes of electrical defects (4), focusing...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Profile of Scott W. Lowe [Profiles]As a graduate student at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Scott Lowe became interested in cancer genetics. The phenomenon that drew his interest was called oncogene cooperation—the idea that it takes multiple oncogenes working together to turn a normal cell into a tumor cell. “That was an exciting concept because...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Partitioning aggression [Anthropology]Human Nature: Nasty or Nice? Have aggression and violence been ramped up in human evolution or dialed down? This sounds like a question that empirical research might have settled long ago, but it remains strangely contentious. In PNAS, Richard Wrangham (1) proposes that debates persist because too many evolutionary anthropologists...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Predicting tipping points in complex environmental systems [Ecology]Ecologists have long recognized that ecosystems can exist and function in one state within predictable bounds for extended periods of time and then abruptly shift to an alternate state (1–5). Desertification of grasslands, shrub expansion in the Arctic, the eutrophication of lakes, ocean acidification, the formation of marine dead zones,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Future of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors [Pharmacology]The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors (NNRTIs) are small molecules that bind to HIV-1 RT at a site distinct from the DNA polymerase active site of the enzyme and block retroviral reverse transcription via an allosteric mechanism of action (1). Nevirapine (NVP) was the first NNRTI approved in 1996 by...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Toward a unifying theory of biodiversity [Ecology]Ecologists have long agreed that to coexist species must be sufficiently different (1, 2). This worldview was challenged when Stephen Hubbell published his neutral theory of biodiversity showing that species that are essentially equal should also be able to evade competitive exclusion (3). Although this neutral theory inspired a fresh...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Fitness landscape of the human immunodeficiency virus envelope protein that is targeted by antibodies [Biophysics and Computational Biology]HIV is a highly mutable virus, and over 30 years after its discovery, a vaccine or cure is still not available. The isolation of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) from HIV-infected patients has led to renewed hope for a prophylactic vaccine capable of combating the scourge of HIV. A major challenge...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Freshwater salinization syndrome on a continental scale [Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences]Salt pollution and human-accelerated weathering are shifting the chemical composition of major ions in fresh water and increasing salinization and alkalinization across North America. We propose a concept, the freshwater salinization syndrome, which links salinization and alkalinization processes. This syndrome manifests as concurrent trends in specific conductance, pH, alkalinity, and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Impact and cost-effectiveness of snail control to achieve disease control targets for schistosomiasis [Economic Sciences]Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease that affects over 240 million people globally. To improve population-level disease control, there is growing interest in adding chemical-based snail control interventions to interrupt the lifecycle of Schistosoma in its snail host to reduce parasite transmission. However, this approach is not widely implemented, and given...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Preferences for moral vs. immoral traits in others are conditional [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]The preference for morality in others is regarded as a dominant factor in person perception. Moral traits are thought to foster liking, and immoral traits are thought to foster disliking, irrespective of the context in which they are embedded. We report the results of four studies that oppose this view....
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structural basis of STAT2 recognition by IRF9 reveals molecular insights into ISGF3 function [Biochemistry]Cytokine signaling through the JAK/STAT pathway controls multiple cellular responses including growth, survival, differentiation, and pathogen resistance. An expansion in the gene regulatory repertoire controlled by JAK/STAT signaling occurs through the interaction of STATs with IRF transcription factors to form ISGF3, a complex that contains STAT1, STAT2, and IRF9 and...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Troy+ brain stem cells cycle through quiescence and regulate their number by sensing niche occupancy [Cell Biology]The adult mouse subependymal zone provides a niche for mammalian neural stem cells (NSCs). However, the molecular signature, self-renewal potential, and fate behavior of NSCs remain poorly defined. Here we propose a model in which the fate of active NSCs is coupled to the total number of neighboring NSCs in...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dysregulation of cotranscriptional alternative splicing underlies CHARGE syndrome [Developmental Biology]CHARGE syndrome—which stands for coloboma of the eye, heart defects, atresia of choanae, retardation of growth/development, genital abnormalities, and ear anomalies—is a severe developmental disorder with wide phenotypic variability, caused mainly by mutations in CHD7 (chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 7), known to encode a chromatin remodeler. The genetic lesions responsible...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
ALKALs are in vivo ligands for ALK family receptor tyrosine kinases in the neural crest and derived cells [Developmental Biology]Mutations in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) are implicated in somatic and familial neuroblastoma, a pediatric tumor of neural crest-derived tissues. Recently, biochemical analyses have identified secreted small ALKAL proteins (FAM150, AUG) as potential ligands for human ALK and the related leukocyte tyrosine kinase (LTK). In the zebrafish Danio rerio, DrLtk,...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Predicting tipping points in mutualistic networks through dimension reduction [Ecology]Complex networked systems ranging from ecosystems and the climate to economic, social, and infrastructure systems can exhibit a tipping point (a “point of no return”) at which a total collapse of the system occurs. To understand the dynamical mechanism of a tipping point and to predict its occurrence as a...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Chronic anthropogenic noise disrupts glucocorticoid signaling and has multiple effects on fitness in an avian community [Ecology]Anthropogenic noise is a pervasive pollutant that decreases environmental quality by disrupting a suite of behaviors vital to perception and communication. However, even within populations of noise-sensitive species, individuals still select breeding sites located within areas exposed to high noise levels, with largely unknown physiological and fitness consequences. We use...
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Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dual evolutionary origin of insect wings supported by an investigation of the abdominal wing serial homologs in Tribolium [Evolution]The origin of insect wings is still a highly debated mystery in biology, despite the importance of this evolutionary innovation. There are currently two prominent, but contrasting wing origin hypotheses (the tergal origin hypothesis and the pleural origin hypothesis). Through studies in the Tribolium beetle, we have previously obtained functional...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
A mixed modality approach towards Xi reactivation for Rett syndrome and other X-linked disorders [Genetics]The X-chromosome harbors hundreds of disease genes whose associated diseases predominantly affect males. However, a subset, including neurodevelopmental disorders, Rett syndrome (RTT), fragile X syndrome, and CDKL5 syndrome, also affects females. These disorders lack disease-specific treatment. Because female cells carry two X chromosomes, an emerging treatment strategy has been to...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Genetics of the human face: Identification of large-effect single gene variants [Genetics]To discover specific variants with relatively large effects on the human face, we have devised an approach to identifying facial features with high heritability. This is based on using twin data to estimate the additive genetic value of each point on a face, as provided by a 3D camera system....
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Signaling by the Epstein-Barr virus LMP1 protein induces potent cytotoxic CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses [Immunology and Inflammation]The B-lymphotropic Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), pandemic in humans, is rapidly controlled on initial infection by T cell surveillance; thereafter, the virus establishes a lifelong latent infection in the host. If surveillance fails, fatal lymphoproliferation and lymphomagenesis ensue. The initial T cell response consists of predominantly CD8+ cytotoxic T cells and...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
CFH and ARMS2 genetic risk determines progression to neovascular age-related macular degeneration after antioxidant and zinc supplementation [Medical Sciences]We evaluated the influence of an antioxidant and zinc nutritional supplement [the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) formulation] on delaying or preventing progression to neovascular AMD (NV) in persons with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). AREDS subjects (n = 802) with category 3 or 4 AMD at baseline who had been...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Modeling lethal X-linked genetic disorders in pigs with ensured fertility [Applied Biological Sciences]Genetically engineered pigs play an indispensable role in the study of rare monogenic diseases. Pigs harboring a gene responsible for a specific disease can be efficiently generated via somatic cell cloning. The generation of somatic cell-cloned pigs from male cells with mutation(s) in an X chromosomal gene is a reliable...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Reverse chemical ecology approach for the identification of an oviposition attractant for Culex quinquefasciatus [Applied Biological Sciences]Pheromones and other semiochemicals play a crucial role in today’s integrated pest and vector management strategies. These semiochemicals are typically discovered by bioassay-guided approaches. Here, we applied a reverse chemical ecology approach; that is, we used olfactory proteins to lead us to putative semiochemicals. Specifically, we used 7 of the...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Ecological and evolutionary dynamics of interconnectedness and modularity [Applied Mathematics]In this contribution, we develop a theoretical framework for linking microprocesses (i.e., population dynamics and evolution through natural selection) with macrophenomena (such as interconnectedness and modularity within an ecological system). This is achieved by developing a measure of interconnectedness for population distributions defined on a trait space (generalizing the notion...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Ion dissolution mechanism and kinetics at kink sites on NaCl surfaces [Applied Physical Sciences]Desolvation barriers are present for solute–solvent exchange events, such as ligand binding to an enzyme active site, during protein folding, and at battery electrodes. For solution-grown crystals, desolvation at kink sites can be the rate-limiting step for growth. However, desolvation and the associated kinetic barriers are poorly understood. In this...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Development and retention of a primordial moonlighting pathway of protein modification in the absence of selection presents a puzzle [Biochemistry]Lipoic acid is synthesized by a remarkably atypical pathway in which the cofactor is assembled on its cognate proteins. An octanoyl moiety diverted from fatty acid synthesis is covalently attached to the acceptor protein, and sulfur insertion at carbons 6 and 8 of the octanoyl moiety form the lipoyl cofactor....
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Glycoengineering of antibody (Herceptin) through yeast expression and in vitro enzymatic glycosylation [Biochemistry]Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been developed as therapeutics, especially for the treatment of cancer, inflammation, and infectious diseases. Because the glycosylation of mAbs in the Fc region influences their interaction with effector cells that kill antibody-targeted cells, and the current method of antibody production is relatively expensive, efforts have been...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Functional characterization of the mucus barrier on the Xenopus tropicalis skin surface [Biochemistry]Mucosal surfaces represent critical routes for entry and exit of pathogens. As such, animals have evolved strategies to combat infection at these sites, in particular the production of mucus to prevent attachment and to promote subsequent movement of the mucus/microbe away from the underlying epithelial surface. Using biochemical, biophysical, and...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
In situ detection of live-to-dead bacteria ratio after inactivation by means of synchronous fluorescence and PCA [Chemistry]The determination of live and dead bacteria is of considerable significance for preventing health care-associated infection in hospitals, field clinics, and other areas. In this study, the viable (live) and nonviable (dead) bacteria in a sample were determined by means of their fluorescence spectra and principal component analysis (PCA). Data...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Dynamics of charged excitons in electronically and morphologically homogeneous single-walled carbon nanotubes [Chemistry]The trion, a three-body charge-exciton bound state, offers unique opportunities to simultaneously manipulate charge, spin, and excitation in one-dimensional single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) at room temperature. Effective exploitation of trion quasi-particles requires fundamental insight into their creation and decay dynamics. Such knowledge, however, remains elusive for SWNT trion states, du
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Unified description of H-atom-induced chemicurrents and inelastic scattering [Chemistry]The Born–Oppenheimer approximation (BOA) provides the foundation for virtually all computational studies of chemical binding and reactivity, and it is the justification for the widely used “balls and springs” picture of molecules. The BOA assumes that nuclei effectively stand still on the timescale of electronic motion, due to their large...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Contrasting responses of functional diversity to major losses in taxonomic diversity [Ecology]Taxonomic diversity of benthic marine invertebrate shelf species declines at present by nearly an order of magnitude from the tropics to the poles in each hemisphere along the latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG), most steeply along the western Pacific where shallow-sea diversity is at its tropical maximum. In the Bivalvia, a...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Lumpy species coexistence arises robustly in fluctuating resource environments [Ecology]The effect of life-history traits on resource competition outcomes is well understood in the context of a constant resource supply. However, almost all natural systems are subject to fluctuations of resources driven by cyclical processes such as seasonality and tidal hydrology. To understand community composition, it is therefore imperative to...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Host and parasite thermal ecology jointly determine the effect of climate warming on epidemic dynamics [Ecology]Host–parasite systems have intricately coupled life cycles, but each interactor can respond differently to changes in environmental variables like temperature. Although vital to predicting how parasitism will respond to climate change, thermal responses of both host and parasite in key traits affecting infection dynamics have rarely been quantified. Through temperature-controlled...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Single-crystal metal growth on amorphous insulating substrates [Engineering]Metal structures on insulators are essential components in advanced electronic and nanooptical systems. Their electronic and optical properties are closely tied to their crystal quality, due to the strong dependence of carrier transport and band structure on defects and grain boundaries. Here we report a method for creating patterned single-crystal...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Science and Culture: Painting with invasive pigments [Environmental Sciences]In the abandoned lots of the Bushwick neighborhood of Brooklyn, NY, dandelion, black nightshade, and dozens of other weedy plants thrive. Although some see hotbeds of invasive species, artist and Brooklyn local Ellie Irons sees a vibrant urban ecosystem. She also sees the makings of a unique color palette. Artist...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Emergence of cooperation and division of labor in the primitively eusocial wasp Ropalidia marginata [Evolution]In most primitively eusocial wasps new nests are initiated by a single female or by small groups of females. To study the emergence of division of labor (DOL) among the nest foundresses and to determine its possible effect on nest productivity we maintained newly eclosed females of Ropalidia marginata in...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
DNA double-strand break response factors influence end-joining features of IgH class switch and general translocation junctions [Genetics]Ig heavy chain (IgH) class switch recombination (CSR) in B lymphocytes switches IgH constant regions to change antibody functions. CSR is initiated by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) within a donor IgH switch (S) region and a downstream acceptor S region. CSR is completed by fusing donor and acceptor S region...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Structure of the C1r-C1s interaction of the C1 complex of complement activation [Immunology and Inflammation]The multiprotein complex C1 initiates the classical pathway of complement activation on binding to antibody–antigen complexes, pathogen surfaces, apoptotic cells, and polyanionic structures. It is formed from the recognition subcomponent C1q and a tetramer of proteases C1r2C1s2 as a Ca2+-dependent complex. Here we have determined the structure of a complex...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
PfCDPK1 is critical for malaria parasite gametogenesis and mosquito infection [Microbiology]Efforts to knock out Plasmodium falciparum calcium-dependent protein kinase 1 (PfCDPK1) from asexual erythrocytic stage have not been successful, indicating an indispensable role of the enzyme in asexual growth. We recently reported generation of a transgenic parasite with mutant CDPK1 [Bansal A, et al. (2016) MBio 7:e02011-16]. The mutant CDPK1...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Golgi stress response reprograms cysteine metabolism to confer cytoprotection in Huntington’s disease [Neuroscience]Golgi stress response is emerging as a physiologic process of comparable importance to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial stress responses. However, unlike ER stress, the identity of the signal transduction pathway involved in the Golgi stress response has been elusive. We show that the Golgi stressor monensin acts via the...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Influence of anterior midcingulate cortex on drinking behavior during thirst and following satiation [Neuroscience]In humans, activity in the anterior midcingulate cortex (aMCC) is associated with both subjective thirst and swallowing. This region is therefore likely to play a prominent role in the regulation of drinking in response to dehydration. Using functional MRI, we investigated this possibility during a period of “drinking behavior” represented...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Melanopsin- and L-cone-induced pupil constriction is inhibited by S- and M-cones in humans [Neuroscience]The human retina contains five photoreceptor types: rods; short (S)-, mid (M)-, and long (L)-wavelength–sensitive cones; and melanopsin-expressing ganglion cells. Recently, it has been shown that selective increments in M-cone activation are paradoxically perceived as brightness decrements, as opposed to L-cone increments. Here we show that similar effects are also...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
GBA1 deficiency negatively affects physiological {alpha}-synuclein tetramers and related multimers [Neuroscience]Accumulating evidence suggests that α-synuclein (α-syn) occurs physiologically as a helically folded tetramer that resists aggregation. However, the mechanisms underlying the regulation of formation of α-syn tetramers are still mostly unknown. Cellular membrane lipids are thought to play an important role in the regulation of α-syn tetramer formation. Since glucocerebrosidase...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Suppression of frontal eye field neuronal responses with maintained fixation [Neuroscience]The decision of where to make an eye movement is thought to be driven primarily by responses to stimuli in neurons’ receptive fields (RFs) in oculomotor areas, including the frontal eye field (FEF) of prefrontal cortex. It is also thought that a saccade may be generated when the accumulation of...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Power law tails in phylogenetic systems [Physics]Covariance analysis of protein sequence alignments uses coevolving pairs of sequence positions to predict features of protein structure and function. However, current methods ignore the phylogenetic relationships between sequences, potentially corrupting the identification of covarying positions. Here, we use random matrix theory to demonstrate the existence of a power law...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Pyruvate induces torpor in obese mice [Physiology]Mice subjected to cold or caloric deprivation can reduce body temperature and metabolic rate and enter a state of torpor. Here we show that administration of pyruvate, an energy-rich metabolic intermediate, can induce torpor in mice with diet-induced or genetic obesity. This is associated with marked hypothermia, decreased activity, and...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Demography and mating system shape the genome-wide impact of purifying selection in Arabis alpina [Plant Biology]Plant mating systems have profound effects on levels and structuring of genetic variation and can affect the impact of natural selection. Although theory predicts that intermediate outcrossing rates may allow plants to prevent accumulation of deleterious alleles, few studies have empirically tested this prediction using genomic data. Here, we study...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Testing the impact and durability of a group malleability intervention in the context of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict [Psychological and Cognitive Sciences]Fostering perceptions of group malleability (teaching people that groups are capable of change and improvement) has been shown to lead to short-term improvements in intergroup attitudes and willingness to make concessions in intractable conflicts. The present study, a field intervention involving 508 Israelis from three locations in Israel, replicated and...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
The social genome of friends and schoolmates in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health [Social Sciences]Humans tend to form social relationships with others who resemble them. Whether this sorting of like with like arises from historical patterns of migration, meso-level social structures in modern society, or individual-level selection of similar peers remains unsettled. Recent research has evaluated the possibility that unobserved genotypes may play an...
14h
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences current issue
Chemical encoding of risk perception and predator detection among estuarine invertebrates [Systems Biology]An effective strategy for prey to survive in habitats rich in predators is to avoid being noticed. Thus, prey are under selection pressure to recognize predators and adjust their behavior, which can impact numerous community-wide interactions. Many animals in murky and turbulent aquatic environments rely on waterborne chemical cues. Previous...
14h
Ingeniøren
Kommunerne vil gå længere med samkøring af borgerdata end Søren Pape PoulsenKommunerne bakker op om justitsministerens forslag om lettere datadeling hos myndighederne, men ønsker mere frie tøjler end, hvad Søren Pape Poulsen er i gang med at give dem.
14h
Ingeniøren
Swipe med øjnene: Handicappede styrer mobilen med blikketEn ny type eye tracking kombineret med mobiltelefoner og moderne smart home-udstyr skal gøre livet lettere for handicappede, mener de DTU-studerende bag teknologien.
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
A new family of aerodynamic configurations for hypersonic airplanesHypersonic vehicles, which fly at Mach values larger than five (flight velocity more than 6000 km/h), could provide more convenient and efficient transportation than present subsonic airplanes for long-distance journeys in future. Typically, it only takes a couple of hours to fly from Beijing to New York at hypersonic speeds. Recent interest in these vehicles has grown, and various innovative desi
14h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Scientists achieve high power with new smaller laserAn international team of scientists has produced the first high-powered, randomly polarised laser beam with a "Q switch" laser, which typically emits pulses of light so brief that they're measured in nanoseconds. Lasers are a critical part of modern technology—they're used in everything from our automobiles to medical equipment to the satellites orbiting Earth. Now, researchers are broadening the
14h
Viden
Teenagedruk kan give leversygdomme som voksenSelv et lille forbrug af alkohol i teenage-årene kan føre til leversygdomme senere i livet, viser nyt stort studie.
15h
Dagens Medicin
Holbæk Sygehus får professor i hjerte-forebyggelseOverlæge Michael Hecht Olsen ansat som professor i hypertension og kardiovaskulær forebyggelse på Holbæk Sygehus.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Leprosy's drug resistance and origin revealed by genome analysisScientists led by EPFL have isolated leprosy bacteria directly from human samples, and analyzed the purified genomes to identify mutations that confer drug resistance to the bacterium, as well as gain insights into the origins of the disease. The study is published in Nature Communications, just ahead of the World Leprosy Day, Jan. 28, 2018.
15h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Nanoparticle vaccine offers universal protection against influenza A viruses, study findsResearchers have developed a universal vaccine to combat influenza A viruses that produces long-lasting immunity in mice and protects them against the limitations of seasonal flu vaccines, according to a study led by Georgia State University.
15h
Ingeniøren
Virksomhedsleder: Industri 4.0 er for meget snak og for få løsningerUdstyrsleverandørerne skal køre mere open source, og deres udstyr skal kunne fungere samme med ældre produktionsudstyr, hvis den digitale fabrik skal blive til realitet, påpeger direktøren for KP Komponenter.
15h
The Atlantic
How Democrats Stopped Worrying and Learned to Accept Trump's WallVacuous and expensive. Pointless. Ineffective. Medieval. A non-starter. Over the last year, Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer has used each of those words, and many more, to denigrate the proposed southern border wall that President Trump made a centerpiece of his campaign. Hamming it up on the Senate floor, Schumer frequently mocked the president’s demand that Congress front the money for a s
15h
The Atlantic
Why Some Catholics Defend the Kidnapping of a Jewish BoyOne summer evening in 1858, the police showed up at the home of a Jewish family in Bologna, Italy, and took their six-year-old child. Authorities had discovered that the child, Edgardo Mortara, had been secretly baptized when he was a baby. Edgardo had fallen gravely ill and his Catholic nanny baptized him for fear that he would die a Jew and be locked out of heaven. But Edgardo survived—and, in
15h
Nyheder - Forskning - Videnskab
Prøve på vej for ansøgere i kvote 2Københavns Universitet håber, at Uddannelsesministeriet vil tillade, atuniversitetet indfører...
15h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Thousands more flee erupting Philippine volcanoThousands more have fled an erupting volcano in the Philippines, relief workers said Wednesday, as foreign tourists arrived to watch the flaming lava and giant cauliflower clouds spurting from its crater.
15h
Science : NPR
Is There A Ticking Time Bomb Under The Arctic?Just what exactly is permafrost? And what is happening now that it's warming up? To find out, we enter the Arctic Circle's secret world of ice and frozen history. (Image credit: Kate Ramsayer/NASA)
15h
Ingeniøren
Stort behov for projektledere: Find job hos Sweco, Rambøll eller ØrstedNogle af de mest eftertragtede kandidater lige nu er projektledere. Find dit drømmejob på dagens liste.
16h
Ingeniøren
For Andreas er lav løn en investeringNår civilingeniør ­Andreas Hoé Bergstrand forhandler løn med sig selv, er det firmaet, der vinder. Men ønsket om at gøre det, han brænder for, og drømmen om en fremtidig gevinst er en god gulerod.
16h
New Scientist - News
Google-sponsored race to the moon has ended without a winnerNone of the private space firms racing to put a rover on the moon will be ready to launch by March, so the $30 million Google Lunar X Prize will go unclaimed
17h
New Scientist - News
Drug that fools the womb could help stop painful periodsA drug tested in mice tricks the womb into thinking there is low oxygen, which promotes healing and prevents excessive bleeding during menstruation
17h
New Scientist - News
We’ve stopped trusting social media – and that’s a good thingI'm one of the growing number of users cynical about social networks such as Facebook. But there are upsides to all this digital doubt, says Lara Williams
17h
New Scientist - News
Australia’s A$60 million plan for Great Barrier Reef won’t workThe Australian government has pledged millions of dollars in extra funding to protect the Great Barrier Reef, but none of it will go to tackling the biggest threat
17h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A new ecosystem approach to fight antibiotic resistanceThe World Health Organization has deemed antibiotic resistance to be one of the greatest threats to human health, as bacteria become increasingly resistant and too few treatments are being developed to combat them. The research project DRIVE-AB, a consortium managed by the University of Geneva and AstraZeneca, has determined that a market entry reward of $1 billion per antibiotic globally could si
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Contest for second Amazon HQ heats up as finalists namedWith billions of dollars and tens of thousands of jobs at stake, Amazon's quest for a second North American headquarters has thrust 20 cities into a cutthroat "Hunger Games" style contest—but at what cost?
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Novartis says profit up 15% in 2017Swiss pharmaceuticals giant Novartis said Wednesday that strong sales of two of its main blockbuster drugs enabled it to turn in a "good operational performance" in 2017.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Expert behind new MH370 search hopeful of find within a monthAfter years of futile efforts, a fresh hunt for MH370 has set off for the remote Indian Ocean—and the top Australian scientist who helped pinpoint the new search zone is hopeful the missing jet can be found within weeks.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Google parent tops big spenders on Washington lobbyistsGoogle parent Alphabet Inc. outspent all other companies on lobbying Washington bureaucrats and politicians in 2017, a year in which it and other tech giants were hauled before legislators probing Russian influence in the 2016 election.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Endangered woodpeckers persist, but still struggle, on private landThe U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service started the Safe Harbor program in North Carolina in 1995 to reduce conflict between landowners and conservation officials and to encourage private landowners to take steps to benefit endangered Red-cockaded Woodpeckers on their land. The program has successfully reduced conflict over conservation and reduced the abandonment of nest clusters, but a new study from
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Mitigation techniques fall short of preventing electrocution of golden eagles on power polesDespite efforts to retrofit power poles and to build new poles to avian-friendly standards, electrocution remains a substantial cause of death for the golden eagle. The global conservation problem results in an estimated 504 eagles electrocuted annually in North America alone. A new Journal of Wildlife Management article examines the risk factors and mitigation techniques from literature published
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Warming temperatures may cause birds to shrinkBiologists have known for a long time that animals living in colder climates tend to have larger bodies, supposedly as an adaptation to reduce heat loss. However, understanding how temperature affects animals has gained new importance thanks to climate change. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances uses European House Sparrows, which have spread into a variety of climates in Australia a
17h
Science | The Guardian
How do I stop being lonely? You asked Google – here’s the answer | Kate LeaverEvery day millions of people ask Google life’s most difficult questions. Our writers answer some of the commonest queries Loneliness is a stealthy bastard. It can settle in on your soul without you even noticing, until the texture of the words appear on your tongue one day: “I’m lonely.” It’s a hollow melancholy that wraps itself around your heart and stays there, whispering fear of social reject
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Do terrorist attacks affect ethnic discrimination in the labor market?Terrorist attacks are known to influence public opinion, but do they also change behaviour? A new British Journal of Sociology study that addressed this question found that Pakistanis in Norway still experience the same level of discrimination, despite claims that Norwegians have become more positive about migrants after the far-right, anti-migrant terrorist attacks of 2011.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Tracking wastewater's path to wells, groundwaterWe often "flush it and forget it" when it comes to waste from toilets and sinks. However, it's important to be able to track this wastewater to ensure it doesn't end up in unwanted places. A group of Canadian scientists has found an unlikely solution.
17h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Chasing dark matter with the oldest stars in the Milky WayJust how quickly is the dark matter near Earth zipping around? The speed of dark matter has far-reaching consequences for modern astrophysical research, but this fundamental property has eluded researchers for years.
17h
Science | The Guardian
Nearly half of UK 14-year-olds have tried alcohol, figures showFindings from on risky behaviours will help to design interventions, say researchers Almost half of children in the UK have tried alcohol by the age of 14, while nearly 20% have had a run-in with the police, new figures have revealed. The research also found that among 14-year-olds, 17% of boys and 8% of girls had gambled in the previous four weeks, 17% had tried a cigarette at some point, and mo
18h
Ingeniøren
Kalundborg: Én dum databaseoverførsel starter 5-dages maraton med password-skiftEfter en journalist på grund af en fejl fik adgang til tusindvis af følsomme oplysninger og passwords på FTP-server i Kalundborg Kommune, tog det fem dage at få nulstillet alle administrator kodeord.
19h
Ingeniøren
Dansk spilplatform på vej: »Vi kan blive blandt de største«I Aalborg er tre danskere i fuld sving med at skabe en ny computerspilplatform, der skal gøre det muligt at spille mange forskellige computerspil til overkommelige priser.
19h
Science | The Guardian
Mixing herbal remedies and conventional drugs 'could be harmful'Alternative treatments could alter effects of prescription medication, warn researchers Herbal remedies such as St John’s wort, ginseng and ginkgo biloba could have harmful interactions with conventional drugs, scientists have warned. In an extensive review of the medical literature, the team uncovered dozens of cases in which alternative treatments appeared to have altered the effects of prescri
19h
Science | The Guardian
How do you sex a fossil? | Elsa PanciroliHow can we tell if an extinct animal is male or female? And how did dinosaurs mate? “It was a slit, like this,” Vinther held his cupped hands side by side and opened and closed them, like a puppet’s mouth. “That’s it. That’s what a dinosaur cloaca looked like.” For those who don’t habituate the often explicit world of natural scientists, let me explain. A cloaca is the opening through which most
19h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Study provides new guidelines for assessing severity of head and neck cancersCedars-Sinai investigators have developed a new, more accurate set of guidelines for assessing the severity of head and neck cancers and predicting patient survival. The new guidelines, outlined in a study recently published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, center around counting the number of malignant lymph nodes found in each patient.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Chasing dark matter with the oldest stars in the Milky WayJust how quickly is the dark matter near Earth zipping around? The speed of dark matter has far-reaching consequences for modern astrophysical research, but this fundamental property has eluded researchers for years. In a paper published Jan. 22 in the journal Physical Review Letters, Princeton researchers provided the first clue: The solution to this mystery, it turns out, lies among some of the
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Guidelines support telemedicine as an effective tool for allergistsA position paper by the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology provides guidance to allergists interested in providing telemedicine care to their patients.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Tracking wastewater's path to wells, groundwaterWe often 'flush it and forget it' when it comes to waste from toilets and sinks. However, it's important to be able to track this wastewater to ensure it doesn't end up in unwanted places. Tracing where this water ends up is hard to measure: What's something found in all wastewater that will allow us to account for all of it? The answer, of all things, is artificial sweeteners.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Physicists have learned to change the wavelength of Tamm plasmonsScientists from Siberian Federal University (SFU) and the L. V. Kirensky Institute of Physics (SB RAS) conducted theoretical studies of hybrid Tamm plasmons. Using numerical calculations, they were able to predict the structure in which it is possible to control the wavelength of these quasiparticles by means of an external electric field or heating. The study is presented in the Journal of the Op
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Mitigation techniques fall short of preventing electrocution of golden eagles on power polesDespite efforts to retrofit power poles and to build new poles to avian-friendly standards, electrocution remains a substantial cause of death for the golden eagle. The global conservation problem results in an estimated 504 eagles electrocuted annually in North America alone. A new Journal of Wildlife Management article examines the risk factors and mitigation techniques from literature published
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Do terrorist attacks affect ethnic discrimination in the labor market?Terrorist attacks are known to influence public opinion, but do they also change behaviour? A new British Journal of Sociology study that addressed this question found that Pakistanis in Norway still experience the same level of discrimination, despite claims that Norwegians have become more positive about migrants after the far-right, anti-migrant terrorist attacks of 2011.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
The impact of lower total knee replacement rates in black AmericansThe impact of lower total knee replacement rates in black Americans.It's known that racial minorities in the United States undergo fewer total knee replacements (TKRs) for knee osteoarthritis, but it's unclear how this affects their quality of life. A new study published in Arthritis Care & Research indicates that, on a population level, black Americans lose 72,000 quality-adjusted life years (QAL
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Can cruise vacations contribute to well-being?A new International Journal of Tourism Research study indicates that cruise vacations are not only for fun but can also be beneficial for individuals' happiness and well-being.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Cancer immunotherapy found safe in patients with rheumatologic diseasesIn the largest single-center study of patients with rheumatologic diseases who were prescribed modern cancer immunotherapy with what are called immune checkpoint inhibitors, only a minority of patients experienced a flare of their rheumatologic disease or immune-related side effects.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
A call for greater attention to older women's sexual healthA new Journal of the American Geriatrics Society article reviews common issues in caring for the sexual health of older women, noting that physicians often lack sufficient training.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Many older individuals with type 2 diabetes are over-treatedIn a recent Diabetes, Obesity & Metabolism analysis of individuals aged 70 years with type 2 diabetes, almost 40 percent with recommended HbA1c levels (which indicate blood glucose levels) were over-treated.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Social media use linked to lack of sleep in studentsGreater use of social media was associated with a greater likelihood of getting too little sleep in an Acta Paediatrica study of Canadian students aged 11-20 years.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Herbal products may compromise prescription drugs and cause serious side effectsAn analysis of published studies and reports indicates that a number of herbal products may affect the properties of prescription drugs, leading to alterations in the drugs' effectiveness as well as potentially dangerous side effects.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Wisdom at the end of lifeIn a paper publishing Jan. 24 in the journal International Psychogeriatrics, researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine asked 21 hospice patients, ages 58 to 97 and in the last six months of their lives, to describe the core characteristics of wisdom and whether their terminal illnesses had changed or impacted their understanding of wisdom.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Air pollution may shorten telomeres in newborns -- a sign of increased health risksA study conducted before and after the 2004 closure of a coal-burning power plant in Tongliang, China, found children born before the closure had shorter telomeres than those conceived and born after the plant stopped polluting the air.
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Endangered woodpeckers persist, but still struggle, on private landThe US Fish and Wildlife Service's Safe Harbor was established to encourage private landowners to take steps to benefit endangered Red-cockaded Woodpeckers on their land. The program has reduced conflict over conservation and the abandonment of nest clusters, but a new study shows that while the program may have raised landowners' awareness of and tolerance for their feathered neighbors, it has la
20h
EurekAlert! - Breaking News
Warming temperatures may cause birds to shrinkBiologists have known for a long time that animals living in colder climates tend to have larger bodies, supposedly as an adaptation to reduce heat loss. However, a new study of European House Sparrows in Australia and New Zealand shows that this trend in birds might actually be due to the effects of high temperatures during development -- raising new alarms about how populations might be affected
20h
New on MIT Technology Review
China wants to make the chips that will add AI to any gadgetThe AI boom offers Chinese chipmakers a chance to catch up after years of lagging behind.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Biomechanical mapping method aids development of therapies for damaged heart tissueResearchers have developed a new way to capture the detailed biomechanical properties of heart tissue. The high-resolution optical technique fills an important technology gap necessary to develop and test therapies that might eventually be used to heal heart damage after a heart attack.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Better predicting mountains' flora and fauna in a changing worldClimbing a mountain is challenging. So, too, is providing the best possible information to plan for climate change's impact on mountain vegetation and wildlife. Scientists show that using several sources of climate measurements when modeling the potential future distributions of mountain vegetation and wildlife can increase confidence in the model results and provide useful guidance for conservati
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Flu infection study increases understanding of natural immunityPeople with higher levels of antibodies against the stem portion of the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) protein have less viral shedding when they get the flu, but don't have fewer or less severe signs of illness, according to a new study. This study is the first of its kind to evaluate pre-existing levels of these antibodies as a predictor of protection against influenza. The findings could ha
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Air quality is leading environmental threat to public healthThe 2018 Environmental Performance Index (EPI) finds that air quality is the leading environmental threat to public health. The tenth EPI report ranks 180 countries on 24 performance indicators across 10 issue categories covering environmental health and ecosystem vitality.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
Dietary fiber protects against obesity and metabolic syndrome, study findsConsumption of dietary fiber can prevent obesity, metabolic syndrome and adverse changes in the intestine by promoting growth of 'good' bacteria in the colon, according to a new study.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
First trimester exposure to antithyroid drugs associated with birth defectsTaking antithyroid drugs (ATDs) during the first trimester of pregnancy is associated with an increased risk for birth defects, particularly for women receiving prescriptions for methimazole (MMI) or both MMI and propylthiouracil (PTU).
20h
Phys.org - latest science and technology news stories
Native forest habitats promote pollinators and fruit production of Açaí palm in the Amazon river deltaLow-impact farming methods benefit both pollinators and açaí fruit production, scientists from Embrapa and other Brazilian institutions have found. In a new study published in the Journal of Applied Ecology, they show that diverse forest habitats provide safe havens for important pollinators and contribute to the environmental sustainability of this native Amazonian crop.
20h
Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily
A new approach to rechargeable batteriesA new battery technology, based on a metal-mesh membrane and electrodes made of molten sodium, could open the way for more intermittent, renewable power sources on the grid.
20h
Ingeniøren
Sådan konfronterer du din chefSom medarbejder skal du vide, hvordan du håndterer din leder, når personen tager fejl eller presser dig for meget. Jobfinder giver dig tre tips til at tackle din chef i en konfrontation.
21h
Ingeniøren
Rente-manøvre redder økonomien for Københavns første letbaneForsinkelser og dyre entreprenørkontrakter betød, at der manglede godt 300 millioner kroner til at bygge en letbane langs Ring 3 i forstæderne. Men den lave rente gør, at ejerne slipper for at skulle til lommerne.
21h
BBC News - Science & Environment
Antarctica's Weddell Sea 'deserves protected status'Scientists have called for special status to protect coral, penguins and other wildlife in Antarctica.
23h
Feed: All Latest
Remembering Ursula Le Guin, Imaginer of Difficult WorldsThe fantasy and science fiction writer dreamed of tomorrows that may not have always been sunny, but were always original.
23h

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